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1

DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol Place Itasca, Illinois Zip 60143 Product DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol is a joint venture to develop technologies for cellulosic ethanol. Coordinates 32.1666°, -97.154369° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.1666,"lon":-97.154369,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

Cellulosic ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cellulosic ethanol Cellulosic ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Cellethanol.jpg Cellulosic ethanol is identical to first generation bio ethanol except that it can be derived from agricultural residues, other lignocellulosic raw materials or energy crops. These lignocellulosic raw materials are more widely available than the standard material used for ethanol. They are also considered to be more sustainable, however they need to be broken down (hydrolysed) into simple sugars prior to distillation, a much more complex process than the first generation bioethanol. It first must go through pretreatment,hydrolysis then a conversion. Research since the 1970s and large investments are being made in the US and Europe to speed up development of this route to bioethanol. Biomass refineries like Inbicon in Denmark are producing

3

Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Biorefinery Groundbreaking Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Biorefinery Groundbreaking October...

4

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State

5

Definition: Cellulosic ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dictionary.png Dictionary.png Cellulosic ethanol An advanced type of biofuel that is produced by breaking down and using the cellulose compound found in trees and grasses.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Cellulosic ethanol is a biofuel produced from wood, grasses, or the inedible parts of plants. It is a type of biofuel produced from lignocellulose, a structural material that comprises much of the mass of plants. Lignocellulose is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Corn stover, Panicum virgatum (switchgrass), Miscanthus grass species, wood chips and the byproducts of lawn and tree maintenance are some of the more popular cellulosic materials for ethanol production. Production of ethanol from lignocellulose has the advantage of abundant and

6

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DANISCO U.S. INC. (f/k/a GENENCOR INTERNATIONAL,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DANISCO U.S. INC. (f/k/a GENENCOR INTERNATIONAL, DANISCO U.S. INC. (f/k/a GENENCOR INTERNATIONAL, INC.) FOR WAIVER OF U.S. COMPETITIVENESS PROVISION IN W(A)-00- 013 FOR SUBCONTRACT ZCO-0-30017-01 UNDER THE MIDWEST RESEARCH INSTITUTE'S MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACT DE-AC36-98GO10337 NREL and Danisco entered into subcontract ZCO-0-30017-01 to conduct research and development work relating to cellulase cost reduction for bioethanol production. In connection with the subcontract, Danisco also licensed certain NREL patents, subject to 35 USC 202-204. The goal of the research project was the development of low-cost cellulase enzymes that can be used to convert biomass into fuel ethanol. Danisco requested, and was granted waiver W(A)-00- 013, which was submitted with this petition, and which includes the U.S. Competitiveness

7

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit A qualified investor may receive a tax credit of up to 40% of an

8

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Cellulosic Ethanol Investment Tax Credit A tax credit is available for investments in a qualified small business

9

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Cellulosic Ethanol Production Financing The Kansas Development Finance Authority may issue revenue bonds to cover

10

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale July 31, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis...

11

Research Advances Cellulosic Ethanol, NREL Leads the Way (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure highlights NREL's recent advances in cellulosic ethanol production. Research at NREL addresses both biochemical and thermochemical processes.

Not Available

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Energy Corn for Cellulosic Ethanol - National Renewable Energy ...  

edenspace. Edenspace: A Track Record of Success Improved crop feedstocks for cellulosic ethanol Superb development team includes NREL,

13

The Role of Cellulosic Ethanol in Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum provides essentially all of the energy used today in the transportation sector. To reduce this dependence on fossil energy, other fuels are beginning to be used, notably ethanol and biodiesel. Almost all fuel ethanol is produced by the conversion of corn grain to starch with subsequent fermentation to ethanol. In 2006, almost 5 billion gallons of fuel ethanol were produced, which used 17% of domestic corn production. The DOE has a goal to displace 30% of motor gasoline demand or 60 billion gallons per year by 2030. To achieve this goal, production of ethanol from lignocellulosic sources (e.g., agricultural residues, forest residues, and dedicated energy crops) is needed. This paper will describe the production of cellulosic ethanol as well as the issues and benefits associated with its production.

Robert M. Neilson, Jr.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Name Belize-OAS Cellulosic Ethanol Market Assessment Agency/Company /Organization Organization of American States (OAS) Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Biomass Topics Market analysis, Background analysis Website http://www.sepa-americas.net/p Program Start 2008 Program End 2009 Country Belize UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References OAS Project Database[1] "The main objective of the Project is to assess the market potential for cellulosic ethanol in Belize through sustainable implementation of cellulosic ethanol technology utilizing agricultural and forest residues as primary biomass feedstock. A supplementary objective will be to help prepare for potential future cellulosic ethanol projects in other Caribbean

15

NREL Proves Cellulosic Ethanol Can Be Cost Competitive (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Ethanol from non-food sources - known as "cellulosic ethanol" - is a near-perfect transportation fuel: it is clean, domestic, abundant, and renewable, and it can potentially replace 30% of the petroleum consumed in the United States, but its relatively high cost has limited its market. That changed in 2012, when the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) demonstrated the technical advances needed to produce cellulosic ethanol at a minimum ethanol selling price of $2.15/gallon (in 2007 dollars). Through a multi-year research project involving private industry, NREL has proven that cellulosic ethanol can be cost competitive with other transportation fuels.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Biorefinery Groundbreaking Secretary Bodman Touts Importance of Cellulosic Ethanol at Georgia Biorefinery Groundbreaking October 6, 2007 - 4:21pm Addthis SOPERTON, GA - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today attended a groundbreaking ceremony for Range Fuels' biorefinery - one of the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol biorefineries - and made the following statement. "Together, the Department of Energy and private sector pioneers, such as Range Fuels, are blending science and technology to advance the President's goal of reducing our dependence on foreign oil," U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman said. "The production of cost-competitive cellulosic ethanol is a significant part of America's energy future. This new

17

Genes and Mechanisms for Improving Cellulosic Ethanol ...  

Background Cellulosic biomass accounts for roughly 75% of all plant material, and can be used to produce biofuels. Sources of cellulosic biomass ...

18

Genes and Mechanisms for Improving Cellulosic Ethanol ...  

Cellulosic biomass accounts for roughly 75% of all plant material, and can be used to produce biofuels. Sources of cellulosic biomass include ...

19

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale July 31, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department today recognized the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol production at INEOS Bio's Indian River BioEnergy Center in Vero Beach, Florida. Developed through a joint venture between INEOS Bio and New Planet Energy, the project uses a unique hybrid of gasification and fermentation technology - originally developed with Energy Department support starting in the 1990's - to convert wood scraps, grass clippings and other waste materials into transportation fuels as well as energy for heat and power.

20

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale July 31, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Energy Department today recognized the nation's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol production at INEOS Bio's Indian River BioEnergy Center in Vero Beach, Florida. Developed through a joint venture between INEOS Bio and New Planet Energy, the project uses a unique hybrid of gasification and fermentation technology - originally developed with Energy Department support starting in the 1990's - to convert wood scraps, grass clippings and other waste materials into transportation fuels as well as energy for heat and power.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Life cycle analysis of hybrid poplar trees for cellulosic ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main purpose of this paper is to assess the energy and environmental benefits of cultivating hybrid poplars as a biomass crop for cellulosic ethanol. A "Life Cycle Assessment" (LCA) methodology is used to systematically ...

Huang, Jessica J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Conversion of bagasse cellulose into ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study conducted by Arkenol was designed to test the conversion of feedstocks such as sugar cane bagasse, sorghum, napier grass and rice straw into fermentable sugars, and then ferment these sugars using natural yeasts and genetically engineered Zymomonis mobilis bacteria (ZM). The study did convert various cellulosic feedstocks into fermentable sugars utilizing the patented Arkenol Concentrated Acid Hydrolysis Process and equipment at the Arkenol Technology Center in Orange, California. The sugars produced using this process were in the concentration range of 12--15%, much higher than the sugar concentrations the genetically engineered ZM bacteria had been developed for. As a result, while the ZM bacteria fermented the produced sugars without initial inhibition, the completion of high sugar concentration fermentations was slower and at lower yield than predicted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Natural yeasts performed as expected by Arkenol, similar to the results obtained over the last four years of testing. Overall, at sugar concentrations in the 10--13% range, yeast produced 850090% theoretical ethanol yields and ZM bacteria produced 82--87% theoretical yields in 96 hour fermentations. Additional commercialization work revealed the ability to centrifugally separate and recycle the ZM bacteria after fermentation, slight additional benefits from mixed culture ZM bacteria fermentations, and successful utilization of defined media for ZM bacteria fermentation nutrients in lieu of natural media.

Cuzens, J.E.

1997-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

23

Production of ethanol from cellulose (sawdust).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The production of ethanol from food such as corn, cassava etc. is the most predominate way of producing ethanol. This has led to a shortage (more)

Otulugbu, Kingsley

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the lowest cost feedstock sources for cellulosic ethanolfeedstock costs along with achieving high yields of ethanol can result in significant improvements in the economics of cellulosic

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulose and xylose to ethanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35[degrees]C to about 40[degrees]C until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol.

Lastick, S.M.; Mohagheghi, A.; Tucker, M.P.; Grohmann, K.

1991-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

26

Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulose and xylose to ethanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35{degrees}C to about 40{degrees}C until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol.

Lastick, S.M.; Mohagheghi, A.; Tucker, M.P.; Grohmann, K.

1991-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

27

EA-1694: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Highlands Ethanol, LLC, for the Cellulosic Ethanol Facility in Highlands County, Florida  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to issue a Federal loan guarantee to Highlands Ethanol, LLC, for a cellulosic ethanol facility in Highlands County, Florida. This EA is on hold.

28

An Environmental and Policy Evaluation of Cellulosic Ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the global demand for energy rises, there are significant efforts to find alternative energy sources. In the United States (US), these efforts are primarily motivated by a desire to increase energy security and reduce the potential impacts on climate change caused by carbon dioxide emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Biofuels are considered a potential partial solution, which are being encouraged through public policy. Cellulosic ethanol is a biofuel that is required in increasing amounts over time as part of the Renewable Fuel Standards. Thus, researchers are exploring the environmental impacts of using this biofuel on a large scale. This dissertation research performed an environmental evaluation using the Life Cycle Assessment technique on Bioenergy Sorghum, a crop which was specifically produced as an energy crop, used in a conversion process (MixAlco version 1) that can produce cellulosic ethanol. Results indicate that the conversion process is highly optimized with minimal environmental concerns. Analysis of the crop production, however, demonstrate that further investigation is warranted regarding the depletion of natural resources and emissions from the fertilizers and pesticides/herbicides, due to large scale production of energy crops. A new policy is proposed to support the sustainable, environmentally responsible development of cellulosic ethanol in the US.

Hurtado, Lisa Diane

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Method for producing ethanol and co-products from cellulosic biomass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention generally relates to processes for production of ethanol from cellulosic biomass. The present invention also relates to production of various co-products of preparation of ethanol from cellulosic biomass. The present invention further relates to improvements in one or more aspects of preparation of ethanol from cellulosic biomass including, for example, improved methods for cleaning biomass feedstocks, improved acid impregnation, and improved steam treatment, or "steam explosion."

Nguyen, Quang A

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Enriching and characterizing an aerotolerant mixed microbial community capable of cellulose hydrolysis and ethanol production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cellulosic ethanol produced via consolidated bioprocessing may one day be a viable alternative to fossil fuels However, efforts must focus on streamlining and simplifying its (more)

Ronan, Patrick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Fair Oaks Dairy Farms Cellulosic Ethanol Technology Review Summary  

SciTech Connect

At Fair Oaks Dairy, dried manure solids (''DMS'') are currently used as a low value compost. United Power was engaged to evaluate the feasibility of processing these DMS into ethanol utilizing commercially available cellulosic biofuels conversion platforms. The Fair Oaks Dairy group is transitioning their traditional ''manure to methane'' mesophilic anaerobic digester platform to an integrated bio-refinery centered upon thermophilic digestion. Presently, the Digested Manure Solids (DMS) are used as a low value soil amendment (compost). United Power evaluated the feasibility of processing DMS into higher value ethanol utilizing commercially available cellulosic biofuels conversion platforms. DMS was analyzed and over 100 potential technology providers were reviewed and evaluated. DMS contains enough carbon to be suitable as a biomass feedstock for conversion into ethanol by gasification technology, or as part of a conversion process that would include combined heat and power. In the first process, 100% of the feedstock is converted into ethanol. In the second process, the feedstock is combusted to provide heat to generate electrical power supporting other processes. Of the 100 technology vendors evaluated, a short list of nine technology providers was developed. From this, two vendors were selected as finalists (one was an enzymatic platform and one was a gasification platform). Their selection was based upon the technical feasibility of their systems, engineering expertise, experience in commercial or pilot scale operations, the ability or willingness to integrate the system into the Fair Oaks Biorefinery, the know-how or experience in producing bio-ethanol, and a clear path to commercial development.

Andrew Wold; Robert Divers

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

32

Cellulosic Biomass Feedstocks and Logistics for Ethanol Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The economic competitiveness of cellulosic ethanol production is highly dependent on feedstock cost, which constitutes 3550% of the total ethanol production cost, depending on various geographical factors and the types of systems used for harvesting, collecting, preprocessing, transporting, and handling the material. Consequently, as the deployment of cellulosic ethanol biorefi neries approaches, feedstock cost and availability are the driving factors that infl uence pioneer biorefi nery locations and will largely control the rate at which this industry grows. Initial scenarios were postulated to develop a pioneer dry feedstock supply system design case as a demonstration of the current state of technology. Based on this pioneer design, advanced scenarios were developed to determine key cost barriers, needed supply system improvements, and technology advancements to achieve government and private sector cost targets. Analysis of the pioneer supply system resulted in a delivered feedstock cost to the throat of the pretreatment reactor of $37.00 per dry tonne (2002 $). Pioneer supply systems will start by using current infrastructure and technologies and be individually designed for biorefi neries using specifi c feedstock types and varieties based on local geographic conditions. As the industry develops and cost barriers are addressed, the supply systems will incorporate advanced technologies that will eliminate downstream diversity and provide a uniform, tailored feedstock for multiple biorefi neries located in different regions.

J. Richard Hess; Christopher T. Wright; Kevin L. Kenney

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Cellulosic Ethanol Technology on Track to Being Competitive With Other Transportation Fuels (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have been driving down the cost of cellulosic ethanol and overcoming the technical challenges that surround it-major milestones toward the Department of Energy (DOE) goal of making cellulosic ethanol cost-competitive by 2012.

Not Available

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

NREL: Continuum Magazine - At $2.15 a Gallon, Cellulosic Ethanol Could Be  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

At $2.15 a Gallon, Cellulosic Ethanol Could Be Cost Competitive At $2.15 a Gallon, Cellulosic Ethanol Could Be Cost Competitive Issue 5 Print Version Share this resource At $2.15 a Gallon, Cellulosic Ethanol Could Be Cost Competitive DOE challenge met-research advances cut costs to produce fuel from non-food plant sources. A photo showing a silhouette of a man wearing glass in a dark room lit only by a band of light consisting or red, blue, and white dots (26186). Enlarge image In NREL's new Energy Systems Integration Facility, the Insight Collaboration Laboratory shows a 3D model of cellulose microfibrils. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL Imagine a near perfect transportation fuel-it's clean, domestic, abundant, and renewable. Now imagine that it's also affordable. Bringing this vision closer to reality was the challenge the U.S.

35

Preliminary Economics for the Production of Pyrolysis Oil from Lignin in a Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cellulosic ethanol biorefinery economics can be potentially improved by converting by-product lignin into high valued products. Cellulosic biomass is composed mainly of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery, cellulose and hemicellullose are converted to ethanol via fermentation. The raw lignin portion is the partially dewatered stream that is separated from the product ethanol and contains lignin, unconverted feed and other by-products. It can be burned as fuel for the plant or can be diverted into higher-value products. One such higher-valued product is pyrolysis oil, a fuel that can be further upgraded into motor gasoline fuels. While pyrolysis of pure lignin is not a good source of pyrolysis liquids, raw lignin containing unconverted feed and by-products may have potential as a feedstock. This report considers only the production of the pyrolysis oil and does not estimate the cost of upgrading that oil into synthetic crude oil or finished gasoline and diesel. A techno-economic analysis for the production of pyrolysis oil from raw lignin was conducted. comparing two cellulosic ethanol fermentation based biorefineries. The base case is the NREL 2002 cellulosic ethanol design report case where 2000 MTPD of corn stover is fermented to ethanol (NREL 2002). In the base case, lignin is separated from the ethanol product, dewatered, and burned to produce steam and power. The alternate case considered in this report dries the lignin, and then uses fast pyrolysis to generate a bio-oil product. Steam and power are generated in this alternate case by burning some of the corn stover feed, rather than fermenting it. This reduces the annual ethanol production rate from 69 to 54 million gallons/year. Assuming a pyrolysis oil value similar to Btu-adjusted residual oil, the estimated ethanol selling price ranges from $1.40 to $1.48 (2007 $) depending upon the yield of pyrolysis oil. This is considerably above the target minimum ethanol selling price of $1.33 for the 2012 goal case process as reported in the 2007 State of Technology Model (NREL 2008). Hence, pyrolysis oil does not appear to be an economically attractive product in this scenario. Further research regarding fast pyrolysis of raw lignin from a cellulosic plant as an end product is not recommended. Other processes, such as high-pressure liquefaction or wet gasification, and higher value products, such as gasoline and diesel from fast pyrolysis oil should be considered in future studies.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A Probabilistic Inventory Analysis of Biomass for the State of Texas for Cellulosic Ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural and forestry wastes for the use of creating cellulosic ethanol were inventoried for each county in Texas. A simple forecast was created for each of the agricultural wastes and then a multivariate empirical distribution was used to simulate the range of biomass available by county and district. The probability that a district could support a 25, 50, 75, or 100 million gallon cellulosic ethanol plant is estimated from the Monte Carlo simulation results. Biomass in Texas is concentrated in the Northern and Eastern areas of the state. The areas of South and West Texas have little to no biomass available to use for cellulosic ethanol. The North East, South East, and Upper Coast districts include forestry waste that increase the amount of available biomass. With 100 percent certainty the North East and South East districts can support four 100 million gallon cellulosic ethanol plants each. The research found that there is more than enough biomass to support numerous cellulosic ethanol plants in Texas, and decision makers can use the results of this study to identify regions of low and high risk for available biomass from agricultural and forestry waste.

Gleinser, Matthew A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Physical Energy Accounting in California: A Case Study of Cellulosic Ethanol Production  

SciTech Connect

California's target for greenhouse gas reduction in part relies on the development of viable low-carbon fuel alternatives to gasoline. It is often assumed that cellulosic ethanol--ethanol made from the structural parts of a plant and not from the food parts--will be one of these alternatives. This study examines the physical viability of a switchgrass-based cellulosic ethanol industry in California from the point of view of the physical requirements of land, water, energy and other material use. Starting from a scenario in which existing irrigated pastureland and fiber-crop land is converted to switchgrass production, the analysis determines the total acreage and water supply available and the resulting total biofuel feedstock output under different assumed yields. The number and location of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries that can be supported is also determined, assuming that the distance from field to biorefinery would be minimized. The biorefinery energy input requirement, available energy from the fraction of biomass not converted to ethanol, and energy output is calculated at various levels of ethanol yields, making different assumptions about process efficiencies. The analysis shows that there is insufficient biomass (after cellulose separation and fermentation into ethanol) to provide all the process energy needed to run the biorefinery; hence, the purchase of external energy such as natural gas is required to produce ethanol from switchgrass. The higher the yield of ethanol, the more external energy is needed, so that the net gains due to improved process efficiency may not be positive. On 2.7 million acres of land planted in switchgrass in this scenario, the switchgrass outputproduces enough ethanol to substitute for only 1.2 to 4.0percent of California's gasoline consumption in 2007.

Coughlin, Katie; Fridley, David

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

38

Physical Energy Accounting in California: A Case Study of Cellulosic Ethanol Production  

SciTech Connect

California's target for greenhouse gas reduction in part relies on the development of viable low-carbon fuel alternatives to gasoline. It is often assumed that cellulosic ethanol--ethanol made from the structural parts of a plant and not from the food parts--will be one of these alternatives. This study examines the physical viability of a switchgrass-based cellulosic ethanol industry in California from the point of view of the physical requirements of land, water, energy and other material use. Starting from a scenario in which existing irrigated pastureland and fiber-crop land is converted to switchgrass production, the analysis determines the total acreage and water supply available and the resulting total biofuel feedstock output under different assumed yields. The number and location of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries that can be supported is also determined, assuming that the distance from field to biorefinery would be minimized. The biorefinery energy input requirement, available energy from the fraction of biomass not converted to ethanol, and energy output is calculated at various levels of ethanol yields, making different assumptions about process efficiencies. The analysis shows that there is insufficient biomass (after cellulose separation and fermentation into ethanol) to provide all the process energy needed to run the biorefinery; hence, the purchase of external energy such as natural gas is required to produce ethanol from switchgrass. The higher the yield of ethanol, the more external energy is needed, so that the net gains due to improved process efficiency may not be positive. On 2.7 million acres of land planted in switchgrass in this scenario, the switchgrass outputproduces enough ethanol to substitute for only 1.2 to 4.0percent of California's gasoline consumption in 2007.

Coughlin, Katie; Fridley, David

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

39

Assessing the Environmental Impacts of Cellulosic Bioethanol Production: An Ongoing Case Study of Switchgrass Production around Vonore, TN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the Vonore area, we will relate these changes in water quality to changes in economic criteria (e.g., target of Tennessee Biofuels Initiative. Managed by Genera Energy LLC and operated by DuPont Danisco Cellulosic

40

Process Design of Wastewater Treatment for the NREL Cellulosic Ethanol Model  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a preliminary process design for treating the wastewater from NREL's cellulosic ethanol production process to quality levels required for recycle. In this report Brown and Caldwell report on three main tasks: 1) characterization of the effluent from NREL's ammonia-conditioned hydrolyzate fermentation process; 2) development of the wastewater treatment process design; and 3) development of a capital and operational cost estimate for the treatment concept option. This wastewater treatment design was incorporated into NREL's cellulosic ethanol process design update published in May 2011 (NREL/TP-5100-47764).

Steinwinder, T.; Gill, E.; Gerhardt, M.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Cellulosic Ethanol Technology on Track to Being Competitive With...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 a gallon in 2010. References: Cellulose, Volume 16, No. 4, August 2009, Special issue: Corn Stover Conversion to Biofuels, Ed. Michael E. Himmel. M.M. Yung, K. A. Magrini-Bair,...

42

Research Advances Cellulosic Ethanol, NREL Leads the Way (Brochure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ethanol biorefinery. Cover image: Confocal laser microscope image of rind tissue in corn stover, showing the detailed structure of two vascular bundles. Improving the...

43

The economics of corn cob cellulosic ethanol for northwest Iowa.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??To meet the demand of the 2007 Energy Bill will require a new approach to ethanol production in the United States. The question persists: how (more)

Schany, William J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Final Environmental Assessment for Construction and Operation of a Proposed Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Plant, Range Fuels, Inc.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

i i n a l E n v i r o n m e n t a l A s s e s s m e n t Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Ethanol Plant, Range Fuels, Inc. Treutlen County, Georgia DOE/EA 1597 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy October 2007 Contents Section Page Contents........................................................................................................................................iii Acronyms and Abbreviations .................................................................................................vii 1.0 Introduction......................................................................................................................1 1.1 Background ..........................................................................................................1

45

Understanding the Growth of the Cellulosic Ethanol Industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report identifies, outlines, and documents a set of plausible scenarios for producing significant quantities of lignocellulosic ethanol in 2017. These scenarios can provide guidance for setting government policy and targeting government investment to the areas with greatest potential impact.

Sandor, D.; Wallace, R.; Peterson, S.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Understanding the Growth of the Cellulosic Ethanol Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

grow from 1.5M in 2006 to 30M in 2017 Fuel Market * Oil price based on "AEO 2006 High Oil Price Projection" * ORNL refinery model analysis used to predict ethanol blending...

47

What is (and is not) vital to advancing cellulosic ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Received in revised form 8 November 2011 Accepted 9 December 2011 Available online xxx Keywords: Bioethanol release and sugar conversion were measured. Up to 26% difference in sugar release between cultivars to cellulose can impede the sugar conversion rate, and convertibility of each botanical fraction might be more

California at Riverside, University of

48

Techno-Economic Analysis of Biochemical Scenarios for Production of Cellulosic Ethanol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 June 2010 Techno-Economic Analysis of Biochemical Scenarios for Production of Cellulosic Ethanol F. Kabir Kazi, J. Fortman, and R. Anex Iowa State University G. Kothandaraman ConocoPhillips Company D. Hsu, A. Aden, and A. Dutta National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-46588 June 2010 Techno-Economic Analysis of Biochemical Scenarios for Production of Cellulosic Ethanol F. Kabir Kazi, J. Fortman, and R. Anex

49

Cellulosic Ethanol: Securing the Planet Future Energy Needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Bioenergy is fairly recognized as not only a necessity, but an inevitable path to secure the planet future energy needs. There is however a global consensus that the overall feasibility of bioenergy will require an integrated approach based on diversified feedstocks and conversion processes. As illustrated in the Brazilian experience, the thrust of any bioenergy program should be centered on the principles and criteria of sustainable production. In general the trends are towards exploiting low value cellulosic materials to obtain high-end value energy products. To this end, it is expected that scientific or technical innovation will come to play a critical role on the future prospects and potential of any bioenergy initiative.

Clifford Louime; Hannah Uckelmann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Integration of Feedstock Assembly System and Cellulosic Ethanol Conversion Models to Analyze Bioenergy System Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research barriers continue to exist in all phases of the emerging cellulosic ethanol biorefining industry. These barriers include the identification and development of a sustainable and abundant biomass feedstock, the assembly of viable assembly systems formatting the feedstock and moving it from the field (e.g., the forest) to the biorefinery, and improving conversion technologies. Each of these phases of cellulosic ethanol production are fundamentally connected, but computational tools used to support and inform analysis within each phase remain largely disparate. This paper discusses the integration of a feedstock assembly system modeling toolkit and an Aspen Plus conversion process model. Many important biomass feedstock characteristics, such as composition, moisture, particle size and distribution, ash content, etc. are impacted and most effectively managed within the assembly system, but generally come at an economic cost. This integration of the assembly system and the conversion process modeling tools will facilitate a seamless investigation of the assembly system conversion process interface. Through the integrated framework, the user can design the assembly system for a particular biorefinery by specifying location, feedstock, equipment, and unit operation specifications. The assembly system modeling toolkit then provides economic valuation, and detailed biomass feedstock composition and formatting information. This data is seamlessly and dynamically used to run the Aspen Plus conversion process model. The model can then be used to investigate the design of systems for cellulosic ethanol production from field to final product.

Jared M. Abodeely; Douglas S. McCorkle; Kenneth M. Bryden; David J. Muth; Daniel Wendt; Kevin Kenney

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS PETITION FOR ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS BY DANISCO  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DANISCO DANISCO US, INC. (UDANISCO") UNDER AGREEMENT NO. DE-FG36-08G018078 BETWEEN DANISCO AND DOE; W(A)-08-045; CH-1464 The Petitioner, DANISCO, has requested a waiver of domestic and certain foreign patent rights for all subject inventions that may be conceived or first actually reduced to practice under the above-identified agreement, and subcontracts thereof. The agreement is entitled "DEVELOPMENT OF COMMERCIAL ENZYMES SYSTEM FOR LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS SACCHARIFICATION." This waiver shall not impact the rights of those parties subject to Public Law 96-517, as amended, nor shall it grant any rights in inventions made by employees of the National Laboratories. The object of the current project is to address one of the key technical barriers

52

Breaking the Biological barriers to Cellulosic Ethanol: A Joint Research Agenda  

SciTech Connect

A robust fusion of the agricultural, industrial biotechnology, and energy industries can create a new strategic national capability for energy independence and climate protection. In his State of the Union Address (Bush 2006), President George W. Bush outlined the Advanced Energy Initiative, which seeks to reduce our national dependence on imported oil by accelerating the development of domestic, renewable alternatives to gasoline and diesel fuels. The president has set a national goal of developing cleaner, cheaper, and more reliable alternative energy sources to substantially replace oil imports in the coming years. Fuels derived from cellulosic biomass - the fibrous, woody, and generally inedible portions of plant matter - offer one such alternative to conventional energy sources that can dramatically impact national economic growth, national energy security, and environmental goals. Cellulosic biomass is an attractive energy feedstock because it is an abundant, domestic, renewable source that can be converted to liquid transportation fuels. These fuels can be used readily by current-generation vehicles and distributed through the existing transportation-fuel infrastructure. The Biomass to Biofuels Workshop, held December 7-9, 2005, was convened by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the Office of Science; and the Office of the Biomass Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The purpose was to define barriers and challenges to a rapid expansion of cellulosic-ethanol production and determine ways to speed solutions through concerted application of modern biology tools as part of a joint research agenda. Although the focus was ethanol, the science applies to additional fuels that include biodiesel and other bioproducts or coproducts having critical roles in any deployment scheme. The core barrier is cellulosic-biomass recalcitrance to processing to ethanol. Biomass is composed of nature's most ready energy source, sugars, but they are locked in a complex polymer composite exquisitely created to resist biological and chemical degradation. Key to energizing a new biofuel industry based on conversion of cellulose (and hemicelluloses) to ethanol is to understand plant cell-wall chemical and physical structures - how they are synthesized and can be deconstructed. With this knowledge, innovative energy crops - plants specifically designed for industrial processing to biofuel - can be developed concurrently with new biology-based treatment and conversion methods. Recent advances in science and technological capabilities, especially those from the nascent discipline of systems biology, promise to accelerate and enhance this development. Resulting technologies will create a fundamentally new process and biorefinery paradigm that will enable an efficient and economic industry for converting plant biomass to liquid fuels. These key barriers and suggested research strategies to address them are described in this report. As technologies mature for accomplishing this task, the technical strategy proceeds through three phases: In the research phase, within 5 years, an understanding of existing feedstocks must be gained to devise sustainable, effective, and economical methods for their harvest, deconstruction, and conversion to ethanol. Research is centered on enzymatic breakdown of cellulosic biomass to component 5- and 6-carbon sugars and lignin, using a combination of thermochemical and biological processes, followed by cofermentation of sugars to specified endproducts such as ethanol. Processes will be integrated and consolidated to reduce costs, improve efficacy, reduce generation of and sensitivity to inhibitors, and improve overall yields and viability in biorefinery environments. The technology deployment phase, within 10 years, will include creation of a new generation of energy crops with enhanced sustainability, yield, and composition, coupled with processes for simultaneous breakdown of biomass to sugars and cofermentation of sugars via new biological system

Mansfield, Betty Kay [ORNL; Alton, Anita Jean [ORNL; Andrews, Shirley H [ORNL; Bownas, Jennifer Lynn [ORNL; Casey, Denise [ORNL; Martin, Sheryl A [ORNL; Mills, Marissa [ORNL; Nylander, Kim [ORNL; Wyrick, Judy M [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Finding of No Significant Impact for the Proposed Construction and Operation of a Cellulosic Ethanol Plant, Treutlen County, Georgia  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

05 05 October 15, 2007 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT for the PROPOSED CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A CELLULOSIC ETHANOL PLANT, TREUTLEN COUNTY, GEORGIA SUMMARY: The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) conducted an environmental assessment (EA) that analyzed the potential impacts associated with the construction and operation of a proposed cellulosic ethanol plant in Treutlen County, Georgia. DOE, through its Golden Field Office, in Golden, Colorado, would provide funding to Range Fuels, Inc., a Colorado based corporation, to support the construction and initial operation of the proposed plant. All discussion, analysis and findings related to the potential impacts of construction and operation ofthe proposed cellulosic ethanol plant (including the applicant-committed practices presented in the Proposed Action) are contained in the Final EA. The Final EA is hereby incorporated

54

Modification of Corn Starch Ethanol Refinery to Efficiently Accept Various High-Impact Cellulosic Feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Corn-to-Cellulosic Migration (CCM) pilot facility was to demonstrate the implementation of advanced technologies and methods for conversion of non-food, cellulosic feedstocks into ethanol, assess the economics of the facility and evaluate potential environmental benefits for biomass to fuels conversion. The CCM project was comprised of design, build, and operate phases for the CCM pilot facility as well as research & development, and modeling components. The CCM pilot facility was designed to process 1 tonne per day of non-food biomass and biologically convert that biomass to ethanol at a rate of 70 gallons per tonne. The plant demonstrated throughputs in excess of 1 tonne per day for an extended run of 1400 hours. Although target yields were not fully achieved, the continuous operation validated the design and operability of the plant. These designs will permit the design of larger scale operations at existing corn milling operations or for greenfield plants. EdeniQ, a partner in the project and the owner of the pilot plant, continues to operate and evaluate other feedstocks.

Derr, Dan

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

55

Characterization, Genetic Variation, and Combining Ability of Maize Traits Relevant to the Production of Cellulosic Ethanol  

SciTech Connect

Maize (Zea mays L.) stover has been identified as an important feedstock for the production of cellulosic ethanol. Our objectives were to measure hybrid effect and combining ability patterns of traits related to cellulosic ethanol production, determine if germplasm and mutations used for silage production would also be beneficial for feedstock production, and examine relationships between traits that are relevant to selective breeding. We evaluated grain hybrids, germplasm bred for silage production, brown-midrib hybrids, and a leafy hybrid. Yield and composition traits were measured in four environments. There was a 53% difference in stover yield between commercial grain hybrids that were equivalent for other production-related traits. Silage germplasm may be useful for increasing stover yield and reducing lignin concentration. We found much more variation among hybrids than either in vitro ruminal fermentability or polysaccharide concentration. Correlations between traits were mostly favorable or nonexistent. Our results suggest that utilizing standing genetic variation of maize in breeding programs could substantially increase the amount of biofuels produced from stover per unit area of land.

Lorenz, A. J.; Coors, J. G.; de Leon, N.; Wolfrum, E. J.; Hames, B. R.; Sluiter, A. D.; Weimer, P. J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulose and xylose to ethanol by Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cellulase, [beta]-glucosidase, and xylose isomerase  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe ATCC No. 2476, having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35 C to about 40 C until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol. 2 figures.

Lastick, S.M.; Mohagheghi, A.; Tucker, M.P.; Grohmann, K.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

57

Final report (September, 1999--February, 2002) [Public outreach and information dissemination - cellulosic and corn-based ethanol outreach project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

EESI's ''Ethanol, Climate Protection, Oil Reduction'' (ECO) electr[on]ic newsletter reaches out to the environmental and agricultural communities, state/local government officials and other interested parties, and provides a forum for dialogue about ''the potential benefits of ethanol--and particularly the expanded opportunities provided by cellulosic ethanol--with a special focus on climate protection.'' Each issue features expert commentary, excerpts from recent studies about ethanol, a summary of current government activity on ethanol, and ''notable quotables.'' The newsletter is distributed primarily via email and is also posted on EESI's web site. EESI also conducts outreach on the benefits of ethanol and other biofuels by attending and speaking at conferences, meetings and workshops around the country. The 16 issues of the newsletter published through December 2001 are included as attachments.

Ames, Jeremy; Werner, Carol

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Final report (September, 1999--February, 2002) [Public outreach and information dissemination - cellulosic and corn-based ethanol outreach project  

SciTech Connect

EESI's ''Ethanol, Climate Protection, Oil Reduction'' (ECO) electr[on]ic newsletter reaches out to the environmental and agricultural communities, state/local government officials and other interested parties, and provides a forum for dialogue about ''the potential benefits of ethanol--and particularly the expanded opportunities provided by cellulosic ethanol--with a special focus on climate protection.'' Each issue features expert commentary, excerpts from recent studies about ethanol, a summary of current government activity on ethanol, and ''notable quotables.'' The newsletter is distributed primarily via email and is also posted on EESI's web site. EESI also conducts outreach on the benefits of ethanol and other biofuels by attending and speaking at conferences, meetings and workshops around the country. The 16 issues of the newsletter published through December 2001 are included as attachments.

Ames, Jeremy; Werner, Carol

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Techno-Economic Analysis of Biochemical Scenarios for Production of Cellulosic Ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A techno-economic analysis on the production of cellulosic ethanol by fermentation was conducted to understand the viability of liquid biofuel production processes within the next 5-8 years. Initially, 35 technologies were reviewed, then a two-step down selection was performed to choose scenarios to be evaluated in a more detailed economic analysis. The lignocellulosic ethanol process was selected because it is well studied and portions of the process have been tested at pilot scales. Seven process variations were selected and examined in detail. Process designs were constrained to public data published in 2007 or earlier, without projecting for future process improvements. Economic analysis was performed for an 'nth plant' (mature technology) to obtain total investment and product value (PV). Sensitivity analysis was performed on PV to assess the impact of variations in process and economic parameters. Results show that the modeled dilute acid pretreatment process without any downstream process variation had the lowest PV of $3.40/gal of ethanol ($5.15/gallon of gasoline equivalent) in 2007 dollars. Sensitivity analysis shows that PV is most sensitive to feedstock and enzyme costs.

Kazi, F. K.; Fortman, J.; Anex, R.; Kothandaraman, G.; Hsu, D.; Aden, A.; Dutta, A.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from wheat straw  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cultivar Cultivar variation and selection potential relevant to the production of cellulosic ethanol from wheat straw J. Lindedam a, *, S.B. Andersen b , J. DeMartini c , S. Bruun b , H. Jørgensen a , C. Felby a , J. Magid b , B. Yang d , C.E. Wyman c a Forestry and Wood Products, Forest & Landscape, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Rolighedsvej 23, DK-1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark b Plant and Soil Science Laboratory, Department of Agriculture and Ecology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, DK-1871 Frederiksberg C, Denmark c Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California Riverside, 1084 Columbia Avenue, Riverside, CA 92507, USA d Center for Bioproducts and Bioenergy, Washington State University, 2710 University Drive, Richland, WA 99354, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Novel Biomass Conversion Process Results in Commercial Joint Venture; The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet describing DuPont/NREL cooperative research and development agreement that resulted in biomass-to-ethanol conversion process used as a basis for DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol, LLC and cellulosic ethanol demonstration plant.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Combined inactivation of the Clostridium cellulolyticum lactate and malate dehydrogenase genes substantially increases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrass fermentations  

SciTech Connect

Background: The model bacterium Clostridium cellulolyticum efficiently hydrolyzes crystalline cellulose and hemicellulose, using cellulosomes to degrade lignocellulosic biomass. Although it imports and ferments both pentose and hexose sugars to produce a mixture of ethanol, acetate, lactate, H2 and CO2, the proportion of ethanol is low, which impedes its use in consolidated bioprocessing for biofuels. Therefore genetic engineering will likely be required to improve the ethanol yield. Random mutagenesis, plasmid transformation, and heterologous expression systems have previously been developed for C. cellulolyticum, but targeted mutagenesis has not been reported for this organism. Results: The first targeted gene inactivation system was developed for C. cellulolyticum, based on a mobile group II intron originating from the Lactococcus lactis L1.LtrB intron. This markerless mutagenesis system was used to disrupt both the paralogous L-lactate dehydrogenase (Ccel_2485; ldh) and L-malate dehydrogenase (Ccel_0137; mdh) genes, distinguishing the overlapping substrate specificities of these enzymes. Both mutations were then combined in a single strain. This double mutant produced 8.5-times more ethanol than wild-type cells growing on crystalline cellulose. Ethanol constituted 93% of the major fermentation products (by molarity), corresponding to a molar ratio of ethanol to organic acids of 15, versus 0.18 in wild-type cells. During growth on acid-pretreated switchgrass, the double mutant also produced four-times as much ethanol as wild-type cells. Detailed metabolomic analyses identified increased flux through the oxidative branch of the mutant s TCA pathway. Conclusions: The efficient intron-based gene inactivation system produced the first gene-targeted mutations in C. cellulolyticum. As a key component of the genetic toolbox for this bacterium, markerless targeted mutagenesis enables functional genomic research in C. cellulolyticum and rapid genetic engineering to significantly alter the mixture of fermentation products. The initial application of this system successfully engineered a strain with high ethanol productivity from complex biomass substrates.

Li, Yongchao [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Hamilton, Choo Yieng [ORNL; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel [ORNL; Liao, James C [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Guss, Adam M [ORNL; Yang, Yunfeng [ORNL; Graham, David E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

techno-economic models of corn stover ethanol processes wereprice $0.91/gallon ethanol as using corn stover, which waswaste corn stover (112.7 gallon ethanol/ton). Compared to

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

process streams. Handb. Bioethanol:395-415. 10. Ehrman T.solid waste used as bioethanol sources and its relatedof cellulosic biomass into bioethanol as an alternative

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Application in the Ethanol Fermentation of Immobilized Yeast Cells in Matrix of Alginate/Magnetic Nanoparticles, on Chitosan-Magnetite Microparticles and Cellulose-coated Magnetic Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells were entrapped in matrix of alginate and magnetic nanoparticles and covalently immobilized on magnetite-containing chitosan and cellulose-coated magnetic nanoparticles. Cellulose-coated magnetic nanoparticles with covalently immobilized thermostable {\\alpha}-amylase and chitosan particles with immobilized glucoamylase were also prepared. The immobilized cells and enzymes were applied in column reactors - 1/for simultaneous corn starch saccharification with the immobilized glucoamylase and production of ethanol with the entrapped or covalently immobilized yeast cells, 2/ for separate ethanol fermentation of the starch hydrolysates with the fixed yeasts. Hydrolysis of corn starch with the immobilized {\\alpha}-amylase and glucoamylase, and separate hydrolysis with the immobilized {\\alpha}-amylase were also examined. In the first reactor the ethanol yield reached approx. 91% of the theoretical; the yield was approx. 86% in the second. The ethanol fermentation was affected by the typ...

Ivanova, Viara; Hristov, Jordan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Pilot plant studies of the bioconversion of cellulose and production of ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in several areas of research. The following cellulosic raw materials were selected for study: wheat, barley, and rice straws, rice hulls, sorghum, corn stover, cotton gin trash, newsprint, ground wood, and masonite steam-treated Douglas fir and redwood. Samples were collected, prepared, and analyzed for hexosans, pentosans, lignin, ash, and protein. Results of acid extraction and enzymatic hydrolysis are discussed. Yields of glucose, polyglucose, xylose, and arabinose are reported. Progress in process design and economic studies, as well as pilot plant process development and design studies, is summarized. (JGB)

Wilke, C.R.

1977-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Process development studies of the bioconversion of cellulose and production of ethanol. Semi annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress in the following process development studio is reported: economic evaluation of hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation schemes, economic evaluation of alternative fermentation processes, raw materials evaluation, and evaluation of pretreatment process. Microbiological and enzymatic studies reported are: production of cellulase enzyme from high yielding mutants, hydrolysis reactor development, xylose fermentation, and xylanese production. Fermentation and separation processes include: process development studies on vacuum fermentation and distillation, evaluation of low energy separations processes, large scale hollow fiber reactor development. (MHR)

Wilke, C.R.; Blanch, H.W.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

A Pilot Plant Scale Reactor/Separator for Ethanol from Cellulosics. ERIP/DOE Quarterly Reports 5 and 6, October 1, 1998 through March 30, 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a continuous low energy process for the conversion of cellulosics to ethanol. BPI's process involves a proprietary low temperature pretreatment step which allows recycle of the pretreatment chemicals and recovery of a lignin stream. The pretreated biomass is then converted to glucans and xylans enzymatically and these sugars simultaneously fermented to ethanol (SSF) in BPI's Continuous Stirred Reactor Separator (CSRS). The CSRS is a multi stage bio-reactor where the glucans are first converted to ethanol using a high temperature tolerant yeast, followed by xylan SSF on the lower stages using a second xylose fermenting yeast strain. Ethanol is simultaneously removed from the bio-reactor stages, speeding the fermentation, and allowing the complete utilization of the biomass.

Dale, M. Clark; Moelhman, Mark

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

A Pilot Plant Scale Reactor/Separator for Ethanol from Cellulosics. ERIP/DOE Quarterly Reports 7, 8 and Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a continuous low energy process for the conversion of cellulosics to ethanol. BPI's process involves a proprietary low temperature pretreatment step which allows recycle of the pretreatment chemicals and recovery of a lignin stream. The pretreated biomass is then converted to glucans and xylans enzymatically and these sugars simultaneously fermented to ethanol (SSF) in BPI's Continuous Stirred Reactor Separator (CSRS). The CSRS is a multi stage bio-reactor where the glucans are first converted to ethanol using a high temperature tolerant yeast stran, followed by xylan SSF on the lower stages using a second xylose fermenting yeast strain. Ethanol is simultaneously removed from the bio-reactor stages, speeding the fermentation, and allowing the complete utilization of the biomass.

Cale, M. Clark; Moelhman, Mark

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

70

Combined inactivation of the Clostridium cellulolyticum lactate and malate dehydrogenase genes substantially increases ethanol yield from cellulose and switchgrass fermentations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

feedstock on earth for biofuel production [1]. However, the economic feasibility and sustainability of cellulosic

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

DOE/EA-1647: Finding of No Significant for the Proposed Construction and Operation of a Cellulosic Ethanol Plant, Treutlen County, Georgia (01/14/09)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

93 93 January 14, 2009 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT for the PROPOSED CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A CELLULOSIC ETHANOL PLANT, TREUTLEN COUNTY, GEORGIA SUMMARY: In October 2007, the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) completed an environmental assessment (EA) that analyzed the potential impacts associated with the construction and operation of a proposed cellulosic ethanol plant in Treutlen County, Georgia. Subsequent to the issuance of a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the October 2007 EA, changes were proposed for the design and operating parameters of the facility. In compliance with NEPA (42 U.S. Code [USe] §§ 4321 et seq.) and DOE's NEPA implementing regulations (10 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Section 1021.330) and procedures, DOE completed a supplemental environmental assessment (SEA) to examine the potential environmental impacts associated with

72

A pilot plant scale reactor/separator for ethanol from cellulosics. Quarterly report No. 1 & 2, October 1, 1997--March 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The basic objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a continuous, low energy process for the conversion of cellulosics to ethanol. This process involves a pretreatment step followed by enzymatic release of sugars and the consecutive saccharification/fermentation of cellulose (glucans) followed by hemi-cellulose (glucans) in a multi-stage continuous stirred reactor separator (CSRS). During year 1, pretreatment and bench scale fermentation trials will be performed to demonstrate and develop the process, and during year 2, a 130 L or larger process scale unit will be operated to demonstrate the process using straw or cornstalks. Co-sponsors of this project include the Indiana Biomass Grants Program, Bio-Process Innovation, Xylan Inc as a possible provider of pretreated biomass.

Dale, M.C.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Grain & Wood Based Technologies for Production of Ethanol  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Outline Sources of Ethanol Grain Based Dry Mill Process Cellulosic Based Processes Costs Conclusions The Production of Ethanol Bioethanol ...

74

MN Center for Renewable Energy: Cellulosic Ethanol, Optimization of Bio-fuels in Internal Combustion Engines, & Course Development for Technicians in These Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report for Grant #DE-FG02-06ER64241, MN Center for Renewable Energy, will address the shared institutional work done by Minnesota State University, Mankato and Minnesota West Community and Technical College during the time period of July 1, 2006 to December 30, 2008. There was a no-cost extension request approved for the purpose of finalizing some of the work. The grant objectives broadly stated were to 1) develop educational curriculum to train technicians in wind and ethanol renewable energy, 2) determine the value of cattails as a biomass crop for production of cellulosic ethanol, and 3) research in Optimization of Bio-Fuels in Internal Combustion Engines. The funding for the MN Center for Renewable Energy was spent on specific projects related to the work of the Center.

John Frey

2009-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

75

The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the processing of the cellulosic feedstock to ethanol wascellulosic ethanol scenarios, use of poplar as a feedstock

Qing, Qing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Energy and greenhouse gas emission effects of corn and cellulosic ethanol with technology improvements and land use changes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of ethanol as a transportation fuel in the United States has grown from 76 dam{sup 3} in 1980 to over 40.1 hm{sup 3} in 2009 - and virtually all of it has been produced from corn. It has been debated whether using corn ethanol results in any energy and greenhouse gas benefits. This issue has been especially critical in the past several years, when indirect effects, such as indirect land use changes, associated with U.S. corn ethanol production are considered in evaluation. In the past three years, modeling of direct and indirect land use changes related to the production of corn ethanol has advanced significantly. Meanwhile, technology improvements in key stages of the ethanol life cycle (such as corn farming and ethanol production) have been made. With updated simulation results of direct and indirect land use changes and observed technology improvements in the past several years, we conducted a life-cycle analysis of ethanol and show that at present and in the near future, using corn ethanol reduces greenhouse gas emission by more than 20%, relative to those of petroleum gasoline. On the other hand, second-generation ethanol could achieve much higher reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In a broader sense, sound evaluation of U.S. biofuel policies should account for both unanticipated consequences and technology potentials. We maintain that the usefulness of such evaluations is to provide insight into how to prevent unanticipated consequences and how to promote efficient technologies with policy intervention.

Wang, M.; Han, J.; Haq, Z; Tyner, .W.; Wu, M.; Elgowainy, A. (Energy Systems)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Why Sequence Cellulose Degrading Bacteria?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cellulose Degrading Bacteria? Cellulose Degrading Bacteria? One of the major DOE missions is the production of renewable fuels to reduce our dependence on foreign oil, and also to take the place of petroleum-based fuels as these resources dwindle. Biologically produced ethanol is one possible replacement for fossil fuels. Currently, ethanol is produced from corn starch, but there is much research into using lignocellulosic materials (those containing cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin) as the raw material for ethanol production. Ethanol production from cellulose requires several steps: pretreatment with steam, acid, or ammonia; digestion of cellulose to sugars; and fermentation of sugars to ethanol. The slowest and most expensive step is the breakdown of cellulose, chemically accomplished by cellulases. The second and third

78

Building a foundation for structure-based cellulosome design for cellulosic ethanol: Insight into cohesin-dockerin complexation from computer simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foundation for Structure-Based Cellulosome Design for Foundation for Structure-Based Cellulosome Design for Cellulosic Ethanol: Insight into Cohesin-Dockerin Complexation from Computer Simulation Jiancong Xu, 1,3 Michael Crowley, 2,3 and Jeremy C. Smith 1,3 1 Center for Molecular Biophysics, Building 6011, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37830, USA. 2 Chemical and Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd, Golden, CO, 80401-3393, USA 3 BioEnergy Science Center Corresponding author. Jiancong Xu, Building 6011, MS6309, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830, USA; E-mail: xuj1@ornl.gov; Phone: 865-241-9111; Fax: 865-576-7651. Running title. Computer simulation of cohesin-dockerin complexes. Manuscript pages: 29 Supplementary material pages: 4

79

DOE/EA-1647: Supplemental Environmental Assessment for the Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Ethanol Plant, Range Fuels Soperton Plant, LLC (January 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S S u p p l e m e n t a l E n v i r o n m e n t a l A s s e s s m e n t a n d N o t i c e o f W e t l a n d s I n v o l v e m e n t Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Ethanol Plant, Range Fuels Soperton Plant, LLC (formerly Range Fuels Inc.) Treutlen County, Georgia DOE/EA 1647 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy January 2009 Contents Section Page Acronyms and Abbreviations ................................................................................................... v 1.0 Introduction......................................................................................................................1 1.1 Background ..........................................................................................................1 1.2 Purpose and Need for Proposed Action ..........................................................2

80

Genes and Mechanisms for Improving Cellulosic Vaccine for ...  

and ethanol, along with other inhibitors found in cellulosic hydrolysate. Advantages Hardier organisms with increased growth and production potential

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Ethanol Tolerant Yeast for Improved Production of Ethanol from ...  

Inventors: Audrey Gasch, Jeffrey Lewis Ethanol production from cellulosic biomass can make a significant contribution toward decreasing our dependence on fossil fuels.

82

Pacific Ethanol, Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mascoma Mascoma Corporate HQ: Cambridge, Massachusetts Proposed Facility Location: Vonore, Tennessee Description: The partnership aims to establish an approximately 85 tonnes per day cellulosic ethanol facility in the Niles Ferry Industrial Park, in Monroe County, Tennessee. The facility will produce 2 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol annually and generate process heat through the combustion of byproduct lignin. CEO or Equivalent: Bruce A. Jamerson, CEO Participants: University of Tennessee, Genera Energy LLC Production: * Capacity of 2 million gallons per year of cellulosic ethanol Technology and Feedstocks: * Mascoma proprietary biochemical conversion process * Switchgrass, hardwood chips State of Readiness: * Estimated to be operational in 2009

83

EA-1694: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Highlands Ethanol...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to Highlands Ethanol, LLC, for the Cellulosic Ethanol Facility in Highlands County, Florida EA-1694: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee to...

84

Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007) Cellulosic ethanol: biofuel researchers prepare toBiofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial welltechnologies that enable biofuel production. Decades of work

Fortman, J. L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

A low-energy continuous reactor-separator for ethanol from starch, whey permeate, permeate mother liquor, molasses or cellulosics. Project final report, April 1, 1994--February 28, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this project, a novel bio-reactor technology in which reaction is coupled with product separation was developed to pilot/demonstration scale. Combining reaction with separation during a fermentation allows the fermentation of highly concentrated feeds and allows the fermentation of streams with high levels of salts/non-fermentable inhibitors. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of polysaccharides such as starch and cellulose can also be combined with ethanol separation in the Continuous Stirred Reactor Separator (CSRS). Application of the bio-reactor to various substrates was investigated on a lab scale with fermentation of raw starch, cane molasses, xylose, whey permeate and permeate mother liquor. Flocculating yeast strains for high density sucrose/glucose fermentation were selected and adapted to form fast settling pellets. A strain of K marxianus capable of fermenting high salt permeate mother liquor was also selected and adapted. A low energy solvent ethanol recovery system was developed for ethanol recovery from the vapors leaving the reactor/separator. This Solvent Absorption/Extractive Distillation (SAED) process gives a low energy method for purifying the ethanol to an anhydrous product. The amount of energy needed to recover an anhydrous ethanol product from a CSRS stage running at 8% ethanol was calculated to be under 8,000 BTU/gallon. This process may also have further application in VOC (volatile organic carbon compounds) removal from air streams. During this project, a 24,000 Liter CSRS was designed, fabricated, installed, and operated at a small batch ethanol plant (Permeate Refining Inc) in NE Iowa. The reactor was operated on a semi-continuous basis over a period of 18 months. A Solvent Absorption Extractive Distillation (SAED) system was also recently completed and installed at the Permeate Refining Inc. site for ethanol recovery/dehydration.

Dale, M.C.; Moelhman, M.

1997-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

86

A case study of agricultural residue availability and cost for a cellulosic ethanol conversion facility in the Henan province of China  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary analysis of the availability and cost of corn stover and wheat straw for the area surrounding a demonstration biorefinery in the Henan Province of China was performed as a case study of potential cooperative analyses of bioenergy feedstocks between researchers and industry in the US and China. Though limited in scope, the purpose of this analysis is to provide insight into some of the issues and challenges of estimating feedstock availability in China and how this relates to analyses of feedstocks in the U.S. Completing this analysis also highlighted the importance of improving communication between U.S. researchers and Chinese collaborators. Understanding the units and terms used in the data provided by Tianguan proved to be a significant challenge. This was further complicated by language barriers between collaborators in the U.S. and China. The Tianguan demonstration biorefinery has a current capacity of 3k tons (1 million gallons) of cellulosic ethanol per year with plans to scale up to 10k tons (3.34 million gallons) per year. Using data provided by Tianguan staff in summer of 2011, the costs and availability of corn stover and wheat straw were estimated. Currently, there are sufficient volumes of wheat straw and corn stover that are considered 'waste' and would likely be available for bioenergy in the 20-km (12-mile) region surrounding the demonstration biorefinery at a low cost. However, as the industry grows, competition for feedstock will grow and prices are likely to rise as producers demand additional compensation to fully recover costs.

Webb, Erin [ORNL; Wu, Yun [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Making Biofuel From Corncobs and Switchgrass in Rural America | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuel From Corncobs and Switchgrass in Rural America Biofuel From Corncobs and Switchgrass in Rural America Making Biofuel From Corncobs and Switchgrass in Rural America June 11, 2010 - 4:48pm Addthis DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol (DDCE) opened a new biorefinery in Vonore, Tenn., last year. | Photo courtesy of DDCE DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol (DDCE) opened a new biorefinery in Vonore, Tenn., last year. | Photo courtesy of DDCE Lindsay Gsell Energy crops and agricultural residue, like corncobs and stover, are becoming part of rural America's energy future. Unlike the more common biofuel derived from corn, these are non-food/feed based cellulosic feedstocks, and the energy content of the biomass makes it ideal for converting to sustainable fuel. Last January in Vonore, Tenn., DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol (DDCE)

88

EA-1704: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

consists of the design, construction and operation of a biorefinery facility producing ethanol and other co-products from cellulosic materials utilizing a patented concentrated...

89

Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15.degree. and about 70.degree. C. and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours.

Wang, Daniel I. C. (Belmont, MA); Avgerinos, George C. (Newton Center, MA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15 and about 70 C and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours. 6 figs.

Wang, D.I.C.; Avgerinos, G.C.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

91

Pacific Ethanol, Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RSE Pulp & Chemical, LLC RSE Pulp & Chemical, LLC (Subsidiary of Red Shield Environmental, LLC) Corporate HQ: Old Town, Maine Proposed Facility Location: Old Town, Maine Description: Develop, design, and install a biorefinery facility in an existing pulp mill to demonstrate the production of cellulosic ethanol from lignocellulosic (wood) extract. CEO or Equivalent: Edward Paslawski, Chairman and CEO of Red Shield Environmental, LLC Participants: University of Maine, American Process Inc. Production: * Capacity of 2.2 million gallons per year of cellulosic ethanol Technology and Feedstocks: * University of Maine proprietary process for pre-extracting hemicelluloses during the pulping process * 80 dry tons/day hemicellulose extract from woody biomass

92

SUSTAINABLE COMPOSITES: CELLULOSE NANOFIBERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SUSTAINABLE COMPOSITES: CELLULOSE NANOFIBERS. Iulia Sacui and Jeffrey Gilman. Our main focus is on using cellulose ...

93

Ethanol Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ethanol Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) Ethanol Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) Ethanol Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Qualified ethanol producers are eligible for an income tax credit of $1 per gallon of corn- or cellulosic-based ethanol that meets ASTM standard D4806. The total credit amount available for all corn and cellulosic ethanol producers is $5 million for each taxable year. Unused ethanol credits from one ethanol-based cap, such as corn, may be applied to another ethanol-based cap, such as cellulosic, in the same taxable year. Unused credits may not be carried forward. Kentucky statute information regarding alternative fuel producer tax credits can be found within KRS Chapters 141.422-141.430

94

Feasibility Study for Co-Locating and Integrating Ethanol Production Plants from Corn Starch and Lignocellulosic Feedstocks (Revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of the feasibility of co-locating corn-grain-to-ethanol and lignocellulosic ethanol plants and potential savings from combining utilities, ethanol purification, product processing, and fermentation. Although none of the scenarios identified could produce ethanol at lower cost than a straight grain ethanol plant, several were lower cost than a straight cellulosic ethanol plant.

Wallace, R.; Ibsen, K.; McAloon, A.; Yee, W.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Pacific Ethanol, Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Verenium Biofuels Corporation Verenium Biofuels Corporation Corporate HQ: Cambridge, Massachusetts Proposed Facility Location: Jennings, Louisiana Description: Operation and maintenance of a demonstration-scale facility in Jennings, Louisiana with some capital additions. CEO or Equivalent: Carlos A. Riva, President, Chief Executive Officer and Director Participants: Only Verenium Biofuels Corporation Production: * Capacity of 1.5 million gallons per year of cellulosic ethanol biofuel Technology and Feedstocks: * Pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosics and fermentation of sugars into ethanol * sugarcane bagasse, dedicated energy crops, agricultural waste, and wood product residues State of Readiness: * The demonstration facility has been completed and is in the

96

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production to Production to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Blends Specifications Production & Distribution Feedstocks Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Production and Distribution Ethanol is a domestically produced alternative fuel that's most commonly made from corn. It can also be made from cellulosic feedstocks, such as

97

Outlook for Biomass Ethanol Production and Demand  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper presents a midterm forecast for biomass ethanol production under three different technology cases for the period 2000 to 2020, based on projections developed from the Energy Information Administration's National Energy Modeling System. An overview of cellulose conversion technology and various feedstock options and a brief history of ethanol usage in the United States are also presented.

Information Center

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Improving the bioconversion yield of carbohydrates and ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Improving the efficiency of lignocellulosic ethanol production is of the utmost importance if cellulosic bioethanol is to be competitive with fossil fuels and first generation (more)

Ewanick, Shannon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Tax Ethanol Production Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Tax Credit An ethanol producer located in Indiana is entitled to a credit of $0.125 per gallon of ethanol produced, including cellulosic ethanol. The Indiana

100

Inbicon Biomass Refinery Cellulosic Ethanol Technology Platforms  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

for biogas production Inbicon Biomass Refinery Energy integrated solutions Wheat Straw 50 t/h (at 86 % dm) C5 molasses Power The Lignin and biogas are used in power

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Tax Ethanol Production Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Tax Credit Qualified ethanol producers are eligible for an income tax credit of $1.00 per gallon of corn- or cellulosic-based ethanol that meets ASTM

102

Ethanol annual report FY 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the research progress and accomplishments of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Ethanol from Biomass Program, field managed by the Solar Energy Research Institute, during FY 1990. The report includes an overview of the entire program and summaries of individual research projects. These projects are grouped into the following subject areas: technoeconomic analysis; pretreatment; cellulose conversion; xylose fermentation; and lignin conversion. Individual papers have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Texeira, R.H.; Goodman, B.J. (eds.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

EA-1704: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

704: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic 704: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC, Fulton, Mississippi EA-1704: Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire Fulton Renewable Energy, LLC, Fulton, Mississippi SUMMARY ThIs EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a propsal, (Fulton Project) that consists of the design, construction and operation of a biorefinery facility producing ethanol and other co-products from cellulosic materials utilizing a patented concentrated acid hydrolysis process. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD June 4, 2010 EA-1704: Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Operation of a Proposed Cellulosic Biorefinery, BlueFire

104

EFFECTS OF CHANGES IN U.S. ETHANOL PRODUCTION FROM CORN GRAIN, CORN STOVER, AND SWITCHGRASS ON WORLD AGRICULTURAL MARKETS AND TRADE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The renewable energy industry continues to expand at a rapid pace. New advances in cellulosic ethanol technologies have the potential to reduce our dependency on (more)

Campiche, Jody L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Ethanol Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 13, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Kentucky Name Ethanol Production Tax Credit (Kentucky) Policy Category Financial Incentive Policy Type Corporate Tax Incentive Affected Technologies Biomass/Biogas Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Primary Website http://energy.ky.gov/biofuels/Pages/biofuelsIncentives.aspx Summary Qualified ethanol producers are eligible for an income tax credit of $1 per gallon of corn- or cellulosic-based ethanol that meets ASTM standard D4806. The total credit amount available for all corn and cellulosic ethanol producers is $5 million for each taxable year. Unused ethanol credits from

106

Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science Computing, Environment & Life Sciences Energy Engineering & Systems Analysis Photon Sciences Physical Sciences & Engineering Energy Frontier Research Centers Science Highlights Postdoctoral Researchers Land-use change and greenhouse gas emissions from corn and cellulosic ethanol July 16, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint The greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that may accompany land-use change (LUC) from increased biofuel feedstock production are a source of debate in the discussion of drawbacks and advantages of biofuels. Estimates of LUC GHG emissions focus mainly on corn ethanol and vary widely. Increasing the understanding of LUC GHG impacts associated with both corn and cellulosic ethanol will inform the on-going debate concerning their magnitudes and

107

Convergence of Agriculture and Energy: II. Producing Cellulosic Biomass for Biofuels  

SciTech Connect

The economic competitiveness of cellulosic ethanol production is highly dependent on feedstock cost, which constitutes 35-50% of the total ethanol production cost, depending on geographical factors such as biomass species, yield, location, climate, local economy, as well as the types of systems used for harvesting, collection, preprocessing, and transportation. Consequently, as the deployment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries approaches, feedstock cost and availability are the driving factors that influence the selection of pioneer biorefinery locations, and these same factors will largely control the rate at which this industry grows. Due to geographic variability and complex distributed supply system dynamics, estimating feedstock costs and supplies has been a major source of uncertainty.

Steven L. Fales; Wallace W. Wilhelm; J. Richard Hess

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Evaluating possible cap and trade legislation on cellulosic feedstock availability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated, socioeconomic biogeophysical model is used to analyze the interactions of cap-and-trade legislation and the Renewable Fuels Standard. Five alternative policy scenarios were considered with the purpose of identifying policies that act in a synergistic manner to reduce carbon emissions, increase economic returns to agriculture, and adequately meet ethanol mandates. We conclude that climate and energy policies can best be implemented together by offering carbon offset payments to conservation tillage, herbaceous grasses for biomass, and by constraining crop residue removal for ethanol feedstocks to carbon neutral level. When comparing this scenario to the Baseline scenario, the agricultural sector realizes an economic benefit of US$156 billion by 2030 and emissions are reduced by 135 Tg C-equivalent (Eq) yr 1. Results also indicate that geographic location of cellulosic feedstocks could shift significantly depending on the final policies implemented in cap and trade legislation. Placement of cellulosic ethanol facilities should consider these possible shifts when determining site location.

Hellwinckel, Chad [Agricultural Policy Analysis Center, University of Tennessee; de la Torre Ugarte, Daniel [University of Tennessee; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; West, T. O. [University of Maryland

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

SANS Study of Cellulose Extracted from Switchgrass  

SciTech Connect

AbstractLignocellulosic biomass, an abundant renewable natural resource, has the potential to play a major role in generation of renewable biofuels through its conversion to bio-ethanol. Unfortunately, it is a complex biological composite material that shows significant recalcitrance making it a cost-ineffective feedstock for bioethanol production. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was employed to probe the multi-scale structure of cellulosic materials. Cellulose was extracted from milled native switchgrass and switchgrass that had undergone the dilute acid pretreatment method to disrupt the lignocellulose structure. The high-Q structural feature (Q > 0.07 -1) can be assigned to cellulose fibrils based on comparison with the switchgrass purified by solvent extraction of native and dilute acid pretreated and a commercial preparation of microcrystalline cellulose. Dilute acid pretreatment results in an increase in the smallest structural size, a decrease in the interconnectivity of the fibrils; and no change in the smooth domain boundaries at length scales larger than 1000 .

Pingali, Sai Venkatesh [ORNL; Urban, Volker S [ORNL; Heller, William T [ORNL; McGaughey, Joseph [ORNL; O' Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL; Foston, Marcus B [ORNL; Myles, Dean A A [ORNL; Ragauskas, Arthur J [ORNL; Evans, Barbara R [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Cellulose binding domain proteins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy (Davis, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Technical Support to SBIR Phase II Project: Improved Conversion of Cellulose Waste to Ethanol Using a Dual Bioreactor System: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-310  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over-dependence on fossil fuel has spurred research on alternative energy. Inedible plant materials such as grass and corn stover represent abundant renewable natural resources that can be transformed into biofuel. Problems in enzymatic conversion of biomass to sugars include the use of incomplete synergistic enzymes, end-product inhibition, and adsorption and loss of enzymes necessitating their use in large quantities. Technova Corporation will develop a defined consortium of natural microorganisms that will efficiently break down biomass to energy-rich soluble sugars, and convert them to cleaner-burning ethanol fuel. The project will also develop a novel biocatalytic hybrid reactor system dedicated to this bioprocess, which embodies recent advances in nanotechnology. NREL will participate to develop a continuous fermentation process.

Zhang, M.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Energy Basics: Ethanol  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photo of several beakers of gold and orange liquid ethanol. Ethanol is a renewable fuel made from various plant materials, which collectively are called "biomass." Ethanol...

113

BlueFire Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BlueFire Ethanol BlueFire Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name BlueFire Ethanol Place Irvine, California Zip 92618 Sector Hydro Product US biofuel producer that utilises a patented concentrated acid hydrolysis technology to process various cellulosic waste materials into ethanol. Coordinates 41.837752°, -79.268594° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.837752,"lon":-79.268594,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

114

Effects of Fuel Ethanol Use on Fuel-Cycle Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We estimated the effects on per-vehicle-mile fuel-cycle petroleum use, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and energy use of using ethanol blended with gasoline in a mid-size passenger car, compared with the effects of using gasoline in the same car. Our analysis includes petroleum use, energy use, and emissions associated with chemicals manufacturing, farming of corn and biomass, ethanol production, and ethanol combustion for ethanol; and petroleum use, energy use, and emissions associated with petroleum recovery, petroleum refining, and gasoline combustion for gasoline. For corn-based ethanol, the key factors in determining energy and emissions impacts include energy and chemical usage intensity of corn farming, energy intensity of the ethanol plant, and the method used to estimate energy and emissions credits for co-products of corn ethanol. The key factors in determining the impacts of cellulosic ethanol are energy and chemical usage intensity of biomass farming, ethanol yield per dry ton of biomass, and electricity credits in cellulosic ethanol plants. The results of our fuel-cycle analysis for fuel ethanol are listed below. Note that, in the first half of this summary, the reductions cited are per-vehicle-mile traveled using the specified ethanol/gasoline blend instead of conventional (not reformulated) gasoline. The second half of the summary presents estimated changes per gallon of ethanol used in ethanol blends. GHG emissions are global warming potential (GWP)-weighted, carbon dioxide (CO2)-equivalent emissions of CO2, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O).

C. Saricks; D. Santini; M. Wang

1999-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

115

Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis of cellulosic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified. 1 fig.

Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.; Davison, B.H.; Woodward, J.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

116

Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis or cellulosic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified.

Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Faison, Brendlyn D. (Knoxville, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Oak Ridge, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis of cellulosic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified.

Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Faison, Brendlyn D. (Knoxville, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Oak Ridge, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Enhanced attrition bioreactor for enzyme hydrolysis or cellulosic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals, such as sugars and ethanol, utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major carbohydrate of paper: cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. Additionally, microfiltration, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis steps are included to further increase reaction efficiency. The resulting sugars are converted to a dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing a biocatalyst, such as microorganisms. The dilute product is then concentrated and purified. 1 fig.

Scott, T.C.; Scott, C.D.; Faison, B.D.; Davison, B.H.; Woodward, J.

1996-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

119

Method of saccharifying cellulose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed of saccharifying cellulose by incubation with the cellulase of Clostridium thermocellum in a broth containing an efficacious amount of thiol reducing agent. Other incubation parameters which may be advantageously controlled to stimulate saccharification include the concentration of alkaline earth salts, pH, temperature, and duration. By the method of the invention, even native crystalline cellulose such as that found in cotton may be completely saccharified.

Johnson, E.A.; Demain, A.L.; Madia, A.

1983-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

120

Ethanol production with dilute acid hydrolysis using partially dried lignocellulosics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol, comprising hydrolyzing lignocellulosic materials by subjecting dried lignocellulosic material in a reactor to a catalyst comprised of a dilute solution of a strong acid and a metal salt to lower the activation energy (i.e., the temperature) of cellulose hydrolysis and ultimately obtain higher sugar yields.

Nguyen, Quang A. (Chesterfield, MO); Keller, Fred A. (Lakewood, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Available Technologies: Cellulose Degradation Using ...  

... enzymes. When combined with heat and acid pretreatments for cellulose, they can speed the degradation process, saving time and energy, ...

122

Pacific Ethanol, Inc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc More Documents & Publications Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc...

123

Ethanol and Classic Cars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

have ethanol in them; the typical one is E10 which is 10% ethanol. But there's also E85 which is 85% ethanol. The basic rule is E10 is ok for everything, but E85 can only be...

124

The environmental benefits of cellulosic energy crops at a landscape scale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to present a broad overview of the potential environmental impacts of biomass energy from energy crops--particularly the cellulosic energy crops current under development. For this discussion, the term energy crop refers to a crop grown primarily to create feedstock for either making biofuels such as ethanol or burning in a heat or electricity generation facility. Cellulosic energy crops are designed to be used in cellulose-based ethanol conversion processes (as opposed to starch or sugar-based ethanol conversion processes). As more cellulose can be produced per hectare of land than can sugar or starch, the cellulose-based ethanol conversion process is a more efficient sue of land for ethanol production. Assessing the environmental impacts of biomass energy from energy crops is complex because the environmental impact of using biomass for energy must be considered in the context of alternative energy options while the environmental impact of producing biomass from energy crops must be considered in the context of alternative land-uses. Using biomass-derived energy can reduce greenhouse gas emissions or increase them; growing biomass energy crops can enhance soil fertility or degrade it. Without knowing the context of the biomass energy, one can say little about its specific environmental impacts. The primary focus of this paper is an evaluation of the environmental impacts of growing cellulosic energy crops especially at the landscape or regional scale. However, to set the stage for this discussion, the authors begin by comparing the environmental advantages and disadvantages of biomass-derived energy relative to other energy alternatives such as coal, hydropower, nuclear power, oil/gasoline, natural gas and photovoltaics.

Graham, R.L.; Liu, W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); English, B.C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Inst. of Agriculture

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

MICROBIAL FERMENTATION OF ABUNDANT BIOPOLYMERS: CELLULOSE AND CHITIN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our research has dealt with seven major areas of investigation: i) characterization of cellulolytic members of microbial consortia, with special attention recently given to Clostridium phytofermentans, a bacterium that decomposes cellulose and produces uncommonly large amounts of ethanol, ii) investigations of the chitinase system of Cellulomonas uda; including the purification and characterization of ChiA, the major component of this enzyme system, iii) molecular cloning, sequence and structural analysis of the gene that encodes ChiA in C. uda, iv) biofilm formation by C. uda on nutritive surfaces, v) investigations of the effects of humic substances on cellulose degradation by anaerobic cellulolytic microbes, vi) studies of nitrogen metabolism in cellulolytic anaerobes, and vii) understanding the molecular architecture of the multicomplex cellulase-xylanase system of Clostridium papyrosolvens. Also, progress toward completing the research of more recent projects is briefly summarized. Major accomplishments include: 1. Characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans, a cellulose-fermenting, ethanol-producing bacterium from forest soil. The characterization of a new cellulolytic species isolated from a cellulose-decomposing microbial consortium from forest soil was completed. This bacterium is remarkable for the high concentrations of ethanol produced during cellulose fermentation, typically more than twice the concentration produced by other species of cellulolytic clostridia. 2. Examination of the use of chitin as a source of carbon and nitrogen by cellulolytic microbes. We discovered that many cellulolytic anaerobes and facultative aerobes are able to use chitin as a source of both carbon and nitrogen. This major discovery expands our understanding of the biology of cellulose-fermenting bacteria and may lead to new applications for these microbes. 3. Comparative studies of the cellulase and chitinase systems of Cellulomonas uda. Results of these studies indicate that the chitinase and cellulase systems of this bacterium are distinct in terms of the proteins involved and the regulation of their production. 4. Characterization of the chitinase system of C. uda. A 70,000-Mr endochitinase, designated ChiA, was purified from C. uda culture supernatant fluids and characterized. 5. Analysis of chiA, which codes for the major enzymatic component of the chitinase system of C. uda. The gene encoding the endochitinase ChiA in C. uda was cloned, its complete nucleotide sequence was determined and its implications were investigated. 6. Formation of biofilms by C. uda on cellulose and chitin. Microscopic observations indicated that, under conditions of nitrogen limitation, C. uda cells grew as a biofilm attached tightly to the surface of cellulose or chitin. 7. Development of tools for a genetic approach to studies of cellulose fermentation by cellulolytic clostridia. We have explored the potential of various techniques, and obtained evidence indicating that Tn916 mutagenesis may be particularly effective in this regard. As part of this research, we identified the presence of a plasmid in one strain, which was cloned, sequenced, and analyzed for its utility in the development of vectors for genetic studies. 8. Effects of humic substances on cellulose degradation by anaerobic cellulolytic microbes. We determined that humic substances play an important role in the anaerobic cellulose decomposition and in the physiology of cellulose-fermenting soil bacteria. 9. Nitrogenases of cellulolytic clostridia. We described a nitrogenase gene from a cellulolytic clostridium and presented evidence, based on sequence analyses and conserved gene order, for lateral gene transfer between this bacterium and a methanogenic archaeon. 10. Characterization of Clostridium hungatei, a new N2-fixing cellulolytic species isolated from a methanogenic consortium from soil. 11. Understanding the molecular architecture of the multicomplex cellulase-xylanase system of Clostridium papyrosolvens. We discovered that C. papyrosolvens produces a multiprotein, multicom

Leschine, Susan

2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Solid-state production of ethanol from sorghum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main goal of this research is to study the solid-state fermentation of sorghum-sudangrass, Grazex II (F{sub 1} hybrid of Sorghum vulgare X Sorghum sudanese), to ethanol. Our research focuses on using a modified method of ensiling to produce ethanol directly in the silo. Thirty-eight liters of ethanol/metric ton (L/MT) on a wet-weight basis were produced from sorghum receiving cellulose compared to 23.4 L/MT for sorghum not receiving cellulose additives. Based on total free sugar content, 101 and 84% of theoretical yield are achieved for cellulase-amended and nonamended sorghum, respectively. 47 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Henk, L.L.; Linden, J.C. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all but one energy source: petroleum We use more petroleumimported Petroleum is single largest energy source in U.S.dependent on petroleum (~96%) The largest source of U.S.

Wyman, C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al uiv q t igh e Cost of oil, $/barrel Cost of Cellulosice gy t ener len quiva E Cost of oil, $/barrel Key Processing

Wyman, C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

High Ethanol Titers from Cellulose using Metabolically Engineered...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research in the DOE Office of Science. We thank A. Joe Shaw, Christopher D. Herring, and William R. Kenealy for useful discussion. Authors declare a conflict of...

130

Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum in/Energy out Fossil energy in/Energy out GHGPetroleum in/Energy out Fossil energy in/Energy out GHGPetroleum in/Energy out Fossil energy in/Energy out GHG

Wyman, C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Advancing Cellulosic Ethanol for Large Scale Sustainable Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

balanced for all but one energy source: petroleum Weuse more petroleum than we produce >70% imported Petroleum is single largest energy source in

Wyman, C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Cellulosic ethanol: progress towards a simulation model of lignocellulosic biomass;  

SciTech Connect

A CHARMM molecular mechanics force field for lignin is derived. Parameterization is based on reproducing quantum mechanical data of model compounds. Partial atomic charges are derived by the examination of methoxybenzene:water interactions. Dihedral parameters are optimized by fitting to critical rotational potentials, and bonded parameters are obtained by optimizing vibrational frequencies and normal modes. The force field is validated by performing a molecular dynamics simulation of a crystal of a lignin fragment molecule and comparing simulation-derived structural features with experimental results. Together with the existing force field for polysaccharides, this work will enable full simulations of lignocellulose. This work presents a molecular mechanics force field for lignin that is compatible with the CHARMM potential energy function. The parameterization was based on reproducing quantum-mechanically derived target data. Special care was taken to correctly describe the most common lignin linkage: the {beta}-O-4{prime} bond. The partial atomic charge of the oxygen and carbon atoms participating in the linkage were derived by examining interactions between a lignin fragment model compound and a water molecule. Dihedral parameters were obtained by reproducing QM potential energy profiles, with emphasis placed on reproducing accurately the thermally sampled low energy regions. The remaining bond and angle parameters were derived using the AFMM method. In order to test the validity of the force field a simulation of a lignin-dimer crystal was performed. The overall good agreement between the structural properties of the MD run and the experiment provide confidence that the force field can be used in simulation of biomass. The accurate computer simulation of lignin in lignocellulose will present significant challenges. Unlike many biological macromolecules that have been studied with molecular simulation, both the chemical and three-dimensional structures of lignin are relatively poorly researched. However, the present force field provides a basis for constructing molecular models of lignin systems, and, in combination with a range of biophysical measurements, significant progress in determining structures of lignocellulosic biomass can be expected in the near future.

Petridis, Loukas [ORNL; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Mutant alcohol dehydrogenase leads to improved ethanol tolerance in Clostridium thermocellum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clostridium thermocellum is a thermophilic, obligately anaerobic, Gram-positive bacterium that is a candidate microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into ethanol through consolidated bioprocessing. Ethanol intolerance is an important metric in terms of process economics, and tolerance has often been described as a complex and likely multigenic trait for which complex gene interactions come into play. Here, we resequence the genome of an ethanol-tolerant mutant, show that the tolerant phenotype is primarily due to a mutated bifunctional acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase gene (adhE), hypothesize based on structural analysis that cofactor specificity may be affected, and confirm this hypothesis using enzyme assays. Biochemical assays confirm a complete loss of NADH-dependent activity with concomitant acquisition of NADPH-dependent activity, which likely affects electron flow in the mutant. The simplicity of the genetic basis for the ethanol-tolerant phenotype observed here informs rational engineering of mutant microbial strains for cellulosic ethanol production.

Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Guss, Adam M [ORNL; Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL; Smolin, Nikolai [ORNL; Yang, Shihui [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Klingeman, Dawn Marie [ORNL; Bhandiwad, Ashwini [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel [ORNL; Raman, Babu [Dow Chemical Company, The; Shao, Xiongjun [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Keller, Martin [ORNL; Lynd, Lee R [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of succinic acid production were such that it could not compete with current commercial practice. To allow recovery of commercial amounts of ethanol from bagasse fermentation, research was conducted on high solids loading fermentations (using S. cerevisiae) with commercial cellulase on pretreated material. A combination of SHF/SSF treatment with fed-batch operation allowed fermentation at 30% solids loading. Supplementation of the fermentation with a small amount of black-strap molasses had results beyond expectation. There was an enhancement of conversion as well as production of ethanol levels above 6.0% w/w, which is required both for efficient distillation as well as contaminant repression. The focus of fermentation development was only on converting the cellulose to ethanol, as this yeast is not capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose (from hemicellulose). In anticipation of the future development of such an organism, we screened the commercially available xylanases to find the optimum mix for conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose. A different mixture than the spezyme/novozyme mix used in our fermentation research was found to be more efficient at converting both cellulose and hemicellulose. Efforts were made to select a mutant of Pichia stipitis for ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol. New mutation technology was developed, but an appropriate mutant has not yet been isolated. The ability to convert to stillage from biomass fermentations were determined to be suitable for anaerobic degradation and methane production. An economic model of a current sugar factory was developed in order to provide a baseline for the cost/benefit analysis of adding cellulosic ethanol production.

Donal F. Day

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Microbial diversity of cellulose hydrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

871; 871; NO. OF PAGES 5 Please cite this article in press as: Wilson DB. Microbial diversity of cellulose hydrolysis, Curr Opin Microbiol (2011), doi:10.1016/j.mib.2011.04.004 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Microbial diversity of cellulose hydrolysis David B Wilson Enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose by microorganisms is a key step in the global carbon cycle. Despite its abundance only a small percentage of microorganisms can degrade cellulose, probably because it is present in recalcitrant cell walls. There are at least five distinct mechanisms used by different microorganisms to degrade cellulose all of which involve cellulases. Cellulolytic organisms and cellulases are extremely diverse possibly because their natural substrates, plant cell walls, are very diverse. At this time the microbial ecology of cellulose degradation in any environment is still

136

Utilization of agricultural wastes for production of ethanol. Progress report, October 1979-May 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project proposes to develop methods to utilize agricultural wastes, especially cottonseed hulls and peanut shells to produce ethanol. Initial steps will involve development of methods to break down cellulose to a usable form of substrates for chemical or biological digestion. The process of ethanol production will consist of (a) preparatory step to separate fibrous (cellulose) and non-fibrous (non-cellulosic compounds). The non-cellulosic residues which may include grains, fats or other substrates for alcoholic fermentation. The fibrous residues will be first pre-treated to digest cellulose with acid, alkali, and sulfur dioxide gas or other solvents. (b) The altered cellulose will be digested by suitable micro-organisms and cellulose enzymes before alcoholic fermentation. The digester and fermentative unit will be specially designed to develop a prototype for pilot plant for a continuous process. The first phase of the project will be devoted toward screening of a suitable method for cellulose modification, separation of fibrous and non-fibrous residues, the micro-organism and enzyme preparations. Work is in progress on: the effects of various microorganisms on the degree of saccharification; the effects of higher concentrations of acids, alkali, and EDTA on efficiency of microbial degradation; and the effects of chemicals on enzymatic digestion.

Singh, B.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Process for producing ethanol from plant biomass using the fungus paecilomyces sp.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing ethanol from plant biomass is disclosed. The process in cludes forming a substrate from the biomass with the substrate including hydrolysates of cellulose and hemicellulose. A species of the fungus Paecilomyces, which has the ability to ferment both cellobiose and xylose to ethanol, is then selected and isolated. The substrate is inoculated with this fungus, and the inoculated substrate is then fermented under conditions favorable for cell viability and conversion of hydrolysates to ethanol. Finally, ethanol is recovered from the fermented substrate.

Wu, Jung Fu (Lakewood, CO)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Process for producing ethanol from plant biomass using the fungus Paecilomyces sp  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing ethanol from plant biomass is disclosed. The process includes forming a substrate from the biomass with the substrate including hydrolysates of cellulose and hemicellulose. A species of the fungus Paecilomyces which has the ability to ferment both cellobiose and xylose to ethanol is then selected and isolated. The substrate is inoculated with this fungus, and the inoculated substrate is then fermented under conditions favorable for cell viability and conversion of hydrolysates to ethanol. Finally, ethanol is recovered from the fermented substrate. 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Wu, J.F.

1985-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

139

Ethanol-blended Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ethanol-Blended Ethanol-Blended Fuels A Study Guide and Overview of: * Ethanol's History in the U.S. and Worldwide * Ethanol Science and Technology * Engine Performance * Environmental Effects * Economics and Energy Security The Curriculum This curriculum on ethanol and its use as a fuel was developed by the Clean Fuels Development Coalition in cooperation with the Nebraska Ethanol Board. This material was developed in response to the need for instructional materials on ethanol and its effects on vehicle performance, the environment, and the economy. As a renewable alternative energy source made from grain and other biomass resources, ethanol study serves as an excellent learning opportunity for students to use in issue clarification and problem-solving activities. Ethanol illustrates that science and technology can provide us with new

140

FRACTIONATION OF LIGNOCELLULOSIC BIOMASS FOR FUEL-GRADE ETHANOL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) of Fort Lupton, Colorado is developing a process for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into fuel-grade ethanol and specialty chemicals in order to enhance national energy security, rural economies, and environmental quality. Lignocellulosic-containing plants are those types of biomass that include wood, agricultural residues, and paper wastes. Lignocellulose is composed of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the component in lignocellulose that has potential for the production of fuel-grade ethanol by direct fermentation of the glucose. However, enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose and raw cellulose into glucose is hindered by the presence of lignin. The cellulase enzyme, which hydrolyzes cellulose to glucose, becomes irreversibly bound to lignin. This requires using the enzyme in reagent quantities rather than in catalytic concentration. The extensive use of this enzyme is expensive and adversely affects the economics of ethanol production. PureVision has approached this problem by developing a biomass fractionator to pretreat the lignocellulose to yield a highly pure cellulose fraction. The biomass fractionator is based on sequentially treating the biomass with hot water, hot alkaline solutions, and polishing the cellulose fraction with a wet alkaline oxidation step. In September 2001 PureVision and Western Research Institute (WRI) initiated a jointly sponsored research project with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate their pretreatment technology, develop an understanding of the chemistry, and provide the data required to design and fabricate a one- to two-ton/day pilot-scale unit. The efforts during the first year of this program completed the design, fabrication, and shakedown of a bench-scale reactor system and evaluated the fractionation of corn stover. The results from the evaluation of corn stover have shown that water hydrolysis prior to alkaline hydrolysis may be beneficial in removing hemicellulose and lignin from the feedstock. In addition, alkaline hydrolysis has been shown to remove a significant portion of the hemicellulose and lignin. The resulting cellulose can be exposed to a finishing step with wet alkaline oxidation to remove the remaining lignin. The final product is a highly pure cellulose fraction containing less than 1% of the native lignin with an overall yield in excess of 85% of the native cellulose. This report summarizes the results from the first year's effort to move the technology to commercialization.

F.D. Guffey; R.C. Wingerson

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

143

Gulf Ethanol Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corp Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Gulf Ethanol Corp Place Houston, Texas Zip 77055 Sector Biomass Product Focused on developing biomass preprocessing technology to efficiently produce cellulosic feedstocks for ethanol producers. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

144

2007 Ethanol Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

available. The 2 largest sources of cellulosic feedstock are forest- ry resources and corn stover. In both cas- es, these sources can leverage existing markets and...

145

Ethanol | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

that ethanol and other biofuels could replace 30% or more of U.S. gasoline demand by 2030. Nearly half of U.S. gasoline contains ethanol in a low-level blend to oxygenate the...

146

Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production  

SciTech Connect

The work conducted in this project is an extension of the developments itemized in DE-FG-36-04GO14236. This program is designed to help the development of a biorefinery based around a raw sugar mill, which in Louisiana is an underutilized asset. Some technical questions were answered regarding the addition of a biomass to ethanol facility to existing sugar mills. The focus of this work is on developing technology to produce ethanol and valuable by-products from bagasse. Three major areas are addressed, feedstock storage, potential by-products and the technology for producing ethanol from dilute ammonia pre-treated bagasse. Sugar mills normally store bagasse in a simple pile. During the off season there is a natural degradation of the bagasse, due to the composting action of microorganisms in the pile. This has serious implications if bagasse must be stored to operate a bagasse/biorefinery for a 300+ day operating cycle. Deterioration of the fermentables in bagasse was found to be 6.5% per month, on pile storage. This indicates that long term storage of adequate amounts of bagasse for year-round operation is probably not feasible. Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of succinic acid production were such that it could not compete with current commercial practice. To allow recovery of commercial amounts of ethanol from bagasse fermentation, research was conducted on high solids loading fermentations (using S. cerevisiae) with commercial cellulase on pretreated material. A combination of SHF/SSF treatment with fed-batch operation allowed fermentation at 30% solids loading. Supplementation of the fermentation with a small amount of black-strap molasses had results beyond expectation. There was an enhancement of conversion as well as production of ethanol levels above 6.0% w/w, which is required both for efficient distillation as well as contaminant repression. The focus of fermentation development was only on converting the cellulose to ethanol, as this yeast is not capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose (from hemicellulose). In anticipation of the future development of such an organism, we screened the commercially available xylanases to find the optimum mix for conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose. A different mixture than the spezyme/novozyme mix used in our fermentation research was found to be more efficient at converting both cellulose and hemicellulose. Efforts were made to select a mutant of Pichia stipitis for ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol. New mutation technology was developed, but an appropriate mutant has not yet been isolated. The ability to convert to stillage from biomass fermentations were determined to be suitable for anaerobic degradation and methane production. An economic model of a current sugar factory was developed in order to provide a baseline for the cost/benefit analysis of adding cellulosic ethanol production.

Donal F. Day

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

Microbial fuel cell treatment of ethanol fermentation process water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method for removing inhibitor compounds from a cellulosic biomass-to-ethanol process which includes a pretreatment step of raw cellulosic biomass material and the production of fermentation process water after production and removal of ethanol from a fermentation step, the method comprising contacting said fermentation process water with an anode of a microbial fuel cell, said anode containing microbes thereon which oxidatively degrade one or more of said inhibitor compounds while producing electrical energy or hydrogen from said oxidative degradation, and wherein said anode is in electrical communication with a cathode, and a porous material (such as a porous or cation-permeable membrane) separates said anode and cathode.

Borole, Abhijeet P. (Knoxville, TN)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

148

Compositions and methods for increasing cellulose production  

SciTech Connect

This disclosure relates to methods and compositions for genetically altering cellulose biosynthesis.

Yang, Zhenbiao (Riverside, CA); Karr, Stephen (Camarillo, CA)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Magnetic cellulose-derivative structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Structures to serve as selective magnetic sorbents are formed by dissolving a cellulose derivative such as cellulose triacetate in a solvent containing magnetic particles. The resulting solution is sprayed as a fine mist into a chamber containing a liquid coagulant such as n-hexane in which the cellulose derivative is insoluble but in which the coagulant is soluble or miscible. On contact with the coagulant, the mist forms free-flowing porous magnetic microspheric structures. These structures act as containers for the ion-selective or organic-selective sorption agent of choice. Some sorbtion agents can be incorporated during the manufacture of the structure.

Walsh, Myles A. (Falmouth, MA); Morris, Robert S. (Fairhaven, MA)

1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

150

Magnetic cellulose-derivative structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Structures to serve as selective magnetic sorbents are formed by dissolving a cellulose derivative such as cellulose triacetate in a solvent containing magnetic particles. The resulting solution is sprayed as a fine mist into a chamber containing a liquid coagulant such as n-hexane in which the cellulose derivative is insoluble but in which the coagulant is soluble or miscible. On contact with the coagulant, the mist forms free-flowing porous magnetic microspheric structures. These structures act as containers for the ion-selective or organic-selective sorption agent of choice. Some sorption agents can be incorporated during the manufacture of the structure. 3 figs.

Walsh, M.A.; Morris, R.S.

1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

151

Development of efficient, integrated cellulosic biorefineries : LDRD final report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cellulosic ethanol, generated from lignocellulosic biomass sources such as grasses and trees, is a promising alternative to conventional starch- and sugar-based ethanol production in terms of potential production quantities, CO{sub 2} impact, and economic competitiveness. In addition, cellulosic ethanol can be generated (at least in principle) without competing with food production. However, approximately 1/3 of the lignocellulosic biomass material (including all of the lignin) cannot be converted to ethanol through biochemical means and must be extracted at some point in the biochemical process. In this project we gathered basic information on the prospects for utilizing this lignin residue material in thermochemical conversion processes to improve the overall energy efficiency or liquid fuel production capacity of cellulosic biorefineries. Two existing pretreatment approaches, soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) and the Arkenol (strong sulfuric acid) process, were implemented at Sandia and used to generated suitable quantities of residue material from corn stover and eucalyptus feedstocks for subsequent thermochemical research. A third, novel technique, using ionic liquids (IL) was investigated by Sandia researchers at the Joint Bioenergy Institute (JBEI), but was not successful in isolating sufficient lignin residue. Additional residue material for thermochemical research was supplied from the dilute-acid simultaneous saccharification/fermentation (SSF) pilot-scale process at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The high-temperature volatiles yields of the different residues were measured, as were the char combustion reactivities. The residue chars showed slightly lower reactivity than raw biomass char, except for the SSF residue, which had substantially lower reactivity. Exergy analysis was applied to the NREL standard process design model for thermochemical ethanol production and from a prototypical dedicated biochemical process, with process data supplied by a recent report from the National Research Council (NRC). The thermochemical system analysis revealed that most of the system inefficiency is associated with the gasification process and subsequent tar reforming step. For the biochemical process, the steam generation from residue combustion, providing the requisite heating for the conventional pretreatment and alcohol distillation processes, was shown to dominate the exergy loss. An overall energy balance with different potential distillation energy requirements shows that as much as 30% of the biomass energy content may be available in the future as a feedstock for thermochemical production of liquid fuels.

Teh, Kwee-Yan; Hecht, Ethan S.; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Buffleben, George M.; Dibble, Dean C.; Lutz, Andrew E.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

DOE Selects Five Ethanol Conversion Projects for $23 Million in Federal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Five Ethanol Conversion Projects for $23 Million in Five Ethanol Conversion Projects for $23 Million in Federal Funding DOE Selects Five Ethanol Conversion Projects for $23 Million in Federal Funding March 27, 2007 - 12:10pm Addthis Projects to Develop Fermentative Organisms to Speed Ethanol Refining WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Alexander Karsner today announced just over $23 million in federal funding, subject to negotiation of final project plans and funding, for five projects focused on developing highly efficient fermentative organisms to convert biomass material to ethanol. This research will further President Bush's goals of making cellulosic ethanol cost-competitive by 2012 and, along with increased automobile fuel efficiency, reducing America's gasoline consumption by 20 percent in ten

153

Chapter 18: Understanding the Developing Cellulosic Biofuels Industry through Dynamic Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this chapter is to discuss a system dynamics model called the Biomass Scenario Model (BSM), which is being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a tool to better understand the interaction of complex policies and their potential effects on the burgeoning cellulosic biofuels industry in the United States. The model has also recently been expanded to include advanced conversion technologies and biofuels (i.e., conversion pathways that yield biomass-based gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, and butanol), but we focus on cellulosic ethanol conversion pathways here. The BSM uses a system dynamics modeling approach (Bush et al., 2008) built on the STELLA software platform.

Newes, E.; Inman, D.; Bush, B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Evaluation of nanoparticle-immobilized cellulase for improved ethanol yield in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation reactions  

SciTech Connect

Ethanol yields were 2.1 (P = 0.06) to 2.3 (P = 0.01) times higher in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) reactions of microcrystalline cellulose when cellulase was physisorbed on silica nanoparticles compared to enzyme in solution. In SSF reactions, cellulose is hydrolyzed to glucose by cellulase while yeast simultaneously ferments glucose to ethanol. The 35 C temperature and the presence of ethanol in SSF reactions are not optimal conditions for cellulase. Immobilization onto solid supports can stabilize the enzyme and promote activity at non-optimum reaction conditions. Mock SSF reactions that did not contain yeast were used to measure saccharification products and identify the mechanism for the improved ethanol yield using immobilized cellulase. Cellulase adsorbed to 40 nm silica nanoparticles produced 1.6 times (P = 0.01) more glucose than cellulase in solution in 96 h at pH 4.8 and 35 C. There was no significant accumulation (<250 {mu}g) of soluble cellooligomers in either the solution or immobilized enzyme reactions. This suggests that the mechanism for the immobilized enzyme's improved glucose yield compared to solution enzyme is the increased conversion of insoluble cellulose hydrolysis products to soluble cellooligomers at 35 C and in the presence of ethanol. The results show that silica-immobilized cellulase can be used to produce increased ethanol yields in the conversion of lignocellulosic materials by SSF.

Lupoi, Jason; Smith, Emily

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

Shao, Xiongjun [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth; Raman, Babu [ORNL; Zhu, Mingjun [South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, PR China; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Guss, Adam M [ORNL; Lynd, Lee R [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1 2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

Lynd, Lee R [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth; Shao, Xiongjun [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth; Raman, Babu [Dow Chemical Company, The; Mielenz, Jonathan R [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Guss, Adam M [ORNL; Zhu, Mingjun [South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, PR China

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fuel Prices Find ethanol fuel prices and trends. Ethanol is a renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. The use of ethanol is widespread-almost all gasoline in the U.S. contains

158

Chief Ethanol Fuels Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chief Ethanol Fuels Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Chief Ethanol Fuels Inc Place Hastings, Nebraska Product Ethanol producer and supplier References Chief Ethanol Fuels...

159

Sioux River Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Sioux River Ethanol LLC Place Hudson, South Dakota Zip 57034 Product Farmer owned ethanol producer, Sioux River Ethanol is...

160

Degradation of cellulosic biomass and its subsequent utilization for the production of chemical feedstocks. Progress report, December 1, 1978-February 28, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ongoing progress of a coordinated research program aimed at optimizing the biodegradation of cellulosic biomass to ethanol and chemical feedstocks is summarized. Growth requirements and genetic manipulations of clostridium thermocellum for selection of high cellulose producers are reported. The enzymatic activity of the cellulase produced by these organisms was studied. The soluble sugars produced from hydrolysis were analyzed. Increasing the tolerance of C. thermocellum to ethanol during liquid fuel production, increasing the rate of product formation, and directing the catabolism to selectively achieve high ethanol concentrations with respect to other products were studied. Alternative substrates for C. thermocellum were evaluated. Studies on the utilization of xylose were performed. Single stage fermentation of cellulose using mixed cultures of C. thermocellum and C. thermosaccharolyticum were studied. The study of the production of chemical feedstocks focused on acrylic acid, acetone/butanol, acetic acid, and lactic acid.

Wang, D.I.C.; Cooney, C.L.; Demain, A.L.; Gomez, R.F.; Sinskey, A.J.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Fermentation method producing ethanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ethanol is the major end product of an anaerobic, thermophilic fermentation process using a mutant strain of bacterium Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum. This organism is capable of converting hexose and pentose carbohydrates to ethanol, acetic and lactic acids. Mutants of Clostridium thermosaccharolyticum are capable of converting these substrates to ethanol in exceptionally high yield and with increased productivity. Both the mutant organism and the technique for its isolation are provided.

Wang, Daniel I. C. (Belmont, MA); Dalal, Rajen (Chicago, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

OpenEI - ethanol  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

biodiesel CNG compressed natural gas E85 Electricity ethanol hydrogen liquefied natural gas LNG liquefied petroleum gas LPG propane station locations Tue, 14 Dec 2010...

163

Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description and move this content to a more...

164

Energy Basics: Ethanol  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biodiesel Biofuel Conversion Processes Biopower Bio-Based Products Biomass Resources Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Ethanol Photo of several beakers of gold and...

165

Pacific Ethanol, Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

enzyme complexes to convert a potentially wide range of lignocellulosic feedstocks to ethanol and other vendible products. CEO or Equivalent: Dr. Pearse Lyons, Alltech Inc Founder...

166

NREL: News - NREL Finds a New Cellulose Digestion Mechanism by a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

114 114 NREL Finds a New Cellulose Digestion Mechanism by a Fast-eating Enzyme CelA digests cellulose faster than enzymes from commercial preparations January 2, 2014 Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have discovered that an enzyme from a microorganism first found in the Valley of Geysers on the Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia in 1990 can digest cellulose almost twice as fast as the current leading component cellulase enzyme on the market. If the enzyme continues to perform well in larger tests, it could help drive down the price of making lignocellulosic fuels, from ethanol to other biofuels that can be dropped into existing infrastructure. A paper reporting this finding, "Revealing Nature's Cellulase Diversity: The

167

Stripping Ethanol from Ethanol-Blended Diesel Fuels for Reductant ...  

Stripping Ethanol from Ethanol-Blended Diesel Fuels for Reductant Use in N0x Catalytic Reduction Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity.

168

Cellulosic Fiber Composites Using Protein Hydrolysates and Methods ...  

Technology Marketing Summary This technology relates to cellulosic fiber composites using protein hydrolysates. Description Cellulosic fiber composites currently use ...

169

Life Cycle Assessment of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007: Ethanol - Global Warming Potential and Environmental Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to use life cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate the global warming potential (GWP), water use, and net energy value (NEV) associated with the EISA-mandated 16 bgy cellulosic biofuels target, which is assumed in this study to be met by cellulosic-based ethanol, and the EISA-mandated 15 bgy conventional corn ethanol target. Specifically, this study compares, on a per-kilometer-driven basis, the GWP, water use, and NEV for the year 2022 for several biomass feedstocks.

Heath, G. A.; Hsu, D. D.; Inman, D.; Aden, A.; Mann, M. K.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Bioconversion of plant biomass to ethanol. Annual report and revised research plan, January 1977--January 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to demonstrate on a laboratory scale the technical feasibility of the direct microbial conversion of pretreated wood to ethanol. During the first year of this contract, we investigated the feasibility of biologically delignifying wood with C. pruinosum and directly fermenting the pretreated wood to ethanol with a mixed culture. Bench-top fermentations of a thermophilic bacillus growing on glucose and of a mixed culture of thermophilic sporocytophaga (US) and a thermophilic bacillus growing on microcrystalline and amorphous cellulose were evaluated for growth and ethanol production. In the mixed culture fermentation of amorphous and microcrystalline cellulose, the specific rate of substrate depletion was calculated to be 0.087 hr/sup -1/ and 0.0346 hr/sup -1/, respectively. However, defining the growth requirements of C. pruinosum and sporocytophaga (US) proved more difficult than originally anticipated. In order to achieve the program objectives within the contract period, a revised research plan was developed based upon chemical pretreatment and the direct fermentation of pretreated hardwood to ethanol. In place of the biological delignification pretreatment step, we have substituted a chemically supplemented steam pretreatment step to partially delignify wood and to enhance its accessibility to microbial utilization. Clostridium thermocellum, which ferments cellulose directly to ethanol and acetic acid, has replaced the mixed culture fermentation stage for ethanol production. Research on the production of ethanol from xylose by the thermophilic bacillus ZB-B2 is retained as one means of utilizing the hemicellulose fraction of hardwood. Work on the genetic improvement of the ethanol yields of both cultures by suppressing acetic acid production is also retained. The rationale, experimental approach, and economic considerations of this revised research plan are also presented.

Brooks, R.E.; Bellamy, W.D.; Su, T.M.

1978-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

171

Ethanol Demand in United States Regional Production of Oxygenate-limited Gasoline  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (the Act) outlined a national energy strategy that called for reducing the nation's dependency on petroleum imports. The Act directed the Secretary of Energy to establish a program to promote and expand the use of renewable fuels. The Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT) within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has evaluated a wide range of potential fuels and has concluded that cellulosic ethanol is one of the most promising near-term prospects. Ethanol is widely recognized as a clean fuel that helps reduce emissions of toxic air pollutants. Furthermore, cellulosic ethanol produces less greenhouse gas emissions than gasoline or any of the other alternative transportation fuels being considered by DOE.

Hadder, G.R.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Structural and Thermal Stability Properties of Cellulose ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, nanocomposite based on cellulose nanowhiskers (CNW) and polyactic ... The optical transparency properties were studied by Fourier Transform...

173

Sunnyside Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sunnyside Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Sunnyside Ethanol Place Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Zip PA 15237 Product Pennsylvania based company created for the specific purpose...

174

Northstar Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northstar Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Northstar Ethanol Place Lake Crystal, Minnesota Zip 56055 Product Corn-base bioethanol producer in Minnesotta References...

175

Ethanol India | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name Ethanol India Place Kolhapur, Maharashtra, India Sector Biofuels Product Maharashtra-based biofuels consultancy firm. References Ethanol India1...

176

Combined enzyme mediated fermentation of cellulous and xylose to ethanol by Schizosaccharoyces pombe, cellulase, .beta.-glucosidase, and xylose isomerase  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing ethanol from mixed sugar streams from pretreated biomass comprising xylose and cellulose using enzymes to convert these substrates to fermentable sugars; selecting and isolating a yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe ATCC No. 2476, having the ability to ferment these sugars as they are being formed to produce ethanol; loading the substrates with the fermentation mix composed of yeast, enzymes and substrates; fermenting the loaded substrates and enzymes under anaerobic conditions at a pH range of between about 5.0 to about 6.0 and at a temperature range of between about 35.degree. C. to about 40.degree. C. until the fermentation is completed, the xylose being isomerized to xylulose, the cellulose being converted to glucose, and these sugars being concurrently converted to ethanol by yeast through means of the anaerobic fermentation; and recovering the ethanol.

Lastick, Stanley M. (Longmont, CO); Mohagheghi, Ali (Northglen, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Grohmann, Karel (Winter Haven, FL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Mascoma Announces Major Cellulosic Biofuel Technology Breakthrough  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mascoma Announces Major Cellulosic Biofuel Technology Breakthrough Lebanon, NH - May 7, 2009 bioprocessing, or CBP, a low-cost processing strategy for production of biofuels from cellulosic biomass. CBP much, much closer to billions of gallons of low cost cellulosic biofuels," said Michigan State

178

TamingtheCellulosic BiofuelsSupplyChain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TamingtheCellulosic BiofuelsSupplyChain: DistributedBiomassProcessingfor SustainableBiofuelsandAnimalFeeds Supplying adequate cellulosic biomass to biorefineries is emerging as a crucial issue in biofuel systems. We addresss this problem by pretreating cellulosic biomass using the ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) process

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

179

Method of producing thin cellulose nitrate film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for forming a thin nitrocellulose film of reproducible thickness is described. The film is a cellulose nitrate film, 10 to 20 microns in thickness, cast from a solution of cellulose nitrate in tetrahydrofuran, said solution containing from 7 to 15 percent, by weight, of dioctyl phthalate, said cellulose nitrate having a nitrogen content of from 10 to 13 percent.

Lupica, S.B.

1975-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

180

Pacific Ethanol, Inc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc RSE Pulp & Chemical, LLC (Subsidiary of Red Shield Environmental, LLC)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Production of bacterial cellulose from alternate feedstocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Production of bacterial cellulose by Acetobacter xylinum ATCC 10821 and 23770 in static cultures was tested from unamended food process effluents. Effluents included low- and high-solids potato effluents (LS and HS), cheese whey permeate (CW), and sugar beet raffinate (CSB). Strain 23770 produced 10% less cellulose from glucose than did 10821, and diverted more glucose to gluconate. Unamended HS, CW, and CSB were unsuitable for cellulose production by either strain, while LS was unsuitable for production by 10821. However, 23770 produced 17% more cellulose from LS than from glucose, indicating unamended LS could serve as a feedstock for bacterial cellulose.

D. N. Thompson; M. A. Hamilton

2000-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

182

Genetically Engineered Ethanol Producing Microorganisms ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Genetically Engineered Ethanol Producing Microorganisms. Battelle ...

183

Clostridium thermocellum ATCC27405 transcriptomic, metabolomic and proteomic profiles after ethanol stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clostridium thermocellum is a candidate consolidated bioprocessing biocatalyst, which is a microorganism that expresses enzymes for both cellulose hydrolysis and its fermentation to produce fuels such as lignocellulosic ethanol. However, C. thermocellum is relatively sensitive to ethanol compared to ethanologenic microorganisms such as yeast and Zymomonas mobilis that are used in industrial fermentations but do not possess native enzymes for industrial cellulose hydrolysis. In this study, C. thermocellum was grown to mid-exponential phase and then treated with ethanol to a final concentration of 3.9 g/L to investigate its physiological and regulatory responses to ethanol stress. Samples were taken pre-shock and 2, 12, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min post-shock, and from untreated control fermentations for systems biology analyses. Cell growth was arrested by ethanol supplementation with intracellular accumulation of carbon sources such as cellobiose, and sugar phosphates, including fructose-6-phosphate and glucose-6-phosphate. The largest response of C. thermocellum to ethanol shock treatment was in genes and proteins related to nitrogen uptake and metabolism, which is likely important for redirecting the cells physiology to overcome inhibition and allow growth to resume. This study suggests possible avenues for metabolic engineering and provides comprehensive, integrated systems biology datasets that will be useful for future metabolic modeling and strain development endeavors.

Yang, Shihui [ORNL; Giannone, Richard J [ORNL; Dice, Lezlee T [ORNL; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

ethanol | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ethanol ethanol Dataset Summary Description These data files contain volume, mass, and hardness changes of elastomers and plastics representative exposed to gasoline containing various levels of ethanol. These materials are representative of those used in gasoline fuel storage and dispensing hardware. All values are compared to the original untreated condition. The data sets include results from specimens exposed directly to the fuel liquid and also a set of specimens exposed only to the fuel vapors. Source Mike Kass, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Date Released August 16th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated August 16th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords compatibility elastomers ethanol gasoline plastics polymers Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon plastics_dma_results_san.xlsx (xlsx, 4.9 MiB)

185

Ethanol production from lignocellulose  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention presents a method of improving enzymatic degradation of lignocellulose, as in the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, through the use of ultrasonic treatment. The invention shows that ultrasonic treatment reduces cellulase requirements by 1/3 to 1/2. With the cost of enzymes being a major problem in the cost-effective production of ethanol from lignocellulosic material, this invention presents a significant improvement over presently available methods.

Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Wood, Brent E. (Gainesville, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

High pressure HC1 conversion of cellulose to glucose  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The production of ethanol from glucose by means of fermentation represents a potential long-range alternative to oil for use as a transportation fuel. Today's rising oil prices and the dwindling world supply of oil have made other fuels, such as ethanol, attractive alternatives. It has been shown that automobiles can operate, with minor alterations, on a 10% ethanol-gasoline mixture popularly known as gasohol. Wood has long been known as a potential source of glucose. Glucose may be obtained from wood following acid hydrolysis. In this research, it was found that saturating wood particles with HCl gas under pressure was an effective pretreatment before subjecting the wood to dilute acid hydrolysis. The pretreatment is necessary because of the tight lattice structure of cellulose, which inhibits dilute acid hydrolysis. HCl gas makes the cellulose more susceptible to hydrolysis and the glucose yield is doubled when dilute acid hydrolysis is preceded by HCl saturation at high pressure. The saturation was most effectively performed in a fluidized bed reactor, with pure HCl gas fluidizing equal volumes of ground wood and inert particles. The fluidized bed effectively dissipated the large amount of heat released upon HCl absorption into the wood. Batch reaction times of one hour at 314.7 p.s.i.a. gave glucose yields of 80% and xylose yields of 95% after dilute acid hydrolysis. A non-catalytic gas-solid reaction model, with gas diffusing through the solid limiting the reaction rate, was found to describe the HCl-wood reaction in the fluidized bed. HCl was found to form a stable adduct with the lignin residue in the wood, in a ratio of 3.33 moles per mole of lignin monomer. This resulted in a loss of 0.1453 lb. of HCl per pound of wood. The adduct was broken upon the addition of water. A process design and economic evaluation for a plant to produce 214 tons per day of glucose from air-dried ground Populus tristi gave an estimated glucose cost of 15.14 cents per pound. This would correspond to $2.54 per gallon of ethanol if the glucose were fermented. Key factors contributing to the cost of glucose production were unrecovered HCl, which contributed 5.70 cents per pound of glucose, and the cost of wood, which at $25 per ton contribute 4.17 cents per pound.

Antonoplis, Robert Alexander; Blanch, Harvey W.; Wilke, Charles R.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Experiences from Introduction of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel Station |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Experiences from Introduction of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel Station Experiences from Introduction of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel Station Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Experiences from Introduction of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel Station Agency/Company /Organization: BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.best-europe.org/upload/BEST_documents/info_documents/Best%20report Ethanol buses were demonstrated within BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport (BEST). This report describes the problems at the sites and how they were solved. The aim of the report is to guide other local transport authorities on how to deal with the questions raised when a bus demonstration begins. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies:

188

Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

189

Southridge Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Southridge Ethanol Place Dallas, Texas Zip 75219 Sector Renewable Energy Product Southridge Ethanol is a renewable energy company interested in becoming one of the biggest producers of ethanol in the Southeast. References Southridge Ethanol[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Southridge Ethanol is a company located in Dallas, Texas . References ↑ "Southridge Ethanol" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Southridge_Ethanol&oldid=351577" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

190

Ethanol Myths and Facts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ethanol Myths and Facts Ethanol Myths and Facts Ethanol Myths and Facts More Documents & Publications Biofuels & Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Myths versus Facts Biofuels & Greenhouse...

191

Chief Ethanol Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chief Ethanol Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Chief Ethanol Fuels Place Hastings, NE Website http:www.chiefethanolfuels.c References Chief Ethanol Fuels1 Information...

192

Vehicle Technologies Office: DOE Brochure Highlights Ethanol...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ethanol production beginning with fertilizer manufacture, GREET determined that producing ethanol from corn requires 0.74 million Btu fossil energy input per million Btu of ethanol...

193

Pacific Ethanol, Inc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc More Documents & Publications RSE Pulp & Chemical, LLC (Subsidiary of Red Shield Environmental, LLC) EA-1888: Final...

194

Central Indiana Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Indiana Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Central Indiana Ethanol LLC Place Marion, Indiana Zip 46952 Product Ethanol producer developina a 151 mlpa plant in...

195

Pacific Ethanol, Inc | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc More Documents & Publications RSE Pulp & Chemical, LLC (Subsidiary of Red Shield Environmental, LLC) Pacific...

196

Bioconversion of plant biomass to ethanol. Final report, 15 December 1976-31 December 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two approaches to ethanol production via thermophilic mixed culture fermentation of pretreated wood were investigated. The initial studies of wood biodelignification by Chrysosporium pruinosum and subsequent mixed culture fermentation to ethanol using a cellulolytic strain of sporocytophaga and a strain of Bacillus stearothermophilus proved to be premature for a development effort. Studies of the fermentation of SO/sub 2//steam-treated poplar by a mixed culture of C. thermocellum and C. thermosaccharolyticum were, however, technically and economically promising. Wood pretreatment to enhance microbial utilization, the microbiology and biochemistry of pure and mixed culture fermentation of cellulose by C. thermocellum and C. thermocellum and C. thermosaccharolyticum, and techniques for improving ethanol tolerance and yield were investigated. Considerable progress in overcoming the technical barriers to efficient ethanol production from wood have been demonstrated; however, additional studies and development work are required before technical feasibility can be established.

Brooks, R.E.; Su, T.M.; Brennan, M.J. Jr.; Frick, J.; Lynch, M.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Supercomputer Provides Molecular Insight into Cellulose (Fact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cellulose, which is a fundamental step in biomass conversion technolo- gies for biofuels production. NREL used the new high-performance supercomputer Red Mesa to conduct...

198

Preparation and Characterization on Cellulose Nanofiber Film  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, cellulose nanofibers from wood were obtained using ... Employment of PS Template in the Surface Modification and Performance Improvement of...

199

Greater Ohio Ethanol LLC GO Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ohio Ethanol LLC GO Ethanol Ohio Ethanol LLC GO Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Greater Ohio Ethanol, LLC (GO Ethanol) Place Lima, Ohio Zip OH 45804 Product GO Ethanol is a pure play ethanol producer located in Ohio. Coordinates -12.0436°, -77.021217° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-12.0436,"lon":-77.021217,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

200

Degradation of cellulosic biomass and its subsequent utilization for the production of chemical feedstocks. Progress report, September 1-November 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies on the accumulation of glucose during the fermentation of cellulose by Clostridium thermocellum are discussed. Production of ethanol and its relationship to growth rate in C. thermocellum is reported. Different biomasses were tested for ethanol yields. These included exploded poplar, sugar cane, bagasse, corn cobs, sweet gum, rice straw, and wheat straw. Thermophilic bacteria were tested to determine relationship of temperature to yield of ethanol. A preliminary report on isolating plaque forming emits derived from C. thermocellum is presented as well as the utilization of carbohydrates in nutrition. A cellulose enzyme is being purified from C. thermocellum. The production of chemical feedstocks by fermentation is reported. Acrylic acid, acetone/butanol, and acetic acid, produced by C. propionicum, C. acetobutylicum, and C. thermoaceticum, are discussed. (DC)

Wang, D.I.; Cooney, C.L.; Demain, A.L.; Gomez, R.F.; Sinskey, A.J.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Methods for enhancing the degradation or conversion of cellulosic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to methods for degrading or converting a cellulosic material and for producing a substance from a cellulosic material.

Harris, Paul (Carnation, WA); Rey, Michael (Davis, CA); Ding, Hanshu (Davis, CA)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

202

Genes and Mechanisms for Improving Cellulosic Vaccine for ...  

Background Cellulosic biomass accounts for roughly 75% of all plant material, and can be used to produce biofuels. Sources of cellulosic biomass ...

203

Less is more: Novel cellulose structure requires fewer enzymes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved methods for breaking down cellulose nanofibers are central to cost-effective biofuel production. June 19, 2013 An enzyme (shown in blue) pulls out individual cellulose...

204

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel suggests that infrastructure development was not a major limitation. Cellulosic-based advanced biofuel has

205

Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 15 figs.

Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

1996-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

206

Nucleic acids encoding a cellulose binding domain  

SciTech Connect

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Cellulose Pyrolysis A Literature, Review.  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reaction Mechanisms in Reaction Mechanisms in Cellulose Pyrolysis A Literature, Review. - - pacific N o r t h ~ ~ ~ , baboratwies I - - bCL-T-,,;, .,- , . . . I ' I . - " 1- jl,! # . .' , . - --h 1 , i b - . "I 1.- . . ., .. ' N O T - I C E , , If PACIF tC NORTHWLST U B O R A T ~ R Y .4peiild by B h m E far c h t ,EP4ERGY RESEARCH AN0 PEVELOPMEM ADMtNlSTRAnQN U m h Contract Z Y - ~ ~ - C ~ & I # D w n : m a , m & l 3 Q j l m OIdrfrn m y - !*? 1SI71Y9 1 - m-u3 2s-m .**-2?3 ,Sbca lcPa w m *a0 Iffy &a It- w-% w w @.a SlO.0 m u 6 REACTION MECHANISMS IN CELLULOSE PYROLYSIS A LITERATURE REVIEW by Peter M. Molton T.F. Demmitt Chemical Technology Department BATTELLE Pacific Northwest Laboratories Richland, Washington 99352 CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L I S T OF F I G U R E S iii L I S T O F T A B L E S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i v . . . . . . . . . . . . . I . INTRODUCTION 1

208

Catalytic Mechanism of Cellulose Degradation by a Cellobiohydrolase, CelS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrolysis of cellulose is the bottleneck in cellulosic ethanol production. The cellobiohydrolase CelS from Clostridium thermocellum catalyzes the hydrolysis of cello-oligosaccharides via inversion of the anomeric carbon. Here, to examine key features of the CelS-catalyzed reaction, QM/MM (SCCDFTB/MM) simulations are performed. The calculated free energy profile for the reaction possesses a 19 kcal/mol barrier. The results confirm the role of active site residue Glu87 as the general acid catalyst in the cleavage reaction and show that Asp255 may act as the general base. A feasible position in the reactant state of the water molecule responsible for nucleophilic attack is identified. Sugar ring distortion as the reaction progresses is quantified. The results provide a computational approach that may complement the experimental design of more efficient enzymes for biofuel production.

Saharay, Moumita [ORNL; Guo, Hong [ORNL; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Cellulosic Biofuel Tax Exemption Fuel consisting of cellulosic biofuel or a blend of gasoline and cellulosic

210

Sulfuric Acid Pretreatment and Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Photoperiod Sensitvie Sorghum for Ethanol Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photoperiod sensitive (PS) sorghum, with high soluble sugar content, high mass yield and high drought tolerance in dryland environments, has great potential for bioethanol production. The effect of diluted sulfuric acid pretreatment on enzymatic hydrolysis was investigated. Hydrolysis efficiency increased from 78.9 to 94.4% as the acid concentration increased from 0.5 to 1.5%. However, the highest total glucose yield (80.3%) occurred at the 1.0% acid condition because of the significant cellulose degradation at the 1.5% concentration. Synchrotron wide-angle X-ray diffraction was used to study changes of the degree of crystallinity. With comparison of cellulosic crystallinity and adjusted cellulosic crystallinity, the crystalline cellulose decreased after low acidic concentration (0.5%) applied, but did not change significantly, as the acid concentration increased. Scanning electron microscopy was also employed to understand how the morphological structure of PS sorghum changed after pretreatment. Under current processing conditions, the total ethanol yield is 74.5% (about 0.2 g ethanol from 1 g PS sorghum). A detail mass balance was also provided.

F Xu; Y Shi; X Wu

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Preparation for commercial demonstration of biomass-to-ethanol conversion technology. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to complete the development of a commercially viable process to produce fuel ethanol from renewable cellulosic biomass. The program focused on pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation technologies where Amoco has a unique proprietary position. Assured access to low-cost feedstock is a cornerstone of attractive economics for cellulose to ethanol conversion in the 1990s. Most of Amoco`s efforts in converting cellulosic feedstocks to ethanol before 1994 focused on using paper from municipal solid waste as the feed. However, while many municipalities and MSW haulers expressed interest in Amoco`s technology, none were willing to commit funding to process development. In May, 1994 several large agricultural products companies showed interest in Amoco`s technology, particularly for application to corn fiber. Amoco`s initial work with corn fiber was encouraging. The project work plan was designed to provide sufficient data on corn fiber conversion to convince a major agriculture products company to participate in the construction of a commercial demonstration facility.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Definition: Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol A colorless, flammable liquid produced by fermentation of sugars. While it is also the alcohol found in alcoholic beverages, it can be denatured for fuel use. Fuel ethanol is used principally for blending in low concentrations with motor gasoline as an oxygenate or octane enhancer. In high concentrations, it is used to fuel alternative-fuel vehicles specially designed for its use.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Ethanol fuel is ethanol (ethyl alcohol), the same type of alcohol found in alcoholic beverages. It is most often used as a motor fuel, mainly as a biofuel additive for gasoline. World ethanol production for transport fuel tripled between 2000 and 2007 from 17 billion to more than 52 billion liters. From 2007 to 2008, the share of ethanol in global gasoline type

213

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fueling Stations Photo of an ethanol fueling station. Thousands of ethanol fueling stations are available in the United States.

214

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Related Links on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Blends Specifications Production & Distribution Feedstocks Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

215

Effects of Dilute Acid Pretreatment on Cellulose DP and the Relationship Between DP Reduction and Cellulose Digestibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The degree of polymerization(DP) of cellulose is considered to be one of the most important properties affecting the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. Various pure cellulosic and biomass materials have been used in a study of the effect of dilute acid treatment on cellulose DP. A substantial reduction in DP was found for all pure cellulosic materials studied even at conditions that would be considered relatively mild for pretreatment. The effect of dilute acid pretreatment on cellulose DP in biomass samples was also investigated. Corn stover pretreated with dilute acid under the most optimal conditions contained cellulose with a DPw in the range of 1600{approx}3500, which is much higher than the level-off DP(DPw 150{approx}300) obtained with pure celluloses. The effect of DP reduction on the saccharification of celluloses was also studied. From this study it does not appear that cellulose DP is a main factor affecting cellulose saccharification.

Wang, W.; Chen, X.; Tucker, M.; Himmel, M. E.; Johnson, D. K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Xylose fermentation to ethanol  

SciTech Connect

The past several years have seen tremendous progress in the understanding of xylose metabolism and in the identification, characterization, and development of strains with improved xylose fermentation characteristics. A survey of the numerous microorganisms capable of directly fermenting xylose to ethanol indicates that wild-type yeast and recombinant bacteria offer the best overall performance in terms of high yield, final ethanol concentration, and volumetric productivity. The best performing bacteria, yeast, and fungi can achieve yields greater than 0.4 g/g and final ethanol concentrations approaching 5%. Productivities remain low for most yeast and particularly for fungi, but volumetric productivities exceeding 1.0 g/L-h have been reported for xylose-fermenting bacteria. In terms of wild-type microorganisms, strains of the yeast Pichia stipitis show the most promise in the short term for direct high-yield fermentation of xylose without byproduct formation. Of the recombinant xylose-fermenting microorganisms developed, recombinant E. coli ATTC 11303 (pLOI297) exhibits the most favorable performance characteristics reported to date.

McMillan, J.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Renewable materials for tissue repair/biocompatibility of cellulose nanocrystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface of cellulose displays hydroxyl groups can be reacted to a broad range of molecules adding unique properties to cellulose surfaces. This opens for possible applications for cellulose nanoparticles in biomedicine, specifically in areas that ... Keywords: atomic force microscope, biocompatibility, cellulose nanoparticles

E.-M. Ulrika Egertsdotter; Cyrus K. Aidun

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Production of permeable cellulose triacetate membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A phase inversion process for the preparation of cellulose triacetate (CTA) and regenerated cellulose membranes is disclosed. Such membranes are useful as supports for liquid membranes in facilitated transport processes, as microfiltration membranes, as dialysis or ultrafiltration membranes, and for the preparation of ion-selective electrodes. The process comprises the steps of preparing a casting solution of CTA in a solvent comprising a mixture of cyclohexanone and methylene chloride, casting a film from the casting solution, and immersing the cast film in a methanol bath. The resulting CTA membrane may then be hydrolyzed to regenerated cellulose using conventional techniques.

Johnson, B.M.

1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

219

Microscopic Analysis of Corn Fiber Using Corn Starch- and Cellulose-Specific Molecular Probes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ethanol is the primary liquid transportation fuel produced from renewable feedstocks in the United States today. The majority of corn grain, the primary feedstock for ethanol production, has been historically processed in wet mills yielding products such as gluten feed, gluten meal, starch, and germ. Starch extracted from the grain is used to produce ethanol in saccharification and fermentation steps; however the extraction of starch is not 100% efficient. To better understand starch extraction during the wet milling process, we have developed fluorescent probes that can be used to visually localize starch and cellulose in samples using confocal microscopy. These probes are based on the binding specificities of two types of carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), which are small substrate-specific protein domains derived from carbohydrate degrading enzymes. CBMs were fused, using molecular cloning techniques, to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) or to the red fluorescent protein DsRed (RFP). Using these engineered probes, we found that the binding of the starch-specific probe correlates with starch content in corn fiber samples. We also demonstrate that there is starch internally localized in the endosperm that may contribute to the high starch content in corn fiber. We also surprisingly found that the cellulose-specific probe did not bind to most corn fiber samples, but only to corn fiber that had been hydrolyzed using a thermochemical process that removes the residual starch and much of the hemicellulose. Our findings should be of interest to those working to increase the efficiency of the corn grain to ethanol process.

Porter, S. E.; Donohoe, B. S.; Beery, K. E.; Xu, Q.; Ding, S.-Y.; Vinzant, T. B.; Abbas, C. A.; Himmel, M. E.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Reaction mechanisms in cellulose pyrolysis: a literature review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A bibliographic review of 195 references is presented outlining the history of the research into the mechanisms of cellulose pyrolysis. Topics discussed are: initial product identification, mechanism of initial formation of levoglucosan, from cellulose and from related compounds, decomposition of cellulose to other compounds, formation of aromatics, pyrolysis of levoglucosan, crosslinking of cellulose, pyrolytic reactions of cellulose derivatives, and the effects of inorganic salts on the pyrolysis mechanism. (JSR)

Molton, P.M.; Demmitt, T.F.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Essays concerning the cellulosic biofuel industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Despite market-based incentives and mandated production, the U.S. cellulosic biofuel industry has been slow to develop. This dissertation explores the economic factors that have limited (more)

Rosburg, Alicia Sue

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Raw materials evaluation and process development studies for conversion of biomass to sugars and ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A range of cellulosic raw materials in the form of agricultural crop residue was analyzed for chemical composition and assessed for potential yields of sugars through chemical pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of these materials. Corn stover was used as a representative raw material for a preliminary process design and economic assessment of the production of sugars and ethanol. With the process as presently developed, 23 gallons of ethanol can be obtained per ton of corn stover at a processing cost of about $1.80 per gallon exclusive of by-product credits. The analysis shows the cost of ethanol to be highly dependent upon (1) the cost of the biomass, (2) the extent of conversion to glucose, (3) enzyme recovery and production cost and (4) potential utilization of xylose. Significant cost reduction appears possible through further research in these directions.

Wilke, C.R.; Yang, R.D.; Sciamanna, A.S.; Freitas, R.P.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

| Diesel Vehicles Electricity | Hybrid & Plug-In Electric Vehicles Ethanol | Flex Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen | Fuel Cell Vehicles Natural Gas | Natural Gas Vehicles Propane |...

224

Utilization of biocatalysts in cellulose waste minimization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the principal component of biomass and, therefore, a major source of waste that is either buried or burned. Examples of biomass waste include agricultural crop residues, forestry products, and municipal wastes. Recycling of this waste is important for energy conservation as well as waste minimization and there is some probability that in the future biomass could become a major energy source and replace fossil fuels that are currently used for fuels and chemicals production. It has been estimated that in the United States, between 100-450 million dry tons of agricultural waste are produced annually, approximately 6 million dry tons of animal waste, and of the 190 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated annually, approximately two-thirds is cellulosic in nature and over one-third is paper waste. Interestingly, more than 70% of MSW is landfilled or burned, however landfill space is becoming increasingly scarce. On a smaller scale, important cellulosic products such as cellulose acetate also present waste problems; an estimated 43 thousand tons of cellulose ester waste are generated annually in the United States. Biocatalysts could be used in cellulose waste minimization and this chapter describes their characteristics and potential in bioconversion and bioremediation processes.

Woodward, J.; Evans, B.R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Labeling Ethanol Labeling Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Labeling Requirement All gasoline containing 1% or more ethanol by volume offered for sale must be conspicuously identified as "with ethanol" or "containing ethanol."

226

Tharaldson Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tharaldson Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Tharaldson Ethanol LLC Place Casselton, North Dakota Zip 58012 Product Owner of a USD 200m 120m-gallon ethanol plant in...

227

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Incentive The Ethanol Production Incentive provides qualified ethanol producers with quarterly payments based on production volume during times when ethanol

228

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Blend Mandate Ethanol Blend Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blend Mandate All gasoline offered for sale at retail stations within the state must contain 10% ethanol (E10). This requirement is waived only if a distributor is unable to purchase ethanol or ethanol-blended gasoline at the same or

229

Fuel Ethanol Oxygenate Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Fuel Ethanol Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Merchant Plants Captive Plants Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Product: Fuel Ethanol Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Merchant Plants Captive Plants Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 27,197 26,722 26,923 26,320 25,564 27,995 1981-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) 628 784 836 842 527 636 2004-2013 Midwest (PADD 2) 25,209 24,689 24,786 24,186 23,810 26,040 2004-2013 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 523 404 487 460 431 473 2004-2013 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) 450 432 430 432 415 429 2004-2013 West Coast (PADD 5)

230

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GHG emissions for both corn ethanol and cellulosic ethanole/MJ, respectively, a 93% (corn ethanol) and 50% (cellulosicSugar Cane) Ethanol (Corn) Ethanol (Cellulosic biomass) 25

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Highwater Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Highwater Ethanol Highwater Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Highwater Ethanol Place Lamberton, Minnesota Zip MN 56152 Product Highwater Ethanol LLC is the SPV behind the 195mLpa ethanol plant being constructed in Lamberton, Minnesota, US. Coordinates 44.233433°, -95.262294° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.233433,"lon":-95.262294,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

232

Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intermediate Ethanol Intermediate Ethanol Blends to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Fuel Effects on Combustion Lubricants Natural Gas Research Biofuels End-Use Research

233

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Feedstocks to Feedstocks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Feedstocks on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Blends Specifications Production & Distribution Feedstocks Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Feedstocks Map of the United States BioFuels Atlas Use this interactive map to compare biomass feedstocks and biofuels by

234

Ethanol Capital Management | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ethanol Capital Management Jump to: navigation, search Name Ethanol Capital Management Place Tucson, Arizona...

235

Cardinal Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cardinal Ethanol is in the process of building an ethanol plant in East Central Indiana, near Union City. Coordinates 39.184005, -78.164049 Loading map......

236

Ethanol production in non-recombinant hosts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Non-recombinant bacteria that produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product, associated nucleic acids and polypeptides, methods for producing ethanol using the bacteria, and kits are disclosed.

Kim, Youngnyun; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O.

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

237

Algodyne Ethanol Energy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Algodyne Ethanol Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Algodyne Ethanol Energy Inc Place Las Vegas, Nevada Zip 89145 Sector Biofuels Product Holds proprietary...

238

Ethanol Myths and Facts | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ethanol Myths and Facts Ethanol Myths and Facts More Documents & Publications Biofuels & Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Myths versus Facts Biofuels & Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Myths...

239

US Ethanol Vehicle Coalition | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vehicle Coalition Jump to: navigation, search Name US Ethanol Vehicle Coalition Place Jefferson City, Missouri Zip 65109 Product The National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition is the...

240

Platte Valley Fuel Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Platte Valley Fuel Ethanol Place Central City, Nebraska Product Bioethanol producer using corn as feedstock References Platte Valley Fuel Ethanol1 LinkedIn...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Economic evaluation of the MIT process for manufacture of ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of an economic evaluation of the MIT process for the manufacture of ethanol from cellulosic residues. Conceptual process designs were developed for two cases, Case A which is based on the experimental data obtained to date, and Case B which hypothesizes the suppression of acid byproducts. Manufacturing costs, including profit, were estimated at $12.20/million Btu for Case A and $9.40/million Btu for Case B. These are equivalent to about $1.05 and $0.80/gal ethanol respectively. These economic estimates may be slightly on the low side since they do not consider feedstock storage nor working capital requirements. Nevertheless, the manufacturing costs for Case A appear to be comparable to those of the manufacture of ethanol from corn. The plant size used for this analysis was 1500 ton/day corn stover. This is considered to be a realistic size. The conceptual plants make about 27 million gal/yr ethanol in Case A and 41 million gal/yr in Case B. The MIT process appears to be one of the more promising programs being developed under contract for DOE. It is recommended that the process research be continued. Three areas of concern were identified which must be investigated before the process can be commercialized. First, a satisfactory means of storage of corn stover and other agricultural residues must be developed. Second, a method to sterilize corn stover must be developed or it must be demonstrated that the MIT process can run continuously for extended periods with stover that has been sterilized. Third, research must be done to demonstrate the recycle and reuse of process water.

Jenkins, D.M.; Reddy, T.S.

1979-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

242

Degradation of cellulosic biomass and its subsequent utilization for the reproduction of chemical feedstocks. Progress report, December 1, 1977--February 28, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies were performed to examine the utilization and hydrolysis of xylan, a major component of natural biomass materials. Experiments designed to examine the differential adsorption onto cellulose and xylan were inconclusive in proving that the xylan hydrolysis activity is distinct from cellulose hydrolysis activity. It is clear, however, that enzymes from C. thermocellum are able to effect xylan hydrolysis. A new biomass, thermally exploded lignocellulose Poplar, has undergone degradation studies by C. thermocellum. A concentrated effort has begun to examine the production of a liquid fuel (ethanol) directly from cellulosic biomass by Clostridium thermocellum. It was found that the pH has a significant influence on the extent of cellulose degradation as well as on the amount of products formed. To further our understandings on the production of ethanol by Clostridium thermocellum, a program was initiated to find anaerobes which could utilize the hemicelluloses from biomasses, as well as its ability to produce ethanol. The conditions of protoplasting C. thermocellum were examined and the optimum conditions established. A cellulase-hyperproducing mutant, AS-39, has been isolated. As-39 produces twice the cellulase activity of the parent as determined from measurements of both TNP-CMCase and Avicel-hydrolyzing activities. However, degradation studies using cellulosic substrates do not show enhanced rates. Studies on acrylic acid production have continued to proceed along several lines. Kinetic analysis has hypothesized that non-growing cells of Clostridium acetobutylicum should have the highest specific formation rates for acetone and n-butanol. Experimental studies indicated nongrowing cells can convert glucose to acetone and n-butanol with no other nutrient. The production of acetic acid by Clostridium thermoaceticum has focused on a mutant (S-2) which was isolated and found to tolerate higher concentrations of acetate.

Wang, D.I.C.; Cooney, C.L.; Demain, A.L.; Gomez, R.F.; Sinskey, A.J.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Vehicle Ethanol Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Vehicle Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions Laws & Incentives Ethanol Vehicle Emissions When blended with gasoline for use as a vehicle fuel, ethanol can offer some emissions benefits over gasoline, depending on vehicle type, engine

244

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Infrastructure Ethanol Infrastructure Funding to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Funding on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Infrastructure Funding The Ethanol Infrastructure Incentive Program provides funding to offset the cost of installing ethanol blender pumps at retail fueling stations

245

Simulation studies of the insolubility of cellulose  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation Simulation studies of the insolubility of cellulose Malin Bergenstråhle a , Jakob Wohlert a, , Michael E. Himmel b , John W. Brady a, * a Department of Food Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, United States b National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, CO 80401-3393, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 4 February 2010 Received in revised form 5 June 2010 Accepted 25 June 2010 Available online 6 July 2010 Keywords: Cellulase Cellobiohydrolase I Cellulose Computer modeling Molecular dynamics a b s t r a c t Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to calculate the potentials of mean force for separating short cellooligomers in aqueous solution as a means of estimating the contributions of hydrophobic stacking and hydrogen bonding to the insolubility of crystalline cellulose. A series of four potential of mean force (pmf) calculations

246

Why sequence cellulose degrading fungus Amanita thiersii?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sequence cellulose degrading fungus Amanita thiersii? sequence cellulose degrading fungus Amanita thiersii? Amanita thiersii is a white, sticky mushroom that obtains its carbon by decomposing grasses, playing a role in the terrestrial carbon cycle. The fungus is commonly found in grasslands throughout the central United States and grows in grassy areas away from trees, often seen on lawns after the rain. By sequencing A. thiersii's genome, researchers hope increase the list of fungi that might provide enzymes that can be used to commercialize the production of cellulosic biofuel, which falls in with the U.S. Department of Energy's mission to develop clean energy, by potentially offering a more cost-effective method of breaking down lignocellulose in plant cell walls. Because the fungus is found in regions where the biomass is high in

247

Process design and optimization of cellulose hydrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary concern of this work is the economic optimization of a process for the hydrolysis of waste cellulosic material to fermentable sugars. Hydrolysis is performed enzymatically, utilizing the cellulase enzyme complex produced by Trichoderma viride. Using corn stover as a substrate, a system was designed to provide 14% hydrolyzate sugars (70% fermentable) at an estimated cost of 6.84 cents/pound of sugar, a 43% cost reduction over previous designs. Optimal residence time for hydrolysis was found to be 62 hours, resulting in a 34% conversion of raw material to sugars. Total fixed capital investment for the process is estimated to be $17.13 x 10/sup 6/. The kinetics of cellulose hydrolysis were modeled through the use of a modified Michaelis--Menten equation, making computer simulation of batch hydrolyses possible. Additional studies on the accessibility of cellulose were performed, and the feasibility of a counter-current processing scheme was investigated.

Lindsey, R.R.; Wilke, C.R.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Cellulosic Fiber Composites Using Protein Hydrolysates and Methods of Making Same  

This technology relates to cellulosic fiber composites using protein hydrolysates. Cellulosic fiber composites currently use petroleum-derived binders ...

249

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure: Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the long- established corn processing infrastructure. Cellulosic-based advanced biofuel has a target of 21Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure: Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel Infrastructure of biofuel sustainability. #12;

250

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure: Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure: Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel The rapid limitation. Cellulosic-based advanced biofuel has a target of 21 billion gallons by 2022 and requires almost

251

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel leveraged the long-established corn processing infrastructure. Cellulosic-based advanced biofuel has is being integrated into a national economic model of biofuel sustainability. Point of Contact: Michael R

252

Energy Economy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 11, 2010 June 11, 2010 Crockett has seen Chattanooga change dramatically in the last 30 years. The Office of Sustainability will build on the city's environmental success. | Photo Courtesy of Flickr user mjasonprickett David Crockett, Chattanooga's Green Frontiersman David Crockett is no stranger to Chattanooga, Tennessee. A three-term city councilman, former chairman of the council and President of the Chattanooga Institute for Sustainability, he knows his way around the city government. June 11, 2010 DuPont Danisco Cellulosic Ethanol (DDCE) opened a new biorefinery in Vonore, Tenn., last year. | Photo courtesy of DDCE Making Biofuel From Corncobs and Switchgrass in Rural America Energy crops and agricultural residue, like corncobs and stover, are becoming part of rural America's energy future. Unlike the more common

253

Environmental Cycling of Cellulosic Thermal Insulation and Its ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... cellulosic insulation industry, lengthy conditioning cycles and testing -8- ... energy using a flux profile generated during test ... and Technology, Vol. ...

2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

254

Structure and processing of fibrous cellulose: bacterial and ascidian material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

properties. The estimated Youngs modulus of cellulose microfibrils by experimental and theoretical approaches is up to 220 GPa [3, 4]. Cellulose has deeply integrated with our society in applications such as paper, cotton, lubricants, fillers, adhesives... and visualisation [15, 16]. The chapter 7 of this thesis explores the effect of various additives on the bacterial cellulose microstructure. Work has been directed towards developing a rationale to modify cellulose microstructure. In situ modification has also...

Khandelwal, Mudrika

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

255

Method for separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for enzymatically separating the non-inked cellulose fibers from the inked cellulose fibers in cellulosic materials. The cellulosic material, such as newsprint, is introduced into a first chamber containing a plastic canvas basket. This first chamber is in fluid communication, via plastic tubing, with a second chamber containing cellobiase beads in a plastic canvas basket. Cellulase is then introduced into the first chamber. A programmable pump then controls the flow rate between the two chambers. The action of cellulase and stirring in the first chamber results in the production of a slurry of newsprint pulp in the first chamber. This slurry contains non-inked fibers, inked fibers, and some cellobiose. The inked fibers and cellobiose flow from the first chamber to the second chamber, whereas the non-inked fibers remain in the first chamber because they are too large to pass through the pores of the plastic canvas basket. The resulting non-inked and inked fibers are then recovered. 6 figs.

Woodward, J.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel Center infrastructure. Cellulosic-based ad- vanced biofuel has a target of 21 billion gallons by 2022 and requires into a national economic model of biofuel sustainability. Cellulosic biomass relocates the demand

257

Book ReViews Comprehensive Cellulose Chemistry. Volume 1. Fundamentals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book ReViews Comprehensive Cellulose Chemistry. Volume 1. Fundamentals and Analytical Methods. By D is a valuable and much-needed reference book for both the novice and the practitioner of cellulose chemistry does this significantly reduce the clarity of the book. The section on cellulose structure is extensive

Dantus, Marcos

258

Diversified Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Diversified Ethanol Place Northbrook, Illinois Zip 60062 Product A division of OTCBB-traded ONYI that is building an ethanol plant in Iowa. Coordinates 42.12972°, -87.831564° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.12972,"lon":-87.831564,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

259

Bushmills Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bushmills Ethanol Bushmills Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Bushmills Ethanol Place Atwater, Minnesota Zip 56209 Product A group of local agricultural producers and investors working to build a 40m gallon per year ethanol facility in Minnesota. Coordinates 41.032997°, -81.168008° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.032997,"lon":-81.168008,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

260

Ace Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Ace Ethanol Place Stanley, Wisconsin Zip 54768 Product Producer of corn-based ethanol in Wisconsin. Coordinates 44.958844°, -90.937009° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.958844,"lon":-90.937009,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Labeling Ethanol Labeling Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Labeling Requirement Any motor vehicle fuel sold at retail containing more than 1% ethanol or methanol must be labeled according to Connecticut Department of Consumer

262

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Tax Exemption Ethanol Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Tax Exemption Sales and use taxes apply to 80% of the proceeds from the sale of fuels containing 10% ethanol (E10) made between July 1, 2003, and December 31, 2018. If at any time these taxes are imposed at a rate of 1.25%, the tax on

263

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol License  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol License to Ethanol License to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol License on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol License on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol License on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol License on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol License on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol License on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol License Anyone who imports, exports, or supplies ethanol in the state of Wyoming must obtain an annual license from the Wyoming Department of Transportation. The fee for each license is $25. (Reference Wyoming

264

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Incentive Ethanol producers may qualify for an income tax credit equal to 30% of production facility nameplate capacity between 500,000 and 15 million

265

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Labeling Ethanol Labeling Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Labeling Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Labeling Requirement Motor fuel containing more than 1% ethanol or methanol may not be sold or offered for sale from a motor fuel dispenser unless the individual selling

266

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Infrastructure Ethanol Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Infrastructure Grants The Colorado Corn Blender Pump Pilot Program provides funding assistance for each qualified station dispensing mid-level ethanol blends. Projects

267

Ethanol Fuel Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ethanol Fuel Basics Ethanol Fuel Basics Ethanol Fuel Basics July 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis biomass in beekers Ethanol is a renewable fuel made from various plant materials, which collectively are called "biomass." Ethanol contains the same chemical compound (C2H5OH) found in alcoholic beverages. Studies have estimated that ethanol and other biofuels could replace 30% or more of U.S. gasoline demand by 2030. Nearly half of U.S. gasoline contains ethanol in a low-level blend to oxygenate the fuel and reduce air pollution. Ethanol is also increasingly available in E85, an alternative fuel that can be used in flexible fuel vehicles. Several steps are required to make ethanol available as a vehicle fuel. Biomass feedstocks are grown and transported to ethanol production

268

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Incentive The Missouri Department of Agriculture manages the Missouri Ethanol Producer Incentive Fund (Fund), which provides monthly grants to qualified

269

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blends to Blends to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blends on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Blends E15 E85 Specifications Production & Distribution Feedstocks Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Blends Ethanol is blended with gasoline in various amounts for use in vehicles. E10 E10 is a low-level blend composed of 10% ethanol and 90% gasoline. It is

270

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Incentive Qualified ethanol producers are eligible for a production incentive payable from the Kansas Qualified Agricultural Ethyl Alcohol Producer Fund. An

271

Magnetic Alignment of Cellulose Nanowhiskers in an All-Cellulose Composite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unidirectional reinforced nanocomposite paper was fabricated from cellulose nanowhiskers and wood pulp under an externally-applied magnetic field. A 1.2 Tesla magnetic field was applied in order to align the nanowhiskers in the pulp as it was being formed into a sheet of paper. The magnetic alignment was driven by the characteristic negative diamagnetic anisotropy of the cellulose nanowhiskers. ESEM micrographs demonstrated unidirectional alignment of the nanowhiskers in the all-cellulose composite paper. Comparing with control paper sheets made from wood pulp only, the storage modulus in the all-cellulose nanocomposites increased dramatically. The storage modulus along the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field was much stronger than that parallel to the magnetic field. This new nanocomposite, which contains preferentially-oriented microstructures and has improved mechanical properties, demonstrates the possibility of expanding the functionality of paper products and constitutes a promising alternative to hydrocarbon based materials and fibers.

Li, Dongsheng; Liu, Zuyan; Al-Haik, Marwan; Tehrani, Mehran; Murray, Frank; Tennenbaum, Rina; Garmestani, Hamid

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

woody and grass waste, cardboard, mixed paper and otherwastes Woody wastes Cardboard Mixed paper Digestibilitycontent, 44.9 (grass wastes) 128.3 (mixed paper) gallon of

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is fermentation plant production cost. Fermentative ethanolhere, greatly reduce production costs. Energy requirementscapital equipment and production costs for fermentative

Wilke, Charles R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LINE -l (b) SLOPE INTERNAL Rmin 1.25 Rmin REQUIRED REFLUX'" 8.00 x OVERHEADline~-10 years (zero salvage) 3% of FIXED CAPITAL 0.70% of FIXED CAPITAL TOTAL FIXED COST PLANT OVERHEAD

Wilke, Charles R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of Purdue University Corn Stover Approximately10 pounds of corn stover, 1977 crop, grown in Tippecanoeof Purdue University Corn Stover 4

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Review: Continuous hydrolysis and fermentation for cellulosic ethanol production Simone Brethauer, Charles E. Wyman *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

precede the grain. Wheat flour, enriched wheat flour and unbleached wheat flour are not whole grain of these essential oils to increase flavor and satisfaction. Whole Grains Whole grain breads Whole wheat English muffins Whole wheat bagels, mini bagels Whole wheat or corn tortillas Whole wheat pitas Cereal

California at Riverside, University of

277

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

final ADC green With the total project investment, variableProject Investment Corn stover ADC final ADC green OperatingReturn on Investment Corn stover ADC final ADC green Table 6

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RECOVERY Dist. Column Condenser Fl Preheat Exchanger F2189,000 Condenser 2707 , CS ..SEP. (301 (10 gal) 2nd VAP, condenser CENTRIFUGE YEAST DRYER

Wilke, Charles R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as agricultural wastes and energy crops, also raisesacid hydrolysis. Energy Biomass Wastes 13:1281- 16. Green M,fraction. Energy from Biomass and Wastes 15:725-43. 2. Aden

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Uncertainty in techno-economic estimates of cellulosic ethanol production due to experimental measurement uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Background Cost-effective production of lignocellulosic biofuels remains a major financial and technical challenge at the industrial scale. A critical tool in biofuels process development is the techno-economic ...

Vicari, Kristin Jenise

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tank Gas Liquid Separators 2nd Vapor Condensor CentrifugeGAS LIQUID SEP. (301 (10 gal) 2nd VAP, condenser CENTRIFUGE

Wilke, Charles R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT STUDIES ON THE BIOCONVERSION OF CELLULOSE AND PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory, 1978. Private Communication, Douglas Everleigh, Biochemistry, Rutgers University, New Brunswick,

Wilke, C.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda colonizes and degrades insoluble substrates. Major accomplishments of the project include: Development of media containing dialysis tubing (described by the manufacturer as regenerated cellulose) as sole carbon and energy source and a nutritive surface for the growth of cellulolytic bacteria, and development of various microscopic methods to image biofilms on dialysis tubing. Demonstration that cultures of C. phytofermentans, an obligate anaerobe, C. uda, a facultative aerobe, and T. fusca, a filamentous aerobe, formed microbial communities on the surface of dialysis tubing, which possessed architectural features and functional characteristics typical of biofilms. Demonstration that biofilm formation on the nutritive surface, cellulose, involves a complex developmental processes, including colonization of dialysis tubing, formation of cell clusters attached to the nutritive surface, cell morphological changes, formation of complex structures embedded in extracellular polymeric matrices, and dispersal of biofilm communities as the nutritive surface is degraded. Determination of surface specificity and regulatory aspects of biofilm formation by C. phytofermentans, C. uda, and T. fusca. Demonstration that biofilm formation by T. fusca forms an integral part of the life cycle of this filamentous cellulolytic bacterium, including studies on the role of mycelial pellet formation in the T. fusca life cycle and a comparison of mycelial pellets to surface-attached T. fusca biofilms. Characterization of T. fusca biofilm EPS, including demonstration of a functional role for EPS constituents. Correlation of T. fusca developmental life cycle and cellulase gene expression.

Leschine, Susan

2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellulosic Ethanol Production Costs Other Other Feedstockand cellulosic ethanol. The role of feedstock providers

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Blending Ethanol Blending Regulation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blending Regulation on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blending Regulation Gasoline suppliers who provide fuel to distributors in the state must offer gasoline that is suitable for blending with fuel alcohol. Suppliers may not

286

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Incentive Montana-based ethanol producers are eligible for a tax incentive of $0.20 per gallon of ethanol produced solely from Montana agricultural products or

287

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blend Mandate Blend Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Mandate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blend Mandate Within one year after the Montana Department of Transportation has certified that ethanol producers in the state have produced a total of 40 million gallons of denatured ethanol and have maintained that level of

288

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Credit County governments are eligible to receive waste reduction credits for using yard clippings, clean wood waste, or paper waste as feedstock for the

289

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Infrastructure Ethanol Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Infrastructure Grants The Kentucky Corn Growers' Association (KyCGA) offers grants of $5,000 per pump to retailers installing new E85 dispensers in Kentucky. For more

290

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Basics to Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Blends Specifications Production & Distribution Feedstocks Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fuel Basics Related Information National Biofuels Action Plan Ethanol is a renewable fuel made from various plant materials collectively

291

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Blend Ethanol Blend Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blend Requirement Suppliers that import gasoline for sale in North Carolina must offer fuel that is not pre-blended with fuel alcohol but that is suitable for future

292

Agri Ethanol Products LLC AEPNC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Products LLC AEPNC Jump to: navigation, search Name Agri-Ethanol Products LLC (AEPNC) Place Raleigh, North Carolina Zip 27615 Product Ethanol producer and project...

293

Tampa Bay Area Ethanol Consortium | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tampa Bay Area Ethanol Consortium Jump to: navigation, search Name Tampa Bay Area Ethanol Consortium Place Tampa, Florida Sector Biomass Product Consortium researching ethanol from...

294

Pacific Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pacific Ethanol Pacific Ethanol Address 400 Capitol Mall, Suite 2060 Place Sacramento, California Zip 95814 Sector Biofuels Product Ethanol production Website http://www.pacificethanol.net/ Coordinates 38.578811°, -121.502314° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.578811,"lon":-121.502314,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

295

Ethanol production method and system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ethanol is selectively produced from the reaction of methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen in the presence of a transition metal carbonyl catalyst. Methanol serves as a solvent and may be accompanied by a less volatile co-solvent. The solution includes the transition metal carbonyl catalysts and a basic metal salt such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal formate, carbonate or bicarbonate. A gas containing a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio, as is present in a typical gasifer product, is contacted with the solution for the preferential production of ethanol with minimal water as a byproduct. Fractionation of the reaction solution provides substantially pure ethanol product and allows return of the catalysts for reuse.

Chen, M.J.; Rathke, J.W.

1983-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

296

Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

Hadder, G.R.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

297

Electrospinning of Cellulose and Carbon Nanotube-Cellulose Fibers for Smart Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellulose is one of the Earths most abundant natural polymers and is used as a raw material in various applications. Recently, cellulose based electro-active paper (EAPap) has been investigated for its potential as a smart material. The electrospinning method of fiber production is not a new way of fabrication; however, it has attracted a great deal of attention as a means of producing non-woven membranes of nanofibers due to its simple methodology and the advent of nano applications. Electrospinning occurs when the electrical force on a polymer droplet overcomes its surface tension, and a charged jet is ejected. As the liquid jet is continuously elongated and the solvent is evaporated, the fibers of sub-micron size or nano size are formed, depending on the conditions. In a previous study, a cellulose mat was electro-spun and tested for piezoelectric characteristics. This aligned, electrospun cellulose mat showed a possibility as a promising smart material. Additionally, carbon nanotubes have been considered for the versatile nano-applications due to their superior material properties such as low density and high aspect ratio. Parametric studies were conducted to find optimum conditions for electrospinning. Various ways of reducing surface tension of solutions were investigated including radiative and convective heating of the solution. Pre-examination of solution is very important in consistent, uniform fiber formation. In this study, cellulose and CNT-cellulose composite fibers were prepared via electrospinning. The optimal experimental conditions for fiber generation were found so that the mechanical strength of both the composite and the pure cellulose fibers could be compared in future tests. Eventually, this fiber will be interwoven into the CNT-cellulose mat and be used as an electro-active paper sensor and actuator. The CNT-cellulose electrospun mat will be widely applicable to the fields of sensors, filters and reinforcements in composites because of its intrinsic properties of porosity, light weight, flexibility, and large surface area. To be used in the aforementioned applications, piezoelectric properties of this composite will also be tested in the next step.

Pankonien, Alexander

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

298

Preliminary engineering and cost analysis of Purdue/Tsao cellulose hydrolysis (solvent) process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using information published on the Purdue/Tsao Acid Solution Process for the Hydrolysis of Ligno-Cellulosic materials--specifically corn stovers--an engineering and cost analysis was performed for a battery limits facility to produce sufficient glucose syrup for 25 million gallons per year of ethanol. A capital investment estimate of 59 million dollars was derived. This estimate was based on vendor quoted equipment prices and a detailed consideration of all aspects of constructing the facility. The product transfer cost of the fermentable sugars--pentoses and hexoses--was estimated at 4.5 cents/pound. The major factor impacting the commercial feasibility of such a facility is the price assigned to the delivered corn stover. Although considerable development work on the process is required before it will be ready for commercialization, no technical problem was uncovered to preclude this commercialization.

Not Available

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Enabling High Efficiency Ethanol Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Delphi Automotive Systems and ORNL established this CRADA to explore the potential to improve the energy efficiency of spark-ignited engines operating on ethanol-gasoline blends. By taking advantage of the fuel properties of ethanol, such as high compression ratio and high latent heat of vaporization, it is possible to increase efficiency with ethanol blends. Increasing the efficiency with ethanol-containing blends aims to remove a market barrier of reduced fuel economy with E85 fuel blends, which is currently about 30% lower than with petroleum-derived gasoline. The same or higher engine efficiency is achieved with E85, and the reduction in fuel economy is due to the lower energy density of E85. By making ethanol-blends more efficient, the fuel economy gap between gasoline and E85 can be reduced. In the partnership between Delphi and ORNL, each organization brought a unique and complementary set of skills to the project. Delphi has extensive knowledge and experience in powertrain components and subsystems as well as overcoming real-world implementation barriers. ORNL has extensive knowledge and expertise in non-traditional fuels and improving engine system efficiency for the next generation of internal combustion engines. Partnering to combine these knowledge bases was essential towards making progress to reducing the fuel economy gap between gasoline and E85. ORNL and Delphi maintained strong collaboration throughout the project. Meetings were held regularly, usually on a bi-weekly basis, with additional reports, presentations, and meetings as necessary to maintain progress. Delphi provided substantial hardware support to the project by providing components for the single-cylinder engine experiments, engineering support for hardware modifications, guidance for operational strategies on engine research, and hardware support by providing a flexible multi-cylinder engine to be used for optimizing engine efficiency with ethanol-containing fuels.

Szybist, J.; Confer, K. (Delphi Automotive Systems)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Cellulosic Biofuels: Importance, Recalcitrance, and Pretreatment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cellulosic Cellulosic Biofuels: Importance, Recalcitrance, and Pretreatment Lee Lynd 1,2 and Mark Laser 1 1 Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, USA 2 BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, USA 2.1 Our Place in History The two most profound societal transformations in history have been spawned by radical shifts in human- kind's use of natural resources. The agricultural revolution, which spanned about two millennia beginning around 4000 BC, saw hunter-gatherer societies subsisting on wild plants and animals being largely dis- placed by those cultivating the land to produce crops and domesticated livestock. The industrial revolution followed, beginning around 1700 and lasting roughly two hundred years, during which time preindustrial agricultural societies gave way to those harnessing precious metals and fossil energy to develop sophisti- cated economies centered

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Cellulose and the Control of Growth Anisotropy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors research aims to understand morphogenesis, focusing on growth anisotropy, a process that is crucial to make organs with specific and heritable shapes. For the award, the specific aims were to test hypotheses concerning how growth anisotropy is controlled by cell wall structure, particularly by the synthesis and alignment of cellulose microfibrils, the predominant mechanical element in the cell wall. This research has involved characterizing the basic physiology of anisotropic expansion, including measuring it at high resolution; and second, characterizing the relationship between growth anisotropy, and cellulose microfibrils. Important in this relationship and also to the control of anisotropic expansion are structures just inside the plasma membrane called cortical microtubules, and the research has also investigated their contribution to controlling anisotropy and microfibril alignment. In addition to primary experimental papers, I have also developed improved methods relating to these objectives as well as written relevant reviews. Major accomplishments in each area will now be described.

Tobias I. Baskin

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Review: Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulosic Biomass  

SciTech Connect

Biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals offers the high yields to products vital to economic success and the potential for very low costs. Enzymatic hydrolysis that converts lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars may be the most complex step in this process due to substrate-related and enzyme-related effects and their interactions. Although enzymatic hydrolysis offers the potential for higher yields, higher selectivity, lower energy costs, and milder operating conditions than chemical processes, the mechanism of enzymatic hydrolysis and the relationship between the substrate structure and function of various glycosyl hydrolase components are not well understood. Consequently, limited success has been realized in maximizing sugar yields at very low cost. This review highlights literature on the impact of key substrate and enzyme features that influence performance to better understand fundamental strategies to advance enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass for biological conversion to fuels and chemicals. Topics are summarized from a practical point of view including characteristics of cellulose (e.g., crystallinity, degree of polymerization, and accessible surface area) and soluble and insoluble biomass components (e.g., oligomeric xylan, lignin, etc.) released in pretreatment, and their effects on the effectiveness of enzymatic hydrolysis. We further discuss the diversity, stability, and activity of individual enzymes and their synergistic effects in deconstructing complex lignocellulosic biomass. Advanced technologies to discover and characterize novel enzymes and to improve enzyme characteristics by mutagenesis, post-translational modification, and over-expression of selected enzymes and modifications in lignocellulosic biomass are also discussed.

Yang, Bin; Dai, Ziyu; Ding, Shi-You; Wyman, Charles E.

2011-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

303

Ethanol Facts : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ethanol Facts Ethanol Facts In 2005, the U.S. produced about 4 billion gallons of ethanol from corn grain, equaling approximately 2% of the 140 billion gallons of gasoline consumed. Ethanol is widely used as a fuel additive. The oxygen contained in ethanol improves gasoline combustibility. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 has established a renewable fuels standard which requires using 7.5 billion gallons of ethanol by 2012. E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline blend) can be used as a substitute for gasoline in vehicles that have been modified to use E85. Energy content of E85 is 70% that of gasoline, so about 1.4 gallons of E85 are needed to displace one gallon of gasoline. Starch in corn grain is readily degraded into glucose sugar molecules that are fermented to ethanol. The complex structural

304

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blend Blend Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blend Definition An ethanol blend is defined as a blended motor fuel containing ethyl alcohol that is at least 99% pure, derived from agricultural products, and

305

Blue Flint Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Ethanol Flint Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Flint Ethanol Place Underwood, North Dakota Zip ND 58576 Product Joint Venture bentween Great River Energy and Headwaters Incorporated, was established to build and operate a 50 million gallon per year dry mill ethanol plant in Underwood, North Dakota. References Blue Flint Ethanol[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Blue Flint Ethanol is a company located in Underwood, North Dakota . References ↑ "Blue Flint Ethanol" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Blue_Flint_Ethanol&oldid=342914" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here

306

Autothermal Partial Oxidation of Ethanol and Alcohols  

Autothermal Reforming of Ethanol and Alcohols into Syngas Ethanol and alcohols can be converted into syngas using a robust autothermal reforming process. Syngas is a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen that can be used to synthesize other ...

307

Brazil Ethanol Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil Ethanol Inc. Place New York, New York Zip 10021 Product A New York City-based firm that had raised USD 10.4m as of 1 May 2007 and appears to be planning to build ethanol...

308

Badger State Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Badger State Ethanol LLC Place Monroe, Wisconsin Zip 53566 Product Dry-mill bioethanol producer References Badger State Ethanol LLC1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

309

Northern Lights Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Northern Lights Ethanol LLC is a company located in Big Stone City, South Dakota . References "Northern Lights Ethanol LLC" Retrieved from...

310

Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbialtechnologies that enable biofuel production. Decades of workstrategy for producing biofuel. Although ethanol currently

Fortman, J.L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Ethanol production by recombinant hosts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

Fowler, David E. (Gainesville, FL); Horton, Philip G. (Gainesville, FL); Ben-Bassat, Arie (Gainesville, FL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Ethanol production by recombinant hosts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel plasmids comprising genes which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase are described. Also described are recombinant hosts which have been transformed with genes coding for alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate. By virtue of their transformation with these genes, the recombinant hosts are capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product. Also disclosed are methods for increasing the growth of recombinant hosts and methods for reducing the accumulation of undesirable metabolic products in the growth medium of these hosts. Also disclosed are recombinant host capable of producing significant amounts of ethanol as a fermentation product of oligosaccharides and plasmids comprising genes encoding polysaccharases, in addition to the genes described above which code for the alcohol dehydrogenase and pyruvate decarboxylase. Further, methods are described for producing ethanol from oligomeric feedstock using the recombinant hosts described above. Also provided is a method for enhancing the production of functional proteins in a recombinant host comprising overexpressing an adhB gene in the host. Further provided are process designs for fermenting oligosaccharide-containing biomass to ethanol.

Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Beall, David S. (Gainesville, FL); Burchhardt, Gerhard F. H. (Gainesville, FL); Guimaraes, Walter V. (Vicosa, BR); Ohta, Kazuyoshi (Miyazaki, JP); Wood, Brent E. (Gainesville, FL); Shanmugam, Keelnatham T. (Gainesville, FL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

New Saccharification Process of Cellulosic Biomass by Microwave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, As renewable energy, the research to produce biofuels from cellulosic resources which does not compete with foods has been actively doing ...

314

Cellulose Simulations Demystify High-Temperature Behavior (Fact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

easier to break down, which could lead to more efficient processing of cellulose into biofuel. Using molecular dynamics simulation, scientists at the National Renewable Energy...

315

Synthesis of Cellulose Hydrogels with High Strength and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high strength of cellulose fibers and the ability to synthesize gels with high optical ... Ab Initio Study of Thermodynamic, Structural, and Elastic Properties of...

316

Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels ...  

Catalytic conversion of cellulose to liquid hydrocarbon fuels by progressive removal of oxygen to facilitate separation processes and achieve high selectivities

317

Cost-Effective Enzyme for Producing Biofuels from Cellulosic ...  

Potential to be produced in-house: The enzyme could potentially be produced in house by biorefineries, reducing one of the cost impediments to cellulosic biofuels.

318

Cellulosic biofuels begin to flow but in lower volumes than ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Several companies combined to produce about 20,000 gallons of fuels using cellulosic biomass (e.g., wood waste, sugarcane bagasse) from commercial-scale facilities in ...

319

Cellulosic biofuels begin to flow but in lower volumes than ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Technology scale-up difficulties at startup companies; ... many companies are developing technologies to produce intermediate chemicals from cellulosic biomass as ...

320

List of Ethanol Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Incentives Ethanol Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 67 Ethanol Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 67) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AlabamaSAVES Revolving Loan Program (Alabama) State Loan Program Alabama Commercial Industrial Institutional Building Insulation Doors Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls Lighting Lighting Controls/Sensors Steam-system upgrades Water Heaters Windows Biodiesel Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Ethanol Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Photovoltaics Renewable Fuels Solar Water Heat Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Natural Gas Yes Alcohol Fuel Credit (Federal) Corporate Tax Credit United States Commercial Industrial Ethanol

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Tall Corn Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tall Corn Ethanol LLC Tall Corn Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Tall Corn Ethanol LLC Place Coon Rapids, Iowa Zip 50058 Product Farmer owned bioethanol production company which owns a 40m gallon (151.4m litre) bioethanol plant in Coon Rapids, Iowa. References Tall Corn Ethanol LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Tall Corn Ethanol LLC is a company located in Coon Rapids, Iowa . References ↑ "Tall Corn Ethanol LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Tall_Corn_Ethanol_LLC&oldid=352015" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

322

The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

than first generation corn ethanol (Farrell et al. , 2006).or first generation corn ethanol (Farrell, 2006). However,with fossil fuels or corn ethanol (Lynd et al. , 2008).

Qing, Qing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

IMPROVED BIOREFINERY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL, CHEMICALS, ANIMAL FEED AND BIOMATERIALS FROM SUGAR CANE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Audubon Sugar Institute (ASI) of Louisiana State Universitys Agricultural Center (LSU AgCenter) and MBI International (MBI) sought to develop technologies that will lead to the development of a sugar-cane biorefinery, capable of supplying fuel ethanol from bagasse. Technology development focused on the conversion of bagasse, cane-leaf matter (CLM) and molasses into high value-added products that included ethanol, specialty chemicals, biomaterials and animal feed; i.e. a sugar cane-based biorefinery. The key to lignocellulosic biomass utilization is an economically feasible method (pretreatment) for separating the cellulose and the hemicellulose from the physical protection provided by lignin. An effective pretreatment disrupts physical barriers, cellulose crystallinity, and the association of lignin and hemicellulose with cellulose so that hydrolytic enzymes can access the biomass macrostructure (Teymouri et al. 2004, Laureano-Perez, 2005). We chose to focus on alkaline pretreatment methods for, and in particular, the Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX) process owned by MBI. During the first two years of this program a laboratory process was established for the pretreatment of bagasse and CLM using the AFEX process. There was significant improvement of both rate and yield of glucose and xylose upon enzymatic hydrolysis of AFEX-treated bagasse and CLM compared with untreated material. Because of reactor size limitation, several other alkaline pretreatment methods were also co-investigated. They included, dilute ammonia, lime and hydroxy-hypochlorite treatments. Scale-up focused on using a dilute ammonia process as a substitute for AFEX, allowing development at a larger scale. The pretreatment of bagasse by an ammonia process, followed by saccharification and fermentation produced ethanol from bagasse. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) allowed two operations in the same vessel. The addition of sugarcane molasses to the hydrolysate/fermentation process yielded improvements beyond what was expected solely from the addition of sugar. In order to expand the economic potential for building a biorefinery, the conversion of enzyme hydrolysates of AFEX-treated bagasse to succinic acid was also investigated. This program established a solid basis for pre-treatment of bagasse in a manner that is feasible for producing ethanol at raw sugar mills.

Dr. Donal F. Day

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

324

Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

References Brown, R. C. 2003. Bio renewable Resources:RIVERSIDE Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic BiomassTHE THESIS Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass

Goyal, Garima

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

Shoseyov, Oded (Shimshon, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (North Gallilea, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Single Molecule Study of Cellulase Hydrolysis of Crystalline Cellulose  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report seeks to elucidate the role of cellobiohydrolase-I (CBH I) in the hydrolysis of crystalline cellulose. A single-molecule approach uses various imaging techniques to investigate the surface structure of crystalline cellulose and changes made in the structure by CBH I.

Liu, Y.-S.; Luo, Y.; Baker, J. O.; Zeng, Y.; Himmel, M. E.; Smith, S.; Ding, S.-Y.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

328

Methods of detection using a cellulose binding domain fusion product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 34 figs.

Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

329

Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins  

SciTech Connect

A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Cellulose synthesizing Complexes in Vascular Plants andProcaryotes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Continuing the work initiated under DE-FG03-94ER20145, the following major accomplishments were achieved under DE-FG02-03ER15396 from 2003-2007: (a) we purified the acsD gene product of the Acetobacter cellulose synthase operon as well as transferred the CesA cellulose gene from Gossypium into E. coli in an attempt to crystallize this protein for x-ray diffraction structural analysis; however, crystallization attempts proved unsuccessful; (b) the Acetobacter cellulose synthase operon was successfully incorporated into Synechococcus, a cyanobacterium2; (c) this operon in Synechococcus was functionally expressed; (d) we successfully immunolabeled Vigna cellulose and callose synthase components and mapped their distribution before and after wounding; (e) we developed a novel method to produce replicas of cellulose synthases in tobacco BY-2 cells, and we demonstrated the cytoplasmic domain of the rosette TC; (f) from the moss Physcomitrella, we isolated two full-length cDNA sequences of cellulose synthase (PpCesA1 and PpCesA2) and attempted to obtain full genomic DNA sequences; (g) we examined the detailed molecular structure of a new form of non-crystalline cellulose known as nematic ordered cellulose (=NOC)3.

Brown, Richard M, Jr; Saxena, Inder Mohan

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

331

Neutron Reflectometry and QCM-D Study of the Interaction of Cellulase Enzymes with Films of Amorphous Cellulose  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improving the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose is one of the key technological hurdles to reduce the cost of producing ethanol and other transportation fuels from lignocellulosic material. A better understanding of how soluble enzymes interact with insoluble cellulose will aid in the design of more efficient enzyme systems. We report a study involving neutron reflectometry (NR) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) of the interaction of a commercial fungal enzyme extract (T. viride), two purified endoglucanses from thermophilic bacteria (Cel9A from A. acidocaldarius and Cel5A from T. maritima), and a mesophilic fungal endoglucanase (Cel45A from H. insolens) with amorphous cellulose films. The use of amorphous cellulose is motivated by the promise of ionic liquid pretreatment as a second generation technology that disrupts the native crystalline structure of cellulose. NR reveals the profile of water through the film at nm resolution, while QCM-D provides changes in mass and film stiffness. At 20 oC and 0.3 mg/ml, the T. viride cocktail rapidly digested the entire film, beginning from the surface followed by activity throughout the bulk of the film. For similar conditions, Cel9A and Cel5A were active for only a short period of time and only at the surface of the film, with Cel9A releasing 40 from the ~ 700 film and Cel5A resulting in only a slight roughening/swelling effect at the surface. Subsequent elevation of the temperature to the Topt in each case resulted in a very limited increase in activity, corresponding to the loss of an additional 60 from the film for Cel9A and 20 from the film for Cel5A, and very weak penetration into and digestion within the bulk of the film, before the activity again ceased. The results for Cel9A and Cel5A contrast sharply with results for Cel45A where very rapid and extensive penetration and digestion within the bulk of the film was observed at 20 C. We speculate that the large differences are due to the use of the thermophilic enzymes far below their optimal temperatures and also the presence of a cellulose binding module (CBM) on Cel45A while the thermophilic enzymes lack a CBM.

Halbert, Candice E [ORNL; Ankner, John Francis [ORNL; Kent, Michael S [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Jaclyn, Murton K [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Browning, Jim [ORNL; Cheng, Gang [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Liu, Zelin [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Majewski, Jaroslaw [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Supratim, Datta [Joint Bioenergy Institute; Michael, Jablin [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bulent, Akgun [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD; Alan, Esker [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Simmons, Blake [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and PostgreSQL database hosting. The second resource was the DOE-JGCRI 'Evergreen' cluster, capable of executing millions of simulations in relatively short periods. ARRA funding also supported a PhD student from UMD who worked on creating the geodatabases and executing some of the simulations in this study. Using a physically based classification of marginal lands, we simulated production of cellulosic feedstocks from perennial mixtures grown on these lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands in the western states of the US Midwest appear to have significant potential to supply feedstocks to a cellulosic biofuel industry. Similar results were obtained with simulations of N-fertilized perennial mixtures. A detailed spatial analysis allowed for the identification of possible locations for the establishment of 34 cellulosic ethanol biorefineries with an annual production capacity of 5.6 billion gallons. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided simulation results on the potential of perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. The results of this study will be submitted to the USDOE Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework as a way to contribute to the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

National Geo-Database for Biofuel Simulations and Regional Analysis of Biorefinery Siting Based on Cellulosic Feedstock Grown on Marginal Lands  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project undertaken by GLBRC (Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center) Area 4 (Sustainability) modelers is to develop a national capability to model feedstock supply, ethanol production, and biogeochemical impacts of cellulosic biofuels. The results of this project contribute to sustainability goals of the GLBRC; i.e. to contribute to developing a sustainable bioenergy economy: one that is profitable to farmers and refiners, acceptable to society, and environmentally sound. A sustainable bioenergy economy will also contribute, in a fundamental way, to meeting national objectives on energy security and climate mitigation. The specific objectives of this study are to: (1) develop a spatially explicit national geodatabase for conducting biofuel simulation studies and (4) locate possible sites for the establishment of cellulosic ethanol biorefineries. To address the first objective, we developed SENGBEM (Spatially Explicit National Geodatabase for Biofuel and Environmental Modeling), a 60-m resolution geodatabase of the conterminous USA containing data on: (1) climate, (2) soils, (3) topography, (4) hydrography, (5) land cover/ land use (LCLU), and (6) ancillary data (e.g., road networks, federal and state lands, national and state parks, etc.). A unique feature of SENGBEM is its 2008-2010 crop rotation data, a crucially important component for simulating productivity and biogeochemical cycles as well as land-use changes associated with biofuel cropping. ARRA support for this project and to the PNNL Joint Global Change Research Institute enabled us to create an advanced computing infrastructure to execute millions of simulations, conduct post-processing calculations, store input and output data, and visualize results. These computing resources included two components installed at the Research Data Center of the University of Maryland. The first resource was 'deltac': an 8-core Linux server, dedicated to county-level and state-level simulations and PostgreSQL database hosting. The second resource was the DOE-JGCRI 'Evergreen' cluster, capable of executing millions of simulations in relatively short periods. ARRA funding also supported a PhD student from UMD who worked on creating the geodatabases and executing some of the simulations in this study. Using a physically based classification of marginal lands, we simulated production of cellulosic feedstocks from perennial mixtures grown on these lands in the US Midwest. Marginal lands in the western states of the US Midwest appear to have significant potential to supply feedstocks to a cellulosic biofuel industry. Similar results were obtained with simulations of N-fertilized perennial mixtures. A detailed spatial analysis allowed for the identification of possible locations for the establishment of 34 cellulosic ethanol biorefineries with an annual production capacity of 5.6 billion gallons. In summary, we have reported on the development of a spatially explicit national geodatabase to conduct biofuel simulation studies and provided simulation results on the potential of perennial cropping systems to serve as feedstocks for the production of cellulosic ethanol. To accomplish this, we have employed sophisticated spatial analysis methods in combination with the process-based biogeochemical model EPIC. The results of this study will be submitted to the USDOE Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework as a way to contribute to the development of a sustainable bioenergy industry. This work provided the opportunity to test the hypothesis that marginal lands can serve as sources of cellulosic feedstocks and thus contribute to avoid potential conflicts between bioenergy and food production systems. This work, we believe, opens the door for further analysis on the characteristics of cellulosic feedstocks as major contributors to the development of a sustainable bioenergy economy.

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, David H.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Final Report on Development of Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum for the conversion of lignocellulose to ethanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project addressed the need for economical technology for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels, specifically the conversion of pretreated hardwood to ethanol. The technology developed is a set of strains of the bacterium Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum and an associated fermentation process for pretreated hardwood. Tools for genetic engineering and analysis of the organism were developed, including a markerless mutation method, a complete genome sequence and a set of gene expression profiles that show the activity of its genes under a variety of conditions relevant to lignocellulose conversion. Improved strains were generated by selection and genetic engineering to be able to produce higher amounts of ethanol (up to 70 g/L) and to be able to better tolerate inhibitory compounds from pretreated hardwood. Analysis of these strains has generated useful insight into the genetic basis for desired properties of biofuel producing organisms. Fermentation conditions were tested and optimized to achieve ethanol production targets established in the original project proposal. The approach proposed was to add cellulase enzymes to the fermentation, a method called Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF). We had reason to think SSF would be an efficient approach because the optimal temperature and pH for the enzymes and bacterium are very close. Unfortunately, we discovered that commercially available cellulases are inactivated in thermophilic SSF by a combination of low redox potential and ethanol. Despite this, progress was made against the fermentation targets using bacterial cellulases. Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum may still prove to be a commercially viable technology should cellulase enzyme issues be addressed. Moreover, the organism was demonstrated to produce ethanol at approximately theoretical yield from oligomeric hemicellulose extracts, an ability that may prove to be uniquely valuable in pretreatment configurations in which cellulose and hemicellulose are separated.

Herring, Christopher D.; Kenealy, William R.; Shaw, A. Joe; Raman, Babu; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Brown, Steven D.; Davison, Brian H.; Covalla, Sean F.; Sillers, W. Ryan; Xu, Haowen; Tsakraklides, Vasiliki; Hogsett, David A.

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

335

Kinder Morgan Central Florida Pipeline Ethanol Project  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

KINDER MORGAN CENTRAL FLORIDA PIPELINE ETHANOL PROJECT  In December 2008, Kinder Morgan began transporting commercial batches of denatured ethanol along with gasoline shipments in its 16-inch Central Florida Pipeline (CFPL) from Tampa to Orlando, making CFPL the first transmarket gasoline pipeline in the United States to do so. The 16-inch pipeline previously only transported regular and premium gasoline.  Kinder Morgan invested approximately $10 million to modify the line for ethanol shipments which involved chemically cleaning the pipeline, replacing pipeline equipment that was incompatible with ethanol and expanding storage capacity at its Orlando terminal to handle ethanol shipments.  Kinder Morgan is responding to customer interest in ethanol blending. Our Florida

336

Process for producing ethanol from syngas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a method for producing ethanol, the method comprising establishing an atmosphere containing methanol forming catalyst and ethanol forming catalyst; injecting syngas into the atmosphere at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce methanol; and contacting the produced methanol with additional syngas at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce ethanol. The invention also provides an integrated system for producing methanol and ethanol from syngas, the system comprising an atmosphere isolated from the ambient environment; a first catalyst to produce methanol from syngas wherein the first catalyst resides in the atmosphere; a second catalyst to product ethanol from methanol and syngas, wherein the second catalyst resides in the atmosphere; a conduit for introducing syngas to the atmosphere; and a device for removing ethanol from the atmosphere. The exothermicity of the method and system obviates the need for input of additional heat from outside the atmosphere.

Krause, Theodore R; Rathke, Jerome W; Chen, Michael J

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

337

Food for fuel: The price of ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conversion of corn to ethanol in the US since 2005 has been a major cause of global food price increases during that time and has been shown to be ineffective in achieving US energy independence and reducing environmental impact. We make three key statements to enhance understanding and communication about ethanol production's impact on the food and fuel markets: (1) The amount of corn used to produce the ethanol in a gallon of regular gas would feed a person for a day, (2) The production of ethanol is so energy intensive that it uses only 20% less fossil fuel than gasoline, and (3) The cost of gas made with ethanol is actually higher per mile because ethanol reduces gasoline's energy per gallon.

Albino, Dominic K; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption

339

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits and Benefits and Considerations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Benefits and Considerations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Benefits and Considerations Ethanol is a renewable, domestically produced transportation fuel. Whether

340

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol and Biobutanol Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol and Biobutanol Production Incentive

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Fuel Blend Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations

342

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Flexible Fuel Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions on AddThis.com... Ethanol Flexible Fuel Vehicle Conversions Updated July 29, 2011 Rising gasoline prices and concerns about climate change have greatly

343

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Fueling Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Grants The Minnesota Corn Research & Promotion Council and the Minnesota

344

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Investment Tax Credits

345

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Infrastructure Grant Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Blend Ethanol Blend Infrastructure Grant Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Infrastructure Grant Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Infrastructure Grant Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Infrastructure Grant Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Infrastructure Grant Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Infrastructure Grant Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Infrastructure Grant Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blend Infrastructure Grant Program

346

Bioconversion of Secondary Fiber Fines to Ethanol Using Counter-Current Enzymatic Saccharification and Co-Fermentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research examined several enzymatic and microbial process for the conversion of waste cellulosic fibers into ethanol. The first was a one-stage process in which pulp fines were contacted with commercial enzyme solutions. The second process used sequential, multistage saccharification. The third used sequential enzyme addition in a countercurrent mode. Experiments compared the results with various feedstocks, different commercial enzymes, supplementation with b-glucosidase, and saccharification combined with fermentation. The highest saccharification (65%) from a 4% consistency pulp and the highest sugar concentration (5.4%) from an 8% consistency pulp were attained when 5 FPU/g plus 10 IU/g of b-glucosidase were used.

Ethanol Using; Counter-current Enzymatic; Thomas W. Jeffries; Richard Schartman

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Cellulosic biomass could help meet Californias transportation fuel needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be competitive with corn ethanol (which today costs closecosts for producing ethanol from corn (Wyman 2001). Many of

Wyman, Charles E.; Yang, Bin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Low-Level Ethanol Fuel Blends  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet addresses: (a) why Clean Cities promotes ethanol blends; (b) how these blends affect emissions; (c) fuel performance and availability; and (d) cost, incentives, and regulations.

Not Available

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

High ethanol producing derivatives of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Derivatives of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus which under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions continuously ferment substrates such as starch, cellobiose, glucose, xylose and other sugars to produce recoverable amounts of ethanol solving the problem of fermentations yielding low concentrations of ethanol using the parent strain of the microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are disclosed. These new derivatives are ethanol tolerant up to 10% (v/v) ethanol during fermentation. The process includes the use of an aqueous fermentation medium, containing the substrate at a substrate concentration greater than 1% (w/v).

Ljungdahl, Lars G. (Athens, GA); Carriera, Laura H. (Athens, GA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Fueling Infrastructure Polymer Materials Compatibility to Ethanol...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fueling Infrastructure Polymer Materials Compatibility to Ethanol-blended Gasoline These data files contain volume, mass, and hardness changes of elastomers and plastics...

351

High ethanol producing derivatives of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Derivatives of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus which under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions continuously ferment substrates such as starch, cellobiose, glucose, xylose and other sugars to produce recoverable amounts of ethanol solving the problem of fermentations yielding low concentrations of ethanol using the parent strain of the microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are disclosed. These new derivatives are ethanol tolerant up to 10% (v/v) ethanol during fermentation. The process includes the use of an aqueous fermentation medium, containing the substrate at a substrate concentration greater than 1% (w/v).

Ljungdahl, L.G.; Carriera, L.H.

1983-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

352

Mixed waste paper to ethanol fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to evaluate the use of mixed waste paper for the production of ethanol fuels and to review the available conversion technologies, and assess developmental status, current and future cost of production and economics, and the market potential. This report is based on the results of literature reviews, telephone conversations, and interviews. Mixed waste paper samples from residential and commercial recycling programs and pulp mill sludge provided by Weyerhauser were analyzed to determine the potential ethanol yields. The markets for ethanol fuel and the economics of converting paper into ethanol were investigated.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Emissions from ethanol and LPG fueled vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper addresses the environmental concerns of using neat ethanol and liquified petroleum gas (LPG) as transportation fuels in the US Low-level blends of ethanol (10%) with gasoline have been used as fuels in the US for more than a decade, but neat ethanol (85% or more) has only been used extensively in Brazil. LPG, which consists mostly of propane, is already used extensively as a vehicle fuel in the US, but its use has been limited primarily to converted fleet vehicles. Increasing US interest in alternative fuels has raised the possibility of introducing neat ethanol vehicles into the market and expanding the number of LPG vehicles. Use of such vehicles and increased production and consumption of fuel ethanol and LPG will undoubtedly have environmental impacts. If the impacts are determined to be severe, they could act as barriers to the introduction of neat ethanol and LPG vehicles. Environmental concerns include exhaust and evaporative emissions and their impact on ozone formation and global warming, toxic emissions from fuel combustion and evaporation, and agricultural emissions from production of ethanol. The paper is not intended to be judgmental regarding the overall attractiveness of ethanol or LPG compared to other transportation fuels. The environmental concerns are reviewed and summarized, but the only conclusion reached is that there is no single concern that is likely to prevent the introduction of neat ethanol fueled vehicles or the increase in LPG fueled vehicles.

Pitstick, M.E.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

Emissions from ethanol and LPG fueled vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper addresses the environmental concerns of using neat ethanol and liquified petroleum gas (LPG) as transportation fuels in the US Low-level blends of ethanol (10%) with gasoline have been used as fuels in the US for more than a decade, but neat ethanol (85% or more) has only been used extensively in Brazil. LPG, which consists mostly of propane, is already used extensively as a vehicle fuel in the US, but its use has been limited primarily to converted fleet vehicles. Increasing US interest in alternative fuels has raised the possibility of introducing neat ethanol vehicles into the market and expanding the number of LPG vehicles. Use of such vehicles and increased production and consumption of fuel ethanol and LPG will undoubtedly have environmental impacts. If the impacts are determined to be severe, they could act as barriers to the introduction of neat ethanol and LPG vehicles. Environmental concerns include exhaust and evaporative emissions and their impact on ozone formation and global warming, toxic emissions from fuel combustion and evaporation, and agricultural emissions from production of ethanol. The paper is not intended to be judgmental regarding the overall attractiveness of ethanol or LPG compared to other transportation fuels. The environmental concerns are reviewed and summarized, but the only conclusion reached is that there is no single concern that is likely to prevent the introduction of neat ethanol fueled vehicles or the increase in LPG fueled vehicles.

Pitstick, M.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Ethanol: the billion-dollar harvest.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ethanol has dominated headlines as people and governments invest in alternative forms of energy. The biofuel is made from corn kernels and is being touted (more)

Allan, Chantal Marie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Redirecting carbon flux through exogenous pyruvate kinase to achieve high ethanol yields in Clostridium thermocellum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Redirecting Redirecting carbon flux through exogenous pyruvate kinase to achieve high ethanol yields in Clostridium thermocellum Yu Deng a,c , Daniel G. Olson a,c , Jilai Zhou a,c , Christopher D. Herring a,b,c , A. Joe Shaw d , Lee R. Lynd a,b,c,n a Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755, USA b Mascoma Corporation, Lebanon, NH 03766, USA c BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, TN 37830, USA d Novogy, Inc. Cambridge, MA 02138, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 24 August 2012 Received in revised form 6 November 2012 Accepted 16 November 2012 Available online 29 November 2012 Keywords: Clostridium thermocellum Ethanol yield Pyruvate kinase Malate shunt a b s t r a c t In Clostridium thermocellum, a thermophilic anaerobic bacterium able to rapidly ferment cellulose to ethanol, pyruvate kinase (EC 2.7.1.40) is absent based on both the genome sequence and enzymatic

357

Author Proof A ARTICLE Cellulose Hydrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II: II: Numerical Results and Analysis Wen Zhou, 1,2 Zhiqian Hao, 3 Ying Xu, 1,2 Heinz-Bernd Schu ¨ ttler 3 1 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute of Bioinformatics, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-9779; fax: 706-542-9751; e-mail: xyn@bmb.uga.edu 2 BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee 3 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-3886; fax: 706-542-2492; e-mail: hbs@physast.uga.edu Received 16 December 2008; revision received 13 March 2009; accepted 27 April 2009 Published online 12 May 2009 in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22388 ABSTRACT: Numerical simulation results are presented for a cellulose hydrolysis model which incorporates both the enzymatic glucan chain fragmentation kinetics and the hydrolytic

358

Author Proof A ARTICLE Cellulose Hydrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I: I: A General Modeling Formalism Wen Zhou, 1,2 Heinz-Bernd Schu ¨ ttler, 3 Zhiqian Hao, 3 Ying Xu 1,2 1 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Institute of Bioinformatics, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-9779; fax: 706-542-9751; e-mail: xyn@bmb.uga.edu 2 BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, Tennassee 3 Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia; telephone: 706-542-3886; fax: 706-542-9751; e-mail: hbs@physast.uga.edu Received 16 December 2008; revision received 13 March 2009; accepted 27 April 2009 Published online 8 May 2009 in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22389 ABSTRACT: We develop a general framework for a realistic rate equation modeling of cellulose hydrolysis using non- complexed cellulase. Our proposed formalism, for the first time, takes

359

Carbohydrate derivedpseudolignin can retard cellulose biological conversion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbohydrate Carbohydrate Derived-Pseudo-Lignin Can Retard Cellulose Biological Conversion Rajeev Kumar, 1,2,3 Fan Hu, 3,4 Poulomi Sannigrahi, 3,4 Seokwon Jung, 3,4 Arthur J. Ragauskas, 3,4 Charles E. Wyman 1,2,3 1 Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, 1084 Columbia Avenue, Riverside, California 92507; telephone: 951-781-5668; fax: 951-781-5790; e-mail: rajeev.dartmouth@gmail.com 2 Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Bourns College of Engineering, 446 Winston Chung Hall, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, California 92507 3 BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6422 4 School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia ABSTRACT: Dilute acid as well as water only (hydrother- mal) pretreatments often lead to a significant

360

PEMFC Power System on EthanolPEMFC Power System on Ethanol Caterpillar Inc.Caterpillar Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

represents a carbon cycle, where plants absorb carbon dioxide during growth, "recycling" the carbon released #12;Program ObjectivesProgram Objectives Integrated PEM Fuel Cell System Ethanol based Power Plant 10PEMFC Power System on EthanolPEMFC Power System on Ethanol Caterpillar Inc.Caterpillar Inc. Thomas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Consolidated Bio-Processing of Cellulosic Biomass for Efficient Biofuel Production Using Yeast Consortium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bioethanol production has become more competitive by combining cellulose saccharification and fermentation (

Goyal, Garima

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Understanding Cellulose Through Molecular Simulation and Electron Tomography  

SciTech Connect

High-resolution cellulose crystal structures have been determined from diffraction experiments using large diameter microfibrils as the sample material. However, cellulose microfibrils in plants are much smaller in diameter, and are more difficult to directly examine experimentally. Molecular dynamics simulation combined with quantum chemical calculations can help to elucidate the structure and dynamics of small diameter cellulose microfibrils. These simulation techniques also aid in the interpretation of electron tomography volumetric structural data from maize cell walls, where pretreatment with dilute acid or ammonia reveals microfibril geometry.

Matthews, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Ethanol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

designed to run on gasoline, E85, or any mixture of the two. FFVs are offered by several vehicle manufacturers. To determine if your vehicle can use E85, consult your owner's...

364

BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. BlueFire Ethanol, Inc. A proposal issued by BlueFire Ethanol Inc,describing a project that will give DOE understanding of a new biological fermentation...

365

Ethanol production using engineered mutant E. coli  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject invention concerns novel means and materials for producing ethanol as a fermentation product. Mutant E. coli are transformed with a gene coding for pyruvate decarboxylase activity. The resulting system is capable of producing relatively large amounts of ethanol from a variety of biomass sources.

Ingram, Lonnie O. (Gainesville, FL); Clark, David P. (Carbondale, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

US Ethanol Production and Use Under Alternative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gasoline as a motor fuel, use of ethanol-blended gasoline results in lower carbon monoxide emission encourages ethanol production. Two prominent policy instruments are currently employed: a federal excise tax are currently employed: a federal excise tax credit on each gallon produced and a "renewable fuel standard" (RFS

367

Nedak Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nedak Ethanol LLC Nedak Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Nedak Ethanol LLC Place Atkinson, Nebraska Zip 68713 Product NEDAK Ethanol, LLC is a Nebraska limited liability company, which was formed on December 15, 2003 for the purpose of constructing and operating an ethanol plant near Atkinson, Nebraska. Coordinates 34.52909°, -78.168819° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.52909,"lon":-78.168819,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

368

Running Line-Haul Trucks on Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

I I magine driving a 55,000-pound tractor- trailer that runs on corn! If you find it difficult to imagine, you can ask the truck drivers for Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) what it's like. For the past 4 years, they have been piloting four trucks powered by ethyl alcohol, or "ethanol," derived from corn. Several advantages to operating trucks on ethanol rather than on conventional petro- leum diesel fuel present themselves. Because ethanol can be produced domestically, unlike most of our petroleum supply, the price and supply of ethanol is not subject to the whims of potentially unstable foreign governments. And domestic production translates into domestic jobs. In addition, ethanol has the potential to reduce harmful emissions, such as particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen

369

First look at cellulose's early production could hold keys to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cellulose's early production could hold keys to bacteria-free medical devices, better biofuel By Jared Sagoff * May 14, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint Produced by plants as well as algae...

370

Shear and Extensional Rheology of Cellulose/Ionic Liquid Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, we characterize the shear and extensional rheology of dilute to semidilute solutions of cellulose in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIAc). In steady shear flow, the semidilute solutions ...

Haward, Simon J.

371

The structure and mechanics of nanofibrillar cellulose foams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crystalline nanofibrillar cellulose has remarkable mechanical properties: a Young's modulus of about 130 GPa and a tensile strength in the range of 7501000 MPa. Recently, there has been increasing interest in exploiting ...

Ali, Zubaidah Mohammed

372

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on AddThis.com...

373

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Underwriters Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser Safety Testing to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser Safety Testing on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser Safety Testing on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser Safety Testing on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser Safety Testing on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser Safety Testing on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser Safety Testing on AddThis.com... Underwriters Laboratories Ethanol Dispenser Safety Testing

374

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Pennsylvania's Ethanol Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project Surpasses 1 Million Gallons to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project Surpasses 1 Million Gallons on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project Surpasses 1 Million Gallons on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project Surpasses 1 Million Gallons on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project Surpasses 1 Million Gallons on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project Surpasses 1 Million Gallons on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania's Ethanol Corridor Project Surpasses 1 Million Gallons on

375

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR BIOMASS-TO-ETHANOL PROJECTS, IG-0513...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR BIOMASS-TO-ETHANOL PROJECTS, IG-0513 FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR BIOMASS-TO-ETHANOL PROJECTS, IG-0513 The Department of Energy (Department) has the strategic...

376

Relationships between circadian rhythms and ethanol intake in mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intake/(ethanol + water intake)). This exposure lasted 5intake/(ethanol + water intake). Statistical Analysesand water bottles were weighed to determine g/kg intake as

Trujillo, Jennifer L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Impact of Ethanol Blending on U.S. Gasoline Prices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study assesses the impact of ethanol blending on gasoline prices in the US today and the potential impact of ethanol on gasoline prices at higher blending concentrations.

Not Available

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

AE Biofuels Inc formerly American Ethanol Inc | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AE Biofuels Inc formerly American Ethanol Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name AE Biofuels Inc. (formerly American Ethanol Inc.) Place Cupertino, California Zip CA 95014 Product...

379

NIST Finds That Ethanol-Loving Bacteria Accelerate Cracking ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... US production of ethanol for fuel has been rising quickly, topping 13 ... and reliably transport ethanol fuel in repurposed oil and gas pipelines.". ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Definitions and Retail  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel and Ethanol Biodiesel and Ethanol Definitions and Retail Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Definitions and Retail Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Definitions and Retail Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Definitions and Retail Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Definitions and Retail Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Definitions and Retail Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Definitions and Retail Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Structure and dynamics of a complex of cellulose with EDA: insights into the action of amines on cellulose  

SciTech Connect

The neutron structure of a complex of EDA with cellulose has been determined to reveal the location of hydrogen atoms involved in hydrogen bonding. EDA disrupts the hydrogen bonding pattern of naturally occurring cellulose by accepting a strong hydrogen bond from the O6 hydroxymethyl group as the conformation of this group is rotated from tg to gt. The O3-H O5 intrachain hydrogen bond commonly found in cellulose allomorphs is observed to be disordered in the neutron structure, and quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics calculations show that O3 prefers to donate to EDA. The hydrogen bonding arrangement is highly dynamic with bonds continually being formed and broken thus explaining the difficulty in locating all of the hydrogen atoms in the neutron scattering density maps. Comparison with other polysaccharide-amine complexes supports a common underlying mechanism for amine disruption of cellulose.

Sawada, Daisuke [ORNL; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu [Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolecules Vegetales (CERMAV-CNRS); Petridis, Loukas [ORNL; Parthasarathi, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Gnanakaran, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Forsyth, V. T. [Institut Laue Langevin and Keele University; Wada, Masahisa [University of Tokyo, Japan; Langan, Paul [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Blend Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blend Dispenser Requirement An ethanol retailer selling a blend of 10% ethanol by volume or higher must

383

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol » Laws & Incentives Ethanol » Laws & Incentives Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Laws and Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Laws and Incentives

384

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blended Fuel Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Blended Fuel Ethanol Blended Fuel Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blended Fuel Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blended Fuel Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blended Fuel Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blended Fuel Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blended Fuel Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blended Fuel Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blended Fuel Definition Ethanol blended fuel, such as gasohol, is defined as any gasoline blended with 10% or more of anhydrous ethanol. (Reference Idaho Statutes 63-240

385

Conversion of cellulosic wastes to liquid fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current status and future plans for a project to convert waste cellulosic (biomass) materials to quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels is described. The basic approach is indirect liquefaction, i.e., thermal gasification followed by catalytic liquefaction. The indirect approach results in separation of the oxygen in the biomass feedstock, i.e., oxygenated compounds do not appear in the liquid hydrocarbon fuel product. The process is capable of accepting a wide variety of feedstocks. Potential products include medium quality gas, normal propanol, diesel fuel and/or high octane gasoline. A fluidized bed pyrolysis system is used for gasification. The pyrolyzer can be fluidized with recycle pyrolysis gas, steam or recycle liquefaction system off gas or some combination thereof. Tars are removed in a wet scrubber. Unseparated pyrolysis gases are utilized as feed to a modified Fischer-Tropsch reactor. The liquid condensate from the reactor consists of a normal propanol-water phase and a paraffinic hydrocarbon phase. The reactor can be operated to optimize for either product. The following tasks were specified in the statement of work for the contract period: (1) feedstock studies; (2) gasification system optimization; (3) waste stream characterization; and (4) liquid fuels synthesis. In addition, several equipment improvements were implemented.

Kuester, J.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Environmental analysis of biomass-ethanol facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes the environmental regulatory requirements for several process configurations of a biomass-to-ethanol facility. It also evaluates the impact of two feedstocks (municipal solid waste [MSW] and agricultural residues) and three facility sizes (1000, 2000, and 3000 dry tons per day [dtpd]) on the environmental requirements. The basic biomass ethanol process has five major steps: (1) Milling, (2) Pretreatment, (3) Cofermentation, (4) Enzyme production, (5) Product recovery. Each step could have environmental impacts and thus be subject to regulation. Facilities that process 2000 dtpd of MSW or agricultural residues would produce 69 and 79 million gallons of ethanol, respectively.

Corbus, D.; Putsche, V.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Wastepaper as a feedstock for ethanol production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The possibility of using wastepaper as a cheap feedstock for production of ethanol is discussed. As the single largest material category in the municipal solid waste (MSW) stream, wastepaper is the main target of efforts to reduce the volume of MSW. And in the process for producing ethanol from lignocellulosics, the feedstock represents the highest cost. If wastepaper could be obtained cheaply in large enough quantities and if conversion process cost and efficiency prove to be similar to those for wood, the cost of ethanol could be significantly reduced. At the same time, the volume of wastepaper that must be disposed of in landfills could be lessened. 13 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

Bergeron, P.W.; Riley, C.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Conversion of cellulose materials into nanostructured ceramics by biomineralization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Synthesis of hierarchically ordered silica materials having ordered wood cellular structures has been demonstrated through in-situ mineralization of wood by means of surfactant-directed mineralization in solutions of different pH. At low pH, silicic acid penetrates the buried interfaces of the wood cellular structure without clogging the pores to subsequently molecularly paint the interfaces thereby forming a positive replica following calcinations. At high pH, the hydrolyzed silica rapidly condenses to fill the open cells and pits within the structure resulting in a negative replica of the structure. Surfactant-templated mineralization in acid solutions leads to the formation of micelles that hexagonally pack at the wood interfaces preserving structural integrity while integrating hexagonally ordered nanoporosity into the structure of the cell walls following thermal treatment in air. The carbothermal reduction of mineralized wood with silica at high temperature produces biomorphic silicon carbide (SiC) materials, which are typical aggregations of ?-SiC nanoparticles. To understand the roles of each component (lignin, crystalline cellulose, amorphous cellulose) comprising the natural biotemplates in the transformation to SiC rods, three different cellulose precursors including unbleached and bleached pulp, and cellulose nanocrystals have been utilized. Lignin in unbleached pulp blocked homogeneous penetration of silica into the pores between cellulose fibers resulting in non-uniform SiC fibers containing thick silica layers. Bleached pulp produced uniform SiC rods with camelback structures (80nm in diameter; ~50?m in length), indicating that more silica infiltrates into the amorphous constituent of cellulose to form chunky rather than straight rod structures. The cellulose nanocrystal (CNXL) material produced clean and uniform SiC nanowires (70nm in diameter; >100?m in length) without the camelback structure.

Shin, Yongsoon; Exarhos, Gregory J.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Comparison of Cellulose Ib Simulations with Three Carbohydrate Force Fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics simulations of cellulose have recently become more prevalent due to increased interest in renewable energy applications, and many atomistic and coarse-grained force fields exist that can be applied to cellulose. However, to date no systematic comparison between carbohydrate force fields has been conducted for this important system. To that end, we present a molecular dynamics simulation study of hydrated, 36-chain cellulose I{beta} microfibrils at room temperature with three carbohydrate force fields (CHARMM35, GLYCAM06, and Gromos 45a4) up to the near-microsecond time scale. Our results indicate that each of these simulated microfibrils diverge from the cellulose I{beta} crystal structure to varying degrees under the conditions tested. The CHARMM35 and GLYCAM06 force fields eventually result in structures similar to those observed at 500 K with the same force fields, which are consistent with the experimentally observed high-temperature behavior of cellulose I. The third force field, Gromos 45a4, produces behavior significantly different from experiment, from the other two force fields, and from previously reported simulations with this force field using shorter simulation times and constrained periodic boundary conditions. For the GLYCAM06 force field, initial hydrogen-bond conformations and choice of electrostatic scaling factors significantly affect the rate of structural divergence. Our results suggest dramatically different time scales for convergence of properties of interest, which is important in the design of computational studies and comparisons to experimental data. This study highlights that further experimental and theoretical work is required to understand the structure of small diameter cellulose microfibrils typical of plant cellulose.

Matthews, J. F.; Beckham, G. T.; Bergenstrahle, M.; Brady, J. W.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

390

Ethanol Production, Distribution, and Use: Discussions on Key Issues (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From production to the environment, presentation discusses issues surrounding ethanol as a transportation fuel.

Harrow, G.

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

391

A laboratory and pilot plant scaled continuous stirred reactor separator for the production of ethanol from sugars, corn grits/starch or biomass streams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An improved bio-reactor has been developed to allow the high speed, continues, low energy conversion of various substrates to ethanol. The Continuous Stirred Reactor Separator (CSRS) incorporates gas stripping of the ethanol using a recalculating gas stream between cascading stirred reactors in series. We have operated a 4 liter lab scale unit, and built and operated a 24,000 liter pilot scale version of the bioreactor. High rates of fermentation are maintained in the reactor stages using a highly flocculent yeast strain. Ethanol is recovered from the stripping gas using a hydrophobic solvent absorber (isothermal), after which the gas is returned to the bioreactor. Ethanol can then be removed from the solvent to recover a highly concentrated ethanol product. We have applied the lab scale CSRS to sugars (glucose/sucrose), molasses, and raw starch with simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of the starch granules (SSF). The pilot scale CSRS has been operated as a cascade reactor using dextrins as a feed. Operating data from both the lab and pilot scale CSRS are presented. Details of how the system might be applied to cellulosics, with some preliminary data are also given.

Dale, M.C.; Lei, Shuiwang; Zhou, Chongde

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Business Case Equipment Options

393

Deletion of N-type calcium channels alters ethanol reward and reduces ethanol consumption in mice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and regulate ethanol consumption. Cell 109:733743.Mice blockers on alcohol consumption in alcohol-drinkingRD (1998) Etha- nol consumption and resistance are inversely

Newton, P M; Orr, C J; Wallace, M J; Kim, C; Shin, H S; Messing, R O

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Didion Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Didion Ethanol LLC Didion Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Didion Ethanol LLC Place Cambria, Wisconsin Zip 53923 Product Also Didion Milling LLC, Grand River Distribution LLC. Developing a 50m gallon ethanol facility in Cambria, Wisconsin. Coordinates 43.543205°, -89.108619° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.543205,"lon":-89.108619,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

395

Western Ethanol Company LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Company LLC Ethanol Company LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Western Ethanol Company LLC Place Placentia, California Zip 92871 Product California-based fuel ethanol distribution and marketing company. Coordinates 33.871124°, -117.861401° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.871124,"lon":-117.861401,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

396

Heartland Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol LLC Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Heartland Ethanol LLC Place Knoxville, Tennessee Zip 37929 Product Knoxville, TN based ethanol developer. Coordinates 35.960495°, -83.920914° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.960495,"lon":-83.920914,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

397

Michigan Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol LLC Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Michigan Ethanol LLC Place Caro, Michigan Zip 48723-8804 Product Ethanol productor in Caro, Michigan. Coordinates 43.488705°, -83.396764° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.488705,"lon":-83.396764,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

398

Great Valley Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Ethanol LLC Valley Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Great Valley Ethanol LLC Place Bakersfield, California Product Developing a 63m gallon ethanol plant in Hanford, CA Coordinates 44.78267°, -72.801369° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.78267,"lon":-72.801369,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

399

Kansas Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kansas Ethanol LLC Kansas Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Kansas Ethanol LLC Place Lyons, Kansas Zip 67554 Product Constructing a 55m gallon ethanol plant in Rice County, Kansas Coordinates 43.72394°, -96.871179° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.72394,"lon":-96.871179,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

400

Show Me Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Show Me Ethanol LLC Show Me Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Show Me Ethanol, LLC Place Carrollton, Missouri Zip 64633 Product Developing an ethanol project in Carrollton, Missouri. Coordinates 36.935443°, -76.531593° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.935443,"lon":-76.531593,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Farmers Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol LLC Ethanol LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Farmers' Ethanol LLC Place Adamsville, Ohio Zip OH 43802 Product An association of farmers registered on July 12,2002 with a goal of producing ethanol in the Ohio Appalachian Mountains. Coordinates 35.235864°, -88.390158° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.235864,"lon":-88.390158,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

402

Energy Utilization in Fermentation Ethanol Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fuel ethanol industry has put into practice several techniques for minimizing energy requirements for ethanol manufacture. Thermal energy usage in fermentation grain ethanol plants has been reduced from the prior practice of 80,900 Btu per gallon ethanol to current demonstrated practice of 49,700 Btu per gallon. Future, state-of-the-art improvements are expected to reduce usage further to 37,000 Btu per gallon or less. The total energy input is projected at 52,000 Btu per gallon after adding in the electrical power. Energy savings have been achieved primarily by flash vapor reuse, pressure cascading of distillation units, and use of more efficient byproduct drying methods. These energy saving techniques should also be useful in other commercial processing applications.

Easley, C. E.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Treatment of biomass to obtain ethanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ethanol was produced using biocatalysts that are able to ferment sugars derived from treated biomass. Sugars were obtained by pretreating biomass under conditions of high solids and low ammonia concentration, followed by saccharification.

Dunson, Jr., James B. (Newark, DE); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, III, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Hennessey, Susan Marie (Avondale, PA)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

404

US Ethanol Holdings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

investment bank and advisory firm, Geneva Capital, created in 2006 to develop 6 bioethanol plants in the US. References US Ethanol Holdings1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

405

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Rate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Rate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Rate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Rate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Rate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Rate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Rate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Rate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Rate The tax rate on fuel containing ethanol is $0.06 per gallon less than the tax rate on other motor fuels in certain geographic areas. This reduced

406

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Retailer Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Blend Retailer Ethanol Blend Retailer Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Retailer Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Retailer Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Retailer Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Retailer Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Retailer Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Retailer Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blend Retailer Tax Credit The Ethanol Promotion Tax Credit is available to any fuel retailer for up

407

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Fuel Blend Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard At least 85% of gasoline supplied to a retailer or sold in Hawaii must contain a minimum of 10% ethanol (E10), unless the Director determines that

408

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Facility Fee to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Facility Fee The cost to submit an air quality permit application for an ethanol production plant is $1,000. An annual renewal fee is also required for the

409

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol and Biodiesel Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol and Biodiesel Tax Exemption Motor fuels sold to an ethanol or biodiesel production facility and motor

410

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Sales Tax Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Sales Tax Exemption The portion of ethanol (ethyl alcohol) sold and blended with motor fuel is exempt from sales tax. (Reference Oklahoma Statutes 68-500.10-1 and

411

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Labeling Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Blend Labeling Ethanol Blend Labeling Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Labeling Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Labeling Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Labeling Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Labeling Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Labeling Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Blend Labeling Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Blend Labeling Requirements Pumps that dispense ethanol-blended gasoline available for purchase must be

412

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Specifications  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

and Ethanol and Ethanol Specifications to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Specifications on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Specifications on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Specifications on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Specifications on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Specifications on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Ethanol Specifications on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel and Ethanol Specifications Ethanol-blended gasoline must conform to ASTM D4814, E85 must conform to

413

Ligning-Derived Carbon Fiber as a Co-Product of Refining Cellulosic Biomass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignin by-products from biorefineries has the potential to provide a low-cost alternative to petroleum-based precursors to manufacture carbon fiber, which can be combined with a binding matrix to produce a structural material with much greater specific strength and specific stiffness than conventional materials such as steel and aluminum. The market for carbon fiber is universally projected to grow exponentially to fill the needs of clean energy technologies such as wind turbines and to improve the fuel economies in vehicles through lightweighting. In addition to cellulosic biofuel production, lignin-based carbon fiber production coupled with biorefineries may provide $2,400 to $3,600 added value dry Mg-1 of biomass for vehicle applications. Compared to producing ethanol alone, the addition of lignin-derived carbon fiber could increase biorefinery gross revenue by 30% to 300%. Using lignin-derived carbon fiber in 15 million vehicles per year in the US could reduce fossil fuel consumption by 2-5 billion liters year-1, reduce CO2 emissions by about 6.7 million Mg year-1, and realize fuel savings through vehicle lightweighting of $700 to $1,600 per Mg biomass processed. The value of fuel savings from vehicle lightweighting becomes economical at carbon fiber price of $6.60 kg-1 under current fuel prices, or $13.20 kg-1 under fuel prices of about $1.16 l-1.

Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Baker, Fred S [ORNL; Compere, A L [ORNL; Griffith, William {Bill} L [ORNL; Boeman, Raymond G [ORNL; Keller, Martin [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

High Speed/ Low Effluent Process for Ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

n this project, BPI demonstrated a new ethanol fermentation technology, termed the High Speed/ Low Effluent (HS/LE) process on both lab and large pilot scale as it would apply to wet mill and/or dry mill corn ethanol production. The HS/LE process allows very rapid fermentations, with 18 to 22% sugar syrups converted to 9 to 11% ethanol beers in 6 to 12 hours using either a consecutive batch or continuous cascade implementation. This represents a 5 to 8X increase in fermentation speeds over conventional 72 hour batch fermentations which are the norm in the fuel ethanol industry today. The consecutive batch technology was demonstrated on a large pilot scale (4,800 L) in a dry mill corn ethanol plant near Cedar Rapids, IA (Xethanol Biofuels). The pilot demonstrated that 12 hour fermentations can be accomplished on an industrial scale in a non-sterile industrial environment. Other objectives met in this project included development of a Low Energy (LE) Distillation process which reduces the energy requirements for distillation from about 14,000 BTU/gal steam ($0.126/gal with natural gas @ $9.00 MCF) to as low as 0.40 KW/gal electrical requirements ($0.022/gal with electricity @ $0.055/KWH). BPI also worked on the development of processes that would allow application of the HS/LE fermentation process to dry mill ethanol plants. A High-Value Corn ethanol plant concept was developed to produce 1) corn germ/oil, 2) corn bran, 3) ethanol, 4) zein protein, and 5) nutritional protein, giving multiple higher value products from the incoming corn stream.

M. Clark Dale

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

415

An analysis of producing ethanol and electric power from woody residues and agricultural crops in East Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing U.S. dependence on imported oil; the contribution of fossil fuels to the greenhouse gas emissions and the climate change issue; the current level of energy prices and other environmental concerns have increased world interest in renewable energy sources. Biomass is a large, diverse, readily exploitable resource. This dissertation examines the biomass potential in Eastern Texas by examining a 44 county region. This examination considers the potential establishment of a 100-megawatt (MW) power plant and a 20 million gallon per year (MMGY) ethanol plant using lignocellulosic biomass. The biomass sources considered are switchgrass, sugarcane bagasse, and logging residues. In the case of electricity generation, co-firing scenarios are also investigated. The research analyzes the key indicators involved with economic costs and benefits, environmental and social impacts. The bioenergy production possibilities considered here were biofeedstock supported electric power and cellulosic ethanol production. The results were integrated into a comprehensive set of information that addresses the effects of biomass energy development in the region. The analysis indicates that none of the counties in East Texas have sufficient biomass to individually sustain either a 100% biomass fired power plant or the cellulosic ethanol plant. Such plants would only be feasible at the regional level. Co-firing biomass with coal, however, does provide a most attractive alternative for the study region. The results indicate further that basing the decision solely on economics of feedstock availability and costs would suggest that bioenergy, as a renewable energy, is not a viable energy alternative. Accounting for some environmental and social benefits accruing to the region from bioenergy production together with the feedstock economics, however, suggests that government subsidies, up to the amount of accruing benefits, could make the bioenergies an attractive business opportunity for local farmers and investors.

Ismayilova, Rubaba Mammad

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Cellulose solventbased biomass pretreatment breaks highly ordered hydrogen bonds in cellulose fibers of switchgrass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solvent-Based Solvent-Based Biomass Pretreatment Breaks Highly Ordered Hydrogen Bonds in Cellulose Fibers of Switchgrass Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh, 1,2 Zhiguang Zhu, 1 Sungsool Wi, 3 Y.-H. Percival Zhang 1,2,4 1 Biological Systems Engineering Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), 210-A Seitz Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061; telephone: 540-231-7414, fax: 540-231-3199; e-mail: ypzhang@vt.edu 2 Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 3 Chemistry Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 4 DOE BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge, Tennessee Received 25 June 2010; revision received 23 August 2010; accepted 4 October 2010 Published online 21 October 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com).

417

J33. CSSC Cellulosic H2 2009 (High Resolution $$$).pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reprint Reprint © Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim Supported by  WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim Table of Contents X. Ye, Y. Wang, R. C. Hopkins, M. W. W. Adams, B. R. Evans, J. R. Mielenz, Y.-H. P. Zhang* 149 - 152 Spontaneous High-Yield Production of Hydrogen from Cellulosic Materials and Water Catalyzed by Enzyme Cocktails Cocktail reception: Biohydrogen is pro- duced in high yield from cellulosic ma- terials and water in a one-pot process catalyzed by up to 14 enzymes and one coenzyme. This assembly of enzymes re- sults in non-natural catabolic pathways. These spontaneous reactions are con- ducted under modest reaction condi- tions (32 8C and atmospheric pressure). DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200900017 Spontaneous High-Yield Production of Hydrogen from Cellulosic Materials and Water Catalyzed by Enzyme Cocktails Xinhao Ye, [a] Yiran Wang, [a] Robert

418

New lignocellulose pretreatments using cellulose solvents: a review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Received: Received: 7 September 2012 Accepted: 13 September 2012 Published online in Wiley Online Library: (wileyonlinelibrary.com) DOI 10.1002/jctb.3959 New lignocellulose pretreatments using cellulose solvents: a review Noppadon Sathitsuksanoh, a† Anthe George b,c and Y-H Percival Zhang a,d,e∗ Abstract Non-food lignocellulosic biomass is the most abundant renewable bioresource as a collectable, transportable, and storable chemical energy that is far from fully utilized. The goal of biomass pretreatment is to improve the enzymatic digestibility of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass. Many substrate factors, such as substrate accessibility, lignin content, particle size and so on, contribute to its recalcitrance. Cellulose accessibility to hydrolytic enzymes is believed to be the most important substrate characteristic limiting enzymatic hydrolysis. Cellulose

419

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Breaking down cellulose without blasting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2011 4, 2011 Breaking down cellulose without blasting lignin: "Dry rot" genome offers lessons for biofuel pretreatment WALNUT CREEK, Calif.-Feared by realtors and homeowners alike, dry rot due to the fungus Serpula lacrymans causes millions of dollars worth of damage to homes and buildings around the world. This brown rot fungus' capacity to break down the cellulose in wood led to its selection for sequencing by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) in 2007, with the goal of identifying the enzymes involved in the degradation process and using the information to improve cellulosic biofuels production. Photo: A variant of Serpula lacrymans causes dry rot. (Dave Brown via Flickr/Creative Commons Attribution 2.0) As reported online July 14 in Science Express, an international team of

420

Comparative Study of Corn Stover Pretreated by Dilute Acid and Cellulose Solvent-Based Lignocellulose Fractionation: Enzymatic Hydrolysis, Supramolecular Structure, and Substrate Accessibility  

SciTech Connect

Liberation of fermentable sugars from recalcitrant biomass is among the most costly steps for emerging cellulosic ethanol production. Here we compared two pretreatment methods (dilute acid, DA, and cellulose solvent and organic solvent lignocellulose fractionation, COSLIF) for corn stover. At a high cellulase loading [15 filter paper units (FPUs) or 12.3 mg cellulase per gram of glucan], glucan digestibilities of the corn stover pretreated by DA and COSLIF were 84% at hour 72 and 97% at hour 24, respectively. At a low cellulase loading (5 FPUs per gram of glucan), digestibility remained as high as 93% at hour 24 for the COSLIF-pretreated corn stover but reached only {approx}60% for the DA-pretreated biomass. Quantitative determinations of total substrate accessibility to cellulase (TSAC), cellulose accessibility to cellulase (CAC), and non-cellulose accessibility to cellulase (NCAC) based on adsorption of a non-hydrolytic recombinant protein TGC were measured for the first time. The COSLIF-pretreated corn stover had a CAC of 11.57 m{sup 2}/g, nearly twice that of the DA-pretreated biomass (5.89 m{sup 2}/g). These results, along with scanning electron microscopy images showing dramatic structural differences between the DA- and COSLIF-pretreated samples, suggest that COSLIF treatment disrupts microfibrillar structures within biomass while DA treatment mainly removes hemicellulose. Under the tested conditions COSLIF treatment breaks down lignocellulose structure more extensively than DA treatment, producing a more enzymatically reactive material with a higher CAC accompanied by faster hydrolysis rates and higher enzymatic digestibility.

Zhu, Z.; Sathitsuksanoh, N.; Vinzant, T.; Schell, D. J.; McMillian, J. D.; Zhang, Y. H. P.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Degradation of cellulosic biomass and its subsequent utilization for the production of chemical feedstocks. Progress report, March 1, 1977--May 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The degradation of cellulosic biomass continues to focus on the anaerobic thermophile Clostridium thermocellum. When grown on crystalline cellulose (MN300) in batch culture, there is an initial rapid accumulation of reducing sugars but the sugars are rapidly metabolized in later times during the fermentation. When grown on Solka floc with periodic addition of the substrate, there is a continual accumulation of reducing sugars (xylose, glucose, and cellobiose) as well as ethanol and acetic acid during the entire course of the fermentation. In the presence of surfactant in the growth medium, there is an increased appearance of extracellular cellulases. A chemically defined medium is being developed for growth Cl. thermocellum in order to study the enzyme regulations. Lastly, a trinitrophenyl-carboxylmethyl cellulose substrate for determining cellulose activity appears to be a promising and rapid assay. Progress in the genetic manipulations has been cautious but promising. Preliminary evidence leads to optimistic projection on the presence of plasmids and bacteriophage in Cl. thermocellum. The production of chemical feedstocks continues to focus on acrylic acid, acetone/butanol and acetic acid. Studies with cell free extracts of Clostridium propionicum have shown the production and accumulation of acrylic acid from lactic acid. The use of electron acceptor in cell-free systems has shown effective prevention on the reduction of acrylic acid to propionic acid. Medium development and strain selection using available acetone/butanol producing Cl. acetobutylicum have been initiated. There is every indication that these strains are capable to produce mixed solvents close to the theoretical maximum yield. An accurate and rapid method for quantifying acetic acid was developed. This technique is being used to examine the pertinent parameters on the production of acetic acid by Clostridium thermoaceticum.

Wang, D.I.C.; Cooney, C.L.; Demain, A.L.; Gomez, R.F.; Sinskey, A.J.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

www.exeter.ac.uk/inspiring-science Cellulose: sustainable and renewable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.exeter.ac.uk/inspiring-science Cellulose: sustainable and renewable material for many The talk will cover the use of cellulose as a sustainable and renewable source for use in composites

Mumby, Peter J.

423

Cellulose Simulations Demystify High-Temperature Behavior (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Molecular simulations that model cellulose microfibrils at high temperature indicate regions that may be easier to break down, which could lead to more efficient processing of cellulose into biofuel.

Not Available

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Process for converting cellulosic materials into fuels and chemicals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting cellulosic materials, such as waste paper, into fuels and chemicals utilizing enzymatic hydrolysis of the major constituent of paper, cellulose. A waste paper slurry is contacted by cellulase in an agitated hydrolyzer. The cellulase is produced from a continuous, columnar, fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing immobilized microorganisms. An attritor and a cellobiase reactor are coupled to the agitated hydrolyzer to improve reaction efficiency. The cellulase is recycled by an adsorption process. The resulting crude sugars are converted to dilute product in a fluidized-bed bioreactor utilizing microorganisms. The dilute product is concentrated and purified by utilizing distillation and/or a biparticle fluidized-bed bioreactor system.

Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Faison, Brendlyn D. (Knoxville, TN); Davison, Brian H. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Market penetration of biodiesel and ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines the influence that economic and technological factors have on the penetration of biodiesel and ethanol into the transportation fuels market. This dissertation focuses on four aspects. The first involves the influence of fossil fuel prices, because biofuels are substitutes and have to compete in price. The second involves biofuel manufacturing technology, principally the feedstock-to-biofuel conversion rates, and the biofuel manufacturing costs. The third involves prices for greenhouse gas offsets. The fourth involves the agricultural commodity markets for feedstocks, and biofuel byproducts. This dissertation uses the Forest and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model-Greenhouse Gas (FASOM-GHG) to quantitatively examine these issues and calculates equilibrium prices and quantities, given market interactions, fossil fuel prices, carbon dioxide equivalent prices, government biofuel subsidies, technological improvement, and crop yield gains. The results indicate that for the ranges studied, gasoline prices have a major impact on aggregate ethanol production but only at low prices. At higher prices, one runs into a capacity constraint that limits expansion on the capacity of ethanol production. Aggregate biodiesel production is highly responsive to gasoline prices and increases over time. (Diesel fuel price is proportional to the gasoline price). Carbon dioxide equivalent prices expand the biodiesel industry, but have no impact on ethanol aggregate production when gasoline prices are high again because of refinery capacity expansion. Improvement of crop yields shows a similar pattern, expanding ethanol production when the gasoline price is low and expanding biodiesel. Technological improvement, where biorefinery production costs decrease over time, had minimal impact on aggregate ethanol and biodiesel production. Finally, U.S. government subsidies have a large expansionary impact on aggregate biodiesel production, but only expand the ethanol industry at low gasoline prices. All of these factors increase agricultural welfare with most expanding producer surplus and mixed effects on consumers.

Szulczyk, Kenneth Ray

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Ionic-Liquid Induced Changes in Cellulose Structure Associated with Enhanced Biomass Hydrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of varying ionic liquid pretreatment parameters on various sources of lignocellulosic biomass have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray fiber diffraction, and compositional analysis. Comparative enzymatic hydrolysis and sugar analysis were used to relate the observed changes in cellulose structure to biomass digestibility. In this study, the factor most clearly associated with enhanced biomass hydrolysis is the conversion of cellulose fibers from the cellulose I to the cellulose II crystal phase.

Samayam, Indira P.; Hanson, B. Leif; Langan, Paul; Schall, Constance A. (Toledo)

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

427

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alaska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alaska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Alaska laws and incentives related

428

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Wisconsin Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Wisconsin laws and incentives

429

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Fuel Blend Use Requirement State government agencies and universities owning or operating motor

430

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Virginia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Virginia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Virginia laws and incentives

431

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Arkansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Arkansas laws and incentives

432

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oregon Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Oregon Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Oregon laws and incentives related

433

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Texas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Texas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Texas laws and incentives related

434

Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: California Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type California Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all California laws and incentives

435

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Tennessee Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Tennessee laws and incentives

436

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Minnesota Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Minnesota laws and incentives

437

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Kentucky Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Kentucky laws and incentives

438

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Delaware Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Delaware laws and incentives

439

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Nevada Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Nevada laws and incentives related

440

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Pennsylvania Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Pennsylvania laws and incentives

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "danisco cellulosic ethanol" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Oklahoma Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Oklahoma laws and incentives

442

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Production Tax Production Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Tax Credit An ethanol facility is eligible for a credit of $0.075 per gallon of ethanol, before denaturing, for new production for up to 36 consecutive

443

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Georgia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Georgia Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Georgia laws and incentives

444

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Station Locations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Station Locations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fueling Station Locations Find ethanol (E85) fueling stations near an address or ZIP code or along a

445

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idaho Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Idaho laws and incentives related

446

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Florida Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Florida Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Florida laws and incentives

447

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Mississippi Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Mississippi laws and incentives

448

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Colorado Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Colorado Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Colorado laws and incentives

449

National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition NEVC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Vehicle Coalition NEVC Ethanol Vehicle Coalition NEVC Jump to: navigation, search Name National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition (NEVC) Place Jefferson City, Missouri Zip 65109 Product The National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition is a non-profit membership organisation serving as a primary advocacy group promoting the use of 85% ethanol in the US as a form of alternative transportation fuel. References National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition (NEVC)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition (NEVC) is a company located in Jefferson City, Missouri . References ↑ "National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition (NEVC)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=National_Ethanol_Vehicle_Coalition_NEVC&oldid=349065

450

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Illinois Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Illinois Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Illinois laws and incentives

451

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Michigan Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Michigan laws and incentives

452

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Montana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Montana laws and incentives

453

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Nebraska Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Nebraska laws and incentives

454

Process of concentrating ethanol from dilute aqueous solutions thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Relatively dilute aqueous solutions of ethanol are concentrated by passage through a bed of a crystalline silica polymorph, such as silicalite, to adsorb the ethanol with residual dilute feed in contact with the bed, which is displaced by passing concentrated aqueous ethanol through the bed without displacing the adsorbed ethanol. A product concentrate is then obtained by removing the adsorbed ethanol from the bed together with at least a portion of the concentrated aqueous ethanol used as the displacer liquid. This process permits ethanol to be concentrated from dilute fermentation beers, which may contain from 6 to 10% ethanol, to obtain a concentrate product at very low energy cost having an ethanol concentration in excess of 95%, such as a concentration of from 98 to 99.5%. 5 figs.

Oulman, C.S.; Chriswell, C.D.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

455

Process of concentrating ethanol from dilute aqueous solutions thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Relatively dilute aqueous solutions of ethanol are concentrated by passage through a bed of a crystalline silica polymorph, such as silicalite, to adsorb the ethanol with residual dilute feed in contact with the bed, which is displaced by passing concentrated aqueous ethanol through the bed without displacing the adsorbed ethanol. A product concentrate is then obtained by removing the adsorbed ethanol from the bed together with at least a portion of the concentrated aqueous ethanol used as the displacer liquid. This process permits ethanol to be concentrated from dilute fermentation beers, which may contain from 6 to 10% ethanol, to obtain a concentrate product at very low energy cost having an ethanol concentration in excess of 95%, such as a concentration of from 98 to 99.5%.

Oulman, Charles S. (Ames, IA); Chriswell, Colin D. (Slater, IA)

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

456

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #447: December 11, 2006 World Ethanol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7: December 11, 7: December 11, 2006 World Ethanol Production to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #447: December 11, 2006 World Ethanol Production on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #447: December 11, 2006 World Ethanol Production on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #447: December 11, 2006 World Ethanol Production on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #447: December 11, 2006 World Ethanol Production on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #447: December 11, 2006 World Ethanol Production on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #447: December 11, 2006 World Ethanol Production on AddThis.com... Fact #447: December 11, 2006 World Ethanol Production Twelve billion gallons of ethanol were produced worldwide in 2005. The U.S.

457

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Kansas Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Kansas laws and incentives related

458

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Louisiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Louisiana laws and incentives

459

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Indiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Indiana Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Indiana laws and incentives

460

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol to someone by E-mail Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri L