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Sample records for danisco cellulosic ethanol

  1. DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol Place: Itasca, Illinois Zip: 60143 Product: DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol is a...

  2. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Cellulosic Ethanol | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Cellulosic Ethanol BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Cellulosic Ethanol BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Cellulosic Ethanol This...

  3. Cellulosic ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cellulosic ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Cellethanol.jpg Cellulosic ethanol is identical to first generation bio ethanol except that it can be derived from agricultural...

  4. Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility April 9, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis In 2010, Verenium...

  5. Bioenergy Impacts … Cellulosic Ethanol

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for its cellulosic ethanol biorefinery. Farmers earned additional revenue from selling their leftover corn husks, stalks, and leaves to the POET-DSM biorefinery for production of cellulosic ethanol-a type of biofuel. Biofuels have created extra revenue for farmers

  6. Fulton Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumait, Necy; Cuzens, John; Klann, Richard

    2015-07-24

    Final report on work performed by BlueFire on the deployment of acid hydrolysis technology to convert cellulosic waste materials into renewable fuels, power and chemicals in a production facility to be located in Fulton, Mississippi.

  7. Four Cellulosic Ethanol Breakthroughs | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Four Cellulosic Ethanol Breakthroughs Four Cellulosic Ethanol Breakthroughs September 3, 2014 - 1:11pm Addthis Cellulosic ethanol biorefinery 1 of 10 Cellulosic ethanol biorefinery The mechanical building (front), solid/liquid separation building (left), and anaerobic digestion building (back) at POET-DSM's Project LIBERTY biorefinery in Emmetsburg, Iowa. Image: Courtesy of POET-DSM Stacking up biomass 2 of 10 Stacking up biomass The biomass stackyard, where corn waste is stored at POET-DSM's

  8. Project LIBERTY Biorefinery Starts Cellulosic Ethanol Production |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Project LIBERTY Biorefinery Starts Cellulosic Ethanol Production Project LIBERTY Biorefinery Starts Cellulosic Ethanol Production September 3, 2014 - 12:05pm Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 WASHINGTON - Project LIBERTY, the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol plant to use corn waste as a feedstock, announced the start of production today. Once operating at full, commercial-scale, the biorefinery in Emmetsburg, Iowa will produce 25 million gallons

  9. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Cellulosic Ethanol | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Cellulosic Ethanol BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Cellulosic Ethanol BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Cellulosic Ethanol This infographic was created by students from Williamsburg HS for Architecture and Design in Brooklyn, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge encourages young people to improve their foundational understanding of bioenergy, which is a broad and complex topic. The ideas

  10. Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility April 9, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis In 2010, Verenium Corporation received EERE funds to operate a 1.4 million gallon per year demonstration plant in Jennings, Louisiana, to convert agricultural residues and energy crops to cellulosic ethanol. The project's goal was to implement a technology that had been demonstrated in a laboratory at commercial scale. The plant

  11. Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Biorefinery Groundbreaking Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Biorefinery...

  12. Review of Recent Pilot Scale Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review of Recent Pilot Scale Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Review of Recent Pilot Scale Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Opening Plenary Session: Celebrating Successes-The...

  13. Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment AgencyCompany Organization Organization of American...

  14. DuPont Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery Opening

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DuPont cellulosic ethanol facility, opening in Nevada, Iowa, on October 30, will be the largest cellulosic ethanol plant in the world. The U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Director, Jonathan Male, alongside senior government officials, DuPont leaders and staff, and local farmers will attend the grand opening ceremony and plant tour.

  15. Largest Cellulosic Ethanol Plant in the World Opened in October |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Largest Cellulosic Ethanol Plant in the World Opened in October Largest Cellulosic Ethanol Plant in the World Opened in October November 30, 2015 - 2:07pm Addthis The DuPont cellulosic ethanol facility in Nevada, Iowa, will produce about 30 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol per year. Photo courtesy of DuPont. The DuPont cellulosic ethanol facility in Nevada, Iowa, will produce about 30 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol per year. Photo courtesy of DuPont. The

  16. Research Advances Cellulosic Ethanol, NREL Leads the Way (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-03-01

    This brochure highlights NREL's recent advances in cellulosic ethanol production. Research at NREL addresses both biochemical and thermochemical processes.

  17. The Role of Cellulosic Ethanol in Transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert M. Neilson, Jr.

    2007-10-01

    Petroleum provides essentially all of the energy used today in the transportation sector. To reduce this dependence on fossil energy, other fuels are beginning to be used, notably ethanol and biodiesel. Almost all fuel ethanol is produced by the conversion of corn grain to starch with subsequent fermentation to ethanol. In 2006, almost 5 billion gallons of fuel ethanol were produced, which used 17% of domestic corn production. The DOE has a goal to displace 30% of motor gasoline demand or 60 billion gallons per year by 2030. To achieve this goal, production of ethanol from lignocellulosic sources (e.g., agricultural residues, forest residues, and dedicated energy crops) is needed. This paper will describe the production of cellulosic ethanol as well as the issues and benefits associated with its production.

  18. Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biorefinery Groundbreaking | Department of Energy Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Biorefinery Groundbreaking Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Biorefinery Groundbreaking October 6, 2007 - 4:21pm Addthis SOPERTON, GA - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today attended a groundbreaking ceremony for Range Fuels' biorefinery - one of the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol biorefineries - and made the following statement.

  19. The Current State of Technology for Cellulosic Ethanol | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy The Current State of Technology for Cellulosic Ethanol The Current State of Technology for Cellulosic Ethanol At the February 12, 2009 joint Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Andy Aden (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) discussed the current state of technology for cellulosic ethanol - How close are we? PDF icon aden_20090212.pdf More Documents & Publications Integrated Biorefinery Process Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of

  20. Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Commercial-Scale | Department of Energy Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale July 31, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department today recognized the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol production at INEOS Bio's Indian River BioEnergy Center in Vero Beach, Florida. Developed through a joint venture between

  1. EERE Success Story-Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Facility | Department of Energy Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility EERE Success Story-Louisiana: Verenium Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Facility April 9, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis In 2010, Verenium Corporation received EERE funds to operate a 1.4 million gallon per year demonstration plant in Jennings, Louisiana, to convert agricultural residues and energy crops to cellulosic ethanol. The project's goal was to implement a technology that had been demonstrated in a

  2. NREL Industry Partners Move Cellulosic Ethanol Technology Forward...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL Industry Partners Move Cellulosic Ethanol Technology Forward Lab Contributes Scientific Foundation for Making Biofuel from Non-Food Sources May 15, 2008 Collaborative ...

  3. Largest Cellulosic Ethanol Plant in the World Opened in October...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... representative from biofuels company POET-DSM stand between square and round bales of corn stover stock piled outside of POET-DSM's Project LIBERTY cellulosic ethanol biorefinery. ...

  4. Appendix D: 2012 Cellulosic Ethanol Success, Bioenergy Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    produce cellulosic ethanol at commercial-scale costs that are competitive with gasoline production at 110barrel of crude oil. Many industry partners are also demonstrating...

  5. NREL Proves Cellulosic Ethanol Can Be Cost Competitive (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    Ethanol from non-food sources - known as "cellulosic ethanol" - is a near-perfect transportation fuel: it is clean, domestic, abundant, and renewable, and it can potentially replace 30% of the petroleum consumed in the United States, but its relatively high cost has limited its market. That changed in 2012, when the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) demonstrated the technical advances needed to produce cellulosic ethanol at a minimum ethanol selling price of $2.15/gallon (in 2007 dollars). Through a multi-year research project involving private industry, NREL has proven that cellulosic ethanol can be cost competitive with other transportation fuels.

  6. Review of Recent Pilot Scale Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Review of Recent Pilot Scale Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Review of Recent Pilot Scale Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration Opening Plenary Session: Celebrating Successes-The Foundation of an Advanced Bioindustry Cellulosic Technology Advances-Thomas Foust, Director, National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory PDF icon b13_foust_op-1.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Bio-based Jet Fuel Cross-cutting Technologies for Advanced Biofuels Process Design

  7. Largest Cellulosic Ethanol Plant in the World Opens October 30 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Largest Cellulosic Ethanol Plant in the World Opens October 30 Largest Cellulosic Ethanol Plant in the World Opens October 30 October 26, 2015 - 2:52pm Addthis The DuPont cellulosic ethanol facility in Nevada, Iowa, will produce about 30 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol per year. Photo courtesy of DuPont. The DuPont cellulosic ethanol facility in Nevada, Iowa, will produce about 30 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol per year. Photo courtesy of DuPont. The DuPont cellulosic

  8. Conversion of bagasse cellulose into ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuzens, J.E.

    1997-11-19

    The study conducted by Arkenol was designed to test the conversion of feedstocks such as sugar cane bagasse, sorghum, napier grass and rice straw into fermentable sugars, and then ferment these sugars using natural yeasts and genetically engineered Zymomonis mobilis bacteria (ZM). The study did convert various cellulosic feedstocks into fermentable sugars utilizing the patented Arkenol Concentrated Acid Hydrolysis Process and equipment at the Arkenol Technology Center in Orange, California. The sugars produced using this process were in the concentration range of 12--15%, much higher than the sugar concentrations the genetically engineered ZM bacteria had been developed for. As a result, while the ZM bacteria fermented the produced sugars without initial inhibition, the completion of high sugar concentration fermentations was slower and at lower yield than predicted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Natural yeasts performed as expected by Arkenol, similar to the results obtained over the last four years of testing. Overall, at sugar concentrations in the 10--13% range, yeast produced 850090% theoretical ethanol yields and ZM bacteria produced 82--87% theoretical yields in 96 hour fermentations. Additional commercialization work revealed the ability to centrifugally separate and recycle the ZM bacteria after fermentation, slight additional benefits from mixed culture ZM bacteria fermentations, and successful utilization of defined media for ZM bacteria fermentation nutrients in lieu of natural media.

  9. EERE Success Story-Largest Cellulosic Ethanol Plant in the World Opened

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in October | Department of Energy Largest Cellulosic Ethanol Plant in the World Opened in October EERE Success Story-Largest Cellulosic Ethanol Plant in the World Opened in October November 30, 2015 - 2:07pm Addthis The DuPont cellulosic ethanol facility in Nevada, Iowa, will produce about 30 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol per year. Photo courtesy of DuPont. The DuPont cellulosic ethanol facility in Nevada, Iowa, will produce about 30 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol per year.

  10. Pilot Integrated Cellulosic Biorefinery Operations to Fuel Ethanol

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office(BETO) IBR Project Peer Review *© 2015 ICM, Inc. All Rights Reserved. *1 Recovery Act: Pilot Integrated Cellulosic Biorefinery Operations to Fuel Ethanol Award Number: DE-EE0002875 March 23, 2015 Demonstration and Market Transformation Program Douglas B. Rivers, Ph.D. ICM, Inc. Project Goal Statement  Leverage its existing pilot plant  Operate the pilot cellulosic integrated biorefinery using a biochemical platform with pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis technology coupled with

  11. ZeaChem Pilot Project: High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol Process...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ZeaChem Pilot Project: High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol Process Using High-Impact Feedstock for Commercialization ZeaChem Pilot Project: High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol...

  12. Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around Cellulosic Ethanol |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around Cellulosic Ethanol Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around Cellulosic Ethanol April 19, 2013 - 11:24am Addthis In September 2012, scientists at DOE national laboratories successfully demonstrated technical advances required to produce cellulosic ethanol that is cost competitive with petroleum. Cellulosic ethanol is fuel produced from the inedible, organic material abundant in agricultural waste, including grasses, farm

  13. EA-1694: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Highlands Ethanol, LLC, for the Cellulosic Ethanol Facility in Highlands County, Florida

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to issue a Federal loan guarantee to Highlands Ethanol, LLC, for a cellulosic ethanol facility in Highlands County, Florida. This EA is on hold.

  14. Method for producing ethanol and co-products from cellulosic biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Quang A

    2013-10-01

    The present invention generally relates to processes for production of ethanol from cellulosic biomass. The present invention also relates to production of various co-products of preparation of ethanol from cellulosic biomass. The present invention further relates to improvements in one or more aspects of preparation of ethanol from cellulosic biomass including, for example, improved methods for cleaning biomass feedstocks, improved acid impregnation, and improved steam treatment, or "steam explosion."

  15. DuPont's Cellulosic Ethanol Grand Opening Marks a Milestone for the

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Advanced Biofuels Industry | Department of Energy DuPont's Cellulosic Ethanol Grand Opening Marks a Milestone for the Advanced Biofuels Industry DuPont's Cellulosic Ethanol Grand Opening Marks a Milestone for the Advanced Biofuels Industry November 20, 2015 - 12:49pm Addthis DuPont’s cellulosic ethanol biorefinery in Nevada, Iowa, opened on October 30, 2015. | Photo courtesy of DuPont DuPont's cellulosic ethanol biorefinery in Nevada, Iowa, opened on October 30, 2015. | Photo courtesy

  16. Fair Oaks Dairy Farms Cellulosic Ethanol Technology Review Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Wold; Robert Divers

    2011-06-23

    At Fair Oaks Dairy, dried manure solids (''DMS'') are currently used as a low value compost. United Power was engaged to evaluate the feasibility of processing these DMS into ethanol utilizing commercially available cellulosic biofuels conversion platforms. The Fair Oaks Dairy group is transitioning their traditional ''manure to methane'' mesophilic anaerobic digester platform to an integrated bio-refinery centered upon thermophilic digestion. Presently, the Digested Manure Solids (DMS) are used as a low value soil amendment (compost). United Power evaluated the feasibility of processing DMS into higher value ethanol utilizing commercially available cellulosic biofuels conversion platforms. DMS was analyzed and over 100 potential technology providers were reviewed and evaluated. DMS contains enough carbon to be suitable as a biomass feedstock for conversion into ethanol by gasification technology, or as part of a conversion process that would include combined heat and power. In the first process, 100% of the feedstock is converted into ethanol. In the second process, the feedstock is combusted to provide heat to generate electrical power supporting other processes. Of the 100 technology vendors evaluated, a short list of nine technology providers was developed. From this, two vendors were selected as finalists (one was an enzymatic platform and one was a gasification platform). Their selection was based upon the technical feasibility of their systems, engineering expertise, experience in commercial or pilot scale operations, the ability or willingness to integrate the system into the Fair Oaks Biorefinery, the know-how or experience in producing bio-ethanol, and a clear path to commercial development.

  17. Cellulosic Biomass Feedstocks and Logistics for Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Richard Hess; Christopher T. Wright; Kevin L. Kenney

    2007-10-01

    The economic competitiveness of cellulosic ethanol production is highly dependent on feedstock cost, which constitutes 3550% of the total ethanol production cost, depending on various geographical factors and the types of systems used for harvesting, collecting, preprocessing, transporting, and handling the material. Consequently, as the deployment of cellulosic ethanol biorefi neries approaches, feedstock cost and availability are the driving factors that infl uence pioneer biorefi nery locations and will largely control the rate at which this industry grows. Initial scenarios were postulated to develop a pioneer dry feedstock supply system design case as a demonstration of the current state of technology. Based on this pioneer design, advanced scenarios were developed to determine key cost barriers, needed supply system improvements, and technology advancements to achieve government and private sector cost targets. Analysis of the pioneer supply system resulted in a delivered feedstock cost to the throat of the pretreatment reactor of $37.00 per dry tonne (2002 $). Pioneer supply systems will start by using current infrastructure and technologies and be individually designed for biorefi neries using specifi c feedstock types and varieties based on local geographic conditions. As the industry develops and cost barriers are addressed, the supply systems will incorporate advanced technologies that will eliminate downstream diversity and provide a uniform, tailored feedstock for multiple biorefi neries located in different regions.

  18. Cellulosic Ethanol Technology on Track to Being Competitive With Other Transportation Fuels (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have been driving down the cost of cellulosic ethanol and overcoming the technical challenges that surround it-major milestones toward the Department of Energy (DOE) goal of making cellulosic ethanol cost-competitive by 2012.

  19. Microbial Fuel Cells for Recycle of Process Water from Cellulosic Ethanol

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biorefineries - Energy Innovation Portal Microbial Fuel Cells for Recycle of Process Water from Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefineries Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryA method was invented at ORNL for removing inhibitor compounds from process water in biomass-to-ethanol production. This invention can also be used to produce power for other industrial processes. DescriptionLarge amounts of water are used in the processing of cellulosic

  20. Long-run effects of falling cellulosic ethanol production costs on the US agricultural economy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bryant, Henry L.; Campiche, Jody L.; Richardson, James W.

    2010-03-09

    Renewable energy production has been expanding at a rapid pace. New advances in cellulosic ethanol technologies have the potential to displace the use of petroleum as a transportation fuel, and could have significant effects on both the agricultural economy and the environment. In this letter, the effects of falling cellulosic ethanol production costs on the mix of ethanol feedstocks employed and on the US agricultural economy are examined. Results indicate that, as expected, cellulosic ethanol production increases by a substantial amount as conversion technology improves. Corn production increases initially following the introduction of cellulosic technology, because producers enjoy new revenuemore » from sales of corn stover. After cellulosic ethanol production becomes substantially cheaper, however, acres are shifted from corn production to all other agricultural commodities. Essentially, this new technology could facilitate the exploitation of a previously under-employed resource (corn stover), resulting in an improvement in overall welfare. Thus in the most optimistic scenario considered, 68% of US ethanol is derived from cellulosic sources, coarse grain production is reduced by about 2%, and the prices of all food commodities are reduced modestly.« less

  1. Long-run effects of falling cellulosic ethanol production costs on the US agricultural economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, Henry L.; Campiche, Jody L.; Richardson, James W.

    2010-03-09

    Renewable energy production has been expanding at a rapid pace. New advances in cellulosic ethanol technologies have the potential to displace the use of petroleum as a transportation fuel, and could have significant effects on both the agricultural economy and the environment. In this letter, the effects of falling cellulosic ethanol production costs on the mix of ethanol feedstocks employed and on the US agricultural economy are examined. Results indicate that, as expected, cellulosic ethanol production increases by a substantial amount as conversion technology improves. Corn production increases initially following the introduction of cellulosic technology, because producers enjoy new revenue from sales of corn stover. After cellulosic ethanol production becomes substantially cheaper, however, acres are shifted from corn production to all other agricultural commodities. Essentially, this new technology could facilitate the exploitation of a previously under-employed resource (corn stover), resulting in an improvement in overall welfare. Thus in the most optimistic scenario considered, 68% of US ethanol is derived from cellulosic sources, coarse grain production is reduced by about 2%, and the prices of all food commodities are reduced modestly.

  2. Genes and Mechanisms for Improving Cellulosic Ethanol Production...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fuels and chemicals faster and cheaper is vital for biofuel and biorefining applications. ... biomass, and ethanol tolerance is important for the production of ethanol as a biofuel. ...

  3. ZeaChem Pilot Project: High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol Process Using High-Impact Feedstock for Commercialization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This pilot-scale integrated biorefinery will produce 250,000 gallons per year of cellulosic ethanol when running at full operational status.

  4. Preliminary Economics for the Production of Pyrolysis Oil from Lignin in a Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2009-04-01

    Cellulosic ethanol biorefinery economics can be potentially improved by converting by-product lignin into high valued products. Cellulosic biomass is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery, cellulose and hemicellullose are converted to ethanol via fermentation. The raw lignin portion is the partially dewatered stream that is separated from the product ethanol and contains lignin, unconverted feed and other by-products. It can be burned as fuel for the plant or can be diverted into higher-value products. One such higher-valued product is pyrolysis oil, a fuel that can be further upgraded into motor gasoline fuels. While pyrolysis of pure lignin is not a good source of pyrolysis liquids, raw lignin containing unconverted feed and by-products may have potential as a feedstock. This report considers only the production of the pyrolysis oil and does not estimate the cost of upgrading that oil into synthetic crude oil or finished gasoline and diesel. A techno-economic analysis for the production of pyrolysis oil from raw lignin was conducted. comparing two cellulosic ethanol fermentation based biorefineries. The base case is the NREL 2002 cellulosic ethanol design report case where 2000 MTPD of corn stover is fermented to ethanol (NREL 2002). In the base case, lignin is separated from the ethanol product, dewatered, and burned to produce steam and power. The alternate case considered in this report dries the lignin, and then uses fast pyrolysis to generate a bio-oil product. Steam and power are generated in this alternate case by burning some of the corn stover feed, rather than fermenting it. This reduces the annual ethanol production rate from 69 to 54 million gallons/year. Assuming a pyrolysis oil value similar to Btu-adjusted residual oil, the estimated ethanol selling price ranges from $1.40 to $1.48 (2007 $) depending upon the yield of pyrolysis oil. This is considerably above the target minimum ethanol selling price of $1.33 for the 2012 goal case process as reported in the 2007 State of Technology Model (NREL 2008). Hence, pyrolysis oil does not appear to be an economically attractive product in this scenario. Further research regarding fast pyrolysis of raw lignin from a cellulosic plant as an end product is not recommended. Other processes, such as high-pressure liquefaction or wet gasification, and higher value products, such as gasoline and diesel from fast pyrolysis oil should be considered in future studies.

  5. Physical Energy Accounting in California: A Case Study of Cellulosic Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, Katie; Fridley, David

    2008-07-17

    California's target for greenhouse gas reduction in part relies on the development of viable low-carbon fuel alternatives to gasoline. It is often assumed that cellulosic ethanol--ethanol made from the structural parts of a plant and not from the food parts--will be one of these alternatives. This study examines the physical viability of a switchgrass-based cellulosic ethanol industry in California from the point of view of the physical requirements of land, water, energy and other material use. Starting from a scenario in which existing irrigated pastureland and fiber-crop land is converted to switchgrass production, the analysis determines the total acreage and water supply available and the resulting total biofuel feedstock output under different assumed yields. The number and location of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries that can be supported is also determined, assuming that the distance from field to biorefinery would be minimized. The biorefinery energy input requirement, available energy from the fraction of biomass not converted to ethanol, and energy output is calculated at various levels of ethanol yields, making different assumptions about process efficiencies. The analysis shows that there is insufficient biomass (after cellulose separation and fermentation into ethanol) to provide all the process energy needed to run the biorefinery; hence, the purchase of external energy such as natural gas is required to produce ethanol from switchgrass. The higher the yield of ethanol, the more external energy is needed, so that the net gains due to improved process efficiency may not be positive. On 2.7 million acres of land planted in switchgrass in this scenario, the switchgrass outputproduces enough ethanol to substitute for only 1.2 to 4.0percent of California's gasoline consumption in 2007.

  6. Process Design of Wastewater Treatment for the NREL Cellulosic Ethanol Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinwinder, T.; Gill, E.; Gerhardt, M.

    2011-09-01

    This report describes a preliminary process design for treating the wastewater from NREL's cellulosic ethanol production process to quality levels required for recycle. In this report Brown and Caldwell report on three main tasks: 1) characterization of the effluent from NREL's ammonia-conditioned hydrolyzate fermentation process; 2) development of the wastewater treatment process design; and 3) development of a capital and operational cost estimate for the treatment concept option. This wastewater treatment design was incorporated into NREL's cellulosic ethanol process design update published in May 2011 (NREL/TP-5100-47764).

  7. Understanding the Growth of the Cellulosic Ethanol Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandor, D.; Wallace, R.; Peterson, S.

    2008-04-01

    This report identifies, outlines, and documents a set of plausible scenarios for producing significant quantities of lignocellulosic ethanol in 2017. These scenarios can provide guidance for setting government policy and targeting government investment to the areas with greatest potential impact.

  8. Life Cycle Assessment of Switchgrass Cellulosic Ethanol Production in the Wisconsin and Michigan Agricultural Contexts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinistore, Julie C.; Reinemann, D. J.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Cronin, Keith R.; Meier, Paul J.; Runge, Troy M.; Zhang, Xuesong

    2015-04-25

    Spatial variability in yields and greenhouse gas emissions from soils has been identified as a key source of variability in life cycle assessments (LCAs) of agricultural products such as cellulosic ethanol. This study aims to conduct an LCA of cellulosic ethanol production from switchgrass in a way that captures this spatial variability and tests results for sensitivity to using spatially averaged results. The Environment Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model was used to calculate switchgrass yields, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and nitrogen and phosphorus emissions from crop production in southern Wisconsin and Michigan at the watershed scale. These data were combined with cellulosic ethanol production data via ammonia fiber expansion and dilute acid pretreatment methods and region-specific electricity production data into an LCA model of eight ethanol production scenarios. Standard deviations from the spatial mean yields and soil emissions were used to test the sensitivity of net energy ratio, global warming potential intensity, and eutrophication and acidification potential metrics to spatial variability. Substantial variation in the eutrophication potential was also observed when nitrogen and phosphorus emissions from soils were varied. This work illustrates the need for spatially explicit agricultural production data in the LCA of biofuels and other agricultural products.

  9. Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol: A Joint Research Agenda

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houghton, John; Weatherwax, Sharlene; Ferrell, John

    2006-06-07

    The Biomass to Biofuels Workshop, held December 79, 2005, was convened by the Department of Energys Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the Office of Science; and the Office of the Biomass Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The purpose was to define barriers and challenges to a rapid expansion of cellulosic-ethanol production and determine ways to speed solutions through concerted application of modern biology tools as part of a joint research agenda. Although the focus was ethanol, the science applies to additional fuels that include biodiesel and other bioproducts or coproducts having critical roles in any deployment scheme.

  10. Integration of Feedstock Assembly System and Cellulosic Ethanol Conversion Models to Analyze Bioenergy System Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jared M. Abodeely; Douglas S. McCorkle; Kenneth M. Bryden; David J. Muth; Daniel Wendt; Kevin Kenney

    2010-09-01

    Research barriers continue to exist in all phases of the emerging cellulosic ethanol biorefining industry. These barriers include the identification and development of a sustainable and abundant biomass feedstock, the assembly of viable assembly systems formatting the feedstock and moving it from the field (e.g., the forest) to the biorefinery, and improving conversion technologies. Each of these phases of cellulosic ethanol production are fundamentally connected, but computational tools used to support and inform analysis within each phase remain largely disparate. This paper discusses the integration of a feedstock assembly system modeling toolkit and an Aspen Plus conversion process model. Many important biomass feedstock characteristics, such as composition, moisture, particle size and distribution, ash content, etc. are impacted and most effectively managed within the assembly system, but generally come at an economic cost. This integration of the assembly system and the conversion process modeling tools will facilitate a seamless investigation of the assembly system conversion process interface. Through the integrated framework, the user can design the assembly system for a particular biorefinery by specifying location, feedstock, equipment, and unit operation specifications. The assembly system modeling toolkit then provides economic valuation, and detailed biomass feedstock composition and formatting information. This data is seamlessly and dynamically used to run the Aspen Plus conversion process model. The model can then be used to investigate the design of systems for cellulosic ethanol production from field to final product.

  11. High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol Process Using High-Impact Feedstock

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a d e b y N a t u r e , R e f i n e d b y Z e a C h e m DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol Process Using High- Impact Feedstock March 24, 2015 Demonstration and Market Transformation Program Tim Eggeman, Ph.D., P.E. ZeaChem Inc. This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Goal Statement * Goals of IBR Project: - Mitigate risks so that a 1 st Commercial Plant can be

  12. Develop and Demonstrate the Cellulose to Ethanol Process: Executive Summary of the Final Technical Report, 17 September 1980 - 17 March 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emert, George H.; Becker, Dana K.; Bevernitz, Kurt J.; Gracheck, Stephen J.; Kienholz, Eldon W.; Rivers, Dougals B.; Zoldak, Bernadette R.; Woodford, Lindley C.

    1982-01-01

    The Biomass Research Center at the University of Arkansas was contracted by the Solar Energy Research Institute to 'Develop and Demonstrate the Cellulose to Ethanol Process.' The purpose of the contract was to accelerate site selection, site specific engineering, and research and development leading to the determination of the feasibility of economically operating a cellulose to ethanol commercial scale plant.

  13. Modification of Corn Starch Ethanol Refinery to Efficiently Accept Various High-Impact Cellulosic Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derr, Dan

    2013-12-30

    The goal of the Corn-to-Cellulosic Migration (CCM) pilot facility was to demonstrate the implementation of advanced technologies and methods for conversion of non-food, cellulosic feedstocks into ethanol, assess the economics of the facility and evaluate potential environmental benefits for biomass to fuels conversion. The CCM project was comprised of design, build, and operate phases for the CCM pilot facility as well as research & development, and modeling components. The CCM pilot facility was designed to process 1 tonne per day of non-food biomass and biologically convert that biomass to ethanol at a rate of 70 gallons per tonne. The plant demonstrated throughputs in excess of 1 tonne per day for an extended run of 1400 hours. Although target yields were not fully achieved, the continuous operation validated the design and operability of the plant. These designs will permit the design of larger scale operations at existing corn milling operations or for greenfield plants. EdeniQ, a partner in the project and the owner of the pilot plant, continues to operate and evaluate other feedstocks.

  14. Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulose and xylose to ethanol by Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cellulase, [beta]-glucosidase, and xylose isomerase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lastick, S.M.; Mohagheghi, A.; Tucker, M.P.; Grohmann, K.

    1994-12-13

    A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe ATCC No. 2476, having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35 C to about 40 C until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol. 2 figures.

  15. Techno-Economic Analysis of Biochemical Scenarios for Production of Cellulosic Ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazi, F. K.; Fortman, J.; Anex, R.; Kothandaraman, G.; Hsu, D.; Aden, A.; Dutta, A.

    2010-06-01

    A techno-economic analysis on the production of cellulosic ethanol by fermentation was conducted to understand the viability of liquid biofuel production processes within the next 5-8 years. Initially, 35 technologies were reviewed, then a two-step down selection was performed to choose scenarios to be evaluated in a more detailed economic analysis. The lignocellulosic ethanol process was selected because it is well studied and portions of the process have been tested at pilot scales. Seven process variations were selected and examined in detail. Process designs were constrained to public data published in 2007 or earlier, without projecting for future process improvements. Economic analysis was performed for an 'nth plant' (mature technology) to obtain total investment and product value (PV). Sensitivity analysis was performed on PV to assess the impact of variations in process and economic parameters. Results show that the modeled dilute acid pretreatment process without any downstream process variation had the lowest PV of $3.40/gal of ethanol ($5.15/gallon of gasoline equivalent) in 2007 dollars. Sensitivity analysis shows that PV is most sensitive to feedstock and enzyme costs.

  16. Itasca, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    6th congressional district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Itasca, Illinois DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and...

  17. Novel Biomass Conversion Process Results in Commercial Joint Venture; The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01

    Fact sheet describing DuPont/NREL cooperative research and development agreement that resulted in biomass-to-ethanol conversion process used as a basis for DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol, LLC and cellulosic ethanol demonstration plant.

  18. Combined inactivation of the Clostridium cellulolyticum lactate and malate dehydrogenase genes substantially increases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrass fermentations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yongchao; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Engle, Nancy L; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Liao, James C; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Guss, Adam M; Yang, Yunfeng; Graham, David E

    2012-01-01

    Background: The model bacterium Clostridium cellulolyticum efficiently hydrolyzes crystalline cellulose and hemicellulose, using cellulosomes to degrade lignocellulosic biomass. Although it imports and ferments both pentose and hexose sugars to produce a mixture of ethanol, acetate, lactate, H2 and CO2, the proportion of ethanol is low, which impedes its use in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels. Therefore genetic engineering will likely be required to improve the ethanol yield. Random mutagenesis, plasmid transformation, and heterologous expression systems have previously been developed for C. cellulolyticum, but targeted mutagenesis has not been reported for this organism. Results: The first targeted gene inactivation system was developed for C. cellulolyticum, based on a mobile group II intron originating from the Lactococcus lactis L1.LtrB intron. This markerless mutagenesis system was used to disrupt both the paralogous L-lactate dehydrogenase (Ccel_2485; ldh) and L-malate dehydrogenase (Ccel_0137; mdh) genes, distinguishing the overlapping substrate specificities of these enzymes. Both mutations were then combined in a single strain. This double mutant produced 8.5-times more ethanol than wild-type cells growing on crystalline cellulose. Ethanol constituted 93% of the major fermentation products (by molarity), corresponding to a molar ratio of ethanol to organic acids of 15, versus 0.18 in wild-type cells. During growth on acid-pretreated switchgrass, the double mutant also produced four-times as much ethanol as wild-type cells. Detailed metabolomic analyses identified increased flux through the oxidative branch of the mutant s TCA pathway. Conclusions: The efficient intron-based gene inactivation system produced the first gene-targeted mutations in C. cellulolyticum. As a key component of the genetic toolbox for this bacterium, markerless targeted mutagenesis enables functional genomic research in C. cellulolyticum and rapid genetic engineering to significantly alter the mixture of fermentation products. The initial application of this system successfully engineered a strain with high ethanol productivity from complex biomass substrates.

  19. Pacific Ethanol, Inc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc Design and build a demonstration cellulosic ethanol plant in Boardman. PDF icon pacificethanol_fact_sheet_040308.pdf More Documents & Publications Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc

  20. A Pilot Plant Scale Reactor/Separator for Ethanol from Cellulosics. ERIP/DOE Quarterly Reports 5 and 6, October 1, 1998 through March 30, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, M. Clark; Moelhman, Mark

    1999-09-30

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a continuous low energy process for the conversion of cellulosics to ethanol. BPI's process involves a proprietary low temperature pretreatment step which allows recycle of the pretreatment chemicals and recovery of a lignin stream. The pretreated biomass is then converted to glucans and xylans enzymatically and these sugars simultaneously fermented to ethanol (SSF) in BPI's Continuous Stirred Reactor Separator (CSRS). The CSRS is a multi stage bio-reactor where the glucans are first converted to ethanol using a high temperature tolerant yeast, followed by xylan SSF on the lower stages using a second xylose fermenting yeast strain. Ethanol is simultaneously removed from the bio-reactor stages, speeding the fermentation, and allowing the complete utilization of the biomass.

  1. A Pilot Plant Scale Reactor/Separator for Ethanol from Cellulosics. ERIP/DOE Quarterly Reports 7, 8 and Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cale, M. Clark; Moelhman, Mark

    1999-09-30

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a continuous low energy process for the conversion of cellulosics to ethanol. BPI's process involves a proprietary low temperature pretreatment step which allows recycle of the pretreatment chemicals and recovery of a lignin stream. The pretreated biomass is then converted to glucans and xylans enzymatically and these sugars simultaneously fermented to ethanol (SSF) in BPI's Continuous Stirred Reactor Separator (CSRS). The CSRS is a multi stage bio-reactor where the glucans are first converted to ethanol using a high temperature tolerant yeast stran, followed by xylan SSF on the lower stages using a second xylose fermenting yeast strain. Ethanol is simultaneously removed from the bio-reactor stages, speeding the fermentation, and allowing the complete utilization of the biomass.

  2. A pilot plant scale reactor/separator for ethanol from cellulosics. Quarterly report No. 1 & 2, October 1, 1997--March 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, M.C.

    1998-06-01

    The basic objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a continuous, low energy process for the conversion of cellulosics to ethanol. This process involves a pretreatment step followed by enzymatic release of sugars and the consecutive saccharification/fermentation of cellulose (glucans) followed by hemi-cellulose (glucans) in a multi-stage continuous stirred reactor separator (CSRS). During year 1, pretreatment and bench scale fermentation trials will be performed to demonstrate and develop the process, and during year 2, a 130 L or larger process scale unit will be operated to demonstrate the process using straw or cornstalks. Co-sponsors of this project include the Indiana Biomass Grants Program, Bio-Process Innovation, Xylan Inc as a possible provider of pretreated biomass.

  3. MN Center for Renewable Energy: Cellulosic Ethanol, Optimization of Bio-fuels in Internal Combustion Engines, & Course Development for Technicians in These Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Frey

    2009-02-22

    This final report for Grant #DE-FG02-06ER64241, MN Center for Renewable Energy, will address the shared institutional work done by Minnesota State University, Mankato and Minnesota West Community and Technical College during the time period of July 1, 2006 to December 30, 2008. There was a no-cost extension request approved for the purpose of finalizing some of the work. The grant objectives broadly stated were to 1) develop educational curriculum to train technicians in wind and ethanol renewable energy, 2) determine the value of cattails as a biomass crop for production of cellulosic ethanol, and 3) research in Optimization of Bio-Fuels in Internal Combustion Engines. The funding for the MN Center for Renewable Energy was spent on specific projects related to the work of the Center.

  4. Making Biofuel From Corncobs and Switchgrass in Rural America | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Biofuel From Corncobs and Switchgrass in Rural America Making Biofuel From Corncobs and Switchgrass in Rural America June 11, 2010 - 4:48pm Addthis DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol (DDCE) opened a new biorefinery in Vonore, Tenn., last year. | Photo courtesy of DDCE DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol (DDCE) opened a new biorefinery in Vonore, Tenn., last year. | Photo courtesy of DDCE Lindsay Gsell Energy crops and agricultural residue, like corncobs and stover, are becoming part

  5. Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A.

    2011-05-01

    Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

  6. A case study of agricultural residue availability and cost for a cellulosic ethanol conversion facility in the Henan province of China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, Erin [ORNL; Wu, Yun [ORNL

    2012-05-01

    A preliminary analysis of the availability and cost of corn stover and wheat straw for the area surrounding a demonstration biorefinery in the Henan Province of China was performed as a case study of potential cooperative analyses of bioenergy feedstocks between researchers and industry in the US and China. Though limited in scope, the purpose of this analysis is to provide insight into some of the issues and challenges of estimating feedstock availability in China and how this relates to analyses of feedstocks in the U.S. Completing this analysis also highlighted the importance of improving communication between U.S. researchers and Chinese collaborators. Understanding the units and terms used in the data provided by Tianguan proved to be a significant challenge. This was further complicated by language barriers between collaborators in the U.S. and China. The Tianguan demonstration biorefinery has a current capacity of 3k tons (1 million gallons) of cellulosic ethanol per year with plans to scale up to 10k tons (3.34 million gallons) per year. Using data provided by Tianguan staff in summer of 2011, the costs and availability of corn stover and wheat straw were estimated. Currently, there are sufficient volumes of wheat straw and corn stover that are considered 'waste' and would likely be available for bioenergy in the 20-km (12-mile) region surrounding the demonstration biorefinery at a low cost. However, as the industry grows, competition for feedstock will grow and prices are likely to rise as producers demand additional compensation to fully recover costs.

  7. Pacific Ethanol, Inc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pacific Ethanol, Inc. Corporate HQ: Sacramento, CA Proposed Facility Location: Boardman, OR Description: The team will design and build a demonstration cellulosic ethanol plant in Boardman, Oregon, expanding the production of ethanol beyond the Midwest U.S. CEO or Equivalent: Neil Koehler, CEO Participants: BioGasol, LLC; and U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Joint Bioenergy Institute (DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories) Production: * Capacity of 2.7

  8. BETO Project Improves Production of Renewable Chemical from Cellulosic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The process could also be applied to biofuel production to make a cellulosic ethanol facility more commercially viable. Learn more from the Genomatica press release....

  9. BETO Project Improves Production of Renewable Chemical from Cellulosic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The process could also be applied to biofuel production to make a cellulosic ethanol facility more commercially viable. Learn more from the Genomatica press release. ...

  10. Ethanol Tolerant Yeast for Improved Production of Ethanol from Biomass -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Ethanol Tolerant Yeast for Improved Production of Ethanol from Biomass Inventors: Audrey Gasch, Jeffrey Lewis Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Contact GLBRC About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryEthanol production from cellulosic biomass can make a significant contribution toward decreasing our dependence on fossil fuels. However, the fermentation of biomass can be problematic. One bottleneck in this process is the toxicity of ethanol to microbes

  11. Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol Performance Runs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1,000-hour performance runs of its patent-pending Generation 2.0 Co-Located Cellulosic Ethanol process at its cellulosic ethanol pilot plant in St. Joseph, Missouri. This is an...

  12. Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol Performance Runs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ICM Inc. announced successful completion of two 1,000-hour performance runs of its patent-pending Generation 2.0 Co-Located Cellulosic Ethanol process at its cellulosic ethanol pilot plant in St....

  13. Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, D.I.C.; Avgerinos, G.C.

    1983-07-26

    Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15 and about 70 C and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours. 6 figs.

  14. Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Daniel I. C. (Belmont, MA); Avgerinos, George C. (Newton Center, MA)

    1983-01-01

    Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15.degree. and about 70.degree. C. and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours.

  15. Compositions and methods relating to transgenic plants and cellulosic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ethanol production (Patent) | SciTech Connect Patent: Compositions and methods relating to transgenic plants and cellulosic ethanol production Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Compositions and methods relating to transgenic plants and cellulosic ethanol production Transgenic lignocellulosic plants are provided according to embodiments of the present invention, the transgenic plants transformed with an expression cassette encoding a protein operably linked to a signal peptide which

  16. Compositions and methods relating to transgenic plants and cellulosic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ethanol production (Patent) | SciTech Connect Patent: Compositions and methods relating to transgenic plants and cellulosic ethanol production Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Compositions and methods relating to transgenic plants and cellulosic ethanol production Transgenic lignocellulosic plants are provided according to embodiments of the present invention, the transgenic plants transformed with an expression cassette encoding a protein operably linked to a signal peptide which

  17. Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol: A Joint Research Agenda. A Research Roadmap Resulting from the Biomass to Biofuels Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-06-30

    A robust fusion of the agricultural, industrial biotechnology, and energy industries can create a new strategic national capability for energy independence and climate protection. In his State of the Union Address (*Bush 2006), President George W. Bush outlined the Advanced Energy Initiative, which seeks to reduce our national dependence on imported oil by accelerating the development of domestic,renewable alternatives to gasoline and diesel fuels. The president has set a national goal of developing cleaner, cheaper, and more reliable alternative energy sources to substantially replace oil imports in the coming years.Fuels derived from cellulosic biomassthe fibrous, woody, and generally inedible portions of plant matteroffer one such alternative to conventional energy sources that can dramatically impact national economic growth, national energy security, and environmental goals. Cellulosic biomass is an attractive energy feedstock because it is an abundant, domestic, renewable source that can be converted to liquid transportation fuels.These fuels can be used readily by current-generation vehicles and distributed through the existing transportation-fuel infrastructure.

  18. Pacific Ethanol, Inc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Verenium Biofuels Corporation Corporate HQ: Cambridge, Massachusetts Proposed Facility Location: Jennings, Louisiana Description: Operation and maintenance of a demonstration-scale facility in Jennings, Louisiana with some capital additions. CEO or Equivalent: Carlos A. Riva, President, Chief Executive Officer and Director Participants: Only Verenium Biofuels Corporation Production: * Capacity of 1.5 million gallons per year of cellulosic ethanol biofuel Technology and Feedstocks: *

  19. Department of Energy Delivers on R&D Targets around Cellulosic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Users Facility, where scientists led pilot-scale projects for two cellulosic ... Biochemical Waterfall Chart of Minimum Ethanol Selling Price (in 2007 dollars per gallon). ...

  20. Method and apparatus for treating a cellulosic feedstock

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Quang A.; Burke, Murray J.; Hillier, Sunalie N.

    2015-09-08

    Methods and apparatus for treating, pre-treating, preparing and conveying a cellulosic feedstock, such as for ethanol production, are disclosed. More specifically, the invention relates to methods and apparatus for treating a cellulosic feedstock by mixing and heating the cellulosic feedstock and/or by moistening and heating the cellulosic feedstock. The invention also relates to a holding tank, and a method of utilizing the holding tank whereby bridging may be reduced or eliminated and may result in a product stream from autohydrolysis or hydrolysis having an improved yield. The invention further relates to methods and apparatus for obtaining and conveying a cellulosic feedstock, which may be used for the subsequent production of a fermentable sugar stream from the cellulose and hemicellulose in the cellulosic feedstock wherein the fermentable sugar stream may be used for subsequent ethanol production. The invention also relates to a method and apparatus for withdrawing one or more feedstock stream from a holding tank.

  1. Outlook for Biomass Ethanol Production and Demand

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a midterm forecast for biomass ethanol production under three different technology cases for the period 2000 to 2020, based on projections developed from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. An overview of cellulose conversion technology and various feedstock options and a brief history of ethanol usage in the United States are also presented.

  2. Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol Performance Runs | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol Performance Runs Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol Performance Runs October 19, 2015 - 12:38pm Addthis ICM Inc. announced successful completion of two 1,000-hour performance runs of its patent-pending Generation 2.0 Co-Located Cellulosic Ethanol process at its cellulosic ethanol pilot plant in St. Joseph, Missouri. This is an important step toward the commercialization of cellulosic ethanol from switchgrass and energy sorghum.

  3. Commercial Ethanol Turns Dross to Dollars for Rural Iowans

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu Sept. 23 announced the Department finalized a $105 million loan guarantee to support the development of one of the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol plants.

  4. Acid softening and hydrolysis of cellulose. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The report describes the experimental and analytic work to develop a process to reduce the cost of producing ethanol from cellulose. Ethanol is a renewable liquid fuel with applications in transportation, including oxygenation of fuel to reduce carbon monoxide emissions. If produced from cellulose contained in New York State's abundant low-grade wood resources or waste paper, significant quantities of petroleum could be displaced while creating new economic opportunity. The focus of the project was evaluating acid softening and hydrolysis technology to make cellulose responsive to conversion to fermentable sugar, from which production of ethanol would then be conventional and economical. The procedure is competitive with other cellulose-to-ethanol approaches such as enzyme hydrolysis; however, overall economic feasibility is problematic. To produce ethanol at $1.00 per gallon, a cost that would be competitive with producing ethanol from corn, and at the same time earn a 15 percent return for the owners of the plant, one of the major coproducts, lignin, would have to sell for $0.21 to $0.24 per pound. Identification of a suitable lignin market, a rise in petroleum prices, or restricting fossil-based carbon dioxide emissions will affect the economic feasibility of this particular type of lignin.

  5. Ethanol Basics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-01-30

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  6. Ethanol annual report FY 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Texeira, R.H.; Goodman, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the research progress and accomplishments of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Ethanol from Biomass Program, field managed by the Solar Energy Research Institute, during FY 1990. The report includes an overview of the entire program and summaries of individual research projects. These projects are grouped into the following subject areas: technoeconomic analysis; pretreatment; cellulose conversion; xylose fermentation; and lignin conversion. Individual papers have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  7. EA-1705: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, Mascoma Corporation, Kinross Charter Township, Michigan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The frontier Project consists of the design, construction and operation of a biorefinery producing ethanol and other co-products from cellulosic materials utilizing a proprietary pretreatment and fermentation process.

  8. Development of a Bulk-Format System to Harvest, Handle, Store, and Deliver High-Tonnage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Abstract Development of a Bulk-Format System to Harvest, Handle, Store, and Deliver High- Tonnage Low-Moisture Switchgrass Feedstock Genera Energy (Lead), University of Tennessee, Laidig Systems, Inc., Marathon Equipment, Dupont-Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol, Deere & Company, Idaho National Lab, Oak Ridge National Lab Prepared by Alvin Womac, Biosystems Engineering, Univ. Tenn. A high-tonnage feedstock supply system was developed using agricultural, transportation, and industrial technologies

  9. Electrically conductive cellulose composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Woodward, Jonathan

    2010-05-04

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  10. Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ethanol | Argonne National Laboratory Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic ethanol July 16, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that may accompany land-use change (LUC) from increased biofuel feedstock production are a source of debate in the discussion of drawbacks and advantages of biofuels. Estimates of LUC GHG emissions focus mainly on corn ethanol and vary widely. Increasing the understanding of LUC GHG impacts associated with both

  11. EERE Success Story-Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Performance Runs | Department of Energy Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol Performance Runs EERE Success Story-Pilot Plant Completes Two 1,000-Hour Ethanol Performance Runs January 22, 2016 - 11:01am Addthis ICM Inc. announced successful completion of two 1,000-hour performance runs of its patent-pending Generation 2.0 Co-Located Cellulosic Ethanol process at its cellulosic ethanol pilot plant in St. Joseph, Missouri. This is an important step toward the commercialization of

  12. Technical Support to SBIR Phase II Project: Improved Conversion of Cellulose Waste to Ethanol Using a Dual Bioreactor System: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-310

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, M.

    2013-04-01

    Over-dependence on fossil fuel has spurred research on alternative energy. Inedible plant materials such as grass and corn stover represent abundant renewable natural resources that can be transformed into biofuel. Problems in enzymatic conversion of biomass to sugars include the use of incomplete synergistic enzymes, end-product inhibition, and adsorption and loss of enzymes necessitating their use in large quantities. Technova Corporation will develop a defined consortium of natural microorganisms that will efficiently break down biomass to energy-rich soluble sugars, and convert them to cleaner-burning ethanol fuel. The project will also develop a novel biocatalytic hybrid reactor system dedicated to this bioprocess, which embodies recent advances in nanotechnology. NREL will participate to develop a continuous fermentation process.

  13. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy (Davis, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  14. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  15. The Effect of Cellulose Crystal Structure and Solid-State Morphology on the Activity of Cellulases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stipanovic, Arthur J

    2014-11-17

    Consistent with the US-DOE and USDA Roadmap objective of producing ethanol and chemicals from cellulosic feedstocks more efficiently, a three year research project entitled The Effect of Cellulose Crystal Structure and Solid-State Morphology on the Activity of Cellulases was initiated in early 2003 under DOE sponsorship (Project Number DE-FG02-02ER15356). A three year continuation was awarded in June 2005 for the period September 15, 2005 through September 14, 2008. The original goal of this project was to determine the effect of cellulose crystal structure, including allomorphic crystalline form (Cellulose I, II, III, IV and sub-allomorphs), relative degree of crystallinity and crystallite size, on the activity of different types of genetically engineered cellulase enzymes to provide insight into the mechanism and kinetics of cellulose digestion by pure enzymes rather than complex mixtures. We expected that such information would ultimately help enhance the accessibility of cellulose to enzymatic conversion processes thereby creating a more cost-effective commercial process yielding sugars for fermentation into ethanol and other chemical products. Perhaps the most significant finding of the initial project phase was that conversion of native bacterial cellulose (Cellulose I; BC-I) to the Cellulose II (BC-II) crystal form by aqueous NaOH pretreatment provided an increase in cellulase conversion rate approaching 2-4 fold depending on enzyme concentration and temperature, even when initial % crystallinity values were similar for both allomorphs.

  16. Pacific Ethanol, Inc | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Pacific Ethanol, Inc

  17. Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis of cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Faison, Brendlyn D. (Knoxville, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1997-01-01

    A process for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified.

  18. Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis of cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.; Davison, B.H.; Woodward, J.

    1997-06-10

    A process is described for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified. 1 fig.

  19. Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis or cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.; Davison, B.H.; Woodward, J.

    1996-04-16

    A process is described for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified. 1 fig.

  20. Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis or cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Faison, Brendlyn D. (Knoxville, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1996-01-01

    A process for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified.

  1. Greater Ohio Ethanol LLC GO Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ohio Ethanol LLC GO Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Greater Ohio Ethanol, LLC (GO Ethanol) Place: Lima, Ohio Zip: OH 45804 Product: GO Ethanol is a pure play ethanol...

  2. Method of saccharifying cellulose

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, E.A.; Demain, A.L.; Madia, A.

    1983-05-13

    A method is disclosed of saccharifying cellulose by incubation with the cellulase of Clostridium thermocellum in a broth containing an efficacious amount of thiol reducing agent. Other incubation parameters which may be advantageously controlled to stimulate saccharification include the concentration of alkaline earth salts, pH, temperature, and duration. By the method of the invention, even native crystalline cellulose such as that found in cotton may be completely saccharified.

  3. Method of saccharifying cellulose

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric A. (Brookline, MA); Demain, Arnold L. (Wellesley, MA); Madia, Ashwin (Decatur, IL)

    1985-09-10

    A method of saccharifying cellulose by incubation with the cellulase of Clostridium thermocellum in a broth containing an efficacious amount of a reducing agent. Other incubation parameters which may be advantageously controlled to stimulate saccharification include the concentration of alkaline earth salts, pH, temperature, and duration. By the method of the invention, even native crystalline cellulose such as that found in cotton may be completely saccharified.

  4. Experiences from Introduction of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel Station Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Experiences from Introduction of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel Station Agency...

  5. Ethanol production with dilute acid hydrolysis using partially dried lignocellulosics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Quang A. (Chesterfield, MO); Keller, Fred A. (Lakewood, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

    2003-12-09

    A process of converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol, comprising hydrolyzing lignocellulosic materials by subjecting dried lignocellulosic material in a reactor to a catalyst comprised of a dilute solution of a strong acid and a metal salt to lower the activation energy (i.e., the temperature) of cellulose hydrolysis and ultimately obtain higher sugar yields.

  6. Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Add description and move this content to a more appropriate page name (like "List of ethanol incentives") List of Ethanol Incentives E85 Standards Retrieved from "http:...

  7. MICROBIAL FERMENTATION OF ABUNDANT BIOPOLYMERS: CELLULOSE AND CHITIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    Our research has dealt with seven major areas of investigation: i) characterization of cellulolytic members of microbial consortia, with special attention recently given to Clostridium phytofermentans, a bacterium that decomposes cellulose and produces uncommonly large amounts of ethanol, ii) investigations of the chitinase system of Cellulomonas uda; including the purification and characterization of ChiA, the major component of this enzyme system, iii) molecular cloning, sequence and structural analysis of the gene that encodes ChiA in C. uda, iv) biofilm formation by C. uda on nutritive surfaces, v) investigations of the effects of humic substances on cellulose degradation by anaerobic cellulolytic microbes, vi) studies of nitrogen metabolism in cellulolytic anaerobes, and vii) understanding the molecular architecture of the multicomplex cellulase-xylanase system of Clostridium papyrosolvens. Also, progress toward completing the research of more recent projects is briefly summarized. Major accomplishments include: 1. Characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans, a cellulose-fermenting, ethanol-producing bacterium from forest soil. The characterization of a new cellulolytic species isolated from a cellulose-decomposing microbial consortium from forest soil was completed. This bacterium is remarkable for the high concentrations of ethanol produced during cellulose fermentation, typically more than twice the concentration produced by other species of cellulolytic clostridia. 2. Examination of the use of chitin as a source of carbon and nitrogen by cellulolytic microbes. We discovered that many cellulolytic anaerobes and facultative aerobes are able to use chitin as a source of both carbon and nitrogen. This major discovery expands our understanding of the biology of cellulose-fermenting bacteria and may lead to new applications for these microbes. 3. Comparative studies of the cellulase and chitinase systems of Cellulomonas uda. Results of these studies indicate that the chitinase and cellulase systems of this bacterium are distinct in terms of the proteins involved and the regulation of their production. 4. Characterization of the chitinase system of C. uda. A 70,000-Mr endochitinase, designated ChiA, was purified from C. uda culture supernatant fluids and characterized. 5. Analysis of chiA, which codes for the major enzymatic component of the chitinase system of C. uda. The gene encoding the endochitinase ChiA in C. uda was cloned, its complete nucleotide sequence was determined and its implications were investigated. 6. Formation of biofilms by C. uda on cellulose and chitin. Microscopic observations indicated that, under conditions of nitrogen limitation, C. uda cells grew as a biofilm attached tightly to the surface of cellulose or chitin. 7. Development of tools for a genetic approach to studies of cellulose fermentation by cellulolytic clostridia. We have explored the potential of various techniques, and obtained evidence indicating that Tn916 mutagenesis may be particularly effective in this regard. As part of this research, we identified the presence of a plasmid in one strain, which was cloned, sequenced, and analyzed for its utility in the development of vectors for genetic studies. 8. Effects of humic substances on cellulose degradation by anaerobic cellulolytic microbes. We determined that humic substances play an important role in the anaerobic cellulose decomposition and in the physiology of cellulose-fermenting soil bacteria. 9. Nitrogenases of cellulolytic clostridia. We described a nitrogenase gene from a cellulolytic clostridium and presented evidence, based on sequence analyses and conserved gene order, for lateral gene transfer between this bacterium and a methanogenic archaeon. 10. Characterization of Clostridium hungatei, a new N2-fixing cellulolytic species isolated from a methanogenic consortium from soil. 11. Understanding the molecular architecture of the multicomplex cellulase-xylanase system of Clostridium papyrosolvens. We discovered that C. papyrosolvens produces a multiprotein, multicom

  8. Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June 2006 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy bhighres

  9. Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June 2006 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy blowres

  10. Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    This new facility, one of six commercial scale biorefineries to be constructed with the Department of Energy's support, will expand the use of home-grown alternative fuels - ...

  11. Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to bring innovative, cost-cutting biofuel technologies on line, test the latest ... future INEOS Bio facilities as well as other advanced biofuel projects across the country. ...

  12. Breaking the Biological Barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol, June...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... scientist at NIH National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases until ... cells with emphasis on obesity and diabetes, and bioinformatics and functional ...

  13. Process for producing ethanol from plant biomass using the fungus Paecilomyces sp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, J.F.

    1985-08-08

    A process for producing ethanol from plant biomass is disclosed. The process includes forming a substrate from the biomass with the substrate including hydrolysates of cellulose and hemicellulose. A species of the fungus Paecilomyces which has the ability to ferment both cellobiose and xylose to ethanol is then selected and isolated. The substrate is inoculated with this fungus, and the inoculated substrate is then fermented under conditions favorable for cell viability and conversion of hydrolysates to ethanol. Finally, ethanol is recovered from the fermented substrate. 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Process for producing ethanol from plant biomass using the fungus paecilomyces sp.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Jung Fu

    1989-01-01

    A process for producing ethanol from plant biomass is disclosed. The process in cludes forming a substrate from the biomass with the substrate including hydrolysates of cellulose and hemicellulose. A species of the fungus Paecilomyces, which has the ability to ferment both cellobiose and xylose to ethanol, is then selected and isolated. The substrate is inoculated with this fungus, and the inoculated substrate is then fermented under conditions favorable for cell viability and conversion of hydrolysates to ethanol. Finally, ethanol is recovered from the fermented substrate.

  15. Southridge Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Southridge Ethanol Place: Dallas, Texas Zip: 75219 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Southridge Ethanol is a renewable energy company...

  16. Diversified Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Diversified Ethanol Place: Northbrook, Illinois Zip: 60062 Product: A division of OTCBB-traded ONYI that is building an ethanol plant in...

  17. Ace Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ace Ethanol Place: Stanley, Wisconsin Zip: 54768 Product: Producer of corn-based ethanol in Wisconsin. Coordinates: 44.958844,...

  18. Dakota Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dakota Ethanol Place: Wentworth, South Dakota Zip: 57075 Product: Farmer Coop owner of a 189m litres per year ethanol plant Coordinates:...

  19. FRACTIONATION OF LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS FOR FUEL-GRADE ETHANOL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F.D. Guffey; R.C. Wingerson

    2002-10-01

    PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) of Fort Lupton, Colorado is developing a process for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into fuel-grade ethanol and specialty chemicals in order to enhance national energy security, rural economies, and environmental quality. Lignocellulosic-containing plants are those types of biomass that include wood, agricultural residues, and paper wastes. Lignocellulose is composed of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the component in lignocellulose that has potential for the production of fuel-grade ethanol by direct fermentation of the glucose. However, enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose and raw cellulose into glucose is hindered by the presence of lignin. The cellulase enzyme, which hydrolyzes cellulose to glucose, becomes irreversibly bound to lignin. This requires using the enzyme in reagent quantities rather than in catalytic concentration. The extensive use of this enzyme is expensive and adversely affects the economics of ethanol production. PureVision has approached this problem by developing a biomass fractionator to pretreat the lignocellulose to yield a highly pure cellulose fraction. The biomass fractionator is based on sequentially treating the biomass with hot water, hot alkaline solutions, and polishing the cellulose fraction with a wet alkaline oxidation step. In September 2001 PureVision and Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated a jointly sponsored research project with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate their pretreatment technology, develop an understanding of the chemistry, and provide the data required to design and fabricate a one- to two-ton/day pilot-scale unit. The efforts during the first year of this program completed the design, fabrication, and shakedown of a bench-scale reactor system and evaluated the fractionation of corn stover. The results from the evaluation of corn stover have shown that water hydrolysis prior to alkaline hydrolysis may be beneficial in removing hemicellulose and lignin from the feedstock. In addition, alkaline hydrolysis has been shown to remove a significant portion of the hemicellulose and lignin. The resulting cellulose can be exposed to a finishing step with wet alkaline oxidation to remove the remaining lignin. The final product is a highly pure cellulose fraction containing less than 1% of the native lignin with an overall yield in excess of 85% of the native cellulose. This report summarizes the results from the first year's effort to move the technology to commercialization.

  20. Increase in ethanol yield via elimination of lactate production in an ethanol-tolerant mutant of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Ranjita; Prabhu, Sandeep; Lynd, Lee R; Guss, Adam M

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale production of lignocellulosic biofuel is a potential solution to sustainably meet global energy needs. One-step consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) is a potentially advantageous approach for the production of biofuels, but requires an organism capable of hydrolyzing biomass to sugars and fermenting the sugars to ethanol at commercially viable titers and yields. Clostridium thermocellum, a thermophilic anaerobe, can ferment cellulosic biomass to ethanol and organic acids, but low yield, low titer, and ethanol sensitivity remain barriers to industrial production. Here, we deleted the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene in ethanol tolerant strain of C. thermocellum adhE*(EA) in order to allow use of previously developed gene deletion tools, then deleted lactate dehydrogenase (ldh) to redirect carbon flux towards ethanol. Upon deletion of ldh, the adhE*(EA) ldh strain produced 30% more ethanol than wild type on minimal medium. The adhE*(EA) ldh strain retained tolerance to 5% v/v ethanol, resulting in an ethanol tolerant platform strain of C. thermocellum for future metabolic engineering efforts.

  1. Advanced Cellulosic Biofuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Cellulosic Biofuels Breakout Session 2-B: NewEmerging Pathways Advanced Cellulosic Biofuels Dr. Robert Graham, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman, Ensyn Corporation PDF ...

  2. Byone Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Byone Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Byone Ethanol Place: Brazil Product: Ethanol Producer References: Byone Ethanol1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  3. Highwater Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Highwater Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Highwater Ethanol Place: Lamberton, Minnesota Zip: MN 56152 Product: Highwater Ethanol LLC is the SPV behind the 195mLpa ethanol...

  4. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  5. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  6. Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donal F. Day

    2009-03-31

    The work conducted in this project is an extension of the developments itemized in DE-FG-36-04GO14236. This program is designed to help the development of a biorefinery based around a raw sugar mill, which in Louisiana is an underutilized asset. Some technical questions were answered regarding the addition of a biomass to ethanol facility to existing sugar mills. The focus of this work is on developing technology to produce ethanol and valuable by-products from bagasse. Three major areas are addressed, feedstock storage, potential by-products and the technology for producing ethanol from dilute ammonia pre-treated bagasse. Sugar mills normally store bagasse in a simple pile. During the off season there is a natural degradation of the bagasse, due to the composting action of microorganisms in the pile. This has serious implications if bagasse must be stored to operate a bagasse/biorefinery for a 300+ day operating cycle. Deterioration of the fermentables in bagasse was found to be 6.5% per month, on pile storage. This indicates that long term storage of adequate amounts of bagasse for year-round operation is probably not feasible. Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of succinic acid production were such that it could not compete with current commercial practice. To allow recovery of commercial amounts of ethanol from bagasse fermentation, research was conducted on high solids loading fermentations (using S. cerevisiae) with commercial cellulase on pretreated material. A combination of SHF/SSF treatment with fed-batch operation allowed fermentation at 30% solids loading. Supplementation of the fermentation with a small amount of black-strap molasses had results beyond expectation. There was an enhancement of conversion as well as production of ethanol levels above 6.0% w/w, which is required both for efficient distillation as well as contaminant repression. The focus of fermentation development was only on converting the cellulose to ethanol, as this yeast is not capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose (from hemicellulose). In anticipation of the future development of such an organism, we screened the commercially available xylanases to find the optimum mix for conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose. A different mixture than the spezyme/novozyme mix used in our fermentation research was found to be more efficient at converting both cellulose and hemicellulose. Efforts were made to select a mutant of Pichia stipitis for ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol. New mutation technology was developed, but an appropriate mutant has not yet been isolated. The ability to convert to stillage from biomass fermentations were determined to be suitable for anaerobic degradation and methane production. An economic model of a current sugar factory was developed in order to provide a baseline for the cost/benefit analysis of adding cellulosic ethanol production.

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ethanol Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on AddThis.com... More

  8. Microbial fuel cell treatment of ethanol fermentation process water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borole, Abhijeet P. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-06-05

    The present invention relates to a method for removing inhibitor compounds from a cellulosic biomass-to-ethanol process which includes a pretreatment step of raw cellulosic biomass material and the production of fermentation process water after production and removal of ethanol from a fermentation step, the method comprising contacting said fermentation process water with an anode of a microbial fuel cell, said anode containing microbes thereon which oxidatively degrade one or more of said inhibitor compounds while producing electrical energy or hydrogen from said oxidative degradation, and wherein said anode is in electrical communication with a cathode, and a porous material (such as a porous or cation-permeable membrane) separates said anode and cathode.

  9. Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  10. Evaluation of nanoparticle-immobilized cellulase for improved ethanol yield in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupoi, Jason; Smith, Emily

    2011-12-01

    Ethanol yields were 2.1 (P = 0.06) to 2.3 (P = 0.01) times higher in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) reactions of microcrystalline cellulose when cellulase was physisorbed on silica nanoparticles compared to enzyme in solution. In SSF reactions, cellulose is hydrolyzed to glucose by cellulase while yeast simultaneously ferments glucose to ethanol. The 35 C temperature and the presence of ethanol in SSF reactions are not optimal conditions for cellulase. Immobilization onto solid supports can stabilize the enzyme and promote activity at non-optimum reaction conditions. Mock SSF reactions that did not contain yeast were used to measure saccharification products and identify the mechanism for the improved ethanol yield using immobilized cellulase. Cellulase adsorbed to 40 nm silica nanoparticles produced 1.6 times (P = 0.01) more glucose than cellulase in solution in 96 h at pH 4.8 and 35 C. There was no significant accumulation (<250 {mu}g) of soluble cellooligomers in either the solution or immobilized enzyme reactions. This suggests that the mechanism for the immobilized enzyme's improved glucose yield compared to solution enzyme is the increased conversion of insoluble cellulose hydrolysis products to soluble cellooligomers at 35 C and in the presence of ethanol. The results show that silica-immobilized cellulase can be used to produce increased ethanol yields in the conversion of lignocellulosic materials by SSF.

  11. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynd, Lee R; Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Zhu, Mingjun

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1 2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  12. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Zhu, Mingjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  13. Development of efficient, integrated cellulosic biorefineries : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teh, Kwee-Yan; Hecht, Ethan S.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Buffleben, George M.; Dibble, Dean C.; Lutz, Andrew E.

    2010-09-01

    Cellulosic ethanol, generated from lignocellulosic biomass sources such as grasses and trees, is a promising alternative to conventional starch- and sugar-based ethanol production in terms of potential production quantities, CO{sub 2} impact, and economic competitiveness. In addition, cellulosic ethanol can be generated (at least in principle) without competing with food production. However, approximately 1/3 of the lignocellulosic biomass material (including all of the lignin) cannot be converted to ethanol through biochemical means and must be extracted at some point in the biochemical process. In this project we gathered basic information on the prospects for utilizing this lignin residue material in thermochemical conversion processes to improve the overall energy efficiency or liquid fuel production capacity of cellulosic biorefineries. Two existing pretreatment approaches, soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) and the Arkenol (strong sulfuric acid) process, were implemented at Sandia and used to generated suitable quantities of residue material from corn stover and eucalyptus feedstocks for subsequent thermochemical research. A third, novel technique, using ionic liquids (IL) was investigated by Sandia researchers at the Joint Bioenergy Institute (JBEI), but was not successful in isolating sufficient lignin residue. Additional residue material for thermochemical research was supplied from the dilute-acid simultaneous saccharification/fermentation (SSF) pilot-scale process at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The high-temperature volatiles yields of the different residues were measured, as were the char combustion reactivities. The residue chars showed slightly lower reactivity than raw biomass char, except for the SSF residue, which had substantially lower reactivity. Exergy analysis was applied to the NREL standard process design model for thermochemical ethanol production and from a prototypical dedicated biochemical process, with process data supplied by a recent report from the National Research Council (NRC). The thermochemical system analysis revealed that most of the system inefficiency is associated with the gasification process and subsequent tar reforming step. For the biochemical process, the steam generation from residue combustion, providing the requisite heating for the conventional pretreatment and alcohol distillation processes, was shown to dominate the exergy loss. An overall energy balance with different potential distillation energy requirements shows that as much as 30% of the biomass energy content may be available in the future as a feedstock for thermochemical production of liquid fuels.

  14. Compositions and methods for increasing cellulose production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhenbiao (Riverside, CA); Karr, Stephen (Camarillo, CA)

    2012-05-01

    This disclosure relates to methods and compositions for genetically altering cellulose biosynthesis.

  15. Magnetic cellulose-derivative structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walsh, M.A.; Morris, R.S.

    1986-09-16

    Structures to serve as selective magnetic sorbents are formed by dissolving a cellulose derivative such as cellulose triacetate in a solvent containing magnetic particles. The resulting solution is sprayed as a fine mist into a chamber containing a liquid coagulant such as n-hexane in which the cellulose derivative is insoluble but in which the coagulant is soluble or miscible. On contact with the coagulant, the mist forms free-flowing porous magnetic microspheric structures. These structures act as containers for the ion-selective or organic-selective sorption agent of choice. Some sorption agents can be incorporated during the manufacture of the structure. 3 figs.

  16. Magnetic cellulose-derivative structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walsh, Myles A. (Falmouth, MA); Morris, Robert S. (Fairhaven, MA)

    1986-09-16

    Structures to serve as selective magnetic sorbents are formed by dissolving a cellulose derivative such as cellulose triacetate in a solvent containing magnetic particles. The resulting solution is sprayed as a fine mist into a chamber containing a liquid coagulant such as n-hexane in which the cellulose derivative is insoluble but in which the coagulant is soluble or miscible. On contact with the coagulant, the mist forms free-flowing porous magnetic microspheric structures. These structures act as containers for the ion-selective or organic-selective sorption agent of choice. Some sorbtion agents can be incorporated during the manufacture of the structure.

  17. Chapter 18: Understanding the Developing Cellulosic Biofuels Industry through Dynamic Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newes, E.; Inman, D.; Bush, B.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to discuss a system dynamics model called the Biomass Scenario Model (BSM), which is being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a tool to better understand the interaction of complex policies and their potential effects on the burgeoning cellulosic biofuels industry in the United States. The model has also recently been expanded to include advanced conversion technologies and biofuels (i.e., conversion pathways that yield biomass-based gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, and butanol), but we focus on cellulosic ethanol conversion pathways here. The BSM uses a system dynamics modeling approach (Bush et al., 2008) built on the STELLA software platform.

  18. NREL 2012 Achievement of Ethanol Cost Targets: Biochemical Ethanol Fermentation via Dilute-Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, L.; Schell, D.; Davis, R.; Tan, E.; Elander, R.; Bratis, A.

    2014-04-01

    For the DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office, the annual State of Technology (SOT) assessment is an essential activity for quantifying the benefits of biochemical platform research. This assessment has historically allowed the impact of research progress achieved through targeted Bioenergy Technologies Office funding to be quantified in terms of economic improvements within the context of a fully integrated cellulosic ethanol production process. As such, progress toward the ultimate 2012 goal of demonstrating cost-competitive cellulosic ethanol technology can be tracked. With an assumed feedstock cost for corn stover of $58.50/ton this target has historically been set at $1.41/gal ethanol for conversion costs only (exclusive of feedstock) and $2.15/gal total production cost (inclusive of feedstock) or minimum ethanol selling price (MESP). This year, fully integrated cellulosic ethanol production data generated by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers in their Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) successfully demonstrated performance commensurate with both the FY 2012 SOT MESP target of $2.15/gal (2007$, $58.50/ton feedstock cost) and the conversion target of $1.41/gal through core research and process improvements in pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation.

  19. Cellulose Pyrolysis A Literature, Review.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fed. Sci. Tech. Inform., AD 1968, AD-676351, 44 pp. 194. Kwang-Shaun Huang, Kee-Chuan Pan and Chao-Nan Perng, "Pyrolysis of Cellulose. I. Effect of Diamrnonium Phos- phate...

  20. Sioux River Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sioux River Ethanol LLC Place: Hudson, South Dakota Zip: 57034 Product: Farmer owned ethanol producer, Sioux River Ethanol is...

  1. Cardinal Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cardinal Ethanol LLC Place: Winchester, Indiana Zip: 47394 Product: Cardinal Ethanol is in the process of building an ethanol plant in...

  2. Phelps County Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Phelps County Ethanol Place: Nebraska Product: Focused on ethanol production. References: Phelps County Ethanol1 This article is...

  3. Fermentation method producing ethanol

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Daniel I. C. (Belmont, MA); Dalal, Rajen (Chicago, IL)

    1986-01-01

    Ethanol is the major end product of an anaerobic, thermophilic fermentation process using a mutant strain of bacterium Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum. This organism is capable of converting hexose and pentose carbohydrates to ethanol, acetic and lactic acids. Mutants of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum are capable of converting these substrates to ethanol in exceptionally high yield and with increased productivity. Both the mutant organism and the technique for its isolation are provided.

  4. BlueFire Ethanol

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Construct and operate a facility that converts green waste and lignocellulosic fractions diverted from landfills or Southern California Materials Recovery Facilities to ethanol and other products.

  5. Life Cycle Assessment of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007: Ethanol - Global Warming Potential and Environmental Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, G. A.; Hsu, D. D.; Inman, D.; Aden, A.; Mann, M. K.

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this study is to use life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the global warming potential (GWP), water use, and net energy value (NEV) associated with the EISA-mandated 16 bgy cellulosic biofuels target, which is assumed in this study to be met by cellulosic-based ethanol, and the EISA-mandated 15 bgy conventional corn ethanol target. Specifically, this study compares, on a per-kilometer-driven basis, the GWP, water use, and NEV for the year 2022 for several biomass feedstocks.

  6. Accounting for all sugars produced during integrated production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schell, Daniel J.; Dowe, Nancy; Chapeaux, Alexandre; Nelson, Robert S.; Jennings, Edward W.

    2016-04-01

    This study explored integrated conversion of corn stover to ethanol and highlights techniques for accurate yield calculations. Acid pretreated corn stover (PCS) produced in a pilot-scale reactor was enzymatically hydrolyzed and the resulting sugars were fermented to ethanol by the glucose–xylose fermenting bacteria, Zymomonas mobilis 8b. The calculations account for high solids operation and oligomeric sugars produced during pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation, which, if not accounted for, leads to overestimating ethanol yields. The calculations are illustrated for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of PCS at 17.5% and 20.0% total solids achieving 80.1% and 77.9% conversion of cellulose and xylan tomore » ethanol and ethanol titers of 63 g/L and 69 g/L, respectively. In the future, these techniques, including the TEA results, will be applied to fully integrated pilot-scale runs.« less

  7. Ethanol Demand in United States Regional Production of Oxygenate-limited Gasoline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.

    2000-08-01

    The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (the Act) outlined a national energy strategy that called for reducing the nation's dependency on petroleum imports. The Act directed the Secretary of Energy to establish a program to promote and expand the use of renewable fuels. The Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT) within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has evaluated a wide range of potential fuels and has concluded that cellulosic ethanol is one of the most promising near-term prospects. Ethanol is widely recognized as a clean fuel that helps reduce emissions of toxic air pollutants. Furthermore, cellulosic ethanol produces less greenhouse gas emissions than gasoline or any of the other alternative transportation fuels being considered by DOE.

  8. Bushmills Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bushmills Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bushmills Ethanol Place: Atwater, Minnesota Zip: 56209 Product: A group of local agricultural producers and investors working to...

  9. Northstar Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northstar Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Northstar Ethanol Place: Lake Crystal, Minnesota Zip: 56055 Product: Corn-base bioethanol producer in Minnesotta References:...

  10. Sunnyside Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sunnyside Ethanol Place: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Zip: PA 15237 Product: Pennsylvania based company created for the specific purpose of...

  11. Ethanol India | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    India Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ethanol India Place: Kolhapur, Maharashtra, India Sector: Biofuels Product: Maharashtra-based biofuels consultancy firm. References: Ethanol...

  12. Pacific Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pacific Ethanol Address: 400 Capitol Mall, Suite 2060 Place: Sacramento, California Zip: 95814 Region: Bay Area Sector: Biofuels Product: Ethanol production Website:...

  13. Pacific Ethanol, Inc | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc

  14. Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulous and xylose to ethanol by Schizosaccharoyces pombe, cellulase, .beta.-glucosidase, and xylose isomerase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lastick, Stanley M. (Longmont, CO); Mohagheghi, Ali (Northglen, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Grohmann, Karel (Winter Haven, FL)

    1994-01-01

    A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe ATCC No. 2476, having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35.degree. C. to about 40.degree. C. until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol.

  15. Compositions for saccharification of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBrayer, Brett; Shaghasi, Tarana; Vlasenko, Elena

    2015-11-04

    The present invention relates to enzyme compositions for high temperature saccharification of cellulosic material and to uses thereof.

  16. Compositions for saccharification of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBrayer, Brett; Shaghasi, Tarana; Vlasenko, Elena

    2013-11-12

    The present invention relates to enzyme compositions for high temperature saccharification of cellulosic material and to uses thereof.

  17. Bacterial Cellulose Composites Opportunities and Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bacterial Cellulose Composites Opportunities and Challenges (An important & exciting area that needs more public/private partnership) LEONARD S. FIFIELD, PHD PNNL Applied Materials Science Group Richland, WA June 26, 2012 1 Leonard.Fifield@PNNL.gov What is bacterial cellulose? Why is it unique? June 26, 2012 2 Leonard.Fifield@PNNL.gov Bacterial cellulose-a naturally occurring material: Microbial Exo Poly Saccharides: Dextran, Xanthan, Gellan, Cellulose Gluconacetobacter, Agrobacterium,

  18. Clostridium thermocellum ATCC27405 transcriptomic, metabolomic and proteomic profiles after ethanol stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Shihui; Giannone, Richard J; Dice, Lezlee T; Yang, Zamin Koo; Engle, Nancy L; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Brown, Steven D

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a candidate consolidated bioprocessing biocatalyst, which is a microorganism that expresses enzymes for both cellulose hydrolysis and its fermentation to produce fuels such as lignocellulosic ethanol. However, C. thermocellum is relatively sensitive to ethanol compared to ethanologenic microorganisms such as yeast and Zymomonas mobilis that are used in industrial fermentations but do not possess native enzymes for industrial cellulose hydrolysis. In this study, C. thermocellum was grown to mid-exponential phase and then treated with ethanol to a final concentration of 3.9 g/L to investigate its physiological and regulatory responses to ethanol stress. Samples were taken pre-shock and 2, 12, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min post-shock, and from untreated control fermentations for systems biology analyses. Cell growth was arrested by ethanol supplementation with intracellular accumulation of carbon sources such as cellobiose, and sugar phosphates, including fructose-6-phosphate and glucose-6-phosphate. The largest response of C. thermocellum to ethanol shock treatment was in genes and proteins related to nitrogen uptake and metabolism, which is likely important for redirecting the cells physiology to overcome inhibition and allow growth to resume. This study suggests possible avenues for metabolic engineering and provides comprehensive, integrated systems biology datasets that will be useful for future metabolic modeling and strain development endeavors.

  19. Ethanol-blended Fuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    state. In France, ethanol is produced from grapes that are of insufficient quality for wine production. Prompted by the increase in oil prices in the 1970s, Brazil introduced a...

  20. Ethanol production from lignocellulose

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Wood, Brent E. (Gainesville, FL)

    2001-01-01

    This invention presents a method of improving enzymatic degradation of lignocellulose, as in the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, through the use of ultrasonic treatment. The invention shows that ultrasonic treatment reduces cellulase requirements by 1/3 to 1/2. With the cost of enzymes being a major problem in the cost-effective production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, this invention presents a significant improvement over presently available methods.

  1. BlueFire Ethanol

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. Corporate HQ: Irvine, California Proposed Facility Location: Mecca, California Description: The project will construct and operate a facility that will convert green waste and lignocellulosic fractions diverted from landfills or Southern California Materials Recovery Facilities to ethanol and other products. CEO or Equivalent: Arnold Klann, CEO Participants: Burrtec Waste Industries, JGC Corporation, Brinderson, Roelsien, MECS Inc. NAES, PetroDiamond Production: 19 million

  2. Millennium Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Millennium Ethanol, LLC Place: Marion, South Dakota Zip: 57043 Product: Millennium Ethanol is a group of more than 900 South Dakotan...

  3. East Coast Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: East Coast Ethanol Place: Columbia, South Carolina Zip: 29202 Product: East Coast Ethanol was formed in August 2007 through a merger...

  4. Marysville Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marysville Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Marysville Ethanol LLC Place: Marysville, Michigan Zip: 48040 Product: Developing a 50m gallon ethanol plant in Marysville,...

  5. Great Valley Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Valley Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great Valley Ethanol LLC Place: Bakersfield, California Product: Developing a 63m gallon ethanol plant in Hanford, CA...

  6. Central Indiana Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indiana Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Central Indiana Ethanol LLC Place: Marion, Indiana Zip: 46952 Product: Ethanol producer developina a 151 mlpa plant in Marion,...

  7. SRSL Ethanol Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SRSL Ethanol Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name: SRSL Ethanol Limited Place: Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Product: Mumbai-based ethanol subsidiary of Shree Renuka Sugars...

  8. Kansas Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kansas Ethanol LLC Place: Lyons, Kansas Zip: 67554 Product: Constructing a 55m gallon ethanol plant in Rice County, Kansas...

  9. Chief Ethanol Fuels Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fuels Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Chief Ethanol Fuels Inc Place: Hastings, Nebraska Product: Ethanol producer and supplier References: Chief Ethanol Fuels Inc1 This...

  10. Heartland Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Heartland Ethanol LLC Place: Knoxville, Tennessee Zip: 37929 Product: Knoxville, TN based ethanol developer. Coordinates: 35.960495,...

  11. Standard Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Standard Ethanol LLC Place: Nebraska Product: Nebraska based ethanol producer that operates two plants References: Standard Ethanol LLC1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  12. Ethanol Capital Funding | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Capital Funding Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ethanol Capital Funding Place: Atlanta, Georgia Zip: 30328 Product: Provides funding for ethanol and biodiesel plants....

  13. Michigan Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Michigan Ethanol LLC Place: Caro, Michigan Zip: 48723-8804 Product: Ethanol productor in Caro, Michigan. Coordinates: 43.488705,...

  14. Siouxland Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Siouxland Ethanol LLC Place: Jackson, Nebraska Zip: 68743 Product: Startup hoping to build a USD 80m ethanol manufacturing plant near...

  15. Platinum Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Platinum Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Platinum Ethanol LLC Place: Arthut, Iowa Product: Developed a 110m gallon (416m litre) ethanol plant in Arthur, IA....

  16. Nedak Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nedak Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Nedak Ethanol LLC Place: Atkinson, Nebraska Zip: 68713 Product: NEDAK Ethanol, LLC is a Nebraska limited liability company,...

  17. North Country Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: North Country Ethanol LLC Place: Rosholt, South Dakota Zip: 57260 Product: 20mmgy (75.7m litresy) ethanol producer....

  18. South Louisiana Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    South Louisiana Ethanol LLC Place: Louisiana Product: Ethanol production equipment provider. References: South Louisiana Ethanol LLC1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI...

  19. Show Me Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Show Me Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Show Me Ethanol, LLC Place: Carrollton, Missouri Zip: 64633 Product: Developing an ethanol project in Carrollton, Missouri....

  20. Western Ethanol Company LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Company LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Western Ethanol Company LLC Place: Placentia, California Zip: 92871 Product: California-based fuel ethanol distribution and...

  1. Alexa Fluor-labeled Fluorescent Cellulose Nanocrystals for Bioimaging Solid Cellulose in Spatially Structured Microenvironments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Mo, Kai-For; Shin, Yongsoon; Vasdekis, Andreas; Warner, Marvin G.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Orr, Galya; Hu, Dehong; Dehoff, Karl J.; Brockman, Fred J.; Wilkins, Michael J.

    2015-03-18

    Cellulose nanocrystal materials have been labeled with modern Alexa Fluor dyes in a process that first links the dye to a cyanuric chloride molecule. Subsequent reaction with cellulose nanocrystals provides dyed solid microcrystalline cellulose material that can be used for bioimaging and suitable for deposition in films and spatially structured microenvironments. It is demonstrated with single molecular fluorescence microscopy that these films are subject to hydrolysis by cellulose enzymes.

  2. Ethanol 2000 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol 2000 Place: Bingham lake, Minnesota Zip: 56118 Product: Farmer-owned bioethanol producer References: Ethanol 20001 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  3. Orion Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Orion Ethanol Place: Pratt, Kansas Zip: 67124 Product: A Kansas-based ethanol producer. Coordinates: 38.209925, -81.383804 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  4. Ozark Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ozark Ethanol Place: Missouri Zip: 64762 Product: Missouri-based bioethanol producer planning to develop a 204m-litre per year ethanol plant in Vernon County. References: Ozark...

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ethanol Blends to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Blends E15

  6. Ethanol Myths Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-10-27

    Ethanol is a clean, renewable fuel that is helping to reduce our nations dependence on oil and can offer additional economic and environmental benefits in the future. This fact sheet is intended to address some common misconceptions about this important alternative fuel.

  7. Sorghum to Ethanol Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Dahlberg, Ph D; Ed Wolfrum, Ph D

    2010-06-30

    The development of a robust source of renewable transportation fuel will require a large amount of biomass feedstocks. It is generally accepted that in addition to agricultural and forestry residues, we will need crops grown specifically for subsequent conversion into fuels. There has been a lot of research on several of these so-called "dedicated bioenergy crops" including switchgrass, miscanthus, sugarcane, and poplar. It is likely that all of these crops will end up playing a role as feedstocks, depending on local environmental and market conditions. Many different types of sorghum have been grown to produce syrup, grain, and animal feed for many years. It has several features that may make it as compelling as other crops mentioned above as a renewable, sustainable biomass feedstock; however, very little work has been done to investigate sorghum as a dedicated bioenergy crop. The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of using sorghum biomass to produce ethanol. The work performed included a detailed examination of the agronomics and composition of a large number of sorghum varieties, laboratory experiments to convert sorghum to ethanol, and economic and life-cycle analyses of the sorghum-to-ethanol process. This work showed that sorghum has a very wide range of composition, which depended on the specific sorghum cultivar as well as the growing conditions. The results of laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments indicated that a typical high-biomass sorghum variety performed very similarly to corn stover during the multi-step process required to convert biomass feedstocks to ethanol; yields of ethanol for sorghum were very similar to the corn stover used as a control in these experiments. Based on multi-year agronomic data and theoretical ethanol production, sorghum can achieve more than 1,300 gallons of ethanol per acre given the correct genetics and environment. In summary, sorghum may be a compelling dedicated bioenergy crop that could help provide a major portion of the feedstocks required to produce renewable domestic transportation fuels.

  8. Sorghum to Ethanol Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlberg, Jeff; Wolfrum, Ed

    2010-06-30

    The development of a robust source of renewable transportation fuel will require a large amount of biomass feedstocks. It is generally accepted that in addition to agricultural and forestry residues, we will need crops grown specifically for subsequent conversion into fuels. There has been a lot of research on several of these so-called â??dedicated bioenergy cropsâ? including switchgrass, miscanthus, sugarcane, and poplar. It is likely that all of these crops will end up playing a role as feedstocks, depending on local environmental and market conditions. Many different types of sorghum have been grown to produce syrup, grain, and animal feed for many years. It has several features that may make it as compelling as other crops mentioned above as a renewable, sustainable biomass feedstock; however, very little work has been done to investigate sorghum as a dedicated bioenergy crop. The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of using sorghum biomass to produce ethanol. The work performed included a detailed examination of the agronomics and composition of a large number of sorghum varieties, laboratory experiments to convert sorghum to ethanol, and economic and life-cycle analyses of the sorghum-to-ethanol process. This work showed that sorghum has a very wide range of composition, which depended on the specific sorghum cultivar as well as the growing conditions. The results of laboratory- and pilot-scale experiments indicated that a typical high-biomass sorghum variety performed very similarly to corn stover during the multi-step process required to convert biomass feedstocks to ethanol; yields of ethanol for sorghum were very similar to the corn stover used as a control in these experiments. Based on multi-year agronomic data and theoretical ethanol production, sorghum can achieve more than 1,300 gallons of ethanol per acre given the correct genetics and environment. In summary, sorghum may be a compelling dedicated bioenergy crop that could help provide a major portion of the feedstocks required to produce renewable domestic transportation fuels.

  9. F.O. Licht's 17th Annual World Ethanol & Biofuels Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The F.O. Licht's 17th Annual World Ethanol & Biofuels Conference will be held on November 3–6, 2014, in Budapest, Hungary. Valerie Reed, Deputy Director of the Bioenergy Technolgies Office will be serving on two panels: "Maintaining Next Generation Investments in the Years Ahead" on November 4 and "Putting Together a Constant Supply of Feedstocks for Advanced and Cellulosic Biofuels, Biochemicals and Aviation Fuels" on November 5.

  10. Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cellulose requires fewer enzymes to process biomass to fuel Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes to process biomass to fuel Improved methods for breaking...

  11. Methods for enhancing the degradation or conversion of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Paul (Carnation, WA); Rey, Michael (Davis, CA); Ding, Hanshu (Davis, CA)

    2012-04-03

    The present invention relates to methods for degrading or converting a cellulosic material and for producing a substance from a cellulosic material.

  12. Methods for enhancing the degradation or conversion of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Paul (Carnation, WA) Rey, Michael (Davis, CA); Ding, Hanshu (Davis, CA)

    2009-10-27

    The present invention relates to methods for degrading or converting a cellulosic material and for producing a substance from a cellulosic material.

  13. Secretary Moniz Dedicates Innovative Commercial-Scale Cellulosic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovative Commercial-Scale Cellulosic Biofuel Plant Secretary Moniz Dedicates Innovative Commercial-Scale Cellulosic Biofuel Plant October 17, 2014 - 6:32pm Addthis WASHINGTON - ...

  14. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1996-03-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

  15. Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  16. Weekly Ethanol Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Ethanol Plant Production (Thousand Barrels per Day) Period: Weekly 4-Week Average Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Product/Region 02/05/16 02/12/16 02/19/16 02/26/16 03/04/16 03/11/16 View History Fuel Ethanol 969 975 994 987 978 999 2010-2016 East Coast (PADD 1) W W W W W W 2010-2016 Midwest (PADD 2) 889 892 913 904 897 917 2010-2016 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) W W W W W W 2010-2016 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) W W W W W W

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ethanol Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ethanol Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Digg Find

  19. National Ethanol Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Ethanol Conference was held Feb. 15—17 in New Orleans, Louisiana. Bioenergy Technologies Office Technology Manager Alicia Lindauer was in attendance to help communicate the goals of the Energy Department’s Fuel-Engine Co-Optimization (formerly known as Optima) initiative. She participated in a panel titled "A Conversation About the Future of U.S. Biofuels Policy," where she discussed the environmental and economic benefits of the initiative.

  20. EffectsIntermediateEthanolBlends.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EffectsIntermediateEthanolBlends.pdf EffectsIntermediateEthanolBlends.pdf EffectsIntermediateEthanolBlends.pdf PDF icon EffectsIntermediateEthanolBlends.pdf More Documents &...

  1. Cellulose Pyrolysis A Literature, Review.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reaction Mechanisms in Cellulose Pyrolysis A Literature, Review. - - pacific N o r t h ~ ~ ~ , baboratwies I - - bCL-T-,,;, .,- , . . . I ' I . - " 1- jl,! # . .' , . - --h 1 , i b - . "I 1.- . . ., .. ' N O T - I C E , , If PACIF tC NORTHWLST U B O R A T ~ R Y .4peiild by B h m E far c h t ,EP4ERGY RESEARCH AN0 PEVELOPMEM ADMtNlSTRAnQN U m h Contract Z Y - ~ ~ - C ~ & I # D w n : m a , m & l 3 Q j l m OIdrfrn m y - !*? 1SI71Y9 1 - m-u3 2s-m .**-2?3 ,Sbca lcPa w m *a0 Iffy

  2. Bacterial Cellulose Composites Opportunities and Challenges | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Bacterial Cellulose Composites Opportunities and Challenges Bacterial Cellulose Composites Opportunities and Challenges PDF icon Bacterial Cellulose Composites: Opportunities and Challenges - Leonard Fifield, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory More Documents & Publications Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop Grand Challenges of Characterization & Modeling of Cellulose Nanomaterials Integrating Nanomaterial Applications in the Field of Sustainable Biomaterials

  3. Production of permeable cellulose triacetate membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, B.M.

    1986-12-23

    A phase inversion process for the preparation of cellulose triacetate (CTA) and regenerated cellulose membranes is disclosed. Such membranes are useful as supports for liquid membranes in facilitated transport processes, as microfiltration membranes, as dialysis or ultrafiltration membranes, and for the preparation of ion-selective electrodes. The process comprises the steps of preparing a casting solution of CTA in a solvent comprising a mixture of cyclohexanone and methylene chloride, casting a film from the casting solution, and immersing the cast film in a methanol bath. The resulting CTA membrane may then be hydrolyzed to regenerated cellulose using conventional techniques.

  4. Production of permeable cellulose triacetate membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Bruce M. (Bend, OR)

    1986-01-01

    A phase inversion process for the preparation of cellulose triacetate (CTA) and regenerated cellulose membranes is disclosed. Such membranes are useful as supports for liquid membranes in facilitated transport processes, as microfiltration membranes, as dialysis or ultrafiltration membranes, and for the preparation of ion-selective electrodes. The process comprises the steps of preparing a casting solution of CTA in a solvent comprising a mixture of cyclohexanone and methylene chloride, casting a film from the casting solution, and immersing the cast film in a methanol bath. The resulting CTA membrane may then be hydrolyzed to regenerated cellulose using conventional techniques.

  5. Fuel Ethanol Oxygenate Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Product: Fuel Ethanol Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Merchant Plants Captive Plants Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Jul-15 Aug-15 Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 View History U.S. 30,256 29,621 28,543 30,139 29,594 31,075 1981-2015 East Coast (PADD 1) 876 854 692 664 664

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ethanol can be combined with gasoline in blends ranging from E10 (10% or less ethanol, 90% gasoline) up to E85 (up to 85% ethanol, 15% gasoline). The Renewable Fuels Standard (under the Energy...

  7. Northern Lights Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lights Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Northern Lights Ethanol LLC Place: Big Stone City, South Dakota Zip: 57216 Product: 75mmgy (283.9m litresy) ethanol producer....

  8. Prairie Creek Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Prairie Creek Ethanol LLC Place: Goldfield, Iowa Zip: 50542 Product: Prairie Creek Ethanol, LLC had planned to build a 55m gallon...

  9. Tharaldson Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tharaldson Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tharaldson Ethanol LLC Place: Casselton, North Dakota Zip: 58012 Product: Owner of a USD 200m 120m-gallon ethanol plant in...

  10. United Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Ethanol LLC Place: Wisconsin Product: Developed a 43m gallon ethanol plant in Milton, Wisconsin. References: United Ethanol LLC1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  11. Horizon Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Horizon Ethanol LLC Place: Jewell, Iowa Zip: 50130 Product: 60mmgy (227.1m litrey) ethanol producers in Jewell, Iowa. Coordinates:...

  12. First United Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: First United Ethanol LLC Place: Camilla, Georgia Zip: 31730 Product: First United Ethanol LLC (FUEL) was formed to construct a 100 MGY...

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in this

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Feedstocks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on AddThis.com... More in this section...

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Production to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on AddThis.com... More in this section...

  17. Center Ethanol Company LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Center Ethanol Company LLC Place: Illinois Product: Illinois based company building a 54m gallon ethanol plant in Sauget, IL. References:...

  18. US Ethanol Vehicle Coalition | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vehicle Coalition Jump to: navigation, search Name: US Ethanol Vehicle Coalition Place: Jefferson City, Missouri Zip: 65109 Product: The National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition is the...

  19. Ethanol Capital Management | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Management Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ethanol Capital Management Place: Tucson, Arizona Zip: 85711 Product: Manages funds investing in Ethanol plants in the US Coordinates:...

  20. Blue Flint Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Flint Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Blue Flint Ethanol Place: Underwood, North Dakota Zip: ND 58576 Product: Joint Venture bentween Great River Energy and Headwaters...

  1. Prairie Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Prairie Ethanol LLC Place: Loomis, South Dakota Product: Farmer owned bioethanol project development and managment team. Coordinates:...

  2. Great Plains Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great Plains Ethanol Place: Chancellor, South Dakota Zip: 57015 Product: Limited liability company owned by its 500 members which owns and...

  3. Chief Ethanol Fuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name: Chief Ethanol Fuels Place: Hastings, NE Website: www.chiefethanolfuels.com References: Chief Ethanol Fuels1 Information About Partnership...

  4. Ethanol production in non-recombinant hosts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Youngnyun; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O.

    2013-06-18

    Non-recombinant bacteria that produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product, associated nucleic acids and polypeptides, methods for producing ethanol using the bacteria, and kits are disclosed.

  5. Evergreen Securities formerly Ethanol Investments | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Securities formerly Ethanol Investments Jump to: navigation, search Name: Evergreen Securities (formerly Ethanol Investments) Place: London, England, United Kingdom Zip: EC2V 5DE...

  6. Missouri Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Missouri Ethanol LLC Place: Laddonia, Missouri Product: 45mmgy (170.3m litresy) ethanol producer. Coordinates: 39.24073, -91.645599 Show Map Loading map......

  7. BlueFire Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BlueFire Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: BlueFire Ethanol Place: Irvine, California Zip: 92618 Sector: Hydro Product: US biofuel producer that utilises a patented...

  8. Badger State Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    State Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Badger State Ethanol LLC Place: Monroe, Wisconsin Zip: 53566 Product: Dry-mill bioethanol producer References: Badger State...

  9. Iowa Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Iowa Ethanol LLC Place: Hanlontown, Iowa Zip: 50451 Product: Corn-base bioethanol producer in Iowa Coordinates: 43.28456,...

  10. James Valley Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    James Valley Ethanol LLC Place: Gronton, South Dakota Zip: 57445 Product: Farmers owned cooperative that built and operates an ethanol production facility. Coordinates: 29.72369,...

  11. Algodyne Ethanol Energy Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Algodyne Ethanol Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Algodyne Ethanol Energy Inc Place: Las Vegas, Nevada Zip: 89145 Sector: Biofuels Product: Holds proprietary...

  12. Tall Corn Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tall Corn Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tall Corn Ethanol LLC Place: Coon Rapids, Iowa Zip: 50058 Product: Farmer owned bioethanol production company which owns a...

  13. Frontier Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Frontier Ethanol LLC Place: Gowrie, Iowa Product: Owner and operator of a bioethanol plant near Gowrie, Iowa. Coordinates: 42.28227,...

  14. Ethanol Management Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Management Company Place: Colorado Product: Biofuel blender located in Denver, Colorado. References: Ethanol Management Company1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  15. Ethanol Grain Processors LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Processors LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ethanol Grain Processors, LLC Place: Obion, Tennessee Zip: TN 38240 Product: Tennessee-based ethanol producer. Coordinates:...

  16. Kaapa Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kaapa Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kaapa Ethanol LLC Place: Minden, Nebraska Zip: 68959 Product: Bioethanol producer using corn as feedstock Coordinates:...

  17. Gulf Ethanol Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gulf Ethanol Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Gulf Ethanol Corp Place: Houston, Texas Zip: 77055 Sector: Biomass Product: Focused on developing biomass preprocessing...

  18. Didion Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Didion Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Didion Ethanol LLC Place: Cambria, Wisconsin Zip: 53923 Product: Also Didion Milling LLC, Grand River Distribution LLC....

  19. Atlantic Ethanol Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name: Atlantic Ethanol Capital Place: Washington, Washington, DC Product: Biofuel Investor in Caribbean and Central American region....

  20. Platte Valley Fuel Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Valley Fuel Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Platte Valley Fuel Ethanol Place: Central City, Nebraska Product: Bioethanol producer using corn as feedstock References:...

  1. Isolation and characterization of two cellulose morphology mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769 producing cellulose with lower crystallinity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Fang, Lin; Luan, Xin; Catchmark, Jeffrey M.; Tien, Ming; Kao, Teh -hui; Lai, Hsin -Chih

    2015-03-19

    Gluconacetobacter hansenii, a Gram-negative bacterium, produces and secrets highly crystalline cellulose into growth medium, and has long been used as a model system for studying cellulose synthesis in higher plants. Cellulose synthesis involves the formation of β-1,4 glucan chains via the polymerization of glucose units by a multi-enzyme cellulose synthase complex (CSC). These glucan chains assemble into ordered structures including crystalline microfibrils. AcsA is the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase enzymes in the CSC, and AcsC is required for the secretion of cellulose. However, little is known about other proteins required for the assembly of crystalline cellulose. To addressmore » this question, we visually examined cellulose pellicles formed in growth media of 763 individual colonies of G. hansenii generated via Tn5 transposon insertion mutagenesis, and identified 85 that produced cellulose with altered morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis of these 85 mutants identified two that produced cellulose with significantly lower crystallinity than wild type. The gene disrupted in one of these two mutants encoded a lysine decarboxylase and that in the other encoded an alanine racemase. Solid-state NMR analysis revealed that cellulose produced by these two mutants contained increased amounts of non-crystalline cellulose and monosaccharides associated with non-cellulosic polysaccharides as compared to the wild type. Monosaccharide analysis detected higher percentages of galactose and mannose in cellulose produced by both mutants. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed that cellulose produced by the mutants was unevenly distributed, with some regions appearing to contain deposition of non-cellulosic polysaccharides; however, the width of the ribbon was comparable to that of normal cellulose. As both lysine decarboxylase and alanine racemase are required for the integrity of peptidoglycan, we propose a model for the role of peptidoglycan in the assembly of crystalline cellulose.« less

  2. Pacific Ethanol, Inc | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Verenium Biofuels Fact Sheet Pacific Ethanol, Inc Verenium Pilot- and Demonstration-Scale Biorefinery

  3. Ethanol Ventures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Ventures Place: London, England, United Kingdom Zip: W1D 3SQ Product: Company aims to deliver at least 378 million litres a year of bioethanol from two Facilities in...

  4. Method for separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodward, Jonathan (Kingston, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A method for enzymatically separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials. The cellulosic material, such as newsprint, is introduced into a first chamber containing a plastic canvas basket. This first chamber is in fluid communication, via plastic tubing, with a second chamber containing cellobiase beads in a plastic canvas basket. Cellulase is then introduced into the first chamber. A programmable pump then controls the flow rate between the two chambers. The action of cellulase and stirring in the first chamber results in the production of a slurry of newsprint pulp in the first chamber. This slurry contains non-inked fibers, inked fibers, and some cellobiose. The inked fibers and cellobiose flow from the first chamber to the second chamber, whereas the non-inked fibers remain in the first chamber because they are too large to pass through the pores of the plastic canvas basket. The resulting non-inked and inked fibers are then recovered.

  5. Method for separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodward, J.

    1998-12-01

    A method for enzymatically separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials. The cellulosic material, such as newsprint, is introduced into a first chamber containing a plastic canvas basket. This first chamber is in fluid communication, via plastic tubing, with a second chamber containing cellobiase beads in a plastic canvas basket. Cellulase is then introduced into the first chamber. A programmable pump then controls the flow rate between the two chambers. The action of cellulase and stirring in the first chamber results in the production of a slurry of newsprint pulp in the first chamber. This slurry contains non-inked fibers, inked fibers, and some cellobiose. The inked fibers and cellobiose flow from the first chamber to the second chamber, whereas the non-inked fibers remain in the first chamber because they are too large to pass through the pores of the plastic canvas basket. The resulting non-inked and inked fibers are then recovered. 6 figs.

  6. Cellulosic Liquid Fuels Commercial Production Today | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cellulosic Liquid Fuels Commercial Production Today Cellulosic Liquid Fuels Commercial Production Today Keynote Success Story Robert Graham, Chairman and CEO, Ensyn Corporation PDF icon b13_graham_ensyn.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Cellulosic Biofuels Production of Renewable Fuels from Biomass by FCC Co-processing UOP Pilot-Scale Biorefinery

  7. Grand Challenges of Characterization & Modeling of Cellulose Nanomaterials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grand Challenges of Characterization & Modeling of Cellulose Nanomaterials Robert Moon Adjunct Assistant Professor Materials Engineering Purdue University Materials Research Engineer US Forest Service Forest Products Laboratory DOE- Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop, 26 June, 2012 Cellulose Nanomaterials (CN) 2 * Influence: * Cellulose Source * Extraction Process * Two Particle Morphologies: * Rod: CNC, NCC, NCW, NCXLS * Fibrillar: CNF, NFC, MFC, BC, AC * Questions: * What to Characterize?

  8. DuPont's Cellulosic Ethanol Grand Opening Marks a Milestone for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... More than 10 joint DuPont-NREL U.S. patents were issued from collaborative innovations. At ... local community members in attendance were thrilled-as was I-to see this new plant open. ...

  9. Compositions and methods relating to transgenic plants and cellulosic ethanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tien, Ming; Carlson, John; Liang, Haiying

    2012-04-24

    Transgenic lignocellulosic plants are provided according to embodiments of the present invention, the transgenic plants transformed with an expression cassette encoding a protein operably linked to a signal peptide which targets the protein to a cell wall of the transgenic plant, where at least 5% of the total amino acid residues of the protein are tyrosine, lysine, serine, threonine or cysteine. Methods of increasing lignin-protein bonds in a lignocellulosic plant are provided according to embodiments of the present invention which include expressing a recombinant nucleic acid in a lignocellulosic plant, the recombinant nucleic acid encoding a protein operably linked to a signal peptide which targets the protein to the cell wall of a plant, where at least 5% of the total amino acid residues of the protein are tyrosine, lysine, serine, threonine or cysteine.

  10. Compositions and methods relating to transgenic plants and cellulosic ethanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tien, Ming; Carlson, John; Liang, Haiying

    2015-06-02

    Transgenic lignocellulosic plants are provided according to embodiments of the present invention, the transgenic plants transformed with an expression cassette encoding a protein operably linked to a signal peptide which targets the protein to a cell wall of the transgenic plant, where at least 5% of the total amino acid residues of the protein are tyrosine, lysine, serine, threonine or cysteine. Methods of increasing lignin-protein bonds in a lignocellulosic plant are provided according to embodiments of the present invention which include expressing a recombinant nucleic acid in a lignocellulosic plant, the recombinant nucleic acid encoding a protein operably linked to a signal peptide which targets the protein to the cell wall of a plant, where at least 5% of the total amino acid residues of the protein are tyrosine, lysine, serine, threonine or cysteine.

  11. High-Temperature Behavior of Cellulose I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, James F.; Bergenstråhle, Malin; Beckham, Gregg T.; Himmel, Michael E.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Brady, John W.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2011-03-17

    We use molecular simulation to elucidate the structural behavior of small hydrated cellulose Iβ microfibrils heated to 227 °C (500 K) with two carbohydrate force fields. In contrast to the characteristic two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded layer sheets present in the cellulose Iβ crystal structure, we show that at high temperature a three-dimensional hydrogen bond network forms, made possible by hydroxymethyl groups changing conformation from trans–gauche (TG) to gauche–gauche (GG) in every second layer corresponding to “center” chains in cellulose Iβ and from TG to gauche–trans (GT) in the “origin” layer. The presence of a regular three-dimensional hydrogen bond network between neighboring sheets eliminates the possibility of twist, whereas two-dimensional hydrogen bonding allows for microfibril twist to occur. Structural features of this high-temperature phase as determined by molecular simulation may explain several experimental observations for which no detailed structural basis has been offered. This includes an explanation for the observed temperature and crystal size dependence for the extent of hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and diffraction patterns of cellulose at high temperature.

  12. California Ethanol Power CE P | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power CE P Jump to: navigation, search Name: California Ethanol & Power (CE+P) Place: Florida Product: US ethanol project developer. References: California Ethanol & Power...

  13. Conesul Sugar and Ethanol Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conesul Sugar and Ethanol Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name: Conesul Sugar and Ethanol Plant Place: Brazil Product: Brazilian ethanol producer References: Conesul Sugar and...

  14. Agri Ethanol Products LLC AEPNC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Products LLC AEPNC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Agri-Ethanol Products LLC (AEPNC) Place: Raleigh, North Carolina Zip: 27615 Product: Ethanol producer and project...

  15. Grupo Maris Capital ethanol refinery | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maris Capital ethanol refinery Jump to: navigation, search Name: Grupo Maris (Capital ethanol refinery) Place: Nuporanga, Brazil Product: 32,000 m3 ethanol refinery owner...

  16. Midwest Ethanol Producers Inc MEPI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Producers Inc MEPI Jump to: navigation, search Name: Midwest Ethanol Producers Inc (MEPI) Place: O'Neill, Nebraska Zip: 68763 Product: Focused on ethanol production....

  17. Baicheng Tingfeng Ethanol Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tingfeng Ethanol Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Baicheng Tingfeng Ethanol Co Ltd Place: Baicheng, Jilin Province, China Zip: 137000 Product: The company is a ethanol...

  18. Tampa Bay Area Ethanol Consortium | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bay Area Ethanol Consortium Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tampa Bay Area Ethanol Consortium Place: Tampa, Florida Sector: Biomass Product: Consortium researching ethanol from...

  19. National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition NEVC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Vehicle Coalition NEVC Jump to: navigation, search Name: National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition (NEVC) Place: Jefferson City, Missouri Zip: 65109 Product: The National Ethanol...

  20. Elimination of hydrogenase post-translational modification blocks H2 production and increases ethanol yield in Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Ranjita; Zheng, Tianyong; Olson, Daniel G.; Lynd, Lee R; Guss, Adam M

    2015-01-01

    The native ability of Clostridium thermocellum to rapidly consume cellulose and produce ethanol makes it a leading candidate for a consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) biofuel production strategy. C. thermocellum also synthesizes lactate, formate, acetate, H2, and amino acids that compete with ethanol production for carbon and electrons. Elimination of H2 production could redirect carbon flux towards ethanol production by making more electrons available for acetyl-CoA reduction to ethanol. C. thermocellum encodes four hydrogenases and rather than delete each individually, we targeted a hydrogenase maturase gene (hydG), involved in converting the three [FeFe] hydrogenase apoenzymes into holoenzymes. Further deletion of the [NiFe] hydrogenase (ech) resulted in a mutant that functionally lacks all four hydrogenases. H2 production in hydG ech was undetectable and ethanol yield increased nearly 2-fold compared to wild type. Interestingly, mutant growth improved upon the addition of acetate, which led to increased expression of genes related to sulfate metabolism, suggesting these mutants may use sulfate as a terminal electron acceptor to balance redox reactions. Genomic analysis of hydG revealed a mutation in adhE, resulting in a strain with both NADH- and NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase activities. While this same adhE mutation is found in ethanol tolerant C. thermocellum strain E50C, hydG and hydG ech are not more ethanol tolerant than wild type, illustrating the complicated interactions between redox balancing and ethanol tolerance in C. thermocellum. The dramatic increase in ethanol production here suggests that targeting protein post-translational modification is a promising new approach for inactivation of multiple enzymes simultaneously for metabolic engineering.

  1. IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31

    This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda colonizes and degrades insoluble substrates. Major accomplishments of the project include: Development of media containing dialysis tubing (described by the manufacturer as regenerated cellulose) as sole carbon and energy source and a nutritive surface for the growth of cellulolytic bacteria, and development of various microscopic methods to image biofilms on dialysis tubing. Demonstration that cultures of C. phytofermentans, an obligate anaerobe, C. uda, a facultative aerobe, and T. fusca, a filamentous aerobe, formed microbial communities on the surface of dialysis tubing, which possessed architectural features and functional characteristics typical of biofilms. Demonstration that biofilm formation on the nutritive surface, cellulose, involves a complex developmental processes, including colonization of dialysis tubing, formation of cell clusters attached to the nutritive surface, cell morphological changes, formation of complex structures embedded in extracellular polymeric matrices, and dispersal of biofilm communities as the nutritive surface is degraded. Determination of surface specificity and regulatory aspects of biofilm formation by C. phytofermentans, C. uda, and T. fusca. Demonstration that biofilm formation by T. fusca forms an integral part of the life cycle of this filamentous cellulolytic bacterium, including studies on the role of mycelial pellet formation in the T. fusca life cycle and a comparison of mycelial pellets to surface-attached T. fusca biofilms. Characterization of T. fusca biofilm EPS, including demonstration of a functional role for EPS constituents. Correlation of T. fusca developmental life cycle and cellulase gene expression.

  2. Method of forming an electrically conductive cellulose composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Ashtead, GB)

    2011-11-22

    An electrically conductive cellulose composite includes a cellulose matrix and an electrically conductive carbonaceous material incorporated into the cellulose matrix. The electrical conductivity of the cellulose composite is at least 10 .mu.S/cm at 25.degree. C. The composite can be made by incorporating the electrically conductive carbonaceous material into a culture medium with a cellulose-producing organism, such as Gluconoacetobacter hansenii. The composites can be used to form electrodes, such as for use in membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells.

  3. Ethanol Fuel Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ethanol Fuel Basics Ethanol Fuel Basics July 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis biomass in beekers Ethanol is a renewable fuel made from various plant materials collectively known as "biomass." Studies have estimated that ethanol and other biofuels could replace 30% or more of U.S. gasoline demand by 2030. More than 95% of U.S. gasoline contains ethanol in a low-level blend to oxygenate the fuel and reduce air pollution. Ethanol is also increasingly available in E85, an alternative fuel that

  4. Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.

    1998-11-24

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

  5. Ethanol production method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, M.J.; Rathke, J.W.

    1983-05-26

    Ethanol is selectively produced from the reaction of methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen in the presence of a transition metal carbonyl catalyst. Methanol serves as a solvent and may be accompanied by a less volatile co-solvent. The solution includes the transition metal carbonyl catalysts and a basic metal salt such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal formate, carbonate or bicarbonate. A gas containing a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio, as is present in a typical gasifer product, is contacted with the solution for the preferential production of ethanol with minimal water as a byproduct. Fractionation of the reaction solution provides substantially pure ethanol product and allows return of the catalysts for reuse.

  6. Enabling High Efficiency Ethanol Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szybist, J.; Confer, K.

    2011-03-01

    Delphi Automotive Systems and ORNL established this CRADA to explore the potential to improve the energy efficiency of spark-ignited engines operating on ethanol-gasoline blends. By taking advantage of the fuel properties of ethanol, such as high compression ratio and high latent heat of vaporization, it is possible to increase efficiency with ethanol blends. Increasing the efficiency with ethanol-containing blends aims to remove a market barrier of reduced fuel economy with E85 fuel blends, which is currently about 30% lower than with petroleum-derived gasoline. The same or higher engine efficiency is achieved with E85, and the reduction in fuel economy is due to the lower energy density of E85. By making ethanol-blends more efficient, the fuel economy gap between gasoline and E85 can be reduced. In the partnership between Delphi and ORNL, each organization brought a unique and complementary set of skills to the project. Delphi has extensive knowledge and experience in powertrain components and subsystems as well as overcoming real-world implementation barriers. ORNL has extensive knowledge and expertise in non-traditional fuels and improving engine system efficiency for the next generation of internal combustion engines. Partnering to combine these knowledge bases was essential towards making progress to reducing the fuel economy gap between gasoline and E85. ORNL and Delphi maintained strong collaboration throughout the project. Meetings were held regularly, usually on a bi-weekly basis, with additional reports, presentations, and meetings as necessary to maintain progress. Delphi provided substantial hardware support to the project by providing components for the single-cylinder engine experiments, engineering support for hardware modifications, guidance for operational strategies on engine research, and hardware support by providing a flexible multi-cylinder engine to be used for optimizing engine efficiency with ethanol-containing fuels.

  7. US Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Place: Vancouver, Washington State Zip: 98660 Product: Ethanol producer in the north-west. References: US Ethanol LLC1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  8. Elkhorn Valley Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Elkhorn Valley Ethanol LLC Place: Norfolk, Nebraska Zip: 68701 Product: Operates a 40m gallon ethanol plant in Norfolk, Nebraska. Coordinates: 36.846825, -76.285069 Show Map...

  9. Brazil Ethanol Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Brazil Ethanol Inc. Place: New York, New York Zip: 10021 Product: A New York City-based firm that had raised USD 10.4m as of 1 May...

  10. JH Kelly LLC Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    JH Kelly LLC Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: JH Kelly LLC Ethanol Place: Longview, Washington State Zip: 98632 Product: A joint venture company between JH Kelly and and...

  11. Farmers Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Farmers' Ethanol LLC Place: Adamsville, Ohio Zip: OH 43802 Product: An association of farmers registered on July 12,2002 with a goal...

  12. Ethanol's Effect on Grain Supply and Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-01-01

    This document provides graphical information about ethanol's effect on grain supply and prices, uses of corn, and grain price trends.

  13. Re-engineering bacteria for ethanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W; Zhou, Shengde; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-05-06

    The invention provides recombinant bacteria, which comprise a full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes. Expression of the full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes causes the recombinant bacteria to produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product when grown in mineral salts medium, without the addition of complex nutrients. Methods for producing the recombinant bacteria and methods for producing ethanol using the recombinant bacteria are also disclosed.

  14. BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. A proposal issued by BlueFire Ethanol Inc,describing a project that will give DOE understanding of a new biological fermentation process not using enzymes. PDF icon BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. More Documents & Publications Applicant Organization: BlueFire Ethanol Pacific Ethanol, Inc

  15. Cellulosome preparations for cellulose hydrolysis - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Cellulosome preparations for cellulose hydrolysis National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary With the annual potential of over 1.3 billion dry tons of biomass, the prospective growth of biomass related industries is tremendous. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) leads the DOE's National Bioenergy Center, with research spanning the full spectrum from fundamental science to demonstration in fully integrated pilot

  16. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fowler, David E.; Horton, Philip G.; Ben-Bassat, Arie

    1996-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  17. Ethanol production by recombinant hosts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Beall, David S.; Burchhardt, Gerhard F. H.; Guimaraes, Walter V.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.

    1995-01-01

    Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

  18. Ethanol production in recombinant hosts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal; Barbosa-Alleyne, Maria D.

    2005-02-01

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase.

  19. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh (Memphis, TN) [Memphis, TN; Woodward, Jonathan (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-28

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  20. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN); Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh (Memphis, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Knoxville, TN)

    2011-06-07

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  1. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh; Woodward, Jonathan

    2006-01-17

    The employment of metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The fuel cell includes an electrolyte membrane comprising a membrane support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, an anode disposed on one side of the electrolyte membrane, and a cathode disposed on an opposite side of the electrolyte membrane. At least one of the anode and the cathode comprises an electrode support structure comprising bacterial cellulose, and a catalyst disposed in or on the electrode support structure.

  2. Cellulosic Fiber Composites Using Protein Hydrolysates and Methods of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Making Same - Energy Innovation Portal Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Cellulosic Fiber Composites Using Protein Hydrolysates and Methods of Making Same Battelle Memorial Institute Contact BMI About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryThis technology relates to cellulosic fiber composites using protein hydrolysates. DescriptionCellulosic fiber composites currently use petroleum-derived binders such as isocyanates and phenol formaldehyde.

  3. Cellulosic Fiber Composites Using Protein Hydrolysates and Methods of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Making Same - Energy Innovation Portal Cellulosic Fiber Composites Using Protein Hydrolysates and Methods of Making Same Battelle Memorial Institute Contact BMI About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary This technology relates to cellulosic fiber composites using protein hydrolysates. Cellulosic fiber composites currently use petroleum-derived binders such as isocyanates and phenol formaldehyde. This work fills a need for a new fiber-adhesive, resin binder system that reduces the

  4. Cost-Effective Enzyme for Producing Biofuels from Cellulosic Biomass -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Cost-Effective Enzyme for Producing Biofuels from Cellulosic Biomass Inventors: Ming Woei Lau, Bruce Dale Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Contact GLBRC About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryProducing biofuels from cellulosic materials, such as corn stalks, wood chips, and other biomass, requires the use of enzymes to degrade the cellulosic biomass into its molecular components. The cost to produce these enzymes is high, a factor contributing to the

  5. Center for Lignocellulose Structure and Function - Symposium: Cellulose

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    synthesis, structure, matrix interactions and technology Symposium: Cellulose synthesis, structure, matrix interactions and technology International symposium on the structure of cellulose in primary and secondary cell walls, the mechanism of its synthesis and its interactions with matrix polymers, and new uses of cellulose for energy and material applications. May 16-18, 2013 at Penn State University. For more information and registration, see the symposium site at

  6. Cellulosic emissions (kg of pollutant per km2 county area) -...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cellulosic emissions (kg of pollutant per km2 county area) Data reflects projected air emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOX), ammonia (NH3), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur oxide (SOX),...

  7. Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    enzymes to process biomass to fuel Improved methods for breaking down cellulose nanofibers are central to cost-effective biofuel production. June 19, 2013 An enzyme (shown in...

  8. Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    enzymatic deconstruction; however, the recent observation that cellulose III increased sugar yields with reduced levels of bound enzyme was unexpected. To explain this finding,...

  9. IMPROVED BIOREFINERY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL, CHEMICALS, ANIMAL FEED AND BIOMATERIALS FROM SUGAR CANE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Donal F. Day

    2009-01-29

    The Audubon Sugar Institute (ASI) of Louisiana State Universitys Agricultural Center (LSU AgCenter) and MBI International (MBI) sought to develop technologies that will lead to the development of a sugar-cane biorefinery, capable of supplying fuel ethanol from bagasse. Technology development focused on the conversion of bagasse, cane-leaf matter (CLM) and molasses into high value-added products that included ethanol, specialty chemicals, biomaterials and animal feed; i.e. a sugar cane-based biorefinery. The key to lignocellulosic biomass utilization is an economically feasible method (pretreatment) for separating the cellulose and the hemicellulose from the physical protection provided by lignin. An effective pretreatment disrupts physical barriers, cellulose crystallinity, and the association of lignin and hemicellulose with cellulose so that hydrolytic enzymes can access the biomass macrostructure (Teymouri et al. 2004, Laureano-Perez, 2005). We chose to focus on alkaline pretreatment methods for, and in particular, the Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX) process owned by MBI. During the first two years of this program a laboratory process was established for the pretreatment of bagasse and CLM using the AFEX process. There was significant improvement of both rate and yield of glucose and xylose upon enzymatic hydrolysis of AFEX-treated bagasse and CLM compared with untreated material. Because of reactor size limitation, several other alkaline pretreatment methods were also co-investigated. They included, dilute ammonia, lime and hydroxy-hypochlorite treatments. Scale-up focused on using a dilute ammonia process as a substitute for AFEX, allowing development at a larger scale. The pretreatment of bagasse by an ammonia process, followed by saccharification and fermentation produced ethanol from bagasse. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) allowed two operations in the same vessel. The addition of sugarcane molasses to the hydrolysate/fermentation process yielded improvements beyond what was expected solely from the addition of sugar. In order to expand the economic potential for building a biorefinery, the conversion of enzyme hydrolysates of AFEX-treated bagasse to succinic acid was also investigated. This program established a solid basis for pre-treatment of bagasse in a manner that is feasible for producing ethanol at raw sugar mills.

  10. Enabling High Efficiency Ethanol Engines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Efficiency Ethanol Engines (VSSP 12) Presented by Robert Wagner Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. May 20, 2009 Lee Slezak Vehicle Technologies U.S. Department of Energy David Smith Sentech Inc Keith Confer, John MacBain Delphi Automotive Systems Project ID: vssp_12_wagner 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of

  11. Mid-Level Ethanol Blends

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Test Program DOE, NREL, and ORNL Team Presented by Keith Knoll Work supported by DOE/EERE Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation meeting May 19, 2009 Kevin Stork Vehicle Technologies Program Shab Fardanesh and Joan Glickman Office of the Biomass Program This presentation does not contain any proprietary or classified information Project ID: ft_05_knoll Collaborators Kevin Stork DOE OVT Shab Fardanesh DOE OBP Joan Glickman DOE OBP Wendy Clark

  12. Cellulosic Liquid Fuels Commercial Production Today

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cellulosic Liquid Fuels Commercial Production Today DOE Conference Washington DC, Aug 1, 2013 Our Business 2  We produce a renewable liquid fuel from wood and other non-food biomass  Our key product is Renewable Fuel Oil(tm) (RFO(tm))  RFO is a flexible petroleum-replacement with multiple uses including heating and for production of drop-in transportation fuels Commercial Status  Commercial production for over 20 years  Over 35 million gallons produced to date  Five commercial

  13. Final Report on Development of Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum for the conversion of lignocellulose to ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herring, Christopher D.; Kenealy, William R.; Shaw, A. Joe; Raman, Babu; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Brown, Steven D.; Davison, Brian H.; Covalla, Sean F.; Sillers, W. Ryan; Xu, Haowen; Tsakraklides, Vasiliki; Hogsett, David A.

    2012-01-24

    This project addressed the need for economical technology for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels, specifically the conversion of pretreated hardwood to ethanol. The technology developed is a set of strains of the bacterium Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum and an associated fermentation process for pretreated hardwood. Tools for genetic engineering and analysis of the organism were developed, including a markerless mutation method, a complete genome sequence and a set of gene expression profiles that show the activity of its genes under a variety of conditions relevant to lignocellulose conversion. Improved strains were generated by selection and genetic engineering to be able to produce higher amounts of ethanol (up to 70 g/L) and to be able to better tolerate inhibitory compounds from pretreated hardwood. Analysis of these strains has generated useful insight into the genetic basis for desired properties of biofuel producing organisms. Fermentation conditions were tested and optimized to achieve ethanol production targets established in the original project proposal. The approach proposed was to add cellulase enzymes to the fermentation, a method called Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF). We had reason to think SSF would be an efficient approach because the optimal temperature and pH for the enzymes and bacterium are very close. Unfortunately, we discovered that commercially available cellulases are inactivated in thermophilic SSF by a combination of low redox potential and ethanol. Despite this, progress was made against the fermentation targets using bacterial cellulases. Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum may still prove to be a commercially viable technology should cellulase enzyme issues be addressed. Moreover, the organism was demonstrated to produce ethanol at approximately theoretical yield from oligomeric hemicellulose extracts, an ability that may prove to be uniquely valuable in pretreatment configurations in which cellulose and hemicellulose are separated.

  14. Methods for enhancing the degradation of cellulosic material with chitin binding proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Feng

    2015-08-25

    The present invention relates to methods for degrading or converting a cellulosic material and for producing substances from the cellulosic material.

  15. Methods for enhancing the degradation of cellulosic material with chitin binding proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Feng

    2015-03-31

    The present invention relates to methods for degrading or converting a cellulosic material and for producing substances from the cellulosic material.

  16. National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

    2012-04-01

    The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and PostgreSQL database hosting. The second resource was the DOE-JGCRI 'Evergreen' cluster, capable of executing millions of simulations in relatively short periods. ARRA funding also supported a PhD student from UMD who worked on creating the geodatabases and executing some of the simulations in this study. Using a physically based classification of marginal lands, we simulated production of cellulosic feedstocks from perennial mixtures grown on these lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands in the western states of the US Midwest appear to have significant potential to supply feedstocks to a cellulosic biofuel industry. Similar results were obtained with simulations of N-fertilized perennial mixtures. A detailed spatial analysis allowed for the identification of possible locations for the establishment of 34 cellulosic ethanol biorefineries with an annual production capacity of 5.6 billion gallons. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided simulation results on the potential of perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. The results of this study will be submitted to the USDOE Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework as a way to contribute to the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

  17. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1997-09-23

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  18. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  19. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Shimshon, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (North Gallilea, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  20. Single Molecule Study of Cellulase Hydrolysis of Crystalline Cellulose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.-S.; Luo, Y.; Baker, J. O.; Zeng, Y.; Himmel, M. E.; Smith, S.; Ding, S.-Y.

    2009-12-01

    This report seeks to elucidate the role of cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I) in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. A single-molecule approach uses various imaging techniques to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBH I.

  1. Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1999-01-05

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 34 figs.

  2. Process for producing ethanol from syngas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krause, Theodore R; Rathke, Jerome W; Chen, Michael J

    2013-05-14

    The invention provides a method for producing ethanol, the method comprising establishing an atmosphere containing methanol forming catalyst and ethanol forming catalyst; injecting syngas into the atmosphere at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce methanol; and contacting the produced methanol with additional syngas at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce ethanol. The invention also provides an integrated system for producing methanol and ethanol from syngas, the system comprising an atmosphere isolated from the ambient environment; a first catalyst to produce methanol from syngas wherein the first catalyst resides in the atmosphere; a second catalyst to product ethanol from methanol and syngas, wherein the second catalyst resides in the atmosphere; a conduit for introducing syngas to the atmosphere; and a device for removing ethanol from the atmosphere. The exothermicity of the method and system obviates the need for input of additional heat from outside the atmosphere.

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure

  4. Kinder Morgan Central Florida Pipeline Ethanol Project

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    KINDER MORGAN CENTRAL FLORIDA PIPELINE ETHANOL PROJECT  In December 2008, Kinder Morgan began transporting commercial batches of denatured ethanol along with gasoline shipments in its 16-inch Central Florida Pipeline (CFPL) from Tampa to Orlando, making CFPL the first transmarket gasoline pipeline in the United States to do so. The 16-inch pipeline previously only transported regular and premium gasoline.  Kinder Morgan invested approximately $10 million to modify the line for ethanol

  5. US Ethanol Holdings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Holdings Jump to: navigation, search Name: US Ethanol Holdings Place: New York, New York Zip: 10022 Product: Subsidiary of boutique investment bank and advisory firm, Geneva...

  6. Ethanol: Producting Food, Feed, and Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the August 7, 2008 joint quarterly Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Todd Sneller (Nebraska Ethanol Board) discussed the food versus fuel issue.

  7. High ethanol producing derivatives of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ljungdahl, Lars G.; Carriera, Laura H.

    1983-01-01

    Derivatives of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus which under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions continuously ferment substrates such as starch, cellobiose, glucose, xylose and other sugars to produce recoverable amounts of ethanol solving the problem of fermentations yielding low concentrations of ethanol using the parent strain of the microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are disclosed. These new derivatives are ethanol tolerant up to 10% (v/v) ethanol during fermentation. The process includes the use of an aqueous fermentation medium, containing the substrate at a substrate concentration greater than 1% (w/v).

  8. High ethanol producing derivatives of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ljungdahl, L.G.; Carriera, L.H.

    1983-05-24

    Derivatives of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus which under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions continuously ferment substrates such as starch, cellobiose, glucose, xylose and other sugars to produce recoverable amounts of ethanol solving the problem of fermentations yielding low concentrations of ethanol using the parent strain of the microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are disclosed. These new derivatives are ethanol tolerant up to 10% (v/v) ethanol during fermentation. The process includes the use of an aqueous fermentation medium, containing the substrate at a substrate concentration greater than 1% (w/v).

  9. Emissions from ethanol and LPG fueled vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitstick, M.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses the environmental concerns of using neat ethanol and liquified petroleum gas (LPG) as transportation fuels in the US Low-level blends of ethanol (10%) with gasoline have been used as fuels in the US for more than a decade, but neat ethanol (85% or more) has only been used extensively in Brazil. LPG, which consists mostly of propane, is already used extensively as a vehicle fuel in the US, but its use has been limited primarily to converted fleet vehicles. Increasing US interest in alternative fuels has raised the possibility of introducing neat ethanol vehicles into the market and expanding the number of LPG vehicles. Use of such vehicles and increased production and consumption of fuel ethanol and LPG will undoubtedly have environmental impacts. If the impacts are determined to be severe, they could act as barriers to the introduction of neat ethanol and LPG vehicles. Environmental concerns include exhaust and evaporative emissions and their impact on ozone formation and global warming, toxic emissions from fuel combustion and evaporation, and agricultural emissions from production of ethanol. The paper is not intended to be judgmental regarding the overall attractiveness of ethanol or LPG compared to other transportation fuels. The environmental concerns are reviewed and summarized, but the only conclusion reached is that there is no single concern that is likely to prevent the introduction of neat ethanol fueled vehicles or the increase in LPG fueled vehicles.

  10. Emissions from ethanol and LPG fueled vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitstick, M.E.

    1992-12-31

    This paper addresses the environmental concerns of using neat ethanol and liquified petroleum gas (LPG) as transportation fuels in the US Low-level blends of ethanol (10%) with gasoline have been used as fuels in the US for more than a decade, but neat ethanol (85% or more) has only been used extensively in Brazil. LPG, which consists mostly of propane, is already used extensively as a vehicle fuel in the US, but its use has been limited primarily to converted fleet vehicles. Increasing US interest in alternative fuels has raised the possibility of introducing neat ethanol vehicles into the market and expanding the number of LPG vehicles. Use of such vehicles and increased production and consumption of fuel ethanol and LPG will undoubtedly have environmental impacts. If the impacts are determined to be severe, they could act as barriers to the introduction of neat ethanol and LPG vehicles. Environmental concerns include exhaust and evaporative emissions and their impact on ozone formation and global warming, toxic emissions from fuel combustion and evaporation, and agricultural emissions from production of ethanol. The paper is not intended to be judgmental regarding the overall attractiveness of ethanol or LPG compared to other transportation fuels. The environmental concerns are reviewed and summarized, but the only conclusion reached is that there is no single concern that is likely to prevent the introduction of neat ethanol fueled vehicles or the increase in LPG fueled vehicles.

  11. Algenol Announces Commercial Algal Ethanol Fuel Partnership ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    This funding allowed Algenol to successfully scale up its production of algal biofuel from ... Ethanol Fuel Partnership Making Algal Biofuel Production More Efficient, Less Expensive ...

  12. Mixed waste paper to ethanol fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the use of mixed waste paper for the production of ethanol fuels and to review the available conversion technologies, and assess developmental status, current and future cost of production and economics, and the market potential. This report is based on the results of literature reviews, telephone conversations, and interviews. Mixed waste paper samples from residential and commercial recycling programs and pulp mill sludge provided by Weyerhauser were analyzed to determine the potential ethanol yields. The markets for ethanol fuel and the economics of converting paper into ethanol were investigated.

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ethanol Benefits and Considerations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Digg Find More

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ethanol Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center:

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Flexible Fuel

  16. Ethanol production using engineered mutant E. coli

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Clark, David P.

    1991-01-01

    The subject invention concerns novel means and materials for producing ethanol as a fermentation product. Mutant E. coli are transformed with a gene coding for pyruvate decarboxylase activity. The resulting system is capable of producing relatively large amounts of ethanol from a variety of biomass sources.

  17. Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - Nanyang...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nanyang Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - Nanyang AgencyCompany Organization: BioEthanol for...

  18. Vehicle Certification Test Fuel and Ethanol Flex Fuel Quality...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Certification Test Fuel and Ethanol Flex Fuel Quality Vehicle Certification Test Fuel and Ethanol Flex Fuel Quality Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-B:...

  19. Henan Tianguan Fuel Ethanol Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tianguan Fuel Ethanol Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Henan Tianguan Fuel Ethanol Co Ltd Place: Nanyang, Henan Province, China Product: Project developer of a bioethanol...

  20. Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State of Technology Model Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State of Technology Model An update to...

  1. Utica Energy LLC formerly Algoma Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Utica Energy LLC formerly Algoma Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Utica Energy LLC (formerly Algoma Ethanol) Place: Oshkosh, Wisconsin Product: Utica Energy, founded by 5...

  2. Levelland Hockley County Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Levelland Hockley County Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: LevellandHockley County Ethanol LLC Place: Levelland, Texas Zip: 79336 Product: LevellandHockley County...

  3. Ethanol Oil Recovery Systems EORS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Systems EORS Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ethanol Oil Recovery Systems (EORS) Place: Clayton, Georgia Product: Ethanol Oil Recovery Systems (EORS), a green technology...

  4. AE Biofuels Inc formerly American Ethanol Inc | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AE Biofuels Inc formerly American Ethanol Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: AE Biofuels Inc. (formerly American Ethanol Inc.) Place: Cupertino, California Zip: CA 95014...

  5. Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level Ethanol/Gasoline...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level EthanolGasoline Test Fluid Dispensing Equipment Testing With Mid-Level EthanolGasoline Test Fluid The National Renewable Energy...

  6. Central Minnesota Ethanol Cooperative CMEC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Cooperative CMEC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Central Minnesota Ethanol Cooperative (CMEC) Place: Minnesota Zip: 56345 Sector: Hydro Product: CMEC produces 200 proof...

  7. Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - La Spezia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - La Spezia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report...

  8. Green Renewable Energy Ethanol and Nutrition Holding LLC | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol and Nutrition Holding LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Renewable Energy Ethanol and Nutrition-Holding, LLC Place: Palm, Pennsylvania Zip: 18070 Product: A local...

  9. Pacific Ethanol Inc formerly Accessity Corporation | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Inc formerly Accessity Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pacific Ethanol Inc (formerly Accessity Corporation) Place: Fresno, California Zip: 93711 Product:...

  10. Report to Congress: Dedicated Ethanol Pipeline Feasability Study...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report to Congress: Dedicated Ethanol Pipeline Feasability Study - Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 Section 243 Report to Congress: Dedicated Ethanol Pipeline...

  11. Gateway Ethanol LLC formerly Wildcat Bio Energy LLC | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol LLC formerly Wildcat Bio Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Gateway Ethanol LLC (formerly Wildcat Bio-Energy LLC) Place: Pratt, Kansas Zip: 67124 Product:...

  12. Infrastructure Requirements for an Expanded Fuel Ethanol Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Robert E.

    2002-01-15

    This report provides technical information specifically related to ethanol transportation, distribution, and marketing issues. This report required analysis of the infrastructure requirements for an expanded ethanol industry.

  13. Impact of Ethanol Blending on U.S. Gasoline Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-11-01

    This study assesses the impact of ethanol blending on gasoline prices in the US today and the potential impact of ethanol on gasoline prices at higher blending concentrations.

  14. Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis ...

  15. Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well Engineered ...

  16. Novel Vertimass Catalyst for Conversion of Ethanol and Other...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Novel Vertimass Catalyst for Conversion of Ethanol and Other Alcohols into Fungible Gasoline, Jet, and Diesel Fuel Blend Stocks Novel Vertimass Catalyst for Conversion of Ethanol...

  17. Reaction Rates and Catalysts in Ethanol Production (1 Activity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reaction Rates and Catalysts in Ethanol Production (1 Activity) Reaction Rates and Catalysts in Ethanol Production (1 Activity) Below is information about the student activity...

  18. Improving Ethanol-Gasoline Blends by Addition of Higher Alcohols

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mixtures of ethanol, gasoline, and higher alcohols were evaluated to determine if they offer superior performance to ethanol/gasoline blends in meeting the Renewal Fuels Standard II.

  19. Dual-fueling turbocharged diesels with ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruz, J.M.; Rotz, C.A.; Watson, D.H.

    1982-09-01

    Spray addition and carburetion methods were tested for dual-fueling a turbocharged, 65 kW diesel tractor. Approximately 30 percent of the fuel energy for the tractor was supplied by spraying ethanol into the intake air and about 46 percent by carburetion with little affect on the engine thermal efficiency. Further substitution of diesel fuel with ethanol was limited by knock. As the amount of ethanol fed into the engine was increased, ignition apparently changed from the steady burning process which normally occurs in a diesel engine to a rapid explosion which caused knock. The best fuel for the spray approach was a 50 percent ethanol/water solution and with the carburetor it was an 80 percent ethanol/water solution.

  20. Dual-fueling turbocharged diesels with ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cruz, J.M.; Rotz, C.A.; Watson, D.H.

    1982-09-01

    Spray addition and carburetion methods were tested for dual-fueling a turbocharged, 65 kW diesel tractor. Approximately 30 percent of the fuel energy for the tractor was supplied by spraying ethanol into the intake air and about 46 percent by carburetion with little affect on the engine thermal efficiency. Further substitution of diesel fuel with ethanol was limited by knock. As the amount of ethanol fed into the engine was increased, ignition apparently changed from the steady burning process which normally occurs in a diesel engine to a rapid explosion which caused knock. The best fuel for the spray approach was a 50 percent ethanol/water solution and with the carburetor it was an 80 percent ethanol/water solution. (Refs. 6).

  1. Advanced Biofuels from Cellulose via Genetic Engineering of Clostridiu...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * Isoprene is nontoxic and a gas at 34 C - helping its harvesting. * Theoretical ... G3P DMAPP IspS Isoprene cellulosome Cellulosic Biomass (3 C's) (3 C's) (5 C's) Objective: ...

  2. BETO Project Improves Production of Renewable Chemical from Cellulosic

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Feedstocks | Department of Energy Project Improves Production of Renewable Chemical from Cellulosic Feedstocks BETO Project Improves Production of Renewable Chemical from Cellulosic Feedstocks October 13, 2015 - 1:43pm Addthis Renewable chemical company Genomatica made significant progress toward increasing the range of feedstocks that can be used to commercially produce high-quality bio-based chemicals, in a project funded by the Energy Department's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO).

  3. Identification and Characterization of Non-Cellulose-Producing Mutants of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gluconacetobacter hansenii Generated by Tn5 Transposon Mutagenesis (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Identification and Characterization of Non-Cellulose-Producing Mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii Generated by Tn5 Transposon Mutagenesis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Identification and Characterization of Non-Cellulose-Producing Mutants of Gluconacetobacter hansenii Generated by Tn5 Transposon Mutagenesis Authors: Deng, Ying ; Nagachar, Nivedita ; Xiao, Chaowen ; Tien,

  4. Advanced and Cellulosic Biofuels and Biorefineries: State of the Industry,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy and Politics | Department of Energy and Cellulosic Biofuels and Biorefineries: State of the Industry, Policy and Politics Advanced and Cellulosic Biofuels and Biorefineries: State of the Industry, Policy and Politics Afternoon Plenary Introduction Brent Erickson, Executive Vice President, BIO PDF icon b13_erickson_day2-apintro.pdf More Documents & Publications Biomass 2013 Agenda Biomass 2012 Agenda U.S. Biofuels Industry: Mind the Gap

  5. The Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthase Complex: A Proposed Hexamer of CESA

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Trimers in an Equimolar Stoichiometry (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: The Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthase Complex: A Proposed Hexamer of CESA Trimers in an Equimolar Stoichiometry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthase Complex: A Proposed Hexamer of CESA Trimers in an Equimolar Stoichiometry In this study, we show a 1:1:1 stoichiometry between the three Arabidopsis thaliana secondary cell wall isozymes: CESA4, CESA7, and CESA8. This

  6. BETO Project Improves Production of Renewable Chemical from Cellulosic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Feedstocks | Department of Energy BETO Project Improves Production of Renewable Chemical from Cellulosic Feedstocks BETO Project Improves Production of Renewable Chemical from Cellulosic Feedstocks October 20, 2015 - 11:18am Addthis Renewable chemical company Genomatica made significant progress toward increasing the range of feedstocks that can be used to commercially produce high-quality bio-based chemicals, in a project funded by the Energy Department's Bioenergy Technologies Office

  7. The Journey to Commercializing Cellulosic Biofuels in the United States |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy The Journey to Commercializing Cellulosic Biofuels in the United States The Journey to Commercializing Cellulosic Biofuels in the United States October 17, 2014 - 1:28pm Addthis Secretary Moniz (center) tours the Abengoa Biorefinery in Hugoton, Kansas.| Photo Courtesy of Abengoa. Secretary Moniz (center) tours the Abengoa Biorefinery in Hugoton, Kansas.| Photo Courtesy of Abengoa. David Danielson David Danielson Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable

  8. Environmental analysis of biomass-ethanol facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbus, D.; Putsche, V.

    1995-12-01

    This report analyzes the environmental regulatory requirements for several process configurations of a biomass-to-ethanol facility. It also evaluates the impact of two feedstocks (municipal solid waste [MSW] and agricultural residues) and three facility sizes (1000, 2000, and 3000 dry tons per day [dtpd]) on the environmental requirements. The basic biomass ethanol process has five major steps: (1) Milling, (2) Pretreatment, (3) Cofermentation, (4) Enzyme production, (5) Product recovery. Each step could have environmental impacts and thus be subject to regulation. Facilities that process 2000 dtpd of MSW or agricultural residues would produce 69 and 79 million gallons of ethanol, respectively.

  9. Running Line-Haul Trucks on Ethanol

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    I magine driving a 55,000-pound tractor- trailer that runs on corn! If you find it difficult to imagine, you can ask the truck drivers for Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) what it's like. For the past 4 years, they have been piloting four trucks powered by ethyl alcohol, or "ethanol," derived from corn. Several advantages to operating trucks on ethanol rather than on conventional petro- leum diesel fuel present themselves. Because ethanol can be produced domestically, unlike most of our

  10. Ethanol Production, Distribution, and Use: Discussions on Key Issues (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrow, G.

    2008-05-14

    From production to the environment, presentation discusses issues surrounding ethanol as a transportation fuel.

  11. Ethanol Pathways in the 2050 North American Transportation Futures Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-18

    A paper discussing the various ethanol pathways in the 2050 North American Transportation Futures Study

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Safety Testing Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser Safety Testing to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser Safety Testing on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser Safety Testing on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser Safety Testing on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Underwriters Laboratories

  13. Conversion of cellulosic wastes to liquid fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuester, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    The current status and future plans for a project to convert waste cellulosic (biomass) materials to quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels is described. The basic approach is indirect liquefaction, i.e., thermal gasification followed by catalytic liquefaction. The indirect approach results in separation of the oxygen in the biomass feedstock, i.e., oxygenated compounds do not appear in the liquid hydrocarbon fuel product. The process is capable of accepting a wide variety of feedstocks. Potential products include medium quality gas, normal propanol, diesel fuel and/or high octane gasoline. A fluidized bed pyrolysis system is used for gasification. The pyrolyzer can be fluidized with recycle pyrolysis gas, steam or recycle liquefaction system off gas or some combination thereof. Tars are removed in a wet scrubber. Unseparated pyrolysis gases are utilized as feed to a modified Fischer-Tropsch reactor. The liquid condensate from the reactor consists of a normal propanol-water phase and a paraffinic hydrocarbon phase. The reactor can be operated to optimize for either product. The following tasks were specified in the statement of work for the contract period: (1) feedstock studies; (2) gasification system optimization; (3) waste stream characterization; and (4) liquid fuels synthesis. In addition, several equipment improvements were implemented.

  14. Transesterification of waste vegetable oil under pulse sonication using ethanol, methanol and ethanolmethanol mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Guerra, Edith; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: Pulse sonication effect on transesterification of waste vegetable oil was studied. Effects of ethanol, methanol, and alcohol mixtures on FAMEs yield were evaluated. Effect of ultrasonic intensity, power density, and its output rates were evaluated. Alcohol mixtures resulted in higher biodiesel yields due to better solubility. - Abstract: This study reports on the effects of direct pulse sonication and the type of alcohol (methanol and ethanol) on the transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil without any external heating or mechanical mixing. Biodiesel yields and optimum process conditions for the transesterification reaction involving ethanol, methanol, and ethanolmethanol mixtures were evaluated. The effects of ultrasonic power densities (by varying sample volumes), power output rates (in W), and ultrasonic intensities (by varying the reactor size) were studied for transesterification reaction with ethanol, methanol and ethanolmethanol (50%-50%) mixtures. The optimum process conditions for ethanol or methanol based transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil were determined as: 9:1 alcohol to oil ratio, 1% wt. catalyst amount, 12 min reaction time at a power output rate between 75 and 150 W. It was shown that the transesterification reactions using ethanolmethanol mixtures resulted in biodiesel yields as high as >99% at lower power density and ultrasound intensity when compared to ethanol or methanol based transesterification reactions.

  15. Sterling Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol LLC Place: Colorado Product: Owned by local investors including farmers, ranchers and business people that primarily reside in north-west Colorado, and set up to build and...

  16. QER- Comment of ND Ethanol Council

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To whom it may concern, Attached please find comments from the North Dakota Ethanol Council regarding infrastructure constraints in preparation for the OER Public Meeting, which will be held in Bismarck, N.D., on August 8. Sincerely, Deana Wies

  17. Treatment of biomass to obtain ethanol

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunson, Jr., James B. (Newark, DE); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, III, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Hennessey, Susan Marie (Avondale, PA)

    2011-08-16

    Ethanol was produced using biocatalysts that are able to ferment sugars derived from treated biomass. Sugars were obtained by pretreating biomass under conditions of high solids and low ammonia concentration, followed by saccharification.

  18. Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Test Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Test Program Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Test Program 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ft005_west_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 … Updated Feb 2009 EffectsIntermediateEthanolBlends.pdf

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Station Locations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Ethanol

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ethanol Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for

  1. Comparison of Cellulose Ib Simulations with Three Carbohydrate Force Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, J. F.; Beckham, G. T.; Bergenstrahle, M.; Brady, J. W.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-02-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations of cellulose have recently become more prevalent due to increased interest in renewable energy applications, and many atomistic and coarse-grained force fields exist that can be applied to cellulose. However, to date no systematic comparison between carbohydrate force fields has been conducted for this important system. To that end, we present a molecular dynamics simulation study of hydrated, 36-chain cellulose I{beta} microfibrils at room temperature with three carbohydrate force fields (CHARMM35, GLYCAM06, and Gromos 45a4) up to the near-microsecond time scale. Our results indicate that each of these simulated microfibrils diverge from the cellulose I{beta} crystal structure to varying degrees under the conditions tested. The CHARMM35 and GLYCAM06 force fields eventually result in structures similar to those observed at 500 K with the same force fields, which are consistent with the experimentally observed high-temperature behavior of cellulose I. The third force field, Gromos 45a4, produces behavior significantly different from experiment, from the other two force fields, and from previously reported simulations with this force field using shorter simulation times and constrained periodic boundary conditions. For the GLYCAM06 force field, initial hydrogen-bond conformations and choice of electrostatic scaling factors significantly affect the rate of structural divergence. Our results suggest dramatically different time scales for convergence of properties of interest, which is important in the design of computational studies and comparisons to experimental data. This study highlights that further experimental and theoretical work is required to understand the structure of small diameter cellulose microfibrils typical of plant cellulose.

  2. High Speed/ Low Effluent Process for Ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Clark Dale

    2006-10-30

    n this project, BPI demonstrated a new ethanol fermentation technology, termed the High Speed/ Low Effluent (HS/LE) process on both lab and large pilot scale as it would apply to wet mill and/or dry mill corn ethanol production. The HS/LE process allows very rapid fermentations, with 18 to 22% sugar syrups converted to 9 to 11% ethanol beers in 6 to 12 hours using either a consecutive batch or continuous cascade implementation. This represents a 5 to 8X increase in fermentation speeds over conventional 72 hour batch fermentations which are the norm in the fuel ethanol industry today. The consecutive batch technology was demonstrated on a large pilot scale (4,800 L) in a dry mill corn ethanol plant near Cedar Rapids, IA (Xethanol Biofuels). The pilot demonstrated that 12 hour fermentations can be accomplished on an industrial scale in a non-sterile industrial environment. Other objectives met in this project included development of a Low Energy (LE) Distillation process which reduces the energy requirements for distillation from about 14,000 BTU/gal steam ($0.126/gal with natural gas @ $9.00 MCF) to as low as 0.40 KW/gal electrical requirements ($0.022/gal with electricity @ $0.055/KWH). BPI also worked on the development of processes that would allow application of the HS/LE fermentation process to dry mill ethanol plants. A High-Value Corn ethanol plant concept was developed to produce 1) corn germ/oil, 2) corn bran, 3) ethanol, 4) zein protein, and 5) nutritional protein, giving multiple higher value products from the incoming corn stream.

  3. Role of water activity in ethanol fermentations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.P.; Greenfield, P.F.

    1986-01-01

    A separate role for water activity in the conversion of sugars to ethanol by two strains of yeast is identified. During fermentation of both single and mixed sugar substrates, the water activity was shown to remain constant during the logarithmic growth phase. This is despite the changes in concentration of substrates and production, the constancy reflecting the fact that the greater influence of ethanol on the solution activity is counterbalanced, in the early stages of the fermentation, by its low yield. The end of the log phase of growth coincides with the start of a period of gradually decreasing water activity. For the more ethanol-tolerant strain UQM66Y, growth was found to cease at a constant value of water activity while that for the less tolerant strain UQM70Y depended on both ethanol concentration and water activity. It is argued that water activity is a more appropriate variable than ethanol concentration for describing some of the nonspecific inhibitory effects apparent in ethanol fermentations. A straightforward method for the calculation of water activity during such fermentations based on the use of solution osmolarity is presented.

  4. Lignin-Derived Carbon Fiber as a Co-Product of Refining Cellulosic Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langholtz, Matthew H; Downing, Mark; Graham, Robin Lambert; Baker, Fred S; Compere, A L; Griffith, William {Bill} L; Boeman, Raymond G; Keller, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Lignin by-products from biorefineries has the potential to provide a low-cost alternative to petroleum-based precursors to manufacture carbon fiber, which can be combined with a binding matrix to produce a structural material with much greater specific strength and specific stiffness than conventional materials such as steel and aluminum. The market for carbon fiber is universally projected to grow exponentially to fill the needs of clean energy technologies such as wind turbines and to improve the fuel economies in vehicles through lightweighting. In addition to cellulosic biofuel production, lignin-based carbon fiber production coupled with biorefineries may provide $2,400 to $3,600 added value dry Mg-1 of biomass for vehicle applications. Compared to producing ethanol alone, the addition of lignin-derived carbon fiber could increase biorefinery gross revenue by 30% to 300%. Using lignin-derived carbon fiber in 15 million vehicles per year in the US could reduce fossil fuel consumption by 2-5 billion liters year-1, reduce CO2 emissions by about 6.7 million Mg year-1, and realize fuel savings through vehicle lightweighting of $700 to $1,600 per Mg biomass processed. The value of fuel savings from vehicle lightweighting becomes economical at carbon fiber price of $6.60 kg-1 under current fuel prices, or $13.20 kg-1 under fuel prices of about $1.16 l-1.

  5. Fibril orientation redistribution induced by stretching of cellulose nanofibril hydrogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Josefsson, Gabriella; Gamstedt, E. Kristofer; Ahvenainen, Patrik; Mushi, Ngesa Ezekiel

    2015-06-07

    The mechanical performance of materials reinforced by cellulose nanofibrils is highly affected by the orientation of these fibrils. This paper investigates the nanofibril orientation distribution of films of partly oriented cellulose nanofibrils. Stripes of hydrogel films were subjected to different amount of strain and, after drying, examined with X-ray diffraction to obtain the orientation of the nanofibrils in the films, caused by the stretching. The cellulose nanofibrils had initially a random in-plane orientation in the hydrogel films and the strain was applied to the films before the nanofibrils bond tightly together, which occurs during drying. The stretching resulted in a reorientation of the nanofibrils in the films, with monotonically increasing orientation towards the load direction with increasing strain. Estimation of nanofibril reorientation by X-ray diffraction enables quantitative comparison of the stretch-induced orientation ability of different cellulose nanofibril systems. The reorientation of nanofibrils as a consequence of an applied strain is also predicted by a geometrical model of deformation of nanofibril hydrogels. Conversely, in high-strain cold-drawing of wet cellulose nanofibril materials, the enhanced orientation is promoted by slipping of the effectively stiff fibrils.

  6. Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Slide 1 The Current State of Technology for Cellulosic Ethanol

  7. Process of concentrating ethanol from dilute aqueous solutions thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oulman, Charles S. [Ames, IA; Chriswell, Colin D. [Slater, IA

    1981-07-07

    Relatively dilute aqueous solutions of ethanol are concentrated by passage through a bed of a crystalline silica polymorph, such as silicalite, to adsorb the ethanol with residual dilute feed in contact with the bed, which is displaced by passing concentrated aqueous ethanol through the bed without displacing the adsorbed ethanol. A product concentrate is then obtained by removing the adsorbed ethanol from the bed together with at least a portion of the concentrated aqueous ethanol used as the displacer liquid. This process permits ethanol to be concentrated from dilute fermentation beers, which may contain from 6 to 10% ethanol, to obtain a concentrate product at very low energy cost having an ethanol concentration in excess of 95%, such as a concentration of from 98 to 99.5%.

  8. Process of concentrating ethanol from dilute aqueous solutions thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oulman, C.S.; Chriswell, C.D.

    1981-07-07

    Relatively dilute aqueous solutions of ethanol are concentrated by passage through a bed of a crystalline silica polymorph, such as silicalite, to adsorb the ethanol with residual dilute feed in contact with the bed, which is displaced by passing concentrated aqueous ethanol through the bed without displacing the adsorbed ethanol. A product concentrate is then obtained by removing the adsorbed ethanol from the bed together with at least a portion of the concentrated aqueous ethanol used as the displacer liquid. This process permits ethanol to be concentrated from dilute fermentation beers, which may contain from 6 to 10% ethanol, to obtain a concentrate product at very low energy cost having an ethanol concentration in excess of 95%, such as a concentration of from 98 to 99.5%. 5 figs.

  9. DuPont's Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DuPont's Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise DuPont's Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise Plenary I: Progress in Advanced ...

  10. Department of Energy Offers Abengoa Bioenergy a Conditional Commitment for a $133.9 Million Loan Guarantee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Groundbreaking Cellulosic Ethanol Project Expected to Create Over 300 Jobs and Build Nation’s Capacity for Cellulosic Ethanol Production

  11. Process for converting cellulosic materials into fuels and chemicals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Faison, Brendlyn D. (Knoxville, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A process for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major constituent of paper, cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. The cellulase is produced from a continuous, columnar, fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing immobilized microorganisms. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. The cellulase is recycled by an adsorption process. The resulting crude sugars are converted to dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing microorganisms. The dilute product is concentrated and purified by utilizing distillation and/or a biparticle fluidized-bed bioreactor system.

  12. An Indirect Route for Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eggeman, T.; Verser, D.; Weber, E.

    2005-04-29

    The ZeaChem indirect method is a radically new approach to producing fuel ethanol from renewable resources. Sugar and syngas processing platforms are combined in a novel way that allows all fractions of biomass feedstocks (e.g. carbohydrates, lignins, etc.) to contribute their energy directly into the ethanol product via fermentation and hydrogen based chemical process technologies. The goals of this project were: (1) Collect engineering data necessary for scale-up of the indirect route for ethanol production, and (2) Produce process and economic models to guide the development effort. Both goals were successfully accomplished. The projected economics of the Base Case developed in this work are comparable to today's corn based ethanol technology. Sensitivity analysis shows that significant improvements in economics for the indirect route would result if a biomass feedstock rather that starch hydrolyzate were used as the carbohydrate source. The energy ratio, defined as the ratio of green energy produced divided by the amount of fossil energy consumed, is projected to be 3.11 to 12.32 for the indirect route depending upon the details of implementation. Conventional technology has an energy ratio of 1.34, thus the indirect route will have a significant environmental advantage over today's technology. Energy savings of 7.48 trillion Btu/yr will result when 100 MMgal/yr (neat) of ethanol capacity via the indirect route is placed on-line by the year 2010.

  13. Engineered microbes and methods for microbial oil overproduction from cellulosic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Tai, Mitchell

    2015-08-04

    The invention relates to engineering microbial cells for utilization of cellulosic materials as a carbon source, including xylose.

  14. Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes to process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biomass to fuel Cellulose requires fewer enzymes to process biomass to fuel Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes to process biomass to fuel Improved methods for breaking down cellulose nanofibers are central to cost-effective biofuel production. June 19, 2013 An enzyme (shown in blue) pulls out individual cellulose chains (pink) from the pretreated nanofiber surface (green) and then breaks them apart into simple sugars. Image credit, Shishir Chundawat, Great Lakes

  15. Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes to process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biomass to fuel Cellulose requires fewer enzymes to process biomass to fuel Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes to process biomass to fuel Improved methods for breaking down cellulose nanofibers are central to cost-effective biofuel production. June 19, 2013 An enzyme (shown in blue) pulls out individual cellulose chains (pink) from the pretreated nanofiber surface (green) and then breaks them apart into simple sugars. Image credit, Shishir Chundawat, Great Lakes

  16. Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes to process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biomass to fuel Cellulose requires fewer enzymes to process biomass to fuel Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes to process biomass to fuel Improved methods for breaking down cellulose nanofibers are central to cost-effective biofuel production. June 19, 2013 An enzyme (shown in blue) pulls out individual cellulose chains (pink) from the pretreated nanofiber surface (green) and then breaks them apart into simple sugars. Image credit, Shishir Chundawat, Great Lakes

  17. Ethanol from biomass: A status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, R.

    1996-12-31

    Programmatic and technical activities of SWAN Biomass, a company formed by Amoco Corporation and Stone & Webster, to convert non-grain biomass material to ethanol, are highlighted in this presentation. The potential ethanol markets identified are: (1) fuel oxygenate and octane additive, and (2) waste reduction in the agricultural and forestry industries and in municipal waste streams. Differences in the SWAN process from that used in corn-based ethanol facilities include more intense pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, different enzymes, hydrolysis and fermentation of sugar polymers is performed in the same vessel, and a typical solid residue of lignin. The major market and technical risks have been assessed as being manageable. 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Method and system for ethanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feder, H.M.; Chen, M.J.

    1980-05-21

    A transition metal carbonyl and a tertiary amine are employed as a homogeneous catalytic system in methanol or a less volatile solvent to react methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas producing ethanol and carbon dioxide. The gas contains a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio as is present in a typical gasifier product. The reaction has potential for anhydrous ethanol production as carbon dioxide rather than water is produced. The only other significant by-product is methane. Selected transition metal carbonyls include those of iron, ruthenium and possibly manganese and osmium. Selected amines include trimethylamine, N-Methylpyrrolidine, 24-diazabicyclooctane, dimethyneopentylamine and 2-pryidinol.

  19. Method and system for ethanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feder, H.M.; Chen, M.J.

    1981-09-24

    A transition metal carbonyl and a tertiary amine are employed as a homogeneous catalytic system in methanol or a less volatile solvent to react methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas producing ethanol and carbon dioxide. The gas contains a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio as is present in a typical gasifier product. The reaction has potential for anhydrous ethanol production as carbon dioxide rather than water is produced. Selected transition metal carbonyls include those of iron, rhodium, ruthenium, manganese in combination with iron and possibly osmium. Selected amines include trimethylamine, N-Methylpyrrolidine, 2,4-diazabicyclooctane, dimethylneopentylamine, N-methylpiperidine and derivatives of N-methylpiperidine.

  20. Method and system for ethanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feder, Harold M. (Darien, IL); Chen, Michael J. (Darien, IL)

    1983-01-01

    A transition metal carbonyl and a tertiary amine are employed as a homogeneous catalytic system in methanol or a less volatile solvent to react methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas producing ethanol and carbon dioxide. The gas contains a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio as is present in a typical gasifier product. The reaction has potential for anhydrous ethanol production as carbon dioxide rather than water is produced. Selected transition metal carbonyls include those of iron, rhodium ruthenium, manganese in combination with iron and possibly osmium. Selected amines include trimethylamine, N-Methylpyrrolidine, 2,4-diazabicyclooctane, dimethylneopentylamine, N-methylpiperidine and derivatives of N-methylpiperidine.

  1. Method and system for ethanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feder, Harold M. (Darien, IL); Chen, Michael J. (Darien, IL)

    1981-01-01

    A transition metal carbonyl and a tertiary amine are employed as a homogeneous catalytic system in methanol or a less volatile solvent to react methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas producing ethanol and carbon dioxide. The gas contains a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio as is present in a typical gasifier product. The reaction has potential for anhydrous ethanol production as carbon dioxide rather than water is produced. The only other significant by product is methane. Selected transition metal carbonyls include those of iron, ruthenium and possibly manganese and osmium. Selected amines include trimethylamine, N-Methylpyrrolidine, 24-diazabicyclooctane, dimethyneopentylamine and 2-pryidinol.

  2. Chippewa Valley Ethanol Company CVEC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CVEC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Chippewa Valley Ethanol Company (CVEC) Place: NW Benson, Minnesota Zip: 56215 Product: Owns 57.0m litres a year dry mill ethanol plant....

  3. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 Updated Feb 2009...

  4. State-level workshops on ethanol for transportaton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graf, Angela

    2004-01-01

    The Ethanol Workshop Series (EWS) was intended to provide a forum for interest groups to gather and discuss what needs to be accomplished to facilitate ethanol production in-state using local biomass resources.

  5. Ethanol Vehicle and Infrastructure Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    This document lists codes and standards typically used for U.S. ethanol vehicle and infrastructure projects.

  6. Autothermal Partial Oxidation of Ethanol and Alcohols - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Autothermal Partial Oxidation of Ethanol and Alcohols Syngas from Autothermal Reforming of Ethanol DOE Grant Recipients University of Minnesota Contact University of Minnesota About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Autothermal Reforming of Ethanol and Alcohols into Syngas Ethanol and alcohols can be converted into syngas using a robust autothermal reforming process. Syngas is a mixture of carbon

  7. Fact Sheet: Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends Fact Sheet: Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends October 7, 2008 - 4:14pm Addthis In August 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to assess the potential impacts of higher intermediate ethanol blends on conventional vehicles and other engines that rely on gasoline. The test program focuses specifically on the effects of intermediate blends of E15 and E20-gasoline blended with 15 and 20 percent ethanol, respectively-on

  8. Mid-Level Ethanol Blends | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Mid-Level Ethanol Blends 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon ft_05_knoll.pdf More Documents & Publications Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Test Program Biofuels Quality Surveys Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 … Updated Feb 2009

  9. Renewable Fuels Association’s National Ethanol Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mark Elless, a BETO technology manager, will be representing BETO at the 20th anniversary of the National Ethanol Conference.

  10. Clean Cities: Ethanol Basics, Fact Sheet, October 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-10-01

    Document answers frequently asked questions about ethanol as a transportation fuel, including those on production, environmental effects, and vehicles.

  11. Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass | Department of Energy Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass Thermochemical Ethanol via Indirect Gasification and Mixed Alcohol Synthesis of Lignocellulosic Biomass This process design and technoeconomic evaluation addresses the conversion of biomass to ethanol via thermochemical pathways that are expected to be demonstrated at the pilot level by 2012. PDF icon Thermochemical Ethanol via

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Surpasses 1 Million Gallons Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project Surpasses 1 Million Gallons to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project Surpasses 1 Million Gallons on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project Surpasses 1 Million Gallons on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project Surpasses 1 Million Gallons on Google Bookmark Alternative

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Ethanol Blender Pump

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Dispenser Certified (August 2010) Ethanol Blender Pump Dispenser Certified (August 2010) to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Ethanol Blender Pump Dispenser Certified (August 2010) on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Ethanol Blender Pump Dispenser Certified (August 2010) on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Ethanol Blender Pump Dispenser Certified (August 2010) on Google Bookmark Alternative

  14. Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with carbonate-containing solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Francis, Raymond

    2012-11-06

    Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with an acidic solution and then a carbonate-containing solution to produce a pretreated cellulosic material are provided. The pretreated material may then be further treated in a pulping process, for example, a soda-anthraquinone pulping process, to produce a cellulose pulp. The pretreatment solutions may be extracted from the pretreated cellulose material and selectively re-used, for example, with acid or alkali addition, for the pretreatment solutions. The resulting cellulose pulp is characterized by having reduced lignin content and increased yield compared to prior art treatment processes.

  15. Ethanol production in Gram-positive microbes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ingram, L.O.; Barbosa-Alleyne, M.D.F.

    1999-06-29

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase. 2 figs.

  16. Ethanol production in Gram-positive microbes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ingram, L.O.; Barbosa-Alleyne, M.D.F.

    1996-01-09

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase. 2 figs.

  17. Ethanol production in gram-positive microbes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal (Gainesville, FL); Barbosa-Alleyne, Maria D. F. (Gainesville, FL)

    1999-01-01

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase.

  18. Ethanol production in Gram-positive microbes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal (Gainesville, FL); Barbosa-Alleyne, Maria D. F. (Gainesville, FL)

    1996-01-01

    The subject invention concerns the transformation of Gram-positive bacteria with heterologous genes which confer upon these microbes the ability to produce ethanol as a fermentation product. Specifically exemplified is the transformation of bacteria with genes, obtainable from Zymomonas mobilis, which encode pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase.

  19. Nucleic acid molecules conferring enhanced ethanol tolerance and microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Steven; Guss, Adam; Yang, Shihui; Karpinets, Tatiana; Lynd, Lee; Shao, Xiongjun

    2014-01-14

    The present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules which encode a mutant acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase or mutant alcohol dehydrogenase and confer enhanced tolerance to ethanol. The invention also provides related expression vectors, genetically engineered microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol, as well as methods of making and using such genetically modified microorganisms for production of biofuels based on fermentation of biomass materials.

  20. Recent Advances in Catalytic Conversion of Ethanol to Chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-04-30

    With increased availability and decreased cost, ethanol is potentially a promising platform molecule for the production of a variety of value-added chemicals. In this review, we provide a detailed summary of recent advances in catalytic conversion of ethanol to a wide range of chemicals and fuels. We particularly focus on catalyst advances and fundamental understanding of reaction mechanisms involved in ethanol steam reforming (ESR) to produce hydrogen, ethanol conversion to hydrocarbons ranging from light olefins to longer chain alkenes/alkanes and aromatics, and ethanol conversion to other oxygenates including 1-butanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, diethyl ether, and ethyl acetate.

  1. Process for converting cellulosic materials into fuels and chemicals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.; Davison, B.H.; Woodward, J.

    1994-09-20

    A process is described for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major constituent of paper, cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. The cellulase is produced from a continuous, columnar, fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing immobilized microorganisms. An attrition mill and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. The cellulase is recycled by an adsorption process. The resulting crude sugars are converted to dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing microorganisms. The dilute product is concentrated and purified by utilizing distillation and/or a biparticle fluidized-bed bioreactor system. 1 fig.

  2. Development of Cellulosic Biofuels (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Somerville, Chris [Director, Energy Biosciences Institute

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2007: Chris Somerville, Director of the Energy Biosciences Institute and an award-winning plant biochemist with Berkeley Lab's Physical Biosciences Division, is a leading authority on the structure and function of plant cell walls. He discusses an overview of some of the technical challenges associated with the production of cellulosic biofuels, which will require an improved understanding of a diverse range of topics in fields such as agronomy, chemical engineering, microbiology, structural biology, genomics, environmental sciences, and socioeconomics.

  3. NREL, Chevron Establish Research Alliance to Advance Cellulosic Biofuels -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Releases | NREL NREL, Chevron Establish Research Alliance to Advance Cellulosic Biofuels Collaboration to focus on next-generation production technologies for renewable fuels October 4, 2006 Chevron Corporation (NYSE: CVX) and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), headquartered in Golden, Colo., today announced a strategic research alliance to advance the development of renewable transportation fuels. Chevron Technology Ventures LLC (CTV), a

  4. Watershed Scale Optimization to Meet Sustainable Cellulosic Energy Crop Demands

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Watershed Scale Optimization to Meet Sustainable Cellulosic Energy Crop Demands March 23, 2015 Analysis and Sustainability Peer Review Drs. Indrajeet Chaubey and Ben Gramig Purdue University This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Goal Statement 2 * Overall goal is to conduct a watershed-scale sustainability assessment of multiple energy crops and removal of crop residues * Assessment conducted in two watersheds representative of

  5. Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IL); Binder, Thomas P. (Decatur, IL); Rammelsberg, Anne M. (Decatur, IL)

    2010-11-16

    The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

  6. Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

    2012-02-01

    In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.

  7. NREL Finds a New Cellulose Digestion Mechanism by a Fast-eating Enzyme -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Releases | NREL Finds a New Cellulose Digestion Mechanism by a Fast-eating Enzyme CelA digests cellulose faster than enzymes from commercial preparations January 2, 2014 Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have discovered that an enzyme from a microorganism first found in the Valley of Geysers on the Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia in 1990 can digest cellulose almost twice as fast as the current leading component cellulase enzyme on the

  8. WPN 97-6: Approval of Wet-Spray Cellulose Insulation as an Allowable Weatherization Material

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To provide states with information about the approved use of wet-spray cellulose for use in the low-income Weatherization Assistance Program.

  9. Saccharification of wheat-straw cellulose by enzymatic hydrolysis following fermentative and chemical pretreatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Detroy, R.W.; Lindenfelser, L.A.; St. Julian, G. Jr.; Orton, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    In our investigations, wheat straw fermentations were conducted using the edible, white-rot fungus commonly known as the oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq. ex Fr.) Kummer, as fermentation organism. Fermented substrates were evaluated for degree of lignin and cellulose degradation and saccharification. In addition, since our primary objective in the P. ostreatus fermentation was to increase the amount of availabile cellulose in straw for further fermentation, cellulose hydrolysis rates were determined. Cellulose conversion to fermentable sugar was also determined on chemically modified straws by subjecting them to enzymatic hydrolysis. Progress and extent of delignification was follwed also by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and structural changes were determined in treated-straw substrates.

  10. Pathway engineering to improve ethanol production by thermophilic bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynd, L.R.

    1998-12-31

    Continuation of a research project jointly funded by the NSF and DOE is proposed. The primary project goal is to develop and characterize strains of C. thermocellum and C. thermosaccharolyticum having ethanol selectivity similar to more convenient ethanol-producing organisms. An additional goal is to document the maximum concentration of ethanol that can be produced by thermophiles. These goals build on results from the previous project, including development of most of the genetic tools required for pathway engineering in the target organisms. As well, we demonstrated that the tolerance of C. thermosaccharolyticum to added ethanol is sufficiently high to allow practical utilization should similar tolerance to produced ethanol be demonstrated, and that inhibition by neutralizing agents may explain the limited concentrations of ethanol produced in studies to date. Task 1 involves optimization of electrotransformation, using either modified conditions or alternative plasmids to improve upon the low but reproducible transformation, frequencies we have obtained thus far.

  11. Energy Landscape of Water and Ethanol on Silica Surfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Di; Guo, Xiaofeng; Sun, Hui; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-06-26

    Fundamental understanding of small molecule–silica surface interactions at their interfaces is essential for the scientific, technological, and medical communities. We report direct enthalpy of adsorption (Δhads) measurements for ethanol and water vapor on porous silica glass (CPG-10), in both hydroxylated and dehydroxylated (hydrophobic) forms. Results suggest a spectrum of energetics as a function of coverage, stepwise for ethanol but continuous for water. The zero-coverage enthalpy of adsorption for hydroxylated silica shows the most exothermic enthalpies for both water (-72.7 ± 3.1 kJ/mol water) and ethanol (-78.0 ± 1.9 kJ/mol ethanol). The water adsorption enthalpy becomes less exothermic gradually until reachingmore » its only plateau (-20.7 ± 2.2 kJ/mol water) reflecting water clustering on a largely hydrophobic surface, while the enthalpy of ethanol adsorption profile presents two well separated plateaus, corresponding to strong chemisorption of ethanol on adsorbate-free silica surface (-66.4 ± 4.8 kJ/mol ethanol), and weak physisorption of ethanol on ethanol covered silica (-4.0 ± 1.6 kJ/mol ethanol). On the other hand, dehydroxylation leads to missing water–silica interactions, whereas the number of ethanol binding sites is not impacted. The isotherms and partial molar properties of adsorption suggest that water may only bind strongly onto the silanols (which are a minor species on silica glass), whereas ethanol can interact strongly with both silanols and the hydrophobic areas of the silica surface.« less

  12. Energy Landscape of Water and Ethanol on Silica Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Di; Guo, Xiaofeng; Sun, Hui; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2015-06-26

    Fundamental understanding of small moleculesilica surface interactions at their interfaces is essential for the scientific, technological, and medical communities. We report direct enthalpy of adsorption (?hads) measurements for ethanol and water vapor on porous silica glass (CPG-10), in both hydroxylated and dehydroxylated (hydrophobic) forms. Results suggest a spectrum of energetics as a function of coverage, stepwise for ethanol but continuous for water. The zero-coverage enthalpy of adsorption for hydroxylated silica shows the most exothermic enthalpies for both water (-72.7 3.1 kJ/mol water) and ethanol (-78.0 1.9 kJ/mol ethanol). The water adsorption enthalpy becomes less exothermic gradually until reaching its only plateau (-20.7 2.2 kJ/mol water) reflecting water clustering on a largely hydrophobic surface, while the enthalpy of ethanol adsorption profile presents two well separated plateaus, corresponding to strong chemisorption of ethanol on adsorbate-free silica surface (-66.4 4.8 kJ/mol ethanol), and weak physisorption of ethanol on ethanol covered silica (-4.0 1.6 kJ/mol ethanol). On the other hand, dehydroxylation leads to missing watersilica interactions, whereas the number of ethanol binding sites is not impacted. The isotherms and partial molar properties of adsorption suggest that water may only bind strongly onto the silanols (which are a minor species on silica glass), whereas ethanol can interact strongly with both silanols and the hydrophobic areas of the silica surface.

  13. Dissociative electron attachments to ethanol and acetaldehyde: A combined

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    experimental and simulation study (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Dissociative electron attachments to ethanol and acetaldehyde: A combined experimental and simulation study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dissociative electron attachments to ethanol and acetaldehyde: A combined experimental and simulation study Dissociation dynamics of the temporary negative ions of ethanol and acetaldehyde formed by the low-energy electron attachments is investigated by using the anion

  14. Lipid-enhanced ethanol production from xylose by Pachysolen tannophilus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dekker, R.F.H.

    1986-04-01

    A number of different yeasts are now recognized as being capable of fermenting the pentose sugar, D-xylose, into ethanol. The most prominent among these are Pachysolen tannophilus and several Candida species. D-Xylose is found principally in lignocellulosic materials where it occurs as the main constitutent of the hemicellulosic xylans (1,4-..beta..-D-heteroxylans). With the exception of Candida XF-217, the conversion yields of xylose into ethanol for most yeasts were generally low (less than 70% of theoretical when grown on at least 50 g/l xylose). The low ethanol yields are attributable to a number of factors: 1) fermentation was not performed under conditions that maximize ethanol formation; 2) ethanol was not the major fermentation end-product, (e.g., acetic acid xylitol, and arabinitol are also known products, 3) ethanol toxicity; 4) ethanol is assimilated when the substrate becomes limiting; 4.8 and 5) osmotic sensitivity to high substrate levels, i.e. substrate inhibition. Attempts to increase ethanol yields of yeasts by adding exogenous lipids (e.g., oleic and linoleic acids, or ergosterol or its ester, lipid mixtures, or protein-lipid mixtures) to nutrient medium have succeeded in improving ethanol yields and also in reducing fermentation times. These lipids, when added to the nutrient medium, were incorporated into the yeast's cellular membrane. The protective action of these lipids was to alleviate the inhibitory effect of ethanol which then allowed the cells to tolerate higher ethanol levels. This communication reports on improved ethanol yields arising from the fermentation of xylose by a Pachysolen tannophilus strain when grown semi-aerobically in the presence of exogenous-added lipids. 17 references.

  15. Lipid-enhanced ethanol production from xylose by Pachysolen tannophilus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dekker, R.F.H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reports improved ethanol yields following the fermentation of xylose by a Pachysolen tannophilus strain when grown semi-aerobically in the presence of exogenous-added lipids. Profiles for ethanol production from 45 g/L xylose when grown on a medium containing ergosterol, linoleic acid, Tween-80, a mixture of the three lipids and no lipids (control) are presented. The enhancement in the amount of ethanol produced was most pronounced after 72 h fermentation.

  16. Mid-Blend Ethanol Fuels - Implementation Perspectives | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Mid-Blend Ethanol Fuels - Implementation Perspectives Mid-Blend Ethanol Fuels - Implementation Perspectives Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-B: End Use and Fuel Certification Bill Woebkenberg, Fuels Technical and Regulatory Affairs Senior Engineer, Mercedes-Benz PDF icon b13_woebkenberg_2-b.pdf More Documents & Publications High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation Fuels Making Better Use of Ethanol as a Transportation Fuel With

  17. NOx Aftertreatment Using Ethanol as Reductant | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aftertreatment Using Ethanol as Reductant NOx Aftertreatment Using Ethanol as Reductant The hydrocarbon-SCR that was developed using ethanol and E85 as the reductant showed high NOx reduction, no need for thawing, use of existing infrastructure, and reduced system cost making it a viable alternative to urea-based SCR PDF icon deer10_diewald.pdf More Documents & Publications Selective ammonia slip catalyst enabling highly efficient NOx removal requirements of the future SCR-DPF Integrations

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Clarification of Ethanol

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Certification Limits for Legacy Equipment (December 2008) Clarification of Ethanol Certification Limits for Legacy Equipment (December 2008) to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Clarification of Ethanol Certification Limits for Legacy Equipment (December 2008) on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Clarification of Ethanol Certification Limits for Legacy Equipment (December 2008) on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data

  19. Preliminary evaluation of alternative ethanol/water separation processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eakin, D.E.; Donovan, J.M.; Cysewski, G.R.; Petty, S.E.; Maxham, J.V.

    1981-05-01

    Preliminary evaluation indicates that separation of ethanol and water can be accomplished with less energy than is now needed in conventional distillation processes. The state of development for these methods varies from laboratory investigation to commercially available processes. The processes investigated were categorized by type of separation depending on their ability to achieve varying degrees of ethanol/water separation. The following methods were investigated: ethanol extraction with CO/sub 2/ (the A.D. Little process); solvent extraction of ethanol; vacuum distillation; vapor recompression distillation; dehydration with fermentable grains; low temperature blending with gasoline; molecular sieve adsorption; and reverse osmosis.

  20. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    117 Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 - Updated February 2009 Prepared by Keith Knoll Brian West Wendy Clark...

  1. Wet Gasification of Ethanol Residue: A Preliminary Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Michael D.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2008-09-22

    A preliminary technoeconomic assessment has been made of several options for the application of catalytic hydrothermal gasification (wet gasification) to ethanol processing residues.

  2. Issues and Methods for Estimating the Percentage Share of Ethanol...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Energy Information Administration 1 Issues and Methods for Estimating the Share of Ethanol in the Motor Gasoline Supply U.S. Energy Information Administration October 6, 2011...

  3. Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Presentation of Results Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results AgencyCompany...

  4. Ethanol Extraction Technologies Inc EETI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Extraction Technologies Inc EETI Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ethanol Extraction Technologies Inc (EETI) Place: New York, New York Zip: 10036-2601 Product: New York-based...

  5. International Ethanol Trade Association IETHA | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trade Association IETHA Jump to: navigation, search Name: International Ethanol Trade Association (IETHA) Place: Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Product: Association of 48 globally...

  6. Pacific Ethanol Inc the former | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc the former Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pacific Ethanol Inc (the former) Place: Fresno, California Zip: 93711 Product: California-based developer of bioethanol plants....

  7. Ask a scientist: Ethanol & car performance | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 issue of Argonne Now, the laboratory science magazine. Ask a scientist: Ethanol & car performance September 13, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint Does ethanol extend or decrease your gas mileage? -Tommy Holly, via Facebook JEHLIK: In a one-to-one comparison in a regular engine, ethanol will decrease your mileage. This is because the energy content of a gallon of ethanol is lower than the energy in a gallon of gasoline-it only has about 70% of the energy. The reason why is purely chemical: the chemical

  8. Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics Utilizing Co-Current Dilute Acid Prehydrolysis and Enzymatic Hydrolysis For Corn Stover Lignocellulosic Biomass to ...

  9. U.S. Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    All Petrolem Reports U.S. Fuel Ethanol Plant Production Capacity Release Date: June 23, 2015 | Next Release Date: June 2016 Previous Issues Year: 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 Go This is the fifth release of U.S. Energy Information Administration data on fuel ethanol production capacity. EIA first reported fuel ethanol production capacities as of January 1, 2011 on November 29, 2011. This new report contains production capacity data for all operating U.S. fuel ethanol production plants as of January

  10. Emissions from ethanol- and LPG-fueled vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitstick, M.E.

    1995-06-01

    This paper addresses the environmental concerns of using neat ethanol and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as transportation fuels in the United States. Low-level blends of ethanol (10%) with gasoline have been used as fuels in the United States for more than a decade, but neat ethanol (85% or more) has only been used extensively in Brazil. LPG, which consists mostly of propane, is already used extensively as a vehicle fuel in the United States, but its use has been limited primarily to converted fleet vehicles. Increasing U.S. interest in alternative fuels has raised the possibility of introducing neat-ethanol vehicles into the market and expanding the number of LPG vehicles. Use of such vehicles, and increased production and consumption of fuel ethanol and LPG, will undoubtedly have environmental impacts. If the impacts are determined to be severe, they could act as barriers to the introduction of neat-ethanol and LPG vehicles. Environmental concerns include exhaust and evaporative emissions and their impact on ozone formation and global warming, toxic emissions from fuel combustion and evaporation, and agricultural impacts from production of ethanol. The paper is not intended to be judgmental regarding the overall attractiveness of ethanol or LPG as compared with other transportation fuels. The environmental concerns are reviewed and summarized, but only conclusion reached is that there is no single concern that is likely to prevent the introduction of neat-ethanol-fueled vehicles or the increase in LPG-fueled vehicles.

  11. Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Non-Road Engines, Report 1 … Updated Feb 2009 | Department of Energy Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 … Updated Feb 2009 Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 … Updated Feb 2009 Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 … Updated Feb 2009 PDF

  12. Low and intermediate temperature oxidation of ethanol and ethanol-PRF blends: An experimental and modeling study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, Francis M.; Chaos, Marcos; Dryer, Frederick L.

    2009-12-15

    In this brief communication, we present new experimental species profile measurements for the low and intermediate temperature oxidation of ethanol under knock-prone conditions. These experiments show that ethanol exhibits no global low temperature reactivity at these conditions, although we note the heterogeneous decomposition of ethanol to ethylene and water. Similar behavior is reported for an E85 blend in n-heptane. Kinetic modeling results are presented to complement these experiments and elucidate the interaction of ethanol and primary reference fuels undergoing cooxidation. (author)

  13. Progressive structural changes of Avicel, bleached softwood, and bacterial cellulose during enzymatic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kafle, Kabindra; Shin, Heenae; Lee, Christopher M.; Park, Sunkyu; Kim, Seong H.

    2015-10-14

    A comprehensive picture of structural changes of cellulosic biomass during enzymatic hydrolysis is essential for a better understanding of enzymatic actions and development of more efficient enzymes. In this study, a suite of analytical techniques including sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were employed for lignin-free model biomass samplesAvicel, bleached softwood, and bacterial celluloseto find correlations between the decrease in hydrolysis rate over time and the structural or chemical changes of biomass during the hydrolysis reaction. The results showed that the decrease in hydrolysis rate over time appears to correlate with the irreversible deposition of non-cellulosic species (either reaction side products or denatured enzymes, or both) on the cellulosic substrate surface. The crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and meso-scale packing of cellulose do not seem to positively correlate with the decrease in hydrolysis rate observed for all three substrates tested in this study. Moreover, it was also found that the cellulose I? component of the bacterial cellulose is preferentially hydrolyzed by the enzyme than the cellulose I? component.

  14. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.

    1998-04-14

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  15. Compositions and methods comprising cellulase variants with reduced affinity to non-cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cascao-Pereira, Luis G; Kaper, Thijs; Kelemen, Bradley R; Liu, Amy D

    2015-04-07

    The present disclosure relates to cellulase variants. In particular the present disclosure relates to cellulase variants having reduced binding to non-cellulosic materials. Also described are nucleic acids encoding the cellulase, compositions comprising said cellulase, methods of identifying cellulose variants and methods of using the compositions.

  16. Kits and methods of detection using cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  17. Compositions and methods comprising cellulase variants with reduced affinity to non-cellulosic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cascao-Pereira, Luis G.; Kaper, Thijs; Kelemen, Bradley R; Liu, Amy D.

    2012-08-07

    The present disclosure relates to cellulase variants. In particular the present disclosure relates to cellulase variants having reduced binding to non-cellulosic materials. Also described are nucleic acids encoding the cellulase, compositions comprising said cellulase, methods of identifying cellulose variants and methods of using the compositions.

  18. Cellulose Nanomaterials: The Sustainable Material of Choice for the 21st Century

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Theodore H. Wegner, Ph.D. Assistant Director USDA Forest Service Forest Products Laboratory June 26, 2012 Cellulose Nanomaterials: The Sustainable Material of Choice for the 21 st Century Sustainable Nanomaterials Workshop * Wood: a Sustainable & Renewable Material * Cellulosic Nanomaterials From Wood Overview 3 Top 5 forested countries: Russian Federation........................809 million ha.......20.6% world's forests Brazil................................................520 million

  19. Ethanol fuel modification for highway vehicle use. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    A number of problems that might occur if ethanol were used as a blending stock or replacement for gasoline in present cars are identified and characterized as to the probability of occurrence. The severity of their consequences is contrasted to those found with methanol in a previous contract study. Possibilities for correcting several problems are reported. Some problems are responsive to fuel modifications but others require or are better dealt with by modification of vehicles and the bulk fuel distribution system. In general, problems with ethanol in blends with gasoline were found to be less severe than those with methanol. Phase separation on exposure to water appears to be the major problem with ethanol/gasoline blends. Another potentially serious problem with blends is the illict recovery of ethanol for beverage usage, or bootlegging, which might be discouraged by the use of select denaturants. Ethanol blends have somewhat greater tendency to vapor lock than base gasoline but less than methanol blends. Gasoline engines would require modification to operate on fuels consisting mostly of ethanol. If such modifications were made, cold starting would still be a major problem, more difficult with ethanol than methanol. Startability can be provided by adding gasoline or light hydrocarbons. Addition of gasoline also reduces the explosibility of ethanol vapor and furthermore acts as denaturant.

  20. Greenhouse gases in the corn-to-fuel ethanol pathway.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M. Q.

    1998-06-18

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has applied its Greenhouse gas, Regulated Emissions and Energy in Transportation (GREET) full-fuel-cycle analysis model to examine greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of corn-feedstock ethanol, given present and near-future production technology and practice. On the basis of updated information appropriate to corn farming and processing operations in the four principal corn- and ethanol-producing states (Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska), the model was used to estimate energy requirements and GHG emissions of corn farming; the manufacture, transportation to farms, and field application of fertilizer and pesticide; transportation of harvested corn to ethanol plants; nitrous oxide emissions from cultivated cornfields; ethanol production in current average and future technology wet and dry mills; and operation of cars and light trucks using ethanol fuels. For all cases examined on the basis of mass emissions per travel mile, the corn-to-ethanol fuel cycle for Midwest-produced ethanol used in both E85 and E10 blends with gasoline outperforms conventional (current) and reformulated (future) gasoline with respect to energy use and GHG production. Also, GHG reductions (but not energy use) appear surprisingly sensitive to the value chosen for combined soil and leached N-fertilizer conversion to nitrous oxide. Co-product energy-use attribution remains the single key factor in estimating ethanol's relative benefits because this value can range from 0 to 50%, depending on the attribution method chosen.

  1. Investigation of Bio-Ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt-based...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bio-Ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt-based Catalysts (Presentation) Investigation of Bio-Ethanol Steam Reforming over Cobalt-based Catalysts (Presentation) Presented at the 2007...

  2. Making Better Use of Ethanol as a Transportation Fuel With "Renewable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Making Better Use of Ethanol as a Transportation Fuel With "Renewable Super Premium" Making Better Use of Ethanol as a Transportation Fuel With "Renewable Super Premium" Breakout...

  3. Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System (Presentation) Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System (Presentation) Presented at the 2007...

  4. The U.S. Dry-Mill Ethanol Industry: Biobased Products and Bioenergy Initiative Success Stories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-10-28

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the history of ethanol production in the United States and describes innovations in dry-mill ethanol production.

  5. A Pre-Treatment Model for Ethanol Production Using a Colorimetric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Pre-Treatment Model for Ethanol Production Using a Colorimetric Analysis of Starch Solutions (1 Activity) A Pre-Treatment Model for Ethanol Production Using a Colorimetric...

  6. Ethanol oxidation on metal oxide-supported platinum catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. M. Petkovic 090468; Sergey N. Rashkeev; D. M. Ginosar

    2009-09-01

    Ethanol is a renewable fuel that can be used as an additive to gasoline (or its substitute) with the advantage of octane enhancement and reduced carbon monoxide exhaust emissions. However, on Ethanol is a renewable fuel that can be used as an additive to gasoline (or its substitute) with the advantage of octane enhancement and reduced carbon monoxide exhaust emissions. However, on the standard three-way catalysts, the conversion of unburned ethanol is low because both ethanol and some of its partially oxidized derivatives are highly resistant to oxidation. A combination of first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) based calculations and in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis was applied to uncover some of the fundamental phenomena associated with ethanol oxidation on Pt containing catalysts. In particular, the objective was to analyze the role of the oxide (i.e., ?-Al2O3 or SiO2) substrate on the ethanol oxidation activity. The results showed that Pt nanoparticles trap and accumulate oxygen at their surface and perimeter sites and play the role of stoves that burn ethanol molecules and their partially oxidized derivatives to the final products. The ?-Al2O3 surfaces provided higher mobility of the fragments of ethanol molecules than the SiO2 surface and hence increased the supply rate of these objects to the Pt particles. This will in turn produce a higher conversion rate of unburned ethanol.and some of its partially oxidized derivatives are highly resistant to oxidation. A combination of first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) based calculations and in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis was applied to uncover some of the fundamental phenomena associated with ethanol oxidation on Pt containing catalysts. In particular, the objective was to analyze the role of the oxide (i.e., ?-Al2O3 or SiO2) substrate on the ethanol oxidation activity. The results showed that Pt nanoparticles trap and accumulate oxygen at their surface and perimeter sites and play the role of stoves that burn ethanol molecules and their partially oxidized derivatives to the final products. The ?-Al2O3 surfaces provided higher mobility of the fragments of ethanol molecules than the SiO2 surface and hence increased the supply rate of these objects to the Pt particles. This will in turn produce a higher conversion rate of unburned ethanol.

  7. Stripping ethanol from ethanol-blended fuels for use in NO.sub.x SCR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kass, Michael Delos (Oak Ridge, TN); Graves, Ronald Lee (Knoxville, TN); Storey, John Morse Elliot (Oak Ridge, TN); Lewis, Sr., Samuel Arthur (Andersonville, TN); Sluder, Charles Scott (Knoxville, TN); Thomas, John Foster (Powell, TN)

    2007-08-21

    A method to use diesel fuel alchohol micro emulsions (E-diesel) to provide a source of reductant to lower NO.sub.x emissions using selective catalytic reduction. Ethanol is stripped from the micro emulsion and entered into the exhaust gasses upstream of the reducing catalyst. The method allows diesel (and other lean-burn) engines to meet new, lower emission standards without having to carry separate fuel and reductant tanks.

  8. Grain ethanol as a petroleum substitute: a perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alston, T.G.

    1980-04-01

    Present tax exemptions for gasohol are more than sufficient to move ethanol into the gasoline market in a number of states. The principal near-term response to this profit opportunity, production of ethanol from feed grains, matches a limited biomass resource to an enormous market. This report estimates upper-bound prices for feed grains resulting from gasohol tax exemptions and concludes that grain price increases could be substantial. As shown else-where by Alston and Asbury, industrial uses constitute a more economical market for grain ethanol, one in which the product is now competitive with ethanol derived from petroleum and natural gas liquids. Without tax exemptions for gasohol, grain ethanol would now be displacing petroleum in the industrial market at a net economic gain, rather than in the fuel market at a net economic loss. The present analysis indicates that this industrial market for ethanol could grow significantly, principally by use of grain ethanol as an intermediate in production of chemicals now derived from petroleum and natural gas.

  9. Recombinant host cells and media for ethanol production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Brent E; Ingram, Lonnie O; Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W

    2014-02-18

    Disclosed are recombinant host cells suitable for degrading an oligosaccharide that have been optimized for growth and production of high yields of ethanol, and methods of making and using these cells. The invention further provides minimal media comprising urea-like compounds for economical production of ethanol by recombinant microorganisms. Recombinant host cells in accordance with the invention are modified by gene mutation to eliminate genes responsible for the production of unwanted products other than ethanol, thereby increasing the yield of ethanol produced from the oligosaccharides, relative to unmutated parent strains. The new and improved strains of recombinant bacteria are capable of superior ethanol productivity and yield when grown under conditions suitable for fermentation in minimal growth media containing inexpensive reagents. Systems optimized for ethanol production combine a selected optimized minimal medium with a recombinant host cell optimized for use in the selected medium. Preferred systems are suitable for efficient ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using lignocellulose as an oligosaccharide source. The invention also provides novel isolated polynucleotide sequences, polypeptide sequences, vectors and antibodies.

  10. Progressive structural changes of Avicel, bleached softwood, and bacterial cellulose during enzymatic hydrolysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kafle, Kabindra; Shin, Heenae; Lee, Christopher M.; Park, Sunkyu; Kim, Seong H.

    2015-10-14

    A comprehensive picture of structural changes of cellulosic biomass during enzymatic hydrolysis is essential for a better understanding of enzymatic actions and development of more efficient enzymes. In this study, a suite of analytical techniques including sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were employed for lignin-free model biomass samples—Avicel, bleached softwood, and bacterial cellulose—to find correlations between the decrease in hydrolysis rate over time and the structural or chemical changes of biomass during the hydrolysis reaction. The results showed that the decrease in hydrolysis rate over time appears to correlatemore » with the irreversible deposition of non-cellulosic species (either reaction side products or denatured enzymes, or both) on the cellulosic substrate surface. The crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and meso-scale packing of cellulose do not seem to positively correlate with the decrease in hydrolysis rate observed for all three substrates tested in this study. Moreover, it was also found that the cellulose Iα component of the bacterial cellulose is preferentially hydrolyzed by the enzyme than the cellulose Iβ component.« less

  11. Recyclable organic solar cells on substrates comprising cellulose nanocrystals (CNC)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kippelen, Bernard; Fuentes-Hernandez, Canek; Zhou, Yinhua; Moon, Robert; Youngblood, Jeffrey P

    2015-12-01

    Recyclable organic solar cells are disclosed herein. Systems and methods are further disclosed for producing, improving performance, and for recycling the solar cells. In certain example embodiments, the recyclable organic solar cells disclosed herein include: a first electrode; a second electrode; a photoactive layer disposed between the first electrode and the second electrode; an interlayer comprising a Lewis basic oligomer or polymer disposed between the photoactive layer and at least a portion of the first electrode or the second electrode; and a substrate disposed adjacent to the first electrode or the second electrode. The interlayer reduces the work function associated with the first or second electrode. In certain example embodiments, the substrate comprises cellulose nanocrystals that can be recycled. In certain example embodiments, one or more of the first electrode, the photoactive layer, and the second electrode may be applied by a film transfer lamination method.

  12. Corn Ethanol: The Surprisingly Effective Route for Natural Gas Consumption in the Transportation Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szybist, James P.; Curran, Scott

    2015-05-01

    Proven reserves and production of natural gas (NG) in the United States have increased dramatically in the last decade, due largely to the commercialization of hydraulic fracturing. This has led to a plentiful supply of NG, resulting in a significantly lower cost on a gallon of gasoline-equivalent (GGE) basis. Additionally, NG is a domestic, non-petroleum source of energy that is less carbon-intensive than coal or petroleum products, and thus can lead to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Because of these factors, there is a desire to increase the use of NG in the transportation sector in the United States (U.S.). However, using NG directly in the transportation sector requires that several non-trivial challenges be overcome. One of these issues is the fueling infrastructure. There are currently only 1,375 NG fueling stations in the U.S. compared to 152,995 fueling stations for gasoline in 2014. Additionally, there are very few light-duty vehicles that can consume this fuel directly as dedicated or bi-fuel options. For example, in model year 2013Honda was the only OEM to offer a dedicated CNG sedan while a number of others offered CNG options as a preparation package for LD trucks and vans. In total, there were a total of 11 vehicle models in 2013 that could be purchased that could use natural gas directly. There are additional potential issues associated with NG vehicles as well. Compared to commercial refueling stations, the at-home refueling time for NG vehicles is substantial – a result of the small compressors used for home refilling. Additionally, the methane emissions from both refueling (leakage) and from tailpipe emissions (slip) from these vehicles can add to their GHG footprint, and while these emissions are not currently regulated it could be a barrier in the future, especially in scenarios with broad scale adoption of CNG vehicles. However, NG consumption already plays a large role in other sectors of the economy, including some that are important to the transportation sector. Examples include steam reforming of natural gas to provide hydrogen for hydrotreating unit operations within the refinery and production of urea for use as a reductant for diesel after treatment in selective catalytic reduction (SCR). This discussion focuses on the consumption of natural gas in the production pathway of conventional ethanol (non-cellulosic) from corn through fermentation. Though it is clear that NG would also play a significant role in the cellulosic production pathways, those cases are not considered in this analysis.

  13. Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Clausen, Edgar C. (Fayetteville, AR)

    1992-01-01

    A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate.

  14. Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaddy, J.L.; Clausen, E.C.

    1992-12-22

    A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H[sub 2]O and/or CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate. 3 figs.

  15. Comparison of ethanol production by different Zymomonas strains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skotnicki, M.L.; Lee, K.J.; Tribe, D.E.; Rogers, P.L.

    1981-04-01

    A comparison of the rates of growth and ethanol production by 11 different strains of Zymomonas revealed a wide range of characteristics, with some strains being more tolerant of high sugar or ethanol concentrations and high incubation temperatures than others. Some strains were unable to utilize sucrose; others produced large amounts of levan, and one strain grew well but produced no levan. One strain, CP4, was considerably better in all respects than most of the other strains and was chosen as a starting strain for genetic improvement of ethanol production.

  16. Plants in Your Gas Tank: From Photosynthesis to Ethanol

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    With ethanol becoming more prevalent in the media and in gas tanks, it is important for students to know from where it comes. This module uses a series of activities to show how energy and mass are converted from one form to another. It focuses on the conversion of light energy into chemical energy via photosynthesis. It then goes on to show how the chemical energy in plant sugars can be fermented to produce ethanol. Finally, the reasons for using ethanol as a fuel are discussed.

  17. DuPont's Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy DuPont's Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise DuPont's Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise Plenary I: Progress in Advanced Biofuels DuPont's Journey to Build a Global Cellulosic BioFuel Business Enterprise William Provine, Director-Science and Technology External Affairs, DuPont PDF icon provine_biomass_2014.pdf More Documents & Publications A Comparison of Key PV Backsheet and Module Properties from Fielded

  18. Nicotinic acid increases the lipid content of rat brain synaptosomes. [Ethanol effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basilio, C.; Flores, M.

    1989-02-09

    Chronic administration of nicotinic acid (NA) increase hepatic lipids and potentiates a similar effect induced by ethanol. The amethystic properties of NA promoted us to study its effects on the lipid content of brain synaptosomes of native and ethanol treated rats. Groups of 10 Sprague-Dawley female rats received i.p. either saline, ethanol (4g/kg), NA (50mg/kg), or a mixture of both compounds once a week during 3 weeks. The sleeping time (ST) of the animals receiving ethanol was recorded, brain synaptosomes of all groups were prepared and total lipids (TL) and cholesterol (Chol) content were determined. NA, ethanol and ethanol + NA markedly increased both TL and Chol of synaptosomes. Animals treated with ethanol or ethanol + NA developed tolerance. The group treated with ethanol-NA showed the highest Chol content and slept significantly less than the one treated with ethanol alone indicating that the changes induced by NA favored the appearance of tolerance.

  19. Novel Vertimass Catalyst for Conversion of Ethanol and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ethanol production in place * U.S. 13.4 billion galsyear mostly from corn starch * Brazil 6.3 billion galsyear from cane sugar * Rest of world 2.8 billion galsyear *...

  20. Continuous production of ethanol by use of flocculent zymomonas mobilis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arcuri, Edward J. (Del Mar, CA); Donaldson, Terrence L. (Lenoir City, TN)

    1983-01-01

    Ethanol is produced by means of a floc-forming strain of Zymomonas mobilis bacteria. Gas is vented along the length of a column containing the flocculent bacteria to preclude disruption of liquid flow.

  1. Ethanol-to-Hydrocarbon Technology Moves Closer to Commercialization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory published an article in Scientific Reports on its new method to directly convert biomass-derived ethanol to a hydrocarbon blendstock and is continuing work with...

  2. Methods for increasing the production of ethanol from microbial fermentation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Arora, Dinesh K. (Fayetteville, AR); Ko, Ching-Whan (Fayetteville, AR); Phillips, John Randall (Fayetteville, AR); Basu, Rahul (Bethlehem, PA); Wikstrom, Carl V. (Fayetteville, AR); Clausen, Edgar C. (Fayetteville, AR)

    2007-10-23

    A stable continuous method for producing ethanol from the anaerobic bacterial fermentation of a gaseous substrate containing at least one reducing gas involves culturing a fermentation bioreactor anaerobic, acetogenic bacteria in a liquid nutrient medium; supplying the gaseous substrate to the bioreactor; and manipulating the bacteria in the bioreactor by reducing the redox potential, or increasing the NAD(P)H TO NAD(P) ratio, in the fermentation broth after the bacteria achieves a steady state and stable cell concentration in the bioreactor. The free acetic acid concentration in the bioreactor is maintained at less than 5 g/L free acid. This method allows ethanol to be produced in the fermentation broth in the bioreactor at a productivity greater than 10 g/L per day. Both ethanol and acetate are produced in a ratio of ethanol to acetate ranging from 1:1 to 20:1.

  3. Current State of the U.S. Ethanol Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urbanchuk, John

    2010-11-30

    The objective of this study is to provide a comprehensive overview of the state of the U.S. ethanol industry and to outline the major forces that will affect the development of the industry over the next decade.

  4. Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress responses

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress responses Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Systems biology analysis of Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 ethanol stress responses Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 is a capable ethanogenic bacterium with high ethanol productivity and high level of ethanol tolerance. Previous studies indicated that several stress-related proteins and changes in the ZM4 membrane lipid composition may contribute to ethanol

  5. Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet), Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ethanol Basics Ethanol is a widely used, domesti- cally produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Fuel ethanol contains the same chemical compound as beverage alcohol, but it is denatured with a small amount of gasoline or other chemicals during the production process, making it unsafe for human consumption. Ethanol's primary market drivers are the Federal Renewable Fuel Standard requiring its use and

  6. Enabling High Efficiency Ethanol Engines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enabling High Efficiency Ethanol Engines Enabling High Efficiency Ethanol Engines 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon vssp_12_wagner.pdf More Documents & Publications Ignition Control for HCCI High-Efficiency Clean Combustion in Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Diesel Engines Expanding Robust HCCI Operation (Delphi CRADA)

  7. Effects of ethanol on small engines and the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettis, M.D.

    1995-01-09

    With the support of the Missouri Corn Merchandising Council and the Department of Energy, Northwest Missouri State University conducted an applied research project to investigate the effects of the commercially available ethanol/gasoline fuel blend on small engines. The study attempted to identify any problems when using the 10% ethanol/gasoline blend in engines designed for gasoline and provide solutions to the problems identified. Fuel economy, maximum power, internal component wear, exhaust emissions and engine efficiency were studied.

  8. Report to Congress: Dedicated Ethanol Pipeline Feasability Study - Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Independence and Security Act of 2007 Section 243 | Department of Energy Report to Congress: Dedicated Ethanol Pipeline Feasability Study - Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 Section 243 Report to Congress: Dedicated Ethanol Pipeline Feasability Study - Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 Section 243 This study was prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in response to Section 243 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). Section 243 directs DOE

  9. The ethanol heavy-duty truck fleet demonstration project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    This project was designed to test and demonstrate the use of a high- percentage ethanol-blended fuel in a fleet of heavy-duty, over-the- road trucks, paying particular attention to emissions, performance, and repair and maintenance costs. This project also represents the first public demonstration of the use of ethanol fuels as a viable alternative to conventional diesel fuel in heavy-duty engines.

  10. Evolved strains of Scheffersomyces stipitis achieving high ethanol

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    productivity on acid- and base-pretreated biomass hydrolyzate at high solids loading (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Evolved strains of Scheffersomyces stipitis achieving high ethanol productivity on acid- and base-pretreated biomass hydrolyzate at high solids loading Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evolved strains of Scheffersomyces stipitis achieving high ethanol productivity on acid- and base-pretreated biomass hydrolyzate at high solids loading Lignocellulosic biomass is

  11. Evolved strains of Scheffersomyces stipitis achieving high ethanol

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    productivity on acid- and base-pretreated biomass hydrolyzate at high solids loading (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES DOE PAGES Search Results Accepted Manuscript: Evolved strains of Scheffersomyces stipitis achieving high ethanol productivity on acid- and base-pretreated biomass hydrolyzate at high solids loading Title: Evolved strains of Scheffersomyces stipitis achieving high ethanol productivity on acid- and base-pretreated biomass hydrolyzate at high solids loading Lignocellulosic biomass

  12. Evolved strains of Scheffersomyces stipitis achieving high ethanol

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    productivity on acid- and base-pretreated biomass hydrolyzate at high solids loading (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Evolved strains of Scheffersomyces stipitis achieving high ethanol productivity on acid- and base-pretreated biomass hydrolyzate at high solids loading Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evolved strains of Scheffersomyces stipitis achieving high ethanol productivity on acid- and base-pretreated biomass hydrolyzate at high solids loading × You are accessing a

  13. Vehicle Certification Test Fuel and Ethanol Flex Fuel Quality | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Vehicle Certification Test Fuel and Ethanol Flex Fuel Quality Vehicle Certification Test Fuel and Ethanol Flex Fuel Quality Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-B: End Use and Fuel Certification Paul Machiele, Center Director for Fuel Programs, Office of Transportation & Air Quality, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency PDF icon b13_machiele_2-b.pdf More Documents & Publications High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation Fuels The

  14. More Efficient Ethanol Production from Mixed Sugars Using Spathaspora Yeast

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Energy Innovation Portal More Efficient Ethanol Production from Mixed Sugars Using Spathaspora Yeast Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Contact GLBRC About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryEthanol obtained from the fermentation of grains and sugars is being blended with gasoline to bolster dwindling petroleum supplies. The alcohol increases combustion efficiency and octane value, and can be fermented from renewable corn cobs, stalks, cane and grasses. Still, it is essential

  15. Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Model | Department of Energy Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State of Technology Model Biochemical Production of Ethanol from Corn Stover: 2007 State of Technology Model An update to the FY 2005 assessment of the state of technical research progress toward biochemical process goals. This assessment containins research results from 2006 and 2007. PDF icon 43205.pdf More Documents & Publications Process Design and Economics for Biochemical Conversion of

  16. Ethanol-to-Hydrocarbon Technology Moves Closer to Commercialization |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Ethanol-to-Hydrocarbon Technology Moves Closer to Commercialization Ethanol-to-Hydrocarbon Technology Moves Closer to Commercialization December 16, 2015 - 2:23pm Addthis Dr. Chaitanya Narula led analysis of an Oak Ride National Laboratory biofuel-to-hydrocarbon conversion technology to explain the underlying process. Photo courtesy Oak Ride National Laboratory. Dr. Chaitanya Narula led analysis of an Oak Ride National Laboratory biofuel-to-hydrocarbon conversion

  17. Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics Utilizing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Co-Current Dilute Acid Prehydrolysis and Enzymatic Hydrolysis For Corn Stover | Department of Energy Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics Utilizing Co-Current Dilute Acid Prehydrolysis and Enzymatic Hydrolysis For Corn Stover Lignocellulosic Biomass to Ethanol Process Design and Economics Utilizing Co-Current Dilute Acid Prehydrolysis and Enzymatic Hydrolysis For Corn Stover This report is an update of NREL's ongoing process design and economic analyses of

  18. NREL Refinery Process Shows Increased Effectiveness of Producing Ethanol

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    from Algae | Department of Energy NREL Refinery Process Shows Increased Effectiveness of Producing Ethanol from Algae NREL Refinery Process Shows Increased Effectiveness of Producing Ethanol from Algae February 11, 2016 - 5:07pm Addthis A new biorefinery process developed by scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) has proven to be significantly more effective at

  19. Recovery and reuse of cellulase catalyst in an exzymatic cellulose hydrolysis process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodward, Jonathan (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1989-01-01

    A process for recovering cellulase from the hydrolysis of cellulose, and reusing it in subsequent hydrolyois procedures. The process utilizes a commercial adsorbent that efficiently removes cellulase from reaction products which can be easily removed by simple decantation.

  20. Modified cellulose synthase gene from Arabidopsis thaliana confers herbicide resistance to plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somerville, Chris R. (Portola Valley, CA); Scheible, Wolf (Golm, DE)

    2007-07-10

    Cellulose synthase ("CS"), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of cellulose in plants is inhibited by herbicides comprising thiazolidinones such as 5-tert-butyl-carbamoyloxy-3-(3-trifluromethyl)phenyl-4-thiazolidinone (TZ), isoxaben and 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB). Two mutant genes encoding isoxaben and TZ-resistant cellulose synthase have been isolated from isoxaben and TZ-resistant Arabidopsis thaliana mutants. When compared with the gene coding for isoxaben or TZ-sensitive cellulose synthase, one of the resistant CS genes contains a point mutation, wherein glycine residue 998 is replaced by an aspartic acid. The other resistant mutation is due to a threonine to isoleucine change at amino acid residue 942. The mutant CS gene can be used to impart herbicide resistance to a plant; thereby permitting the utilization of the herbicide as a single application at a concentration which ensures the complete or substantially complete killing of weeds, while leaving the transgenic crop plant essentially undamaged.

  1. Determination of saccharides and ethanol from biomass conversion using Raman spectroscopy: Effects of pretreatment and enzyme composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, Chien-Ju

    2010-05-16

    This dissertation focuses on the development of facile and rapid quantitative Raman spectroscopy measurements for the determination of conversion products in producing bioethanol from corn stover. Raman spectroscopy was chosen to determine glucose, xylose and ethanol in complex hydrolysis and fermentation matrices. Chapter 1 describes the motives and main goals of this work, and includes an introduction to biomass, commonly used pretreatment methods, hydrolysis and fermentation reactions. The principles of Raman spectroscopy, its advantages and applications related to biomass analysis are also illustrated. Chapter 2 and 3 comprise two published or submitted manuscripts, and the thesis concludes with an appendix. In Chapter 2, a Raman spectroscopic protocol is described to study the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by measuring the main product in hydrolysate, glucose. Two commonly utilized pretreatment methods were investigated in order to understand their effect on glucose measurements by Raman spectroscopy. Second, a similar method was set up to determine the concentration of ethanol in fermentation broth. Both of these measurements are challenged by the presence of complex matrices. In Chapter 3, a quantitative comparison of pretreatment protocols and the effect of enzyme composition are studied using systematic methods. A multipeak fitting algorithm was developed to analyze spectra of hydrolysate containing two analytes: glucose and xylose. Chapter 4 concludes with a future perspective of this research area. An appendix describes a convenient, rapid spectrophotometric method developed to measure cadmium in water. This method requires relatively low cost instrumentation and can be used in microgravity, such as space shuttles or the International Space Station. This work was performed under the supervision of Professor Marc Porter while at Iowa State University. Research related to producing biofuel from bio-renewable resources, especially bioethanol from biomass, has grown significantly in the past decade due to the high demand and rising costs of fossil fuels. More than 3 percent of the energy consumption in the U.S. is derived from renewable biomass, mostly through industrial heat and steam production by the pulp and paper industry, and electricity generation from municipal solid waste (MSW) and forest industry residues. The utilization of food-based biomass to make fuels has been widely criticized because it may increase food shortages throughout the world and raise the cost of food. Thus, nonfood-based and plentiful lignocellulosic feedstocks, such as corn stover, perennial grass, bagasse, sorghum, wheat/rice straw, herbaceous and woody crops, have great potential to be new bio-renewable sources for energy production. Given that many varieties of biomass are available, there is need for a rapid, simple, high-throughput method to screen the conversion of many plant varieties. The most suitable species for each geographic region must be determined, as well as the optimal stage of harvest, impacts of environmental conditions (temperature, soil, pH, etc.). Various genetically modified plants should be studied in order to establish the desired biomass in bioethanol production. The main screening challenge, however, is the complexity of plant cell wall structures that make reliable and sensitive analysis difficult. To date, one of the most popular methods to produce lignocellulosic ethanol is to perform enzymatic hydrolysis followed by fermentation of the hydrolysate with yeast. There are several vital needs related to the field of chemistry that have been suggested as primary research foci needed to effectively improve lignocellulosic ethanol production. These topics include overcoming the recalcitrance of cellulosic biomass, the pervasiveness of pretreatment, advanced biological processing and better feedstocks. In this thesis, a novel approach using Raman spectroscopy has been developed to address important issues related to bioethanol generation, which will aid the research aimed to solve the topics m

  2. DECREASE Final Technical Report: Development of a Commercial Ready Enzyme Application System for Ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teter, Sarah A

    2012-04-18

    Conversion of biomass to sugars plays a central in reducing our dependence on petroleum, as it allows production of a wide range of biobased fuels and chemicals, through fermentation of those sugars. The DECREASE project delivers an effective enzyme cocktail for this conversion, enabling reduced costs for producing advanced biofuels such as cellulosic ethanol. Benefits to the public contributed by growth of the advanced biofuels industry include job creation, economic growth, and energy security. The DECREASE primary project objective was to develop a two-fold improved enzyme cocktail, relative to an advanced cocktail (CZP00005) that had been developed previously (from 2000- 2007). While the final milestone was delivery of all enzyme components as an experimental mixture, a secondary objective was to deploy an improved cocktail within 3 years following the close of the project. In February 2012, Novozymes launched Cellic CTec3, a multi-enzyme cocktail derived in part from components developed under DECREASE. The externally validated performance of CTec3 and an additional component under project benchmarking conditions indicated a 1.8-fold dose reduction in enzyme dose required for 90% conversion (based on all available glucose and xylose sources) of NREL dilute acid pretreated PCS, relative to the starting advanced enzyme cocktail. While the ability to achieve 90% conversion is impressive, targeting such high levels of biomass digestion is likely not the most cost effective strategy. Novozymes techno economic modeling showed that for NREL's dilute acid pretreated corn stover (PCS), 80% target conversion enables a lower total production cost for cellulosic ethanol than for 90% conversion, and this was also found to be the case when cost assumptions were based on the NREL 2002 Design Report. A 1.8X dose-reduction was observed for 80% conversion in the small scale (50 g) DECREASE benchmark assay for CTec3 and an additional component. An upscaled experiment (in 0.5 kg kettle reactors) was performed to compare the starting enzyme mixture CZP00005 with CTec3 alone; these results indicated a 1.9X dose- reduction for 80% conversion. The CTec3 composition does not include the best available enzyme components from the DECREASE effort. While these components are not yet available in a commercial product, experimental mixtures were assayed in a smaller scale assay using DECREASE PCS, at high solids loadings (21.5% TS). The results indicated that the newer mixtures required 2.9X-less enzyme for 90% conversion, and 3.2X-less enzyme for 80% conversion, relative to the starting enzyme cocktail. In conclusion, CTec3 delivers a 1.8-1.9X dose reduction on NREL PCS at high solids loadings, and the next generation enzyme from Novozymes will continue to show dramatically improved biochemical performance. CTec3 allows reduced costs today, and the experimental cocktails point to continued biotechnological improvements that will further drive down costs for biorefineries of tomorrow.

  3. Ethanol Dehydration to Ethylene in a Stratified Autothermal Millisecond Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, MJ; Michor, EL; Fan, W; Tsapatsis, M; Bhan, A; Schmidt, LD

    2011-08-10

    The concurrent decomposition and deoxygenation of ethanol was accomplished in a stratified reactor with 50-80 ms contact times. The stratified reactor comprised an upstream oxidation zone that contained Pt-coated Al(2)O(3) beads and a downstream dehydration zone consisting of H-ZSM-5 zeolite films deposited on Al(2)O(3) monoliths. Ethanol conversion, product selectivity, and reactor temperature profiles were measured for a range of fuel:oxygen ratios for two autothermal reactor configurations using two different sacrificial fuel mixtures: a parallel hydrogen-ethanol feed system and a series methane-ethanol feed system. Increasing the amount of oxygen relative to the fuel resulted in a monotonic increase in ethanol conversion in both reaction zones. The majority of the converted carbon was in the form of ethylene, where the ethanol carbon-carbon bonds stayed intact while the oxygen was removed. Over 90% yield of ethylene was achieved by using methane as a sacrificial fuel. These results demonstrate that noble metals can be successfully paired with zeolites to create a stratified autothermal reactor capable of removing oxygen from biomass model compounds in a compact, continuous flow system that can be configured to have multiple feed inputs, depending on process restrictions.

  4. Evaluation of Exothermic Reactions from Bulk-Vitrification Melter Feeds Containing Cellulose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheele, Randall D.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Bos, Stanley J.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Berry, Pam

    2007-06-25

    PNNL has demonstrated that cellulose effectively reduces the amount of molten ionic salt during Bulk Vitrification of simulated Hanford Low Level Waste (LLW). To address concerns about the potential reactivity of cellulose-LLW, PNNL used thermogravimetric analysis, differential thermal analysis, and accelerating rate calorimetry to determine in these preliminary studies that these mixtures will support a self-sustaining reaction if heated to 110C at adiabatic conditions. Additional testing is recommended.

  5. Feasibility study of fuel grade ethanol plant for Alcohol Fuels of Mississippi, Inc. , Vicksburg, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-01-01

    The results are presented of a feasibility study performed to determine the technical and economic viability of constructing an alcohol plant utilizing the N.Y.U. continuous acid hydrolysis process to convert wood wastes to fuel grade alcohol. The following is a summary of the results: (1) The proposed site in the Vicksburg Industrial Foundation Corporation Industrial Park is adequate from all standpoints, for all plant capacities envisioned. (2) Local hardwood sawmills can provide adequate feedstock for the facility. The price per dry ton varies between $5 and $15. (3) Sale of fuel ethanol would be made primarily through local distributors and an adequate market exists for the plant output. (4) With minor modifications to the preparation facilities, other waste cellulose materials can also be utilized. (5) There are no anticipated major environmental, health, safety or socioeconomic risks related to the construction and operation of the proposed facility. (6) The discounted cash flow and rate of return analysis indicated that the smallest capacity unit which should be built is the 16 million gallon per year plant, utilizing cogeneration. This facility has a 3.24 year payback. (7) The 25 million gallon per year plant utilizing cogeneration is an extremely attractive venture, with a zero interest break-even point of 1.87 years, and with a discounted rate of return of 73.6%. (8) While the smaller plant capacities are unattractive from a budgetary viewpoint, a prudent policy would dictate that a one million gallon per year plant be built first, as a demonstration facility. This volume contains process flowsheets and maps of the proposed site.

  6. Reaction Rates and Catalysts in Ethanol Production (1 Activity)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Students will have the opportunity to investigate alternative catalysts for the degradation of hydrogen peroxide, which will be used as a model system for the breaking down of cellulose into sugar. After identifying other potential catalysts, students will develop their own research question about catalysts and conduct an additional experiment of their own design to investigate their question.

  7. Overcoming the Recalcitrance of Cellulosic Biomass by Value Prior to Pulping: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-221

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowell, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Value Prior to Pulping (VPP) project goal was to demonstrate the technical and commercial feasibility of introducing a new value stream into existing pulp and paper mills. Essentially the intent was to transfer the energy content of extracted hemicellulose from electricity and steam generated in the recovery boiler to a liquid transportation fuel. The hemicellulose fraction was extracted prior to pulping, fractionated, or conditioned if necessary, and fermented to ethanol. Commercial adaptation of the process to wood hemicelluloses was a prerequisite for using this less currently valued component available from biomass and wood. These hemicelluloses are predominately glucurono-xylan in hardwoods and galactoglucomannan in softwoods (with a significant softwood component of an arabino-xylan) and will yield fermentation substrates different from cellulose. NREL provided its expertise in the area of fermentation host evaluation using its Zymomonas strains on the CleanTech Partner's (CTP) VPP project. The project was focused on the production of fuel ethanol and acetic acid from hemicellulose streams generated from wood chips of industrially important hardwood and softwood species. NREL was one of four partners whose ethanologen was tested on the hydrolyzed extracts. The use of commercially available enzymes to treat oligomeric sugar extracts was also investigated and coupled with fermentation. Fermentations by NREL were conducted with the Zymomonas mobilis organism with most of the work being performed with the 8b strain. The wood extracts hydrolyzed and/or fermented by NREL were those derived from maple, mixed southern hardwoods, and loblolly pine. An unhydrolyzed variant of the mixed southern hardwood extract possessed a large concentration of oligomeric sugars and enzymatic hydrolysis was performed with a number of enzymes, followed by fermentation. The fermentation of the wood extracts was carried out at bench scale in flasks or small bioreactors, with a maximum volume of 500 mL.

  8. Isolation of levoglucosan from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moens, L.

    1994-12-06

    High purity levoglucosan is obtained from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose by: mixing pyrolysis oil with water and a basic metal hydroxide, oxide, or salt in amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of from about 12 to about 12.5, and adding an amount of the hydroxide, oxide, or salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range until colored materials of impurities from the oil are removed and a slurry is formed; drying the slurry azeotropically with methyl isobutyl ketone solvent to form a residue, and further drying the residue by evaporation; reducing the residue into a powder; continuously extracting the powder residue with ethyl acetate to provide a levoglucosan-rich extract; and concentrating the extract by removing ethyl acetate to provide crystalline levoglucosan. Preferably, Ca(OH)[sub 2] is added to adjust the pH to the elevated values, and then Ca(OH)[sub 2] is added in an excess amount needed. 3 figures.

  9. Cellulose triacetate based novel optical sensor for uranium estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, J.M.; Pathak, P.N.; Pandey, A.K.; Manchanda, V.K.

    2008-07-01

    A cellulose triacetate (CTA) based optode has been developed by immobilizing tricapryl-methyl ammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) as the extractant and 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5- diethyl-aminophenol (Br-PADAP) as the chromophore. The optode changes color (from yellow to magenta) due to uranium uptake in bicarbonate medium ({approx}10{sup -4} M) at pH 7-8 in the presence of triethanolamine (TEA) buffer. The detection limit of the optode film (dimension: 3 cm x 1 cm) was determined to be {approx}0.3 {mu}g/mL for a 15 mL pure uranium sample at pH 7-8 (in TEA buffer). The effects of experimental parameters have been evaluated in terms of maximum uptake of U(VI), minimum response time, and reproducibility and stability of the Br-PADAP-U(VI ) complex formed in the optode matrix. The applicability of the optimized optode has been examined in the effluent samples obtained during magnesium diuranate precipitation step following the TBP purification cycle. (authors)

  10. Isolation of levoglucosan from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

    1994-01-01

    High purity levoglucosan is obtained from pyrolysis oil derived from cellulose by: mixing pyrolysis oil with water and a basic metal hydroxide, oxide, or salt in amount sufficient to elevate pH values to a range of from about 12 to about 12.5, and adding an amount of the hydroxide, oxide, or salt in excess of the amount needed to obtain the pH range until colored materials of impurities from the oil are removed and a slurry is formed; drying the slurry azeotropically with methyl isobutyl ketone solvent to form a residue, and further drying the residue by evaporation; reducing the residue into a powder; continuously extracting the powder residue with ethyl acetate to provide a levoglucosan-rich extract; and concentrating the extract by removing ethyl acetate to provide crystalline levoglucosan. Preferably, Ca(OH).sub.2 is added to adjust the pH to the elevated values, and then Ca(OH).sub.2 is added in an excess amount needed.

  11. Imaging the condensation and evaporation of molecularly thin ethanol films with surface forces apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Gutian; Tan, Qiyan; Xiang, Li; Zhang, Di; Ni, Zhonghua E-mail: yunfeichen@seu.edu.cn; Yi, Hong; Chen, Yunfei E-mail: yunfeichen@seu.edu.cn

    2014-01-15

    A new method for imaging condensation and evaporation of molecularly thin ethanol films is reported. It is found that the first adsorbed layer of ethanol film on mica surface behaves as solid like structure that cannot flow freely. With the increase of exposure time, more ethanol molecules condense over the mica surface in the saturated ethanol vapor condition. The first layer of adsorbed ethanol film is about 3.8 thick measured from the surface forces apparatus, which is believed to be the average diameter of ethanol molecules while they are confined in between two atomically smooth mica surfaces.

  12. Fact #679: June 13, 2011 U.S. Imports of Fuel Ethanol Drop Sharply |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 9: June 13, 2011 U.S. Imports of Fuel Ethanol Drop Sharply Fact #679: June 13, 2011 U.S. Imports of Fuel Ethanol Drop Sharply U.S. imports of fuel ethanol were low until 2004 when imports began to rise sharply. By 2006 imports of fuel ethanol reached a record high of 735.8 million gallons. As domestic supply of fuel ethanol increased to meet demand, imports of fuel ethanol began to drop after 2006. By 2010, imports declined to pre-2004 levels. Annual U.S. Imports of Fuel

  13. Analysis of Fuel Ethanol Transportation Activity and Potential Distribution Constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Sujit; Peterson, Bruce E; Chin, Shih-Miao

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of fuel ethanol transportation activity and potential distribution constraints if the total 36 billion gallons of renewable fuel use by 2022 is mandated by EPA under the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. Ethanol transport by domestic truck, marine, and rail distribution systems from ethanol refineries to blending terminals is estimated using Oak Ridge National Laboratory s (ORNL s) North American Infrastructure Network Model. Most supply and demand data provided by EPA were geo-coded and using available commercial sources the transportation infrastructure network was updated. The percentage increases in ton-mile movements by rail, waterways, and highways in 2022 are estimated to be 2.8%, 0.6%, and 0.13%, respectively, compared to the corresponding 2005 total domestic flows by various modes. Overall, a significantly higher level of future ethanol demand would have minimal impacts on transportation infrastructure. However, there will be spatial impacts and a significant level of investment required because of a considerable increase in rail traffic from refineries to ethanol distribution terminals.

  14. Fermentation pattern of sucrose to ethanol conversions by Zymomonas mobilis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyness, E.; Doelle, H.W.

    1981-07-01

    General patterns of sucrose fermentation by two strains of Zymomonas mobilis, designated Z7 and Z10, were established using sucrose concentrations from 50 to 200 g/liter. Strain Z7 showed a higher invertase activity than Z10. Strain Z10 showed a reduced specific growth rate at high sucrose concentrations while Z7 was unaffected. High sucrose hydrolyzing activity in strain Z7 lead to glucose accumulation in the medium at high sucrose concentrations. Ethanol production and fermentation time depend on the rate of catabolism of the products of sucrose hydrolysis, glucose and fructose. The metabolic quotients for sucrose utilization, qs, and ethanol production, qp (g/g.hr), are unsuitable for describing sucrose utilization by Zymomonas mobilis as the logarithmic phase of growth precedes the phase of highest substrate utilization (g/liter.hr) and ethanol production (g/liter.hr) in batch culture. (Refs. 10).

  15. Section 2, Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Route Feedstock Abengoa 25 Cellulosic Ethanol Biochemical Agricultural Residue POET-DSM 25 Cellulosic Ethanol Biochemical Agricultural Residue INEOS New Planet Bioenergy 8 ...

  16. Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program Plan, March...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Route Feedstock Abengoa 25 Cellulosic Ethanol Biochemical Agricultural Residue POET-DSM 25 Cellulosic Ethanol Biochemical Agricultural Residue INEOS New Planet Bioenergy 8 ...

  17. Bioenergy Success Stories

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    61 Bioenergy Success Stories en Largest Cellulosic Ethanol Plant in the World Opened in October http:energy.goveeresuccess-storiesarticleslargest-cellulosic-ethanol-plant-wor...

  18. Breakthrough in Bioenergy: American Process Sells First RIN-qualified...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    API ships first RIN-qualified cellulosic ethanol from their Alpena Biorefinery. Photo: Alex Wisniewski API ships first RIN-qualified cellulosic ethanol from their Alpena...

  19. Bioenergy Success Stories | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    EERE's bioenergy success stories below. November 30, 2015 The DuPont cellulosic ethanol facility in Nevada, Iowa, will produce about 30 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol...

  20. BioEnergy Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    most exciting, recent accomplishments. September 3, 2014 Cellulosic ethanol biorefinery Four Cellulosic Ethanol Breakthroughs Today, the nation's first ever commercial-scale...