Sample records for danger tree removal

  1. "Dangerous" urban trees & community health & safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    weak regarding individual trees 3. Planning Law - TPO ­ mainly reactive/response to planning trees, safety & climate change · Highways Act 1980 · Electricity Act 1989 · Telecommunications Act 1984

  2. Changes in Soil Quality Due to Grazing and Oak Tree Removal in California Blue Oak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    investigated (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, pH) within 5 to 15 years following tree removal. Following treeChanges in Soil Quality Due to Grazing and Oak Tree Removal in California Blue Oak Woodlands1 Trina of grazing and oak tree removal on soil quality and fertility were examined in a blue oak (Quercus douglasii

  3. Danger radiations

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Le confrencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrle des zones et les prcautions prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

  4. Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

  5. The dangers of extremes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marolf, Donald

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of quantum corrections to extreme black holes indicate noeffects [10]. The dangers of extremes 8. Ori, A. : StructureFOUNDATION The dangers of extremes Donald Marolf Published

  6. 1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate A BrAzil-UK AnAlysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;3DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL April 2011Alysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;4 DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE

  7. UNESCO's world heritage sites A danger list in danger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , was declared in danger--despite the awkward fact that China is a big market for the timber, which takes an extra card in its dealings with other parties, from the local authorities to companies. Other cases

  8. Map Construction and Exploration by Mobile Agents Scattered in a Dangerous Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santoro, Nicola

    of routing tables, etc. Underlying many of these tasks is the primitive process of exploration of the networkMap Construction and Exploration by Mobile Agents Scattered in a Dangerous Network Paola Flocchini the exploration and map construction problems. The end result is also a rooted spanning tree and the election

  9. Modeled PM2.5 removal by trees in ten U.S. cities and associated health David J. Nowak a,*, Satoshi Hirabayashi b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    organic compounds and altering energy use (e.g., tree shade on building, altering wind speeds, cooling air i n f o Article history: Received 5 November 2012 Received in revised form 23 March 2013 Accepted 25

  10. Recommended Trees for Plains Communities of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . When you buy a low-quality tree, you and your tree will have many costly problems even if you take and completely remove containers from containerized stock. · Adding peat moss or manure to soil in the planting

  11. Recommended Trees for Plains Communities of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .When you buy a low-quality tree, you and your tree will have many costly problems even if you take great and completely remove containers from containerized stock. · Adding peat moss or manure to soil in the planting

  12. 5.4 PDS WATCHES: HOW DANGEROUS ARE THESE "PARTICULARLY DANGEROUS SITUATIONS?" Andrew R. Dean*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    address: Andrew R. Dean, CIMMS, Univ. of Oklahoma, National Weather Center, Suite 2300, Norman, OK 730725.4 PDS WATCHES: HOW DANGEROUS ARE THESE "PARTICULARLY DANGEROUS SITUATIONS?" Andrew R. Dean* 1, Norman, OK 2 NOAA/NWS Storm Prediction Center, Norman, OK 1. INTRODUCTION When the threat for damage

  13. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, 616 Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Storage Facility. Revision 2A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, R.C.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This permit application for the 616 Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Storage Facility consists for 15 chapters. Topics of discussion include the following: facility description and general provisions; waste characteristics; process information; personnel training; reporting and record keeping; and certification.

  14. Can These Trees Be Saved?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2005-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ER-039 5-06 Can These Trees Be Saved? Eric L. Taylor, Extension Specialist, and C. Darwin Foster, Associate Department Head and Extension Program Leader for Forestry, The Texas A&M University System A storm or other disaster can leave trees... healthy, mature tree can recover even when several ma- jor limbs are damaged. With large trees, a professional arborist should be brought in to assess damage and safely do any necessary pruning and branch removal. Easy does it: Resist the temptation...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - american studies dangers Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    american studies dangers Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 DEFINING AND EXPERIENCING DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE An Editorial Essay Summary: and dangerous climate change include revealed...

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing dangerous climate Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dangerous climate Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 DEFINING AND EXPERIENCING DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE An Editorial Essay Summary: DEFINING AND EXPERIENCING DANGEROUS CLIMATE...

  17. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1991-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This document, Set 2, the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Part B Permit Application, consists of 15 chapters that address the content of the Part B checklists prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1987) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR 270), with additional information requirements mandated by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 and revisions of WAC 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology checklist section numbers, in brackets, follow the chapter headings and subheadings. This permit application contains umbrella- type'' documentation with overall application to the Hanford Facility. This documentation is broad in nature and applies to all TSD units that have final status under the Hanford Facility Permit.

  18. As of: September 2005 Waste Incineration --A Potential Danger?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    As of: September 2005 Waste Incineration -- A Potential Danger? Bidding Farewell to Dioxin Spouting #12;2 Waste Incineration -- A Potential Danger? Bidding Farewell to Dioxin Spouting In the eighties of the previous century, waste incineration plants (WIPs) came to be the symbol of environmental contamination

  19. How Can We Avert Dangerous Climate Change?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent analyses indicate that the amount of atmospheric CO2 required to cause dangerous climate change is at most 450 ppm, and likely less than that. Reductions of non-CO2 climate forcings can provide only moderate, albeit important, adjustments to the CO2 limit. Realization of how close the planet is to "tipping points" with unacceptable consequences, especially ice sheet disintegration with sea level rise out of humanity's control, has a bright side. It implies an imperative: we must find a way to keep the CO2 amount so low that it will also avert other detrimental effects that had begun to seem inevitable, e.g., ocean acidification, loss of most alpine glaciers and thus the water supply for millions of people, and shifting of climatic zones with consequent extermination of species. Here I outline from a scientific perspective actions needed to achieve low limits on CO2 and global warming. These changes are technically feasible and have ancillary benefits. Achievement of needed changes requires overcoming t...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - avoiding dangerous climate Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dangerous climate Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 DEFINING AND EXPERIENCING DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE An Editorial Essay Summary: Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - avoid dangerous climate Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    avoid dangerous climate Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 DEFINING AND EXPERIENCING DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE An Editorial Essay Summary: Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change...

  2. activating danger signal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WeissOn the Dangers of Cross-Validation. An Experimental Evaluation R. Bharat Rao IKM CKS Siemens Medical Solutions USA Abstract Cross validation allows models to be tested using...

  3. The Climate Policy Narrative for a Dangerously Warming World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanford, Todd [Union of Concerned Scientists] [Union of Concerned Scientists; Frumhoff, Peter [Union of Concerned Scientists] [Union of Concerned Scientists; Luers, Amy [Skoll Global Threats Fund] [Skoll Global Threats Fund; Gulledge, Jay [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is time to acknowledge that global average temperatures will likely rise above the 2 C policy target and consider how that deeply troubling prospect should affect priorities for communicating and managing the risks of a dangerously warming climate.

  4. Keeping Tabs on the World's Dangerous Chemicals | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on the World's Dangerous Chemicals March 20, 2013 - 5:07pm Addthis Sandia chemical engineer Nancy Jackson has worked in laboratories around the world to help ensure that...

  5. Urban tree mortality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roman, Lara Angelica

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    s estimates of shade tree energy benefits previously assumedsurfaces and shade trees to reduce energy use and improvereducing building energy use through tree shade during the

  6. Data quality objective for regulatory requirements for dangerous waste sampling and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulkey, C.H., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Contains requirements for sampling and analysis to meet the dangerous (hazardous) waste regulations.

  7. Operating Experience Level 3, Losing Control: Material Handling Dangers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about the dangers inherent in material handling and the role hazard analysis, work planning, and walkdowns can play in preventing injuries during heavy equipment moves. More than 200 material handling events reported to the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) from January 1, 2010, through August 31, 2014.

  8. Communicating Dangers and Opportunities in Global Warming 13 December Draft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Communicating Dangers and Opportunities in Global Warming 13 December Draft James Hansen American: "Subversion of Public Affairs Chart 7: The Global Warming Story C. Tenets of a Democracy: "An Informed Public, not as a spokesman for NASA There is a huge gap between what is understood about global warming and what is known

  9. Sir --Venezuela has entered 2003 deadlocked in a dangerous political

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Clark R.

    Sir -- Venezuela has entered 2003 deadlocked in a dangerous political confrontation and a general to preserve Venezuela's science and its natural environment, which is rich in biodiversity. We ask for Scientific Research, PO Box 21827, Caracas 1020A, Venezuela correspondence NATURE |VOL 421 |30 JANUARY 2003

  10. Community Trees Power Lines and Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koford, Rolf R.

    aesthetic and psychological benefits. Figure 2. Grown into a power pole. #12;become hazardous to peopleCommunity Trees Power Lines and Trees Introduction Trees serve many purposes in urban and rural, hundreds of people throughout the United States are injured or killed each year when they climb or prune

  11. A SLIPPERY SLOPE: HOW MUCH GLOBAL WARMING CONSTITUTES "DANGEROUS ANTHROPOGENIC INTERFERENCE"?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    A SLIPPERY SLOPE: HOW MUCH GLOBAL WARMING CONSTITUTES "DANGEROUS ANTHROPOGENIC INTERFERENCE on the global warming that can be tolerated without risking dangerous anthropogenic interference with climate. I" mainly as a metaphor for the danger posed by global warming. So I changed "Hell" to "disaster." What

  12. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, general information portion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hays, C.B.

    1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1996) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needed by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in this report).

  13. River Protection Project (RPP) Dangerous Waste Training Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    POHTO, R.E.

    2000-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This supporting document contains the training plan for dangerous waste management at River Protection Project TSD Units. This document outlines the dangerous waste training program developed and implemented for all Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) Units operated by River Protection Project (RPP) in the Hanford 200 East, 200 West and 600 Areas and the <90 Day Accumulation Area at 209E. Operating TSD Units managed by RPP are: the Double-Shell Tank (DST) System, 204-AR Waste Unloading Facility, Grout, and the Single-Shell Tank (SST) System. The program is designed in compliance with the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-330 and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 265.16 for the development of a written dangerous waste training program and the Hanford Facility Permit. Training requirements were determined by an assessment of employee duties and responsibilities. The RPP training program is designed to prepare employees to operate and maintain the Tank Farms in a safe, effective, efficient, and environmentally sound manner. In addition to preparing employees to operate and maintain the Tank Farms under normal conditions, the training program ensures that employees are prepared to respond in a prompt and effective manner should abnormal or emergency conditions occur. Emergency response training is consistent with emergency responses outlined in the following Building Emergency Plans: HNF-IP-0263-TF and HNF-=IP-0263-209E.

  14. Tree SelectionTree Selection Why is selection important?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    There are lists from different locations. Utility company Local tree board Native trees #12;Utility Company their list. #12;Tree Selection Style I Process Pick up trees Plant them #12;This could be the result! Is this tree right for this location? #12;Tree Selection Style II Let's try selection method 2. #12;Tree List

  15. Protected trees A guide to tree preservation procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protected trees A guide to tree preservation procedures #12;Protected trees A guide to tree preservation procedures April 2012 Department for Communities and Local Government #12;© Crown copyright, 2012 trees: A guide to tree preservation procedures Introduction This leaflet is written for tree owners

  16. FedEx - New dangerous goods and hazmat shipping requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial ThinFORFALL NEWS ROCKYGas FedEx® Dangerous

  17. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, general information portion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, S.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The `Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application` is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (this document, DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit- Specific Portion. The scope of the General Information Portion includes information that could be used to discuss operating units, units undergoing closure, or units being dispositioned through other options. Documentation included in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units. A checklist indicating where information is contained in the General Information Portion, in relation to the Washington State Department of Ecology guidance documentation, is located in the Contents Section. The intent of the General Information Portion is: (1) to provide an overview of the Hanford Facility; and (2) to assist in streamlining efforts associated with treatment, storage, and/or disposal unit-specific Part B permit application, preclosure work plan, closure work plan, closure plan, closure/postclosure plan, or postclosure permit application documentation development, and the `Hanford Facility Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit` modification process. Revision 2 of the General Information Portion of the `Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application` contains information current as of May 1, 1996. This document is a complete submittal and supersedes Revision 1.

  18. Hanford Facility dangerous waste permit application, general information. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (this document, number DOE/RL-91-28) and a treatment, storage, and/or disposal Unit-Specific Portion, which includes documentation for individual TSD units (e.g., document numbers DOE/RL-89-03 and DOE/RL-90-01). Both portions consist of a Part A division and a Part B division. The Part B division consists of 15 chapters that address the content of the Part B checklists prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1987) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information requirements mandated by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology checklist section numbers, in brackets, follow the chapter headings and subheadings. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion (i.e., this document, number DOE/RL-91-28) is broader in nature and applies to all treatment, storage, and/or disposal units for which final status is sought. Because of its broad nature, the Part A division of the General Information Portion references the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Part A Permit Application (document number DOE/RL-88-21), a compilation of all Part A documentation for the Hanford Facility.

  19. Distributed Contour Trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morozov, Dmitriy; Weber, Gunther H.

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological techniques provide robust tools for data analysis. They are used, for example, for feature extraction, for data de-noising, and for comparison of data sets. This chapter concerns contour trees, a topological descriptor that records the connectivity of the isosurfaces of scalar functions. These trees are fundamental to analysis and visualization of physical phenomena modeled by real-valued measurements. We study the parallel analysis of contour trees. After describing a particular representation of a contour tree, called local{global representation, we illustrate how di#11;erent problems that rely on contour trees can be solved in parallel with minimal communication.

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - avert dangerous climate Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dark & Bright Sides of Global Warming Summary: anthropogenic interference with the climate system." 12;Metrics for "Dangerous" Change Ice Sheet Disintegration... ) of...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - avoiding dangerous anthropogenic Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ice albedos James Hansen* Summary: and permafrost. If, as we suggest, melting ice and sea level rise define the level of dangerous anthropogenic... temperature level at which...

  2. For Motorcycle Riders Don't place yourself in danger of becoming a statistic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    For Motorcycle Riders Risks Don't place yourself in danger of becoming a statistic by increasing · Makesureyouhaveasuitableseatfittedonyour motorcycle · Apassengerisyourresponsibility-makesurethey areaswellprotectedasyouare

  3. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, PUREX storage tunnels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, S.M.

    1997-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, operating treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the PUREX Storage Tunnels (this document, DOE/RL-90-24). Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the content of the Part B permit application guidance prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology 1996) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (40 Code of Federal Regulations 270), with additional information needs defined by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments and revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303. For ease of reference, the Washington State Department of Ecology alpha-numeric section identifiers from the permit application guidance documentation (Ecology 1996) follow, in brackets, the chapter headings and subheadings. A checklist indicating where information is contained in the PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation, in relation to the Washington State Department of Ecology guidance, is located in the Contents Section. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (e.g., the glossary provided in the General Information Portion). Wherever appropriate, the PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation makes cross-reference to the General Information Portion, rather than duplicating text. Information provided in this PUREX Storage Tunnels permit application documentation is current as of April 1997.

  4. SCHOLARLY PAPERS Is Construction Blasting Still Abnormally Dangerous?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and quarries 15% Dowding 1996 .7 The mining, quarrying, and construction industries use over 4 billion pounds 1 quarry operations,13 mining,14 removing boulders from a stream bed to prevent flooding,15 sewer

  5. What's in your water? An Overview of the Dangers of Pharmaceutical Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    What's in your water? An Overview of the Dangers of Pharmaceutical Waste An environmental education regarding the dangers of pharmaceutical waste and the impact of improper disposal practices on our practicing safe disposal of pharmaceutical waste to prevent further damage to our water system, our food

  6. Turbomachinery debris remover

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krawiec, Donald F. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kraf, Robert J. (North Huntingdon, PA); Houser, Robert J. (Monroeville, PA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for removing debris from a turbomachine. The apparatus includes housing and remotely operable viewing and grappling mechanisms for the purpose of locating and removing debris lodged between adjacent blades in a turbomachine.

  7. Apple Tree, NH Big Tree for May By Anne Krantz, NH Big Tree Team,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Apple Tree, NH Big Tree for May By Anne Krantz, NH Big Tree Team, UNH Cooperative Extension The explosion of apple blossoms in May transforms the most gnarled old tree into a delicate cloud of beauty (1817-1862) in his essay "The Wild Apple Tree," described the blossoms perfectly: `The flowers

  8. Implementing Municipal Tree Planting: Los Angeles Million-Tree Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pincetl, Stephanie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1993) Energy conservation potential of urban tree planting.energy ef?ciency, and other environmental bene?ts associated with the trees

  9. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, 325 hazardous waste treatment units. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application for the 325 Hazardous Waste Treatment Units (325 HWTUs) which consist of the Shielded Analytical Laboratory, the 325 Building, and the 325 Collection/Loadout Station Tank. The 325 HWTUs receive, store, and treat dangerous waste generated by Hanford Facility programs. Routine dangerous and/or mixed waste treatment that will be conducted in the 325 HWTUs will include pH adjustment, ion exchange, carbon absorption, oxidation, reduction, waste concentration by evaporation, precipitation, filtration, solvent extraction, solids washing, phase separation, catalytic destruction, and solidification/stabilization.

  10. Gibbs fragmentation trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullagh, Peter; Winkel, Matthias

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study fragmentation trees of Gibbs type. In the binary case, we identify the most general Gibbs type fragmentation tree with Aldous's beta-splitting model, which has an extended parameter range $\\beta>-2$ with respect to the ${\\rm Beta}(\\beta+1,\\beta+1)$ probability distributions on which it is based. In the multifurcating case, we show that Gibbs fragmentation trees are associated with the two-parameter Poisson-Dirichlet models for exchangeable random partitions of $\\bN$, with an extended parameter range $0\\le\\alpha\\le 1$, $\\theta\\ge -2\\alpha$ and $\\alpha<0$, $\\theta=-m\\alpha$, $m\\in\\bN$.

  11. Interdigital dielectrometry based detection and identification of dangerous materials for security applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Jason, 1978-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent terrorist threats have increased the attention paid to searching airline passengers for dangerous and explosive materials. In particular, the possibility that terrorists might hide explosives in shoes has prompted ...

  12. EA-1707: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of closing the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and the Solid Waste Landfill. The Washington State Department of Ecology is a cooperating agency in preparing this EA.

  13. Operating Experience Level 3, Dangers of Objects Falling into Normally Occupied Areas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides information about a safety concern related to the dangers of items falling from heights into spaces normally occupied by workers at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities.

  14. Graphs, Trees Pebbles, Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Ruth

    Graphs, Trees Pebbles, Robots 1 #12;Outline I. Robot Arms. II. Rigid Graphs. III. Characterizations. Applications: (a) Rigid Components. 2 #12;I. Robot arms and the Carpenter's Rule Problem. Can a robot arm

  15. Generalized constructive tree weights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivasseau, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.rivasseau@th.u-psud.fr, E-mail: adrian.tanasa@ens-lyon.org [LPT, CNRS UMR 8627, Univ. Paris 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex, France and Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St. N, Ontario N2L 2Y5, Waterloo (Canada)] [LPT, CNRS UMR 8627, Univ. Paris 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex, France and Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St. N, Ontario N2L 2Y5, Waterloo (Canada); Tanasa, Adrian, E-mail: vincent.rivasseau@th.u-psud.fr, E-mail: adrian.tanasa@ens-lyon.org [Universit Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cit, 99, Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clment LIPN, Institut Galile, CNRS UMR 7030, F-93430 Villetaneuse, France and Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O.B. MG-6, 077125 Magurele (Romania)] [Universit Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cit, 99, Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clment LIPN, Institut Galile, CNRS UMR 7030, F-93430 Villetaneuse, France and Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O.B. MG-6, 077125 Magurele (Romania)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Loop Vertex Expansion (LVE) is a quantum field theory (QFT) method which explicitly computes the Borel sum of Feynman perturbation series. This LVE relies in a crucial way on symmetric tree weights which define a measure on the set of spanning trees of any connected graph. In this paper we generalize this method by defining new tree weights. They depend on the choice of a partition of a set of vertices of the graph, and when the partition is non-trivial, they are no longer symmetric under permutation of vertices. Nevertheless we prove they have the required positivity property to lead to a convergent LVE; in fact we formulate this positivity property precisely for the first time. Our generalized tree weights are inspired by the Brydges-Battle-Federbush work on cluster expansions and could be particularly suited to the computation of connected functions in QFT. Several concrete examples are explicitly given.

  16. Tree Fertilization Soil Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , increase root density, maintain tree health #12;#12;pH ­ effects nutrient availability · Symptoms of high pHTree Fertilization #12;Soil Analysis vs. Foliar Analysis #12;Macronutrients N P K Mg S Ca

  17. Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application documentation consists of both Part A and a Part B permit application documentation. An explanation of the Part A revisions associated with this treatment and storage unit, including the current revision, is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. Once the initial Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit is issued, the following process will be used. As final, certified treatment, storage, and/or disposal unit-specific documents are developed, and completeness notifications are made by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington State Department of Ecology, additional unit-specific permit conditions will be incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit through the permit modification process. All treatment, storage, and/or disposal units that are included in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application will operate under interim status until final status conditions for these units are incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit. The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility contains information current as of May 1, 1993.

  18. Extracting Species Trees From Complex Gene Trees: Reconciled Trees And Vertebrate Phylogeny

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, Roderic

    , trypsinogen, tyrosinase, vassopressin, and Wnt-7). The resulting species tree shows much similarity

  19. Continuous sulfur removal process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jalan, V.; Ryu, J.

    1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuous process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a gas stream using a membrane comprising a metal oxide deposited on a porous support is disclosed. 4 figures.

  20. Reactor for removing ammonia

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luo, Weifang (Livermore, CA); Stewart, Kenneth D. (Valley Springs, CA)

    2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a device for removing trace amounts of ammonia from a stream of gas, particularly hydrogen gas, prepared by a reformation apparatus. The apparatus is used to prevent PEM "poisoning" in a fuel cell receiving the incoming hydrogen stream.

  1. MORINGACEAE Martinov Drumstick Tree Family

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Mark

    167 MORINGACEAE Martinov · Drumstick Tree Family Mark E. Olson Trees or shrubs; glabrous and southwestern Ethiopia. 1. Moringa oleifera Lamarck in J. Lamarck et al., Encycl. 1: 398. 1785 · Drumstick

  2. Arsenic removal from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert C. (Edgewood, NM); Anderson, D. Richard (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  3. Forecast Technical Document Tree Species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forecast Technical Document Tree Species A document listing the tree species included in the 2011 Production Forecast Tom Jenkins Justin Gilbert Ewan Mackie Robert Matthews #12;PF2011 ­ List of tree species The following is the list of species used within the Forecast System. Species are ordered alphabetically

  4. Derivation Tree Based Genetic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Derivation Tree Based Genetic Programming Summary of the Ph.D. Thesis by R´obert V´anyi supervisor presented in the Ph.D. thesis enti- tled Derivation Tree Based Genetic Programming. The thesis describes of the generated candidates. [6] 1.2 Proposed method The method presented in the thesis uses derivation trees

  5. Removable feedwater sparger assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Challberg, Roy C. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A removable feedwater sparger assembly includes a sparger having an inlet pipe disposed in flow communication with the outlet end of a supply pipe. A tubular coupling includes an annular band fixedly joined to the sparger inlet pipe and a plurality of fingers extending from the band which are removably joined to a retention flange extending from the supply pipe for maintaining the sparger inlet pipe in flow communication with the supply pipe. The fingers are elastically deflectable for allowing engagement of the sparger inlet pipe with the supply pipe and for disengagement therewith.

  6. Drum lid removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pella, Bernard M. (Martinez, GA); Smith, Philip D. (North Augusta, SC)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A tool for removing the lid of a metal drum wherein the lid is clamped over the drum rim without protruding edges, the tool having an elongated handle with a blade carried by an angularly positioned holder affixed to the midsection of the handle, the blade being of selected width to slice between lid lip and the drum rim and, when the blade is so positioned, upward motion of the blade handle will cause the blade to pry the lip from the rim and allow the lid to be removed.

  7. Removable feedwater sparger assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Challberg, R.C.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A removable feedwater sparger assembly includes a sparger having an inlet pipe disposed in flow communication with the outlet end of a supply pipe. A tubular coupling includes an annular band fixedly joined to the sparger inlet pipe and a plurality of fingers extending from the band which are removably joined to a retention flange extending from the supply pipe for maintaining the sparger inlet pipe in flow communication with the supply pipe. The fingers are elastically deflectable for allowing engagement of the sparger inlet pipe with the supply pipe and for disengagement therewith. 8 figs.

  8. Red-black Tree Jingjing Xia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yangjun

    Advanced Algorithm Design Red-black Tree Jingjing Xia #12;Red-Black Tree A red-black tree is a binary search tree, and each node contains one extra field: its color, it can be either black or red of the binary search tree. If a binary search tree satisfies all the following red-black properties, it is a red

  9. Chapter 7 -Welding The dangers in welding, cutting, heating and grinding should never be underestimated.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    36 Chapter 7 - Welding The dangers in welding, cutting, heating and grinding should never and to understand the hazards involved. Spot the hazard Hazards associated with welding include: · The arc itself eyes can become extremely red and sore and in extreme cases suffer permanent damage. · Welding gases

  10. Dangerous Anthropogenic Interference* A Discussion of Humanity's Faustian Climate Bargain and the Payments Coming Due

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    conclusion is that we, in the United States, are on a dangerous course in our climate and energy policies. I in the United States is to wait another decade before re-examining the climate change matter. Delay of another with nature and the balance is shifting. Ominously, the data show that human effects have been minimized

  11. Entropy-based Power Attack Houssem Maghrebi, Sylvain Guilley, Jean-Luc Danger, Florent Flament

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entropy-based Power Attack Houssem Maghrebi, Sylvain Guilley, Jean-Luc Danger, Florent Flament D-Order Differential Power Analysis (HO-DPA). For instance, an attack based on a variance analysis clearly shows attacks, called the Entropy-based Power Analysis (EPA). This new attack gives a greatest importance

  12. Entropy-based Power Attack Houssem Maghrebi, Sylvain Guilley, Jean-Luc Danger, Florent Flament

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Entropy-based Power Attack Houssem Maghrebi, Sylvain Guilley, Jean-Luc Danger, Florent Flament D to Higher-Order Differential Power Analysis (HO-DPA). For instance, an attack based on a variance anal- ysis to information- theoretic HO attacks, called the Entropy-based Power Analysis (EPA). This new attack gives

  13. The Most Dangerous Code in the World: Validating SSL Certificates in Non-Browser Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shmatikov, Vitaly

    The Most Dangerous Code in the World: Validating SSL Certificates in Non-Browser Software Martin The University of Texas at Austin ABSTRACT SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) is the de facto standard for secure In- ternet communications. Security of SSL connections against an active network attacker depends

  14. South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Sexting, Facebook can put students in danger, FAU expert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com Sexting, Facebook can put students in danger, FAU expert warns not realize how easy it is for a Facebook friend to spread embarrasing content from a private profile. Add pictures on their profiles. Misrepresentations At least 75 Facebook friends thought Boca Raton resident

  15. What should we do about the dangers posed by global warming? Judging by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    What should we do about the dangers posed by global warming? Judging by the collective actions rainandozonedepletioninanattempt toconfusethepublicaboutthescience of global warming and delay regula- tion of greenhouse of Engineering,itdiffersfromtheothers in its attitude towards those who deny the reality of global warming, or hu

  16. CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Merrick

    CHARACTERIZING DANGEROUS WAVES FOR OCEAN WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER SURVIVABILITY Justin Hovland ABSTRACT Ocean Wave Energy Converters (OWECs) operating on the water surface are subject to storms gradient technologies. This paper is focused on Ocean Wave Energy Converters (OWECs) and the need

  17. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neuhaus, J.E.

    1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

  18. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neuhaus, John E. (Newport News, VA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

  19. KKG Group Paraffin Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulte, Ralph

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed a test of a paraffin removal system developed by the KKG Group utilizing the technology of two Russian scientists, Gennady Katzyn and Boris Koggi. The system consisting of chemical ''sticks'' that generate heat in-situ to melt the paraffin deposits in oilfield tubing. The melted paraffin is then brought to the surface utilizing the naturally flowing energy of the well.

  20. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, general information portion. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnichsen, J.C.

    1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    For purposes of the Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, the US Department of Energy`s contractors are identified as ``co-operators`` and sign in that capacity (refer to Condition I.A.2. of the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Hanford Facility Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit). Any identification of these contractors as an ``operator`` elsewhere in the application is not meant to conflict with the contractors` designation as co-operators but rather is based on the contractors` contractual status with the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office. The Dangerous Waste Portion of the initial Hanford Facility Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit, which incorporated five treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, was based on information submitted in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application and in closure plan and closure/postclosure plan documentation. During 1995, the Dangerous Waste Portion was modified twice to incorporate another eight treatment, storage, and/or disposal units; during 1996, the Dangerous Waste Portion was modified once to incorporate another five treatment, storage, and/or disposal units. The permit modification process will be used at least annually to incorporate additional treatment, storage, and/or disposal units as permitting documentation for these units is finalized. The units to be included in annual modifications are specified in a schedule contained in the Dangerous Waste Portion of the Hanford Facility Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Permit. Treatment, storage, and/or disposal units will remain in interim status until incorporated into the Permit. The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (this document, DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to individual operating treatment, storage, and/or disposal units for which Part B permit application documentation has been, or is anticipated to be, submitted. Documentation for treatment, storage, and/or disposal units undergoing closure, or for units that are, or are anticipated to be, dispositioned through other options, will continue to be submitted by the Permittees in accordance with the provisions of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. However, the scope of the General Information Portion includes information that could be used to discuss operating units, units undergoing closure, or units being dispositioned through other options. Both the General Information and Unit-Specific portions of the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application address the contents of the Part B permit application guidance documentation prepared by the Washington State Department of Ecology and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, with additional information needs defined by revisions of Washington Administrative Code 173-303 and by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments. Documentation contained in the General Information Portion is broader in nature and could be used by multiple treatment, storage, and/or disposal units (i.e., either operating units, units undergoing closure, or units being dispositioned through other options).

  1. ARM - Tree Rings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM ForcingTeachersTopic List Outreach Home Room NewsPastTree Rings

  2. Building Random Trees from Blocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 18, 2012 ... We have a finite collection of unlabeled, rooted, nonplanar building ... We use these as building blocks of an unlabeled, rooted, nonplanar tree.

  3. Optimal Tree Approximation with Wavelets Richard Baraniuk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    simply represented: the energy from a singularity localizes along one branch of the tree (see Figure 1Optimal Tree Approximation with Wavelets Richard Baraniuk Department of Electrical and Computer on trees and point out that an optimal tree approximant exists and is easily computed. The optimal tree

  4. Note: PMS 2725C Christmas Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be "upcycled" in your landscape as mulch or protection for sensitive plants, Michigan Christmas Trees Cut Christmas trees offer consumers a great opportunity to buy local because Michigan ranks as the third leading. Picking the perfect tree Whether you choose a precut tree at a local tree lot or bundle up the family

  5. Global Tree Optimization: A Nongreedy Decision Tree Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Carlos

    ­ tional experience is reported. 1 Introduction Global Tree Optimization (GTO) is a new approach between this work and prior decision tree algorithms (e.g. CART [5] and ID3 [10]) is that GTO is non. This process is started at the root and repeated recursively until all or almost all of the points

  6. 44 TREE CARE INDUSTRY -MARCH 2002 Tree&Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    for the care and maintenance of a landscape. Lack of moisture is one of the most severe problems that affects44 TREE CARE INDUSTRY - MARCH 2002 Tree&Landscape 44 II nstallation of underground irrigation- ditionally, consultation services may be offered to irrigation and landscape construction contractors related

  7. Red-Black Trees 1 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia Red-Black Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alechina, Natasha

    Red-Black Trees 1© 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia Red-Black Trees 6 3 8 4 v z #12;Red-Black Trees 2© 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia From (2,4) to Red-Black Trees A red-black tree is a representation of a (2,4) tree by means of a binary tree whose nodes are colored red or black In comparison with its associated (2,4) tree

  8. The effect of alternative tree representations on tree bank Mark Johnson*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson (1998) The effect of alternative tree representations on tree bank grammars. In D.M.W. Powers (ed

  9. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, low-level burial grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelmann, R.H.

    1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Plaste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, `operating` treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the Low-Level Burial Grounds (this document, DOE/RL-88-20).

  10. Geometry of Power Flows in Tree Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavaei, Javad; Zhang, Baosen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the problem of power flow and its relationship to optimization in tree networks by looking at the injection regions of the networks. The injection region is the set of all vectors of bus power injections that satisfy the network and operation constraints. The geometrical object of interest is the set of Pareto-optimal points of the injection region, since they are the solutions to the minimization of increasing functions. If the voltage magnitudes are fixed, the injection region of a tree network can be written as a linear transformation of the product of two-bus injection regions, one for each line in the network. Using this decomposition, we show that under the practical condition that the angle difference across each line is not too large, the set of Pareto-optimal points of the injection region remains unchanged by taking the convex hull. Therefore, the optimal power flow problem can be convexified and efficiently solved. This result improves upon earlier works by removing the assumptions o...

  11. Dangerous Waste Characteristics of Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed Wastes from the Hanford Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tingey, Joel M.; Bryan, Garry H.; Deschane, Jaquetta R.

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes existing analytical data from samples taken from the Hanford tanks designated as potentially containing transuranic mixed process wastes. Process knowledge of the wastes transferred to these tanks has been reviewed to determine whether the dangerous waste characteristics now assigned to all Hanford underground storage tanks are applicable to these particular wastes. Supplemental technologies are being examined to accelerate the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission and accomplish waste treatment safely and efficiently. To date, 11 Hanford waste tanks have been designated as potentially containing contact-handled (CH) transuranic mixed (TRUM) wastes. The CH-TRUM wastes are found in single-shell tanks B-201 through B-204, T-201 through T-204, T-104, T-110, and T-111. Methods and equipment to solidify and package the CH-TRUM wastes are part of the supplemental technologies being evaluated. The resulting packages and wastes must be acceptable for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The dangerous waste characteristics being considered include ignitability, corrosivity, reactivity, and toxicity arising from the presence of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol at levels above the dangerous waste threshold. The analytical data reviewed include concentrations of sulfur, sulfate, cyanide, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, total organic carbon, and oxalate; the composition of the tank headspace, pH, and mercury. Differential scanning calorimetry results were used to determine the energetics of the wastes as a function of temperature.

  12. Beta Diffusion Trees Creighton Heaukulani

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Beta Diffusion Trees Creighton Heaukulani CKH28@CAM.AC.UK David A. Knowles DAVIDKNOWLES Stanford University, Department of Computer Science, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract We define the beta structures over clusters of the particles. With the beta diffu- sion tree, however, multiple copies

  13. Genetic conservation of native trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genetic conservation of native trees Scott McG. Wilson1 and C. J. A. Samuel Over recent years, the genetic conservation of British native tree populations has become an increasingly important part policy-makers in the genetic basis of forest biodiversity conservation, both at the UK and, more

  14. On Cartesian trees and range minimum queries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demaine, Erik D.

    We present new results on Cartesian trees with applications in range minimum queries and bottleneck edge queries. We introduce a cache-oblivious Cartesian tree for solving the range minimum query problem, a Cartesian tree ...

  15. Geothermal hydrogen sulfide removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urban, P.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UOP Sulfox technology successfully removed 500 ppM hydrogen sulfide from simulated mixed phase geothermal waters. The Sulfox process involves air oxidation of hydrogen sulfide using a fixed catalyst bed. The catalyst activity remained stable throughout the life of the program. The product stream composition was selected by controlling pH; low pH favored elemental sulfur, while high pH favored water soluble sulfate and thiosulfate. Operation with liquid water present assured full catalytic activity. Dissolved salts reduced catalyst activity somewhat. Application of Sulfox technology to geothermal waters resulted in a straightforward process. There were no requirements for auxiliary processes such as a chemical plant. Application of the process to various types of geothermal waters is discussed and plans for a field test pilot plant and a schedule for commercialization are outlined.

  16. Inner Sphere Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rene Weller; Gabriel Zachmann

    We present a novel geometric data structure for collision detection at haptic rates between arbitrary rigid objects. Our data structure, which we call inner sphere trees, efficiently supports both proximity queries and the penetration volume. The latter is related to the water displacement of the overlapping region and, thus, corresponds to a physically motivated force. Moreover, we present a time-critical version of the penetration volume computation that is able to achieve very good estimates of the penetration volume within a fixed budget of query time. In order to build our new hierarchy, we propose to use an AI clustering algorithm, which we extend and adapt here. The results show extremely good performance of our algorithms both for proximity and penetration volume queries for models consisting

  17. Universit d'Angers L3 P " rie d9exeries nIF sxiqesyxF 2008-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menichi, Luc

    Université d'Angers L3 P " érie d9exeries n¦IF sxiqesyxF 2008-2009 ixerie IF i) Soient X et Y deux

  18. Removing Arsenic from Drinking Water

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    See how INL scientists are using nanotechnology to remove arsenic from drinking water. For more INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  19. Apple Trees for Every Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Orin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Grower Press. Organic Apple Production Manual. Publication #of dwarf and semi-dwarf apple varieties can be seen in theGardener Apple Trees for Every Garden Orin Martin manages

  20. Dangerous Waste Characteristics of Waste from Hanford Tank 241-S-109

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tingey, Joel M.; Bryan, Garry H.; Deschane, Jaquetta R.

    2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing analytical data from samples taken from Hanford Tank 241-S-109, along with process knowledge of the wastes transferred to this tank, are reviewed to determine whether dangerous waste characteristics currently assigned to all waste in Hanford underground storage tanks are applicable to this tank waste. Supplemental technologies are examined to accelerate the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission and to accomplish the waste treatment in a safer and more efficient manner. The goals of supplemental technologies are to reduce costs, conserve double-shell tank space, and meet the scheduled tank waste processing completion date of 2028.

  1. Climate change deduced from isotopes in tree rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendall, E.G.; Leavitt, S.W.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the theory of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen isotopic signatures in cellulose for the purpose of paleoclimatic reconstruction. Mechanisms governing tree ring cellulose isotopic variability are investigated, and applications to the southwestern United States are delineated. A monitoring program of pinyon trees and comparison to climatic parameters is briefly described. Variables measured included deviations in hydrogen and oxygen-18 isotopic composition in precipitation, soil water, stem and leaf water, and atmospheric vapor. Water from phloem tissue was found to be isotopically identical to the xylem sap, suggesting that cellulose precursors can exchange isotopically with source water before cellulose is made in the trunk, thus removing most of the isotopic signal from the leaves. Overall results suggest that, on arid sites in the southwestern US receiving adequate summer rain, a precipitation seasonality signal may be recorded. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  2. TreeRefiner: A Tool for Refining a Multiple Alignment on a Phylogenetic Tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batzoglou, Serafim

    TreeRefiner: A Tool for Refining a Multiple Alignment on a Phylogenetic Tree Aswath Manohar@cs.stanford.edu, serafim@cs.stanford.edu Abstract We present TreeRefiner, a tool for refining multiple alignments of biological sequences. Given a multiple alignment, a phylogenetic tree, and scoring parameters as input, TreeRefiner

  3. Page 2 of 4 TREE Cookies Etc. Trees & Air-continued

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    #12;Page 2 of 4 TREE Cookies Etc. Trees & Air- continued pollutants include ozone, sulfur dioxide of trees on air pollution. The research on trees and air pollution is rather new and still ongoing, nitrogen dioxide, and carbon monoxide. These are taken out of the air by trees primarily through leaf

  4. Generic physical protection logic trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulus, W.K.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generic physical protection logic trees, designed for application to nuclear facilities and materials, are presented together with a method of qualitative evaluation of the trees for design and analysis of physical protection systems. One or more defense zones are defined where adversaries interact with the physical protection system. Logic trees that are needed to describe the possible scenarios within a defense zone are selected. Elements of a postulated or existing physical protection system are tagged to the primary events of the logic tree. The likelihood of adversary success in overcoming these elements is evaluated on a binary, yes/no basis. The effect of these evaluations is propagated through the logic of each tree to determine whether the adversary is likely to accomplish the end event of the tree. The physical protection system must be highly likely to overcome the adversary before he accomplishes his objective. The evaluation must be conducted for all significant states of the site. Deficiencies uncovered become inputs to redesign and further analysis, closing the loop on the design/analysis cycle.

  5. Foreground Removal using FastICA: A Showcase of LOFAR-EoR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Emma; Harker, Geraint; Jeli?, Vibor; Labropoulos, Panagiotis; Zaroubi, Saleem; Brentjens, Michiel A; de Bruyn, A G; Koopmans, L V E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a new implementation of the FastICA algorithm on simulated LOFAR EoR data with the aim of accurately removing the foregrounds and extracting the 21-cm reionization signal. We find that the method successfully removes the foregrounds with an average fitting error of 0.5 per cent and that the 2D and 3D power spectra are recovered across the frequency range. We find that for scales above several PSF scales the 21-cm variance is successfully recovered though there is evidence of noise leakage into the reconstructed foreground components. We find that this blind independent component analysis technique provides encouraging results without the danger of prior foreground assumptions.

  6. Red-black Trees To know what a red-black tree is (10.1).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Y. Daniel

    809 CHAPTER 10 Red-black Trees Objectives · To know what a red-black tree is (§10.1). · To convert a red-black tree to a 2-4 tree and vice versa (§10.2). · To design the RBTree class that extends the BinaryTree class (§10.3). · To insert an element in a red-black tree and resolve the double red problem

  7. Optimal Decision Trees Kristin P. Bennett \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Carlos

    of all the decisions in the tree concurrently. Using Global Tree Optimization (GTO), we can optimize. Decisions are constructed recursively for each of the regions. This process is repeated until the points

  8. CX-007166: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pinnacle Peak-Prescott Danger Tree RemovalCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 03/18/2010Location(s): Maricopa County, ArizonaOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  9. High removal rate laser-based coating removal system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Mrowka, Stanley (Richmond, CA)

    1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact laser system that removes surface coatings (such as paint, dirt, etc.) at a removal rate as high as 1000 ft.sup.2 /hr or more without damaging the surface. A high repetition rate laser with multiple amplification passes propagating through at least one optical amplifier is used, along with a delivery system consisting of a telescoping and articulating tube which also contains an evacuation system for simultaneously sweeping up the debris produced in the process. The amplified beam can be converted to an output beam by passively switching the polarization of at least one amplified beam. The system also has a personal safety system which protects against accidental exposures.

  10. Selecting Landscape Plants: Shade Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Selecting Landscape Plants: Shade Trees Diane Relf, Extension Specialist, Horticulture, Virginia for any landscape plan. They set the stage for the entire home grounds design. The type used. Many will live and enhance the landscape for 100 or more years if they are given a chance. Because

  11. Cultural Values of Trees, Woods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    research into the importance of the cultural values of trees, woods and forests for sustainable forest managers have to take account of cultural values as one of the central themes of Sustainable Forest and taking them into account as part of the processes of planning and decisionmaking. Cultural values

  12. Heavy Water Test Reactor Dome Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high speed look at the removal of the Heavy Water Test Reactor Dome Removal. A project sponsored by the Recovery Act on the Savannah River Site.

  13. Large Component Removal/Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, D. M.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

  14. THE UBIQUITOUS DIGITAL TREE PHILIPPE FLAJOLET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flajolet, Philippe

    - bility theory--the digital tree process. Because of space-time limitations, this text, an invited lectureTHE UBIQUITOUS DIGITAL TREE PHILIPPE FLAJOLET Abstract. The digital tree also known as trie made is a recursive partitioning based on successive bits or digits of data items. Under various guises, it has

  15. Supervised Harvesting of Expression Trees Trevor Hastie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hastie, Trevor

    Supervised Harvesting of Expression Trees Trevor Hastie #3; , Robert Tibshirani y , David Botstein learning from gene ex- pression data. We call it \\Tree Harvesting". This technique starts between genes. Conclusions Tree Harvesting is a potentially useful tool for exploration of gene expression

  16. Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are applied to young trees at improper rates. Above normal rainfall, soil pH, and the amount of soil organicFNR-217-W Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center North Central Research Station USDA and Management Injury in Hardwood Tree Plantations John Seifert, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

  17. Malcolm Guite The Magic Apple Tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, Stephen

    Malcolm Guite The Magic Apple Tree Someday make a journey through the rain Through sodden streets in darkening December A journey to the magic apple tree. And journey also, darkling, through your past Journey records. You glimpsed it once within the garden wall, The image of an ancient apple tree, The fall

  18. Multiple criteria minimum spanning trees Pedro Cardoso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    Multiple criteria minimum spanning trees Pedro Cardoso M´ario Jesus ´Alberto M´arquez Abstract The NP multiple criteria minimum spanning tree as several applications into the network design problems criteria minimum spanning trees. There are several geometric network design and application problems

  19. Universit d'Angers, Angers, France Anne 2012 Universit Chouaib Doukkali El Jadida, Maroc N d'ordre : 1236

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Université d'Angers, Angers, France Année 2012 Université Chouaib Doukkali El Jadida, Maroc N° d, Université Chouaib Doukkali, El Jadida, Maroc Jean Ebothé, Rapporteur, Professeur, Université de Reims Addou, Rapporteur, Professeur, Université Ibn Tofail, Kénitra, Maroc Jaroslaw Mysliwiec, Examinateur

  20. Boiling Water at Hot Creek--The Dangerous and Dynamic Thermal Springs in California's Long Valley Caldera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    ). Conditions in Hot Creek can change very quickly. These fish--caught in a burst of high-temperature water" or intermittently spurting very hot, sediment-laden water as high as 6 feet (2 m) above the stream surface. At timesBoiling Water at Hot Creek--The Dangerous and Dynamic Thermal Springs in California's Long Valley

  1. Contraindications and Potential Dangers of the Use of Vibration as a Treatment for Osteoporosis and other Musculoskeletal Diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contraindications and Potential Dangers of the Use of Vibration as a Treatment for Osteoporosis and perhaps curb osteoporosis. Just because some vibration may be beneficial, however, does not mean that a lot is better. Before considering vibration as an avenue of intervention for osteoporosis

  2. Actinide removal from spent salts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Peter C. (Pleasanton, CA); von Holtz, Erica H. (Livermore, CA); Hipple, David L. (Livermore, CA); Summers, Leslie J. (Livermore, CA); Adamson, Martyn G. (Danville, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for removing actinide contaminants (uranium and thorium) from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents are added to precipitate the thorium as thorium oxide and/or the uranium as either uranium oxide or as a diuranate salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as radioactive waste. About 90% of the thorium and/or uranium present is removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 0.1 ppm of thorium or uranium.

  3. The Climate + Energy Project is excited to announce an exclusive screening of the docu-series about climate change, YEARS OF LIVING DANGEROUSLY.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -series about climate change, YEARS OF LIVING DANGEROUSLY. The 9-part series premiered on April 13, 2014. CEP on Climate Change (IPCC) Reports. Tuesday, November 11th , Lawrence Years of Living Dangerously events: FilmThe Climate + Energy Project is excited to announce an exclusive screening of the SHOWTIME® docu

  4. Red-Black Trees 11/26/2007 11:09 AM Red-Black Trees 1 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alechina, Natasha

    Red-Black Trees 11/26/2007 11:09 AM 1 Red-Black Trees 1© 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia Red-Black Trees 6 3 8 4 v z Red-Black Trees 2© 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia From (2,4) to Red-Black Trees A red-black tree is a representation of a (2,4) tree by means of a binary tree whose nodes are colored red or black In comparison

  5. Red-Black Trees 11/11/2004 10:02 AM Red-Black Trees 1 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alechina, Natasha

    Red-Black Trees 11/11/2004 10:02 AM 1 Red-Black Trees 1© 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia Red-Black Trees 6 3 8 4 v z Red-Black Trees 2© 2004 Goodrich, Tamassia From (2,4) to Red-Black Trees A red-black tree is a representation of a (2,4) tree by means of a binary tree whose nodes are colored red or black In comparison

  6. Forecast Technical Document Felling and Removals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forecast Technical Document Felling and Removals Forecasts A document describing how volume fellings and removals are handled in the 2011 Production Forecast system. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Felling and removals forecasts Background A fellings and removals

  7. Data Quality Objectives for Regulatory Requirements for Dangerous Waste Sampling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MULKEY, C.H.

    1999-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes sampling and analytical requirements needed to meet state and federal regulations for dangerous waste (DW). The River Protection Project (RPP) is assigned to the task of storage and interim treatment of hazardous waste. Any final treatment or disposal operations, as well as requirements under the land disposal restrictions (LDRs), fall in the jurisdiction of another Hanford organization and are not part of this scope. The requirements for this Data Quality Objective (DQO) Process were developed using the RPP Data Quality Objective Procedure (Banning 1996), which is based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Guidance for the Data Quality Objectives Process (EPA 1994). Hereafter, this document is referred to as the DW DQO. Federal and state laws and regulations pertaining to waste contain requirements that are dependent upon the composition of the waste stream. These regulatory drivers require that pertinent information be obtained. For many requirements, documented process knowledge of a waste composition can be used instead of analytical data to characterize or designate a waste. When process knowledge alone is used to characterize a waste, it is a best management practice to validate the information with analytical measurements.

  8. An Investigation of the Perceptions of Latino High School Males Who Were in Danger of Dropping Out but Persevered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nell, Jan Elizabeth

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Chambers Fred Bonner Anita McCormick Head of Department, Fredrick Nafukho December 2010 Major Subject: Educational Administration iii ABSTRACT An Investigation of the Perceptions of Latino High School Males Who Were in Danger of Dropping.... Fred Bonner, Dr. Tara Venzant Chambers, and Dr. Anita McCormick, was insightful and invaluable. I never felt discouraged or criticized when they offered constructive comments to improve the study. For that, I am truly grateful. Dr. Jim Scheurich, my...

  9. Application and Removal of Strippable Coatings via Remote Platform - 13133

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shoffner, P.; Lagos, L. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)] [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Maggio, S. [International Climbing Machine, 630 Elmira Road, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)] [International Climbing Machine, 630 Elmira Road, Ithaca, NY 14850 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Florida International University's (FIU's) Applied Research Center is currently supporting the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management Office of D and D and Facility Engineering program. FIU is supporting DOE's initiative to improve safety, reduce technical risks, and limit uncertainty within D and D operations by identifying technologies suitable to meet specific facility D and D requirements, assessing the readiness of those technologies for field deployment, and conducting feasibility studies and technology demonstrations of selected technologies and working with technology vendors to optimize the design of their current technologies to accomplish dangerous and demanding tasks during D and D operations. To meet one identified technology gap challenge for a technology to remotely apply strippable coatings, fixatives and decontamination gels, FIU identified and performed an initial demonstration of an innovative remote fixative sprayer platform from International Climbing Machines (ICM). The selected technology was demonstrated spraying fixative products at the hot cell mockup facility at the Applied Research Center at FIU in November 2008 under cold (non-radioactive) conditions. The remotely controlled platform was remotely operated and entered the facility and sprayed a fixative onto horizontal and vertical surfaces. Based on the initial FIU demonstration and the specific technical requirements identified at the DOE facilities, a follow-up demonstration was expanded to include strippable coatings and a decontamination gel, which was demonstrated in June 2010 at the ICM facility in Ithaca, NY. This second technology evaluation documented the ability of the remote system to spray the selected products on vertical stainless steel and concrete surfaces to a height of 3 meters (10 feet) and to achieve sufficient coverage and product thickness to promote the ability to peel/remove the strippable coatings and decontamination gel. The next challenge was to determine if a remote platform could be used to remove the strippable coatings and decontamination gels. In 2012, FIU worked with the technology provider, ICM, to conduct feasibility and trade studies to identify the requirements for the remote removal of strippable coatings or decontamination gels using the existing remote controlled platform. (authors)

  10. Internship at Trees, Inc., Houston, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swearington, Mary Caroll

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    winds rip through buildings and knock over trees, hurling heavy objects that easily break electric lines. Rain-soaked, mushy ground may fail to support trees or electric poles, which may fall, stretching and snapping electric wires. Therefore, Trees..., Inc. has several brands, are typified by the diesel- powered chipper with four or five very heavy knives screw'ed into a ponderous drum that has tremendous kinetic energy while rotating. The knives are set with their length parallel to the axis...

  11. Method of altering lignin in trees

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacKay, J.; O`Malley, D.; Whetten, R.; Sederoff, R.

    1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of providing and breeding trees having more easily extractable lignin due to the presence of a cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (Cad) null gene are presented. 16 figs.

  12. Method of altering lignin in trees

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacKay, John (Raleigh, NC); O'Malley, David (Cary, NC); Whetten, Ross (Raleigh, NC); Sederoff, Ronald (Raleigh, NC)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of providing and breeding trees having more easily extractable lignin due to the presence of a cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (Cad) null gene are presented.

  13. Optimization Online - Dynamic Generation of Scenario Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Ch. Pflug

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 3, 2014 ... Abstract: We present new algorithms for the dynamic generation of scenario trees for multistage stochastic optimization. The different methods...

  14. Mexico HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home content Four-Year Plan Mexico HEU Removal Mexico HEU Removal Location Mexico United States 24 24' 35.298" N, 102...

  15. Arsenic removal and stabilization by synthesized pyrite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Jin Kun

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry method for measuring arsenic species (As(III), As(V)). The synthesized pyrite was applied to remove arsenic and its maximum capacity for arsenic removal was measured in batch adsorption experiments to be 3...

  16. Libya HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Plan Libya HEU Removal Libya HEU Removal Location Libya United States 27 34' 9.5448" N, 17 24' 8.4384" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

  17. Canada HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Plan Canada HEU Removal Canada HEU Removal Location Canada United States 53 47' 24.972" N, 104 35' 23.4384" W See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

  18. Israel HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Plan Israel HEU Removal Israel HEU Removal Location Israel United States 30 53' 18.2328" N, 34 52' 14.178" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

  19. Turkey HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Plan Turkey HEU Removal Turkey HEU Removal Location Turkey United States 38 26' 50.2044" N, 40 15' 14.0616" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

  20. Uzbekistan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Uzbekistan HEU Removal Uzbekistan HEU Removal Location Uzbekistan United States 42 6' 56.196" N, 63 22' 8.9076" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

  1. France HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Four-Year Plan France HEU Removal France HEU Removal Location United States 45 44' 20.0544" N, 2 17' 6.5616" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

  2. Kazakhstan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    HEU Removal Kazakhstan HEU Removal Location Kazakhstan United States 48 59' 44.1492" N, 67 3' 37.9692" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

  3. Ukraine HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Plan Ukraine HEU Removal Ukraine HEU Removal Location Ukraine United States 50 12' 24.8688" N, 25 50' 23.4384" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

  4. Chile HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Four-Year Plan Chile HEU Removal Chile HEU Removal Location United States 25 28' 1.4916" S, 69 33' 55.548" W See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

  5. Taiwan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Plan Taiwan HEU Removal Taiwan HEU Removal Location Taiwan United States 24 35' 37.4964" N, 120 53' 36.798" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

  6. Romania HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Plan Romania HEU Removal Romania HEU Removal Location Romania United States 45 47' 1.932" N, 24 41' 50.1576" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

  7. Hungary HEU removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Plan Hungary HEU removal Hungary HEU removal Location Hungary United States 47 11' 51.6336" N, 19 41' 15" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

  8. Serbia HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Plan Serbia HEU Removal Serbia HEU Removal Location Serbia United States 44 22' 45.7068" N, 20 26' 4.452" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

  9. Japan HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Plan Japan HEU Removal Japan HEU Removal Location Japan United States 37 36' 59.5872" N, 140 5' 51.5616" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

  10. Poland HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Plan Poland HEU Removal Poland HEU Removal Location Poland United States 53 23' 50.2872" N, 17 50' 30.4692" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

  11. Italy HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Plan Italy HEU Removal Italy HEU Removal Location Italy United States 43 41' 3.4548" N, 11 28' 11.0172" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

  12. Vietnam HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Plan Vietnam HEU Removal Vietnam HEU Removal Location Vietnam United States 13 12' 30.8628" N, 108 19' 30.702" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

  13. A First Look at Tree Decay An Introduction to How Injury and Decay Affect Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A First Look at Tree Decay An Introduction to How Injury and Decay Affect Trees by Kevin T. Smith Look at Tree Decay Photosynthesis and decay are the two most essential processes in nature. Photosynthesis by green plants captures and stores energy from the sun. This energy is used to form wood

  14. Water Distribution and Removal Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Deng; N. Chipman; E.L. Hardin

    2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of the Yucca Mountain high level radioactive waste repository depends on the performance of the engineered barrier system (EBS). To support the total system performance assessment (TSPA), the Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport Process Model Report (EBS PMR) is developed to describe the thermal, mechanical, chemical, hydrological, biological, and radionuclide transport processes within the emplacement drifts, which includes the following major analysis/model reports (AMRs): (1) EBS Water Distribution and Removal (WD&R) Model; (2) EBS Physical and Chemical Environment (P&CE) Model; (3) EBS Radionuclide Transport (EBS RNT) Model; and (4) EBS Multiscale Thermohydrologic (TH) Model. Technical information, including data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documents will be provided to defend the applicability of these models for their intended purpose of evaluating the postclosure performance of the Yucca Mountain repository system. The WD&R model ARM is important to the site recommendation. Water distribution and removal represents one component of the overall EBS. Under some conditions, liquid water will seep into emplacement drifts through fractures in the host rock and move generally downward, potentially contacting waste packages. After waste packages are breached by corrosion, some of this seepage water will contact the waste, dissolve or suspend radionuclides, and ultimately carry radionuclides through the EBS to the near-field host rock. Lateral diversion of liquid water within the drift will occur at the inner drift surface, and more significantly from the operation of engineered structures such as drip shields and the outer surface of waste packages. If most of the seepage flux can be diverted laterally and removed from the drifts before contacting the wastes, the release of radionuclides from the EBS can be controlled, resulting in a proportional reduction in dose release at the accessible environment. The purposes of this WD&R model (CRWMS M&O 2000b) are to quantify and evaluate the distribution and drainage of seepage water within emplacement drifts during the period of compliance for post-closure performance. The model bounds the fraction of water entering the drift that will be prevented from contacting the waste by the combined effects of engineered controls on water distribution and on water removal. For example, water can be removed during pre-closure operation by ventilation and after closure by natural drainage into the fractured rock. Engineered drains could be used, if demonstrated to be necessary and effective, to ensure that adequate drainage capacity is provided. This report provides the screening arguments for certain Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) that are related to water distribution and removal in the EBS. Applicable acceptance criteria from the Issue Resolution Status Reports (IRSRs) developed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC 1999a; 1999b; 1999c; and 1999d) are also addressed in this document.

  15. Removing Stains from Washable Fabrics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beard, Ann Vanderpoorten

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Page Numbers Stain Page Numbers Acne medicine Blueberry Special 9 Wet 8 Adhesive tape Dye 8 Special 9 Butter Alcoholic beverages Dry 8 Wet 8 Oil 8 Tannin 8 Calamine lotion Asphalt Combination 8 Combination 8 Dye 8 Dye 8 Candle wax Automotive... the most gentle to the most harsh, so always stop treatments as soon as the stain has been removed. Dry Type Stains Dissolve the stain with a grease solvent. Lubricate the stain with dry spotter, coconut oil or mineral oil (sold in health food...

  16. Automatic Eyeglasses Removal from Face Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    Automatic Eyeglasses Removal from Face Images Chenyu Wu, Ce Liu, Heung-Yueng Shum, Member, IEEE an intelligent image editing and face synthesis system that automatically removes eyeglasses from an input frontal face image. Although conventional image editing tools can be used to remove eyeglasses by pixel

  17. "The Most Hazardous and Dangerous and Greatest Adventure on Which Man Has Ever Embarked": The Frontier in Presidential Pro-Space Discourse, 1957-1963

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leyerzapf, Amy Beth

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Most Hazardous and Dangerous and Greatest Adventure on Which Man Has Ever Embarked: The Frontier in Presidential Pro-Space Discourse, 1957-1963 By Amy Beth Leyerzapf Submitted to the graduate degree program in Communication Studies....D. ________________________________ Dr. Jerry Bailey, Ed.D. Date Defended: September 1, 2011 ii The Dissertation Committee for Amy Beth Leyerzapf certifies that this is the approved version of the following dissertation: The Most Hazardous and Dangerous...

  18. A Contour Method on Cayley tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. A. Rozikov

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a finite range lattice models on Cayley tree with two basic properties: the existence of only a finite number of ground states and with Peierls type condition. We define notion of a contour for the model on the Cayley tree. By a contour argument we show the existence of $s$ different (where $s$ is the number of ground states) Gibbs measures.

  19. Form drag at Three Tree Point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warner, Sally

    form drag with bottom pressure sensors #12;Oscillatory dynamics tidal energy converted to internal waves, eddies and mixing no tidally averaged work done on system slack tide: background tilt flood & ebb Puget Sound, WA Point Three Tree Pressure sensors (PPODs) at Three Tree Point (TTP) PPODs #12;PPOD

  20. Conservation and Management of Butternut Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conservation and Management of Butternut Trees Lenny Farlee1,3 , Keith Woeste1 , Michael Ostry2 stands even if they do not contract the canker disease. Conservation of native butternut populations may black center and whitish margin #12;2 Conservation and Management of Butternut Trees · FNR-421-W

  1. a buyer's guide Trees for Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a buyer's guide Trees for Conservation #12;ii Many thanks to Dennis Will, Dan Wand, Greg Morgenson; and enhance wildlife habitat. Our trees and shrubs are grown for their conservation benefits only. Ornamental, contact your local soil conservation district, your local Extension county office, your district Colorado

  2. Deforestation: Transforming programs to eliminate trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadler, Philip

    Deforestation: Transforming programs to eliminate trees Philip Wadler University of Glasgow \\Lambda---called the Deforestation Algorithm. A form of function definition that uses no intermediate trees is characterised, called and the Deforestation Algorithm are presented in three steps. The first step presents ``pure'' treeless form in a first

  3. NOTICE OF VACANCY Extension Tree Fruit Program Leader

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    NOTICE OF VACANCY Extension Tree Fruit Program Leader Washington State University Search # 114569 WORKING TITLE: Extension Tree Fruit Program Leader 100% Extension OFFICIAL TITLE: Area Extension Educator State University (WSU) Tree Fruit Research and Extension Center (TFREC), Wenatchee, Washington

  4. Final Report Survey of Hazardous Trees on Marine Corps Depot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    in the mitigation of damages caused by tree failure to people, vehicles and infrastructure. This project and power infrastructure. For this survey, tree attributes, damages to the trees, potential targets

  5. Approximating the Minimum Spanning Tree Weight in Sublinear Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trevisan, Luca

    Approximating the Minimum Spanning Tree Weight in Sublinear Time Bernard Chazelle #3; Ronitt a parameter 0 minimum spanning tree- components algorithm picks O(1=#15; 2 ) vertices in the graph and then grows \\local spanning trees" whose

  6. Lambek Grammars, Tree Adjoining Grammars and Hyperedge Replacement Grammars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Lambek Grammars, Tree Adjoining Grammars and Hyperedge Replacement Grammars Richard Moot La (tree generating) hyperedge replacement grammars as an intermediate step. As a consequence both, using hyperedge replacement grammars as an intermediate step. 2 Tree Adjoining Grammars and Hyperedge

  7. Method of making thermally removable epoxies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Russick, Edward M. (Rio Rancho, NM); McElhanon, James R. (Albuquerque, NM); Saunders, Randall S. (late of Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a thermally-removable epoxy by mixing a bis(maleimide) compound to a monomeric furan compound containing an oxirane group to form a di-epoxy mixture and then adding a curing agent at temperatures from approximately room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a thermally-removable epoxy. The thermally-removable epoxy can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C. in a polar solvent. The epoxy material can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the solid material for component repair, modification or quality control.

  8. Response of beneficial and associated insects of the southern pine beetle to beetle-infested trees and to behavioral chemicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Wayne Neal

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    diameter) manually? infested with newly emerged male and female southern pine beetles. The pine bolts were attached at 5 m on the bole of the tree. The bolts were removed at the first sign of beetle attack (boring dust, pitch tubes and/or bark beetles... at 3 and 4 m traps with a low catch of 32 each at the 11 and 12 m traps. In comparison, I. avulsus was most abundant on the upper half of the tree bole. The male:female ratio of I. avulsus on the lower 8 traps was 1. :0. 39, compared to 1:0. 77...

  9. Shopping For Danger: E-commerce techniques applied to collaboration in cyber security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce, Joseph R.; Fink, Glenn A.

    2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Collaboration among cyber security analysts is essential to a successful protection strategy on the Internet today, but it is uncommonly practiced or encouraged in operating environments. Barriers to productive collaboration often include data sensitivity, time and effort to communicate, institutional policy, and protection of domain knowledge. We propose an ambient collaboration framework, Vulcan, designed to remove the barriers of time and effort and mitigate the others. Vulcan automated data collection, collaborative filtering, and asynchronous dissemination, eliminating the effort implied by explicit collaboration among peers. We instrumented two analytic applications and performed a mock analysis session to build a dataset and test the output of the system.

  10. amazon tree boa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    i Ken Dowser (a former member of the original ;.' Health Physics Division's radioactive waste 299 From Gene to Organismal Phylogeny: Reconciled Trees and the Gene TreeSpecies...

  11. Melter Glass Removal and Dismantlement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, BS

    2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been using vitrification processes to convert high-level radioactive waste forms into a stable glass for disposal in waste repositories. Vitrification facilities at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) are converting liquid high-level waste (HLW) by combining it with a glass-forming media to form a borosilicate glass, which will ensure safe long-term storage. Large, slurry fed melters, which are used for this process, were anticipated to have a finite life (on the order of two to three years) at which time they would have to be replaced using remote methods because of the high radiation fields. In actuality the melters useable life spans have, to date, exceeded original life-span estimates. Initial plans called for the removal of failed melters by placing the melter assembly into a container and storing the assembly in a concrete vault on the vitrification plant site pending size-reduction, segregation, containerization, and shipment to appropriate storage facilities. Separate facilities for the processing of the failed melters currently do not exist. Options for handling these melters include (1) locating a facility to conduct the size-reduction, characterization, and containerization as originally planned; (2) long-term storing or disposing of the complete melter assembly; and (3) attempting to refurbish the melter and to reuse the melter assembly. The focus of this report is to look at methods and issues pertinent to size-reduction and/or melter refurbishment in particular, removing the glass as a part of a refurbishment or to reduce contamination levels (thus allowing for disposal of a greater proportion of the melter as low level waste).

  12. Tree Death Study's Climate Change Connections

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nate

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    What are the exact physiological mechanisms that lead to tree death during prolonged drought and rising temperatures? These are the questions that scientists are trying to answer at a Los Alamos National Laboratory research project called SUMO. SUMO stands for SUrvival/MOrtality study; it's a plot of land on the Lab's southern border that features 18 climate controlled tree study chambers and a large drought structure that limits rain and snowfall. Scientists are taking a wide variety of measurements over a long period of time to determine what happens during drought and warming, and what the connections and feedback loops might be between tree death and climate change.

  13. Texas Wholesale Market for Christmas Trees.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorensen, H. B. (Harold B.); Smith, W. A.

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wholesale Market for 7 :. @EXAS A&M UNIVERSITY . TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION R. E. Patterson, Director, College Station, Texas trees might capture as much as one-half of the more than 2 million Texas evergreen tree market. Wl... metropolitan areas and to Fort Wortl~. The study was performed at the request of the Texas Forest Service to provide information about the feasiblity and direction of Cl~ristmas tree man- agement research. Fi~zdings A market exists in the wholesale trade...

  14. Algorithms for optimal dyadic decision trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hush, Don [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Porter, Reid [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new algorithm for constructing optimal dyadic decision trees was recently introduced, analyzed, and shown to be very effective for low dimensional data sets. This paper enhances and extends this algorithm by: introducing an adaptive grid search for the regularization parameter that guarantees optimal solutions for all relevant trees sizes, revising the core tree-building algorithm so that its run time is substantially smaller for most regularization parameter values on the grid, and incorporating new data structures and data pre-processing steps that provide significant run time enhancement in practice.

  15. Tree Death Study's Climate Change Connections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Nate

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    What are the exact physiological mechanisms that lead to tree death during prolonged drought and rising temperatures? These are the questions that scientists are trying to answer at a Los Alamos National Laboratory research project called SUMO. SUMO stands for SUrvival/MOrtality study; it's a plot of land on the Lab's southern border that features 18 climate controlled tree study chambers and a large drought structure that limits rain and snowfall. Scientists are taking a wide variety of measurements over a long period of time to determine what happens during drought and warming, and what the connections and feedback loops might be between tree death and climate change.

  16. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Paul J. (both Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (both Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

    1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  17. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Paul J. (Los Alamos, NM); Delhaize, Emmanuel (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Nigel J. (Durham, GB2); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Furlong, Clement (Seattle, WA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  18. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training the head was safely removed and stored and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

  19. TMI-2 reactor vessel head removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bengel, P.R.; Smith, M.D.; Estabrook, G.A.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the safe removal and storage of the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) reactor vessel head. The head was removed in July 1984 to permit the removal of the plenum and the reactor core, which were damaged during the 1979 accident. From July 1982, plans and preparations were made using a standard head removal procedure modified by the necessary precautions and changes to account for conditions caused by the accident. After data acquisition, equipment and structure modifications, and training, the head was safely removed and stored; and the internals indexing fixture and a work platform were installed on top of the vessel. Dose rates during and after the operation were lower than expected; lessons were learned from the operation which will be applied to the continuing fuel removal operations activities.

  20. Process for particulate removal from coal liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rappe, Gerald C. (Macungie, PA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Suspended solid particulates are removed from liquefied coal products by first subjecting such products to hydroclone action for removal in the underflow of the larger size particulates, and then subjecting the overflow from said hydroclone action, comprising the residual finer particulates, to an electrostatic field in an electrofilter wherein such finer particulates are deposited in the bed of beads of dielectric material on said filter. The beads are periodically cleaned by backwashing to remove the accumulated solids.

  1. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  2. Regenerative tree growth: binary self-similar continuum random trees and Poisson-Dirichlet compositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitman, Jim

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a natural ordered extension of the Chinese Restaurant Process to grow a two-parameter family of binary self-similar continuum fragmentation trees. We provide an explicit embedding of Ford's sequence of alpha model trees in the continuum tree which we identified in a previous article as a distributional scaling limit of Ford's trees. In general, the Markov branching trees induced by the two-parameter growth rule are not sampling consistent, so the existence of compact limiting trees cannot be deduced from previous work on the sampling consistent case. We develop here a new approach to establish such limits, based on regenerative interval partitions and the urn-model description of sampling from Dirichlet random distributions.

  3. Method of making thermally removable polymeric encapsulants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Small, James H. (Santa Fe, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); McElhanon, James R. (Albuquerque, NM); Saunders, Randall S. (late of Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a thermally-removable encapsulant by heating a mixture of at least one bis(maleimide) compound and at least one monomeric tris(furan) or tetrakis(furan) compound at temperatures from above room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a gel and cooling the gel to form the thermally-removable encapsulant. The encapsulant can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C., preferably in a polar solvent. The encapsulant can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the encapsulant for component repair, modification or quality control.

  4. Australia HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Australia HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

  5. Argentina HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Argentina HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

  6. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  7. Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Sweden Plutonium Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

  8. Method for contamination control and barrier apparatus with filter for containing waste materials that include dangerous particulate matter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinson, P.A.

    1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A container for hazardous waste materials that includes air or other gas carrying dangerous particulate matter has incorporated barrier material, preferably in the form of a flexible sheet, and one or more filters for the dangerous particulate matter sealably attached to such barrier material. The filter is preferably a HEPA type filter and is preferably chemically bonded to the barrier materials. The filter or filters are preferably flexibly bonded to the barrier material marginally and peripherally of the filter or marginally and peripherally of air or other gas outlet openings in the barrier material, which may be a plastic bag. The filter may be provided with a backing panel of barrier material having an opening or openings for the passage of air or other gas into the filter or filters. Such backing panel is bonded marginally and peripherally thereof to the barrier material or to both it and the filter or filters. A coupling or couplings for deflating and inflating the container may be incorporated. Confining a hazardous waste material in such a container, rapidly deflating the container and disposing of the container, constitutes one aspect of the method of the invention. The chemical bonding procedure for producing the container constitutes another aspect of the method of the invention. 3 figs.

  9. Research Report Trees, people and the built

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Gregory Moore Quantifying the cooling benefits of urban trees 113 Roland Ennos Contents #12;iv Parallel session 2b Energy supplies and other management challenges Advances in utility arboriculture research

  10. Deforestation: Transforming programs to eliminate trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadler, Philip

    Deforestation: Transforming programs to eliminate to eliminate inter* *mediate lists_and intermediate trees_called the Deforestation Algorithm. A form of fun. Treeless form and the Deforestation Algorithm are presented in three steps. * *The first step presents

  11. Pine Tree Development Zones Program (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pine Tree Development Zones program offers eligible businesses the chance to reduce, and sometimes eliminate, state taxes for up to ten years. There is a statutory requirement of hiring a...

  12. New bounds on optimal binary search trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Dion (Dion Kane)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Binary search trees (BSTs) are a class of simple data structures used to store and access keys from an ordered set. They have been around for about half a century. Despite their ubiquitous use in practical programs, ...

  13. Optimizing Tree Reconfiguration for Mobile Target Tracking in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wensheng

    nodes in the tree may become faraway from the root of the tree, and hence a large amount of energy mayOptimizing Tree Reconfiguration for Mobile Target Tracking in Sensor Networks Wensheng Zhang and then the collaboration among them becomes an important issue. In [1], a tree-based approach has been proposed

  14. Generalized Digital Trees and Their Difference-Differential Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flajolet, Philippe

    Generalized Digital Trees and Their Difference- Differential Equations Philippe Flajolet a tree partitioning process in which n elements are split into b at the root of a tree (b a design. This extends some familiar tree data structures of computer science like the digital trie and the digital

  15. GrowingProduce.com | 27 Tree Fruit Expert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    GrowingProduce.com | 27 Tree Fruit Expert Moving WestClemson University tree fruit specialist-time tree fruit specialist at Clemson University (and "Stone Fruit" columnist for American/Western Fruit at Washington State University (WSU) as a new endowed chair created by funding from the state's tree fruit

  16. aBubbleTree? Thomas H. Parker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Thomas H.

    on Rn \\ {0}. That limit loses energy. A bubble tree is a way of recovering the lost energy by keepingaBubbleTree? Thomas H. Parker 666 NOTICES OF THE AMS VOLUME 50, NUMBER 6 Some of the most important for functions u on a domain in R2, which arises as the variational equation of the energy (2) E(u) = |du|2 dvol

  17. Parallel object-oriented decision tree system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kamath; Chandrika (Dublin, CA), Cantu-Paz; Erick (Oakland, CA)

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A data mining decision tree system that uncovers patterns, associations, anomalies, and other statistically significant structures in data by reading and displaying data files, extracting relevant features for each of the objects, and using a method of recognizing patterns among the objects based upon object features through a decision tree that reads the data, sorts the data if necessary, determines the best manner to split the data into subsets according to some criterion, and splits the data.

  18. SAMPLING-BASED ROADMAP OF TREES FOR PARALLEL MOTION PLANNING 1 Sampling-Based Roadmap of Trees for Parallel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Brian Y.

    SAMPLING-BASED ROADMAP OF TREES FOR PARALLEL MOTION PLANNING 1 Sampling-Based Roadmap of Trees for multiple query motion planning (Probabilistic Roadmap Method - PRM) with sampling-based tree methods algorithms, roadmap, tree, PRM, EST, RRT, SRT. I. INTRODUCTION HIGH-DIMENSIONAL problems such as those

  19. Method And Apparatus For Arbitrarily Large Capacity Removable Media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milligan, Charles A. (Golden, CO); Hughes, James P. (Lino Lakes, MN); Debiez; Jacques (Cugnaux, FR)

    2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus to handle multiple sets of removable media within a storage system. A first set of removable media are mounted on a set of drives. Data is accepted until the first set of removable media is filled. A second set of removable media is mounted on the drives, while the first set of removable media is removed. When the change in removable media is complete, writing of data proceeds on the second set of removable media. Data may be buffered while the change in removable media occurs. Alternatively, two sets of removable media may be mounted at the same time. When the first set of removable media is filled to a selected amount, the second set of removable media may then be used to write the data. A third set of removable media is set up or mounted for use, while the first set of removable media is removed.

  20. 2727-S Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Storage Facility clean closure evaluation report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luke, S.N.

    1994-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the analytical results of 2727-S NRDWS facility closure verification soil sampling and compares these results to clean closure criteria. The results of this comparison will determine if clean closure of the unit is regulatorily achievable. This report also serves to notify regulators that concentrations of some analytes at the site exceed sitewide background threshold levels (DOE-RL 1993b) and/or the limits of quantitation (LOQ). This report also presents a Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup (MTCA) (WAC 173-340) regulation health-based closure standard under which the unit can clean close in lieu of closure to background levels or LOQ in accordance with WAC 173-303-610. The health-based clean closure standard will be closure to MTCA Method B residential cleanup levels. This report reconciles all analyte concentrations reported above background or LOQ to this health-based cleanup standard. Regulator acceptance of the findings presented in this report will qualify the TSD unit for clean closure in accordance with WAC 173-303-610 without further TSD unit soil sampling, or soil removal and/or decontamination. Nondetected analytes require no further evaluation.

  1. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  2. Method of removing contaminants from plastic resins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert,George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand,Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); Delaurentiis,Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  3. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

    2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for removing contaminants from synthetic resin material containers using a first organic solvent system and a second carbon dioxide system. The organic solvent is utilized for removing the contaminants from the synthetic resin material and the carbon dioxide is used to separate any residual organic solvent from the synthetic resin material.

  4. Removable bearing arrangement for a wind turbine generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

  5. Method for changing removable bearing for a wind turbine generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Scotia, NY); Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya (Rexford, NY)

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

  6. Global tree network for computing structures enabling global processing operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blumrich; Matthias A. (Ridgefield, CT); Chen, Dong (Croton-On-Hudson, NY); Coteus, Paul W. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Gara, Alan G. (Mount Kisco, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Hoenicke, Dirk (Ossining, NY); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Mount Kisco, NY); Takken, Todd E. (Mount Kisco, NY); Vranas, Pavlos M. (Bedford Hills, NY)

    2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for enabling high-speed, low-latency global tree network communications among processing nodes interconnected according to a tree network structure. The global tree network enables collective reduction operations to be performed during parallel algorithm operations executing in a computer structure having a plurality of the interconnected processing nodes. Router devices are included that interconnect the nodes of the tree via links to facilitate performance of low-latency global processing operations at nodes of the virtual tree and sub-tree structures. The global operations performed include one or more of: broadcast operations downstream from a root node to leaf nodes of a virtual tree, reduction operations upstream from leaf nodes to the root node in the virtual tree, and point-to-point message passing from any node to the root node. The global tree network is configurable to provide global barrier and interrupt functionality in asynchronous or synchronized manner, and, is physically and logically partitionable.

  7. Sulfur dioxide removal by enhanced electrostatics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larkin, K.; Tseng, C.; Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The economic removal of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) still represents a significant technical challenge which could determine the use of certain types of fossil fuels for energy production. This paper will present the preliminary results of an innovative research project utilizing a low-cost wet electrostatic precipitator to remove sulfur dioxide. There are many aspects for gas removal in an electrostatic precipitator which are not currently being used. This project utilizes electron attachment of free electrons onto gas molecules and ozone generation to remove sulfur dioxide which is a typical flue gas pollutant. This research was conducted on a bench-scale, wet electrostatic precipitator. A direct-current negative discharge corona is used to generate the ozone in-situ. This ozone will be used to oxidize SO{sub 2} to form sulfuric acid, which is very soluble in water. However, it is believed that the primary removal mechanism is electron attachment of the free electrons from the corona which force the SO{sub 2} to go to equilibrium with the water and be removed from the gas stream. Forcing the equilibrium has been shown to achieve removal efficiencies of up to 70%. The bench scale unit has been designed to operate wet or dry, positive and negative for comparison purposes. The applied dc voltage is variable from 0 to 100 kV, the flow rate is a nominal 7 m{sup 3}/hr and the collecting electrode area is 0.20 m{sup 2}. Tests are conducted on a simulated flue gas stream with SO{sub 2} ranging from 0 to 4,000 ppmv. This paper presents the results of tests conducted to determine the effect of operating conditions on removal efficiency. The removal efficiency was found to vary with gas residence time, water flow rate, inlet concentration, applied power, and the use of corona pulsing.

  8. In situ removal of contamination from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindgren, E.R.; Brady, P.V.

    1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination. The process also uses further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed. 5 figs.

  9. In situ removal of contamination from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindgren, Eric R. (Albuquerque, NM); Brady, Patrick V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination, and further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed.

  10. Part removal of 3D printed parts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pea Doll, Mateo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study was performed to understand the correlation between printing parameters in the FDM 3D printing process, and the force required to remove a part from the build platform of a 3D printing using a patent ...

  11. Install Removable Insulation on Valves and Fittings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on installing removable insulation on valves and fittings provides how-to advice for improving the system using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  12. Method of removing polychlorinated biphenyl from oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, G.T.; Holshouser, S.K.; Coleman, R.M.; Harless, C.E.; Whinnery, W.N. III

    1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Polychlorinated biphenyls are removed from oil by extracting the biphenyls into methanol. The mixture of methanol and extracted biphenyls is distilled to separate methanol therefrom, and the methanol is recycled for further use in extraction of biphenyls from oil.

  13. Confirmatory Tree Sampling for Tritium in Trees at the Salmon Site, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sampling was conducted on April 20, 21, and 22, 2010. DOE acquired 36 samples for analysis, approximately 10 percent of the total number of samples the Mississippi Forestry Commission acquired. The plan was to sample trees that the Mississippi Forestry Commission also sampled, so that a tree-by-tree comparison of analysis results could be made. The Mississippi Forestry Commission provided DOE with latitude and longitude coordinates, determined by a global positioning system (GPS), for each sampled tree. The Mississippi Forestry Commission also placed a blaze-orange number on each sampled tree. DOE used a GPS unit to assist in locating trees for sampling. DOE acquired one sample from an off-site location to have a reference for comparison to on-site results if necessary. The other 35 samples were acquired on site, for a total of 36 samples. Figure 1 shows the sampling locations, the sample identifiers DOE assigned, and the corresponding tree numbers the Mississippi Forestry Commission assigned

  14. Laser removal of sludge from steam generators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nachbar, Henry D. (Ballston Lake, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing unwanted chemical deposits known as sludge from the metal surfaces of steam generators with laser energy is provided. Laser energy of a certain power density, of a critical wavelength and frequency, is intermittently focused on the sludge deposits to vaporize them so that the surfaces are cleaned without affecting the metal surface (sludge substrate). Fiberoptic tubes are utilized for laser beam transmission and beam direction. Fiberoptics are also utilized to monitor laser operation and sludge removal.

  15. Danger of Tunnels on Al Aqsa Mosque Buildings For more than 40 years, the city of Jerusalem has faced accelerated historical transformation on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danger of Tunnels on Al Aqsa Mosque Buildings Abstract For more than 40 years, the city tunnels under Al Aqsa Mosque and the Arab historical town to weaken the foundation of buildings. This research highlights Palestinian, Israeli and international important reports about the excavations under Al

  16. Experts are partnering in Tampa, the Lightning Capital of the U.S., to provide safety information about the dangers of lightning and promote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    this free event to learn more about the national Lightning Safety Awareness Campaign to protect your family about the dangers of lightning and promote risk reduction and lightning protection education. Attend safety & protection resources FEATURED GUESTS INCLUDE: · Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn · Tampa Fire Chief

  17. Tree-ring reconstruction of maximum and minimum temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , minimum temperatures, diurnal temperature range, changing tree-ring/climate relationships, b; Vaganov et al. 1999; Bar- ber et al. 2000; Lloyd, Fastie 2002). Similar changes during investigations of tree- ring growth/climate relationships in interior British Columbia (BC

  18. 273KELLY: TREE WETA MOVEMENT PATTERNS SHORT COMMUNICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gwynne, Darryl T.

    273KELLY: TREE WETA MOVEMENT PATTERNS SHORT COMMUNICATION Movement patterns and gallery use by the sexually dimorphic Wellington tree weta Clint D. Kelly Department of Biology, University of Toronto University, Canberra, ACT, Australia 0200 (E-mail: clint.kelly

  19. Distributed multicast tree generation with dynamic group membership Frank Adelsteina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard III, Golden G.

    Distributed multicast tree generation with dynamic group membership Frank Adelsteina , Golden G. Another distinguishing character- istic for tree generation algorithms is centralized versus distributed, efficient network utilization becomes a growing concern. Multicast transmission may use network bandwidth

  20. Propagating Belief Functions in AND-Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Rajendra P.; Shenoy, Prakash P.; Shafer, Glenn R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : . Open Access Version: . Propagating Belief Functions in AND-Trees Rajendra P. Srivastava Professor of Accounting School of Business...'s Official Version: . Open Access Version: . 23 REFERENCES 1. Shenoy, P. P., and G. Shafer, Propagating Belief Functions using Local Computations, IEEE...

  1. Bioclimatology Optimization of water for fruit trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Bioclimatology Optimization of water for fruit trees by a computerized irrigation system R. Assaf1 load (the ratio of reproductive to vegetative growth - kg fruit/cm2 trunk growth) and fruit size penetration, improve fruit quality, and lower the cost of production. This method will permit the planting

  2. Forest Research Much more than trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    justice to renewable energy and land use. We have teams of experts in the areas of forest sciencesForest Research Much more than trees #12;Welcome to Forest Research. We are the research agency and supplying scientific evidence on the human, ecological and economic aspects of sustainable forest management

  3. Density Estimation Trees in High Energy Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderlini, Lucio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Density Estimation Trees can play an important role in exploratory data analysis for multidimensional, multi-modal data models of large samples. I briefly discuss the algorithm, a self-optimization technique based on kernel density estimation, and some applications in High Energy Physics.

  4. Optimal Robot Localization in Trees Rudolf Fleischer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleischer, Rudolf

    Optimal Robot Localization in Trees Rudolf Fleischer Department of Computer Science, The Hong Kong of localization, that is, of a robot finding its position on a map, is an important task for autonomous mobile robots. It has appli­ cations in numerous areas of robotics ranging from aerial photography to autonomous

  5. Tree Rings in Archaeology, Climatology and Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .gfz-potsdam.de #12;Abandoned Oak coppice on both sides of the Jura Mountains: dendroecological growth models-mail: olivier.girardclos@univ-fcomte.fr Introduction As documented in numerous written sources, coppice, for oak, tree-ring investigations of abandoned oak coppice have been recently undertaken on both sides

  6. The Arctic Tree Line and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    ­ Compared the spruce treeline between 1947 and 1989 ­ Used remote sensing applications ­ Mean temperature cover - Causes surface heating Forest Tundra Chapin et al., (2005), 10 Nadezhda et al., (2008) Albedo) ­Heating effect exceeds cooling effect ­Advances in the tree line are causing global warming to occur even

  7. a difference Please help us plant trees!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .m.-1:00 p.m. Berry Brook Restoration Site Why? The trees will enhance the wildlife habitat along the newly created wetland and stream channel and help to filter pollutants and make the stream bank more to the Berry Brook Restoration Site: From Rt. 16 ­Take Exit 9 toward Rt-9/Dover/Rt 108/Somersworth. Take

  8. Generation and Synchronous TreeAdjoining Grammars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shieber, Stuart

    Generation and Synchronous Tree­Adjoining Grammars Stuart M. Shieber Yves Schabes Aiken Computation) have been proposed as a formal­ ism for generation based on the intuition that the extended domain serving as an aid to generation from semantic representations. We demonstrate that this intuition can

  9. Cooling our Communities. A Guidebook on Tree Planting and Light-Colored Surfacing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of trees which save energy and trees that only sequester1990, a team of SMUD "Energy Advisors" and Tree Foundation "of'an unshaded lawn, Trees, Energy,And Water: Implications

  10. SmartTree: Mobile Tree Inventory Device for Rapid Data Collection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Louise

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to make a tree inventory in forests it is essential to collect field data as quickly, efficiently and in a cost effective manner. Under the UN REDD framework or REDD+ (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and ...

  11. An Accurate and Provably Efficient GARCH Option Pricing Tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

    An Accurate and Provably Efficient GARCH Option Pricing Tree Advisor: Prof. Yuh-Dauh Lyuu Chi-Ning Wu Department of Finance National Taiwan University #12;Abstract The trinomial-tree GARCH option not prevent explosion. This thesis then presents a trinomial-tree GARCH option pricing algorithm that solves

  12. Tree-Structured GARCH Models Francesco Audrino and Peter Buhlmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehlmann, Peter

    Tree-Structured GARCH Models Francesco Audrino and Peter Buhlmann #3; ETH Zurich, Switzerland Revised Version February 2001 Abstract We propose a new GARCH model with tree-structured multiple tree where every terminal node parameterizes a (local) GARCH model for a partition cell

  13. Stocrestr Cymru o Goed Trefol Wales Inventory of Urban Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocrestr Cymru o Goed Trefol Wales Inventory of Urban Trees #12;31/01/20132 Wales Inventory Inventory of Urban Trees To improve our understanding of distribution and canopy cover of urban trees and woodlands Provide a base-line to monitor change over time Intention is that inventory will also be of use

  14. Minimum-Energy Multicast Tree in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, M. Saif

    Minimum-Energy Multicast Tree in Cognitive Radio Networks Wei Ren, Xiangyang Xiao, Qing Zhao algorithm with bounded performance guarantee for constructing the minimum-energy multicast tree, which by studying the impact of the traffic load of the primary network on the minimum-energy multicast tree. I

  15. Minimum-Hot-Spot Query Trees for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeinalipour, Demetris

    an energy- efficient query routing tree. (a) Energy harvesting for battery- less nodes for the (b) Voltree to the querying node. Energy-efficient query routing trees are needed in a plethora of systems such as PeopleMinimum-Hot-Spot Query Trees for Wireless Sensor Networks Georgios Chatzimilioudis Dept

  16. Shapes of tree representations of spin-glass Wim Hordijka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Peter F.

    of distinguishing different types of landscapes, that the barrier trees from p-spin energy landscapes are quite of barrier trees, whose leaves represent the local minima and the internal nodes the lowest-energy saddles of barrier trees (and hence energy landscapes) remains to be obtained. For instance, the size

  17. Competitive Tree-Structured Dictionaries MICHAEL T. GOODRICH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodrich, Michael T.

    . Our approach is based on a potential energy parameter stored at each node in the tree. As updates and queries are performed, the potential energy of tree nodes are increased or decreased. Whenever on data structure usage. Energy-Balanced Binary Search Trees. A dictionary holds pairs of ordered keys

  18. A tree projection algorithm for wavelet-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Andrew

    the rooted tree of size k whose coefficients have maximum energy. #12;Optimization formulation · Pk preserves to finding the rooted tree of size k whose coefficients have maximum energy. · we can formulateA tree projection algorithm for wavelet-based sparse approximation Andrew Thompson Duke University

  19. Architecture independent parallel binomial tree option price valuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerbessiotis, Alexandros V.

    Architecture independent parallel binomial tree option price valuations Alexandros V. Gerbessiotis02 #12; Architecture independent parallel binomial tree option price valuations Alexandros V in American or Europeanstyle option valuations can be performed in parallel in the binomialtree model

  20. Verifying Red-Black Trees Paolo Baldan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldan, Paolo

    Verifying Red-Black Trees Paolo Baldan1 , Andrea Corradini2 , Javier Esparza3 , Tobias Heindel3,heindets,koenigba,koziouvi}@fmi.uni-stuttgart.de Abstract. We show how to verify the correctness of insertion of ele- ments into red-black trees--a form of balanced search trees--using anal- ysis techniques developed for graph rewriting. We first model red

  1. Termites, elephants and fire are key drivers of tree mortality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mortality: 2 dominated by elephant damage, 2 by termite attack and 1 by fire. Wind and human activity wereTermites, elephants and fire are key drivers of tree mortality 5 plots suffered substantial tree not major causes of tree mortality. Sample sizes are too small to reasonably determine the most significant

  2. Inner Sphere Trees Rene Weller and Gabriel Zachmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachmann, Gabriel

    Inner Sphere Trees Rene Weller and Gabriel Zachmann IfI Technical Report Series IfI-08-09 #12 Science) Prof. Dr. Gabriel Zachmann (Computer Graphics) #12;Inner Sphere Trees Rene Weller and Gabriel Zachmann Figure 1: Our Inner Sphere Trees are based on sphere packings of arbitrary polygonal objects (left

  3. Compositions of Extended Top-down Tree Transducers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyle, Uwe

    initil stte q suh tht q@tA n e rewritten to uF st is shown in PH tht synhronized tree sustitution grmmrsCompositions of Extended Top-down Tree Transducers Andreas Maletti£;1 International Computer of transformations computed by linear extended top-down tree trans- ducers with regular look-ahead is not closed

  4. Graduate Assistantships in: Forest Tree Breeding and Restoration Genetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (M.S. or Ph.D.) is offered to qualified students seeking training in forest tree breedingGraduate Assistantships in: Forest Tree Breeding and Restoration Genetics A Graduate Assistantship with The Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center (HTIRC). Qualifications: Candidates should have well

  5. ORIGINAL PAPER Influence of tree species on carbon and nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    /nutrient ratios, pH and nutrient contents according to the tree species (Vesterdal and Raulund-Rasmussen 1998ORIGINAL PAPER Influence of tree species on carbon and nitrogen transformation patterns in forest Science+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract · Background Among forest management practices, forest tree

  6. TREE SEEDING BPG NOTE 10 Best Practice Guidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    achieved by tree planting, using tree stock grown from seed or cuttings in the nursery. However for reclaimed brownfield land, taking account of modern guidance on site preparation and recent research on tree is comparatively inexpensive, and woodland so created can be cheaper than using the equivalent nursery stock. I

  7. Approximating the Minimum Spanning Tree Weight in Sublinear Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldwasser, Shafi

    Approximating the Minimum Spanning Tree Weight in Sublinear Time #3; Bernard Chazelle y Ronitt a parameter 0 minimum span- ning tree in the graph and then grows \\local spanning trees" whose sizes are speci#12;ed by a stochastic process. From

  8. Using Sparsification for Parametric Minimum Spanning Tree Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppstein, David

    Using Sparsification for Parametric Minimum Spanning Tree Problems David Fern'andez­Baca 1? , Giora with a parameter. The second is an asymptotically optimal algorithm for the minimum ratio spanning tree problem, as well as other search problems, on dense graphs. 1 Introduction In the parametric minimum spanning tree

  9. Parametric and Kinetic Minimum Spanning Trees Pankaj K. Agarwal 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppstein, David

    Parametric and Kinetic Minimum Spanning Trees Pankaj K. Agarwal 1 David Eppstein 2 Leonidas J. Guibas 3 Monika R. Henzinger 4 Abstract We consider the parametric minimum spanning tree problem- pute the sequence of minimum spanning trees generated as varies. We also consider the kinetic minimum

  10. Using Sparsification for Parametric Minimum Spanning Tree Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppstein, David

    Using Sparsification for Parametric Minimum Spanning Tree Problems David Fern´andez-Baca Giora algorithm for the minimum ratio spanning tree problem, as well as other search prob- lems, on dense graphs. 1 Introduction In the parametric minimum spanning tree problem, one is given an n-node, m

  11. Stochastic Minimum Spanning Trees in Euclidean Spaces Pegah Kamousi #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Timothy M.

    Stochastic Minimum Spanning Trees in Euclidean Spaces Pegah Kamousi # Computer Science University­1­4503­0682­9/11/06 ...$10.00. Keywords Algorithms, Theory General Terms Stochastic Minimum Spanning Trees, Geometric Data and arbitrary but known probability p i . We want to compute the expected length of the minimum spanning tree

  12. Selective Removal of Lanthanides from Natural Waters, Acidic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Removal of Lanthanides from Natural Waters, Acidic Streams and Dialysate. Selective Removal of Lanthanides from Natural Waters, Acidic Streams and Dialysate. Abstract: The...

  13. Y-12 Removes Nuclear Materials from Two Facilities to Reduce...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Home Field Offices Welcome to the NNSA Production Office NPO News Releases Y-12 Removes Nuclear Materials from Two Facilities ... Y-12 Removes Nuclear Materials from...

  14. Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Removing Barriers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review 2014: Removing Barriers, Implementing Policies and Advancing Alternative Fuels Markets in New England Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Removing Barriers,...

  16. Evaluation of Passive and Active Soot Filters for Removal of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Passive and Active Soot Filters for Removal of Particulate Emissions from Diesel Engines Evaluation of Passive and Active Soot Filters for Removal of Particulate Emissions from...

  17. Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organic Compound Removal for Characterization of Spark Ignited Direct Injection Engine Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal for Characterization...

  18. Method of making thermally removable polyurethanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); McElhanon, James R. (Livermore, CA); Saunders, Randall S. (late of Albuquerque, NM); Durbin-Voss, Marvie Lou (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a thermally-removable polyurethane material by heating a mixture of a maleimide compound and a furan compound, and introducing alcohol and isocyanate functional groups, where the alcohol group and the isocyanate group reacts to form the urethane linkages and the furan compound and the maleimide compound react to form the thermally weak Diels-Alder adducts that are incorporated into the backbone of the urethane linkages during the formation of the polyurethane material at temperatures from above room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. The polyurethane material can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C. in a polar solvent. The polyurethane material can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the solid material for component repair, modification or quality control.

  19. Technetium Removal Using Tc-Goethite Coprecipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Um, Wooyong; Wang, Guohui; Jung, Hun Bok; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, Low temperature waste forms coupled with technetium removal using an alternative immobilization process such as Fe(II) treated-goethite precipitation to increase our understanding of 99Tc long-term stability in goethite mineral form and the process that controls the 99Tc(VII) reduction and removal by the final Fe (oxy)hydroxide forms. The overall objectives of this task were to 1) evaluate the transformation process of Fe (oxy)hydroxide solids to the more crystalline goethite (?-FeOOH) mineral for 99Tc removal and 2) determine the mechanism that limits 99Tc(IV) reoxidation in Fe(II)-treated 99Tc-goethite mineral and 3) evaluate whether there is a long-term 99Tcoxidation state change for Tc sequestered in the iron solids.

  20. P. Cruiziat et al.Hydraulic architecture of trees Hydraulic architecture of trees: main concepts and results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    P. Cruiziat et al.Hydraulic architecture of trees Review Hydraulic architecture of trees: main March 2001; accepted 13 February 2002) Abstract Since about twenty years, hydraulic architecture (h. This review encompasses the main concepts and results concerning the hydraulic of architecture of trees. After

  1. Heat treatment of exchangers to remove coke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.D.

    1990-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a process for preparing furfural coke for removal from metallic surfaces. It comprises: heating the furfural coke without causing an evolution of heat capable of undesirably altering metallurgical properties of the surfaces in the presence of a gas containing molecular oxygen at a sufficient temperature below 800{degrees}F (427{degrees}C) for a sufficient time to change the crush strength of the coke so as to permit removal with a water jet at a pressure of five thousand pounds per square inch.

  2. Integrated pollutant removal: modeling and experimentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ochs, Thomas L.; Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Summers, Cathy A.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental and computational work at the Albany Research Center, USDOE is investigating an integrated pollutant removal (IPR) process which removes all pollutants from flue gas, including SOX, NOX, particulates, CO2, and Hg. In combination with flue gas recirculation, heat recovery, and oxy-fuel combustion, the process produces solid, gas, and liquid waste streams. The gas exhaust stream comprises O2 and N2. Liquid streams contain H2O, SOX, NOX, and CO2. Computer modeling and low to moderate pressure experimentation are defining system chemistry with respect to SOX and H2O as well as heat and mass transfer for the IPR process.

  3. Process for removing metals from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Napier, J.M.; Hancher, C.M.; Hackett, G.D.

    1987-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions. 2 tabs.

  4. Factorizations of some weighted spanning tree enumerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeremy L.; Reiner, Victor

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .08.003, Open Access version: http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu/dspace/ 4 JEREMY L. MARTIN AND VICTOR REINER In particular, setting yi = xi gives X T2Tree(G) xdeg(T) = x1x2 xn n 1Y r=2 0 @ 0rX i=1 xi 1 A: The proof, sketched in Section 6, proceeds by identi... S [n] x S x[n]nS 1 2 degT (S) = Y edges fS;Rg in T xSxR x[n] (6) Theorem 3. X T2Tree(Qn) qdir(T)xwt(T) = q1 qn Y A [n] jAj 2 X i2A qi x 1i + xi : Proof. As before, regard the vertex set of Qn as the power set 2[n]. Denote the symmetric di erence...

  5. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  6. Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, C. Jr.; Derzon, D.K.; Nelson, J.S.; Rand, P.B.

    1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications. 1 fig.

  7. Automatic Red Eye Removal for Digital Photography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schettini, Raimondo

    Chapter 1 Automatic Red Eye Removal for Digital Photography FRANCESCA GASPARINI DISCo, Dipartimento The red eye effect is a well known problem in photography. It is often seen in amateur shots taken with a built-in flash, but the problem is also well known to professional photographers. Red eye is the red

  8. Plastic bottles > Remove lids (not recyclable)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    Plastic bottles Please: > Remove lids (not recyclable) > Empty bottles > Rinse milk bottles, & other bottles if possible > Squash bottles www.st-andrews.ac.uk/estates/environment All types of plastic bottle accepted Clear, opaque and coloured bottles Labels can remain on X No plastic bags X No plastics

  9. Method of preparation of removable syntactic foam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jr., Charles (Albuquerque, NM); Derzon, Dora K. (Albuquerque, NM); Nelson, Jill S. (Albuquerque, NM); Rand, Peter B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Easily removable, environmentally safe, low-density, syntactic foams are disclosed which are prepared by mixing insoluble microballoons with a solution of water and/or alcohol-soluble polymer to produce a pourable slurry, optionally vacuum filtering the slurry in varying degrees to remove unwanted solvent and solute polymer, and drying to remove residual solvent. The properties of the foams can be controlled by the concentration and physical properties of the polymer, and by the size and properties of the microballoons. The suggested solute polymers are non-toxic and soluble in environmentally safe solvents such as water or low-molecular weight alcohols. The syntactic foams produced by this process are particularly useful in those applications where ease of removability is beneficial, and could find use in packaging recoverable electronic components, in drilling and mining applications, in building trades, in art works, in the entertainment industry for special effects, in manufacturing as temporary fixtures, in agriculture as temporary supports and containers and for delivery of fertilizer, in medicine as casts and splints, as temporary thermal barriers, as temporary protective covers for fragile objects, as filters for particulate matter, which matter may be easily recovered upon exposure to a solvent, as in-situ valves (for one-time use) which go from maximum to minimum impedance when solvent flows through, and for the automatic opening or closing of spring-loaded, mechanical switches upon exposure to a solvent, among other applications.

  10. Method for Removing Precipitates in Biofuel

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    At ORNL the application of ultrasonic energy, or sonication, has been shown to successfully remove or prevent the formation of 5090% of the precipitates in biofuels. Precipitates can plug filters as biodiesel is transported from one location to another, and often cannot be detected by visual inspection....

  11. Method of removing cesium from steam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carson, Jr., Neill J. (Clarendon Hills, IL); Noland, Robert A. (Oak Park, IL); Ruther, Westly E. (Skokie, IL)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for removal of radioactive cesium from a hot vapor, such as high temperature steam, including the steps of passing input hot vapor containing radioactive cesium into a bed of silicate glass particles and chemically incorporating radioactive cesium in the silicate glass particles at a temperature of at least about 700.degree. F.

  12. Removal of a Permanent IVC Filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Bangalore C. Anil [Queen's Medical Centre, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)], E-mail: anil.kumar@doctors.org.uk; Chakraverty, Sam; Zealley, Ian [Ninewells Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) filters are increasingly used for prevention of life-threatening pulmonary emboli in patients who have contraindications to anticoagulation therapy. We report a case of the removal of a permanent IVC filter, which was inadvertently inserted due to an incorrect ultrasound report.

  13. Autonomous models on a Cayley tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad Khorrami; Amir Aghamohammadi

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The most general single species autonomous reaction-diffusion model on a Cayley tree with nearest-neighbor interactions is introduced. The stationary solutions of such models, as well as their dynamics, are discussed. To study dynamics of the system, directionally-symmetric Green function for evolution equation of average number density is obtained. In some limiting cases the Green function is studied. Some examples are worked out in more detail.

  14. Trees and Shrubs in Northwest Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaines, Frank; Karper, R. E. (Robert Earl); Jones, D. L. (Don L.)

    1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for special purposes, such as avenue and yard, roadside, windbreaks, screens, hedges, background, andl foundation plantings, are given. The selection of such plantings, time of planting, preparation of and, cultivation, care, and pruning are also discussed... of the Bulletin is devoted to production of tree seedlings for extensive farm plantings and one to the use amdl value of planting wind- breaks and shelterbelts. The illustrations are, in most part, photographs of actual plantings made in the course...

  15. The Ecological Street Tree: Mainstreaming the Production of Street Tree-based Ecosystem Services in Northern California Cities, 1980-2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamans, Georgia Norma Silvera

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assessments, energy savings and tree replacement assessment.STF with 500,000 energy-saving trees over a 10-year periodBenefits of Trees: Watershed, Energy, and Air, Arborist

  16. Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky9, 2010 The meetingand Eric Edlund |1/2013July 2010Releases*

  17. Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky9, 2010 The meetingand Eric Edlund |1/2013July

  18. Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky9, 2010 The meetingand Eric Edlund |1/2013JulyDouble-Shell Tank

  19. Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky9, 2010 The meetingand Eric Edlund |1/2013JulyDouble-Shell

  20. Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky9, 2010 The meetingand Eric Edlund |1/2013JulyDouble-ShellWe

  1. Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky9, 2010 The meetingand Eric Edlund

  2. Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky9, 2010 The meetingand Eric EdlundWaste Treatment and

  3. Fire Danger Matrix

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:EpitaxialtransatlanticUnified| DepartmentFinding

  4. SIZE OF COARSE WOODY DEBRIS 5 YEARS AFTER GIRDLING AND REMOVAL TREATMENTS IN 50-YEAR-OLD LOBLOLLY PINE PLANTATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Boyd Edwards

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PP 108 -113 in: Connor, Kristina F., ed. 2004. Proceedings of the 12th biennial southern silvicultural research conference. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS?71. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 594 p. Abstract: In 1996, a study began at Savannah River Site to investigate large-scale replicated forest areas to control coarse woody debris for integrated biodiversity objectives. Research design was a randomized complete block with four treatments replicated in four blocks, resulting in 16 plots. The treatments applied to 50-year-old loblolly pine stands were (1) control, (2) girdling of 25 percent of trees to create catastrophic simulation, (3) annual removal of down woody debris > 10 cm in diameter, and (4) annual removal of both standing and down woody debris > 10 cm in diameter. The study tracks coarse woody debris recruitment and loading, rates of decomposition, and effects on the forest ecosystem.

  5. Removal of fluoride from aqueous nitric acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruett, D.J.; Howerton, W.B.; Mailen, J.C.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several methods for removing fluoride from aqueous nitric acid were investigated and compared with the frequently used aluminum nitrate-calcium nitrate (Ca/sup 2 +/-Al/sup 3 +/) chemical trap-distillation system. Zirconium oxynitrate solutions were found to be superior in preventing volatilization of fluoride during distillation of the nitric acid, producing decontamination factors (DFs) on the order of 2 x 10/sup 3/ (vs approx. 500 for the Ca/sup 2 +/-Al/sup 3 +/ system). Several other metal nitrate systems were tested, but they were less effective. Alumina and zirconia columns proved highly effective in removing HF from HF-HNO/sub 3/ vapors distilled through the columns; fluoride DFs on the order of 10/sup 6/ and 10/sup 4/, respectively, were obtained. A silica gel column was very effective in adsorbing HF from HF-HNO/sub 3/ solutions, producing a fluoride DF of approx. 10/sup 4/.

  6. Photoacoustic removal of occlusions from blood vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA); London, Richard A. (Orinda, CA); Maitland, IV, Duncan J. (Lafayette, CA); Esch, Victor C. (San Francisco, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Partial or total occlusions of fluid passages within the human body are removed by positioning an array of optical fibers in the passage and directing treatment radiation pulses along the fibers, one at a time, to generate a shock wave and hydrodynamics flows that strike and emulsify the occlusions. A preferred application is the removal of blood clots (thrombin and embolic) from small cerebral vessels to reverse the effects of an ischemic stroke. The operating parameters and techniques are chosen to minimize the amount of heating of the fragile cerebral vessel walls occurring during this photo acoustic treatment. One such technique is the optical monitoring of the existence of hydrodynamics flow generating vapor bubbles when they are expected to occur and stopping the heat generating pulses propagated along an optical fiber that is not generating such bubbles.

  7. Fly ash enhanced metal removal process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nonavinakere, S. [Plexus Scientific Corp., Annapolis, MD (United States); Reed, B.E. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of fly ashes from local thermal power plants in the removal of cadmium, nickel, chromium, lead, and copper from aqueous waste streams. Physical and chemical characteristics of fly ashes were determined, batch isotherm studies were conducted. A practical application of using fly ash in treating spent electroless nickel (EN) plating baths by modified conventional precipitation or solid enhanced metal removal process (SEMR) was investigated. In addition to nickel the EN baths also contains completing agents such as ammonium citrate and succinic acid reducing agents such as phosphate and hypophosphite. SEMR experiments were conducted at different pHs, fly ash type and concentrations, and settling times.

  8. Method of arsenic removal from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gadgil, Ashok (El Cerrito, CA)

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for low-cost arsenic removal from drinking water using chemically prepared bottom ash pre-treated with ferrous sulfate and then sodium hydroxide. Deposits on the surface of particles of bottom ash form of activated iron adsorbent with a high affinity for arsenic. In laboratory tests, a miniscule 5 grams of pre-treated bottom ash was sufficient to remove the arsenic from 2 liters of 2400 ppb (parts per billion) arsenic-laden water to a level below 50 ppb (the present United States Environmental Protection Agency limit). By increasing the amount of pre-treated bottom ash, even lower levels of post-treatment arsenic are expected. It is further expected that this invention supplies a very low-cost solution to arsenic poisoning for large population segments.

  9. IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang, William A. Goddard, Yongchun Tang

    2005-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In the second year of this project, we continued our effort to develop low temperature decarboxylation catalysts and investigate the behavior of these catalysts at different reaction conditions. We conducted a large number of dynamic measurements with crude oil and model compounds to obtain the information at different reaction stages, which was scheduled as the Task2 in our work plan. We developed a novel adsorption method to remove naphthenic acid from crude oil using naturally occurring materials such as clays. Our results show promise as an industrial application. The theoretical modeling proposed several possible reaction pathways and predicted the reactivity depending on the catalysts employed. From all of these studies, we obtained more comprehensive understanding about catalytic decarboxylation and oil upgrading based on the naphthenic acid removal concept.

  10. Removal of arsenic compounds from petroliferous liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fish, Richard H. (Berkeley, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described is a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous derived liquids by contacting said liquid at an elevated temperature with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene having catechol ligands anchored thereon. Also, described is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid as described above and involves: a. treating said spent catecholated polystyrene, at a temperature in the range of about 20.degree. to 100.degree. C. with an aqueous solution of at least one carbonate and/or bicarbonate of ammonium, alkali and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10 and, b. separating the solids and liquids from each other. Preferably the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution containing lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (a) and (b) are repeated using a bicarbonate.

  11. Acid treatment removes zinc sulfide scale restriction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, K. (Kerr McGee Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Allison, D. (Otis Engineering Corp., Lafayette, LA (US)); Ford, W.G.F. (Halliburton Co., Duncan, OK (United States))

    1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that removal of zinc sulfide (ZnS) scale with acid restored an offshore Louisiana well's production to original rates. The zinc sulfide scale was determined to be in the near well bore area. The selected acid had been proven to control iron sulfide (FeS) scales in sour wells without causing harm to surface production equipment, tubing, and other downhole hardware. The successful removal of the blockage re-established previous production rates with a 105% increase in flowing tubing pressure. On production for a number of months, a high rate, high-pressure offshore well was experiencing unusually rapid pressure and rate declines. A small sample of the restrictive material was obtained during the wire line operations. The well was subsequently shut in while a laboratory analysis determined that zinc sulfide was the major component of the obstruction.

  12. TMI defueling project fuel debris removal system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdge, B.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident on March 28, 1979, presented the nuclear community with many challenging remediation problems; most importantly, the removal of the fission products within the reactor containment vessel. To meet this removal problem, an air-lift system (ALS) can be used to employ compressed air to produce the motive force for transporting debris. Debris is separated from the transport stream by gravity separation. The entire method does not rely on any moving parts. Full-scale testing of the ALS at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has demonstrated the capability of transporting fuel debris from beneath the LCSA into a standard fuel debris bucket at a minimum rate of 230 kg/min.

  13. TMI defueling project fuel debris removal system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdge, B.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident on March 28, 1979, presented the nuclear community with many challenging remediation problems; most importantly, the removal of the fission products within the reactor containment vessel. To meet this removal problem, an air-lift system (ALS) can be used to employ compressed air to produce the motive force for transporting debris. Debris is separated from the transport stream by gravity separation. The entire method does not rely on any moving parts. Full-scale testing of the ALS at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has demonstrated the capability of transporting fuel debris from beneath the LCSA into a standard fuel debris bucket at a minimum rate of 230 kg/min.

  14. Process for removing sulfur from coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aida, T.; Squires, T.G.; Venier, C.G.

    1983-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for the removal of divalent organic and inorganic sulfur compounds from coal and other carbonaceous material. A slurry of pulverized carbonaceous material is contacted with an electrophilic oxidant which selectively oxidizes the divalent organic and inorganic compounds to trivalent and tetravalent compounds. The carbonaceous material is then contacted with a molten caustic which dissolves the oxidized sulfur compounds away from the hydrocarbon matrix.

  15. REMOVAL OF LEGACY PLUTONIUM MATERIALS FROM SWEDEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, Kerry A. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Bellamy, J. Steve [Savannah River National Laboratory; Chandler, Greg T. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Iyer, Natraj C. [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of; Koenig, Rich E.; Leduc, D. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Hackney, B. [Savannah River National Laboratory; Leduc, Dan R. [Savannah River National Laboratory

    2013-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Global Threat Reduction (GTRI) recently removed legacy plutonium materials from Sweden in collaboration with AB SVAFO, Sweden. This paper details the activities undertaken through the U.S. receiving site (Savannah River Site (SRS)) to support the characterization, stabilization, packaging and removal of legacy plutonium materials from Sweden in 2012. This effort was undertaken as part of GTRIs Gap Materials Program and culminated with the successful removal of plutonium from Sweden as announced at the 2012 Nuclear Security Summit. The removal and shipment of plutonium materials to the United States was the first of its kind under NNSAs Global Threat Reduction Initiative. The Environmental Assessment for the U.S. receipt of gap plutonium material was approved in May 2010. Since then, the multi-year process yielded many first time accomplishments associated with plutonium packaging and transport activities including the application of the of DOE-STD-3013 stabilization requirements to treat plutonium materials outside the U.S., the development of an acceptance criteria for receipt of plutonium from a foreign country, the development and application of a versatile process flow sheet for the packaging of legacy plutonium materials, the identification of a plutonium container configuration, the first international certificate validation of the 9975 shipping package and the first intercontinental shipment using the 9975 shipping package. This paper will detail the technical considerations in developing the packaging process flow sheet, defining the key elements of the flow sheet and its implementation, determining the criteria used in the selection of the transport package, developing the technical basis for the package certificate amendment and the reviews with multiple licensing authorities and most importantly integrating the technical activities with the Swedish partners.

  16. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

    1987-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  17. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, M.; Sinha, S.N.

    1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  18. Removal of copper from ferrous scrap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, Milton (12833 S. 82nd Ct., Palos Park, IL 60464); Sinha, Shome N. (5748 Drexel, 2A, Chicago, IL 60637)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing copper from ferrous or other metal scrap in which the scrap is contacted with a polyvalent metal sulfide slag in the presence of an excess of copper-sulfide forming additive to convert the copper to copper sulfide which is extracted into the slag to provide a ratio of copper in the slag to copper in the metal scrap of at least about 10.

  19. Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Makarewicz, M.A.; Meredith, P.F.

    1985-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

  20. Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Makarewicz, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Meredith, Paul F. (Knoxville, TN)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

  1. Dynamic Event Tree Analysis Through RAVEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Alfonsi; C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. A. Kinoshita; A. Naviglio

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics is not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (D-PRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed in a high modular and pluggable way in order to enable easy integration of different programming languages (i.e., C++, Python) and coupling with other application including the ones based on the MOOSE framework, developed by INL as well. RAVEN performs two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, RAVEN also models stochastic events, such as components failures, and performs uncertainty quantification. Such stochastic modeling is employed by using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This paper focuses on the first task and shows how it is possible to perform the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, the Dynamic PRA analysis, using Dynamic Event Tree, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out scenario is presented.

  2. Trees Water People | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective:Toyo AluminiumCity Light & PowerTrees Water

  3. Tree Fruit Varieties in North Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, L. E. (Lester E.)

    1936-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Texas Cdljege Statioe, Te~as. --- e Fruit Varieties in North Texas AGRIC~TIJTUBUAIJ AND MECHANICAL COI;LEGE OF TEXAS T. 0. WALTON, President rree fruit varietal investigations were begun at the Wichita Valley Station with the setting of a large... variety for this section. Cherries have proved unadapted, having died from natural causes without fruiting. Peaches and plums are the most dependable tree fruits for this section. The success of either depends to a great extent on the proper selection...

  4. Tree roots and their microbial partners may provide answers to...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    865.576.1946 Tree roots and their microbial partners may provide answers to productivity Researchers investigate cottonwood poplars in Tennessee to understand plant root...

  5. amazonian trees consequences: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Whereas direct tree seeding was probably used extensively in France in the past, it is currently only employed for the reforestation of Pinus pinaster and some species...

  6. The Application of kd-tree in Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dan Gao; Yanxia Zhang; Yongheng Zhao

    2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The basic idea of the kd-tree algorithm is to recursively partition a point set P by hyperplanes, and to store the obtained partitioning in a binary tree. Due to its immense popularity, many applications in astronomy have been implemented. The algorithm can been used to solve a near neighbor problem for cross-identification of huge catalogs and realize the classification of astronomical objects. Since kd-tree can speed up query and partition spaces, some approaches based on it have been applied for photometric redshift measurement. We give the case studies of kd-tree in astronomy to show its importance and performance.

  7. apple tree yielding: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report of Nectria galligena Causing European Canker of Apple Trees in Ontario. A. R. Biggs, Agriculture Canada Research Station, Vineland Station, Ontario LOR 2EO. Plant Biology...

  8. A GRASP heuristic for the capacitated minimum spanning tree ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tree problem using a memory-based local search strategy. Mauricio C. ...... dade: Formulaes com ndice de nvel, Ph.D. thesis, Departamento de Estatstica e.

  9. Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leitnaker, J.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag. 4 figs.

  10. Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leitnaker, James M. (Kingston, TN); Trowbridge, Lee D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag.

  11. Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time Removing nuclear waste, one shipment at a time The Lab's 1,000th shipment of transuranic waste recently left Los Alamos, on its way...

  12. Czech Republic HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    HEU Removal Czech Republic HEU Removal Location Czech Republic United States 49 35' 23.3628" N, 15 4' 23.6712" E See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map....

  13. United Kingdom HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    HEU Removal United Kingdom HEU Removal Location United Kingdom United States 52 24' 15.1416" N, 1 34' 55.3116" W See map: Google Maps Javascript is required to view this map...

  14. Method for removing fluoride contamination from nitric acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howerton, W.B.; Pruett, D.J.

    1982-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluoride ions are removed from nitric acid solution by contacting the vaporized solution with alumina or zirconium.

  15. Ultracapacitor having residual water removed under vacuum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wei, Chang (Niskayuna, NY); Jerabek, Elihu Calvin (Glenmont, NY); Day, James (Scotia, NY)

    2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multilayer cell is provided that comprises two solid, nonporous current collectors, two porous electrodes separating the current collectors, a porous separator between the electrodes and an electrolyte occupying pores in the electrodes and separator. The mutilayer cell is electrolyzed to disassociate water within the cell to oxygen gas and hydrogen gas. A vacuum is applied to the cell substantially at the same time as the electrolyzing step, to remove the oxygen gas and hydrogen gas. The cell is then sealed to form a ultracapacitor substantially free from water.

  16. Portsmouth Removal Actions | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecemberInitiativesNationalNuclearRockyServicesFindings andRemedial ActionsRemoval

  17. TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    5098-SR-02-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  18. Grafting Energy-Harvesting Leaves onto the Sensornet Tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prabal

    Grafting Energy-Harvesting Leaves onto the Sensornet Tree Lohit Yerva , Bradford Campbell , Apoorva the problem of augmenting battery-powered sen- sornet trees with energy-harvesting leaf nodes. Our results Bansal , Thomas Schmid , and Prabal Dutta Computer Science & Engineering Division Electrical

  19. In this issue: Welcome New Forest Stewards and Tree Farmers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    In this issue: · Welcome New Forest Stewards and Tree Farmers · New Reporting Rules for Lump Forestry Association Annual Meeting · Landscape Mulches ­ A Potential Fire Problem? · New UF Extension Welcome New Forest Stewards and Tree Farmers For some this may be the first issue of The Florida Forest

  20. Carbon and nitrogen allocation in trees R.E. Dickson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Carbon and nitrogen allocation in trees R.E. Dickson USDA-Forest Service, NCFES, Rhinelander, WI, U.S.A. Introduction Growth of trees and all plants depends up- on maintaining a positive carbon balance despite to multiple environ- mental stresses (Chapin et aL, 1987; Osmond et al., 1987). Light, carbon, water

  1. k-PROTECTED VERTICES IN BINARY SEARCH TREES MIKLOS BONA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bona, Miklos

    k-PROTECTED VERTICES IN BINARY SEARCH TREES MIKL´OS B´ONA Abstract. We show that for every k, the probability that a randomly selected vertex of a random binary search tree on n nodes is at distance k - 1. In another model, leaves may represent end-users (customers) of a company, and in that case, it may

  2. Lecture Notes: Support Tree Preconditioners for Laplacian Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guattery, Steve

    Lecture Notes: Support Tree Preconditioners for Laplacian Matrices Stephen Guattery ICASE April 22 material to understand the intuition behind Gremban's support tree preconditioners, and his analysis from Chapters 3 and 4 of Gremban's Ph.D. thesis unless otherwise noted. 1 Goals for Preconditioners We

  3. USING TREE AUTOMATA TO INVESTIGATE INTUITIONISTIC PROPOSITIONAL LOGIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shore, Richard A.

    USING TREE AUTOMATA TO INVESTIGATE INTUITIONISTIC PROPOSITIONAL LOGIC A Dissertation Presented'Connor ALL RIGHTS RESERVED #12;USING TREE AUTOMATA TO INVESTIGATE INTUITIONISTIC PROPOSITIONAL LOGIC Michael Kelly O'Connor, Ph.D. Cornell University 2008 Intuitionistic logic is an important variant of classical

  4. PONDY PAPERS IN ECOLOGY TREE ARCHITECTURE AND FOREST DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PONDY PAPERS IN ECOLOGY MODELLING TREE ARCHITECTURE AND FOREST DYNAMICS A RESEARCH PROJECT s de P o n d i c h é r y Modelling tree architecture and forest dynamics A research project. Muriel Durand is a Ph.D. student with both the Institut français de Pondichéry and the CIRAD

  5. The Hull-White Model: Calibration with Irregular Trinomial Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyuu, Yuh-Dauh

    The Hull-White Model: Calibration with Irregular Trinomial Trees · The previous calibration of the tree's irregular shape. c 2011 Prof. Yuh-Dauh Lyuu, National Taiwan University Page 1019 #12;The Hull-White the spot rates exactly. c 2011 Prof. Yuh-Dauh Lyuu, National Taiwan University Page 1020 #12;The Hull-White

  6. 2014 Plant Sale Featuring a variety of trees, shrubs,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    of trees, shrubs, and perennials ideal for growing in Happy Valley, such as hard-to-find Pennsylvania1 2014 Plant Sale Featuring a variety of trees, shrubs, and perennials ideal for growing in Happy Valley, such as hard-to-find Pennsylvania natives, some of the best performers in the H.O. Smith Botanic

  7. Steiner Minimal Trees, Twist Angles, and the Protein Folding Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, J. MacGregor

    Steiner Minimal Trees, Twist Angles, and the Protein Folding Problem J. MacGregor Smith, Yunho Jang. These properties should be ultimately useful in the ab ini- tio protein folding prediction. Proteins 2007;66:889­ 902. VVC 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words: Steiner trees; twist angles; protein fold- ing; side chain

  8. The Aurora Calling Tree Updated May 14, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    The Aurora Calling Tree Updated May 14, 2010 1. If you see the Aurora first, call the next person Only circles. (However, if an early circle person happens to see the Aurora after 11:00, please CALL-529-7066 Norm Williams 406-579-1882 #12;The Aurora Calling Tree Updated May 14, 2010 1. If you see the Aurora

  9. Tree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    to determine how trees affect the behavior of these nutrients in soil water, both during growth and afterTree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on Nutrient Dynamics and Solute Sciences/US Department of Agriculture, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164, USA; 4 USDA

  10. Interactive Rendering of Trees with Shading and Shadows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Interactive Rendering of Trees with Shading and Shadows Alexandre Meyer Fabrice Neyret Pierre Abstract. The goal of this paper is the interactive rendering of 3D trees covering a landscape of view and light directions. We associate a BT for each level of the hierarchy. When rendering

  11. ORIGINAL PAPER Boreal trees in the Mediterranean: recruitment of downy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    change than other European ecosystems. Predicted climatic scenarios in Mediterranean mountains show populations . Tree relicts 1 Introduction Mediterranean mountain ecosystems are more vulnerable to climate). In addition, recent simulations on the ability of temperate tree species to respond to climate change predict

  12. Random Trees, Levy Processes and Spatial Branching Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Gall, Jean-François

    of the exploration process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 0.6 Marginals of trees coded by the height process and the minimum . . . . . . . . . 20 1.2 The height process and the exploration process of continuous trees 71 3.1 Duality properties of the exploration process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 3

  13. Page 2 of 4 TREE Cookies Etc. Conservation will

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    from the air, water, and solar energy through the process of photosynthesis. This food is then used from Asia It wasn't first recognized as a serious problem until 2002 when the Detroit area suddenly has killed more than 20 million ash trees. Ash is a major tree species in these areas both

  14. The National Inventory of Woodland and Trees -England

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The National Inventory of Woodland and Trees - England 1 Mature conifer plantation 2 GIS Officer and has been carrying out national woodland inventories for Britain on a regular basis since 1924 and the social dimensions of sustainable forestry. The current National Inventory of Woodland and Trees (NIWT

  15. Adaptive code generators for tree coding of speech

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Hui

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tree coding is a promising way of obtaining good performance for medium-to-low rate speech coding. The key part of a tree coder is the code generator which consists of a short-term predictor and a long-term predictor. The best predictor designed...

  16. Page 2 of 4 TREE Cookies Etc. Got Woods -continued

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    of a forester is to help sell timber, though they can and should be used to write management plans, manage tree plantings, implement intermediate tending treatments to improve the woods, design soil stabilization the tree, the rays (the lateral transporting structures for water and nutrients) are blocked. Finally

  17. Beyond the Generation of Leaves: The Imagery of Trees and Human Life in Homer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, Charles David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    loses the vigorous energy of the tree and with it loses someretains the vigorous energy of the tree that keeps Odysseusthe vital energy from the living tree and channeling it into

  18. In the Shadow of the Tree of Strange Fruit [Speaking of Places

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proverbs, Theresa Hamilton

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Tree of Strange Fruit Theresa Hamilton Proverbsof the Tree of Strange Fruit Speaking of Places In the earlyShadow of the Tree of Strange Fruit Speaking of Places loss

  19. Influence of planting depth on landscape establishment of container-grown trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Donita Lynn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and productivity (sustainability) of trees within terrestrial ecosystems. Tree planting depth, i.e. location of the root collar relative to soil grade, is of particular concern for tree growth, development, and performance in the landscape. A series of model...

  20. Process for removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hancher, C.W.; Saunders, M.B.; Googin, J.M.

    1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method of removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil. The polychlorinated biphenyls are extracted from the soil by employing a liquid organic solvent dispersed in water in the ratio of about 1:3 to 3:1. The organic solvent includes such materials as short-chain hydrocarbons including kerosene or gasoline which are immiscible with water and are nonpolar. The organic solvent has a greater affinity for the PCB's than the soil so as to extract the PCB's from the soil upon contact. The organic solvent phase is separated from the suspended soil and water phase and distilled for permitting the recycle of the organic solvent phase and the concentration of the PCB's in the remaining organic phase. The present process can be satisfactorily practiced with soil containing 10 to 20% petroleum-based oils and organic fluids such as used in transformers and cutting fluids, coolants and the like which contain PCB's. The subject method provides for the removal of a sufficient concentration of PCB's from the soil to provide the soil with a level of PCB's within the guidelines of the Environmental Protection Agency.

  1. Removal of arsenic compounds from petroliferous liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fish, R.H.

    1984-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention in one aspect comprises a process for removing arsenic from petroliferous-derived liquids by contacting said liquid with a divinylbenzene-crosslinked polystyrene polymer (i.e. PS-DVB) having catechol ligands anchored to said polymer, said contacting being at an elevated temperature. In another aspect, the invention is a process for regenerating spent catecholated polystyrene polymer by removal of the arsenic bound to it from contacting petroliferous liquid in accordance with the aspect described above which regenerating process comprises: (a) treating said spent catecholated polystyrene polymer with an aqueous solution of at least one member selected from the group consisting of carbonates and bicarbonates of ammonium, alkali metals, and alkaline earth metals, said solution having a pH between about 8 and 10, and said treating being at a temperature in the range of about 20/sup 0/ to 100/sup 0/C; (b) separating the solids and liquids from each other. In a preferred embodiment the regeneration treatment is in two steps wherein step: (a) is carried out with an aqueous alcoholic carbonate solution which includes at least one lower alkyl alcohol, and, steps (c) and (d) are added. Steps (c) and (d) comprise: (c) treating the solids with an aqueous alcoholic solution of at least one ammonium, alkali or alkaline earth metal bicarbonate at a temperature in the range of about 20 to 100/sup 0/C; and (d) separating the solids from the liquids.

  2. Tailoring hydrocarbon streams for asphaltene removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Bianco, A.; Stroppa, F.; Bertero, L.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oilfield production is often hindered by asphaltene precipitation which tends to fill the pores of the reservoir rocks and plug the wellbore tubing as well as the other auxiliary equipment used during crude oil recovery. Several remedies to remove these deposits have been proposed and patented but the injection of aromatic solvents such as toluene and light petroleum distillates is normally preferred. Previous studies with a number of pure aromatic hydrocarbons have shown that the solvent capacity of these molecules may be very different and that the degree of condensation plays an important role. In this regard, tetralins and naphthalenes are superior to alkylbenzenes. However, because the use of pure compounds is not economically feasible, the authors examined various industrial streams and the authors correlated their chemical composition to the solvent capacity. This work allowed the identification of the pseudo-components whose relative concentration is crucial for evaluating the solvent performances. Based on these data, the authors were able to find new products with ideal characteristics. The efficiency of one of these products was confirmed by the analysis of the data obtained when using this new solvent to remove asphaltene in damaged wells of an Italian field.

  3. EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF A SMALL, GRAVEL-FILLED DAM1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL downstream were virtually undetectable. One year after dam removal, substrates of bars and riffles within 400 m downstream of the dam coarsened and a dominance of gravel and cobble sediments replaced previously

  4. 13 Red-Black Trees Chapter 12 showed that a binary search tree of height h can support any of the basic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    13 Red-Black Trees Chapter 12 showed that a binary search tree of height h can support any height is large, however, the set operations may run no faster than with a linked list. Red-black trees-set operations take O.lg n/ time in the worst case. 13.1 Properties of red-black trees A red-black tree

  5. Design-by-Analogy Using the WordTree Method and an Automated WordTree Generating Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oriakhi, Edgar Velazquez

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................................... 44 Tutorial for the WordTree Express ........................................................... 45 IV EXPERIMENT: WORDTREE DESIGN METHOD...????????... 46 Overview... for the development of the WTE program. The topics covered are as follows: ? Goals of the WTE program ? WTE user interface layout ? WTE program code layout ? Challenges of the design ? Benefits of the design ? Tutorial Goals of the WordTree Express Program...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - amazonian floodplain trees Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the regeneration of trees in mature floodplain forests in southeastern Peru. Ph. D. Dissertation. University... of tree species in upper Amazonian terra firme ......

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - alternifolia tea tree Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in local populations of Neotropical trees, genetic studies based... ), a Neotropical tree species recently listed as endangered in CITES which is ... Source: Bermingham,...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - adult forest trees Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grow? Fire... ), and tree density in western forests. These changes have altered the small scale (microsite) conditions... that affect the ability of tree seedlings to...

  9. Fluoride removal from water with spent catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Y.D.; Liu, J.C. [National Taiwan Institute of Technology, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The adsorption of fluoride from water with spent catalyst was studied. Adsorption density of fluoride decreased with increasing pH. Linear adsorption isotherm was utilized to describe the adsorption reaction. The adsorption was a first-order reaction, and the rate constant increased with decreasing surface loading. Adsorption reaction of fluoride onto spent catalyst was endothermic, and the reaction rate increased slightly with increasing temperature. Fluoro-alumino complex and free fluoride ion were involved in the adsorption reaction. It is proposed that both the silica and alumina fractions of spent catalyst contribute to the removal of fluoride from aqueous solution. Coulombic interaction is proposed as the major driving force of the adsorption reaction of fluoride onto spent catalyst.

  10. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  11. IMPROVED PROCESSES TO REMOVE NAPHTHENIC ACIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; William A. Goddard; Yongchun Tang

    2004-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In the first year of this project, we have established our experimental and theoretical methodologies for studies of the catalytic decarboxylation process. We have developed both glass and stainless steel micro batch type reactors for the fast screening of various catalysts with reaction substrates of model carboxylic acid compounds and crude oil samples. We also developed novel product analysis methods such as GC analyses for organic acids and gaseous products; and TAN measurements for crude oil. Our research revealed the effectiveness of several solid catalysts such as NA-Cat-1 and NA-Cat-2 for the catalytic decarboxylation of model compounds; and NA-Cat-5{approx}NA-Cat-9 for the acid removal from crude oil. Our theoretical calculations propose a three-step concerted oxidative decarboxylation mechanism for the NA-Cat-1 catalyst.

  12. Removing sulphur oxides from a fluid stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Torsten; Riemann, Christian; Bartling, Karsten; Rigby, Sean Taylor; Coleman, Luke James Ivor; Lail, Marty Alan

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing sulphur oxides from a fluid stream, such as flue gas, comprising: providing a non-aqueous absorption liquid containing at least one hydrophobic amine, the liquid being incompletely miscible with water; treating the fluid stream in an absorption zone with the non-aqueous absorption liquid to transfer at least part of the sulphur oxides into the non-aqueous absorption liquid and to form a sulphur oxide-hydrophobic amine-complex; causing the non-aqueous absorption liquid to be in liquid-liquid contact with an aqueous liquid whereby at least part of the sulphur oxide-hydrophobic amine-complex is hydrolyzed to release the hydrophobic amine and sulphurous hydrolysis products, and at least part of the sulphurous hydrolysis products is transferred into the aqueous liquid; separating the aqueous liquid from the non-aqueous absorption liquid. The process mitigates absorbent degradation problems caused by sulphur dioxide and oxygen in flue gas.

  13. Apparatus for removing micronized coal from steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlnaty, J.

    1981-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Micronized coal is removed from coal-bearing steam by spraying stabilized petroleum oil into the steam and directing the resultant stream at a separation surface on which a coal-oil slurry is deposited and collected. Apparatus includes conduits which direct the resultant stream downward into a housing and normal to a surface on which the slurry is deposited by impact forces. In additional apparatus disclosed, the resultant stream is directed from a horizontal conduit circumferentially along the interior wall of a horizontally disposed cylindrical chamber at the top of the chamber and the coal-oil slurry deposited on the wall by centrifugal force is collected in a trough situated below a longitudinal slot at the bottom of the chamber. In both types of apparatus, after separation of the slurry the velocity of the steam is reduced to settle out remaining oil droplets and is then discharged to the atmosphere.

  14. High SO2 Removal Efficiency Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe

    1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a discussion of the technical progress on DOE/PETC project number DE-AC22-92PC91338, "High Efficiency SO2 Removal Testing", for the time period 1 January through 31 March 1997. The project involves testing at six full-scale utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, to evaluate low capital cost upgrades that may allow these systems to achieve up to 98% SO2 removal efficiency. The upgrades being evaluated mostly involve using performance additives in the FGD systems. The "base" project involved testing at the Tampa Electric Company?s Big Bend Station. All five potential options to the base program have been exercised by DOE, involving testing at Hoosier Energy?s Merom Station (Option I), Southwestern Electric Power Company?s Pirkey Station (Option II), PSI Energy?s Gibson Station (Option III), Duquesne Light?s Elrama Station (Option IV), and New York State Electric and Gas Corporation?s (NYSEG) Kintigh Station (Option V). The originally planned testing has been completed for all six sites. However, additional testing is planned at the Big Bend Station. The remainder of this document is divided into four sections. Section 2, Project Summary, provides a brief overview of the status of technical efforts on this project. Section 3, Results, summarizes the outcome from technical efforts during the quarter, or results from prior quarters that have not been previously reported. In Section 4, Plans for the Next Reporting Period, an overview is provided of the technical efforts that are anticipated for the second quarter of calendar year 1997. Section 5 contains a brief acknowledgement.

  15. PRECOMBUSTION REMOVAL OF HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANT PRECURSORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2000-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to growing environmental concerns reflected in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored several research and development projects in late 1995 as part of an initiative entitled Advanced Environmental Control Technologies for Coal-Based Power Systems. The program provided cost-shared support for research and development projects that could accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. Clean coal technologies developed under this program would serve as prototypes for later generations of technologies to be implemented in the industrial sector. In order to identify technologies with the greatest potential for commercial implementation, projects funded under Phase I of this program were subject to competitive review by DOE before being considered for continuation funding under Phase II. One of the primary topical areas identified under the DOE initiative relates to the development of improved technologies for reducing the emissions of air toxics. Previous studies have suggested that many of the potentially hazardous air pollutant precursors (HAPPs) occur as trace elements in the mineral matter of run-of-mine coals. As a result, these elements have the potential to be removed prior to combustion at the mine site by physical coal cleaning processes (i.e., coal preparation). Unfortunately, existing coal preparation plants are generally limited in their ability to remove HAPPs due to incomplete liberation of the mineral matter and high organic associations of some trace elements. In addition, existing physical coal cleaning plants are not specifically designed or optimized to ensure that high trace element rejections may be achieved.

  16. More Grass from Controlling Trees and Brush with Chemicals.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, A. H.

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , black gum, elm, sweet gum, 1 lb. 2,4,5-T in 6 gal. Dec.-March Apply in frills at base of sycamore, water oak diesel oil or kerosene May-August tree or on freshly cut ' stumps. I L Blackjack oak, bur oak, post oak, 1 lb. 2,4,5-T in 6 gal. Bec....-March Apply to freshly cut stumps ! red oak diesel oil or kerosene May-August or trunk base of standin? trees. On all trees over 6" thick make frills and treat. ' 1 Lote, mesquite < 1 lb. 2,4,5-T in 10 gal. Anytime Apply to freshly cut stumps . diesel...

  17. Fault-tree construction and calculations on a microcomputer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckmann, Jeffery Linn

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 17 - Program Overview Screen Figure 18 ? Main Menu Screen Figure 19 ? Invalid Command Screen Figure 20 - First Usage of Disk Screen Figure 21 ? Fault-tree Name Screen Figure 22 - Invalid Fault-tree Name Screen Fi gure 23 ? TOP EVENT Label... to do? Fi gure 19. Inval i d Command Screen 53 CREATE - This command allows the user to build a new fault tree. After a CREATE command is entered, the system wi 1 1 display the screen in Figure 20. This question is asked in order to determine...

  18. Removal of radioactive and other hazardous material from fluid waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Knecht, Dieter A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Burchfield, Larry A. (W. Richland, WA); Anshits, Alexander G. (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Vereshchagina, Tatiana (Krasnoyarsk, RU); Tretyakov, Alexander A. (Zheleznogorsk, RU); Aloy, Albert S. (St. Petersburg, RU); Sapozhnikova, Natalia V. (St. Petersburg, RU)

    2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Hollow glass microspheres obtained from fly ash (cenospheres) are impregnated with extractants/ion-exchangers and used to remove hazardous material from fluid waste. In a preferred embodiment the microsphere material is loaded with ammonium molybdophosphonate (AMP) and used to remove radioactive ions, such as cesium-137, from acidic liquid wastes. In another preferred embodiment, the microsphere material is loaded with octyl(phenyl)-N-N-diisobutyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) and used to remove americium and plutonium from acidic liquid wastes.

  19. Thiacrown polymers for removal of mercury from waste streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Theodore F. (Tracy, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA); Fox, Glenn A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thiacrown polymers immobilized to a polystyrene-divinylbenzene matrix react with Hg.sup.2+ under a variety of conditions to efficiently and selectively remove Hg.sup.2+ ions from acidic aqueous solutions, even in the presence of a variety of other metal ions. The mercury can be recovered and the polymer regenerated. This mercury removal method has utility in the treatment of industrial wastewater, where a selective and cost-effective removal process is required.

  20. Heat recirculating cooler for fluid stream pollutant removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Berry, David A. (Morgantown, WV)

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process by which heat is removed from a reactant fluid to reach the operating temperature of a known pollutant removal method and said heat is recirculated to raise the temperature of the product fluid. The process can be utilized whenever an intermediate step reaction requires a lower reaction temperature than the prior and next steps. The benefits of a heat-recirculating cooler include the ability to use known pollutant removal methods and increased thermal efficiency of the system.

  1. Organic removal from domestic wastewater by activated alumina adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Pe-Der

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the major groups of pollutants in wastewaters. Adsorption by granular activated carbon, a non-polar adsorbent, is now the primary treatment process for removal of residual organics from biologically treated wastewater. The ability of activated alumina... to human health if they exist in the water supply at relatively high concentrations. A wide variety of treatment processes are available to remove organic matter from wastewater. Biological treatment is the most cost effective method for removing oxygen...

  2. Consistent and efficient reconstruction of latent tree models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Myung Jin

    We study the problem of learning a latent tree graphical model where samples are available only from a subset of variables. We propose two consistent and computationally efficient algorithms for learning minimal latent ...

  3. Absolutely minimal Lipschitz extension of tree-valued mappings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naor, Assaf

    We prove that every Lipschitz function from a subset of a locally compact length space to a metric tree has a unique absolutely minimal Lipschitz extension (AMLE). We relate these extensions to a stochastic game called ...

  4. MDSplus TRAVERSER Data Acquisition Setup and Shot Tree Structure Utility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    1 MDSplus TRAVERSER Data Acquisition Setup and Shot Tree Structure Utility Overview of Traverser TRAVERSER maintains a list of 'selected' nodes which the items in the menus will operate on

  5. Street Trees, Overhead Utlitly Distribution, and Physical Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Street Trees, Overhead Utlitly Distribution, and Physical Infrastructure: Design Implictions of overhead lines for electric transmission to the customer is common in most communities, and is most likely and mission Research and Responsibilities Design considerations Ecological Considerations Budgeting

  6. A Magnetic Retrieval System for Stents in the Pancreaticobiliary Tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantillon-Murphy, Padraig

    Clinical endoscopic intervention of the pancreaticobiliary tree [endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)] often concludes with the insertion of a temporary plastic stent to reduce the risk of post-ERCP ...

  7. amazonian tree species1: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of O(log n). For the random graph Gn,p, for p> c lognn, two spanning trees give an expander. This is suggested by the case of the complete graph, where we prove that two...

  8. amazonian chocolate tree: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of O(log n). For the random graph Gn,p, for p> c lognn, two spanning trees give an expander. This is suggested by the case of the complete graph, where we prove that two...

  9. Hyun Ji (Julie) Lee 25 Bower Tree, Irvine, CA 92603

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    Hyun Ji (Julie) Lee 25 Bower Tree, Irvine, CA 92603 (949) 285-0259; hlee18@uci.edu RESEACH/predictions EDUCATION: University California, Irvine Ph.D., Chemistry, November 2011 Physical Chemistry (atmospheric

  10. Regeneration ecology of broadleaved trees in Caledonian Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogilvy, Tanya

    This thesis quantifies aspects of shade tolerance in tree seedlings of species native to the Caledonian pinewood ecosystems of Glen Affric (Highland Region, Inverness-shire). Growth, allocation and morphological responses ...

  11. Generating Tensor Representation from Concept Tree in Meaning Based Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panigrahy, Jagannath

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    to a representation that can be stored and compared efficiently on computers. Meaning of objects can be adequately captured in terms of a hierarchical composition structure called concept tree. This thesis describes the design and development...

  12. adaptive tree code: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 A fast tree-based method for estimating column densities in Adaptive Mesh Refinement codes Influence of UV radiation field on the structure of molecular clouds CERN Preprints...

  13. COMMON TREES ON THE FIU CAMPUS AND IN MIAMI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koptur, Suzanne

    , but are not woody. Other plants may grow as shrubs or as low trees, as the Surinam cherry (left out of this key published the name, and can ultimately be traced back to the publication and the population of plants

  14. NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More Than One...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Press Releases Video Gallery Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home NNSA Blog NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More ......

  15. Performance evaluation of organic emulsion liquid membrane on phenol removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Y S; Hashim, M A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The percentage removal of phenol from aqueous solution by emulsion liquid membrane and emulsion leakage was investigated experimentally for various parameters such as membrane:internal phase ratio, membrane:external phase ratio, emulsification speed, emulsification time, carrier concentration, surfactant concentration and internal agent concentration. These parameters strongly influence the percentage removal of phenol and emulsion leakage. Under optimum membrane properties, the percentage removal of phenol was as high as 98.33%, with emulsion leakage of 1.25%. It was also found that the necessity of carrier for enhancing phenol removal was strongly dependent on the internal agent concentration.

  16. SEPARATION OF HEAVY METALS: REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATERS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    a two- or three-stage operation to remove the metals and 0il sepcrately). ComplexationSequestration Complexation involves the formation of a complex or chelating agent....

  17. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) product removal can containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boettger, J.S.

    1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This safety evaluation for packaging allows the transport of nine Product Removal (PR) Cans with their Containers from the PUREX Facility to the Plutonium Finishing Plant.

  18. active debris removal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rebecca Bendick a , Kevin D. Hyde b March 2013 Keywords: Debris flow Frequency Magnitude Fire Forecasting debris flow hazard is challenging Montana, University of 110 Removing...

  19. Use, Maintenance, Removal, Inspections, and Safety of Dams (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section describes operating plans for dams with movable structures, as well as procedures for raising or lowering of impoundment levels, dam removal, and dam safety inspections.

  20. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner. 1 fig.

  1. Study of Alternative Approaches for Transite Panel Removal |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (BJC) assembled an experienced team from both sites to evaluate both the manual and mechanical methods of transite panel removal. Study of Alternative Approaches for Transite...

  2. anesthesia optimizing removal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    de 7 Multiplicative Noise Removal Using Variable Splitting and Constrained Optimization CERN Preprints Summary: Multiplicative noise (also known as speckle noise) models...

  3. Removal of Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium by Means of Soil Vapor Extraction Enhanced by Desiccation and Water Removal of Carbon Tetrachloride from a Layered Porous Medium...

  4. Removal of carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium by means of soil vapor extraction enhanced by desiccation and water Removal of carbon tetrachloride from a layered porous medium...

  5. Method of removal of sulfur from coal and petroleum products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verkade, John G. (Ames, IA); Mohan, Thyagarajan (Ames, IA); Angelici, Robert J. (Ames, IA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the removal of sulfur from sulfur-bearing materials such as coal and petroleum products using organophosphine and organophosphite compounds is provided.

  6. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, J.P.; Johnson, T.R.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

  7. REMOVAL OF THE CALIFORNIUM SOURCES FROM THE 222-S LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LINSTRUM D; BAUNE HL

    2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This document develops a proposal for removal of 2-Californium sources from the 222-S Laboratory. Included in this document are assessments of shipping packages and decay calculations.

  8. Process to remove rare earth from IFR electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a process for the removal of rare earths from molten chloride electrolyte salts used in the reprocessing of integrated fast reactor fuel (IFR). The process can be used either continuously during normal operation of the electrorefiner or as a batch process. The process consists of first separating the actinide values from the salt before purification by removal of the rare earths. After replacement of the actinides removed in the first step, the now-purified salt electrolyte has the same uranium and plutonium concentration and ratio as when the salt was removed from the electrorefiner.

  9. South Africa HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    South Africa HEU Removal | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

  10. Convergent Decomposition Solvers for Tree-reweighted Free Energies Jeremy Jancsary Gerald Matz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Convergent Decomposition Solvers for Tree-reweighted Free Energies Jeremy Jancsary Gerald Matz of tree- reweighted free energies for the purpose of obtaining approximate marginal probabil- ities efficient for tree-reweighted energies arising from a small number of spanning trees. While this assumption

  11. An Efficient Query Tree Protocol for RFID Tag Anti-Collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Jehn-Ruey

    An Efficient Query Tree Protocol for RFID Tag Anti-Collision Ming-Kuei Yeh National Taipei Query Tree (EQT) protocol to improve both the Query Tree (QT) protocol and the Collision Tree (CT and the energy consumption is lessened. In the EQT protocol, the timeslots structure, the query and responses

  12. Efficient Algorithms for Comparing, Storing, and Sharing Large Collections of Phylogenetic Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Suzanne

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    relationships contained in tree collections. Our algorithms MrsRF and Phlash are the fastest in the field for comparing large collections of trees. Our algorithm TreeZip is the most efficient way to store large tree collections. Lastly, we developed Noria, a...

  13. A Dynamic Query-tree Energy Balancing Protocol for Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sikdar, Biplab

    A Dynamic Query-tree Energy Balancing Protocol for Sensor Networks H. Yang, F. Ye and B. Sikdar a "Dynamic Query-tree Energy Balancing" (DQEB) protocol to dynamically adjust the tree structure and minimize networks. In [15] it has been shown that the minimum- energy broadcast tree problem is NP

  14. Fungal Diversity Ceratocystis neglecta sp. nov., infecting Eucalyptus trees in Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fungal Diversity 73 Ceratocystis neglecta sp. nov., infecting Eucalyptus trees in Colombia Rodas, C Eucalyptus trees in Colombia. Fungal Diversity 28: 73-84. Commercial plantation forestry utilising species of non-native Eucalyptus trees forms an important industry in Colombia. These trees are, however

  15. Internal respiration of Amazon tree stems greatly exceeds external CO2 efflux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For trees with a pH below 5.0 (trees #4 and #9), this issueassumption for a tree with a xylem pH below 5.0). Based onmissing CO 2 . For trees with a higher pH, additional C can

  16. Prediction of tree diameter growth using quantile regression and mixed-effects models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Quang V.

    Prediction of tree diameter growth using quantile regression and mixed-effects models Som B. Bohora diameter predictions for the same tree in the future. Another approach considered in this study involved and mixed-effects models in predicting tree diameter growth. Tree diameter at the end of each growth period

  17. DIAGONALIZING THE GENOME I: NAVIGATION IN TREE SPACES SATYAN L. DEVADOSS AND JACK MORAVA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devadoss, Satyan

    of this paper summarize work of Billera, Holmes, and Vogtmann on spaces of abstract metric treesDIAGONALIZING THE GENOME I: NAVIGATION IN TREE SPACES SATYAN L. DEVADOSS AND JACK MORAVA Abstract trees. The resolution maps planar metric trees to their underlying abstract representatives, collapsing

  18. Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amonette, J.E.; Fruchter, J.S.; Gorby, Y.A.; Cole, C.R.; Cantrell, K.J.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II). 8 figs.

  19. Method of removing oxidized contaminants from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Amonette, James E. (Richland, WA); Fruchter, Jonathan S. (Richland, WA); Gorby, Yuri A. (Richland, WA); Cole, Charles R. (West Richmond, WA); Cantrell, Kirk J. (West Richmond, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method for removing oxidized contaminant(s) from water. More specifically, the invention has the steps of contacting water containing the oxidized contaminant(s) with a layered aluminosilicate having Fe(II). The aluminosilicate may contain naturally occurring Fe(II), or the Fe(II) may be produced by reducing Fe(III) that is initially present. Reduction may be either by exposure to a chemical or biological reductant. Contacting the water containing oxidized contaminant(s) may be by (1) injection of Fe(II)-containing layered aluminosilicate, via a well, into a saturated zone where it is likely to intercept the contaminated water; (2) injection of contaminated water into a vessel containing the Fe(II)-bearing layered aluminosilicate; and (3) first reducing Fe(III) in the layered aluminosilicate to Fe(II) by injection of a biological or chemical reductant, into an aquifer or vessel having sufficient Fe(III)-bearing aluminosilicate to produce the necessary Fe(II).

  20. The washability of lignites for clay removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oteyaka, B.; Yamik, A.; Ucar, A.; Sahbaz, O.; Demir, U. [Dumlupinar University, Kutahya (Turkey). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the washability research of the Seyitomer Lignites (Kutahya-Turkey), with lower calorific value (1,863 kcal/kg) and high ash content (51.91%), by heavy medium separation, it was found out that middling clay in the coal had an effect to change the medium density. To prevent this problem, a trommel sieve with 18 and 5 mm aperture diameter was designed, and the clay in the coal was tried to be removed using it before the coal was released to heavy medium. Following that, the obtained coal in -100 + 18 mm and -18 + 5 mm fractions was subjected to sink and float test having 1.4 gcm{sup -3} and 1.7 gcm{sup -3} medium densities (-5 mm fraction will be evaluated in a separate work). Depending on the raw coal, with the floating of -100 + 18 mm and -18 + 5 mm size fraction in 1.4 gcm{sup -3} medium density, clean coal with 60.10% combustible matter recovery, 19.12% ash, and 3,150 kcal/kg was obtained. Also floating of the samples sinking in 1.4 gcm{sup -3} in the medium density (1.7 gcm{sup -3}), middling with 18.70% combustible matter recovery, 41.93% ash, 2,150 kcal/kg, and tailing having 78.31% ash were obtained.

  1. Improved Processes to Remove Naphthenic Acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aihua Zhang; Qisheng Ma; Kangshi Wang; Yongchun Tang; William A. Goddard

    2005-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past three years, we followed the work plan as we suggested in the proposal and made every efforts to fulfill the project objectives. Based on our large amount of creative and productive work, including both of experimental and theoretic aspects, we received important technical breakthrough on naphthenic acid removal process and obtained deep insight on catalytic decarboxylation chemistry. In detail, we established an integrated methodology to serve for all of the experimental and theoretical work. Our experimental investigation results in discovery of four type effective catalysts to the reaction of decarboxylation of model carboxylic acid compounds. The adsorption experiment revealed the effectiveness of several solid materials to naphthenic acid adsorption and acidity reduction of crude oil, which can be either natural minerals or synthesized materials. The test with crude oil also received promising results, which can be potentially developed into a practical process for oil industry. The theoretical work predicted several possible catalytic decarboxylation mechanisms that would govern the decarboxylation pathways depending on the type of catalysts being used. The calculation for reaction activation energy was in good agreement with our experimental measurements.

  2. Metagenomic analysis of phosphorus removing sludgecommunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia Martin, Hector; Ivanova, Natalia; Kunin, Victor; Warnecke,Falk; Barry, Kerrie; McHardy, Alice C.; Yeates, Christine; He, Shaomei; Salamov, Asaf; Szeto, Ernest; Dalin, Eileen; Putnam, Nik; Shapiro, HarrisJ.; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Blackall, Linda Louise; McMahon, Katherine D.; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal (EBPR) is not wellunderstood at the metabolic level despite being one of the best-studiedmicrobially-mediated industrial processes due to its ecological andeconomic relevance. Here we present a metagenomic analysis of twolab-scale EBPR sludges dominated by the uncultured bacterium, "CandidatusAccumulibacter phosphatis." This analysis resolves several controversiesin EBPR metabolic models and provides hypotheses explaining the dominanceof A. phosphatis in this habitat, its lifestyle outside EBPR and probablecultivation requirements. Comparison of the same species from differentEBPR sludges highlights recent evolutionary dynamics in the A. phosphatisgenome that could be linked to mechanisms for environmental adaptation.In spite of an apparent lack of phylogenetic overlap in the flankingcommunities of the two sludges studied, common functional themes werefound, at least one of them complementary to the inferred metabolism ofthe dominant organism. The present study provides a much-needed blueprintfor a systems-level understanding of EBPR and illustrates thatmetagenomics enables detailed, often novel, insights into evenwell-studied biological systems.

  3. Schr\\"oder's problems and scaling limits of random trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitman, Jim

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a classic paper Schr\\"oder posed four combinatorial problems about the number of certain types of bracketings of words and sets. Here we address what these bracketings look like on average. For each of the four problems we prove that a uniform pick from the appropriate set of bracketings, when considered as a tree, has the Brownian continuum random tree as its scaling limit as the size of the word or set goes to infinity.

  4. Microcomputer applications of, and modifications to, the modular fault trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, T.L.; Graves, N.L.; Payne, A.C. Jr.; Whitehead, D.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LaSalle Probabilistic Risk Assessment was the first major application of the modular logic fault trees after the IREP program. In the process of performing the analysis, many errors were discovered in the fault tree modules that led to difficulties in combining the modules to form the final system fault trees. These errors are corrected in the revised modules listed in this report. In addition, the application of the modules in terms of editing them and forming them into the system fault trees was inefficient. Originally, the editing had to be done line by line and no error checking was performed by the computer. This led to many typos and other logic errors in the construction of the modular fault tree files. Two programs were written to help alleviate this problem: (1) MODEDIT - This program allows an operator to retrieve a file for editing, edit the file for the plant specific application, perform some general error checking while the file is being modified, and store the file for later use, and (2) INDEX - This program checks that the modules that are supposed to form one fault tree all link up appropriately before the files are,loaded onto the mainframe computer. Lastly, the modules were not designed for relay type logic common in BWR designs but for solid state type logic. Some additional modules were defined for modeling relay logic, and an explanation and example of their use are included in this report.

  5. Passive shut-down heat removal system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hundal, Rolv (Greensburg, PA); Sharbaugh, John E. (Bullskin Township, Fayette County, PA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved shut-down heat removal system for a liquid metal nuclear reactor of the type having a vessel for holding hot and cold pools of liquid sodium is disclosed herein. Generally, the improved system comprises a redan or barrier within the reactor vessel which allows an auxiliary heat exchanger to become immersed in liquid sodium from the hot pool whenever the reactor pump fails to generate a metal-circulating pressure differential between the hot and cold pools of sodium. This redan also defines an alternative circulation path between the hot and cold pools of sodium in order to equilibrate the distribution of the decay heat from the reactor core. The invention may take the form of a redan or barrier that circumscribes the inner wall of the reactor vessel, thereby defining an annular space therebetween. In this embodiment, the bottom of the annular space communicates with the cold pool of sodium, and the auxiliary heat exchanger is placed in this annular space just above the drawn-down level that the liquid sodium assumes during normal operating conditions. Alternatively, the redan of the invention may include a pair of vertically oriented, concentrically disposed standpipes having a piston member disposed between them that operates somewhat like a pressure-sensitive valve. In both embodiments, the cessation of the pressure differential that is normally created by the reactor pump causes the auxiliary heat exchanger to be immersed in liquid sodium from the hot pool. Additionally, the redan in both embodiments forms a circulation flow path between the hot and cold pools so that the decay heat from the nuclear core is uniformly distributed within the vessel.

  6. NDE Studies on CRDMs Removed From Service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doctor, Steven R.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Schuster, George J.; Hockey, Ronald L.; Abrefah, John

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies being conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington are focused on assessing the effectiveness of NDE inspections of control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzles and J-groove weldments. The primary objective of this work is to provide information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) on the effectiveness of ultrasonic testing (UT) and eddy current testing (ET) as related to the in-service inspection of CRDM nozzles and J-groove weldments, and to enhance the knowledge base of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) through destructive characterization of the CRDM assemblies. In describing two CRDM assemblies removed from service, decontaminated, and then used in a series of NDE measurements, this paper will address the following questions: 1) What did each technique detect?, 2) What did each technique miss?, 3) How accurately did each technique characterize the detected flaws? Two CRDM assemblies including the CRDM nozzle, the J-groove weld, buttering, and a portion of the ferritic head material were selected for this study. One contained suspected PWSCC, based on in-service inspection data; the other contained evidence suggesting through-wall leakage, but this was unconfirmed. The selected NDE measurements follow standard industry techniques for conducting in-service inspections of CRDM nozzles and the crown of the J-groove welds and buttering. In addition, laboratory based NDE methods will be employed to conduct inspections of the CRDM assemblies, with particular emphasis on inspecting the J-groove weld and buttering. This paper will also describe the NDE methods used and discus the NDE results. Future work will involve using the results from these NDE studies to guide the development of a destructive characterization plan to reveal the crack morphology, to be compared with NDE responses.

  7. The Ecological Street Tree: Mainstreaming the Production of Street Tree-based Ecosystem Services in Northern California Cities, 1980-2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamans, Georgia Norma Silvera

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the city. Sub-populations of Palo Altos street tree104 Palo Altos publicly owned tree population (street andThe City of Palo Alto is endowed with a large population of

  8. Process for removing pyritic sulfur from bituminous coals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pawlak, Wanda (Edmonton, CA); Janiak, Jerzy S. (Edmonton, CA); Turak, Ali A. (Edmonton, CA); Ignasiak, Boleslaw L. (Edmonton, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for removing pyritic sulfur and lowering ash content of bituminous coals by grinding the feed coal, subjecting it to micro-agglomeration with a bridging liquid containing heavy oil, separating the microagglomerates and separating them to a water wash to remove suspended pyritic sulfur. In one embodiment the coal is subjected to a second micro-agglomeration step.

  9. Removal of residual particulate matter from filter media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Almlie, Jay C; Miller, Stanley J

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for removing residual filter cakes that remain adhered to a filter after typical particulate removal methodologies have been employed, such as pulse-jet filter element cleaning, for all cleanable filters used for air pollution control, dust control, or powder control.

  10. Removal of Estrogenic Pollutants from Contaminated Water Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    Removal of Estrogenic Pollutants from Contaminated Water Using Molecularly Imprinted Polymers Z I H that this material may be appropriate for treating a complex mixture of estrogenic pollutants. The feasibility of removing estrogenic compounds from environmental water by the MIP was demonstrated using lake water spiked

  11. Potential Supply Impacts of Removal of 1-Pound RVP Waiver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    by the Office of Oil and Gas of the Energy Information Administration. General questions concerning the report, Petroleum Division #12;1 Energy Information Administration/Potential Supply Impacts of Removal of 1-Pound;2 Energy Information Administration/Potential Supply Impacts of Removal of 1-Pound Waiver provides

  12. Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 31513160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Jeffrey

    Atmospheric Environment 41 (2007) 3151­3160 Ozone removal by HVAC filters P. Zhao, J.A. Siegel?, R May 2006; accepted 14 June 2006 Abstract Residential and commercial HVAC filters that have been loaded of the relative importance of HVAC filters as a removal mechanism for ozone in residential and commercial

  13. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, C.Y.

    1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x]. 1 figure.

  14. Aluminum Removal from Photographic Waste Submitted to Dr. Tony Bi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluminum Removal from Photographic Waste Submitted to Dr. Tony Bi By: Kristen Favel, Tiffany Jung, and Kenny Tam CHBE 484 University of British Columbia April 15, 2009 #12;ii "Aluminum Removal from photographic waste has shown elevated levels of aluminum in the fixer, which exceed sewer discharge standards

  15. Fuzzy predictive control for nitrogen removal in biological wastewater treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuzzy predictive control for nitrogen removal in biological wastewater treatment S. Marsili wastewater is too low, full denitrification is difficult to obtain and an additional source of organic carbon predictive control; wastewater treatment plant Introduction The problem of improving the nitrogen removal

  16. Continuous cryopump with a method for removal of solidified gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, L.W.; Herman, H.

    1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved cryopump for the removal of gases from a high vacuum, comprising a cryopanel incorporating honeycomb structure, refrigerant means thermally connected to the cryopanel, and a rotatable channel moving azimuthally around an axis located near the center of the cryopanel, removing gases adsorbed within the honeycomb structure by subliming them and conducting them outside the vacuum vessel. 4 figs.

  17. Method for removing chlorine compounds from hydrocarbon mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janoski, E.J.; Hollstein, E.J.

    1984-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing halide ions from a hydrocarbon feedstream containing halogenated hydrocarbons wherein the contaminated feedstock is contacted with a solution of a suitable oxidizing acid containing a lanthanide oxide, the acid being present in a concentration of at least about 50 weight percent for a time sufficient to remove substantially all of the halide ion from the hydrocarbon feedstock.

  18. Seaweeds and halophytes to remove carbon from the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn, E.P.; Kent, K.J.; Thompson, T.L.; Frye, R.J. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Environmental Research Lab.)

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The utility industry and other interested parties have investigated strategies to mitigate the buildup of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. One option that has been considered is the planting of trees on a massive scale to absorb carbon through photosynthesis. A dilemma of using tree plantations, however, is that they might occupy land that will be needed for food production or other needs for an expected doubling of human population in the tropical regions. We evaluated seaweeds and salt-tolerant terrestrial plants (halophytes) to be grown on the coastal shelves and salt deserts of the world as possible alternatives to tree plantations. An estimated 1.3 {times} 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of continental shelf and 1.3 {times} 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of salt desert may be usable for seaweed and halophyte plantations. The production rates of managed seaweed and halophyte plantings are similar to managed tree plantations. Seaweeds and halophytes could conceivably absorb 10--20% of annual fossil fuel carbon emissions through biomass production, similar to estimates made for tree plantations. Present costs of halophyte biomass production are similar to costs of tree biomass production, whereas seaweed biomass is much more expensive to produce using existing technologies. Storage of seaweed carbon might be accomplished by allowing it to enter the sediment detritus chain whereas halophyte carbon might be sequestered in the soil, or used as biomass fuel. As has been concluded for reforestation, these saline biomass crops could at best help delay rather than solve the carbon dioxide build-up problem. 1 fig., 13 tabs.

  19. Accident Fault Trees for Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarrack, A.G.

    1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document fault tree analyses which have been completed for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) safety analysis. Logic models for equipment failures and human error combinations that could lead to flammable gas explosions in various process tanks, or failure of critical support systems were developed for internal initiating events and for earthquakes. These fault trees provide frequency estimates for support systems failures and accidents that could lead to radioactive and hazardous chemical releases both on-site and off-site. Top event frequency results from these fault trees will be used in further APET analyses to calculate accident risk associated with DWPF facility operations. This report lists and explains important underlying assumptions, provides references for failure data sources, and briefly describes the fault tree method used. Specific commitments from DWPF to provide new procedural/administrative controls or system design changes are listed in the ''Facility Commitments'' section. The purpose of the ''Assumptions'' section is to clarify the basis for fault tree modeling, and is not necessarily a list of items required to be protected by Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs).

  20. High Energy Laser for Space Debris Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barty, C; Caird, J; Erlandson, A; Beach, R; Rubenchik, A

    2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Photon Science Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has substantial relevant experience in the construction of high energy lasers, and more recently in the development of advanced high average power solid state lasers. We are currently developing new concepts for advanced solid state laser drivers for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) application, and other high average power laser applications that could become central technologies for use in space debris removal. The debris population most readily addressed by our laser technology is that of 0.1-10 cm sized debris in low earth orbit (LEO). In this application, a ground based laser system would engage an orbiting target and slow it down by ablating material from its surface which leads to reentry into the atmosphere, as proposed by NASA's ORION Project. The ORION concept of operations (CONOPS) is also described in general terms by Phipps. Key aspects of this approach include the need for high irradiance on target, 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 9} W/cm{sup 2}, which favors short (i.e., picoseconds to nanoseconds) laser pulse durations and high energy per pulse ({approx} > 10 kJ). Due to the target's orbital velocity, the potential duration of engagement is only of order 100 seconds, so a high pulse repetition rate is also essential. The laser technology needed for this application did not exist when ORION was first proposed, but today, a unique combination of emerging technologies could create a path to enable deployment in the near future. Our concepts for the laser system architecture are an extension of what was developed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), combined with high repetition rate laser technology developed for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), and heat capacity laser technology developed for military applications. The 'front-end' seed pulse generator would be fiber-optics based, and would generate a temporally, and spectrally tailored pulse designed for high transmission through the atmosphere, as well as efficient ablative coupling to the target. The main amplifier would use either diode-pumped or flashlamp-pumped solid state gain media, depending on budget constraints of the project. A continuously operating system would use the gas-cooled amplifier technology developed for Mercury, while a burst-mode option would use the heat capacity laser technology. The ground-based system that we propose is capable of rapid engagement of targets whose orbits cross over the site, with potential for kill on a single pass. Very little target mass is ablated per pulse so the potential to create additional hazardous orbiting debris is minimal. Our cost estimates range from $2500 to $5000 per J depending on choices for laser gain medium, amplifier pump source, and thermal management method. A flashlamp-pumped, Nd:glass heat-capacity laser operating in the burst mode would have costs at the lower end of this spectrum and would suffice to demonstrate the efficacy of this approach as a prototype system. A diode-pumped, gas-cooled laser would have higher costs but could be operated continuously, and might be desirable for more demanding mission needs. Maneuverability can be incorporated in the system design if the additional cost is deemed acceptable. The laser system would need to be coupled with a target pointing and tracking telescope with guide-star-like wavefront correction capability.

  1. Spinal partitions and invariance under re-rooting of continuum random trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Bndicte; Winkel, Matthias

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop some theory of spinal decompositions of discrete and continuous fragmentation trees. Specifically, we consider a coarse and a fine spinal integer partition derived from spinal tree decompositions. We prove that for a two-parameter Poisson-Dirichlet family of continuous fragmentation trees, including the stable trees of Duquesne and Le Gall, the fine partition is obtained from the coarse one by shattering each of its parts independently, according to the same law. As a second application of spinal decompositions, we prove that among the continuous fragmentation trees, stable trees are the only ones whose distribution is invariant under uniform re-rooting.

  2. Tappable Pine Trees: Commercial Production of Terpene Biofuels in Pine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PETRO Project: The University of Florida is working to increase the amount of turpentine in harvested pine from 4% to 20% of its dry weight. While enhanced feedstocks for biofuels have generally focused on fuel production from leafy plants and grasses, the University of Florida is experimenting with enhancing fuel production in a species of pine that is currently used in the paper pulping industry. Pine trees naturally produce around 3-5% terpene content in the woodterpenes are the energy-dense fuel molecules that are the predominant components of turpentine. The team aims to increase the terpene storage potential and production capacity while improving the terpene composition to a point at which the trees could be tapped while alive, like sugar maples. Growth and production from these trees will take years, but this pioneering technology could have significant impact in making available an economical and domestic source of aviation and diesel biofuels.

  3. Nuclear Waste Removal Using Particle Beams Incineration with Fast Neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revol, Jean Pierre Charles

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The management of nuclear waste is one of the major obstacles to the acceptability of nuclear power as a main source of energy for the future. TARC, a new experiment at CERN, is testing the practicality of Carlo Rubbia's idea to make use of Adiabatic Resonance Crossing to transmute long-lived fission fragments into short-lived or stable nuclides. Spallation neutrons produced in a large Lead assembly have a high probability to be captured at the energies of cross-section resonances in elements such as 99Tc, 129I, etc. An accelerator-driven sub-critical device using Thorium (Energy Amplifier) would be very effective in eliminating TRansUranic elements which constitute the most dangerous part of nuclear waste while producing from it large amounts of energy. In addition, such a system could transform, at a high rate and little energetic cost, long-lived fission fragments into short-lived elements.

  4. A Tree Swaying in a Turbulent Wind: A Scaling Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theo Odijk

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A tentative scaling theory is presented of a tree swaying in a turbulent wind. It is argued that the turbulence of the air within the crown is in the inertial regime. An eddy causes a dynamic bending response of the branches according to a time criterion. The resulting expression for the penetration depth of the wind yields an exponent which appears to be consistent with that pertaining to the morphology of the tree branches. An energy criterion shows that the dynamics of the branches is basically passive. The possibility of hydrodynamic screening by the leaves is discussed.

  5. Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    challenge on the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site by removing a 1,082-ton nuclear test reactor from the 300 Area. The River Corridor is a 220-square-mile section of...

  6. Reconvergent Fanout Removal Through Partial BIST Insertion Ian G. Harris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Ian G.

    Reconvergent Fanout Removal Through Partial BIST Insertion Ian G. Harris Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Massachusetts at Amherst E-mail: harris@ecs.umass.edu I. ABSTRACT

  7. Method to remove uranium/vanadium contamination from groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzler, Donald R. (DeBeque, CO); Morrison, Stanley (Grand Junction, CO)

    2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

  8. Web Indexing on a Diet: Template Removal with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Paul

    April 2009 Web Indexing on a Diet: Template Removal with the Sandwich Algorithm Stephen Wan stephen.wan@csiro.au Paul Thomas paul.thomas@csiro.au Tom Rowlands tom.rowlands@csiro.au #12;Copyright and Disclaimer

  9. Removal of phenols from wastewater by soluble and immobilized tyrosinase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wada, Shinji; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu; Tatsumi, Kenji (National Inst. for Resources and Environment, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An enzymatic method for removal of phenols from industrial wastewater was investigated. Phenols in an aqueous solution were removed after treatment with mushroom tyrosinase. The reduction order of substituted phenols is catechol > p-cresol > p-chlorophenol > phenol > p-methoxyphenol. In the treatment of tyrosinase alone, no precipitate was formed but a color change from colorless to dark-brown was observed. The colored products were removed by chitin and chitosan which are available abundantly as shellfish waste. In addition, the reduction rate of phenols was observed to be accelerated in the presence of chitosan. Tyrosinase, immobilized by using amino groups in the enzyme on cation exchange resins, can be used repeatedly. By treatment with immobilized tyrosinase, 100% of phenol was removed after 2 h, and the activity was reduced very little even after 10 repeat treatments.

  10. Considering removing "Show Preview" button on utility rate form...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 22 April, 2013 - 13:55 Utility Rates I'm considering removing the "Show Preview" button, since it does not work (javascript...

  11. Ozone Removal by Filters Containing Activated Carbon: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William; Spears, Mike; Sullivan, Douglas; Mendell, Mark

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluated the ozone removal performance of moderate-cost particle filters containing activated carbon when installed in a commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system. Filters containing 300 g of activated carbon per 0.09 m2 of filter face area were installed in two 'experimental' filter banks within an office building located in Sacramento, CA. The ozone removal performance of the filters was assessed through periodic measurements of ozone concentrations in the air upstream and downstream of the filters. Ozone concentrations were also measured upstream and downstream of a 'reference' filter bank containing filters without any activated carbon. The filter banks with prefilters containing activated carbon were removing 60percent to 70percent of the ozone 67 and 81 days after filter installation. In contrast, there was negligible ozone removal by the reference filter bank without activated carbon.

  12. aromatic hydrocarbon removal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contamination control 12;10 Transfer of Graphite to Supersack (V) 12;11 Moving graphite pile Complete shipment of graphite to DOE's Nevada Test Site Removal of biological shield...

  13. acid dye removal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contamination control 12;10 Transfer of Graphite to Supersack (V) 12;11 Moving graphite pile Complete shipment of graphite to DOE's Nevada Test Site Removal of biological shield...

  14. Membrane Based intensification of ammonia removal from wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almutairi, Azel

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this research was to study a novel membrane based oxygen intensification system to enhance a biological wastewater treatment process for ammonia removal. Specifically, this work is concerned with the biological nitrification process which...

  15. Comparison of proton and neutron carrier removal rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pease, R.L.; Enlow, E.W.; Dinger, G.L.; Marshall, P.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Displacement damage induced carrier removal rates for proton irradiations in the energy range 10-175 MeV were compared to 1 MeV equivalent neutrons using power MOSFETs as a test vehicle. The results showed that, within experimental error, the degradation mechanisms were qualitatively similar and the ratio of proton to neutron carrier removal rates as a function of proton energy correlate with a calculation based on nonionization energy loss in silicon. For exposures under junction bias, p-type silicon was found to have a smaller carrier removal rate for both proton and neutron irradiations, whereas, for n-type silicon, junction bias had little effect on the carrier removal rate.

  16. Method to Remove Uranium/Vanadium Contamination from Groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzler, Donald R.; Morrison Stanley

    2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

  17. Oil and Gas- Leases to remove or recover (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act states that a lease or agreement conveying the right to remove or recover oil, natural gas or gas of any other designation from lessor to lessee shall not be valid if such lease does not...

  18. Removal Rate Model for Magnetorheological Finishing of Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeGroote, J.E.; Marino, A.E.; WIlson, J.P.; Bishop, A.L.; Lambropoulos, J.C.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is a deterministic subaperture polishing process. The process uses a magntorheological (MR) fluid that consists of micrometer-sized, spherical, magnetic carbonyl iron (CI) particles, nonmagnetic polishing abrasives, water, and stabilizers. Material removal occurs when the CI and nonmagnetic polishing abrasives shear material off the surface being polished. We introduce a new MRF material removal rate model for glass. This model contains terms for the near surface mechanical properties of glass, drag force, polishing abrasive size and concentration, chemical durability of the glass, MR fluid pH, and the glass composition. We introduce quantitative chemical predictors for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, into an MRF removal rate model. We validate individual terms in our model separately and then combine all of the terms to show the whole MRF material removal model compared with experimental data. All of our experimental data were obtained using nanodiamond MR fluids and a set of six optical glasses.

  19. Nitrogen oxides removal by pulsed corona enhanced wet electrostatics precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tseng, C.H.; Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a bench-scale pulsed-corona enhanced wet electrostatic precipitator (wESP) application for removal of nitrogen oxides. This wESP is designed to operate wet/dry, positive/negative, and pulsed/non-pulsed conditions. The applied pulsed voltage is varied from 0 to 60 kV at 70 Hz. Gas flow rate is a nominal 7 m{sup 3}/hr and the collecting electrode area is 0.20 m{sup 2}. A simulated flue gas with NO concentration up to 1,200 ppm{sub v} has been used to determine the feasibility of NO{sub x} removal in the wESP. NO has to be oxidized to N{sub 2} before any removal takes place. NO{sub x} removal efficiency increased with gas residence time, inlet NO concentration and applied corona power. In the air stream with 10 seconds gas residence time, up to 20% of 1,000 ppm NO (or 22% NO{sub x}) was removed from an air stream of 1.9x10{sup {minus}3} m{sup 3}/s with a water flow of 6.3 x 10{sup {minus}5} m{sup 3}/sec and 20 W, 70 Hz pulsed corona. Both ammonia and ozone injections improve the NO{sub x} removal for both the corona and non-corona cases. With the inclusion of NH{sub 3} (NH{sub 3}/NO{sub x} ratio 1.3) and 25 watts corona power, NO removal efficiency was increased from 28% to 57%. The amount of in-situ ozone is not enough to be considered as a major NO{sub x} removal mechanism in this wESP. However, the additional injection of ozone improves the NO removal from 29% to 38% for both the corona and non-corona cases. When the oxygen concentration is dropped to 3% in a simulated flue gas with 12% CO{sub 2} and 800 ppm NO and 70% relative humidity at 11.5 s of gas residence time, the removal efficiency of NO is only 5%. Adding NH{sub 3} (NH{sub 3}/NO{sub x} ratio 1) at 76 watts corona power, NO removal is increased to 13%.

  20. Removal of deposited copper from nuclear steam generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McSweeney, P.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the copper-removal process implemented during the cleaning of the NPD nuclear steam generator in Ontario revealed that major shortcomings in the process were depletion of the strong ammonia solution and relatively poor copper removal. Tests have shown that the concentration of the ammonia solution can be preserved close to its initial value, and high concentrations of complexed copper obtained, by sparging the ammonia solution with oxygen recirculating through a gas recirculation loop. Using recirculating oxygen for sparging at ambient air temperature, approximately 11 g/l of copper were dissolved by 100 g/l ammonia solution while the gaseous ammonia content of the recirculating gas remained well below the lower flammability limit. The corrosion rates of mild steel and commonly used nuclear steam generator tube materials in oxygenated ammonia solution were less than 30 mil/yr and no intergranular attack of samples was observed during tests. A second technique studied for the removal of copper is to ammoniate the spent iron-removal solvent to approximately pH 9.5 and sparge with recirculating oxygen. Complexed ferric iron in the spent iron-removal solvent was found to be the major oxidizing agent for metallic copper. The ferric iron can be derived from oxidation of dissolved ferrous iron to the ferric state or from dissolved oxides of iron directly. To extract copper from the secondary sides of nuclear steam generators, strong ammonia solution sparged with recirculating oxygen is recommended as the first stage, while ammoniated spent iron-removal solvent sparged with recirculating oxygen may be used to remove the copper freshly exposed during the removal of iron.

  1. Radiator debris removing apparatus and work machine using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Kevin L. (Washburn, IL); Elliott, Dwight E. (Chillicothe, IL)

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiator assembly includes a finned radiator core and a debris removing apparatus having a compressed air inlet and at least one compressed air outlet configured to direct compressed air through the radiator core. A work machine such as a wheel loader includes a radiator and a debris removing apparatus coupled with on-board compressed air and having at least one pressurized gas outlet configured to direct a gas toward the face of the radiator.

  2. Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

    1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

  3. Fluidized bed gasification ash reduction and removal system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schenone, Carl E. (Madison, PA); Rosinski, Joseph (Vanderbilt, PA)

    1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In a fluidized bed gasification system an ash removal system to reduce the particulate ash to a maximum size or smaller, allow the ash to cool to a temperature lower than the gasifier and remove the ash from the gasifier system. The system consists of a crusher, a container containing level probes and a means for controlling the rotational speed of the crusher based on the level of ash within the container.

  4. Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

  5. Solid materials for removing arsenic and method thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Sabre J. (Oakland, CA); Sanner, Robert D. (Livermore, CA); Dias, Victoria L. (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid materials have been developed to remove arsenic compounds from aqueous media. The arsenic is removed by passing the aqueous phase through the solid materials which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The solid materials adsorb the arsenic leaving a purified aqueous stream. The materials are aerogels or xerogels and aerogels or xerogels and solid support structure, e.g., granulated activated carbon (GAC), mixtures. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific chemical modifications of the solids tailored towards arsenic.

  6. Solid materials for removing arsenic and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Sabre J. (Oakland, CA); Sanner, Robert D. (Livermore, CA); Dias, Victoria L. (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid materials have been developed to remove arsenic compounds from aqueous media. The arsenic is removed by passing the aqueous phase through the solid materials which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The solid materials adsorb the arsenic leaving a purified aqueous stream. The materials are aerogels or xerogels and aerogels or xerogels and solid support structure, e.g., granulated activated carbon (GAC), mixtures. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific chemical modifications of the solids tailored towards arsenic.

  7. Mercury and tritium removal from DOE waste oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klasson, E.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work covers the investigation of vacuum extraction as a means to remove tritiated contamination as well as the removal via sorption of dissolved mercury from contaminated oils. The radiation damage in oils from tritium causes production of hydrogen, methane, and low-molecular-weight hydrocarbons. When tritium gas is present in the oil, the tritium atom is incorporated into the formed hydrocarbons. The transformer industry measures gas content/composition of transformer oils as a diagnostic tool for the transformers` condition. The analytical approach (ASTM D3612-90) used for these measurements is vacuum extraction of all gases (H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, etc.) followed by analysis of the evolved gas mixture. This extraction method will be adapted to remove dissolved gases (including tritium) from the SRS vacuum pump oil. It may be necessary to heat (60{degrees}C to 70{degrees}C) the oil during vacuum extraction to remove tritiated water. A method described in the procedures is a stripper column extraction, in which a carrier gas (argon) is used to remove dissolved gases from oil that is dispersed on high surface area beads. This method appears promising for scale-up as a treatment process, and a modified process is also being used as a dewatering technique by SD Myers, Inc. (a transformer consulting company) for transformers in the field by a mobile unit. Although some mercury may be removed during the vacuum extraction, the most common technique for removing mercury from oil is by using sulfur-impregnated activated carbon (SIAC). SIAC is currently being used by the petroleum industry to remove mercury from hydrocarbon mixtures, but the sorbent has not been previously tested on DOE vacuum oil waste. It is anticipated that a final process will be similar to technologies used by the petroleum industry and is comparable to ion exchange operations in large column-type reactors.

  8. Modeling Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal at the Subfield Scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muth, D.J.; McCorkle, D.S.; Koch, J.B.; Bryden, K.M.

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This study developed a computational strategy that utilizes data inputs from multiple spatial scales to investigate how variability within individual fields can impact sustainable residue removal for bioenergy production. Sustainable use of agricultural residues for bioenergy production requires consideration of the important role that residues play in limiting soil erosion and maintaining soil C, health, and productivity. Increased availability of subfield-scale data sets such as grain yield data, high-fidelity digital elevation models, and soil characteristic data provides an opportunity to investigate the impacts of subfield-scale variability on sustainable agricultural residue removal. Using three representative fields in Iowa, this study contrasted the results of current NRCS conservation management planning analysis with subfield-scale analysis for rake-and-bale removal of agricultural residue. The results of the comparison show that the field-average assumptions used in NRCS conservation management planning may lead to unsustainable residue removal decisions for significant portions of some fields. This highlights the need for additional research on subfield-scale sustainable agricultural residue removal including the development of real-time variable removal technologies for agricultural residue.

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic fault tree Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Sample search results for: automatic fault tree Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Computer diagnosis systems grounded on hand-crafted fault trees are wide-spread in industrial...

  10. Energy-Efficient Distributed Constructions of Minimum Spanning Tree for Wireless Ad-hoc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Maleq

    1 Energy-Efficient Distributed Constructions of Minimum Spanning Tree for Wireless Ad-hoc Networks of a class of simple and local algorithms called Nearest Neighbor Tree (NNT) algorithms for energy-efficient

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - alien tree schinus Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The outcome of alien tree invasions in Puerto Rico. Front Ecol Environ 22: 265-73. Martin PH... of an essentially contiguous canopy of tree foliage. We begin by evaluating the...

  12. Some remarks on tree-level vacuum stability in two Higgs doublet models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Barroso; P. M. Ferreira; R. Santos

    2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proved that the minimum of a general two Higgs doublet models' potential is stable at tree level. A relation between stability and flavour changing neutral currents at tree level is shown.

  13. Impact of Foliar Fertilizer Containing Iodine on Golden Delicious Apple Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szwonek, Eugeniusz

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on marketable Golden Delicious/M.9 apple production. At thecontaining fertilizer on apple fruits firmness and theirold Golden Delicious/M.9 apple trees Trees were spaced at

  14. Below Canopy Meteorological Measurements at Three Florida Sites with Varying Tree Cover and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonne, J. K.; Vieira, R. K.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for preserving trees within recently constructed developments, as well as the potential impact of tree planting programs. To address this question, temperature measurements were made over a one year period at three Melbourne, Florida sites. The results showed a...

  15. On Postnikov's Hook Length Formula for Binary Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Bill

    note that Seo [7] also found combinatorial proof of the identity (1). Further studies related to Postnikov's hook length formula (1) have been carried out by Du and Liu [1], Gessel and Seo [2], Liu [4., 28 (2007), 1312-1321. [2] I. M. Gessel and S. Seo, A refinement of Cayley's formula for trees

  16. Original article Lack of mother tree alleles in zymograms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Lack of mother tree alleles in zymograms of Cupressus dupreziana A. Camus embryos ­ Absence d'allèles maternels dans les zymogrammes des embryons de Cupressus dupreziana A. Camus. De précé(s). Multiple ploidy levels were also observed in the endosperm of Cupressus dupreziana A. Camus, the other

  17. Caranx: Scalable Social Image Index Using Phylogenetic Tree of Hashtags

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The vectors are quantized and stored in tree-like data structures for fast search. SIFT- based indexing can an efficient algorithm to build/search the PT, and show that using PT structure can effectively avoid unnecessary NRDC computation. The resulting image index provides more accurate and diversified search results1

  18. Fungal endophytes limit pathogen damage in a tropical tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    Fungal endophytes limit pathogen damage in a tropical tree A. Elizabeth Arnold* , Luis Carlos Meji species examined to date harbors endophytic fungi within its asymptomatic aerial tissues, such that endophytes rep- resent a ubiquitous, yet cryptic, component of terrestrial plant communities. Fungal

  19. Interference evaluation between manifold and wet Christmas tree CP systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brasil, S.L.D.C.; Baptista, W.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore production wells are controlled by valves installed in the marine soil, called wet Christmas trees (WCTs). A manifold receives the production of several wells and transports it to the platform. The manifold is cathodically protected by Al anodes and the WCT by Zn anodes. A computer simulation was carried out to evaluate the interference between the equipment cathodic protection systems.

  20. Air temperature regulation by urban trees and green infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air temperature regulation by urban trees and green infrastructure Kieron Doick and Tony Hutchings to a UHI include the thermal properties, height and spacing of buildings, the production of waste heat, air years. An estimated 8­11 extra deaths occur each day for each degree increase in air temperature during

  1. Impact of Tree Species on Carbon in Forest Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    species differ in productivity, litter quality and quantity, canopy structure and nitrogen deposition.1.6 Mycelia production (Paper V) 23 4.2 Vegetation 23 4.2.1 Tree biomass and litterfall (Paper II) 23 4.2.2 Understorey vegetation (Paper II) 24 4.2.3 Fine root biomass (Paper V) 25 4.2.4 Fine root production

  2. Finding Patterns of Attrition using Decision Trees: A Preliminary Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    their programs. However, student attrition does occur, especially in the first two years of education of student retention in a post-secondary institution. Specifically, we apply the classification technique of decision tree induction. We focus on both the accuracy of classification and the identification of specific

  3. Updating the Tyrol tree-ring dataset , U. Bntgen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolussi, Kurt

    Updating the Tyrol tree-ring dataset J. Esper1 , U. Büntgen1 , D. Frank1 , T. Pichler2 , K in palaeoclimatology The Tyrol dataset is a collection of 71 Picea abies ring width measurement series from the study area in Tyrol in the central Alps. We here describe efforts of updating this relevant dataset

  4. Identifying failure in a tree network of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt W. (Rochester, MN); Wallenfelt, Brian P. (Eden Prairie, MN)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, parallel computers, and products are provided for identifying failure in a tree network of a parallel computer. The parallel computer includes one or more processing sets including an I/O node and a plurality of compute nodes. For each processing set embodiments include selecting a set of test compute nodes, the test compute nodes being a subset of the compute nodes of the processing set; measuring the performance of the I/O node of the processing set; measuring the performance of the selected set of test compute nodes; calculating a current test value in dependence upon the measured performance of the I/O node of the processing set, the measured performance of the set of test compute nodes, and a predetermined value for I/O node performance; and comparing the current test value with a predetermined tree performance threshold. If the current test value is below the predetermined tree performance threshold, embodiments include selecting another set of test compute nodes. If the current test value is not below the predetermined tree performance threshold, embodiments include selecting from the test compute nodes one or more potential problem nodes and testing individually potential problem nodes and links to potential problem nodes.

  5. Improving tree survival prediction with forecast combination and disaggregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Quang V.

    (catastrophic) mortality, which results from random disturbances or hazards such as local fire, wind, snow, Yuancai Lei, Quang V. Cao, Xinmei Chen, and Xianzhao Liu Abstract: The tree mortality model plays mortality, one of the main components of forest suc- cession, is a complex process affected by environmental

  6. On the Adaptive Properties of Decision Trees Clayton Scott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Clayton

    '' data dimension. Feature Rejection: If certain features are irrelevant (i.e., independent of the classOn the Adaptive Properties of Decision Trees Clayton Scott Statistics Department Rice University for Z, and let # P n be the empirical estimate of PZ based on Z n : # P n (B) = (1/n) # n i=1 I {Z i #B

  7. On the Adaptive Properties of Decision Trees Clayton Scott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Clayton

    dimension. Feature Rejection: If certain features are irrelevant (i.e., independent of the class labelsOn the Adaptive Properties of Decision Trees Clayton Scott Statistics Department Rice University, and let Pn be the empirical estimate of PZ based on Zn : Pn(B) = (1/n) n i=1 I{ZiB}, B Z, where I denotes

  8. Quicksort via Bird's Tree Fusion Transformation Tjark Weber1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caldwell, James

    Quicksort via Bird's Tree Fusion Transformation Tjark Weber1 and James Caldwell2 1 Institut f¨ur Informatik, Technische Universit¨at M¨unchen Boltzmannstr. 3, D-85748 Garching b. M¨unchen, Germany tjark.weber

  9. ACCLIMATION OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RESPIRATION TO INCREASING TEMPERATURES IN TREES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teskey, Robert O.

    ACCLIMATION OF PHOTOSYNTHESIS AND RESPIRATION TO INCREASING TEMPERATURES IN TREES by JASON ERIC in mean growing season temperature. This allowed us to determine whether net photosynthesis and dark rates of net photosynthesis were similar among seedlings when compared to their respective mean site

  10. RECOMMENDED TREES FOR MICHIGAN'S LOWER PENINSULA American Hornbeam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    slower to establish. Native to Michigan and eastern U.S. Pests: Prone to ice damage. Two-line chestnut bore can be a problem when plants are stressed DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE Michigan State University Michigan State University #12;RECOMMENDED TREES FOR MICHIGAN'S LOWER PENINSULA DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE

  11. PNGFIA FOREST INDUSTRY PLAN 2001 -2036 MORE TREES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    papers, tissues and packaging · Timber is a natural, renewable, energy efficient resource. · ForestPNGFIA FOREST INDUSTRY PLAN 2001 - 2036 · MORE TREES · MORE INVESTMENT · MORE JOBS · MORE RURAL DEVELOPMENT PNG Forest Industry Development Plan 2001-2036 1 http://www.pomcci.org.pg/hiri2001/PNGFIA.doc #12

  12. Eucalyptus as a Landscape Tree1 W. Douglas Hamilton2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Eucalyptus as a Landscape Tree1 W. Douglas Hamilton2 There have been 5 distinctly different studies at the University of California Deciduous Fruit Station in San Jose by W. Douglas Hamilton, Cooperative on Eucalyptus in California, June 14-16, 1983, Sacramento, Calif. 2 W. Douglas Hamilton, Horticulture

  13. 2013 Plant Sale Featuring a variety of trees, shrubs,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    for growing in Happy Valley, such as hard-to-find Pennsylvania natives, some of the best performers in the H1 2013 Plant Sale Featuring a variety of trees, shrubs, and perennials ideal for growing in Happy Valley, such as hard-to-find Pennsylvania natives, some of the best performers in the H.O. Smith Botanic

  14. Discovering Life Cycle Assessment Trees from Impact Factor Databases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and degradation of the envi- ronment. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a methodol- ogy for quantifying multiple to quantifying broad envi- ronmental impacts is the method of life cycle assessment (LCA) (Baumann and TillmanDiscovering Life Cycle Assessment Trees from Impact Factor Databases Naren Sundaravaradan

  15. Neuropeptide alterations in the tree shrew hypothalamus during volatile anesthesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neuropeptide alterations in the tree shrew hypothalamus during volatile anesthesia Laetitia perception and brain cognitive state. Prolonged general anesthesia has an impact on many of these processes anesthesia administered accompanying a neurosurgical procedure. Using a predicted-peptide database and hybrid

  16. Diseases of plantation forestry trees in eastern and southern Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diseases of plantation forestry trees in eastern and southern Africa J. Roux a*, G. Meke b , B are being allocated to the training of forestry staff andtreeimprovement.Theseefforts,aimedatstrengtheningthe forestry business, also embrace research on pests and diseases that might significantly reduce the value

  17. Research Advisory Service REPORT OF TREE PROBLEM FOR DIAGNOSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Supplementary Sheet A for nursery problems. ¾ Planting stock: Sample a number of bags, taking trees from diagnosis of the problem. Supplementary sheets are available for nursery and planting stock quality problems is dead or too hard, by chiselling a section out. ¾ Soil specimens: Take small samples of soil from near

  18. Decelerating growth in tropical forest trees Kenneth J. Feeley,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    significantly at both forests regardless of initial size or organizational level (species, community or stand poorly understood. We examined changes in tree growth rates over the past two decades for all species productivity caused by rising concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and carbon fertilization (Melillo et al. 1993

  19. CSP duality and trees of bounded pathwidth Catarina Carvalhoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krokhin, Andrei

    CSP duality and trees of bounded pathwidth Catarina Carvalhoa , V´ictor Dalmaub , Andrei Krokhin problem (CSP) provides a framework in which it is possible to express, in a natural way, many.g., [10, 14]) that the CSP can be cast as the following fundamental problem: given two finite relational

  20. CSP duality and trees of bounded pathwidth Catarina Carvalhoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krokhin, Andrei

    CSP duality and trees of bounded pathwidth Catarina Carvalhoa , V´ictor Dalmaub , Andrei Krokhin satisfaction problem (CSP) provides a framework in which it is possible to express, in a natural way, many.g., [11, 18]) that the CSP can be cast as the following fundamental problem: given two finite relational

  1. Original article The study of tree fine root distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    distribution and growth were studied in a natural oak-birch coppice, by combining the trench and observation. Tree - root - distribution - profile - spatial distribution - coppice - birch - oak Résumé &mdash to applying this method to a coppicing expe- riment (Bedeneau and Auclair, in prepara- tion). Materials

  2. Hierarchical Decision Tree Induction in Distributed Genomic Databases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuster, Assaf

    . INTRODUCTION The analysis of large databases requires automation. Data mining tools have been shown mining tools are extremely useful for the analysis of genomic data as well [26]. Since the number on diseases, response to treatment, and the risk of side effects [23]. Providing efficient decision tree

  3. Parallel Formulations of Tree-Projection-Based Sequence Mining Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karypis, George

    , database projection algorithms, data mining, parallel processing This work was supported by NSF CCR-9972519 Institute. 1 #12;1 Introduction In recent years there has been an increased interest in using data miningParallel Formulations of Tree-Projection-Based Sequence Mining Algorithm Valerie Guralnik

  4. How to Generate Fault Trees from Causal In uence Diagrams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladkin, Peter B.

    . 1 #12; Hydrocarbon in Steam in Catalyst in Vent 1 Vent 2 Product out Tank Pressure controller Handbook [VGRH81], written by some of the original developers of fault tree methodology in the nuclear; Explosion Pressure too high PRV 1 does not open PRV 2 does not open Valve failure Operator does not know

  5. Coding Hazardous Tree Failures for a Data Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    management; computer programs; coding. The Author Lee A. Paine is a forest pathologist, stationed in Berkeley in the manual on the indicated pages. Page 7, just above H. Property or Person Directly Affected, insert: CityCoding Hazardous Tree Failures for a Data Management System Lee A. Paine PACIFIC SOUTHWEST

  6. Biomedical Image Classification with Random Subwindows and Decision Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehenkel, Louis

    Biomedical Image Classification with Random Subwindows and Decision Trees Rapha¨el Mar´ee, Pierre a problem of biomedical image classification that involves the automatic classification of x-ray images in terms of subwindow relevance. 1 Introduction International Workshop on Computer Vision for Biomedical

  7. Climatic extremes improve predictions of spatial patterns of tree species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

    Climatic extremes improve predictions of spatial patterns of tree species Niklaus E. Zimmermanna,1 of climate extremes suggests the importance of understanding their additional influence on range limits. Here, we assess how measures representing climate extremes (i.e., interannual variability in climate

  8. The potential energy of biased random walks on trees Yueyun Hu and Zhan Shi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The potential energy of biased random walks on trees by Yueyun Hu and Zhan Shi Universit´e Paris­Watson tree, branching random walk, slow movement, random walk in a random environment, potential energy. 2010 XIII & Universit´e Paris VI Summary. Biased random walks on supercritical Galton­Watson trees

  9. Shape minimization of the dissipated energy in dyadic trees Xavier Dubois de La Sabloni`ere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Shape minimization of the dissipated energy in dyadic trees Xavier Dubois de La Sabloni in finding the shape of the tree that minimizes the viscous energy dissipated by the fluid with a constrained of energy by viscous effects and the question of the optimization of the tree geometry arises. Important

  10. Shapes of tree representations of spinglass Wim Hordijk a , Jose F. Fontanari a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Peter F.

    of distinguishing di#erent types of landscapes, that the barrier trees from p­spin energy landscapes are quite di of barrier trees, whose leaves represent the local minima and the internal nodes the lowest­energy saddles of barrier trees (and hence energy landscapes) remains to be obtained. For instance, the size

  11. Rapid Protein Side-Chain Packing via Tree Decomposition Jinbo Xu1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jinbo

    is taken into consideration, then our tree-decomposition based energy minimization algorithm is more thanRapid Protein Side-Chain Packing via Tree Decomposition Jinbo Xu1,2 1 School of Computer Science 02139. j3xu@theory.csail.mit.edu Abstract. This paper proposes a novel tree decomposition based side

  12. Hector is an Energy effiCient Tree-based Optimized Routing protocol for wireless networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stojmenovic, Ivan

    Hector is an Energy effiCient Tree-based Optimized Routing protocol for wireless networks Nathalie geographic locations. We propose HECTOR, a hybrid energy efficient tree-based optimized routing protocol, based on two sets of virtual coordinates. One set is based on rooted tree coordinates, and the other

  13. Minimal supporting subtrees for the free energy of polymers on disordered trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minimal supporting subtrees for the free energy of polymers on disordered trees Peter M, the free energy is supported by a random tree of positive exponential growth rate, which is strictly Abstract: We consider a model of directed polymers on a regular tree with a disorder given by independent

  14. On the Cost and Quality Tradeoff in Constructing Minimum-Energy Broadcast Trees in Wireless Ad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Y. Charlie

    On the Cost and Quality Tradeoff in Constructing Minimum-Energy Broadcast Trees in Wireless Ad Hoc], each having a different complexity and produc- ing a broadcast tree with a different energy cost. Thus to the quality of the trees constructed. II. BUILDING BLOCKS The three ingredients that constitute any minimum-energy

  15. Shape minimization of the dissipated energy in dyadic trees Xavier Dubois de La Sabloni`ere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Privat, Yannick

    Shape minimization of the dissipated energy in dyadic trees Xavier Dubois de La Sabloni in finding the shape of the tree that minimizes the viscous energy dissipated by the fluid with a constrained on the optimal shape of a dyadic tree in which flows a Newtonian fluid. Our optimization problem consists

  16. Elmore Model for Energy Estimation in RC Trees Quming Zhou and Kartik Mohanram

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanram, Kartik

    Elmore Model for Energy Estimation in RC Trees Quming Zhou and Kartik Mohanram Department This paper presents analysis methods for energy estimation in RC trees driven by time-varying voltage sources]: Design aids--simulation General Terms: Algorithms Keywords: Energy estimation, RC trees, interconnect. 1

  17. An Adaptive Tree Code for Computing Total Potential Energy in Classical Molecular Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan, Zhong-Hui

    An Adaptive Tree Code for Computing Total Potential Energy in Classical Molecular Systems Zhong, 2000 Abstract A tree code algorithm is presented for rapid computation of the total potential energy are presented for a variety of systems. Keywords: adaptive tree code; total potential energy; nonbonded

  18. AN ENERGY-AWARE SPANNING TREE AlGORITHM FOR DATA AGGREGATION IN WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Vincent

    AN ENERGY-AWARE SPANNING TREE AlGORITHM FOR DATA AGGREGATION IN WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS Marc Lee. In this paper, we propose E-Span, which is an energy-aware spanning tree algorithm. E-Span is a distributed's residual energy. In [5], a dynamic convoy tree-based collaboration framework for tracking a mobile target

  19. Energy-Efficient Multiple Routing Trees for Aggregate Query Evaluation in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Weifa

    Energy-Efficient Multiple Routing Trees for Aggregate Query Evaluation in Sensor Networks Yuzhen is of paramount importance. Energy-efficient routing trees built for in-network pro- cessing play a central role multiple routing trees in sensor networks for the evaluation of a class of aggre- gate queries including

  20. Bubble tree convergence for the harmonic sequence of harmonic surfaces in CPn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Tiao

    ] and there are no necks [15], i.e. the energy of the bubble tree map is the limit of the energies of the sequenceBubble tree convergence for the harmonic sequence of harmonic surfaces in CPn Mo Xiaohuan and Sun holomorphic (or anti- holomorphic) map from M to CPn , or a "bubble tree limit" consisting of a har- monic map