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1

Integrated pest management (IPM) is an ecological approach to pest control that combines several different techniques to maintain pests below damaging levels. Pests may include insects, spiders, mites, diseases, weeds,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their developing baby. And that includes pesticides, from the kind that farmers spray on fruit and vegetable crops because while others have linked pesticide exposure to potential developmental effects your exposure to pesticides by avoiding crops treated with the chemicals. But if you can't afford

New Hampshire, University of

2

Guest Editorial: Laser Damage  

SciTech Connect

Laser damage of optical materials, first reported in 1964, continues to limit the output energy and power of pulsed and continuous-wave laser systems. In spite of some 48 years of research in this area, interest from the international laser community to laser damage issues remains at a very high level and does not show any sign of decreasing. Moreover, it grows with the development of novel laser systems, for example, ultrafast and short-wavelength lasers that involve new damage effects and specific mechanisms not studied before. This interest is evident from the high level of attendance and presentations at the annual SPIE Laser Damage Symposium (aka, Boulder Damage Symposium) that has been held in Boulder, Colorado, since 1969. This special section of Optical Engineering is the first one devoted to the entire field of laser damage rather than to a specific part. It is prepared in response to growing interest from the international laser-damage community. Some papers in this special section were presented at the Laser Damage Symposium; others were submitted in response to the general call for papers for this special section. The 18 papers compiled into this special section represent many sides of the broad field of laser-damage research. They consider theoretical studies of the fundamental mechanisms of laser damage including laser-driven electron dynamics in solids (O. Brenk and B. Rethfeld; A. Nikiforov, A. Epifanov, and S. Garnov; T. Apostolova et al.), modeling of propagation effects for ultrashort high-intensity laser pulses (J. Gulley), an overview of mechanisms of inclusion-induced damage (M. Koldunov and A. Manenkov), the formation of specific periodic ripples on a metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses (M. Ahsan and M. Lee), and the laser-plasma effects on damage in glass (Y. Li et al). Material characterization is represented by the papers devoted to accurate and reliable measurements of absorption with special emphasis on thin films (C. Mühlig and S. Bublitz; B. Cho, E. Danielewicz, and J. Rudisill; W. Palm et al; and J. Lu et al.). Statistical treatment of measurements of the laser-damage threshold (J. Arenberg) and the relationship to damage mechanisms (F. Wagner et al.) represent the large subfield of laser-damage measurements. Various aspects of multilayer coating and thin-film characterization are considered in papers by B. Cho, J. Rudisill, and E. Danielewicz (spectral shift in multilayer mirrors) and R. Weber et al. (novel approach to damage studies based on third-harmonic generation microscopy). Of special interest for readers is the paper by C. Stolz that summarizes the results of four “thin-film damage competitions” organized as a part of the Laser Damage Symposium. Another paper is devoted to thermal annealing of damage precursors (N. Shen et al.). Finally, the influence of nano-size contamination on initiation of laser damage by ultrashort pulses is considered in paper of V. Komolov et al.

Vitaly Gruzdev, Michelle D. Shinn

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Cambium Damage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cambium Damage Cambium Damage Name: Jamie Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: If the bark from the lower part of trees (elm trees) is almost completly removed (in this case by animals)to a height of about 8ft, is it possible that the trees will still live? What can be done to help the trees? Replies: If the tree has been girdled, that is, the bark and cambium layer beneath it, has been removed completely around the tree, then it will die. If there is any portion of the bark remaining it may live, but if that remaining is small it probably will die fairly soon due to general decline. If the cambium layer has not been destroyed it may recover, but once the bark is stripped away it is most likely doomed because of the likelihood of invasion by fungi, insects, etc. A local forester or landscaper might be able to offer more help if they see it.

4

Ductile damage model with void coalescence  

SciTech Connect

A general model for ductile damage in metals is presented. It includes damage induced by shear stress as well as damage caused by volumetric tension. Spallation is included as a special case. Strain induced damage is also treated. Void nucleation and growth are included and give rise to strain rate effects. Strain rate effects also arise in the model through elastic release wave propagation between damage centers. Underlying physics of the model is the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids in a plastically flowing solid. Implementation of the model in hydrocodes is discussed.

Tonks, D.L.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Schools - CPU Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the investigation of computers in a school computer lab that were being damaged.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

6

Corrosion and Hydrogen Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Advanced Materials and Reservoir Engineering for Extreme Oil & Gas Environments: Corrosion and Hydrogen Damage Sponsored by: TMS ...

7

Ductile damage modeling based on void coalescence and percolation theories  

SciTech Connect

A general model for ductile damage in metals is presented. It includes damage induced by shear stress as well as damage caused by volumetric tension. Spallation is included as a special case. Strain induced damage is also treated. Void nucleation and growth are included, and give rise to strain rate effects. Strain rate effects also arise in the model through elastic release wave propagation between damage centers. The underlying physics of the model is the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids in a plastically flowing solid. The model is intended for hydrocode based computer simulation. An experimental program is underway to validate the model.

Tonks, D.L.; Zurek, A.K.; Thissell, W.R.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix F Appendix F Cultural Resources, Including Section 106 Consultation STATE OF CALIFORNIA - THE RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN, JR., Governor OFFICE OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION 1725 23 rd Street, Suite 100 SACRAMENTO, CA 95816-7100 (916) 445-7000 Fax: (916) 445-7053 calshpo@parks.ca.gov www.ohp.parks.ca.gov June 14, 2011 Reply in Reference To: DOE110407A Angela Colamaria Loan Programs Office Environmental Compliance Division Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave SW, LP-10 Washington, DC 20585 Re: Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, California Dear Ms. Colamaria: Thank you for seeking my consultation regarding the above noted undertaking. Pursuant to 36 CFR Part 800 (as amended 8-05-04) regulations implementing Section

9

Primary Radiation Damage Formation  

SciTech Connect

The physical processes that give rise to changes in the microstructure, and the physical and mechanical properties of materials exposed to energetic particles are initiated by essentially elastic collisions between atoms in what has been called an atomic displacement cascade. The formation and evolution of this primary radiation damage mechanism are described to provide an overview of how stable defects are formed by displacement cascades, as well as the nature and morphology of the defects themselves. The impact of the primary variables cascade energy and irradiation temperature are discussed, along with a range of secondary factors that can influence damage formation.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 01/13/14 7.83 7.76 7.90 8.91 8.76 8.11 3.68 01/06/14 8.00 7.78 7.94 8.92 8.74 8.09 3.69 12/30/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.68 12/23/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.63 12/16/13 7.86 7.79 8.05 9.00 8.78 8.08 3.61 12/9/13 7.95 7.81 8.14 8.99 8.80 8.12 3.63 12/2/13 7.91 7.68 8.07 8.85 8.68 8.08 3.64 11/25/13 7.69 7.61 8.07 8.77 8.63 7.97 3.65 11/18/13 7.99 7.54 8.00 8.70 8.57 7.92 3.57 11/11/13 7.63 7.44 7.79 8.63 8.46 7.85 3.55 11/4/13 7.70 7.51 7.98 8.70 8.59 7.86 3.61 10/28/13 8.02 7.74 8.08 8.96 8.79 8.04 3.64 10/21/13 7.91 7.71 8.11 8.94 8.80 8.05 3.70 10/14/13 7.88 7.62 8.05 8.87 8.74 7.97 3.69

11

Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation is exposed to a series of fluids and operations that can reduce its productive capacity. Any process that causes a loss in the productivity of an oil-, gas-, or water-saturated formation has a damaging effect on the reservoir. These damage mechanisms predominantly fall into three major classifications: mechanical, chemical, and biological. Underbalanced drilling operations involve drilling a portion of the wellbore at fluid pressures less than that of the target formation. This technology has been used to prevent or minimize problems associated with invasive formation damage, which often greatly reduces the productivity of oil and gas reservoirs, mainly in openhole horizontal-well applications. Underbalanced drilling is not a solution for all formation-damage problems. Damage caused by poorly designed and/or executed underbalanced drilling programs can equal or exceed that which may occur with a well-designed conventional overbalanced drilling program. Four techniques are currently available to achieve underbalanced conditions while drilling. These include using lightweight drilling fluids, injecting gas down the drillpipe, injecting gas into a parasite string, and using foam. This study provides an analysis of a number of potential damage mechanisms present when drilling underbalanced. It describes each one and its influence on the productivity of a well. Additionally it presents a general description of the different techniques that can be applied to carry out successful, cost-effective UBD operations, and discusses how these techniques may be used to reduce or eliminate formation damage.

Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Radiation-damage calculations with NJOY  

SciTech Connect

Atomic displacement, gas production, transmutation, and nuclear heating can all be calculated with the NJOY nuclear data processing system using evaluated data in ENDF/B format. Using NJOY helps assure consistency between damage cross sections and those used for transport, and NJOY provides convenient interface formats for linking data to application codes. Unique features of the damage calculation include a simple momentum balance treatment for radiative capture and a new model for (n, particle) reactions based on statistical model calculations. Sample results for iron and nickel are given and compared with the results of other methods.

MacFarlane, R.E.; Muir, D.W.; Mann, F.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Market Damages and the Economic Waste Fallacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robert E. Scott, The Case for Market Damages; Revisiting thethey pay less than full market damages but when buyerssellers recover full market damages. As a consequence,

Scott, Robert E.; Schwartz, Alan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Methods for globally treating silica optics to reduce optical damage  

SciTech Connect

A method for preventing damage caused by high intensity light sources to optical components includes annealing the optical component for a predetermined period. Another method includes etching the optical component in an etchant including fluoride and bi-fluoride ions. The method also includes ultrasonically agitating the etching solution during the process followed by rinsing of the optical component in a rinse bath.

Miller, Philip Edward; Suratwala, Tayyab Ishaq; Bude, Jeffrey Devin; Shen, Nan; Steele, William Augustus; Laurence, Ted Alfred; Feit, Michael Dennis; Wong, Lana Louie

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

15

Identifying structural damage from images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photographs of damaged buildings in Bam, Iran. . . . . . . .patches of Bam, Iran. . . . . . . . . Photo pictures ofBitemporal images of an urban region of Bam, Iran. . . . .

Chen, ZhiQiang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Corrosion Damage Models and Sustainability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Corrosion Damage Models and Sustainability ... Abstract Scope, The ability of industry to make sustainable choices in the future that optimize ...

17

Evaluation of Coal Combustion Product Damage Cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2007, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) published an assessment that identified 67 coal combustion product (CCP) management with groundwater or surface water impacts that were categorized as proven or potential damage cases. This report provides further evaluation of these cases, including additional data obtained from power companies and public sources. Volume 1 provides an overview and summary of findings, and Volume 2 provides descriptions of individual cases.

2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

18

Evaluation of Coal Combustion Product Damage Cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2007, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) published an assessment that identified 67 coal combustion product (CCP) management facilities with groundwater or surface water impacts that were categorized as proven or potential damage cases. This report provides further evaluation of these cases, including additional data obtained from power companies and public sources. Volume 1 provides an overview and summary of findings, and Volume 2 provides descriptions of individual cases.

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

19

Science Accelerator content now includes multimedia  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Accelerator content now includes multimedia Science Accelerator has expanded its suite of collections to include ScienceCinema, which contains videos produced by the U.S....

20

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home > Petroleum > Analysis > Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) Impacts

22

Excitation optimization for damage detection  

SciTech Connect

A technique is developed to answer the important question: 'Given limited system response measurements and ever-present physical limits on the level of excitation, what excitation should be provided to a system to make damage most detectable?' Specifically, a method is presented for optimizing excitations that maximize the sensitivity of output measurements to perturbations in damage-related parameters estimated with an extended Kalman filter. This optimization is carried out in a computationally efficient manner using adjoint-based optimization and causes the innovations term in the extended Kalman filter to be larger in the presence of estimation errors, which leads to a better estimate of the damage-related parameters in question. The technique is demonstrated numerically on a nonlinear 2 DOF system, where a significant improvement in the damage-related parameter estimation is observed.

Bement, Matthew T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bewley, Thomas R [UCSD

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Mechanisms and impact of damage resulting from hydraulic fracturing. Topical report, May 1995-July 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This topical report documents the mechanisms of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and their impact upon gas well productivity. The categories of damage reviewed include absolute or matrix permeability damage, relative permeability alterations, the damage of natural fracture permeability mechanisms and proppant conductivity impairment. Case studies are reviewed in which attempts are made to mitigate each of the damage types. Industry surveys have been conducted to determine the perceptions of the industry on the topic of formation damage following hydraulic fracturing and to identify key formations in which formation damage is a problem. From this information, technical hurdles and new technology needs are identified and estimates are made of the benefits of developing and applying minimum formation damage technology.

Penny, G.S.; Conway, M.W.; Almond, S.W.; Himes, R.; Nick, K.E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Laser-Induced Damage of Calcium Fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As advances continue to be made in laser technology there is an increasing demand for materials that have high thresholds for laser-induced damage. Laser damage occurs when light is absorbed, creating defects in the crystal lattice. These defects can lead to the emission of atoms, ions and molecules from the sample. One specific field where laser damage is of serious concern is semiconductor lithography, which is beginning to use light at a wavelength of 157 nm. CaF2 is a candidate material for use in this new generation of lithography. In order to prevent unnecessary damage of optical components, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms for laser damage and the factors that serve to enhance it. In this research, we study various aspects of laser interactions with CaF2, including impurity absorbance and various forms of damage caused by incident laser light. Ultraviolet (UV) laser light at 266 nm with both femtosecond (fs) and nanosecond (ns) pulse widths is used to induce ion and neutral particle emission from cleaved samples of CaF2. The resulting mass spectra show significant differences suggesting that different mechanisms for desorption occur following excitation using the different pulse durations. Following irradiation by ns pulses at 266 nm, multiple single-photon absorption from defect states is likely responsible for ion emission whereas the fs case is driven by a multi-photon absorption process. This idea is further supported by the measurements made of the transmission and reflection of fs laser pulses at 266 nm, the results of which reveal a non-linear absorption process in effect at high incident intensities. In addition, the kinetic energy profiles of desorbed Ca and K contaminant atoms are different indicating that a different mechanism is responsible for their emission as well. Overall, these results show that purity plays a key role in the desorption of atoms from CaF2 when using ns pulses. On the other hand, once the irradiance reaches high levels, like that of the fs case, significant desorption is possible due to multi-photon absorption by the intrinsic material.

Espana, A.; Joly, A.G.; Hess, W.P.; Dickinson, J.T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Damage Development on Stone Armored Breakwaters and Revetments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

method to calculate damage progression on a rubble-mound breakwater, revetment, or jetty trunk armor layer. The methods apply to uniform-sized armor stone (0.75W50 ? W50 ? 1.25W50, W50 = median weight of armor stone) as well as riprap (0.125W50 ? W50 ? 4W50) exposed to depthlimited wave conditions. The equations discussed herein are primarily intended to be used as part of a life-cycle analysis, to predict the damage for a series of storms throughout the lifetime of the structure. This lifecycle analysis including damage prediction allows engineers to balance initial cost with expected maintenance costs in order to reduce the overall cost of the structure. The equations are intended to provide a tool for accurate damage estimates in order to reduce the possibility of unexpected maintenance costs. INTRODUCTION: Rubble-mound breakwater, revetment, and jetty projects require accurate damage prediction as part of life-cycle analyses. But few studies have been conducted to determine damage progression on stone armor layers for variable wave conditions over the life of a structure. Previous armor stability lab studies were intended to determine damage for the peak of a design storm. As such, most previous laboratory studies were begun with an undamaged

Jeffery A. Melby

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Conservation of Severely Damaged Paper Using Passivation Polymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work examined the use of passivation polymers in the conservation of severely damaged paper. It specifically investigated the use of this functional polymer treatment to address the issues of damage to paper caused by waterlogging, mold, and internal acidity. Several experiments were designed and conducted to examine the effects of the polymers in the conservation of papers compromised by these conditions. Paper artifacts from the Bonfire Memorabilia Collection were selected and conserved using treatment protocols that included the use of the passivation polymers. The conservation of some of the damaged papers from this culturally important site demonstrated the effectiveness of the polymer treatment in real-world conservation situations. This dissertation established that the use of passivation polymers adds strength and stability to severely damaged paper.

Eilert, Eloise

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Microstructural Characterization of Damage Mechanisms of Graphite ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Nanostructured Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries and for Supercapacitors. Presentation Title, Microstructural Characterization of Damage  ...

28

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

29

Field Guide: Bearing Damage Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report 1021780, Manual of Bearing Failures and Repair in Power Plant Rotating Equipment, 2011 Update, is a comprehensive document on the subject of fluid film bearing damage modes. This field guide provides a pocket reference based upon the content of that report. ...

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

30

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers Intentionally Including - Engaging Minorities in Physics Careers April 24, 2013 - 4:37pm Addthis Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the American Institute of Physics Resources. Joining Director Dot Harris (second from left) were Marlene Kaplan, the Deputy Director of Education and director of EPP, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Claudia Rankins, a Program Officer with the National Science Foundation and Jim Stith, the past Vice-President of the

31

(INCLUDING ANY CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, EVEN IF EPRI OR ANY EPRI REPRESENTATIVE HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES) RESULTING FROM YOUR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Section 734.3(b)(3) and published in accordance with Section 734.7 of the U.S. Export Administration Regulations. As a result of this publication, this report is subject to only copyright protection and does not require any license agreement from EPRI. This notice supersedes the export control restrictions and any proprietary licensed material notices embedded in the document prior to publication. Graphite Decommissioning

C. Wood; Bradtec Decon Technologies

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Transmission line including support means with barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas insulated transmission line includes an elongated outer sheath, a plurality of inner conductors disposed within and extending along the outer sheath, and an insulating gas which electrically insulates the inner conductors from the outer sheath. A support insulator insulatably supports the inner conductors within the outer sheath, with the support insulator comprising a main body portion including a plurality of legs extending to the outer sheath, and barrier portions which extend between the legs. The barrier portions have openings therein adjacent the main body portion through which the inner conductors extend.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

DISASTER POLICY Including Extreme Emergent Situations (EES)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the ACGME website with information relating to the ACGME response to the disaster. 3. The University-specific Program Requirements. Defined Responsibilities Following the Declaration of a Disaster or Extreme EmergentPage 123 DISASTER POLICY Including Extreme Emergent Situations (EES) The University of Connecticut

Oliver, Douglas L.

34

Damage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in a nuclear reactor in a realistic time frame. XMAT's delivery of fragment ions at fission fragment energies achieves 25 dpahr. Reactor materials experience a range of dose...

35

Buildings Included on EMS Reports"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports" "Site","Property Name","Property ID","GSF","Incl. in Water Baseline (CY2007)","Water Baseline (sq. ft.)","Water CY2008 (sq. ft.)","Water CY2009 (sq. ft.)","Water Notes","Incl. in Energy Baseline (CY2003)","Energy Baseline (sq. ft.)","CY2008 Energy (sq. ft.)","CY2009 Energy (sq. ft.)","Energy Notes","Included as Existing Building","CY2008 Existing Building (sq. ft.)","Reason for Building Exclusion" "Column Totals",,"Totals",115139,,10579,10579,22512,,,3183365,26374,115374,,,99476 "Durango, CO, Disposal/Processing Site","STORAGE SHED","DUD-BLDG-STORSHED",100,"no",,,,,"no",,,,"OSF","no",,"Less than 5,000 GSF"

36

Power generation method including membrane separation  

SciTech Connect

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

38

Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

Rouse, Carl A. (Del Mar, CA); Simnad, Massoud T. (La Jolla, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Keeping track of the damage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Archives: News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Keeping track of the damage Scientists resolve long-standing mystery of ion-solid interactions Reprinted with kind permission from ScienceWise - Science Magazine of the Australian National University JANUARY 27, 2009 Bookmark and Share Dr. Patrick Kluth and Claudia Schnohr. Silica (silicon dioxide) is the most abundant mineral in the earth's crust and consequently is a core component in many rocks. It's quite common for such rocks to also contain natural traces of materials like uranium that undergo slow radioactive decay. This radioactivity produces energetic particles that smash through the surrounding silica creating tracks of localized damage in their wake.

40

Probabilistic fatigue damage prognosis using maximum entropy approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al., 1979). Therefore, fatigue damage accumulation is stochastic in nature. Several physical models, parameter estimation and future inspection and maintenance need to be carefully included for risk assessment studies have been reported to combine the information obtained from inspection with the physical model

Liu, Yongming

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Field Guide: Turbine Steam Path Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam path damage, particularly of blades, has long been recognized as a leading cause of steam turbine unavailability for large fossil fuel plants. Damage to steam path components by various mechanisms continues to result in significant economic impact domestically and internationally. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Report TR-108943, Turbine Steam Path Damage: Theory and Practice, Volumes 1 and 2, was prepared to compile the most recent knowledge about turbine steam path damage: identifying th...

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

42

Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Models of Procyon A including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detailed models of Procyon A based on new asteroseismic measurements by Eggenberger et al (2004) have been computed using the Geneva evolution code including shellular rotation and atomic diffusion. By combining all non-asteroseismic observables now available for Procyon A with these seismological data, we find that the observed mean large spacing of 55.5 +- 0.5 uHz favours a mass of 1.497 M_sol for Procyon A. We also determine the following global parameters of Procyon A: an age of t=1.72 +- 0.30 Gyr, an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.290 +- 0.010, a nearly solar initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0234 +- 0.0015 and a mixing-length parameter alpha=1.75 +- 0.40. Moreover, we show that the effects of rotation on the inner structure of the star may be revealed by asteroseismic observations if frequencies can be determined with a high precision. Existing seismological data of Procyon A are unfortunately not accurate enough to really test these differences in the input physics of our models.

P. Eggenberger; F. Carrier; F. Bouchy

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

44

Radiation Damage in Polarized Ammonia Solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid NH3 and ND3 provide a highly polarizable, radiation resistant source of polarized protons and deuterons and have been used extensively in high luminosity experiments investigating the spin structure of the nucleon. Over the past twenty years, the UVA polarized target group has been instrumental in producing and polarizing much of the material used in these studies, and many practical considerations have been learned in this time. In this discussion, we analyze the polarization performance of the solid ammonia targets used during the recent JLab Eg4 run. Topics include the rate of polarization decay with accumulated charge, the annealing procedure for radiation damaged targets to recover polarization, and the radiation induced change in optimum microwave frequency used to polarize the sample. We also discuss the success we have had in implementing frequency modulation of the polarizing microwave frequency.

K. Slifer

2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

45

Chemical damage due to drilling operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The drilling of geothermal wells can result in near wellbore damage of both the injection wells and production wells if proper precautions are not taken. Very little specific information on the chemical causes for drilling damage that can directly be applied to the drilling of a geothermal well in a given situation is available in the literature. As part of the present work, the sparse literature references related to the chemical aspects of drilling damage are reviewed. The various sources of chemically induced drilling damages that are related to drilling operations are summarized. Various means of minimizing these chemical damages during and after the drilling of a geothermal well are suggested also.

Vetter, O.J.; Kandarpa, V.

1982-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

46

Analysis of Tornado Damage Tracks from the 3 May Tornado Outbreak Using Multispectral Satellite Imagery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote sensing (RS) and geographic information systems (GIS) techniques are applied to high-resolution satellite imagery to determine characteristics of tornado damage from the 3 May 1999 tornado outbreak. Three remote sensing methods, including ...

May Yuan; Melany Dickens-Micozzi; Michael A. Magsig

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Nanofoams Response to Radiation Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) np-Au foams were successfully synthesized by de-alloying process; (2) np-Au foams remain porous structure after Ne ion irradiation to 1 dpa; (3) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams with highest and intermediate flux, while no SFTs were observed with lowest flux; (4) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams at RT, whereas no SFTs were observed at LNT irradiation; (5) The diffusivity of vacancies in Au at RT is high enough so that the vacancies have enough time to agglomerate and thus collapse. As a result, SFTs were formed; (6) The high flux created much more damage/time, vacancies don't have enough time to diffuse or recombine. As a result, SFTs were formed.

Fu, Engang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nastasi, Michael [Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, NE 68508; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis [PLS, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551; Bringa, Eduardo M. [CONICET and Inst. Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza, 5500 Argentina; Baldwin, Jon K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caro, Jose A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

Schools - Electronic Equipment Damage Due to Lightning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the investigation of damage to a school's phone equipment, security alarm, and network computer system during a lightning storm.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

WEB RESOURCE: Radiation Damage in Materials - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Topic Title: WEB RESOURCE: Radiation Damage in Materials Topic Summary: Allen, Todd. Lecture notes for Univ. of Wisconsin course

50

Detection and Location of Damage on Pipelines  

SciTech Connect

The INEEL has developed and successfully tested a real-time pipeline damage detection and location system. This system uses porous metal resistive traces applied to the pipe to detect and locate damage. The porous metal resistive traces are sprayed along the length of a pipeline. The unique nature and arrangement of the traces allows locating the damage in real time along miles of pipe. This system allows pipeline operators to detect damage when and where it is occurring, and the decision to shut down a transmission pipeline can be made with actual real-time data, instead of conservative estimates from visual inspection above the area.

Karen A. Moore; Robert Carrington; John Richardson

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Natural Resource Damages Assessment | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Council Report Calls for Official Natural Resource Damage Assessment for LANL NRDA PreAssessment Screen, January 2010 Factsheet: Los Alamos National Laboratory...

52

Wind Damage in Washington, DC, 1975  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a large region in the Eastern United States was subjected to severe winds. ... Bureau of Standards (NBS) conducted a limited study of wind damage to ...

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

53

NDE, Foreign Object Damage, and Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Ceramic Matrix Composites: NDE, Foreign Object Damage, and .... used in cylindrical liners, pistons, rings and combustion chamber for ...

54

Water is used for many purposes, includ-ing growing crops, producing copper,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WATER USES Water is used for many purposes, includ- ing growing crops, producing copper, generating electricity, watering lawns, keeping clean, drinking and recreation. Bal- ancing the water budget comes down of the water budget. Reducing demand involves re- ducing how much water each person uses, lim- iting the number

55

Considerations for Planting Corn into Damaged Fields of Wheat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many folks are still assessing the condition of wheat fields damaged by the low temperatures of the past week. In some situations, additional damage to wheat has occurred from standing water in fields due to frequent rains this winter and spring. Some growers may decide replanting damaged wheat fields to corn is a viable economic option. Some of the key considerations for doing so are described in this article. Killing the Remaining Stand of Wheat For damaged wheat fields that will be planted to corn, complete and timely control of the existing wheat is more important than if planting to soybean. Corn is more sensitive to early-season weed competition than soybean. Living wheat plants are essentially weeds and can absorb nitrogen and make it unavailable for the corn plants during the same growing season. Use of a glyphosate-based burndown program should include the use of glyphosate at 1.5 lb ae/A + 2.4-D at 1-2 pts/A. The herbicide 2,4-D is needed to control glyphosateresistant marestail which is very prevalent in southern Indiana and help with control of emerged common lambsquarter and ragweed. Apply in a spray volume of 10 to 15 GPA

Bill Johnson; Tony Vyn; Jim Camberato; Christian Krupke; Rl (bob Nielsen; Depts Of Botany; Plant Pathology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Damage from methamphetamine abuse documented  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dennis Tartaglia, 212 481-7000, dennist@mbooth.com or Karen McNulty Walsh, 631 344-8350 go to home page Dennis Tartaglia, 212 481-7000, dennist@mbooth.com or Karen McNulty Walsh, 631 344-8350 go to home page 01-16 March 1, 2001 Researchers Document Brain Damage, Reduction in Motor and Cognitive Function from Methamphetamine Abuse "Speed" Shows More Neurotoxic Effects Than Heroin, Cocaine, or Alcohol UPTON, NY -- Two studies by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory provide evidence for the first time that abuse of methamphetamine -- the drug commonly known as "speed" -- is associated with physiological changes in two systems of the human brain. The changes are evident even for abusers who have not taken the drug for a year or more. The studies also found that methamphetamine abusers have reduced cognitive and motor functions, even at one year after quitting the drug. The findings appear in the March issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

57

A plastic damage approach for confined concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many situations in which it is necessary to increase the capacity of structures in use. This need maybe either for a change of use or because the structures have suffered some damage or have shown little resistance in case of extreme loads ... Keywords: Concrete, Confinement, Damage, Dilation, Fiber reinforced composites, Plasticity

B. M. Luccioni; V. C. Rougier

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

A new damage testing system for detailed evaluation of damage behavior of bulk KDP and DKDP  

SciTech Connect

We describe a new damage testing approach and instrumentation that provides quantitative measurements of bulk damage performance versus fluence for several frequencies. A major advantage of this method is that it can simultaneously provide direct information on pinpoint density and size, and beam obscuration. This allows for more accurate evaluation of material performance under operational conditions. Protocols for laser conditioning to improve damage performance can also be easily and rapidly evaluated.This damage testing approach has enabled us to perform complex experiments toward probing the fundamental mechanisms of damage initiation and conditioning.

DeMange, P; Negres, R A; Carr, C W; Radousky, H B; Demos, S G

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

59

Strategic petroleum reserve caverns casing damage update 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hanging casing strings are used for oil and brine transfer in the domal salt storage caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Damage to these casings is of concern because hanging string replacement is costly and because of implications on cavern stability. Although the causes of casing damage are not always well defined, many events leading to damage are assumed to be the result of salt falls impacting the hanging strings. However, in some cases, operational aspects may be suspected. The history of damage to hanging strings is updated in this study to include the most recent events. Potential general domal and local operational and material factors that could influence the tendency for caverns to have salt falls are examined in detail. As a result of this examination, general factors, such as salt dome anomalies and crude type, and most of the operational factors, such as geometry, location and depressurizations, are not believed to be primary causes of casing damage. Further analysis is presented of the accumulation of insolubles during cavern solutioning and accumulation of salt fall material on the cavern floor. Inaccuracies in sump geometry probably make relative cavern insolubles contents uncertain. However, determination of the salt fall accumulations, which are more accurate, suggest that the caverns with the largest salt fall accumulations show the greatest number of hanging string events. There is good correlation between the accumulation rate and the number of events when the event numbers are corrected to an equivalent number for a single hanging string in a quiescent, operating cavern. The principal factor that determines the propensity for a cavern to exhibit this behavior is thought to be the effect of impurity content on the fracture behavior of salt.

Munson, D.E.; Molecke, M.A.; Neal, J.T. [and others

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

RAPID DAMAGE ASSESSMENT FROM HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGERY  

SciTech Connect

Disaster impact modeling and analysis uses huge volumes of image data that are produced immediately following a natural or an anthropogenic disaster event. Rapid damage assessment is the key to time critical decision support in disaster management to better utilize available response resources and accelerate recovery and relief efforts. But exploiting huge volumes of high resolution image data for identifying damaged areas with robust consistency in near real time is a challenging task. In this paper, we present an automated image analysis technique to identify areas of structural damage from high resolution optical satellite data using features based on image content.

Vijayaraj, Veeraraghavan [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Carbon Fiber Damage in Accelerator Beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in Beam Wire Scanners. Because of their thermomechanical properties they are very resistant to particle beams. Their strength deteriorates with time due to radiation damage and low-cycle thermal fatigue. In case of high intensity beams this process can accelerate and in extreme cases the fiber is damaged during a single scan. In this work a model describing the fiber temperature, thermionic emission and sublimation is discussed. Results are compared with fiber damage test performed on SPS beam in November 2008. In conclusions the limits of Wire Scanner operation on high intensity beams are drawn.

Sapinski, M; Guerrero, A; Koopman, J; Métral, E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

A damage model for rock fragmentation and comparison of calculations with blasting experiments in granite  

SciTech Connect

Early attempts at estimation of stress wave damage due to blasting by use of finite element calculations met with limited success due to numerical instabilities that prevented calculations from being carried to late times. An improved damage model allows finite element calculations which remain stable at late times. Reasonable agreement between crater profiles calculated with this model using the PRONTO finite element program and excavated crater profiles from blasting experiments in granite demonstrate a successful application of this model. Detailed instructions for use of this new damage model with the PRONTO finite element programs are included. 18 refs., 16 figs.

Thorne, B.J.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Mass spectrometric studies of laser damage in calcium fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both electron impact- and laser-ionization-mass spectrometry have been used to prove the material spalled from CaF/sub 2/ surfaces by the fundamental (1.06..mu..) and harmonic (355 nm and 266 nm) outputs from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. We have identified a number of gas phase products, including Ca, CaF and tentatively, CaF/sub 2/, and have measured their translational and internal energy distributions. Results suggest that while the 1.06..mu.. experiments can be adequately modeled in terms of a single damage mechanism (likely avalanche breakdown), the short-wavelength results suggest the onset of second mechanism, perhaps multiphoton absorption. This is consistent with both the observed bimodal velocity distribution following short-wavelength damage, and with the decrease in CaF vibrational and rotational excitation.

Nogar, N.S.; Apel, E.C.; Estler, R.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Database of average-power damage thresholds at 1064 nm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have completed a database of average-power, laser-induced, damage thresholds at 1064 nm on a variety of materials. Measurements were made with a newly constructed laser to provide design input for moderate and high average-power laser projects. The measurements were conducted with 16-ns pulses at pulse-repetition frequencies ranging from 6 to 120 Hz. Samples were typically irradiated for time ranging from a fraction of a second up to 5 minutes (36,000 shots). We tested seven categories of samples which included antireflective coatings, high reflectors, polarizers, single and multiple layers of the same material, bare and overcoated metal surfaces, bare polished surfaces, and bulk materials. The measured damage threshold ranged from 46 J/cm/sup 2/ for a bare polished glass substrate. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Rainer, F.; Hildum, E.A.; Milam, D.

1987-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

65

Influence of radiation damage on ruby as a pressure gauge  

SciTech Connect

This study tackles the question if ruby crystals, irradiated with energetic heavy ions, can still be used as reliable pressure sensors. The problem is linked to novel irradiation experiments, exposing pressurized samples to swift heavy-ion beams. In order to test and quantify a possible influence of radiation damage on the laser-induced fluorescence lines of ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr{sup 3+}), small crystals were exposed to different heavy ions (Xe, Au, and U) with kinetic energies of several giga-electron volt at ambient as well as high-pressure conditions. With increasing fluence (ions/cm{sup 2}), the R{sub 1} and R{sub 2} lines shift both to lower wavelengths which leads to an underestimation of the pressure. An empirical correction term {epsilon} is proposed to include the irradiation damage effect into the commonly employed ruby calibration scale.

Schuster, B. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Hochschulstrasse 6, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Weikusat, C.; Miletich, R. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 234-236, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Trautmann, C.; Neumann, R. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Fujara, F. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Hochschulstrasse 6, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

DAMAGE TO CONVENTIONAL AND SPECIAL TYPES OF RESIDENCES EXPOSED TO NUCLEAR EFFECTS  

SciTech Connect

Ten residential structures of wood, brick, lightweight reinforced concrete block, and lightweight precast concrete slabs were exposed in pairs to the effects of a nuclear device of approximately 30 kt yield, detonated atop a 500-ft tower. The houses represented various structural types, and two houses of each type were tested. One house was located at an anticipated overpressure at which collapse or major damage might be expected and the other was located at an anticipated overpressure at which damage without collapse might be expected. The one-story reinforced lightweight concrete block house and the one-story precast lightweight concrete house suffered only minor structural damage. Photographs are included of the houses both before and after damage. Motion pictures were made during the event and were analyzed for information on thermal and blast effects. Recommendations are included for strengthening the structures within the limits of practical economy and so providing increased protection to dwelling structures. (C.H.)

Randall, P.A.

1961-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS...

68

Joint Assessment of Cable Damage and Quantification of Effects from Fire (JACQUE-FIRE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 1 of this report documents the results of a Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) exercise that was undertaken on fire-induced electrical circuit failures that may occur in nuclear power plants when cables are damaged by fires.  Volume 2 documents the PRA expert elicitation results and will include the best estimate conditional probabilities of hot short-induced spurious operations of control circuits, given fire damage to associated cables.  This program was sponsored ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Review of Weld Repair Options for Grade 91, Part 2: Damage Development and Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the likely creep damage distributions in weld repairs in Grade 91 steel. Information is provided in terms of the various weld metals that may be used, including nickel-based, matching P91 (B9), and standard P9 (B8) weld metals. The different damage distributions for each type, with associated implications for nondestructive evaluation, are discussed. In particular, the limitations of using surface ...

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

70

Assessing United States hurricane damage under different environmental conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hurricane activity between 1979 and 2011 was studied to determine damage statistics under different environmental conditions. Hurricanes cause billions of dollars of damage every year in the United States, but damage ...

Maheras, Anastasia Francis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Using Landsat to Identify Thunderstorm Damage in Agricultural Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 12 and 18 August 1999, severe thunderstorms produced damaging winds and hail that caused an estimated $50 million in damage to agriculture in west-central Illinois. Landsat-7 imagery was obtained to determine the arealextent of damage and ...

Mace L. Bentley; Thomas L. Mote; Paporn Thebpanya

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Schools - Lightning Causing Electric Equipment Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the investigation of damage to a school's electronic controls and integrated circuit boards within their fire alarm and clock/bell system when there are lightning storms.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

Laser Damage Precursors in Fused Silica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a longstanding, and largely unexplained, correlation between the laser damage susceptibility of optical components and both the surface quality of the optics, and the presence of near surface fractures in an optic. In the present work, a combination of acid leaching, acid etching, and confocal time resolved photoluminescence (CTP) microscopy has been used to study laser damage initiation at indentation sites. The combination of localized polishing and variations in indentation loads allows one to isolate and characterize the laser damage susceptibility of densified, plastically flowed and fractured fused silica. The present results suggest that: (1) laser damage initiation and growth are strongly correlated with fracture surfaces, while densified and plastically flowed material is relatively benign, and (2) fracture events result in the formation of an electronically defective rich surface layer which promotes energy transfer from the optical beam to the glass matrix.

Miller, P; Suratwala, T; Bude, J; Laurence, T A; Shen, N; Steele, W A; Feit, M; Menapace, J; Wong, L

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

74

Thin Film Femtosecond Laser Damage Competition  

SciTech Connect

In order to determine the current status of thin film laser resistance within the private, academic, and government sectors, a damage competition was started at the 2008 Boulder Damage Symposium. This damage competition allows a direct comparison of the current state of the art of high laser resistance coatings since they are tested using the same damage test setup and the same protocol. In 2009 a high reflector coating was selected at a wavelength of 786 nm at normal incidence at a pulse length of 180 femtoseconds. A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity so only a summary of the results are presented here. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of deposition processes, coating materials and layer count, and spectral results will also be shared.

Stolz, C J; Ristau, D; Turowski, M; Blaschke, H

2009-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

75

Dealing with Storm-Damaged Trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many homeowners need help caring for or removing damaged trees after a natural disaster. This publication explains what a certified arborist is and how to select one. It also cautions against burning debris downed by a storm.

Kirk, Melanie; Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

76

Dealing with Storm-Damaged Trees (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many homeowners need help caring for or removing damaged trees after a natural disaster. This publication explains what a certified arborist is and how to select one. It also cautions against burning debris downed by a storm.

Kirk, Melanie; Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

77

Tornado Damage Estimation Using Polarimetric Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of tornadic debris signature (TDS) parameters to estimate tornado damage severity using Norman, Oklahoma (KOUN), polarimetric radar data (polarimetric version of the Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler radar). ...

David J. Bodine; Matthew R. Kumjian; Robert D. Palmer; Pamela L. Heinselman; Alexander V. Ryzhkov

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Controlled ion implant damage profile for etching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention pertains to a process for etching a material such as LiNbO{sub 3} by implanting ions having a plurality of different kinetic energies in an area to be etched, and then contacting the ion implanted area with an etchant. The various energies of the ions are selected to produce implant damage substantially uniformly throughout the entire depth of the zone to be etched, thus tailoring the vertical profile of the damaged zone.

Arnold, G.W. Jr.; Ashby, C.I.H.; Brannon, P.J.

1988-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

79

Reference Poster: Turbine Bearing Damage Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Damage to turbine and generator bearings accounts for a significant amount of lost generation in the power industry. There are numerous known damage mechanisms affecting these bearings, and as part of EPRI’s technology transfer efforts, we have developed a reference poster. This poster provides clear, concise, and visual information for a wide variety of mechanisms and is meant to supplement related EPRI projects. By providing an overview of various issues as well as information on how to ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

80

R-damage cassette (incorporated brass sleeve)  

SciTech Connect

The R-Damage series of ten experiments is part of a long-term collaboration with RFNC/VNIIEF in pulsed power technology. These experiments use a cylindrical configuration to study spallation damage, which allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material under proper driving conditions and post-shot collection of the damaged target material for subsequent metallographic analysis. Dynamic in-situ experimental velocimetry diagnostics are also employed. LANL is responsible for the design of the experimental load and velocimetry system. VNIIEF is responsible for the design and construction of the driving explosive magnetic generator. Eight of the experiments in the planned series have been completed. Thus far, data has been collected about failure initiation of a well-characterized material (aluminum) in a cylindrical geometry, the behavior of material recollected after damage from pressures in the damage initiation regime, and the behavior of material recollected after complete failure. The final two experiments will continue the study of material recollected after complete failure. The load assembly shown is similar to that employed in the previous two experiments, with some modiflications for easier assembly.

Griego, Jeffrey Randall [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ABSTRACT: Ion-Induced Damage Accumulation and Electron-Beam ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 27, 2007... Ion-Induced Damage Accumulation and Electron-Beam-Enhanced ... damage accumulation in strontium titanate from 1.0 MeV Au irradiation

82

Clustered DNA Damage Spectrum in Primary Human Hematopoietic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

94805 Villejuif Cedex France Clustered DNA Damages Induced by Low Radiation Doses Irradiation of cells with low doses of X- or -rays induces clustered damages in mammalian...

83

Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage to environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage to environmental monitoring stations, canyons Stations supporting Santa...

84

Reactor Loose Part Damage Assessments on Steam Generator Tube Sheets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??PROCTOR, WILLIAM CYRUS. Reactor Loose Part Damage Assessments on Steam Generator Tube Sheets. (Under the direction of Joseph Michael Doster). Damage from loose parts inside… (more)

Proctor, William Cyrus

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Experimental determination of the relationship between permeability and microfracture-induced damage in bedded salt  

SciTech Connect

The development of deep underground structures (e.g., shafts, mines, storage and disposal caverns) significantly alters the stress state in the rock near the structure or opening. The effect of such an opening is to concentrate the far-field stress near the free surface. For soft rock such as salt, the concentrating effect of the opening induces deviatoric stresses in the salt that may be large enough to initiate microcracks which then propagate with time. The volume of rock susceptible to damage by microfracturing is often referred to as the disturbed rock zone and, by its nature, is expected to exhibit high permeability relative to that of the native, far-field rock. This paper presents laboratory data that characterize microfracture-induced damage and the effect this damage has on permeability for bedded salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant located in southeastern New Mexico. Damage is induced in the salt through a series of tertiary creep experiments and quantified in terms of dilatant volumetric strain. The permeability of damaged specimens is then measured using nitrogen gas as the permeant. The range in damage investigated included dilatant volumetric strains from less than 0.03 percent to nearly 4.0 percent. Permeability values corresponding to these damage levels ranged from 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} m{sup 2}. Two simple models were fitted to the data for use in predicting permeability from dilatant volumetric strain.

Pfeifle, T.W. [RE/SPEC Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Brodsky, N.S.; Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Damage tolerance design procedures for an automotive composite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Among the durability issues of concern in the use of composites in automobile structures is the damaging effects that low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and roadway kickups) might have on strength and stiffness. This issue was experimentally investigated, and recommended design evaluation procedures were developed for a candidate automotive structural composite--a structural reaction injection-molded polyurethane reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass fibers. Two test facilities were built to cover the range of impacts of interest--a pendulum device to characterize the effects of relative heavy objects at low velocities and an air gun to characterize the effects of relatively light objects at higher velocities. In all cases, the test specimen was a 9 x 9 x 1/8-in.-thick plate clamped on an 8-in.-diam circle. Sixty-five impact tests were performed. Included were tests using various impactor sizes and weights, tests at {minus}40 F, and tests on specimens that has been presoaked in water or exposed to battery acid. Damage areas were determined using ultrasonic C-scans, and the resulting areas were found to correlate with the quantity impactor mass to a power times velocity. A design curve was derived from the correlation and validated using dropped brick tests. To evaluate strength and stiffness reductions, the impacted plate specimens were cut into tensile, compressive, and fatigue test specimens that were used to determine reductions as a function of damage area. It was found that for design purposes, the strength reduction could be determined by representing the damage area by a circular hole of equivalent area.

Corum, J.M.; Battiste, R.L.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Self-Healing of Structural Damage to Restore Performance of Electrical  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Self-Healing of Structural Damage to Self-Healing of Structural Damage to Restore Performance of Electrical Circuits Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights Highlight Archives News & Events Publications Contact BES Home 04.27.12 Self-Healing of Structural Damage to Restore Performance of Electrical Circuits Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Scientific Achievement Designed chemical interactions of liquid-metal-filled microcapsules target areas of microstructural damage and restore conductive pathways. Significance and Impact Selective self-healing mechanism extends the lifetime and reliability of electronic devices including battery electrodes. Research Details Liquid Indium-Gallium metal-filled microcapsules restore nearly 99% of the

88

Damage tracker: a cloud and mobile system for collecting damage information after natural disasters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tornadoes and other natural disasters frequently cause large amounts of damage to buildings and infrastructure. An important part of learning from these events is assessing key damage-indicators within the affected area. Researchers can analyze these ... Keywords: cloud, geo-tagging, natural disaster, tornado

Chris Hodapp, Matt Robbins, Jeff Gray, Andrew Graettinger

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices...

90

Property:Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:...

91

Application of a model to the evaluation of flood damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the initial results of a common methodology for the evaluation of damage produced by a flood. A model has been developed for flood damage estimation based on a geographic information system (GIS). It could be used by land administration ... Keywords: Damage evaluation, Flood, GIS, Hydraulic modelling, Stage---damage curves

F. Luino; C. G. Cirio; M. Biddoccu; A. Agangi; W. Giulietto; F. Godone; G. Nigrelli

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service Table of Contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service Table of Contents i TEXAS WILDLIFE DAMAGE MANAGMENT.............................................................................................................................. 2 #12;Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service, Texas A&M University System Page 1 TEXAS WILDLIFE-651-2880 karen.s.dulaney@usda.gov #12;Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service, Texas A&M University System Page

Wilkins, Neal

93

EFFECT OF CREVICE FORMER ON CORROSION DAMAGE PROPAGATION  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report are: (1) To determine the effect of the crevice former on the localized corrosion damage propagation; (2) FOCUS on post initiation stage, crevice propagation and arrest processes; (3) Determine the evolution of damage--severity, shape, location/distribution, damage profile; and (4) Model of crevice corrosion propagation, i.e. the evolution of the crevice corrosion damage profile.

J.H. Payer; U. Landau; X. Shan; A.S. Agarwal

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Assessing Hail and Freeze Damage to Field Corn and Sorghum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a crop has been damaged by hail, it is important to be able to gauge the extent of the damage, the potential for recovery of the damaged crop, and the actions that might be necessary to maximize the recovery process. This publication tells how to assess hail damage.

Livingston, Stephen

1995-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

95

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Wisconsin (Million Cubic Feet)

96

AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF RAMAN LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTECRYSTAL SURFACES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High quality CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals have the potential for use in room temperature gamma-ray and X-ray spectrometers. Over the last decade, the methods for growing high quality CZT have improved the quality of the produced crystals however there are material features that can influence the performance of these materials as radiation detectors. The presence of structural heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), and secondary phases (SPs) can have an impact on the detector performance. There is considerable need for reliable and reproducible characterization methods for the measurement of crystal quality. With improvements in material characterization and synthesis, these crystals may become suitable for widespread use in gamma radiation detection. Characterization techniques currently utilized to test for quality and/or to predict performance of the crystal as a gamma-ray detector include infrared (IR) transmission imaging, synchrotron X-ray topography, photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy. In some cases, damage caused by characterization methods can have deleterious effects on the crystal performance. The availability of non-destructive analysis techniques is essential to validate a crystal's quality and its ability to be used for either qualitative or quantitative gamma-ray or X-ray detection. The work presented herein discusses the damage that occurs during characterization of the CZT surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy, even at minimal laser powers. Previous Raman studies have shown that the localized annealing from tightly focused, low powered lasers results in areas of higher Te concentration on the CZT surface. This type of laser damage on the surface resulted in decreased detector performance which was most likely due to increased leakage current caused by areas of higher Te concentration. In this study, AFM was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to a Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage and increased conductivity in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam.

Teague, L.; Duff, M.

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

97

Radiation Damage in Nanostructured Metallic Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High energy neutron and charged particle radiation cause microstructural and mechanical degradation in structural metals and alloys, such as phase segregation, void swelling, embrittlement and creep. Radiation induced damages typically limit nuclear materials to a lifetime of about 40 years. Next generation nuclear reactors require materials that can sustain over 60 - 80 years. Therefore it is of great significance to explore new materials with better radiation resistance, to design metals with favorable microstructures and to investigate their response to radiation. The goals of this thesis are to study the radiation responses of several nanostructured metallic thin film systems, including Ag/Ni multilayers, nanotwinned Ag and nanocrystalline Fe. Such systems obtain high volume fraction of boundaries, which are considered sinks to radiation induced defects. From the viewpoint of nanomechanics, it is of interest to investigate the plastic deformation mechanisms of nanostructured films, which typically show strong size dependence. By controlling the feature size (layer thickness, twin spacing and grain size), it is applicable to picture a deformation mechanism map which also provides prerequisite information for subsequent radiation hardening study. And from the viewpoint of radiation effects, it is of interest to explore the fundamentals of radiation response, to examine the microstructural and mechanical variations of irradiated nanometals and to enrich the design database. More importantly, with the assistance of in situ techniques, it is appealing to examine the defect generation, evolution, annihilation, absorption and interaction with internal interfaces (layer interfaces, twin boundaries and grain boundaries). Moreover, well-designed nanostructures can also verify the speculation that radiation induced defect density and hardening show clear size dependence. The focus of this thesis lies in the radiation response of Ag/Ni multilayers and nanotwinned Ag subjected to charged particles. The radiation effects in irradiated nanograined Fe are also investigated for comparison. Radiation responses in these nanostructured metallic films suggest that immiscible incoherent Ag/Ni multilayers are more resistant to radiation in comparison to their monolithic counterparts. Their mechanical properties and radiation response show strong layer thickness dependence in terms of radiation hardening and defect density. Coherent twin boundaries can interact with stacking fault tetrahedral and remove them effectively. Twin boundaries can actively absorb radiation induced defects and defect clusters resulting in boundary migration. Size dependence is also found in nanograins where fewer defects exhibit in films with smaller grains.

Yu, Kaiyuan

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Tornado Damage Survey at Moore, Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 4 May 1999, the Wind Science and Engineering Research Center at Texas Tech University dispatched three survey teams to the Oklahoma City area to conduct a tornado damage survey. The author was the leader of one of the teams whose purpose was ...

Timothy P. Marshall

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Quantitative study of oilfield casing damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carrying on the analysis to the cause of casing failure based on engineering factors and geological factors, and choosing the improved analytic hierarchy process to have a quantitative study for oilfield of the casing failure, improved the influence ... Keywords: analytical hierarchy process (AHP), casing damage, quantitative analysis

Deng Rui; Zhang Liang; Guo Haimin

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

WIND TURBINE BLADE DESIGN BASED ON DURABILITY AND DAMAGE TOLERANCE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the program was to demonstrate and verify Certification-by-Analysis (CBA) capability for wind turbine blades made from advanced lightweight composite materials. The approach integrated durability and damage tolerance analysis with robust design and virtual testing capabilities to deliver superior, durable, low weight, low cost, long life, and reliable wind blade design. The GENOA durability and life prediction software suite was be used as the primary simulation tool. First, a micromechanics-based computational approach was used to assess the durability of composite laminates with ply drop features commonly used in wind turbine applications. Ply drops occur in composite joints and closures of wind turbine blades to reduce skin thicknesses along the blade span. They increase localized stress concentration, which may cause premature delamination failure in composite and reduced fatigue service life. Durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) were evaluated utilizing a multi-scale micro-macro progressive failure analysis (PFA) technique. PFA is finite element based and is capable of detecting all stages of material damage including initiation and propagation of delamination. It assesses multiple failure criteria and includes the effects of manufacturing anomalies (i.e., void, fiber waviness). Two different approaches have been used within PFA. The first approach is Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) PFA while the second one is strength-based. Constituent stiffness and strength properties for glass and carbon based material systems were reverse engineered for use in D&DT evaluation of coupons with ply drops under static loading. Lamina and laminate properties calculated using manufacturing and composite architecture details matched closely published test data. Similarly, resin properties were determined for fatigue life calculation. The simulation not only reproduced static strength and fatigue life as observed in the test, it also showed composite damage and fracture modes that resemble those reported in the tests. The results show that computational simulation can be relied on to enhance the design of tapered composite structures such as the ones used in turbine wind blades. A computational simulation for durability, damage tolerance (D&DT) and reliability of composite wind turbine blade structures in presence of uncertainties in material properties was performed. A composite turbine blade was first assessed with finite element based multi-scale progressive failure analysis to determine failure modes and locations as well as the fracture load. D&DT analyses were then validated with static test performed at Sandia National Laboratories. The work was followed by detailed weight analysis to identify contribution of various materials to the overall weight of the blade. The methodology ensured that certain types of failure modes, such as delamination progression, are contained to reduce risk to the structure. Probabilistic analysis indicated that composite shear strength has a great influence on the blade ultimate load under static loading. Weight was reduced by 12% with robust design without loss in reliability or D&DT. Structural benefits obtained with the use of enhanced matrix properties through nanoparticles infusion were also assessed. Thin unidirectional fiberglass layers enriched with silica nanoparticles were applied to the outer surfaces of a wind blade to improve its overall structural performance and durability. The wind blade was a 9-meter prototype structure manufactured and tested subject to three saddle static loading at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The blade manufacturing did not include the use of any nano-material. With silica nanoparticles in glass composite applied to the exterior surfaces of the blade, the durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) results from multi-scale PFA showed an increase in ultimate load of the blade by 9.2% as compared to baseline structural performance (without nano). The use of nanoparticles lead to a delay in the onset of delamination. Load-displacement relati

Galib Abumeri; Frank Abdi (PhD)

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Energetics of a Symmetric Circulation Including Momentum Constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theory of available potential energy (APE) for symmetric circulations, which includes momentum constraints, is presented. The theory is a generalization of the classical theory of APE, which includes only thermal constraints on the circulation. ...

Sorin Codoban; Theodore G. Shepherd

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Impact of substrate surface scratches on the laser damage resistance of multilayer coatings  

SciTech Connect

Substrate scratches can limit the laser resistance of multilayer mirror coatings on high-peak-power laser systems. To date, the mechanism by which substrate surface defects affect the performance of coating layers under high power laser irradiation is not well defined. In this study, we combine experimental approaches with theoretical simulations to delineate the correlation between laser damage resistance of coating layers and the physical properties of the substrate surface defects including scratches. A focused ion beam technique is used to reveal the morphological evolution of coating layers on surface scratches. Preliminary results show that coating layers initially follow the trench morphology on the substrate surface, and as the thickness increases, gradually overcoat voids and planarize the surface. Simulations of the electrical-field distribution of the defective layers using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method show that field intensification exists mostly near the top surface region of the coating near convex focusing structures. The light intensification could be responsible for the reduced damage threshold. Damage testing under 1064 nm, 3 ns laser irradiation over coating layers on substrates with designed scratches show that damage probability and threshold of the multilayer depend on substrate scratch density and width. Our preliminary results show that damage occurs on the region of the coating where substrate scratches reside and etching of the substrate before coating does not seem to improve the laser damage resistance.

Qiu, S; Wolfe, J; Monterrosa, A; Teslich, N; Feit, M; Pistor, T; Stolz, C

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

103

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Other (including Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Guam Refinery Thermal Cracking/Other (including Gas Oil) Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

104

Scheduling optimization of a real flexible job shop including side ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 19, 2013 ... including side constraints regarding preventive maintenance, fixture availabil- ...... Engineering and Engineering Management, pp. 787–791.

105

Carbon Fiber Damage in Particle Beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in beam wire scanners. The heating of the fiber due to energy loss of the particles travelling through is simulated with Geant4. The heating induced by the beam electromagnetic field is estimated with ANSYS. The heat transfer and sublimation processes are modelled. Due to the model nonlinearity, a numerical approach based on discretization of the wire movement is used to solve it for particular beams. Radiation damage to the fiber is estimated with SRIM. The model is tested with available SPS and LEP data and a dedicated damage test on the SPS beam is performed followed by a post-mortem analysis of the wire remnants. Predictions for the LHC beams are made.

Dehning, B; Kroyer, T; Meyer, M; Sapinski, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Minimizing formation damage during gravel pack operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described for minimizing formation damage caused by intrusive fluids prior to a gravel packing operation in loosely consolidated formations penetrated by at least one well. The method comprises: filling the casing of the well with an underbalanced completion fluid; placing within the well a removable packer capable of isolating the space between the casing and the formation from the downhole well pressure; setting through the packer a first tubing suitable for perforating and stabilizing the flow of fluids into the well; perforating the casing; and introducing a blocking agent into the formation via the perforations which agent upon solidification is sufficient to minimize formation damage by avoiding the introduction of formation fluids.

Jennings, A.R. Jr.

1987-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

107

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pipeline and Distribution Use Price City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial...

108

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; ...

109

FAQ 23-How much depleted uranium -- including depleted uranium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is stored in the United States? How much depleted uranium -- including depleted uranium hexafluoride -- is stored in the United States? In addition to the depleted uranium stored...

110

Electrical machines and assemblies including a yokeless stator ...  

Wind Energy; Partners (27) Visual Patent Search; Success Stories; News; Events; Electrical machines and assemblies including a yokeless stator with modular lamination ...

111

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Other (including Gas Oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Thermal Cracking, Other (including Gas Oil) Downstream Charge Capacity as of January 1 (Barrels per Stream Day)

112

[Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will be diverse and widespread, including renewables, distributed generation, and energy storage. And they will increase rapidly all along the value chain, from suppliers to...

113

Stocks of Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Including SPR)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Stocks include those ...

114

Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11.2 Retro-Cx in Federal ESPCs Including Retro-Commissioning In Federal Energy Saving Performance Contracts Retro-commissioning generally reduces operating and maintenance costs,...

115

PLOT: A UNIX PROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simple, easy-to-read graphics language designed specificallyPROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS Pavel Curtismeanings as in the GRAFPAC graphics system. Definl. ~ tions

Curtis, Pavel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in South Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers...

117

Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Dakota (Including...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Dakota (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to...

118

Damage monitoring in fibre reinforced mortar by combined digital image correlation and acoustic emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concerns, building facades tend to include multi-layered components such as outer thermal insulation correlation and acoustic emission, Construction and Building Materials vol. 38, pp. 317-380. http for the detection and monitoring of damage and frac- tures in building materials in the prospects of energetic

119

Effect of Operational Transients on Boiler Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is increasingly the case that utility systems demand more flexibility in a unit's ability to respond to dispatch requirements, which can create a conflict between maximizing efficient operation and limiting damage accumulation. A boiler can be operated in various cycling modes and can be subjected to planned and unplanned transients associated with load following, minimum load operation, forced cooling, variable pressure operation, increased ramp rates, increased attemperation, over-temperature operat...

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

120

Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Modeling Coal Seam Damage in Cast Blasting  

SciTech Connect

A discrete element computer program named DMC_BLAST (Distinct Motion Code) has been under development since 1987 for modeling rock blasting (Preece & Taylor, 1989). This program employs explicit time integration and uses spherical or cylindrical elements that are represented as circles in two dimensions. DMC_BLAST calculations compare favorably with data from actual bench blasts (Preece et al, 1993). Coal seam chilling refers to the shattering of a significant portion of the coal leaving unusable fines. It is also refereed to as coal damage. Chilling is caused during a blast by a combination of explosive shock energy and movement of the adjacent rock. Chilling can be minimized by leaving a buffer zone between the bottom of the blastholes and the coal seam or by changing the blast design to decrease the powder factor or by a combination of both. Blast design in coal mine cast blasting is usually a compromise between coal damage and rock fragmentation and movement (heave). In this paper the damage to coal seams from rock movement is examined using the discrete element computer code DMC_BLAST. A rock material strength option has been incorporated into DMC_BLAST by placing bonds/links between the spherical particles used to model the rock. These bonds tie the particles together but can be broken when the tensile, compressive or shear stress in the bond exceeds the defined strength. This capability has been applied to predict coal seam damage, particularly at the toe of a cast blast where drag forces exerted by movement of the overlying rock can adversely effect the top of the coal at the bench face. A simulation of coal mine cast blasting has been performed with special attention being paid to the strength of the coal and its behavior at t he bench face during movement of the overlying material.

Chung, S.H.; Preece, D.S.

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

122

Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project is a research into the effect of gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells. It is the result of a problem encountered in producing a low permeability formation from a well in South Texas owned by the El Paso Production Company. The well was producing from a gas condensate reservoir. Questions were raised about whether flowing bottomhole pressure below dewpoint would be appropriate. Condensate damage in the hydraulic fracture was expected to be of significant effect. In the most recent work done by Adedeji Ayoola Adeyeye, this subject was studied when the effects of reservoir depletion were minimized by introduction of an injector well with fluid composition the same as the original reservoir fluid. He also used an infinite conductivity hydraulic fracture along with a linear model as an adequate analogy. He concluded that the skin due to liquid build-up is not enough to prevent lower flowing bottomhole pressures from producing more gas. This current study investigated the condensate damage at the face of the hydraulic fracture in transient and boundary dominated periods when the effects of reservoir depletion are taken into account. As a first step, simulation of liquid flow into the fracture was performed using a 2D 1-phase simulator in order to help us to better understand the results of gas condensate simulation. Then during the research, gas condensate models with various gas compositions were simulated using a commercial simulator (CMG). The results of this research are a step forward in helping to improve the management of gas condensate reservoirs by understanding the mechanics of liquid build-up. It also provides methodology for quantifying the condensate damage that impairs linear flow of gas into the hydraulic fracture.

Reza, Rostami Ravari

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Including the Effects of Electronic Excitations and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Cascade Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Radiation damage has traditionally been modeled using cascade simulations however such simulations generally neglect the effects of electron-ion interactions, which may be significant in high energy cascades. A model has been developed which includes the effects of electronic stopping and electron-phonon coupling in Molecular Dynamics simulations by means of an inhomogeneous Langevin thermostat. The energy lost by the atoms to electronic excitations is gained by the electronic system and the energy evolution of the electronic system is modeled by the heat diffusion equation. Energy is exchanged between the electronic system and the atoms in the Molecular Dynamics simulation by means of a Langevin thermostat, the temperature of which is the local electronic temperature. The model is applied to a 10 keV cascade simulation for Fe. (authors)

Duffy, Dorothy [Physics and Astronomy, UCL, London (United Kingdom)]|[EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Rutherford, Alexis [Physics and Astronomy, UCL, London (United Kingdom)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Fast Neutron Radioactivity and Damage Studies on Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

McClellan, CA 95652 and J. Volk, FNAL, Batavia, Il 60510,current range Wolf and J. Volk, “Radiation Damage StudiesJ. Spencer, Z. Wolf and J. Volk, “Radiation Damage diation

Spencer, J.; Anderson, S. D.; Wolf, Z.; Volk, J. T.; Pellett, D.; Boussoufi, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st century new we focused on the case of un- conventional natural gas recovery from the Marcellus shale In addition

Walter, M.Todd

127

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development Executive Summary In the 21st the Marcellus shale In addition to the specific questions identified for the case of Marcellus shale gas in New

Angenent, Lars T.

128

What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Whistleblower Program > What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint?

129

Damages to DNA that result in neoplastic transformation  

SciTech Connect

Some topics discussed are: correlation between carcinogens and mutagens; defective DNA repair in uv-damaged xeroderma pigmentosum cells; analysis of nucleotide damage to DNA following exposure to chemicals or radiations; photoreactivation in uv-irradiated Escherichia coli; tumor development in fish; excision repair as an aid in identifying damage; detection of excision repair; role of endonucleases in repair of uv damage; and alkylation products and tumors. (HLW)

Setlow, R.B.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

ANALYSIS OF DAMAGE TO WASTE PACKAGES CAUSED BY SEISMIC EVENTS DURING POST-CLOSURE  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents methodology and results of an analysis of damage due to seismic ground motion for waste packages emplaced in a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A series of three-dimensional rigid body kinematic simulations of waste packages, pallets, and drip shields subjected to seismic ground motions was performed. The simulations included strings of several waste packages and were used to characterize the number, location, and velocity of impacts that occur during seismic ground motion. Impacts were categorized as either waste package-to-waste package (WP-WP) or waste package-to-pallet (WP-P). In addition, a series of simulations was performed for WP-WP and WP-P impacts using a detailed representation of a single waste package. The detailed simulations were used to determine the amount of damage from individual impacts, and to form a damage catalog, indexed according to the type, angle, location and force/velocity of the impact. Finally, the results from the two analyses were combined to estimate the total damage to a waste package that may occur during an episode of seismic ground motion. This study addressed two waste package types, four levels of peak ground velocity (PGV), and 17 ground motions at each PGV. Selected aspects of waste package degradation, such as effective wall thickness and condition of the internals, were also considered. As expected, increasing the PGV level of the vibratory ground motion increases the damage to the waste packages. Results show that most of the damage is caused by WP-P impacts. TAD-bearing waste packages with intact internals are highly resistant to damage, even at a PGV of 4.07 m/s, which is the highest level analyzed.

Alves, S W; Blair, S C; Carlson, S R; Gerhard, M; Buscheck, T A

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

131

U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

82: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates 82: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates U-182: Microsoft Windows Includes Some Invalid Certificates June 4, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Microsoft Windows. A remote user may be able to spoof code signing signatures. PLATFORM: Version(s): XP SP3, 2003 SP2, Vista SP2, 2008 SP2, 7 SP1, 2008 R2 SP1; and prior service packs ABSTRACT: The operating system includes some invalid intermediate certificates. The vulnerability is due to the certificate authorities and not the operating system itself. Reference Links: Security tracker ID 1027114 GENERIC-MAP-NOMATCH Vendor Advisory IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: The invalid certificates and their thumbprints are: Microsoft Enforced Licensing Intermediate PCA: 2a 83 e9 02 05 91 a5 5f c6

132

Removal of mineral matter including pyrite from coal  

SciTech Connect

Mineral matter, including pyrite, is removed from coal by treatment of the coal with aqueous alkali at a temperature of about 175.degree. to 350.degree. C, followed by acidification with strong acid.

Reggel, Leslie (Pittsburgh, PA); Raymond, Raphael (Bethel Park, PA); Blaustein, Bernard D. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1976-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

133

Free Energy Efficiency Kit includes CFL light bulbs,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Energy Efficiency Kit Kit includes CFL light bulbs, spray foam, low-flow shower head, and more i ci e n cy On Thursday, March 31st New River Light & Power will sponsor a seminar that is designed

Rose, Annkatrin

134

Characterizations of Aircraft Icing Environments that Include Supercooled Large Drops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of aircraft icing environments that include supercooled large drops (SLD) greater than 50 ?m in diameter have been made during 38 research flights. These flights were conducted during the First and Third Canadian Freezing Drizzle ...

Stewart G. Cober; George A. Isaac; J. Walter Strapp

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Including costs of supply chain risk in strategic sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost evaluations do not always include the costs associated with risks when organizations make strategic sourcing decisions. This research was conducted to establish and quantify the impact of risks and risk-related costs ...

Jain, Avani

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Including Atmospheric Layers in Vegetation and Urban Offline Surface Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A formulation to include prognostic atmospheric layers in offline surface schemes is derived from atmospheric equations. Whereas multilayer schemes developed previously need a complex coupling between atmospheric-model levels and surface-scheme ...

Valéry Masson; Yann Seity

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Commercial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 63.3 59.3 57.9 57.0 57.4 61.3 1983-2013 Alabama 71.7 71.0 68.5 68.2 68.4 66.7 1989-2013 Alaska 94.1 91.6 91.1 91.0 92.3 92.6 1989-2013 Arizona 84.0 83.0 81.6 80.3 82.8 82.7 1989-2013 Arkansas 37.8 28.3 28.1 28.6 26.7 28.0 1989-2013

138

Percentage of Total Natural Gas Industrial Deliveries included in Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual City Gate Price Residential Price Percentage of Total Residential Deliveries included in Prices Commercial Price Percentage of Total Commercial Deliveries included in Prices Industrial Price Percentage of Total Industrial Deliveries included in Prices Electric Power Price Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 16.5 16.3 16.0 16.2 16.6 16.9 2001-2013 Alabama 22.1 21.7 21.6 22.8 22.0 22.7 2001-2013 Alaska 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 2001-2013 Arizona 13.4 15.7 15.3 13.8 13.7 13.9 2001-2013 Arkansas 1.7 1.4 1.2 1.4 1.3 1.5 2001-2013

139

Low Dose Radiation Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in Induced DNA Damage Signaling and Repair Responses in Human 3-Dimensional Skin Model System Yanrong Su, Jarah Meador and Adayabalam S. Balajee Center for Radiological Research, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, 630 West, 168th Street, New York, NY 10032. Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) inflicts a wide variety of lesions in the genomic DNA. Among them, DNA double strand break (DSB) is considered to be the critical lesion for most of the deleterious radiation effects including carcinogenesis. Much of our knowledge on induction and repair kinetics of DSB has come from studies in two dimensional cell culture systems. However, the damage signaling and repair responses to DSB in tissue microenvironment are largely unknown. Knowledge of tissue responses to

140

Structural damage identification in wind turbine blades using piezoelectric active sensing with ultrasonic validation  

SciTech Connect

This paper gives a brief overview of a new project at LANL in structural damage identification for wind turbines. This project makes use of modeling capabilities and sensing technology to understand realistic blade loading on large turbine blades, with the goal of developing the technology needed to automatically detect early damage. Several structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques using piezoelectric active materials are being investigated for the development of wireless, low power sensors that interrogate sections of the wind turbine blade using Lamb wave propagation data, frequency response functions (FRFs), and time-series analysis methods. The modeling and sensor research will be compared with extensive experimental testing, including wind tunnel experiments, load and fatigue tests, and ultrasonic scans - on small- to mid-scale turbine blades. Furthermore, this study will investigate the effect of local damage on the global response of the blade by monitoring low-frequency response changes.

Claytor, Thomas N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ammerman, Curtt N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyu Hae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Atterbury, Marie K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Monitoring genetic damage to ecosystems from hazardous waste  

SciTech Connect

Applications of ecological toxicity testing to hazardous waste management have increased dramatically over the last few years, resulting in a greater awareness of the need for improved biomonitoring techniques. Our laboratory is developing advanced techniques to assess the genotoxic effects of environmental contamination on ecosystems. We have developed a novel mutagenesis assay using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which is potentially applicable for multimedia studies in soil, sediment, and water. In addition, we are conducting validation studies of a previously developed anaphase aberration test that utilizes sea urchin embryos. Other related efforts include field validation studies of the new tests, evaluation of their potential ecological relevance, and analysis of their sensitivity relative to that of existing toxicity tests that assess only lethal effects, rather than genetic damage.

Anderson, S.L.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Contribution of endogenous and exogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in the bacterial spore  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radical scavengers such as polyethylene glycol 4000 and bovine albumin have been used to define the contribution of exogenous and endogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in aqueous buffered suspensions of Bacillus pumilus spores. The results indicate that this damage in the bacterial spore is predominantly endogenous.

Jacobs, G.P.; Samuni, A.; Czapski, G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Laser-Induced Damage of Calcium Fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation damage of materials has long been of fundamental interest, especially since the growth of laser technology. One such source of damage comes from UV laser light. Laser systems continue to move into shorter wavelength ranges, but unfortunately are limited by the damage threshold of their optical components. For example, semiconductor lithography is making its way into the 157nm range and requires a material that can not only transmit this light (air cannot), but also withstand the highly energetic photons present at this shorter wavelength. CaF2, an alkaline earth halide, is the chosen material for vacuum UV 157 nm excimer radiation. It can transmit light down to 120 nm and is relatively inexpensive. Although it is readily available through natural and synthetic sources, it is often times difficult to find in high purity. Impurities in the crystal can result in occupied states in the band gap that induce photon absorption [2] and ultimately lead to the degradation of the material. In order to predict how well CaF2 will perform under irradiation of short wavelength laser light, one must understand the mechanisms for laser-induced damage. Laser damage is often a two-step process: initial photons create new defects in the lattice and subsequent photons excite these defects. When laser light is incident on a solid surface there is an initial production of electron-hole (e-h) pairs, a heating of free electrons and a generation of local heating around optically absorbing centers [3]. Once this initial excitation converts to the driving energy for nuclear motion, the result is an ejection of atoms, ions and molecules from the surface, known as desorption or ablation [3]. Secondary processes further driving desorption are photoabsorption, successive excitations of self-trapped excitons (STE's) and defects, and ionization of neutrals by incident laser light [3]. The combination of laser-induced desorption and the alterations to the electronic and geometrical structure of the lattice result in defect formation. In the material CaF2 some of these defects take the form of F-centers, an electron trapped at a halogen vacancy [4], and H-centers, a F2- molecular ion at a single lattice site [5]. While the F-centers are stable, the H-centers are transient but can form into aggregates that are stable. There are many different configurations the defects can take based on the relative position of F and H centers in the lattice and this is extensively discussed in literature [1,4,5]. Once these defects have formed they cause further absorption of light, which ultimately induces particle emission and the production of even more defects. Various forms of laser-induced damage of CaF2 have been studied. For example, the mechanism for photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) of F+ from CaF2 (111) is discussed in ref. 6 and the energy threshold, distribution and kinetics governing electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) is investigated in ref. 7. The desorption of neutral Ca and F atoms has also been explored [1]. In this paper I focus on the emission of ions and neutrals from CaF2 under the irradiation of pulsed laser light at 266 nm, in addition to a brief study of its purity and transmittance.

Espana, Aubrey L.; Joly, Alan G.; Hess, Wayne P.; Dickinson, J T.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project is a research into the effect of gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells. It is the result of a problem encountered in producing a low permeability formation from a well in South Texas owned by the El Paso Production Company. The well was producing a gas condensate reservoir and questions were raised about how much drop in flowing bottomhole pressure below dewpoint would be appropriate. Condensate damage in the hydraulic fracture was expected to be of significant effect. Previous attempts to answer these questions have been from the perspective of a radial model. Condensate builds up in the reservoir as the reservoir pressure drops below the dewpoint pressure. As a result, the gas moving to the wellbore becomes leaner. With respect to the study by El-Banbi and McCain, the gas production rate may stabilize, or possibly increase, after the period of initial decline. This is controlled primarily by the condensate saturation near the wellbore. This current work has a totally different approach. The effects of reservoir depletion are minimized by introduction of an injector well with fluid composition the same as the original reservoir fluid. It also assumes an infinite conductivity hydraulic fracture and uses a linear model. During the research, gas condensate simulations were performed using a commercial simulator (CMG). The results of this research are a step forward in helping to improve the management of gas condensate reservoirs by understanding the mechanics of liquid build-up. It also provides methodology for quantifying the condensate damage that impairs linear flow of gas into the hydraulic fracture.

Adeyeye, Adedeji Ayoola

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Turbine Steam Path Damage: Theory and Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, most treatises about steam turbines have concentrated on thermo-dynamics or design. In contrast, the primary focus of this book is on the problems that occur in the turbine steam path. Some of these problems have been long known to the industry, starting as early as A. Stodola's work at the turn of the century in which mechanisms such as solid particle erosion, corrosion and liquid droplet damage were recognized. What we have tried to do here is to provide, in a single, comprehensive refere...

1999-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

146

Calculation of complex DNA damage induced by ions  

SciTech Connect

This paper is devoted to the analysis of the complex damage of DNA irradiated by ions. The assessment of complex damage is important because cells in which it occurs are less likely to survive because the DNA repair mechanisms may not be sufficiently effective. We study the flux of secondary electrons through the surface of nucleosomes and calculate the radial dose and the distribution of clustered damage around the ion's path. The calculated radial dose distribution is compared to simulations. The radial distribution of the complex damage is found to be different from that of the dose. A comparison with experiments may solve the question of what is more lethal for the cell, damage complexity or absorbed energy. We suggest a way to calculate the probability of cell death based on the complexity of the damage. This work is done within the framework of the phenomenon-based multiscale approach to radiation damage by ions.

Surdutovich, Eugene [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309 (United States); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Gallagher, David C. [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309 (United States); Solov'yov, Andrey V. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Connecting Chromatin Modifying Factors to DNA Damage Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Cells are constantly damaged by factors that can induce DNA damage. Eukaryotic cells must rapidly load DNA repair proteins onto damaged chromatin during the DNA damage response (DDR). Chromatin-remodeling complexes use the energy from ATP hydrolysis to remodel nucleosomes and have well-established functions in transcription. Emerging lines of evidence indicate that chromatin-remodeling complexes are important and may remodel nucleosomes during DNA damage repair. New studies also reveal that ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling is involved in cell cycle progression, signal transduction pathways, and interaction and modification of DDR-related proteins that are specifically and intimately connected with the process of DNA damage. This article summarizes the recent advances in our understanding of the interplay between chromatin remodeling and DNA damage response.

Weiwei Lai; Hongde Li; Shuang Liu; Yongguang Tao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Application of nonlinear wave modulation spectroscopy to discern material damage  

SciTech Connect

Materials containing structural damage have a far greater nonlinear elastic response than materials with no structural damage. This is the basis for nonlinear wave diagnostics of damage, methods which are remarkably sensitive to the detection and progression of damage in materials. Here the authors describe one nonlinear method, the application of harmonics and sum and difference frequency to discern damage in materials. The method is termed Nonlinear Wave Modulation Spectroscopy (NWMS). It consists of exciting a sample with continuous waves of two separate frequencies simultaneously, and inspecting the harmonics of the two waves, and their sum and difference frequencies (sidebands). Undamaged materials are essentially linear in their response to the two waves, while the same material, when damaged, becomes highly nonlinear, manifested by harmonics and sideband generation. The authors illustrate the method by experiments on uncracked and cracked plexiglass and sandstone samples, and by applying it to intact and damaged engine components.

Johnson, P.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Sutin, A. [Stevens Inst. of Tech., Hoboken, NJ (United States); Abeele, K.E.A. van den [Catholic Univ. Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Building Physics

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Focus Area: Solar Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-introduction-small-scale-photovoltaic- Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/introduction-small-scale-photovoltaic Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Project Development This video teaches the viewer about photovoltaic arrays and RETscreen's photovoltaic module, which can be used to project the cost and production of an array. An example case study was

150

projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million projects are valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million in non-Federal cost sharing) over four years. The overall goal of the research is to develop carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and separation technologies that can achieve at least 90 percent CO 2 removal at no more than a 35 percent increase in the cost of electricity. The projects, managed by FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), include: (1) Linde, LLC, which will use a post-combustion capture technology incorporating BASF's novel amine-based process at a 1-megawatt electric (MWe) equivalent slipstream pilot plant at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) (DOE contribution: $15 million); (2) Neumann Systems Group, Inc., which will design, construct, and test a patented NeuStreamTM absorber at the Colorado

151

Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller Honda Smart Home to Include Berkeley Lab Ventilation Controller Honda smart home October 2013 October-November Special Focus: Energy Efficiency, Buildings, and the Electric Grid Honda Motor Company Inc is proceeding with plans to build a Smart Home in Davis, California, to demonstrate the latest in renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency. The home is expected to produce more energy than is consumed, demonstrating how the goal of "zero net energy" can be met in the near term future. A ventilation controller developed by researchers at Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD) will be included in the smart home. EETD is currently working with the developers of the home control system to integrate its control algorithms.

152

DOE Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions DOE Revises its NEPA Regulations, Including Categorical Exclusions September 30, 2011 - 2:30pm Addthis On September 27, 2011, the Department of Energy (DOE) approved revisions to its National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) regulations, and on September 28th, submitted the revisions to the Federal Register. The final regulations, which become effective 30 days after publication in the Federal Register, are the culmination of a 2-year process to review and update DOE's NEPA implementing procedures. This process involved internal evaluation, public participation, and Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) review. The revisions are designed to focus Departmental resources on projects with the potential for significant environmental impact, to better

153

Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Thin film solar cell including a spatially modulated intrinsic layer  

SciTech Connect

One or more thin film solar cells in which the intrinsic layer of substantially amorphous semiconductor alloy material thereof includes at least a first band gap portion and a narrower band gap portion. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is spatially graded through a portion of the bulk thickness, said graded portion including a region removed from the intrinsic layer-dopant layer interfaces. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is always less than the band gap of the doped layers. The gradation of the intrinsic layer is effected such that the open circuit voltage and/or the fill factor of the one or plural solar cell structure is enhanced.

Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Yang, Chi-Chung (Troy, MI); Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

155

Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Proton damage effects on light emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the effects of 16-MeV proton irradiation on the performance of a variety of light emitting diodes (LED's) emitting between 820 and 1300 nm. Total light output and current were measured at room temperature as a function of forward bias prior to and following a sequence of room temperature 16-MeV proton irradiations. Our results indicate that the relative amount of proton-induced degradation from one LED type to another is similar to that observed for neutron and gamma irradiations. More specifically, the most sensitive device is the amphoterically Si-doped GaAs LED which is characterized by a long preirradiation minority carrier lifetime. The most resistant LEDs are the high radiance GaAlAs (820 nm) and InGaAsP (1300 nm) LEDs. As in the case of Si devices, the degradation rate per irradiating particle fluence is significantly greater for proton irradiation of these LEDs than it is for neutron exposure. Neutron damage data presented herein indicate that the ratio of proton-to-neutron degradation rates can be as high as 100. Lifetime-damage constant products for constant current operation are calculated for each LED type and vary from 1.5 x 10/sup -13/ cm/sup 2//p for the InGaAsP LED to 1.1 x 10/sup -10/ cm/sup 2//p for the amphoterically Si-doped GaAs LED.

Rose, B.H.; Barnes, C.E.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Addressing questions about including environmental effects in the DMSO HLA  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Modeling and Simulation Office (DMSO) is developing a High Level Architecture (HLA) to support the DOD Modeling and Simulation (M and S) community. Many, if not all, of the simulations involve the environment in some fashion. In some applications, the simulation takes place in an acknowledged environment without any environmental functionality being taken into account. The Joint Training Federation Prototype (JTFp) is one of several prototype efforts that have been created to provide a test of the DMSO HLA. In addition to addressing the applicability of the HLA to a training community, the JTFp is also one of two prototype efforts that is explicitly including environmental effects in their simulation effort. These two prototyping efforts are examining the issues associated with the inclusion of the environment in an HLA federation. In deciding whether or not to include an environmental federation in the JTFp effort, a number of questions have been raised about the environment and the HLA. These questions have raised the issue of incompatibility between the environment and the HLA and also shown that there is something unique about including the environment in simulations. The purpose of this White Paper, which was developed with inputs from the National Air and Space [Warfare] Model Program among others, is to address the various questions that have been posed about including environmental effects in an HLA simulation.

Hummel, J.R.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

159

Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints Carlos Murillo{Sanchez Robert J algorithm for unit commitment that employs a Lagrange relaxation technique with a new augmentation. This framework allows the possibility of committing units that are required for the VArs that they can produce

160

Major initiatives in materials research at Western include  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in nuclear reactors; and a third in Engineering- J. Jiang, supported by UNENE, working on control in the theory of condensed matter, including its applications to polymers, optical, electronic, and magnetic NSERC Industrial Research Chairs who together make Western a leading university in nuclear power

Christensen, Dan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Fast Neutron Radioactivity and Damage Studies on Materials  

SciTech Connect

Many materials and electronics need to be tested for the radiation environment expected at linear colliders (LC) to improve reliability and longevity since both accelerator and detectors will be subjected to large fluences of hadrons, leptons and gammas. Examples include NdFeB magnets, considered for the damping rings, injection and extraction lines and final focus, electronic and electro-optic devices to be utilized in detector readout, accelerator controls and the CCDs required for the vertex detector, as well as high and low temperature superconducting materials (LTSMs) because some magnets will be superconducting. Our first measurements of fast neutron, stepped doses at the UC Davis McClellan Nuclear Reactor Center (UCD MNRC) were presented for NdFeB materials at EPAC04 where the damage appeared proportional to the distances between the effective operating point and Hc. We have extended those doses, included other manufacturer's samples and measured induced radioactivities. We have also added L and HTSMs as well as a variety of relevant semiconductor and electro-optic materials including PBG fiber that we studied previously only with gamma rays.

Anderson, S.; Spencer, J.; Wolf, Z.; /SLAC; Gallagher, G.; Pellett, D.; Boussoufi, M.; /UC, Davis; Volk, J.; /Fermilab

2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

162

DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford DOE Considers Natural Gas Utility Service Options: Proposal Includes 30-mile Natural Gas Pipeline from Pasco to Hanford January 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE , (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering natural gas transportation and distribution requirements to support the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) and evaporator operations at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. DOE awarded a task order worth up to $5 million to the local, licensed supplier of natural gas in the Hanford area, Cascade Natural Gas Corporation (Cascade). Cascade will support DOE and its Environmental

163

Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe » Italy Western Europe » Italy (including San Marino) Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends As occurred in many industrialized nations, CO2 emissions from Italy rose steeply since the late 1940's until the growth was abruptly terminated in 1974. Since 1974, emissions from liquid fuels have vacillated, dropping from 76% to 46% of a static but varying total. Significant increases in natural gas consumption have compensated for the drop in oil consumption. In 2008, 35.8% of Italy's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions were due to natural gas consumption. Coal usage grew steadily until 1985 when CO2 emissions from coal consumption reached 16 million metric tons of carbon. Not until 2004 did coal usage exceed 1985 levels and now accounts for 13.9% of Italy's

164

Coordination). Participants include representatives from Balancing Authorities (BAs), Reliability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MRO Subject Matter Expert Team is an industry stakeholder group which includes subject matter experts from MRO member organizations in various technical areas. Any materials, guidance, and views from stakeholder groups are meant to be helpful to industry participants; but should not be considered approved or endorsed by MRO staff or its board of directors unless specified. Page | 2 Disclaimer The Midwest Reliability Organization (MRO) Standards Committee (SC) is committed to providing training and non-binding guidance to industry stakeholders regarding existing and emerging Reliability Standards. Any materials, including presentations, were developed through the MRO SC by Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) from member organizations within the MRO region. In 2012, SMEs in the field of System Operator Communications were brought together to prepare a guide for complying with NERC Reliability Standard COM-002-2 (Communications and

Will Behnke; Alliant Energy; Jacalynn Bentz; Great River Energy; Marie Knox Miso; Jacalynn Bentz; Marie Knox; Terry Harbour

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Flicker Performance of Modern Lighting Technologies including Impacts of Dimmers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existing industry standards on flicker measurement and assessment are based on the response of general purpose incandescent lamps. However, worldwide these lamps are being replaced with more energy efficient lamps including Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) and Light emitting Diode (LED) lamps. In order to keep the flicker standards relevant, the industry standard bodies on the subject are in need of the evidence that compares the flicker performance of new lighting ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

166

Conversion of geothermal waste to commercial products including silica  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the treatment of geothermal residue includes contacting the pigmented amorphous silica-containing component with a depigmenting reagent one or more times to depigment the silica and produce a mixture containing depigmented amorphous silica and depigmenting reagent containing pigment material; separating the depigmented amorphous silica and from the depigmenting reagent to yield depigmented amorphous silica. Before or after the depigmenting contacting, the geothermal residue or depigmented silica can be treated with a metal solubilizing agent to produce another mixture containing pigmented or unpigmented amorphous silica-containing component and a solubilized metal-containing component; separating these components from each other to produce an amorphous silica product substantially devoid of metals and at least partially devoid of pigment. The amorphous silica product can be neutralized and thereafter dried at a temperature from about 25.degree. C. to 300.degree. C. The morphology of the silica product can be varied through the process conditions including sequence contacting steps, pH of depigmenting reagent, neutralization and drying conditions to tailor the amorphous silica for commercial use in products including filler for paint, paper, rubber and polymers, and chromatographic material.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Multi-processor including data flow accelerator module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An accelerator module for a data flow computer includes an intelligent memory. The module is added to a multiprocessor arrangement and uses a shared tagged memory architecture in the data flow computer. The intelligent memory module assigns locations for holding data values in correspondence with arcs leading to a node in a data dependency graph. Each primitive computation is associated with a corresponding memory cell, including a number of slots for operands needed to execute a primitive computation, a primitive identifying pointer, and linking slots for distributing the result of the cell computation to other cells requiring that result as an operand. Circuitry is provided for utilizing tag bits to determine automatically when all operands required by a processor are available and for scheduling the primitive for execution in a queue. Each memory cell of the module may be associated with any of the primitives, and the particular primitive to be executed by the processor associated with the cell is identified by providing an index, such as the cell number for the primitive, to the primitive lookup table of starting addresses. The module thus serves to perform functions previously performed by a number of sections of data flow architectures and coexists with conventional shared memory therein. A multiprocessing system including the module operates in a hybrid mode, wherein the same processing modules are used to perform some processing in a sequential mode, under immediate control of an operating system, while performing other processing in a data flow mode.

Davidson, George S. (Albuquerque, NM); Pierce, Paul E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Global Analysis of Solar Neutrino Oscillations Including SNO CC Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For active and sterile neutrinos, we present the globally allowed solutions for two neutrino oscillations. We include the SNO CC measurement and all other relevant solar neutrino and reactor data. Five active neutrino oscillation solutions (LMA, LOW, SMA, VAC, and Just So2) are currently allowed at 3 sigma; three sterile neutrino solutions (Just So2, SMA, and VAC) are allowed at 3 sigma. The goodness of fit is satisfactory for all eight solutions. We also investigate the robustness of the allowed solutions by carrying out global analyses with and without: 1) imposing solar model constraints on the 8B neutrino flux, 2) including the Super-Kamiokande spectral energy distribution and day-night data, 3) including a continuous mixture of active and sterile neutrinos, 4) using an enhanced CC cross section for deuterium (due to radiative corrections), and 5) a optimistic, hypothetical reduction by a factor of three of the error of the SNO CC rate. For every analysis strategy used in this paper, the most favored solutions all involve large mixing angles: LMA, LOW, or VAC. The favored solutions are robust, but the presence at 3 sigma of individual sterile solutions and the active Just So2 solution is sensitive to the analysis assumptions.

John N. Bahcall; M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; Carlos Pena-Garay

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

169

LNG cascading damage study. Volume I, fracture testing report.  

SciTech Connect

As part of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) Cascading Damage Study, a series of structural tests were conducted to investigate the thermal induced fracture of steel plate structures. The thermal stresses were achieved by applying liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) onto sections of each steel plate. In addition to inducing large thermal stresses, the lowering of the steel temperature simultaneously reduced the fracture toughness. Liquid nitrogen was used as a surrogate for LNG due to safety concerns and since the temperature of LN{sub 2} is similar (-190 C) to LNG (-161 C). The use of LN{sub 2} ensured that the tests could achieve cryogenic temperatures in the range an actual vessel would encounter during a LNG spill. There were four phases to this test series. Phase I was the initial exploratory stage, which was used to develop the testing process. In the Phase II series of tests, larger plates were used and tested until fracture. The plate sizes ranged from 4 ft square pieces to 6 ft square sections with thicknesses from 1/4 inches to 3/4 inches. This phase investigated the cooling rates on larger plates and the effect of different notch geometries (stress concentrations used to initiate brittle fracture). Phase II was divided into two sections, Phase II-A and Phase II-B. Phase II-A used standard A36 steel, while Phase II-B used marine grade steels. In Phase III, the test structures were significantly larger, in the range of 12 ft by 12 ft by 3 ft high. These structures were designed with more complex geometries to include features similar to those on LNG vessels. The final test phase, Phase IV, investigated differences in the heat transfer (cooling rates) between LNG and LN{sub 2}. All of the tests conducted in this study are used in subsequent parts of the LNG Cascading Damage Study, specifically the computational analyses.

Petti, Jason P.; Kalan, Robert J.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Evaluation of moisture damage within asphalt concrete mixes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pavements are a major part of the infrastructure in the United States. Moisture damage of these pavements is a significant problem. To predict and prevent this kind of moisture damage a great deal of research has been performed on this issue in past. This study validates an analytical approach based on surface energy aimed at assessing moisture damage. Two types of bitumen and three aggregates are evaluated in the study. The two types of bitumen represent very different chemical extremes and the three aggregates (a limestone, siliceous gravel, and granite) represent a considerable range in mineralogy. Moisture damage was monitered as a change in dynamic modulus with load cycles. The analysis demonstrates the need to consider mixture compliance as well as bond energy in order to predict moisture damage. Mixtures with the two types of bitumen and each aggregate with and without hydrated lime were evaluated. The hydrated lime substantially improved the resistance of the mixture to moisture damage.

Shah, Brij D.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Information regarding previous INCITE awards including selected highlights  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Information regarding previous INCITE awards including selected highlights Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Accessing ASCR Supercomputers Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) Research & Evaluation Prototypes (REP) Innovative & Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) News & Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building

172

Composite armor, armor system and vehicle including armor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite armor panels are disclosed. Each panel comprises a plurality of functional layers comprising at least an outermost layer, an intermediate layer and a base layer. An armor system incorporating armor panels is also disclosed. Armor panels are mounted on carriages movably secured to adjacent rails of a rail system. Each panel may be moved on its associated rail and into partially overlapping relationship with another panel on an adjacent rail for protection against incoming ordnance from various directions. The rail system may be configured as at least a part of a ring, and be disposed about a hatch on a vehicle. Vehicles including an armor system are also disclosed.

Chu, Henry S.; Jones, Warren F.; Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Thinnes, Gary L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

174

Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties

Bawendi, Moungi G. (Boston, MA); Sundar, Vikram C. (New York, NY)

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

175

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

ORAU's Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

176

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

ORAU' s Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

177

ORNL analysis predicts losses from extreme weather damage could...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL analysis predicts losses from extreme weather damage could double by 2050 Researcher tackles unprecedented county-by-county economic loss forecast Research in impacts,...

178

A Rate-Theory Approach to Irradiation Damage Modeling with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors II. Presentation Title, A Rate-Theory Approach to Irradiation Damage Modeling ...

179

Brief Review of Building Damage by The 2011 Tohoku Japan ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the coast of Japan, damages of many buildings and residential land by ... BRI) and the National Institute for Land & Infrastructure Management (NILIM ...

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

180

MEASUREMENT OF MATERIAL PROPERTIES OF DAMAGED ENERGETIC MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

We recently conducted damaged experiments on three explosives (mechanical damage on LX-04 and thermal experiments on HPP and PBXN-9) and characterized the effect of damage on some material properties. The MTS equipment was used to apply compressive cycling to LX-04 pressed parts and the results showed that older LX-04 parts became mechanically weaker than newer parts. After repeated compressive cycling for over 20,000 times, older LX-04 parts failed but newer LX-04 parts survived. Thermal insults were applied to PBXN-9 and HPP at 180 C and 200 C, respectively in unconfined conditions for several hours. The thermally-damaged HPP sample suffered 12.0% weight losses and a volume expansion of 20% was observed. Porosity of the damaged HPP increased to 25% after thermal exposure, which led to higher gas permeability. Burn rates of damaged PBXN-9 were 2 orders of magnitude higher than those of pristine samples but burn rates of damaged HPP were only slightly higher than those of pristine HPP. Small-scale safety tests (impact, friction, and spark) showed no significant sensitization when the damaged samples were tested at room temperature. Gas permeation measurements showed that gas permeability in damaged materials was several orders of magnitude higher than that in pristine materials. In-situ measurements of gas permeability at high temperatures were made on HPP samples and the results showed that the gas permeability increased by 3 to 4 orders of magnitude.

Hsu, P C; Hust, G; Dehaven, M; Chidester, S; Glascoe, L; Hoffman, M; Maienschein, J L

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

COURSE NOTES: Radiation Damage in Metals (NEEP 541)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 10, 2007 ... "Radiation Damage in Metals (NEEP 541)." Department of Engineering Physics. Fall 2005. University of Wisconsin-Madison. Launch Site

182

Neutronics and radiation damage calculations for fusion reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the neutronics calculations that have been carried out at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to assess radiation damage problems in fusion reactors are presented and discussed.

Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.; Gabriel, T.A.; Santoro, R.T.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Understanding How Damages Are Determined in Patent Litigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding How Damages Are Determined in Patent Litigation. Arnold B. Silverman. The owner of a U.S. patent has the right to prevent others from making , ...

184

Modular Systems Biology applied to TGFbeta and DNA Damage Response...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modular Systems Biology applied to TGFbeta and DNA Damage Response Signaling following Low Dose Radiation Francis Cucinotta NASA Johnson Space Center Abstract Modular systems...

185

Identification of Damage Modes in Ceramic Matrix Composites ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis and Modeling of Foreign Object Damage (FOD) in Ceramic Matrix ... and Microstructure of Alumina Composites for Energy Efficient Sliding Systems.

186

Lumber-Wood Products - ASDs and Lighting Ballasts Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the investigation of equipment damage to adjustable speed drives (ASDs) and lighting ballasts at a hardwood floor manufacturing facility.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Notices ROUTINE USES OF RECORDS MAINTAINED IN THE SYSTEM, INCLUDING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83 Federal Register 83 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 51 / Friday, March 15, 2013 / Notices ROUTINE USES OF RECORDS MAINTAINED IN THE SYSTEM, INCLUDING CATEGORIES OF USERS AND THE PURPOSES OF SUCH USES: The Department may disclose information contained in a record in this system of records under the routine uses listed in this system of records without the consent of the individual if the disclosure is compatible with the purposes for which the record was collected. These disclosures may be made on a case-by-case basis or, if the Department has complied with the computer matching requirements of the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended (Privacy Act), under a computer matching agreement. Any disclosure of individually identifiable information from a record in this system must also comply with the requirements of section

188

Copper laser modulator driving assembly including a magnetic compression laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser modulator (10) having a low voltage assembly (12) with a plurality of low voltage modules (14) with first stage magnetic compression circuits (20) and magnetic assist inductors (28) with a common core (91), such that timing of the first stage magnetic switches (30b) is thereby synchronized. A bipolar second stage of magnetic compression (42) is coupled to the low voltage modules (14) through a bipolar pulse transformer (36) and a third stage of magnetic compression (44) is directly coupled to the second stage of magnetic compression (42). The low voltage assembly (12) includes pressurized boxes (117) for improving voltage standoff between the primary winding assemblies (34) and secondary winding (40) contained therein.

Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

[Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 of 7: Research on the Characteristics of a Modern Grid by the NETL 2 of 7: Research on the Characteristics of a Modern Grid by the NETL Modern Grid Strategy Team Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options Last month we presented the first Principal Characteristic of a Modern Grid, "Motivates and Includes the Consumer". This month we present a second characteristic, "Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options". This characteristic will fundamentally transition today's grid from a centralized model for generation to one that also has a more balanced contribution from decentralized generation and storage. This characteristic, along with the other six, define a Modern Grid that will power the 21 st Century economy. For a more detailed discussion on "Accommodates All Generation and Storage Options", please see:

190

Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search for earth-like planets Search for earth-like planets Search for Earth-like planets includes LANL star analysis The mission will not only be able to search for planets around other stars, but also yield new insights into the parent stars themselves. March 6, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

191

Dye laser amplifier including a specifically designed diffuser assembly  

SciTech Connect

A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replened supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a relatively high flow rate and a specifically designed diffuser assembly for slowing down the flow of dye while, at the same time, assuring that as the dye stream flows through the diffuser assembly it does so in a stable manner.

Davin, James (Gilroy, CA); Johnston, James P. (Stanford, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode. Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between {minus}15 C and 150 C.

Bates, J.B.; Dudney, N.J.; Gruzalski, G.R.; Luck, C.F.

1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

193

Hydraulic engine valve actuation system including independent feedback control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydraulic valve actuation assembly may include a housing, a piston, a supply control valve, a closing control valve, and an opening control valve. The housing may define a first fluid chamber, a second fluid chamber, and a third fluid chamber. The piston may be axially secured to an engine valve and located within the first, second and third fluid chambers. The supply control valve may control a hydraulic fluid supply to the piston. The closing control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the second fluid chamber to the supply control valve. The opening control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the supply control valve to the second fluid chamber.

Marriott, Craig D

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

194

A thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential are disclosed. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

Baldasaro, Paul F.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte  

SciTech Connect

Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between -15.degree. C. and 150.degree. C.

Bates, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Gruzalski, Greg R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Luck, Christopher F. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

An analysis of the kinetics of thermal damage and movement of damage front in laser irradiated egg white  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some of the major applications of laser surgery involve the photocoagulation of diseased tissue, with minimal or no damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. There is a growing need for a model for the quantification of thermal damage. The models presently available in the literature assume biological tissue to be composed of a single component having a single rate of damage. But recent studies have shown that a distribution of rate parameters rather than a single rate parameter, best describes the process of thermal coagulation. This study assumes tissue to be composed of two or more components, having different rates of damage. The results of this model are then used to find an effective rate of damage for a single rate model which would yield the same end concentrations as the multi rate model. Results indicate that the difference between the single rate and the multi rate predictions is highly predominant for relatively lower power settings, for the biokinetic coefficient values used in this research. As the power is increased, a single rate model effectively describes a multi rate model, in the prediction of damage and movement of damage front. The movement of damage front was also studied experimentally using Digital Image Processing techniques. The damage model predicted by this study qualitatively follows the theoretical models available in the literature.

Azeemi, Aamer Amjed

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Mitigation of Boiler Tubing Damage from Use of Explosive Cleaning Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion of fossil fuels results in formation of slags that cover boiler tubes. Efficient boiler operation requires periodic removal of these slags, and explosive cleaning is an excellent cleaning method. While boiler tube cleaning using explosives is an established technology, a number of cases of tube damage have been reported, including cracking and denting of boiler tubes. This report details the work accomplished in Phase I of this project to capture the current understanding and practice of explo...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Tertiary nitrogen heterocyclic material to reduce moisture-induced damage in asphalt-aggregate mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Asphalt-aggregate roads crack when subjected to freezing and thawing cycles. Herein, the useful life of asphalts are substantially improved by a minor amount of a moisture damage inhibiting agent selected from compounds having a pyridine moiety, including acid salts of such compounds. A shale oil fraction may serve as the source of the improving agent and may simply be blended with conventional petroleum asphalts.

Plancher, Henry (Laramie, WY); Petersen, Joseph C. (Laramie, WY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants  

SciTech Connect

An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

200

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

202

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

203

cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

204

Analysis of 70 Ophiuchi AB including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of solar-like oscillations for stars belonging to a binary system provides a unique opportunity to probe the internal stellar structure and to test our knowledge of stellar physics. Such oscillations have been recently observed and characterized for the A component of the 70 Ophiuchi system. A model of 70 Ophiuchi AB that correctly reproduces all observational constraints available for both stars is determined. An age of 6.2 +- 1.0 Gyr is found with an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.266 +- 0.015 and an initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0300 +- 0.0025 when atomic diffusion is included and a solar value of the mixing-length parameter assumed. A precise and independent determination of the value of the mixing-length parameter needed to model 70 Oph A requires accurate measurement of the mean small separation, which is not available yet. Current asteroseismic observations, however, suggest that the value of the mixing-length parameter of 70 Oph A is lower or equal to the solar calibrated value. The e...

Eggenberger, P; Carrier, F; Fernandes, J; Santos, N C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Analysis of alpha Centauri AB including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detailed models of alpha Cen A and B based on new seismological data for alpha Cen B by Carrier & Bourban (2003) have been computed using the Geneva evolution code including atomic diffusion. Taking into account the numerous observational constraints now available for the alpha Cen system, we find a stellar model which is in good agreement with the astrometric, photometric, spectroscopic and asteroseismic data. The global parameters of the alpha Cen system are now firmly constrained to an age of t=6.52+-0.30 Gyr, an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.275+-0.010 and an initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0434+-0.0020. Thanks to these numerous observational constraints, we confirm that the mixing-length parameter alpha of the B component is larger than the one of the A component, as already suggested by many authors (Noels et al. 1991, Fernandes & Neuforge 1995 and Guenther & Demarque 2000): alpha_B is about 8% larger than alpha_A (alpha_A=1.83+-0.10 and alpha_B=1.97+-0.10). Moreover, we show that asteroseismic measurements enable to determine the radii of both stars with a very high precision (errors smaller than 0.3%). The radii deduced from seismological data are compatible with the new interferometric results of Kervella et al. (2003) even if they are slightly larger than the interferometric radii (differences smaller than 1%).

P. Eggenberger; C. Charbonnel; S. Talon; G. Meynet; A. Maeder; F. Carrier; G. Bourban

2004-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

206

Analysis of 70 Ophiuchi AB including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analysis of solar-like oscillations for stars belonging to a binary system provides a unique opportunity to probe the internal stellar structure and to test our knowledge of stellar physics. Such oscillations have been recently observed and characterized for the A component of the 70 Ophiuchi system. A model of 70 Ophiuchi AB that correctly reproduces all observational constraints available for both stars is determined. An age of 6.2 +- 1.0 Gyr is found with an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.266 +- 0.015 and an initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0300 +- 0.0025 when atomic diffusion is included and a solar value of the mixing-length parameter assumed. A precise and independent determination of the value of the mixing-length parameter needed to model 70 Oph A requires accurate measurement of the mean small separation, which is not available yet. Current asteroseismic observations, however, suggest that the value of the mixing-length parameter of 70 Oph A is lower or equal to the solar calibrated value. The effects of atomic diffusion and of the choice of the adopted solar mixture were also studied. We also tested and compared the theoretical tools used for the modeling of stars for which p-modes frequencies are detected by performing this analysis with three different stellar evolution codes and two different calibration methods. We found that the different evolution codes and calibration methods we used led to perfectly coherent results.

P. Eggenberger; A. Miglio; F. Carrier; J. Fernandes; N. C. Santos

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

207

Interim performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. [Glossary included  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is a response to the Photovoltaic Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-590) which required the generation of performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. Since the document is evolutionary and will be updated, the term interim is used. More than 50 experts in the photovoltaic field have contributed in the writing and review of the 179 performance criteria listed in this document. The performance criteria address characteristics of present-day photovoltaic systems that are of interest to manufacturers, government agencies, purchasers, and all others interested in various aspects of photovoltaic system performance and safety. The performance criteria apply to the system as a whole and to its possible subsystems: array, power conditioning, monitor and control, storage, cabling, and power distribution. They are further categorized according to the following performance attributes: electrical, thermal, mechanical/structural, safety, durability/reliability, installation/operation/maintenance, and building/site. Each criterion contains a statement of expected performance (nonprescriptive), a method of evaluation, and a commentary with further information or justification. Over 50 references for background information are also given. A glossary with definitions relevant to photovoltaic systems and a section on test methods are presented in the appendices. Twenty test methods are included to measure performance characteristics of the subsystem elements. These test methods and other parts of the document will be expanded or revised as future experience and needs dictate.

DeBlasio, R.; Forman, S.; Hogan, S.; Nuss, G.; Post, H.; Ross, R.; Schafft, H.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster—readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that—help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners' (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. While the purpose of the CAT is to further prepare the community for an influenza pandemic, its framework is an extension of the traditional all-hazards approach to planning and preparedness. As such, the information gathered by the tool is useful in preparation for most widespread public health emergencies. This tool is primarily intended for use by those involved in healthcare emergency preparedness (e.g., community planners, community disaster preparedness coordinators, 9-1-1 directors, hospital emergency preparedness coordinators). It is divided into sections based on the core agency partners, which may be involved in the community's influenza pandemic influenza response.

HCTT-CHE

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

209

Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza  

SciTech Connect

The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster—readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that—help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners' (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. While the purpose of the CAT is to further prepare the community for an influenza pandemic, its framework is an extension of the traditional all-hazards approach to planning and preparedness. As such, the information gathered by the tool is useful in preparation for most widespread public health emergencies. This tool is primarily intended for use by those involved in healthcare emergency preparedness (e.g., community planners, community disaster preparedness coordinators, 9-1-1 directors, hospital emergency preparedness coordinators). It is divided into sections based on the core agency partners, which may be involved in the community's influenza pandemic influenza response.

HCTT-CHE

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

210

Chemistry of radiation damage to wire chambers  

SciTech Connect

Proportional counters are used to study aspects of radiation damage to wire chambers (wire aging). Principles of low-pressure, rf plasma chemistry are used to predict the plasma chemistry in electron avalanches (1 atm, dc). (1) Aging is studied in CF{sub 4}/iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} gas mixtures. Wire deposits are analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. An apparent cathode aging process resulting in loss of gain rather than in a self-sustained current is observed in CF{sub 4}-rich gases. A four-part model considering plasma polymerization of the hydrocarbon, etching of wire deposits by CF{sub 4}, acceleration of deposition processes in strongly etching environments, and reactivity of the wire surface is developed to understand anode wire aging in CF{sub 4}/iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} gases. Practical guidelines suggested by the model are discussed. (2) Data are presented to suggest that trace amounts of Freons do not affect aging rates in either dimethyl ether or Ar/C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Apparent loss of gain is explained by attachment of primary electrons to a continuously increasing concentration of Freon 11 (CCl{sub 3}F) in the counter gas. An increase in the concentration of Freon 11 in dimethyl ether is caused by a distillation process in the gas supply bottle and is a natural consequence of the unequal volatilities of the two compounds.

Wise, J.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Detection of Storm Damage Tracks with EOS Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The damage surveys conducted by the NWS in the aftermath of a reported tornadic event are used to document the location of the tornado ground damage track (pathlength and width) and an estimation of the tornado intensity. This study explores the ...

Gary J. Jedlovec; Udaysankar Nair; Stephanie L. Haines

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Micro-crack Damage Evolution of Fracturing Rock Chaotic Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chaotic theory and bifurcation of modern nonlinear science were used to study the evolution of micro-cracks under the hydraulic fracturing of the rock mass characteristics, the tensor damage variable which described the chao evolution of micro-cracks ... Keywords: chaos theory, bifurcation theory, damage evolution

Zhaowan Chun; Wang Tingting

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTE CRYSTAL SURFACES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Semi-conducting CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals can be used in a variety of detector-type applications. CZT shows great promise for use as a gamma radiation spectrometer. However, its performance is adversely affected by point defects, structural and compositional heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), secondary phases and in some cases, damage caused by external forces. One example is damage that occurs during characterization of the surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy. Even minimal laser power can cause Te enriched areas on the surface to appear. The Raman spectra resulting from measurements at moderate intensity laser power show large increases in peak intensity that is attributed to Te. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to the Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam. The degree of surface damage to the crystal is dependent on the laser power, with the most observable damage occurring at high laser power. Moreover, intensity increases in the Te peaks of the Raman spectra are observed even at low laser power with little to no visible damage observed by AFM. AFM results also suggest that exposure to the same amount of laser power yields different amounts of surface damage depending on whether the exposed surface is the Te terminating face or the Cd terminating face of CZT.

Hawkins, S; Lucile Teague, L; Martine Duff, M; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

214

Control of Damage to Museum Objects by Optical Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control of Damage to Museum Objects by Optical Radiation Control of Damage to Museum Objects by Optical Radiation Speaker(s): Eliyahu Ne'eman Date: June 7, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 This Presentation is based on CIE Publication 157:2004 which has been recently published. It is the report of CIE Technical Committee 3-22 with the same title. Leading experts on Museum lighting from Australia, Canada, Finland, France, Japan, Germany, Great Britain, New Zealand and the USA, took part in writing this document. The two processes by which exposure to light may cause damage are photochemical action and radiant heating effect. These processes are examined and the characteristics of damage caused to museum objects are described. Recent research, which has aimed to relate the extent of exposure of materials to measures of damage

215

Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation Denise Munoz 1 , Albert Davalos 1 , Francis Rodier 1 , Misako Kawahara 1 , Judith Campisi 1,2 and Steven Yannone 1,3 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 84-171, Berkeley CA 94720; 2 Buck Institute for Age Research, 8001 Redwood Boulevard, Novato CA 94945; 3 Corresponding author Ionizing radiation (IR) induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are cytologically detectable as large nuclear foci that contain phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), the adaptor protein 53BP1, and several other proteins that participate in the sensing and processing of DNA damage (DNA damage foci). In normal human cells, moderately high IR (0.5-1 Gy) doses cause the rapid appearance of these foci (acute DNA damage foci), which gradually disappear

216

Neutron measurements and radiation damage calculations for fusion materials studies  

SciTech Connect

Fusion reactors will generate intense neutron fields, especially at the inner surfaces of containment vessels. With a typical wall loading of 1 MW/m/sup 2/, the yearly neutron fluence will be about 10/sup 26/ n/m/sup 2/. In a material like stainless steel this irradiation will produce about 10 atomic displacements-per-atom (DPA), 100 appM helium, 500 appM hydrogen, and various other transmutations. The gas-to-DPA ratios are very high compared to fission reactors due to the 14 MeV neutrons from the d-t fusion reaction. No existing neutron source can produce both the high fluence and high gas rates needed to simulate fusion damage. Consequently, fusion material studies are underway in a variety of facilities including fission reactors and accelerator-based neutron sources. A Subtask Group has been created by DOE to characterize these diverse facilities in terms of neutron flux and energy spectrum and to calculate DPA and transmutation for specific irradiations. Material property changes can then be correlated between facilities and extrapolated to fusion reactor conditions.

Greenwood, L.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Underground infrastructure damage for a Chicago scenario  

SciTech Connect

Estimating effects due to an urban IND (improvised nuclear device) on underground structures and underground utilities is a challenging task. Nuclear effects tests performed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the era of nuclear weapons testing provides much information on how underground military structures respond. Transferring this knowledge to answer questions about the urban civilian environment is needed to help plan responses to IND scenarios. Explosions just above the ground surface can only couple a small fraction of the blast energy into an underground shock. The various forms of nuclear radiation have limited penetration into the ground. While the shock transmitted into the ground carries only a small fraction of the blast energy, peak stresses are generally higher and peak ground displacement is lower than in the air blast. While underground military structures are often designed to resist stresses substantially higher than due to the overlying rocks and soils (overburden), civilian structures such as subways and tunnels would generally only need to resist overburden conditions with a suitable safety factor. Just as we expect the buildings themselves to channel and shield air blast above ground, basements and other underground openings as well as changes of geology will channel and shield the underground shock wave. While a weaker shock is expected in an urban environment, small displacements on very close-by faults, and more likely, soils being displaced past building foundations where utility lines enter could readily damaged or disable these services. Immediately near an explosion, the blast can 'liquefy' a saturated soil creating a quicksand-like condition for a period of time. We extrapolate the nuclear effects experience to a Chicago-based scenario. We consider the TARP (Tunnel and Reservoir Project) and subway system and the underground lifeline (electric, gas, water, etc) system and provide guidance for planning this scenario.

Dey, Thomas N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bos, Rabdall J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

218

Turbine Steam Path Damage: Theory and Practice, Volume 2: Damage Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, most treatises about steam turbines have concentrated on thermo-dynamics or design. In contrast, the primary focus of this book is on the problems that occur in the turbine steam path. Some of these problems have been long known to the industry, starting as early as A. Stodola's work at the turn of the century in which mechanisms such as solid particle erosion, corrosion and liquid droplet damage were recognized. What we have tried to do here is to provide, in a single, comprehensive refere...

1999-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

219

CRC handbook of laser science and technology. Volume 3. Optical materials, Part 1 - Nonlinear optical properties/radiation damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book examines the nonlinear optical properties of laser materials. The physical radiation effects on laser materials are also considered. Topics considered include: nonlinear optical properties; nonlinear and harmonic generation materials; two-photon absorption; nonlinear refractive index; stimulated Raman scattering; radiation damage; crystals; and glasses.

Weber, M.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Feasibility of impact-acoustic emissions for detection of damaged wheat kernels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A non-destructive, real time device was developed to detect insect damage, sprout damage, and scab damage in kernels of wheat. Kernels are impacted onto a steel plate and the resulting acoustic signal analyzed to detect damage. The acoustic signal was ... Keywords: Acoustic emissions, Insect damage kernels, Neural network, Sorting, Spectral analysis

Tom C. Pearson; A. Enis Cetin; Ahmed H. Tewfik; Ron P. Haff

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

WILD PIGS: BIOLOGY, DAMAGE, CONTROL TECHINQUES AND MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The existence of problems with wild pigs (Sus scrofa) is nothing new to the Western Hemisphere. Damage by these introduced animals was reported as far back as 1505 by the early Spanish colonies in the Caribbean, where wild pigs were killing the colonists cattle. Droves of these animals also ravaged cultivated crops of maize and sugarcane on islands in the West Indies during this same time period. These wild pigs reportedly were very aggressive and often attacked Spanish soldiers hunting rebellious Indians or escaped slaves on these islands, especially when these animals were cornered. The documentation of such impacts by introduced populations of this species in the United States has subsequently increased in recent years, and continued up through the present (Towne and Wentworth. 1950, Wood and Barrett 1979, Mayer and Brisbin 1991, Dickson et al. 2001). In spite of a fairly constant history in this country since the early 1900s, wild pigs have had a dramatic recent increase in both distribution and numbers in the United States. Between 1989 and 2009, the number of states reporting the presence of introduced wild pigs went from 19 up to as many as 44. This increase, in part natural, but largely manmade, has caused an increased workload and cost for land and resource managers in areas where these new populations are found. This is the direct result of the damage that these introduced animals do. The cost of both these impacts and control efforts has been estimated to exceed a billion dollars annually (Pimentel 2007). The complexity of this problem has been further complicated by the widespread appeal and economic potential of these animals as a big game species (Tisdell 1982, Degner 1989). Wild pigs are a controversial problem that is not going away and will likely only get worse with time. Not only do they cause damage, but wild pigs are also survivors. They reproduce at a rate faster than any other mammal of comparable size, native or introduced; they can eat just about anything; and, they can live just about anywhere. On top of that, wild pigs are both very difficult to control and, with the possible exception of island ecosystems, almost impossible to eradicate (Dickson et al. 2001, Sweeney et al. 2003). The solution to the wild pig problem has not been readily apparent. The ultimate answer as to how to control these animals has not been found to date. In many ways, wild pigs are America's most successful large invasive species. All of which means that wild pigs are a veritable nightmare for land and resource managers trying to keep the numbers of these animals and the damage that they do under control. Since the more that one knows about an invasive species, the easier it is to deal with and hopefully control. For wild pigs then, it is better to 'know thy enemy' than to not, especially if one expects to be able to successfully control them. In an effort to better 'know thy enemy,' a two-day symposium was held in Augusta, Georgia, on April 21-22, 2004. This symposium was organized and sponsored by U.S.D.A. Forest Service-Savannah River (USFS-SR), U. S. Department of Energy-Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), the South Carolina Chapter of the Soil & Water Conservation Society, and the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The goal of this symposium was to assemble researchers and land managers to first address various aspects of the biology and damage of wild pigs, and then review the control techniques and management of this invasive species. The result would then be a collected synopsis of what is known about wild pigs in the United States. Although the focus of the symposium was primarily directed toward federal agencies, presenters also included professionals from academic institutions, and private-sector control contractors and land managers. Most of the organizations associated with implementing this symposium were affiliated with the Savannah River Site (SRS), a 803 km{sup 2} federal nuclear facility, located in western South Carolina along the Savannah

Mayer, John; Brisbin, I. Lehr

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

WILD PIGS: BIOLOGY, DAMAGE, CONTROL TECHINQUES AND MANAGEMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existence of problems with wild pigs (Sus scrofa) is nothing new to the Western Hemisphere. Damage by these introduced animals was reported as far back as 1505 by the early Spanish colonies in the Caribbean, where wild pigs were killing the colonists cattle. Droves of these animals also ravaged cultivated crops of maize and sugarcane on islands in the West Indies during this same time period. These wild pigs reportedly were very aggressive and often attacked Spanish soldiers hunting rebellious Indians or escaped slaves on these islands, especially when these animals were cornered. The documentation of such impacts by introduced populations of this species in the United States has subsequently increased in recent years, and continued up through the present (Towne and Wentworth. 1950, Wood and Barrett 1979, Mayer and Brisbin 1991, Dickson et al. 2001). In spite of a fairly constant history in this country since the early 1900s, wild pigs have had a dramatic recent increase in both distribution and numbers in the United States. Between 1989 and 2009, the number of states reporting the presence of introduced wild pigs went from 19 up to as many as 44. This increase, in part natural, but largely manmade, has caused an increased workload and cost for land and resource managers in areas where these new populations are found. This is the direct result of the damage that these introduced animals do. The cost of both these impacts and control efforts has been estimated to exceed a billion dollars annually (Pimentel 2007). The complexity of this problem has been further complicated by the widespread appeal and economic potential of these animals as a big game species (Tisdell 1982, Degner 1989). Wild pigs are a controversial problem that is not going away and will likely only get worse with time. Not only do they cause damage, but wild pigs are also survivors. They reproduce at a rate faster than any other mammal of comparable size, native or introduced; they can eat just about anything; and, they can live just about anywhere. On top of that, wild pigs are both very difficult to control and, with the possible exception of island ecosystems, almost impossible to eradicate (Dickson et al. 2001, Sweeney et al. 2003). The solution to the wild pig problem has not been readily apparent. The ultimate answer as to how to control these animals has not been found to date. In many ways, wild pigs are America's most successful large invasive species. All of which means that wild pigs are a veritable nightmare for land and resource managers trying to keep the numbers of these animals and the damage that they do under control. Since the more that one knows about an invasive species, the easier it is to deal with and hopefully control. For wild pigs then, it is better to 'know thy enemy' than to not, especially if one expects to be able to successfully control them. In an effort to better 'know thy enemy,' a two-day symposium was held in Augusta, Georgia, on April 21-22, 2004. This symposium was organized and sponsored by U.S.D.A. Forest Service-Savannah River (USFS-SR), U. S. Department of Energy-Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), the South Carolina Chapter of the Soil & Water Conservation Society, and the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The goal of this symposium was to assemble researchers and land managers to first address various aspects of the biology and damage of wild pigs, and then review the control techniques and management of this invasive species. The result would then be a collected synopsis of what is known about wild pigs in the United States. Although the focus of the symposium was primarily directed toward federal agencies, presenters also included professionals from academic institutions, and private-sector control contractors and land managers. Most of the organizations associated with implementing this symposium were affiliated with the Savannah River Site (SRS), a 803 km{sup 2} federal nuclear facility, located in western South Carolina along the Savannah

Mayer, John; Brisbin, I. Lehr

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

The Influence of Grain Boundary Type upon Damage Evolution at Grain Boundary Interfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a prior work, it was found that grain boundary structure strongly influences damage evolution at grain boundaries in copper samples subjected to either shock compression or incipient spall. Here, several grain boundaries with different grain boundary structures, including a {Sigma}3 (10-1) boundary, are interrogated via conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) to investigate the effects of atomic-scale structural differences on grain boundary strength and mobility. Boundaries are studied both before and after shock compression at a peak shock stress of 10 GPa. Results of the TEM and HRTEM work are used in conjunction with MD modeling to propose a model for shock-induced damage evolution at grain boundary interfaces that is dependent upon coincidence.

Perez-Bergquist, Alejandro G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brandl, Christian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Escobedo, Juan P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Carl P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cerreta, Ellen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray III, George T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

224

Sources of Data on Freezing Rain and Resulting Damages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Freezing rain produces major damages each year in the United States, and various affected groups continue to seek data on the incidence and losses produced by freezing rain. The various kinds of data available about freezing rain and related ...

Stanley A. Changnon; Tamara G. Creech

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Damage to residential structures from surface mine blasting  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Mines has studied the problem of cracking in residential structure walls from vibrations produced by blasting in surface mines. Direct observations were made of blasting damage consisting primarily of cosmetic cracking.

Siskind, D.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Shock induced multi-mode damage in depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect

Recent dynamic damage studies on depleted uranium samples have revealed mixed mode failure mechanisms leading to incipient cracking as well as ductile failure processes. Results show that delamination of inclusions upon compression may provide nucleation sites for damage initiation in the form of crack tip production. However, under tension the material propagates cracks in a mixed shear localization and mode-I ductile tearing and cracking. Cracks tips appear to link up through regions of severe, shear dominated plastic flow. Shock recovery experiments were conducted on a 50 mm single stage light gas gun. Serial metallographic sectioning was conducted on the recovered samples to characterize the bulk response of the sample. Experiments show delaminated inclusions due to uniaxial compression without damage propagation. Further results show the propagation of the damage through tensile loading to the incipient state, illustrating ductile processes coupled with mixed mode-I tensile ductile tearing, shear localization, and mode-I cracking in depleted uranium.

Koller, Darcie D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cerreta, Ellen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray, Ill, George T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Development of Damage Tolerant Inco 718 for High Temperature ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

697-712. 7. M. Chang et al, Damage tolerance of alloy 718 turbine disc material,. Superalloys. 92, ed. S. Antolovitch et al. (Warrendale,. PA : TMS 1992) 446-456.

228

Spectral identification of ozone-damaged pine needles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Needles were collected from ponderosa and Jeffrey pine trees at three sites in the Sierra Nevada, and were assembled into 504 samples and grouped according to five dominant live needle conditions-green, winter fleck, sucking insect damage, scale insect ...

A. V. Di Vittorio; G. S. Biging

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Jet Engine Coatings Resist Volcanic Ash Damage - Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Posted on: 4/27/2011 12:00:00 AM... Concerns about the damage that volcanic ash clouds can inflict on aircraft engines resulted in last year's $2 billion ...

230

Windspeed Analyses of Tornadoes Based on Structural Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Documentation is presented for the tornadoes of 28 June 1979 in the Iowa towns of Manson and Algona. Analyses of failed engineered and nonengineered structures are presented with an emphasis on those studies of observed damage that can form the ...

Amde M. Wolde-Tinsae; Max L. Porter; Donald I. McKeown

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Fast neutron Damage Studies on NdFeB Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Spencer, Z. Wolf and J. Volk, “Radiation Damage StudiesMcClellan, CA 95652 and J. Volk, FNAL, Batavia, Il 60510,PI), James E. Spencer, James T. Volk and Zachary R. Wolf, “

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Neutron and gamma irradiation damage to organic materials.  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses open literature reports which investigate the damage effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on polymers and/or epoxies - damage refers to reduced physical chemical, and electrical properties. Based on the literature, correlations are made for an SNL developed epoxy (Epon 828-1031/DDS) with an expected total fast-neutron fluence of {approx}10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} and a {gamma} dosage of {approx}500 Gy received over {approx}30 years at < 200 C. In short, there are no gamma and neutron irradiation concerns for Epon 828-1031/DDS. To enhance the fidelity of our hypotheses, in regards to radiation damage, we propose future work consisting of simultaneous thermal/irradiation (neutron and gamma) experiments that will help elucidate any damage concerns at these specified environmental conditions.

White, Gregory Von, II; Bernstein, Robert

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Neutron and gamma irradiation damage to organic materials.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document discusses open literature reports which investigate the damage effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on polymers and/or epoxies - damage refers to reduced physical chemical, and electrical properties. Based on the literature, correlations are made for an SNL developed epoxy (Epon 828-1031/DDS) with an expected total fast-neutron fluence of {approx}10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} and a {gamma} dosage of {approx}500 Gy received over {approx}30 years at irradiation concerns for Epon 828-1031/DDS. To enhance the fidelity of our hypotheses, in regards to radiation damage, we propose future work consisting of simultaneous thermal/irradiation (neutron and gamma) experiments that will help elucidate any damage concerns at these specified environmental conditions.

White, Gregory Von, II; Bernstein, Robert

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Radiation Damage Studies with Hadrons on Materials and Electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SLAC-PUB-10534 July 2004 Radiation Damage Studies withJ. Spencer. , Z. Wolf, SLAC, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA M.J. Spencer ? Z. Wolf, SLAC, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Fast neutron Damage Studies on NdFeB Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-Level Dosimeters used in the SLAC Photon andNeutron Fields”, SLAC-PUB-8517, 2002. [7] G. Gross, J.SLAC-PUB-11219 May2005 Fast Neutron Damage Studies on NdFeB

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Activation and radiation damage in the environment of hadron accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A component which suffers radiation damage usually also becomes radioactive, since the source of activation and radiation damage is the interaction of the material with particles from an accelerator or with reaction products. However, the underlying mechanisms of the two phenomena are different. These mechanisms are described here. Activation and radiation damage can have far-reaching consequences. Components such as targets, collimators, and beam dumps are the first candidates for failure as a result of radiation damage. This means that they have to be replaced or repaired. This takes time, during which personnel accumulate dose. If the dose to personnel at work would exceed permitted limits, remote handling becomes necessary. The remaining material has to be disposed of as radioactive waste, for which an elaborate procedure acceptable to the authorities is required. One of the requirements of the authorities is a complete nuclide inventory. The methods used for calculation of such inventories are presented,...

Kiselev, Daniela

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Microsoft Word - SWPAIceStormDamage_021009.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy (DOE), continues to make steady progress in its efforts to restore transmission lines in Arkansas and Missouri damaged during an ice storm on January 26-27,...

238

Microsoft Word - SWPAIceStormDamage_020609.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy (DOE), continues to make steady progress in its efforts to restore transmission lines in Arkansas and Missouri damaged during a January 27-28, 2009 ice...

239

Normalized Hurricane Damages in the United States: 1925–95  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricanes are the costliest natural disasters in the United States. Understanding how both hurricane frequencies and intensities vary from year to year as well as how this is manifested in changes in damages that occur is a topic of great ...

Roger A. Pielke Jr.; Christopher W. Landsea

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

RADIATION DAMAGE TO BSCCO-2223 FROM 50 MEV PROTONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. and Gupta, R. , “Radiation Resistant Magnets for the RIARADIATION DAMAGE TO BSCCO-2223 FROM 50 MEV PROTONS A. F.HTS materials in high radiation environments requires that

Zeller, A.F.; Ronningen, R.M.; Godeke, A.; Heilbronn, L.H.; McMahan-Norris, P.; Gupta, R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Comparison of DNA Damage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from Low-Dose Radiation and Folate Deficiency Arnold C. Huang,1,2 Chantal Courtemanche,1,2 Nicole Kerry,1,2 Susan T. Mashiyama,1,2 Michael Fenech,3...

242

Tropical Cyclone Damages in China 1983–2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on damage records released by the Department of Civil Affairs of China, direct economic losses and casualties associated with tropical cyclones that made landfall over China during 1983–2006 are examined. In an average year, landfalling ...

Qiang Zhang; Qiufeng Liu; Liguang Wu

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Insured Lightning-Caused Property Damage in Three Western States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Insurance claims resulting from lightning damage in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming were analyzed during the period from 1987 to 1993. Most claims were from personal accounts, while some were commercial.

Ronald L. Holle; Raúl E. López; Lowell J. Arnold; John Endres

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Evaluation of Explosive Cleaning Damage in Ferritic Boiler Tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities have reported boiler tube damage after explosive cleaning to control or remove slag deposits. The damage typically consists of tube crushing, denting, microcracking, and inner diameter (ID) initiated cracking. Because the latter two might not propagate through tube wall thickness initially, these types of cracking are not commonly detected during the cleaning process. However, tube failures after the boiler resumed service have been attributed to these ID-related cracking. Many utilities have r...

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

245

Probing Radiation Damage in Plutonium Alloys with Multiple Measurement Techniques  

SciTech Connect

A material subjected to radiation damage will usually experience changes in its physical properties. Measuring these changes in the physical properties provides a basis to study radiation damage in a material which is important for a variety of real world applications from reactor materials to semiconducting devices. When investigating radiation damage, the relative sensitivity of any given property can vary considerably based on the concentration and type of damage present as well as external parameters such as the temperature and starting material composition. By measuring multiple physical properties, these differing sensitivities can be leveraged to provide greater insight into the different aspects of radiation damage accumulation, thereby providing a broader understanding of the mechanisms involved. In this report, self-damage from {alpha}-particle decay in Pu is investigated by measuring two different properties: magnetic susceptibility and resistivity. The results suggest that while the first annealing stage obeys second order chemical kinetics, the primary mechanism is not the recombination of vacancy-interstitial close pairs.

McCall, S K; Fluss, M J; Chung, B W

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

246

Investigation of Conditions for Moisture Damage in Asphalt Concrete and Appropriate Laboratory Test Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of Moisture Damage Test Methods for Evaluatingart and Critical Review of Test Methods. ” NCAT Report No.Pavement Moisture-Damage Test. ” Transportation Research

Lu, Qing

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Header and Drum Damage: Theory and Practice: Volume 1: Information Common to All Damage Types; Volume 2: Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Headers and drums represent two of the largest and most expensive components in boilers. Particularly in the case of high-temperature headers, there are considerable safety concerns when operating aging plants, and some notable failures have occurred. For these reasons, understanding the types of damage that can accumulate and dealing with that damage are vital to the safe and economic operation of fossil power plants.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

On the formulation, parameter identification and numerical integration of the EMMI model :plasticity and isotropic damage.  

SciTech Connect

In this report we present the formulation of the physically-based Evolving Microstructural Model of Inelasticity (EMMI) . The specific version of the model treated here describes the plasticity and isotropic damage of metals as being currently applied to model the ductile failure process in structural components of the W80 program . The formulation of the EMMI constitutive equations is framed in the context of the large deformation kinematics of solids and the thermodynamics of internal state variables . This formulation is focused first on developing the plasticity equations in both the relaxed (unloaded) and current configurations. The equations in the current configuration, expressed in non-dimensional form, are used to devise the identification procedure for the plasticity parameters. The model is then extended to include a porosity-based isotropic damage state variable to describe the progressive deterioration of the strength and mechanical properties of metals induced by deformation . The numerical treatment of these coupled plasticity-damage constitutive equations is explained in detail. A number of examples are solved to validate the numerical implementation of the model.

Bammann, Douglas J.; Johnson, G. C. (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Marin, Esteban B.; Regueiro, Richard A. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Damage tolerance of well-completion and stimulation techniques in coalbed methane reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs are characterized as naturally fractured, dual porosity, low permeability, and water saturated gas reservoirs. Initially, the gas, water and coal are at thermodynamic equilibrium under prevailing reservoir conditions. Dewatering is essential to promote gas production. This can be accomplished by suitable completion and stimulation techniques. This paper investigates the efficiency and performance of the openhole cavity, hydraulic fractures, frack and packs, and horizontal wells as potential completion methods which may reduce formation damage and increase the productivity in coalbed methane reservoirs. Considering the dual porosity nature of CBM reservoirs, numerical simulations have been carried out to determine the formation damage tolerance of each completion and, stimulation approach. A new comparison parameter named as the normalized productivity index is defined as the ratio of the productivity index of a stimulated well to that of a nondamaged vertical well as a function of time. Typical scenarios have been considered to evaluate the CBM properties, including reservoir heterogeneity, anisotropy, and formation damage, for their effects on this index over the production time. The results for each stimulation technique show that the value of the index declines over the time of production with a rate which depends upon the applied technique and the prevailing reservoir conditions. The results also show that horizontal wells have the best performance if drilled orthogonal to the butt cleats. Open-hole cavity completions outperform vertical fractures if the fracture conductivity is reduced by any damage process. When vertical permeability is much lower than horizontal permeability, production of vertical wells will improve while productivity of horizontal wells will decrease.

Jahediesfanjani, H.; Civan, F. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

From: Development of New Types of Non-Damaging Drill-in and Completion Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of the project has been to develop new types of drill-in fluids (DIFs) and completion fluids (CFs) for use in natural gas reservoirs. Phase 1 of the project was a 24month study to develop the concept of advanced type of fluids usable in well completions. Phase 1 tested this concept and created a kinetic mathematical model to accurately track the fluid’s behavior under downhole conditions. Phase 2 includes tests of the new materials and practices. Work includes the preparation of new materials and the deployment of the new fluids and new practices to the field. This is the final report on a program that has been operating for 7 years, including the last four years under the sponsorship of the U.S. DOE. Accomplishments of Research Program The project addresses the special problem of formation damage issues related to the use of CFs and DIFs in open hole horizontal well completions. The concept of a “removable filtercake ” has, as its basis, a mechanism to initiate or trigger the removal process. Our approach to developing such a mechanism is to identify the components of the filtercake and measure the change in the characteristics of these components when certain cleanup (filtercake removal) techniques are employed. The program has been an unqualified success. We have accomplished the following: Development of New Laboratory Testing Practices Established standard testing practices Identification of key factors involved in formation damage Established appropriate cleanup practices for removal of formation damage to optimize productivity. DE26-98FT34174.000 Development of New Drilling Fluids Established New Guidelines for horizontal well completion practices Drill in fluid design and maintenance Cleanup fluid design and use Development of new well drill in fluids Low solids polymer carbonate DIFs Polymer free high density DIFs Low Density Drill in fluid design

David B. Burnett Harold Vance

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Damage identification and health monitoring of structural and mechanical systems from changes in their vibration characteristics: A literature review  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a review of the technical literature concerning the detection, location, and characterization of structural damage via techniques that examine changes in measured structural vibration response. The report first categorizes the methods according to required measured data and analysis technique. The analysis categories include changes in modal frequencies, changes in measured mode shapes (and their derivatives), and changes in measured flexibility coefficients. Methods that use property (stiffness, mass, damping) matrix updating, detection of nonlinear response, and damage detection via neural networks are also summarized. The applications of the various methods to different types of engineering problems are categorized by type of structure and are summarized. The types of structures include beams, trusses, plates, shells, bridges, offshore platforms, other large civil structures, aerospace structures, and composite structures. The report describes the development of the damage-identification methods and applications and summarizes the current state-of-the-art of the technology. The critical issues for future research in the area of damage identification are also discussed.

Doebling, S.W.; Farrar, C.R.; Prime, M.B.; Shevitz, D.W.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Incipient and Progressive Damage in Polyethylene Under Extreme Tensile Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dynamic-Tensile-Extrusion (Dyn-Ten-Ext) test was developed at LANL by Gray and coworkers to probe the tensile response of materials at large strains (>1) and high strain-rates (>1000/s) by firing projectiles through a conical die at 300-700 m/s. This technique has recently been applied to various polymers, such as the fluoropolymers PTFE (Teflon) and the chemically similar PCTFE, which respectively exhibited catastrophic fragmentation and distributed dynamic necking. This work details investigations of the Dyn-Ten-Ext response of high density polyethylene, both to failure and sub-critical conditions. At large extrusion ratios ({approx}7.4) and high velocities, such as those previously employed, HDPE catastrophically fragmented in a craze-like manner in the extruded jet. At more modest extrusion ratios and high velocities the specimen extruded a stable jet that ruptured cleanly, and at lower velocities was recovered intact after sustaining substantial internal damage. Thermomechanical finite element simulations showed that the damage corresponded to a locus of shear stress in the presence of hydrostatic tension. X-ray computed tomography corroborated the prediction of a shear damage mechanism by finding the region of partially damaged material to consist of macroscopic shear-mode cracks nearly aligned with the extrusion axis, originating from the location of damage inception.

Furmanski, Jevan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Carl P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Daniel Tito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray, George T. III [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

253

Length-scale Effects in Cascade Damage Production in Iron  

SciTech Connect

Molecular dynamics simulations provide an atomistic description of the processes that control primary radiation damage formation in atomic displacement cascades. An extensive database of simulations describing cascade damage production in single crystal iron has been compiled using a modified version of the interatomic potential developed by Finnis and Sinclair. This same potential has been used to investigate primary damage formation in nanocrystalline iron in order to have a direct comparison with the single crystal results. A statistically significant number of simulations were carried out at cascade energies of 10 keV and 20 keV and temperatures of 100 and 600K to make this comparison. The results demonstrate a significant influence of nearby grain boundaries as a sink for mobile defects during the cascade cooling phase. This alters the residual primary damage that survives the cascade event. Compared to single crystal, substantially fewer interstitials survive in the nanograined iron, while the number of surviving vacancies is similar or slightly greater than the single crystal result. The fraction of the surviving interstitials contained in clusters is also reduced. The asymmetry in the survival of the two types of point defects is likely to alter damage accumulation at longer times.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Kamenski, Paul J [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Mechanisms for microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To provide insight into the mechanisms of microvascular damage induced by ultrasound-activated microbubbles, experimental studies were performed to correlate microvascular damage to the dynamics of bubble-vessel interactions. High-speed photomicrography was used to record single microbubbles interacting with microvessels in ex vivo tissue, under the exposure of short ultrasound pulses with a center frequency of 1 MHz and peak negative pressures (PNP) ranging from 0.8-4 MPa. Vascular damage associated with observed bubble-vessel interactions was either indicated directly by microbubble extravasation or examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses. As observed previously, the high-speed images revealed that ultrasound-activated microbubbles could cause distention and invagination of adjacent vessel walls, and could form liquid jets in microvessels. Vessel distention, invagination, and liquid jets were associated with the damage of microvessels whose diameters were smaller than those of maximally expanded microbubbles. However, vessel invagination appeared to be the dominant mechanism for the damage of relative large microvessels.

Chen Hong; Brayman, Andrew A.; Evan, Andrew P.; Matula, Thomas J. [Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology and Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis (United States); Center for Industrial and Medical Ultrasound, Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

2012-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

255

Properly designed underbalanced drilling fluids can limit formation damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drilling fluids for underbalanced operations require careful design and testing to ensure they do not damage sensitive formations. In addition to hole cleaning and lubrication functions, these fluids may be needed as kill fluids during emergencies. PanCanadian Petroleum Ltd. used a systematic approach in developing and field testing a nondamaging drilling fluid. It was for use in underbalanced operations in the Glauconitic sandstone in the Westerose gas field in Alberta. A lab study was initiated to develop and test a non-damaging water-based drilling fluid for the horizontal well pilot project. The need to develop an inexpensive, nondamaging drilling fluid was previously identified during underbalanced drilling operations in the Weyburn field in southeastern Saskatchewan. A non-damaging fluid is required for hole cleaning, for lubrication of the mud motor, and for use as a kill fluid during emergencies. In addition, a nondamaging fluid is required when drilling with a conventional rig because pressure surges during connections and trips may result in the well being exposed to short periods of near balanced or overbalanced conditions. Without the protection of a filter cake, the drilling fluid will leak off into the formation, causing damage. The amount of damage is related to the rate of leak off and depth of invasion, which are directly proportional to the permeability to the fluid.

Churcher, P.L.; Yurkiw, F.J. [PanCanadian Petroleum Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Bietz, R.F.; Bennion, D.B. [Hycal Energy Research Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1996-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

256

This article was downloaded by: [Nishanta Rajakaruna] On: 25 September 2012, At: 15:06  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Bar Harbor, USA c Department of Environmental Science and Policy, University of California, Davis, USA not be liable for any loss, actions, claims, proceedings, demand, or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever, Zürich, Switzerland; b College of the Atlantic, Bar Harbor, USA; c Department of Environmental Science

Rajakaruna, Nishanta

257

This article was downloaded by: [Coll of the Atlantic], [Nishanta Rajakaruna] On: 22 April 2013, At: 08:24  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Texas, Austin, USA b Department of Biological Sciences, San José State University, San José, USA c Department of Biological Sciences, Auburn University, Auburn, USA d College of the Atlantic, Bar Harbor, USA, proceedings, demand, or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever caused arising directly or indirectly

Rajakaruna, Nishanta

258

A simplified implementation of a gradient-enhanced damage model with transient length scale effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gradient-enhanced damage models with constant gradient activity suffer from spurious damage growth at high deformation levels. This issue was resolved by Geers et al. (Comput Methods Appl Mech Eng 160(1---2):133---153, 1998) by expressing the gradient ... Keywords: Continuum damage mechanics, Gradient-enhanced damage models, Regularized media, Transient internal length scale

S. Saroukhani; R. Vafadari; A. Simone

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Links between persistent DNA damage, genome instability, and aging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links between persistent DNA damage, genome instability, and aging Links between persistent DNA damage, genome instability, and aging William Dynan Medical College of Georgia Abstract There is considerable overlap between cellular and molecular changes that occur in response to low doses of ionizing radiation and those that occur during aging. Both processes are characterized by accumulation of persistent DNA damage ("wear and tear" on the genome), accumulation of protein and lipid oxidation products, loss of regenerative capacity at the cellular and tissue level, and increased incidence of cancer. These observations support a hypothesis that exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation accelerates normal, aging-related tissue changes. We have investigated this hypothesis using a genetically tractable model organism, the Japanese medaka fish. The medaka is a whole-animal vertebrate

260

DNA damage induced clusterin expression - A sensitive measure of genomic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

damage induced clusterin expression - A sensitive measure of genomic damage induced clusterin expression - A sensitive measure of genomic instability David Boothman University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas Abstract Secretory clusterin (sCLU) is a glycoprotein secreted from cells following exposure to genotoxic stress, and sCLU expression is elevated in many different disease states. sCLU is a pro-survival protein that acts as a molecular chaperone to remove cell debris caused by trauma to cells and tissues in vivo. sCLU expression is extremely sensitive to oxidative stress and DNA damage and can be induced by low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR), as low as 2 cGy. We previously demonstrated that sCLU was induced after LDIR by activation of the Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF-1R), and downstream stimulation of Src/MAPK/Erk-1/2 to promote binding of the Egr-1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted Environmental Award Exemplary Hurricane Damage Cleanup Earns Petroleum Reserve Coveted Environmental Award April 22, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An exceptional waste management project at a Texas Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) site following Hurricane Ike in 2008 has won a DOE Environmental Sustainability (EStar) Award for Waste/Pollution Prevention. The award recognizes the SPR Storm Recovery Debris Waste Management Project at the Big Hill storage complex near Beaumont, Texas, which was heavily impacted by Hurricane Ike in September 2008. Selected annually by an independent panel of judges, EStar awards recognize environmental sustainability projects and programs that reduce risks and impacts, protect

262

Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Protects against DNA Damage in Low  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Protects against DNA Damage in Low Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein Protects against DNA Damage in Low Dose γ-Irradiated Cells Edouard Azzam New Jersey Medical School Cancer Center Abstract We have previously shown that exposure to low dose/low dose rate γ-rays can protect normal human and rodent cells against oxidative/clastogenic damages induced spontaneously or by a subsequent challenge dose of ionizing radiation. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying these effects, we used amine-specific isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based approach to identify induced proteolytic events. Intriguingly, the Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein (TCTP) was significantly up-regulated after 10cGy (0.2cGy/h) but not after 4 Gy (1 Gy/min) in several strains of normal human fibroblasts maintained in 2- or

263

Effects of ballistic damage on the dynamics of composite driveshafts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research program is to study the dynamics of a composite driveshaft before and after ballistic damage is incurred. Driveshafts are tested under static and dynamic loads to obtain material, mechanical, and vibrational characteristics. In the dynamic tests, driveshafts with and without ballistic damage are observed to determine the critical speeds. The torsional modulus, the longitudinal modulus, and Poisson's ratio are determined from the static tests. Computational models are used to perform parametric studies and to complement the experimental program. Numerical simulations incorporate both beam and shell theory into the analysis. Additionally, non-destructive evaluation (NDE) was used to help determine the extent of the damage caused by the projectile.

Ayers, Thomas Ray

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Thermal annealing of laser damage precursors on fused silica surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous studies have identified two significant precursors of laser damage on fused silica surfaces at fluenes below {approx} 35 J/cm{sup 2}, photoactive impurities in the polishing layer and surface fractures. In the present work, isothermal heating is studied as a means of remediating the highly absorptive, defect structure associated with surface fractures. A series of Vickers indentations were applied to silica surfaces at loads between 0.5N and 10N creating fracture networks between {approx} 10{micro}m and {approx} 50{micro}m in diameter. The indentations were characterized prior to and following thermal annealing under various times and temperature conditions using confocal time-resolved photo-luminescence (CTP) imaging, and R/1 optical damage testing with 3ns, 355nm laser pulses. Significant improvements in the damage thresholds, together with corresponding reductions in CTP intensity, were observed at temperatures well below the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}). For example, the damage threshold on 05.N indentations which typically initiates at fluences 35 J/cm{sup 2} through the use of a {approx} 750 C thermal treatment. Larger fracture networks required longer or higher temperature treatment to achieve similar results. At an annealing temperature > 1100 C, optical microscopy indicates morphological changes in some of the fracture structure of indentations, although remnants of the original fracture and significant deformation was still observed after thermal annealing. This study demonstrates the potential of using isothermal annealing as a means of improving the laser damage resistance of fused silica optical components. Similarly, it provides a means of further understanding the physics associated with optical damage and related mitigation processes.

Shen, N; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Laurence, T A; Suratwala, T I; Steele, W A; Feit, M D; Wang, L L

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

265

Thermal annealing of laser damage precursors on fused silica surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies have identified two significant precursors of laser damage on fused silica surfaces at fluenes below {approx} 35 J/cm{sup 2}, photoactive impurities in the polishing layer and surface fractures. In the present work, isothermal heating is studied as a means of remediating the highly absorptive, defect structure associated with surface fractures. A series of Vickers indentations were applied to silica surfaces at loads between 0.5N and 10N creating fracture networks between {approx} 10{micro}m and {approx} 50{micro}m in diameter. The indentations were characterized prior to and following thermal annealing under various times and temperature conditions using confocal time-resolved photo-luminescence (CTP) imaging, and R/1 optical damage testing with 3ns, 355nm laser pulses. Significant improvements in the damage thresholds, together with corresponding reductions in CTP intensity, were observed at temperatures well below the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}). For example, the damage threshold on 05.N indentations which typically initiates at fluences <8 J/cm{sup 2} could be improved >35 J/cm{sup 2} through the use of a {approx} 750 C thermal treatment. Larger fracture networks required longer or higher temperature treatment to achieve similar results. At an annealing temperature > 1100 C, optical microscopy indicates morphological changes in some of the fracture structure of indentations, although remnants of the original fracture and significant deformation was still observed after thermal annealing. This study demonstrates the potential of using isothermal annealing as a means of improving the laser damage resistance of fused silica optical components. Similarly, it provides a means of further understanding the physics associated with optical damage and related mitigation processes.

Shen, N; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Laurence, T A; Suratwala, T I; Steele, W A; Feit, M D; Wang, L L

2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

266

BDS Thin Film UV Antireflection Laser Damage Competition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UV antireflection coatings are a challenging coating for high power laser applications as exemplified by the use of uncoated Brewster's windows in laser cavities. In order to understand the current laser resistance of UV AR coatings in the industrial and university sectors, a double blind laser damage competition was performed. The coatings have a maximum reflectance of 0.5% at 355 nm at normal incidence. Damage testing will be performed using the raster scan method with a 7.5 ns pulse length on a single testing facility to facilitate direct comparisons. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of deposition processes and coating materials will also be shared.

Stolz, C J

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

267

Development of advanced drilling, completion, and stimulation systems for minimum formation damage and improved efficiency: A program overview  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Natural Gas Resource and Extraction Program consists of industry/government co-sponsored research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects, which focus on gas recovery from both conventional and nonconventional resources. The Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation (DCS) Project focuses on advanced, non-damaging technology systems and equipment for improving gas recovery from conventional and nonconventional reservoirs. As operators move from development of current day economically attractive gas-field development to the lower permeability geologic regions of domestic onshore plays, increasing the emphasis on minimum formation damage DCS will permit economic development of gas reserves. The objective of the Project is to develop and demonstrate cost-effective, advanced technology to accelerate widespread use and acceptance of minimum formation damage DCS systems. The goal of this product development effort is to reduce costs and improve the overall efficiency of vertical, directional, and horizontally drilled wells in gas formations throughout the US. The current focus of the Project is on the development of underbalanced drilling technology and minimum formation damage stimulation technology concurrently with the appropriate completion hardware to improve the economics of domestic natural gas field development. Ongoing drilling technology projects to be discussed include development of an electromagnetic measurement while drilling system for directional and horizontal drilling in underbalanced drilling applications and the development of a steerable air percussion drilling system for hard formation drilling and improved penetration rates. Ongoing stimulation technology projects to be discussed include introduction of carbon dioxide/sand fracturing technology for minimal formation damage.

Layne, A.W.; Yost, A.B. II

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

An Economic Analysis of Erosion and Sediment Damage in the Duck Creek Watershed, Dickens County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972, Public Law 92-500, established a national goal of eliminating the discharge of pollutants into the nation's waterways by 1985. As a step toward that goal an interim water quality standard of "fishable, swimmable waters nationwide" by July 1, 1983 was determined. Under section 208 of this law, each state was required to establish a "continuing planning process" to define controls for agricultural non-point sources of water pollution. Section 208 calls for the development of state and area-wide water quality management plans The plans are to include "a process to (i) identify if appropriate? agriculturally and silviculturally related non-point sources of pollution, including runoff from manure disposal areas, and from land used for livestock and crop production, and (ii) set forth procedures and methods (including land use requirements) to control to the extent feasible such sources." The water quality issue of concern in this study is fertilizer and pesticide residuals carried into waterways by sediment. Since sediment is a potential transporter of pollutants, practices to control agricultural non-point source pollution would probably be aimed at reducing soil loss. Conservation and conservation related practices are, at present, considered the best technical practices to abate agricultural non-point source pollution. This study examines the economic impact of various policies that could be used to reduce soil loss. Both regulatory and voluntary policies are considered. Economic impacts examined include: (a) impacts of the policies on farm income; (b) government costs associated with the policies, including administration costs; (c) off-site sediment damages that would be abated; and (d) social desirability of the policies. The first section of the report describes the selected "Best Management Practices" and examines the on-farm economics of soil conservation. Then, the second section postulates various sediment damage control options and models the economic consequences, both to agricultural producers as a group? and to society of implementing them.

Reneau, D. R.; Taylor, C. R.; Harris, B. L.; Lacewell, R.D.; Mueller, P. E.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Erosion and Sediment Damages and Economic Impacts of Potential 208 Controls: A Summary of Five Watershed Studies in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of economic analyses of erosion and sedimentation in five agricultural watersheds in Texas (see fig. 1). Economic analyses of the study areas considered both the on-farm economics of soil conservation and the economic consequences of various sedimentation control options. These topics were joined in the studies because they deal with different facets of the same problem. Unlike some potential pollutants, soil particles transported from a farmer's field that may become a problem downstream are a valuable resource, not a waste product. Because soil is valuable in itself, some level of soil conservation is going to be economically desirable even if downstream damages are not present or are not considered by the farmer. Results of the studies show that soil conservation does indeed pay in many situations and that its value is greater the longer the planning horizon of a farmer. This suggests that an educational program in this regard may reduce sediment damage while increasing farm income at the same time . Sediment can cause environmental damage (off-site costs) both directly and indirectly. Directly, the soil particles can cause environmental damage by filling up reservoirs and flood control structures and by deposition in other places. Indirectly, sediment can cause environmental costs by carrying plant nutrients that are potential pollutants. For the study watersheds, no evidence was found that the concentration of plant nutrients in the water posed health hazards to livestock or humans, nor caused undue eutrophication in the watersheds. Consequently, the study focused on off-site sediment damages resulting from shortened economic lives of reservoir and flood control structures and from sediment deposition in the watershed. Annualized off-site sediment damages ranged from a high of 26 cents per ton of gross erosion in Lake Lavon watershed to 14 cents per ton of gross erosion in Duck Creek, to 13.5 cents per ton of gross erosion in Lower Running Water Draw, to a negligible amount in Turkey Creek and Cameron County. These estimates are considerably lower than off-site sediment damages in corn belt watersheds (Lee & Guntermann). Policy Options for Controlling Sediment Public policies that can be implemented to abate off-site sediment damages include direct regulation, provision of economic incentives, education, and public investment. For point sources of pollutants, regulations are typically directed toward the pollutant at or near the point of emission into waterways. However, this is infeasible with non-point sources such as sediment because they enter waterways at an infinite number of points. Hence, regulations must be directed toward the practices that cause erosion and thus sedimentation. The economic incentive option includes alternatives such as Federal or State cost-sharing for adoption of conservation practices, and disincentives such as taxes or penalties on erosion. Education is a viable policy option in situations where producers are not adopting soil conservation practices that would be profitable. In these situations a successful education program would increase producer's income as well as reducing off-site sediment damages. Public investment could be used to pay for dredging sediment from reservoirs and flood control structures to prevent loss of flood control, water supply and recreational benefits. Social benefits and costs of various policy options based on direct regulation, taxation, and provision of economic incentives were estimated for three watersheds: Lake Lavon, Duck Creek, and Lower Running Water Draw. Items considered in the benefit-cost analysis were: (a) farm income consequences; (b) off-site sediment damages abated; (c) governmental cost or revenue; and (d) administration and enforcement costs associated with each policy. The major conclusion of this social benefit and cost analysis is that off-site damages are not large enough to warrant controls on agricultural activities in any of the watersheds; that i

Taylor, C. R.; Reneau, D. R.; Harris, B. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Analysis of Building Damages of Paste Backfill Mining under Villages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to realize coal mining in safety without moving villages, increase coal recovery ratio, solve the conflict of mining and panel relays, the scheme of paste backfill mining under villages in Xiaotun coal mine is executed, and the surface subsidence ... Keywords: Mining under Villages, Paste Backfilling, Damage Assessment, Displacement, Deformation

Chai Hua-bin; Zou You-feng; Guo Wen-bing; Chen Jun-jie

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Displacement Damage in Silicon Carbide Irradiated in Fission Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Calculations are performed for displacement damage in SiC due to irradiation in the neutron environments of various types of nuclear reactors using the best available models and nuclear data. The displacement damage calculations use recently developed damage functions for SiC that are based on extensive molecular dynamics simulations of displacement events1. Displacements per atom (DPA) cross sections for SiC have been calculated as a function of neutron energy, and they are presented here in tabular form to facilitate their use as the standard measure of displacement damage for irradiated SiC. DPA cross sections averaged over the neutron energy spectrum are calculated for neutron spectra in the cores of typical commercial reactors and in the test sample irradiation regions of several materials test reactors used in both past and present irradiation testing. Particular attention is focused on a next-generation high-temperature gas-cooled pebble bed reactor, for which the high-temperature properties of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites are well suited. Calculated transmutations and activation levels in a pebble bed reactor are compared to those in other reactors.

Heinisch, Howard L.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Weber, William J.; Williford, Rick E.

2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

272

Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack.

Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack. 8 figs.

Weiss, J.D.

1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

274

Global Warming Effects on U.S. Hurricane Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While many studies of the effects of global warming on hurricanes predict an increase in various metrics of Atlantic basin-wide activity, it is less clear that this signal will emerge from background noise in measures of hurricane damage, which ...

Kerry Emanuel

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Crop-Hail Damage in the Midwest Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crop-hail damage in the ten Midwest corn belt states is examined during the period 1957–81. Estimates of crop losses due to hail are made from hail insurance data for each state and each significant crop in the region. The crop-hail losses are ...

Harry J. Hillaker Jr.; Paul J. Waite

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Computational simulation of electromigration induced damage in copper interconnects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current density levels are expected to increase by orders of magnitude in next generation power electronics and nanoelectronics. Electromigration which occur under high current density is the major concern for the nanoelectronics industry. Using a general ... Keywords: copper interconnects, damage mechanics, electromigration, electronics packaging reliability, thin film

Cemal Basaran; Minghui Lin; Shidong Li

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

ADVANCED COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE DESIGN BASED ON DURABILITY AND DAMAGE TOLERANCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the program was to demonstrate and verify Certification-by-Analysis (CBA) capability for wind turbine blades made from advanced lightweight composite materials. The approach integrated durability and damage tolerance analysis with robust design and virtual testing capabilities to deliver superior, durable, low weight, low cost, long life, and reliable wind blade design. The GENOA durability and life prediction software suite was be used as the primary simulation tool. First, a micromechanics-based computational approach was used to assess the durability of composite laminates with ply drop features commonly used in wind turbine applications. Ply drops occur in composite joints and closures of wind turbine blades to reduce skin thicknesses along the blade span. They increase localized stress concentration, which may cause premature delamination failure in composite and reduced fatigue service life. Durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) were evaluated utilizing a multi-scale micro-macro progressive failure analysis (PFA) technique. PFA is finite element based and is capable of detecting all stages of material damage including initiation and propagation of delamination. It assesses multiple failure criteria and includes the effects of manufacturing anomalies (i.e., void, fiber waviness). Two different approaches have been used within PFA. The first approach is Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) PFA while the second one is strength-based. Constituent stiffness and strength properties for glass and carbon based material systems were reverse engineered for use in D&DT evaluation of coupons with ply drops under static loading. Lamina and laminate properties calculated using manufacturing and composite architecture details matched closely published test data. Similarly, resin properties were determined for fatigue life calculation. The simulation not only reproduced static strength and fatigue life as observed in the test, it also showed composite damage and fracture modes that resemble those reported in the tests. The results show that computational simulation can be relied on to enhance the design of tapered composite structures such as the ones used in turbine wind blades. A computational simulation for durability, damage tolerance (D&DT) and reliability of composite wind turbine blade structures in presence of uncertainties in material properties was performed. A composite turbine blade was first assessed with finite element based multi-scale progressive failure analysis to determine failure modes and locations as well as the fracture load. D&DT analyses were then validated with static test performed at Sandia National Laboratories. The work was followed by detailed weight analysis to identify contribution of various materials to the overall weight of the blade. The methodology ensured that certain types of failure modes, such as delamination progression, are contained to reduce risk to the structure. Probabilistic analysis indicated that composite shear strength has a great influence on the blade ultimate load under static loading. Weight was reduced by 12% with robust design without loss in reliability or D&DT. Structural benefits obtained with the use of enhanced matrix properties through nanoparticles infusion were also assessed. Thin unidirectional fiberglass layers enriched with silica nanoparticles were applied to the outer surfaces of a wind blade to improve its overall structural performance and durability. The wind blade was a 9-meter prototype structure manufactured and tested subject to three saddle static loading at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The blade manufacturing did not include the use of any nano-material. With silica nanoparticles in glass composite applied to the exterior surfaces of the blade, the durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) results from multi-scale PFA showed an increase in ultimate load of the blade by 9.2% as compared to baseline structural performance (without nano). The use of nanoparticles lead to a delay in the onset of delamination. Load-displacement relati

Galib Abumeri; Frank Abdi (PhD)

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

278

ARM: Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits

Gary Hodges; Tom Stoffel; Mark Kutchenreiter; Bev Kay; Aron Habte; Michael Ritsche; Victor Morris; Mary Anderberg

279

Propagation of Reactions in Thermally-damaged PBX-9501  

SciTech Connect

A thermally-initiated explosion in PBX-9501 (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) is observed in situ by flash x-ray imaging, and modeled with the LLNL multi-physics arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian code ALE3D. The containment vessel deformation provides a useful estimate of the reaction pressure at the time of the explosion, which we calculate to be in the range 0.8-1.4 GPa. Closely-coupled ALE3D simulations of these experiments, utilizing the multi-phase convective burn model, provide detailed predictions of the reacted mass fraction and deflagration front acceleration. During the preinitiation heating phase of these experiments, the solid HMX portion of the PBX-9501 undergoes a {beta}-phase to {delta}-phase transition which damages the explosive and induces porosity. The multi-phase convective burn model results demonstrate that damaged particle size and pressure are critical for predicting reaction speed and violence. In the model, energetic parameters are taken from LLNL's thermochemical-kinetics code Cheetah and burn rate parameters from Son et al. (2000). Model predictions of an accelerating deflagration front are in qualitative agreement with the experimental images assuming a mode particle diameter in the range 300-400 {micro}m. There is uncertainty in the initial porosity caused by thermal damage of PBX-9501 and, thus, the effective surface area for burning. To better understand these structures, we employ x-ray computed tomography (XRCT) to examine the microstructure of PBX-9501 before and after thermal damage. Although lack of contrast between grains and binder prevents the determination of full grain size distribution in this material, there are many domains visible in thermally damaged PBX-9501 with diameters in the 300-400 {micro}m range.

Tringe, J W; Glascoe, E A; Kercher, J R; Willey, T M; Springer, H K; Greenwood, D W; Molitoris, J D; Smilowitz, L; Henson, B F; Maienschein, J L

2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

280

DAMAGE TO COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL BUILDINGS EXPOSED TO NUCLEAR EFFECTS  

SciTech Connect

One equipment control building designed to be blast resistant and two each of three standardized types of metal warehouse or utility buildings were exposed to the effects of a nuclear device detonation. One of the utility buildings was frameless, with deeply corrugated wall and roof sections; a second was very largely frameless, utilizing interlocking channel sections; and in the third the aluininum-panel wall and roof covering was supported by girts and purlins, which in turn were supported by steel frames. Because of atmospheric conditions at the time of an earlier detonation in the test series, one of each of the three types of utility buildings was exposed to approximately 0.7 psi overpressure before the planned test. In the planned test one of each of the three types was exposed to approximately 3.0 psi overpressure and one to 1.3 psi, with the intention of bracketing their overpressure survival range and obtaining data for possible economic redesign for improved blast resistance. The equipment control building utilized continuous-welded steel frames and reinforced-gypsum curtain-wall construction. The control building was exposed to approximately 4.1 psi, in the anticipated fringe zone of major structural damage, to determine its protective capabilities. The blast-resistant equipment control building was nat structurally damaged by the blast, thus exceeding the expectations of the design. Each of the three utility buildings received severe damage at the near range, one being completely destroyed, whereas at the far range the damage in every case was repairable. The test results are discussed, and recommendations for improved designs are made. Damage records during the unexpected test and at the far range in the planned test are correlated by means of dynamic analyses with pressuretime data and studies of structural resintance. Pressure-time information is appended. (auth)

Johnston, B.G.

1956-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

Damage development under compression-compression fatigue loading in a stitched uniwoven graphite/epoxy composite material. Interim Report No. 86  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Damage initiation and growth under compression-compression fatigue loading were investigated for a stitched uniweave material system with an underlying AS4/3501-6 quasi-isotropic layup. Performance of unnotched specimens having stitch rows at either 0 degree or 90 degrees to the loading direction was compared. Special attention was given to the effects of stitching related manufacturing defects. Damage evaluation techniques included edge replication, stiffness monitoring, x-ray radiography, residual compressive strength, and laminate sectioning. It was found that the manufacturing defect of inclined stitches had the greatest adverse effect on material performance. Zero degree and 90 degree specimen performances were generally the same. While the stitches were the source of damage initiation, they also slowed damage propagation both along the length and across the width and affected through-the-thickness damage growth. A pinched layer zone formed by the stitches particularly affected damage initiation and growth. The compressive failure mode was transverse shear for all specimens, both in static compression and fatigue cycling effects.

Vandermey, N.E.; Morris, D.H.; Masters, J.E.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Seismic fragility formulations for segmented buried pipeline systems including the impact of differential ground subsidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Though Differential Ground Subsidence (DGS) impacts the seismic response of segmented buried pipelines augmenting their vulnerability, fragility formulations to estimate repair rates under such condition are not available in the literature. Physical models to estimate pipeline seismic damage considering other cases of permanent ground subsidence (e.g. faulting, tectonic uplift, liquefaction, and landslides) have been extensively reported, not being the case of DGS. The refinement of the study of two important phenomena in Mexico City - the 1985 Michoacan earthquake scenario and the sinking of the city due to ground subsidence - has contributed to the analysis of the interrelation of pipeline damage, ground motion intensity, and DGS; from the analysis of the 48-inch pipeline network of the Mexico City's Water System, fragility formulations for segmented buried pipeline systems for two DGS levels are proposed. The novel parameter PGV{sup 2}/PGA, being PGV peak ground velocity and PGA peak ground acceleration, has been used as seismic parameter in these formulations, since it has shown better correlation to pipeline damage than PGV alone according to previous studies. By comparing the proposed fragilities, it is concluded that a change in the DGS level (from Low-Medium to High) could increase the pipeline repair rates (number of repairs per kilometer) by factors ranging from 1.3 to 2.0; being the higher the seismic intensity the lower the factor.

Pineda Porras, Omar Andrey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ordaz, Mario [UNAM, MEXICO CITY

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

The discrepancies in multistep damage evolution of yttria-stabilized zirconia irradiated with different ions  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports a comprehensive investigation of structural damage in yttria-stabilized zirconia irradiated with different ions over a wide fluence range. A similar multistep damage accumulation exists for the irradiations of different ions, but the critical doses for occurrence of second damage step, characterized by a faster increase in damage fraction, and the maximum elastic strain at the first damage step are varied and depend on ion mass. For irradiations of heavier ions, the second damage step occurs at a higher dose with a lower critical elastic strain. Furthermore, larger extended defects were observed in the irradiations of heavy ions at the second damage step. Associated with other experiment results and multistep damage accumulation model, the distinct discrepancies in the damage buildup under irradiations of different ions were interpreted by the effects of electronic excitation, energy of primary knock-on atom and chemistry contributions of deposited ions.

Yang, Tengfei [Peking University; Taylor, Caitlin A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kong, Shuyan [Peking University; Wang, Chenxu [Peking University; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Huang, Xuejun [Peking University; Xue, Jianming [Peking University; Yan, Sha [Peking University; Wang, Yugang [Peking University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Assessing Vulnerabilities, Risks, and Consequences of Damage to Critical Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

Since the publication of 'Critical Foundations: Protecting America's Infrastructure,' there has been a keen understanding of the complexity, interdependencies, and shared responsibility required to protect the nation's most critical assets that are essential to our way of life. The original 5 sectors defined in 1997 have grown to 18 Critical Infrastructures and Key Resources (CIKR), which are discussed in the 2009 National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) and its supporting sector-specific plans. The NIPP provides the structure for a national program dedicated to enhanced protection and resiliency of the nation's infrastructure. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides in-depth, multi-disciplinary assessments of threat, vulnerability, and consequence across all 18 sectors at scales ranging from specific facilities to infrastructures spanning multi-state regions, such as the Oil and Natural Gas (ONG) sector. Like many of the CIKR sectors, the ONG sector is comprised of production, processing, distribution, and storage of highly valuable and potentially dangerous commodities. Furthermore, there are significant interdependencies with other sectors, including transportation, communication, finance, and government. Understanding the potentially devastating consequences and collateral damage resulting from a terrorist attack or natural event is an important element of LLNL's infrastructure security programs. Our work began in the energy sector in the late 1990s and quickly expanded other critical infrastructure sectors. We have performed over 600 physical assessments with a particular emphasis on those sectors that utilize, store, or ship potentially hazardous materials and for whom cyber security is important. The success of our approach is based on building awareness of vulnerabilities and risks and working directly with industry partners to collectively advance infrastructure protection. This approach consists of three phases: The Pre-Assessment Phase brings together infrastructure owners and operators to identify critical assets and help the team create a structured information request. During this phase, we gain information about the critical assets from those who are most familiar with operations and interdependencies, making the time we spend on the ground conducting the assessment much more productive and enabling the team to make actionable recommendations. The Assessment Phase analyzes 10 areas: Threat environment, cyber architecture, cyber penetration, physical security, physical penetration, operations security, policies and procedures, interdependencies, consequence analysis, and risk characterization. Each of these individual tasks uses direct and indirect data collection, site inspections, and structured and facilitated workshops to gather data. Because of the importance of understanding the cyber threat, LLNL has built both fixed and mobile cyber penetration, wireless penetration and supporting tools that can be tailored to fit customer needs. The Post-Assessment Phase brings vulnerability and risk assessments to the customer in a format that facilitates implementation of mitigation options. Often the assessment findings and recommendations are briefed and discussed with several levels of management and, if appropriate, across jurisdictional boundaries. The end result is enhanced awareness and informed protective measures. Over the last 15 years, we have continued to refine our methodology and capture lessons learned and best practices. The resulting risk and decision framework thus takes into consideration real-world constraints, including regulatory, operational, and economic realities. In addition to 'on the ground' assessments focused on mitigating vulnerabilities, we have integrated our computational and atmospheric dispersion capability with easy-to-use geo-referenced visualization tools to support emergency planning and response operations. LLNL is home to the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) and the Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC). NA

Suski, N; Wuest, C

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

285

Dual wavelength laser damage testing for high energy lasers.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As high energy laser systems evolve towards higher energies, fundamental material properties such as the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of the optics limit the overall system performance. The Z-Backlighter Laser Facility at Sandia National Laboratories uses a pair of such kiljoule-class Nd:Phosphate Glass lasers for x-ray radiography of high energy density physics events on the Z-Accelerator. These two systems, the Z-Beamlet system operating at 527nm/ 1ns and the Z-Petawatt system operating at 1054nm/ 0.5ps, can be combined for some experimental applications. In these scenarios, dichroic beam combining optics and subsequent dual wavelength high reflectors will see a high fluence from combined simultaneous laser exposure and may even see lingering effects when used for pump-probe configurations. Only recently have researchers begun to explore such concerns, looking at individual and simultaneous exposures of optics to 1064 and third harmonic 355nm light from Nd:YAG [1]. However, to our knowledge, measurements of simultaneous and delayed dual wavelength damage thresholds on such optics have not been performed for exposure to 1054nm and its second harmonic light, especially when the pulses are of disparate pulse duration. The Z-Backlighter Facility has an instrumented damage tester setup to examine the issues of laser-induced damage thresholds in a variety of such situations [2] . Using this damage tester, we have measured the LIDT of dual wavelength high reflectors at 1054nm/0.5ps and 532nm/7ns, separately and spatially combined, both co-temporal and delayed, with single and multiple exposures. We found that the LIDT of the sample at 1054nm/0.5ps can be significantly lowered, from 1.32J/cm{sup 2} damage fluence with 1054/0.5ps only to 1.05 J/cm{sup 2} with the simultaneous presence of 532nm/7ns laser light at a fluence of 8.1 J/cm{sup 2}. This reduction of LIDT of the sample at 1054nm/0.5ps continues as the fluence of 532nm/7ns laser light simultaneously present increases. The reduction of LIDT does not occur when the 2 pulses are temporally separated. This paper will also present dual wavelength LIDT results of commercial dichroic beam-combining optics simultaneously exposed with laser light at 1054nm/2.5ns and 532nm/7ns.

Atherton, Briggs W.; Rambo, Patrick K.; Schwarz, Jens; Kimmel, Mark W.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Damage tolerance assessment of bonded composite doubler repairs for commercial aircraft applications  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Aviation Administration has sponsored a project at its Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center (AANC) to validate the use of bonded composite doublers on commercial aircraft. A specific application was chosen in order to provide a proof-of-concept driving force behind this test and analysis project. However, the data stemming from this study serves as a comprehensive evaluation of bonded composite doublers for general use. The associated documentation package provides guidance regarding the design, analysis, installation, damage tolerance, and nondestructive inspection of these doublers. This report describes a series of fatigue and strength tests which were conducted to study the damage tolerance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Tension-tension fatigue and ultimate strength tests attempted to grow engineered flaws in coupons with composite doublers bonded to aluminum skin. An array of design parameters, including various flaw scenarios, the effects of surface impact, and other off-design conditions, were studied. The structural tests were used to: (1) assess the potential for interply delaminations and disbonds between the aluminum and the laminate, and (2) determine the load transfer and crack mitigation capabilities of composite doublers in the presence of severe defects. A series of specimens were subjected to ultimate tension tests in order to determine strength values and failure modes. It was demonstrated that even in the presence of extensive damage in the original structure (cracks, material loss) and in spite of non-optimum installations (adhesive disbonds), the composite doubler allowed the structure to survive more than 144,000 cycles of fatigue loading. Installation flaws in the composite laminate did not propagate over 216,000 fatigue cycles. Furthermore, the added impediments of impact--severe enough to deform the parent aluminum skin--and hot-wet exposure did not effect the doubler`s performance. Since the tests were conducting using extreme combinations of flaw scenarios (sizes and collocation) and excessive fatigue load spectrums, the performance parameters were arrived at in a conservative manner.

Roach, D.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Geomechanical modeling of reservoir compaction, surface subsidence, and casing damage at the Belridge diatomite field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geologic, and historical well failure, production, and injection data were analyzed to guide development of three-dimensional geomechanical models of the Belridge diatomite field, California. The central premise of the numerical simulations is that spatial gradients in pore pressure induced by production and injection in a low permeability reservoir may perturb the local stresses and cause subsurface deformation sufficient to result in well failure. Time-dependent reservoir pressure fields that were calculated from three-dimensional black oil reservoir simulations were coupled uni-directionally to three-dimensional non-linear finite element geomechanical simulations. The reservoir models included nearly 100,000 gridblocks (100--200 wells), and covered nearly 20 years of production and injection. The geomechanical models were meshed from structure maps and contained more than 300,000 nodal points. Shear strain localization along weak bedding planes that causes casing dog-legs in the field was accommodated in the model by contact surfaces located immediately above the reservoir and at two locations in the overburden. The geomechanical simulations are validated by comparison of the predicted surface subsidence with field measurements, and by comparison of predicted deformation with observed casing damage. Additionally, simulations performed for two independently developed areas at South Belridge, Sections 33 and 29, corroborate their different well failure histories. The simulations suggest the three types of casing damage observed, and show that although water injection has mitigated surface subsidence, it can, under some circumstances, increase the lateral gradients in effective stress, that in turn can accelerate subsurface horizontal motions. Geomechanical simulation is an important reservoir management tool that can be used to identify optimal operating policies to mitigate casing damage for existing field developments, and applied to incorporate the effect of well failure potential in economic analyses of alternative infilling and development options.

FREDRICH,JOANNE T.; DEITRICK,G.L.; ARGUELLO JR.,JOSE G.; DEROUFFIGNAC,E.P.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Neutron damage reduction in a traveling wave reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traveling wave reactors are envisioned to run on depleted or natural uranium with no need for enrichment or reprocessing, and in a manner which requires little to no operator intervention. If feasible, this type of reactor has significant advantages over conventional nuclear power systems. However, a practical implementation of this concept is challenging as neutron irradiation levels many times greater than those in conventional reactors appear to be required for a fission wave to propagate. Radiation damage to the fuel and cladding materials presents a significant obstacle to a practical design. One possibility for reducing damage is to soften the neutron energy spectrum. Here we show that using a uranium oxide fuel form will allow a shift in the neutron spectrum that can result in at least a three fold decrease in dpa levels for fuel cladding and structural steels within the reactor compared with the dpa levels expected when using a uranium metal fuel. (authors)

Osborne, A. G.; Deinert, M. R. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Univ. of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Natural completions - overcoming the damage caused by drilling and perforations  

SciTech Connect

Natural completions are suggested as a way to avoid or overcome damage to the formation caused by drilling and perforating. Formation damage may take the form of plugged passageways which remain closed because formation pressure does not exceed that of the plug material. Natural completions refer to using maximum differential pressure toward the wellbore, so that such obstructions in passageways can less easily exist. The method allows the formation pressure to backsurge perforation tunnels immediately following detonation of the guns, with the objectives of obtaining deep, clean perforations with the crushed zone and debris completely removed from the perforations. Procedures for natural completions are described and illustrated. A case history is given where the natural completion method restores productivity of a well.

Perry, G.; Smith, G.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Summary of radiation damage studies on rare earth permanent magnets  

SciTech Connect

With the proposed use of permanent magnets for both the NLC and the VLHC the issue flux loss due to radiation damage needs to be fully understood. There exist many papers on the subject. There are many difficulties in drawing conclusions from all of these data. First there is the difference methods of dosimetry, second different types of magnets and magnetic arrangements, and third different manufacturers of magnet material. This paper provides a summary of the existing literature on the subject.

J. T. Volk

2002-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

291

A micromechanics based ductile damage model for anisotropic titanium alloys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The hot-workability of Titanium (Ti) alloys is of current interest to the aerospace industry due to its widespread application in the design of strong and light-weight aircraft structural components and engine parts. Motivated by the need for accurate simulation of large scale plastic deformation in metals that exhibit macroscopic plastic anisotropy, such as Ti, a constitutive model is developed for anisotropic materials undergoing plastic deformation coupled with ductile damage in the form of internal cavitation. The model is developed from a rigorous micromechanical basis, following well-known previous works in the field. The model incorporates the porosity and void aspect ratio as internal damage variables, and seeks to provide a more accurate prediction of damage growth compared to previous existing models. A closed form expression for the macroscopic yield locus is derived using a Hill-Mandel homogenization and limit analysis of a porous representative volume element. Analytical expressions are also developed for the evolution of the internal variables, porosity and void shape. The developed yield criterion is validated by comparison to numerically determined yield loci for specific anisotropic materials, using a numerical limit analysis technique developed herein. The evolution laws for the internal variables are validated by comparison with direct finite element simulations of porous unit cells. Comparison with previously published results in the literature indicates that the new model yields better agreement with the numerically determined yield loci for a wide range of loading paths. Use of the new model in continuum finite element simulations of ductile fracture may be expected to lead to improved predictions for damage evolution and fracture modes in plastically anisotropic materials.

Keralavarma, Shyam Mohan

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

EPRI-SQUG Damage-Indicating Parameter Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides information assembled for the purpose of developing damage-indicating parameters (DIPs) for power plant equipment. An existing Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) seismic experience database is used to develop candidate DIP values associated with two database sites subjected to earthquake events. The two sites are described, the candidate DIPs are derived from the recorded site motions, and the equipment items at these sites are categorized according to performance during an ear...

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

293

Induction of DNA Damage by Low Dose PET scans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Induction of DNA Damage by Low Dose PET scans Induction of DNA Damage by Low Dose PET scans Douglas Boreham McMaster University Abstract This research is focused on assessing the radiation risk associated with positron emission tomography (PET) scans. It has been suggested that low dose medical imaging, such as PET scans, carry an added biological risk because they expose the patient to ionizing radiation. PET scanning is an increasingly used nuclear medicine procedure that requires the administration of isotope 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG, E=250 keV β and 511 keV γ) and results in an effective dose to the patient ranging from 7-22 mSv. The radiation induced DNA damage associated with a PET scan was studied in 7-9 week old female wild type Trp53 +/+ mice. Mice were given a PET scan with 18F-FDG and the biological response was assessed in bone marrow using

294

Damage Survey of Hurricane Andrew and Its Relationship to the Eyewall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A damage map documenting Hurricane Andrew's destructive land fall over southern Florida is presented. Vectors that represent the direction of winds causing damage to trees and structures are shown along with an F-scale rating in order to assess ...

Roger M. Wakimoto; Peter G. Black

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Regulation of DNA damage tolerance : studies of the translesion synthesis DNA ploymerase eta in Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All organisms must control the effects of DNA damage to protect the integrity of their genomes. In addition to DNA repair, this requires DNA damage tolerance pathways, which allow the continuation of essential processes ...

Woodruff, Rachel Van Etten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Piezoelectric-based in-situ damage detection of composite materials for structural health monitoring systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost-effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials. This thesis presents the conclusions of an analytical and experimental survey of candidate methods for in-situ damage ...

Kessler, Seth Stovack, 1977-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Damage Modeling and Life Extending Control of a Boiler-Turbine System1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Damage Modeling and Life Extending Control of a Boiler-Turbine System1 Donglin Li Tongwen Chen2 hierarchical LEC structure and apply it to a typ- ical boiler system. There are two damage models

Marquez, Horacio J.

298

Lightning Casualties and Damages in the United States from 1959 to 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lightning-caused fatalities, injuries, and damage reports for the United States are listed in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration publication Storm Data. Previously published studies of lightning casualties and damages in the ...

E. Brian Curran; Ronald L. Holle; Raúl E. López

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

In Situ Study of Radiation Damage in Pure Zr and Zircaloy-2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, In Situ Study of Radiation Damage in Pure Zr and Zircaloy-2 ... cascades at the early stages of damage development at very low dose (0.01 ...

300

High-speed, low-damage grinding of advanced ceramics Phase 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In manufacture of structural ceramic components, grinding costs can comprise up to 80% of the entire manufacturing cost. Most of these costs arise from the conventional multi-step grinding process with numerous grinding wheels and additional capital equipment, perishable dressing tools, and labor. In an attempt to reduce structural ceramic grinding costs, a feasibility investigation was undertaken to develop a single step, roughing-finishing process suitable for producing high-quality silicon nitride ceramic parts at high material removal rates at lower cost than traditional, multi-stage grinding. This feasibility study employed combined use of laboratory grinding tests, mathematical grinding models, and characterization of resultant material surface condition. More specifically, this Phase 1 final report provides a technical overview of High-Speed, Low-Damage (HSLD) ceramic grinding and the conditions necessary to achieve the small grain depths of cut necessary for low damage grinding while operating at relatively high material removal rates. Particular issues addressed include determining effects of wheel speed and material removal rate on resulting mode of material removal (ductile or brittle fracture), limiting grinding forces, calculation of approximate grinding zone temperatures developed during HSLD grinding, and developing the experimental systems necessary for determining HSLD grinding energy partition relationships. In addition, practical considerations for production utilization of the HSLD process are also discussed.

Kovach, J.A. [Eaton Corp., Willoughby Hills, OH (United States). Mfg. Technologies Center; Malkin, S. [Univ. of Massachusetts (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Studying impact damage on carbon-fiber reinforced aircraft composite panels with sonicir  

SciTech Connect

Composites are becoming more important materials in commercial aircraft structures such as the fuselage and wings with the new B787 Dreamliner from Boeing which has the target to utilize 50% by weight of composite materials. Carbon-fiber reinforced composites are the material of choice in aircraft structures. This is due to their light weight and high strength (high strength-to-weight ratio), high specific stiffness, tailorability of properties, design flexibility etc. Especially, by reducing the aircraft's body weight by using such lighter structures, the cost of fuel can be greatly reduced with the high jet fuel price for commercial airlines. However, these composites are prone to impact damage and the damage may occur without any observable sign on the surface, yet resulting in delaminations and disbonds that may occur well within the layers. We are studying the impact problem with carbon-fiber reinforced composite panels and developing SonicIR for this application as a fast and wide-area NDE technology. In this paper, we present our results in studying composite structures including carbon-fiber reinforced composite materials, and preliminary quantitative studies on delamination type defect depth identification in the panels.

Han Xiaoyan; Zhang Ding; He Qi; Song Yuyang; Lubowicki, Anthony [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Zhao Xinyue; Newaz, Golam. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Favro, Lawrence D.; Thomas, Robert L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

302

Estimate of Undulator Magnet Damage Due to Beam Finder Wire Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beam Finder Wire (BFW) devices will be installed at each break in the Undulator magnet line. These devices will scan small wires across the beam causing some electrons to lose energy through bremsstrahlung. The degraded electrons are subsequently detected downstream of a set of vertical dipole magnets after they pass through the vacuum chamber. This signal can then be used to accurately determine the beam position with respect to the BFW wire. The choice of the wire diameter, scan speed, and operating parameters, depends on the trade-off between the signal size and the radiation damage to the undulator magnets. In this note I estimate the rate of undulator magnet damage that results from scanning as a function of, wire size, scan speed, and average beam current. A separate analysis of the signal size was carried out by Wu. The damage estimate is primarily based on two sources: the first, Fasso, is used to estimate the amount of radiation generated and then absorbed by the magnets; the second, Alderman et. al., is used to estimate the amount of damage the magnet undergoes as a result of the absorbed radiation. Fasso performed a detailed calculation of the radiation, including neutron fluence, that results from a the electron beam passing through a 100 micron diamond foil inserted just in front of the undulator line. Fasso discussed the signficance of various types of radiation and stated that photoneutrons probably play a major role. The estimate in this paper assumes the neutron fluence is the only significant cause of radiation-induced demagnetization. The specific results I use from Fasso's paper are reproduced here in Figure 1, which shows the radial distribution of the integrated neutron fluence per day in the undulator magnets, and Figure 2, which shows the absorbed radiation dose all along the undulator line. In the longitudinal dimension, Fasso's calculation, (see Figure 2), shows that the radiation dose is widely distributed all along the undulator line, but is highest around 70 m from the front of the undulator line where the foil is. At the 70 m point, for the purpose of calculating the demagnetization, I chose a conservative estimate for the effective neutron flux of 1.0 x 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}/day. As can be seen in Figure 1, this choice is representative of the flux nearest the beam where it is the highest. A less conservative estimate, but perhaps more accurate, estimate of the effective flux, would be the average flux in the magnet block, which is roughly one half as much.

Welch, J.

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

303

DOE Order 440. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA) Federal Employees DOE Order 440. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA) Federal Employees Stakeholders:...

304

A Coupled Micromechanical Model of Moisture-Induced Damage in Asphalt Mixtures: Formulation and Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The deleterious effect of moisture on the structural integrity of asphalt mixtures has been recognized as one of the main causes of early deterioration of asphalt pavements. This phenomenon, usually referred to as moisture damage, is defined as the progressive loss of structural integrity of the mixture that is primarily caused by the presence of moisture in liquid or vapor state. Moisture damage is associated with the development of different physical, mechanical, and chemical processes occurring within the microstructure of the mixture at different intensities and rates. Although there have been important advancements in identifying and characterizing this phenomenon, there is still a lack of understanding of the damage mechanisms occurring at the microscopic level. This situation has motivated the research work reported in this dissertation. The main objective of this dissertation is to formulate and apply a numerical micromechanical model of moisture-induced damage in asphalt mixtures. The model focuses on coupling the effects of moisture diffusion—one of the three main modes of moisture transport within asphalt mixtures—with the mechanical performance of the microstructure. Specifically, the model aims to account for the effect of moisture diffusion on the degradation of the viscoelastic bulk matrix of the mixture (i.e., cohesive degradation) and on the gradual deterioration of the adhesive bonds between the aggregates and the asphalt matrix (i.e., adhesive degradation). The micromechanical model was applied to study the role of some physical and mechanical properties of the constitutive phases of the mixtures on the susceptibility of the mixture to moisture damage. The results from this analysis suggest that the diffusion coefficients of the asphalt matrix and aggregates, as well as the bond strength of the aggregate-matrix interface, have the most influence on the moisture susceptibility of the mixtures. The micromechanical model was further used to investigate the influence of the void phase of asphalt mixtures on the generation of moisture-related deterioration processes. Two different probabilistic-based approaches were used to accomplish this objective. In the first approach, a volumetric distribution of air voids sizes measured using X-Ray Computed Tomography in a dense-graded asphalt mixture was used to generate probable void structures in a microstructure of an asphalt mixture. In the second approach, a stochastic modeling technique based on random field theory was used to generate probable air voids distributions of the mixture. In this second approach, the influence of the air voids was accounted for by making the physical and mechanical properties of the asphalt matrix dependent on probable voids distributions. Although both approaches take into consideration the characteristics of the air void phase on the mechanical response of the mixtures subjected to moist environments, the former explicitly introduces the air phase within the microstructure while the latter indirectly includes its effects by modifying the material properties of the bulk matrix. The results from these simulations demonstrated that the amount, variability and location of air voids are decisive in determining the moisture-dependent performance of asphalt mixtures. The results from this dissertation provide new information on the kinetics of moisture damage mechanisms in asphalt mixtures. In particular, the results obtained from applying the micromechanical model permitted identification of the relative influence of the characteristics of the constitutive phases of a mixture on its moisture-related mechanical performance. This information can be used as part of design methodologies of asphalt mixtures, and/or as an input in life-cycle analysis models and maintenance programs of road infrastructure.

Caro Spinel, Silvia

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Measurement and modeling of infrared nonlinear absorption coefficients and laser-induced damage thresholds in Ge and GaSb  

SciTech Connect

Using a simultaneous fitting technique to extract nonlinear absorption coefficients from data at two pulse widths, we measure two-photon and free-carrier absorption coefficients for Ge and GaSb at 2.05 and 2.5 {mu}m for the first time, to our knowledge. Results agreed well with published theory. Single-shot damage thresholds were also measured at 2.5 {mu}m and agreed well with modeled thresholds using experimentally determined parameters including nonlinear absorption coefficients and temperature dependent linear absorption. The damage threshold for a single-layer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} anti-reflective coating on Ge was 55% or 35% lower than the uncoated threshold for picosecond or nanosecond pulses, respectively.

Wagner, T. J.; Bohn, M. J.; Coutu, R. A. Jr. [Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Gonzalez, L. P.; Murray, J. M.; Guha, S. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Schepler, K. L. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Sensors Directorate, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Low permeability filter cake limits damage from high-pH drilling fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changing the particle size distribution in high-pH drilling fluids and perforating underbalanced helped protect sensitive reservoirs from formation damage. In several wells drilled in a carboniferous reservoir system in China, invasion of the high-pH filtrate from the drilling and workover fluids seriously damaged the formation. An in-depth reservoir study determined the cause of the formation damage and led to the development of new field procedures to prevent damage in future wells. Details are described.

Wu, Z.; Hu, Y. [Southwest Petroleum Inst., Nanchong (China)

1997-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

307

Heavy ion radiation damage simulations for CMOS image sensors Henok Mebrahtua  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heavy ion radiation damage simulations for CMOS image sensors Henok Mebrahtua , Wei Gaoa , Paul J, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada ABSTRACT Damage in CMOS image sensors caused by heavy ions and range of ions in matter) simulation results of heavy ion radiation damage to CMOS image sensors

Hornsey, Richard

308

Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

309

Review of the Oconee-3 probabilistic risk assessment: external events, core damage frequency. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

A review of the Oconee-3 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (OPRA) was conducted with the broad objective of evaluating qualitatively and quantitatively (as much as possible) the OPRA assessment of the important sequences that are ''externally'' generated and lead to core damage. The review included a technical assessment of the assumptions and methods used in the OPRA within its stated objective and with the limited information available. Within this scope, BNL performed a detailed reevaluation of the accident sequences generated by internal floods and earthquakes and a less detailed review (in some cases a scoping review) for the accident sequences generated by fires, tornadoes, external floods, and aircraft impact. 12 refs., 24 figs., 31 tabs.

Hanan, N.A.; Ilberg, D.; Xue, D.; Youngblood, R.; Reed, J.W.; McCann, M.; Talwani, T.; Wreathall, J.; Kurth, P.D.; Bandyopadhyay, K.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Formation Damage due to CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration is defined as the removal of gas that would be emitted into the atmosphere and its subsequent storage in a safe, sound place. CO2 sequestration in underground formations is currently being considered to reduce the amount of CO2 emitted into the atmosphere. However, a better understanding of the chemical and physical interactions between CO2, water, and formation rock is necessary before sequestration. These interactions can be evaluated by the change in mineral content in the water before and after injection, or from the change in well injectivity during CO2 injection. It may affect the permeability positively due to rock dissolution, or negatively due to precipitation. Several physical and chemical processes cover the CO2 injection operations; multiphase flow in porous media is represented by the flow of the brine and CO2, solute transportation is represented by CO2 dissolution in the brine forming weak carbonic acid, dissolution-deposition kinetics can be seen in the rock dissolution by the carbonic acid and the deposition of the reaction products, hydrodynamic instabilities due to displacement of less viscous brine with more viscous CO2 (viscous fingering), capillary effects and upward movement of CO2 due to gravity effect. The objective of the proposed work is to correlate the formation damage to the other variables, i.e. pressure, temperature, formation rock type, rock porosity, water composition, sulfates concentration in the water, CO2 volume injected, water volume injected, CO2 to water volumetric ratio, CO2 injection rate, and water injection rate. In order to achieve the proposed objective, lab experiments will be conducted on different rock types (carbonates, limestone and dolomite, and sandstone) under pressure and temperature that simulate the field conditions. CO2 will be used at the supercritical phase and different CO2-water-rock chemical interactions will be addressed. Quantitative analysis of the experimental results using a geochemical simulator (CMG-GEM) will also be performed. The results showed that for carbonate cores, maintaining the CO2/brine volumetric ratio above 1.0 reduced bicarbonate formation in the formation brine and helped in minimizing precipitation of calcium carbonate. Additionally, increasing cycle volume in WAG injection reduced the damage introduced to the core. Sulfate precipitation during CO2 sequestration was primarily controlled by temperature. For formation brine with high total dissolved solids (TDS), calcium sulfate precipitation occurs, even at a low sulfate concentration. For dolomite rock, temperature, injection flow rate, and injection scheme don't have a clear impact on the core permeability, the main factor that affects the change in core permeability is the initial core permeability. Sandstone cores showed significant damage; between 35% and 55% loss in core permeability was observed after CO2 injection. For shorter WAG injection the damage was higher; decreasing the brine volume injected per cycle, decreased the damage. At higher temperatures, 200 and 250 degrees F, more damage was noted than at 70 degrees F.

Mohamed, Ibrahim 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Rapid Damage Assessment Using High-resolution Remote Sensing Imagery: Tools and Techniques  

SciTech Connect

Accurate damage assessment caused by major natural and anthropogenic disasters is becoming critical due to increases in human and economic loss. This increase in loss of life and severe damages can be attributed to growing population, as well as human migration to disaster prone regions of the world. Rapid damage assessment and dissemination of accurate information is critical for creating an effective emergency response. Remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) based techniques and tools are important in disaster damage assessment and reporting activities. In this review, we will look into the state of the art techniques in damage assessment using remote sensing and GIS.

Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL; Tuttle, Mark A [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Cheriyadat, Anil M [ORNL; Chandola, Varun [ORNL; Graesser, Jordan B [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Sulforaphane prevents microcystin-LR-induced oxidative damage and apoptosis in BALB/c mice  

SciTech Connect

Microcystins (MCs), the products of blooming algae Microcystis, are waterborne environmental toxins that have been implicated in the development of liver cancer, necrosis, and even fatal intrahepatic bleeding. Alternative protective approaches in addition to complete removal of MCs in drinking water are urgently needed. In our previous work, we found that sulforaphane (SFN) protects against microcystin-LR (MC-LR)-induced cytotoxicity by activating the NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated defensive response in human hepatoma (HepG2) and NIH 3T3 cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate and confirm efficacy the SFN-induced multi-mechanistic defense system against MC-induced hepatotoxicity in an animal model. We report that SFN protected against MC-LR-induced liver damage and animal death at a nontoxic and physiologically relevant dose in BALB/c mice. The protection by SFN included activities of anti-cytochrome P450 induction, anti-oxidation, anti-inflammation, and anti-apoptosis. Our results suggest that SFN may protect mice against MC-induced hepatotoxicity. This raises the possibility of a similar protective effect in human populations, particularly in developing countries where freshwaters are polluted by blooming algae. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research Highlights: > SFN protected against MC-LR-induced liver damage and animal death in BALB/c mice. > The dose of SFN is at a nontoxic and physiologically relevant dose. > The protection included activities of anti-oxidation, anti-inflammation, and anti-apoptosis. > SFN may protect mice against MC-induced hepatotoxicity.

Sun Xiaoyun [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, CAS (China); Mi Lixin [Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C. 20057 (United States); Liu Jin [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, CAS (China); Song Lirong, E-mail: lrsong@ihb.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, CAS (China); Chung Funglung [Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, D.C. 20057 (United States); Gan Nanqin, E-mail: gannq@ihb.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, CAS (China)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Atomistic modeling of nanowires, small-scale fatigue damage in cast magnesium, and materials for MEMS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lightweight and miniaturized weapon systems are driving the use of new materials in design such as microscale materials and ultra low-density metallic materials. Reliable design of future weapon components and systems demands a thorough understanding of the deformation modes in these materials that comprise the components and a robust methodology to predict their performance during service or storage. Traditional continuum models of material deformation and failure are not easily extended to these new materials unless microstructural characteristics are included in the formulation. For example, in LIGA Ni and Al-Si thin films, the physical size is on the order of microns, a scale approaching key microstructural features. For a new potential structural material, cast Mg offers a high stiffness-to-weight ratio, but the microstructural heterogeneity at various scales requires a structure-property continuum model. Processes occurring at the nanoscale and microscale develop certain structures that drive material behavior. The objective of the work presented in this report was to understand material characteristics in relation to mechanical properties at the nanoscale and microscale in these promising new material systems. Research was conducted primarily at the University of Colorado at Boulder to employ tightly coupled experimentation and simulation to study damage at various material size scales under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions. Experimental characterization of nano/micro damage will be accomplished by novel techniques such as in-situ environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), 1 MeV transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). New simulations to support experimental efforts will include modified embedded atom method (MEAM) atomistic simulations at the nanoscale and single crystal micromechanical finite element simulations. This report summarizes the major research and development accomplishments for the LDRD project titled 'Atomistic Modeling of Nanowires, Small-scale Fatigue Damage in Cast Magnesium, and Materials for MEMS'. This project supported a strategic partnership between Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Colorado at Boulder by providing funding for the lead author, Ken Gall, and his students, while he was a member of the University of Colorado faculty.

Dunn, Martin L. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Talmage, Mellisa J. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); McDowell, David L., 1956- (,-Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); West, Neil (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Gullett, Philip Michael (Mississippi State University , MS); Miller, David C. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Spark, Kevin (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Diao, Jiankuai (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Horstemeyer, Mark F. (Mississippi State University , MS); Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Gall, K (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Benefits of Damage Engineering for PMOS Junction Stability  

SciTech Connect

As CMOS devices continue to shrink, the formation of ultra shallow junction (USJ) in the source/drain extension remains to be a key challenge requiring high dopant activation, shallow dopant profile and abrupt junctions. The next generations of sub nano-CMOS devices impose a new set of challenges such as elimination of residual defects resulting in higher leakage, difficulty to control lateral diffusion, junction stability post anneal and junction formation in new materials. To address these challenges for advanced technological nodes beyond 32 nm, it is imperative to explore novel species and techniques. Molecular species such as Carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}), a novel doping species and a promising alternative to monomer Boron is of considerable interest due to the performance boost for 22 nm low power and high performance devices. Also, to reduce residual defects, damage engineering methodologies have generated a lot of attention as it has demonstrated significant benefits in device performance. Varian proprietary techniques to perform implants at cold temperatures (PTC II) have demonstrated lower junction leakage, enhanced activation, reduced dopant diffusion and less dopant deactivation due to the reduction of self-interstitial atoms present at the end-of-range (EOR) with low implant temperatures. In this paper, for the first time, there is a comprehensive study of the effect of implant temperature on defect engineering affecting deactivation/reactivation, and it is well established in this paper that colder the implant temperature the better it is for damage engineering with reduced EOR defects and better amorphization. The effect has been studied over a wide range of implant temperature. To understand any difference in deactivation between molecular and monomer Boron and to provide direct comparison equivalent Boron implants, co-implanted with Carbon were also studied. Implants with wide range of temperatures are implemented using PTC II. This paper will also show how damage reduction correlates with optimum junction formation and stability.

Khaja, Fareen; Colombeau, Benjamin; Thanigaivelan, Thirumal; Ramappa, Deepak; Henry, Todd [Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates, Inc. 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

315

windspeed | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

windspeed windspeed Dataset Summary Description This dataset is a geographic shapefile generated from the original raster data. The original raster data resolution is a 200-meter cell size. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released August 19th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 23rd, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords GIS hawaii NREL offshore wind shapefile wind windspeed Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 4.2 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment DISCLAIMER NOTICE This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations. DISCLAIMER NOTICE This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

316

Great Lakes | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lakes Lakes Dataset Summary Description This dataset is a geographic shapefile generated from the original raster data. The original raster data resolution is a 200-meter cell size. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released August 19th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 23rd, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords GIS Great Lakes NREL offshore wind shapefile U.S. wind windspeed Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 11.8 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment DISCLAIMER NOTICE This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations. DISCLAIMER NOTICE This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

317

wind power density | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

density density Dataset Summary Description This dataset was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the U.S. Source National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords afghanistan dataset GIS Wind Power wind power density Data application/zip icon Wind Power Density at 50-m Above Ground Level GIS Data (zip, 1.4 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment DISCLAIMER NOTICE This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations. DISCLAIMER NOTICE This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

318

U.S. | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dataset Summary Description This dataset is a geographic shapefile generated from the original raster data. The original raster data resolution is a 200-meter cell size. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released August 19th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 23rd, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords GIS Great Lakes NREL offshore wind shapefile U.S. wind windspeed Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 11.8 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment DISCLAIMER NOTICE This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations. DISCLAIMER NOTICE This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

319

Gulf of Mexico | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gulf of Mexico Gulf of Mexico Dataset Summary Description This dataset is a geographic shapefile generated from the original raster data. The original raster data resolution is a 200-meter cell size. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Date Released August 19th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 23rd, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords GIS Gulf of Mexico NREL offshore wind shapefile wind windspeed Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 4.9 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment DISCLAIMER NOTICE This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations. DISCLAIMER NOTICE This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

320

The damage function approach for estimating fuel cycle externalities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses the methodology used in a study of fuel cycle externalities sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Commission of the European Communities. The methodology is the damage function approach. This paper describes that approach and discusses its application and limitations. The fuel cycles addressed are those in which coal, biomass, oil, hydro, natural gas and uranium are used to generate electric power. The methodology is used to estimate the physical impacts of these fuel cycles on environmental resources and human health, and the external costs and benefits of these impacts.

Lee, R.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Blade reliability collaborative : collection of defect, damage and repair data.  

SciTech Connect

The Blade Reliability Collaborative (BRC) was started by the Wind Energy Technologies Department of Sandia National Laboratories and DOE in 2010 with the goal of gaining insight into planned and unplanned O&M issues associated with wind turbine blades. A significant part of BRC is the Blade Defect, Damage and Repair Survey task, which will gather data from blade manufacturers, service companies, operators and prior studies to determine details about the largest sources of blade unreliability. This report summarizes the initial findings from this work.

Ashwill, Thomas D.; Ogilvie, Alistair B.; Paquette, Joshua A.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Measurement of Radiation Damage on Silica Aerogel \\v Cerenkov Radiator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measured the radiation damage on silica aerogel \\v Cerenkov radiators originally developed for the $B$-factory experiment at KEK. Refractive index of the aerogel samples ranged from 1.012 to 1.028. The samples were irradiated up to 9.8~MRad of equivalent dose. Measurements of transmittance and refractive index were carried out and these samples were found to be radiation hard. Deteriorations in transparency and changes of refractive index were observed to be less than 1.3\\% and 0.001 at 90\\% confidence level, respectively. Prospects of using aerogels under high-radiation environment are discussed.

S. K. Sahu et al

1996-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

323

DOT Motor-fuel use statistics summary to 1995 The data included...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Motor-fuel use statistics summary to 1995 The data included in this submission is United States Department of Transportation (DOT) data up to 1995. The data includes motor-fuel...

324

Molecular Dynamics Model of Ultraviolet Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Including Ionization Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Dynamics Model of Ultraviolet Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Including A molecular dynamics model of UV-MALDI including ionization processes is presented. In addition/desorption of molecular systems, it includes radiative and nonradiative decay, exciton hopping, two pooling processes

Zhigilei, Leonid V.

325

Minimizing formation damage under adverse conditions during gravel pack operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described for minimizing formation damage caused by intrusive fluids prior to a gravel packing operation in loosely consolidated formations penetrated by at least one well comprising: (a) filling the casing of the well with an underbalanced completion fluid; (b) placing within the well a removable packer capable of isolating the space between the casing and the formation from the downhole well pressure; (c) setting through the packer a first tubing suitable for perforating and stabilizing the flow of fluids into the well; (d) perforating the casing; (e) introducing a blocking agent into the formation via the perforations which agent upon solidification is sufficient to minimize formation damage by avoiding the introduction of formation fluids where the agent is a gel; (f) causing the blocking agent to solidify while forming a solidified plug within the well and a solid mass within the adjacent washed out portion of the formation; (g) removing the first tubing from the well; (h) placing within the well a second tubing having a slotted portion therein sufficient to allow gravel packing of the well and the formation; (i) removing the solidified plug from the wellbore along with solidified gel from the washed-out portion of the formation; and (j) placing a gravel pack within the well and the washed-out portion of the formation via the second tubing which consolidates the formation.

Jennings, A.R. Jr.; Shu, P.

1989-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

326

Photovoltaic Device Including A Boron Doping Profile In An I-Type Layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic cell for use in a single junction or multijunction photovoltaic device, which includes a p-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon, an i-type layer of an amorphous semiconductor compound including silicon, and an n-type layer of a semiconductor compound including silicon formed on the i-type layer. The i-type layer including an undoped first sublayer formed on the p-type layer, and a boron-doped second sublayer formed on the first sublayer.

Yang, Liyou (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1993-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

327

Characterization and control of formation damage during waterflooding of a high-clay-content reservoir  

SciTech Connect

Permeability damage was suspected as a factor contributing to postcompletion production declines observed during waterflooding of a friable to unconsolidated sandstone. A loss in water injectivity also indicated that near-wellbore damage may have been occurring. This paper summarizes the laboratory studies undertaken to evaluate and understand permeability damage in this formation. The experimental program consisted of primarily coreflooding experiments to evaluate the influence of injection fluid composition, temperature, mineralogy, and flow velocity on permeability damage. The significance of damage during brine injection was observed to be a strong function of mineralogy and injection rate. Permeability losses of greater than or equal to60% were observed in cores from some sand intervals, while little or no damage was apparent in cores from a second zone in identical wells. In the sands that were susceptible to brine damage, a critical velocity below which permeability damage did not occur was repeatedly established. The occurrence of a critical velocity, along with other observations, indicated that the primary damage mechanism was fines migration. Damage could be controlled by maintaining velocities below the critical value or reducing the pH of the injected brine.

Leone, J.A.; Scott, E.M. (Arco Oil and Gas Co., Plano, TX (US))

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

DOE Order 440. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including 0. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA) Federal Employees DOE Order 440. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA) Federal Employees Stakeholders: DOE and NNSA employees Scope: DOE Order 440.1 B establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Federal workers with a safe and healthful workplace. Summary: Among the requirements of DOE Order 440.1 B, the Department must provide its employees, including NNSA, a number of protections relating to whistle blowing guidelines. The relevant section of requirements includes: 4. REQUIREMENTS. DOE elements must:

329

Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

Botkin, Jonathan (El Cerrito, CA); Graves, Simon (Berkeley, CA); Danning, Matt (Oakland, CA); Culligan, Matthew (Berkeley, CA)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

330

Photovoltaic module kit including connector assembly for non-penetrating array installation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A PV module kit for non-penetrating rooftop installation, including a plurality of PV modules and a plurality of connectors. Each of the PV modules includes a PV laminate and a frame forming a mounting region assembled thereto. The connectors include a male connector having a male fastener extending from a head, and a female connector having a female fastener assembled within a head. The heads are entirely formed of plastic. The kit provides a mounted array state including a junction at which the mounting region of at least two of the PV modules are aligned and interconnected by engagement of the male connector with the female connector. The so-formed junction is substantially electrically insulated. The plurality of connectors can further include a spacer connector including a head forming a bore sized to slidably receive the male fastener, with all of the connector heads being identical.

Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt; Culligan, Matthew

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

331

NREL/Ventyx Utility Rates: What is included? | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL/Ventyx Utility Rates: What is included? NREL/Ventyx Utility Rates: What is included? Home > Groups > Utility Rate Does anyone know what pieces of electric rates are included in the NREL/Ventyx database of rates by utility, i.e. is it supply only or does the file include supply, transmission & distribution costs? Thanks! Submitted by Vbugnion on 27 February, 2013 - 16:25 1 answer Points: 1 Hi Vbugnion, Just to clarify, you're not asking about the OpenEI utility rates, but rather the Ventyx rates found here: http://developer.nrel.gov/doc/api/georeserv/service/utility_rates If so, then the Ventyx rates do include all bundled rates (which includes supply, trans, and distr costs). However, there's a small but non-zero possibility that a few energy-only or delivery-only rates may not have been cleaned

332

A New Definition on Fractal Porous Rock Damage Variable and Study on Evolution Characteristics of Porosity-permeability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considered the fractal characteristic of rock with porosity structure, a rock damage variable which describes rock damage of the reservoir of fractal structure with hydraulic fracturing is defined, and this damage variable that describes the state of ... Keywords: hydraulic fracturing, damage variable, fractal, porosity pore structure, permeability evolving

Zhaowan Chun; Wang Tingting; Ai Chi; Sun Chengyan

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Multi-objective design and optimization of district energy systems including polygeneration energy conversion technologies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the present context of finding ways to decrease CO2 emissions linked with human activity, district energy systems including polygeneration energy conversion technologies are likely… (more)

Weber, Céline Isabelle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Stocks of Crude Oil (Including SPR) - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Stocks include those ...

335

Petroleum Gasoline & Distillate Needs Including the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) Impacts  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This presentation describes the projections for petroleum-based gasoline and distillate in the Update AEO 2008, which includes the impacts of the Energy Independence and Security Act.

Information Center

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

336

ORISE: REAC/TS Symposium to include sessions on the Fukushima...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MEDIA ADVISORY: REACTS International Symposium to include sessions on the Fukushima crisis FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Aug. 31, 2011 FY11-42 Who: Radiation Emergency Assistance Center...

337

Comparative chloroplast genomics: Analyses including new sequences from the angiosperms Nuphar advena and Ranunculus macranthus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to other angiosperms. BMC Genomics 2006, 7:61. 20.history of chloroplast genomics. Photosynth Res 2003, 76:Comparative chloroplast genomics: Analyses including new

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Microsoft Word - SWPAIceStormDamage_030209.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3/02/09 3/02/09 Contacts: Beth Nielsen William Hiller Phone: 918-595-6762 918-595-6697 Email: elizabeth.nielsen@swpa.gov william.hiller@swpa.gov 1 of 1 TULSA, OK - All the poles have been set in place to restore one of the last two transmission line segments remaining out of service following a January ice storm that damaged 300 miles of transmission line and more than 400 structures owned by Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern). The 22 miles that separate Malden and New Madrid, Missouri, are ready to be fitted with new conductor, and the 37.2 mile stretch from New Madrid to Kennett, Missouri, continues to see progress as new transmission structures are constructed daily. Staff from Southwestern's Operations Division reports that the efforts of Southwestern crews and

339

Clues about Rheumatoid Arthritis Damage | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Clues about Rheumatoid Arthritis Damage JANUARY 7, 2013 Bookmark and Share Type II collagen fibrils decomposed into their basic aggregates (viewed via X-ray diffraction and TEM). Some parts of the antibody treated samples maintain a loose alignment of the thin-fibrils allowing them to be analyzed with small angle X-ray diffraction (A), and insert B. An 11 and 4.5 nm packing function are apparent, which appear to correspond to the approximate diameter of the thin-fibrils (insert of C) and microfibrils (D). Native thick fibrils are shown in C as a comparison to the decomposition product (thin-fibrils). From O. Antipova and J.P.R.O. Orgel,

340

Microsoft Word - SWPAIceStormDamage_021109.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1/09 1/09 Contacts: Beth Nielsen William Hiller Phone: 918-595-6762 918-595-6697 Email: elizabeth.nielsen@swpa.gov william.hiller@swpa.gov 1 of 1 TULSA, OK - A major segment of 161-kilovolt (kV) transmission line was returned to service around 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, February 10, 2009, as Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern), an agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), continued its efforts to repair damage caused by a January 26-27, 2009 ice storm in Arkansas and Missouri that affected 300 miles of Southwestern's 1,380-mile, high-voltage transmission system. Southwestern Operations reported early February 11, 2009, that repairs to the line stretching from Dardanelle Dam, near Russellville, Arkansas, to the Hilltop Switching Station near Marshall,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Radiation Damage Study in Natural Zircon Using Neutrons Irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes of atomic displacements in crystalline structure of natural zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}) can be studied by using neutron irradiation on the surface of zircon and compared the data from XRD measurements before and after irradiation. The results of neutron irradiation on natural zircon using Pneumatic Transfer System (PTS) at PUSPATI TRIGA Research Reactor in the Malaysian Nuclear Agency are discussed in this work. The reactor produces maximum thermal power output of 1 MWatt and the neutron flux of up to 1x10{sup 13} ncm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. From serial decay processes of uranium and thorium radionuclides in zircon crystalline structure, the emission of alpha particles can produce damage in terms of atomic displacements in zircon. Hence, zircon has been extensively studied as a possible candidate for immobilization of fission products and actinides.

Lwin, Maung Tin Moe; Amin, Yusoff Mohd.; Kassim, Hasan Abu [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Mohamed, Abdul Aziz [Materials Technology Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Karim, Julia Abdul [Reactor Physics Section, Nuclear Power Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

MDM Project: Analysis of the Micromechanics Damage Model Suite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report extends a previous study of core algorithms and portability considerations associated with the Micromechanics Damage Model computer software developed by the AFRL Materials Directorate at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. 1 The MDM analysis suite is comprised of four fracture mechanics codes used to establish design criteria for newly developed composite materials, particularly for brittle, heat-resistant composites associated with the fabrication of turbine blades. The MDM codes are based on a semi-analytical approach in which single coated fibers and the surrounding composite material are represented as a nested set of concentric shells (Fig. 1). Stresses and displacements at prescribed points along the length of the cylinder are determined by evaluation of a polynomial function. Numerically challenging conditions arise during the construction of this function. The calculation of matrix exponentials in terms of the full spectrum of eigenvalues associated with the pri...

D. C. O' neal; R. Luczak; N. J. Pagano; H. W. Brown Iii; G. P. Tandon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

A Case Study in Porting Strategy: The Axisymmetric Damage Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The axisymmetric damage model (ADM) is one of four micromechanical stress field models developed and maintained by N. J. Pagano's group at the AFRL Materials Directorate, Wright-Patterson AFB. These models serve to establish rigorous field theories to compute accurate stresses and energy release rates for fracture mechanics problems in composite bodies. In turn, these solutions, coupled with experimental research, can establish appropriate failure criteria to be used in the design of composite structures for air and space vehicles. Each of these models is based on Reissner's variational theorem (Reissner, 1950). ADM (Pagano, 1991) is associated with axisymmetric cracking and boundary conditions. Others support fundamentally different cases, i.e. axisymmetric problems incorporating the effects of friction (Tandon and Pagano, 1996), transverse and shear loading and associated cracking patterns in composite cylinders (Pagano and Tandon, 1994), and transverse cracking and delamination pro...

David O' Neal; N. J. Pagano; G. A. Schoeppner; G. P. Tandon

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Endogenous DNA Damage and Risk of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors  

SciTech Connect

Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are comprised of two histologic groups, seminomas and nonseminomas. We postulated that the possible divergent pathogeneses of these histologies may be partially explained by variable endogenous DNA damage. To assess our hypothesis, we conducted a case-case analysis of seminomas and nonseminomas using the alkaline comet assay to quantify single-strand DNA breaks and alkali-labile sites. The Familial Testicular Cancer study and the U.S. Radiologic Technologists cohort provided 112 TGCT cases (51 seminomas & 61 nonseminomas). A lymphoblastoid cell line was cultured for each patient and the alkaline comet assay was used to determine four parameters: tail DNA, tail length, comet distributed moment (CDM) and Olive tail moment (OTM). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using logistic regression. Values for tail length, tail DNA, CDM and OTM were modeled as categorical variables using the 50th and 75th percentiles of the seminoma group. Tail DNA was significantly associated with nonseminoma compared to seminoma (OR{sub 50th percentile} = 3.31, 95%CI: 1.00, 10.98; OR{sub 75th percentile} = 3.71, 95%CI: 1.04, 13.20; p for trend=0.039). OTM exhibited similar, albeit statistically non-significant, risk estimates (OR{sub 50th percentile} = 2.27, 95%CI: 0.75, 6.87; OR{sub 75th percentile} = 2.40, 95%CI: 0.75, 7.71; p for trend=0.12) whereas tail length and CDM showed no association. In conclusion, the results for tail DNA and OTM indicate that endogenous DNA damage levels are higher in patients who develop nonseminoma compared with seminoma. This may partly explain the more aggressive biology and younger age-of-onset of this histologic subgroup compared with the relatively less aggressive, later-onset seminoma.

Cook, M B; Sigurdson, A J; Jones, I M; Thomas, C B; Graubard, B I; Korde, L; Greene, M H; McGlynn, K A

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

345

A Phase Field Crystal Model of Irradiation Damage in Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Modeling of Peirce-Smith Converter Slag at the Chagres Smelter, Chile · Thermodynamic Properties of Cementite Including Magnetic, Vibronic, ...

346

T-603: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

03: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates 03: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates T-603: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates April 15, 2011 - 1:46am Addthis PROBLEM: Mac OS X Includes Some Invalid Comodo Certificates PLATFORM: For Mac OS X Server v10.5.8, Mac OS X v10.5.8, Mac OS X v10.6.7 and Mac OS X Server v10.6.7 ABSTRACT: The operating system includes some invalid certificates. The vulnerability is due to the invalid certificates and not the operating system itself. Other browsers, applications, and operating systems are affected. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025362 APPLE-SA-2011-04-14-4 Security Update 2011-002 Apple Support Downloads IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A partner of Comodo with Registration Authority capabilities suffered an internal security breach and the attacker caused seven certificates to be

347

Property:Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plants Included in Planned Estimate Plants Included in Planned Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate Property Type String Description Number of plants included in the estimate of planned capacity per GEA Pages using the property "Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate" Showing 21 pages using this property. A Alaska Geothermal Region + 3 + C Cascades Geothermal Region + 1 + Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region + 4 + G Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region + 7 + H Hawaii Geothermal Region + 1 + Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region + 4 + I Idaho Batholith Geothermal Region + 1 + N Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region + 9 + Northern Rockies Geothermal Region + 0 + Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region + 6 +

348

Systems including catalysts in porous zeolite materials within a reactor for use in synthesizing hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

Rolllins, Harry W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Petkovic, Lucia M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

349

Systems and strippable coatings for decontaminating structures that include porous material  

SciTech Connect

Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

Fox, Robert V. (Idaho Falls, ID); Avci, Recep (Bozeman, MT); Groenewold, Gary S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

350

Modeling Air-Pollution Damages from Fossil Fuel Use in Urban...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

important indoor pollution sources. We have taken one such model, prepared by the World Bank, and modified it to incorporate damages estimates from human exposure to air...

351

He Ion Irradiation Damage in Fe/W Nanolayer Films - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

He Ion Irradiation Damage in Fe/VV N anolayer Films. Nan Li, X. Zhang. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, ...

352

Public Comment re NOI on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ENERGYSOLUTIONS' Comment in Response to Notice of Inquiry, Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation -75 FR 43945

353

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

LES comments in response to Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934

354

The Role of Interfaces on Shock-induced Damage in Two-phase ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behavior of lead precipitates at copper grain boundaries on damage nucleation and evolution will be investigated using shock loading and release ...

355

An NDE Study of Impact Damage in Multi-Layered Transparent ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For both transparent and opaque protective systems, low velocity impact damage compromises the structural integrity and increases the likelihood of further ...

356

Radiation Damage Study in Mo by in situ TEM/Ion Irradiation and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The identical material was previously neutron-irradiated at 80C in the HFIR. A direct comparison of defect microstructure was made to correlate damage ...

357

Investigating amino acid residue-level damage using novel proteomic approaches, with application to wool proteins.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Damage to wool is derived from the modification of its constituent proteins, as the dry matter of wool is principally made up of protein. A… (more)

Grosvenor, Anita J.

358

Investigation of Conditions for Moisture Damage in Asphalt Concrete and Appropriate Laboratory Test Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pavement Moisture-Damage Test. ” Transportation Researchgreater than five years. 6. Test sections may be necessaryand Parker, F. (1998). “Test for Plastic Fines in Aggregates

Harvey, John T; Lu, Qing

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Role of ATM kinase in ionizing radiation induced DNA damage response...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ATM kinase in ionizing radiation induced DNA damage response in human neural stemprogenitor cells and differentiated cell types Adayabalam Balajee Columbia University Medical...

360

Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800 Number: 1-800-244-3301 Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include 1-800 Number: 1-800-244-3301 September 6, 2005 - 9:50am Addthis Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman announced today that the Department of Energy has expanded its gas gouging reporting system to include a toll-free telephone hotline. The hotline is available to American consumers starting today. "While we've largely seen the best of American generosity and unity throughout the recovery effort, we recognize that there are some bad actors that may try to take advantage of the situation. Consumers are our first line of defense in guarding against gas price gouging. I can assure you, our Administration - from the President down - takes this issue very

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

RECOMMENDATIONS TO INCLUDE IN CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION'S 2009 INTEGRATED ENERGY POLICY REPORT (IEPR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RECOMMENDATIONS TO INCLUDE IN CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION'S 2009 INTEGRATED ENERGY POLICY REPORT solutions. Overview Past Energy Commission Integrated Energy Policy Reports (IEPRs) have recognized (IEPR) Submitted By: Steven Weissman Associate Director Center for Law, Energy and the Environment

Kammen, Daniel M.

362

On a Three Step Model of Anaerobic Digestion Including the Hydrolysis of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On a Three Step Model of Anaerobic Digestion Including the Hydrolysis of Particulate Matter R degradation, chemostat, models, growth rate, equilibrium, bistability. 1. INTRODUCTION Anaerobic digestion, the anaerobic digestion is generally considered as a three step process: hydrolysis and liquefaction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

363

Numerical simulation of ECRIPAC plasma behaviour with Vlasov equations including electron and ion collective effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

976 Numerical simulation of ECRIPAC plasma behaviour with Vlasov equations including electron of 4 MeV energy with very short pulses. (`ompared to ISlectron Ring Accelerators, ECRIPAC presents

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

364

Automated solar collector installation design including ability to define heterogeneous design preferences  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Embodiments may include systems and methods to create and edit a representation of a worksite, to create various data objects, to classify such objects as various types of pre-defined "features" with attendant properties and layout constraints. As part of or in addition to classification, an embodiment may include systems and methods to create, associate, and edit intrinsic and extrinsic properties to these objects. A design engine may apply of design rules to the features described above to generate one or more solar collectors installation design alternatives, including generation of on-screen and/or paper representations of the physical layout or arrangement of the one or more design alternatives. Embodiments may also include definition of one or more design apertures, each of which may correspond to boundaries in which solar collector layouts should comply with distinct sets of user-defined design preferences. Distinct apertures may provide heterogeneous regions of collector layout according to the user-defined design preferences.

Wayne, Gary; Frumkin, Alexander; Zaydman, Michael; Lehman, Scott; Brenner, Jules

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

365

Code Thrust 1400 Aeronautical/Astronautical Engineering (including Aerodynamics, Aerospace Engineering, and Space Technology)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences (including Clinical/Medical Laboratory Technologies, Communication Disorders Sciences and Services, Gerontology, Health and Medical Administrative Services, Other Health Professions and Related Services, Environmental health, Geotechnical, Hydraulic, Hydrologic, Sanitary, Structural, and Transportation) 1404

Alabama in Huntsville, University of

366

Light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration light reflecting surface  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light reflecting apparatus including a multi-aberration bendable light reflecting surface is disclosed herein. This apparatus includes a structural assembly comprised of a rectangular plate which is resiliently bendable, to a limited extent, and which has a front side defining the multi-aberration light reflecting surface and an opposite back side, and a plurality of straight leg members rigidly connected with the back side of the plate and extending rearwardly therefrom. The apparatus also includes a number of different adjustment mechanisms, each of which is connected with specific ones of the leg members. These mechanisms are adjustably movable in different ways for applying corresponding forces to the leg members in order to bend the rectangular plate and light reflecting surface into different predetermined curvatures and which specifically include quadratic and cubic curvatures corresponding to different optical aberrations.

Sawicki, Richard H. (Pleasanton, CA); Sweatt, William (Livermore, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Modification of the Köhler Equation to Include Soluble Trace Gases and Slightly Soluble Substances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A generalized reformulation of the Köhler theory to include the effect of soluble gases and slightly soluble aerosol substances is presented. A single equation is derived that takes into account 1) the Kelvin effect; 2) the Raoult effect caused ...

Ari Laaksonen; Pekka Korhonen; Markku Kulmala; Robert J. Charlson

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

A New Bulk Microphysical Scheme That Includes Riming Intensity and Temperature-Dependent Ice Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new bulk microphysical parameterization (BMP) scheme is presented that includes a diagnosed riming intensity and its impact on ice characteristics. As a result, the new scheme represents a continuous spectrum from pristine ice particles to ...

Yanluan Lin; Brian A. Colle

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Modeling and Controller Design of a Wind Energy Conversion System Including a Matrix Converter.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, a grid-connected wind-energy converter system including a matrix converter is proposed. The matrix converter, as a power electronic converter, is used to… (more)

Barakati, Seyed Masoud

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Including Surface Kinetic Effects in Simple Models of Ice Vapor Diffusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model for kinetically-limited vapor growth and aspect ratio evolution of atmospheric single ice crystals is presented. The method is based on the adaptive habit model of Chen and Lamb (1994), but is modified to include the deposition ...

Chengzhu Zhang; Jerry Y. Harrington

371

A Simple Model of Abyssal Circulation, Including Effects of Wind, Buoyancy and Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine problems of steady abyssal circulation using an inviscid planetary geostrophic layered model. The model includes an active wind-driven upper layer and arbitrary topography; forcing is in the form of specified interlayer mass fluxes ...

Susan L. Hautala; Stephen C. Riser

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Options for Removing Multiple Pollutants Including CO2 at Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a technical review of the fuel changes and technology options for existing coal-fired power plants in response to potential new requirements for increasingly stringent multi-pollutant air emissions reductions, possibly including carbon dioxide (CO2). Preliminary costing of the major options is included. A database of the U.S. coal-fired power plants has been developed for further, more specific analyses.

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

373

Radiation Damage Study for PHENIX Silicon Stripixel Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Silicon stripixel sensors which were developed at BNL will be installed as part of the RHIC-PHENIX silicon vertex tracker (VTX). RHIC II operations provide luminosity up to 2x10^32 /cm2/s so the silicon stripixel sensors will be exposed to a significant amount of radiation. The most problematic radiation effect for VTX is the increase of leakage current, which degrades the signal to noise ratio and may saturate the readout electronics. We studied the radiation damage using the same diodes as CERN-RD48. First, the proportionality between the irradiation fluence and the increase of leakage current of CERN-RD48 was reproduced. Then beam experiments with stripixel sensor were done in which leakage current was found to increase in the same way as that of thereference diode. A stripixel sensor was also irradiated at the PHENIX interaction region (IR) during the 2006 run. We found the same relation between the integrated luminosity and determined fluence from increase of leakage current. The expected fluence is 3-6x10^12 Neq/cm2 (1 MeV neutron equivalent) in RHIC II operations for 10 years. Due to this expected exposure, setting the operating temperature in PHENIX to T< 0 deg. C to suppress leakage current is needed to avoid saturation of preamplifiers.

J. Asai; S. Batsouli; K. Boyle; V. Castillo; V. Cianciolo; D. Fields; C. Haegeman; M. Hoeferkamp; Y. Hosoi; R. Ichimiya; Y. Inoue; M. Kawashima; T. Komatsubara; K. Kurita; Z. Li; D. Lynch; M. Nguyen; T. Murakami; R. Nouicer; H. Ohnishi; R. Pak; K. Sakashita; T. -A. Shibata; K. Suga; A. Taketani; J. Tojo

2007-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

374

RESULTS FROM CAVITATION DAMAGE EXPERIMENTS WITH MERCURY SPALLATION TARGETS AT THE LANSCE WNR IN 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Damage assessment from proton beam induced cavitation experiments on mercury spallation targets done at the LANSCE WNR facility has been completed. The experiments investigated two key questions for the Spallation Neutron Source target, namely, how damage is affected by flow velocity in the SNS coolant channel geometry, and how damage scales with proton beam intensity at a given constant charge per pulse. With regard to the former question, prior in-beam experiments indicated that the coolant channel geometry with stagnant mercury was especially vulnerable to damage which might warrant a design change. Yet other results indicated a reduction in damage with the introduction of flow. Using more prototypic to the SNS, the 2008 experiment damage results show the channel is less vulnerable than the bulk mercury side of the vessel wall. They also show no benefit from increasing channel flow velocity beyond nominal SNS speeds. The second question probed a consensus belief that damage scales with beam intensity (protons per unit area) by a power law dependence with exponent of around 4. Results from a 2005 experiment did not support this power law dependence but some observations were inconsistent and unexplained. These latest results show weaker damage dependence.

Riemer, Bernie [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL; Sangrey, Robert L [ORNL; Wendel, Mark W [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Acoustic emission beamforming for enhanced damage detection Gregory C. McLaskeya,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the structure such as cracking or corrosion, but the severity of this problem is not known, and the evolution for detecting damage, such as cracking, as it occurs on or in a structure. In order to gain meaningful the beamforming technique, the azmuthal direction of the location of the damage may be estimated by the stress

Glaser, Steven D.

376

A knowledge-based decision support system for shipboard damage control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operational complexity of modern ships requires the use of advanced applications, called damage control systems (DCSs), able to assist crew members in the effective handling of dangerous events and accidents. In this article we describe the development ... Keywords: Damage control system, Decision support system, Expert system, Kill card, Knowledge-based system, Shipboard management

F. Calabrese; A. Corallo; A. Margherita; A. A. Zizzari

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Estimation of radiation damage at the structural materials of a hybrid reactor by probabilistic neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new approach based on probabilistic neural networks (PNNs) for the radiation damage parameters at the structural material of a nuclear fusion-fission (hybrid) reactor. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have recently been introduced ... Keywords: Atomic displacement, Helium generation, Hybrid reactor, Probabilistic neural networks (PNNs), Radiation damage

Elif Derya íbeyli; Mustafa íbeyli

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Seismic damage identification in buildings using neural networks and modal data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A seismic damage identification method intended for buildings with steel moment-frame structure is presented in this paper. The method has a statistical approach and is based on artificial neural networks and modal variables. It consists of two main ... Keywords: Mass sensitivity, Modal data, Neural networks, Seismic damage identification, Steel frames, Transmission of errors

María P. González; José L. Zapico

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Damage detection by an adaptive real-parameter simulated annealing genetic algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An effective algorithm, which combined an adaptive real-parameter genetic algorithm with simulated annealing, is proposed to detect damage occurrence in beam-type structures. The proposed algorithm uses the displacements of static response and natural ... Keywords: Adaptive mechanism, Damage detection, Genetic algorithm, Optimization, Simulated annealing

Rong-Song He; Shun-Fa Hwang

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Free Vibration Analysis of Kirchoff Plates with Damaged Boundaries by the Chebyshev Collocation Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Vibration Analysis of Kirchoff Plates with Damaged Boundaries by the Chebyshev Collocation for the free vibration analysis of slender Kirchoff plates with both mixed and damaged boundaries an important role in applications of mechanical, aerospace and civil engineering. Studying the free vibration

Butcher, Eric A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Study of Permeability Change of Fractal Under Fracturing Basing on Damage Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to research the evolution of permeability and damage of fractal rock under hydraulic fracturing, a new damage variable that describing relative reduction of pore amounts as radius is bigger than r any fracturing stage is defined. Assuming the ... Keywords: damagey, fracta, permeabilit

Zhao Wanchun; Ai Chi

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Application of a damage model for rock fragmentation to the Straight Creek Mine blast experiments  

SciTech Connect

Early attempts at estimation of stress wave damage due to blasting by use of finite element calculations met with limited success due to numerical instabilities that prevented calculations from being carried past the fragmentation limit. More recently, the improved damage model PRONTO has allowed finite element calculations which remain stable and yield good agreement between calculated fragmented regions and excavated crater profiles for blasting experiments in granite. Application of this damage model to blast experiments at the Straight Creek Mine in Bell County, Kentucky were complicated by anisotropic conditions and uncertainties in material properties. It appears that significant modifications to the damage model and extensive material testing may be necessary in order to estimate damage in these anisotropic materials. 18 refs., 18 figs.

Thorne, B.J.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Application of Nonlinear Elastic Resonance Spectroscopy For Damage Detection In Concrete: An Interesting Story  

SciTech Connect

Nonlinear resonance ultrasound spectroscopy experiments conducted on concrete cores, one chemically and mechanically damaged by alkali-silica reactivity, and one undamaged, show that this material displays highly nonlinear wave behavior, similar to many other damaged materials. They find that the damaged sample responds more nonlinearly, manifested by a larger resonant peak and modulus shift as a function of strain amplitude. The nonlinear response indicates that there is a hysteretic influence in the stress-strain equation of state. Further, as in some other materials, slow dynamics are present. The nonlinear response they observe in concrete is an extremely sensitive indicator of damage. Ultimately, nonlinear wave methods applied to concrete may be used to guide mixing, curing, or other production techniques, in order to develop materials with particular desired qualities such as enhanced strength or chemical resistance, and to be used for damage inspection.

Byers, Loren W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ten Cate, James A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Paul A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

384

Rapid Damage eXplorer (RDX): A Probabilistic Framework for Learning Changes From Bitemporal Images  

SciTech Connect

Recent decade has witnessed major changes on the Earth, for example, deforestation, varying cropping and human settlement patterns, and crippling damages due to disasters. Accurate damage assessment caused by major natural and anthropogenic disasters is becoming critical due to increases in human and economic loss. This increase in loss of life and severe damages can be attributed to the growing population, as well as human migration to the disaster prone regions of the world. Rapid assessment of these changes and dissemination of accurate information is critical for creating an effective emergency response. Change detection using high-resolution satellite images is a primary tool in assessing damages, monitoring biomass and critical infrastructures, and identifying new settlements. In this demo, we present a novel supervised probabilistic framework for identifying changes using very high-resolution multispectral, and bitemporal remote sensing images. Our demo shows that the rapid damage explorer (RDX) system is resilient to registration errors and differing sensor characteristics.

Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

First results from electron-photon damage equivalence studies on a generic ethylene-propylene rubber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a simulator adequacy assessment program, the relative effectiveness of electrons and photons to produce damage in a generic ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) has been investigated. The investigation was limited in extent in that a single EPR material, in three thickness, was exposed to Cobalt-60 photons and three electron beam energies. Basing material damage on changes in the EPR mechanical properties elongation and tensile strength, we observed that EPR damage was a smoothly varying function of absorbed energy and independent of irradiating particle type. EPR damage tracked equally well as a function of both incident particle energy and material front surface dose. Based on these preliminary data, we tentatively concluded that a correlation between particle, particle energy, and material damage (as measured by changes in material elongation and/or tensile strength) has been demonstrated. 14 figs.

Buckalew, W.H.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES The familiar level of this module is divided into two sections. In the first section, we will discuss the objective, requirements, and the responsibilities assigned to the heads of field elements. In the second section, we will discuss the content of attachment 1, Functional Area Requirements. We have provided examples and a practice to help familiarize you with the material. The practice will also help prepare you for the criterion test. DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 440.1B, Worker Protection Management for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal

387

C3E also includes a network of leaders from the public, private, non-profit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

C3E also includes a network of leaders from the public, private, non-profit, C3E also includes a network of leaders from the public, private, non-profit, and academic sectors who support advocacy, research, scholarships, hands-on training, funding, and networking opportunities to prepare and inspire young women to enter and thrive in STEM fields. C3E Network participants have pledged many types of commitments, from highlighting female role models to creating hands-on activities for young girls. Ongoing activities include: * Filming and featuring women in clean energy fields on online / TV outlets (Earth Day Network); * Designing pilot projects and expanding Young Women's Conferences at DOE's

388

Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Including Alternative Resources Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience Jenny Heeter and Lori Bird Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-55979 November 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Including Alternative Resources in State Renewable Portfolio Standards: Current Design and Implementation Experience Jenny Heeter and Lori Bird Prepared under Task No. SAO9.3110

389

Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: System & Application Design Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-introduction-small-scale-wind-energy-s Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/introduction-small-scale-wind-energy- Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Project Development This video teaches the viewer about wind turbines and RETscreen's wind module, which can be used to project the cost and production of a wind

390

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion for the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion for the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Includes $4.5 billion for the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability February 25, 2009 - 4:52pm Addthis President Barack Obama signed into law the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (P.L.111-5). The $787 billion economic recovery package represents the largest and most ambitious effort to stimulate the economy in United States history. The Department of Energy (DOE) will be responsible for implementing over $38 billion of the $787 billion package. Of the DOE total, $4.5 Billion is allotted to the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability. As outlined in the legislation, these funds are an investment in a

391

Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

40.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE 40.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES The familiar level of this module is divided into two sections. In the first section, we will discuss the objective, requirements, and the responsibilities assigned to the heads of field elements. In the second section, we will discuss the content of attachment 1, Functional Area Requirements. We have provided examples and a practice to help familiarize you with the material. The practice will also help prepare you for the criterion test. DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 440.1B, Worker Protection Management for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal Employees

392

1) What are the current and future communications needs of utilities, including  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(1) What are the current and future communications needs of utilities, including for the (1) What are the current and future communications needs of utilities, including for the deployment of new Smart Grid applications, and how are these needs being met? The current communication needs of SCE include: telephony, data, video, voice dispatch, mobile data, grid monitoring, grid control, tele-protection, customer communication, load management, automated meter reading, and collaboration capabilities ranging from virtual meetings to e-learning. SCE is using a combination of private, leased, and shared telecommunication networks to support these requirements. Those applications that require high availability, low latency, and stringent security rely on a private telecommunications network (SCEnet). A combination of transport media are

393

Fourier and Cauchy-Stieltjes transforms of power laws including stable distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a class of probability measures whose densities near infinity are mixtures of Pareto distributions. This class can be characterized by the Fourier transform which has a power series expansion including real powers, not only integer powers. This class includes stable distributions in probability and also non-commutative probability theories. We also characterize the class in terms of the Cauchy-Stieltjes transform and the Voiculescu transform. If the stability index is greater than one, stable distributions in probability theory do not belong to that class, while they do in non-commutative probability.

Takahiro Hasebe

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

394

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems, including potable hot water. Quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is reported. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition. Included is a comparison of the proposed Solaron-Heat Pump and Solaron-Desiccant Heating and Cooling Systems, Installation Drawings, data on the Akron House at Akron, Ohio, and other program activities from July 1, 1977 through November 9, 1977.

Not Available

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Combinatorial evaluation of systems including decomposition of a system representation into fundamental cycles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

One embodiment of the present invention includes a computer operable to represent a physical system with a graphical data structure corresponding to a matroid. The graphical data structure corresponds to a number of vertices and a number of edges that each correspond to two of the vertices. The computer is further operable to define a closed pathway arrangement with the graphical data structure and identify each different one of a number of fundamental cycles by evaluating a different respective one of the edges with a spanning tree representation. The fundamental cycles each include three or more of the vertices.

Oliveira, Joseph S. (Richland, WA); Jones-Oliveira, Janet B. (Richland, WA); Bailey, Colin G. (Wellington, NZ); Gull, Dean W. (Seattle, WA)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

INFORMATION ABOUT PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS/PROJECT DIRECTORS(PI/PD) and co-PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS/co-PROJECT DIRECTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as confidential information at the time of disclosure ("Confidential Information"). Confidential Information does, AS TO ANY MATTER WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THE CONDITION OF THE RESEARCH OR ANY INVENTION(S; OR THE OWNERSHIP, MERCHANTABILITY, OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OF THE RESEARCH OR ANY SUCH INVENTION

Murayama, Hitoshi

397

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. Quarterly reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activities conducted by Solaron Corporation from November 1977 through September 1978 are summarized and the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water is covered. The system consists of the following subsystems: solar collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

Williamson, R.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

An instructional aid is presented which integrates the subject of solar energy into the classroom study of industrial arts. This guide for teachers was produced in addition to the student activities book for industrial arts by the USDOE Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

A Flux Parameterization Including the Effects of Capillary Waves and Sea State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An air–sea interaction model that includes turbulent transport due to capillary waves (surface ripples) is developed. The model differs from others in that the physical premises are applicable to low wind speeds (10-m wind speed, U10 < 5 m s?1) ...

Mark A. Bourassa; Dayton G. Vincent; W. L. Wood

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

ECOVILLAGE FACTS The complex includes 50 apartments (18 original and 32 new)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, community gatherings o Kitchen o Playroom o Dryers for Ecovillage residents o Solar water heater o Solar of the Ecovillage apartments include: o solar tubes and compact fluorescent lighting o low-flow toilets College-harvested wood o natural building techniques o a composting toilet o a net-metering solar electric

Baltisberger, Jay H.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

An instructional aid is provided for home economics teachers who wish to integrate the subject of solar energy into their classroom activities. This teacher's guide was produced along with the student activities book for home economics by the US Department of Energy Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Method of preparing a negative electrode including lithium alloy for use within a secondary electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A negative electrode that includes a lithium alloy as active material is prepared by briefly submerging a porous, electrically conductive substrate within a melt of the alloy. Prior to solidification, excess melt can be removed by vibrating or otherwise manipulating the filled substrate to expose interstitial surfaces. Electrodes of such as solid lithium-aluminum filled within a substrate of metal foam are provided.

Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Palos Hills, IL); Olszanski, Theodore W. (Roselle, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL)

1977-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

403

Postgraduate Handbook Courses, programs and any arrangements for programs including staff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corn oil; Camelina oil. One of the following: Trans-Esterification, Esterification, Hydrotreating-process renewable biomass and petroleum. 5 POTENTIALLY RELEVANT I Naphtha, LPG Camelina oil Hydrotreating 5 including peat, dung, plant-oils, bees wax, rendered animal fats, draft animals, natural derived sources

Benatallah, Boualem

404

Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An instructional aid is presented which integrates the subject of solar energy into the classroom study of industrial arts. This guide for teachers was produced in addition to the student activities book for industrial arts by the USDOE Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

QUALITATIVE PROPERTIES OF A 3-STEPS MODEL OF ANAEROBIC DIGESTION INCLUDING HYDROLYSIS OF PARTICULATE MATTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUALITATIVE PROPERTIES OF A 3-STEPS MODEL OF ANAEROBIC DIGESTION INCLUDING HYDROLYSIS-SupAgro MISTEA, 2 p. Viala 34060 Montpellier, France, fekih@supagro.inra.fr Introduction. Anaerobic digestion, the anaerobic digestion is generally considered as a three step process: hydrolysis and liquefaction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

406

ON THE STANDARD METABOLIC RATES OF TROPICAL TUNAS, INCLUDING THE EFFECf OF BODY SIZE AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON THE STANDARD METABOLIC RATES OF TROPICAL TUNAS, INCLUDING THE EFFECf OF BODY SIZE AND ACUTE. This study was undertaken to obtain these data for the tropical tuna species, yellowfin tuna, Tkunnl tuna, KatsltWOO1t8 pelamis, previously published. The effect of acute temperature change on the SMR

407

Faddeev-type calculations of few-body nuclear reactions including Coulomb interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The method of screening and renormalization is used to include the Coulomb interaction between the charged particles in the description of few-body nuclear reactions. Calculations are done in the framework of Faddeev-type equations in momentum-space. The reliability of the method is demonstrated. The Coulomb effect on observables is discussed.

A. Deltuva

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

408

Process, including PSA and membrane separation, for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for separating hydrogen from hydrocarbons. The process includes a pressure swing adsorption step, a compression/cooling step and a membrane separation step. The membrane step relies on achieving a methane/hydrogen selectivity of at least about 2.5 under the conditions of the process.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA); He, Zhenjie (Fremont, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES: which include all glass, plastic and metal bottles that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES: which include all glass, plastic and metal bottles that previously contained chemicals (hazardous or non-hazardous) are collected by CWS for recycling. Bottles should be dry and empty without chemical residue. Rinse and collect rinsate in chemical

Ungerleider, Leslie G.

410

Selecting Optional Fees Optional fees include meal plans, money on Tigerstripe, and a TAPS yearbook. All  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supports all of the services at Redfern and includes: · Professional services of primary health care on pharmaceuticals, psychological testing, laboratory and x- ray services. · After Hours Nursewise telephone service. http://sisweb.clemson.edu/ Health Fee Policy University policy requires all students registered for six

Bolding, M. Chad

411

Solar water heater installation guidelines. A manual for homeowners and professionals. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect

The guidelines include detailed diagrams, a selected glossary, a bibliography of books and manuals which might prove useful and a checklist which should be used during and after the installation. The guidelines explain generally how to install a liquid solar hot water heater, but not a specific system. The following are covered: collector location, collector installation, plumbing, solar storage tanks, electrical, and insulation. (MHR)

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Solar Energy Education. Home economics: teacher's guide. Field test edition. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An instructional aid is provided for home economics teachers who wish to integrate the subject of solar energy into their classroom activities. This teacher's guide was produced along with the student activities book for home economics by the US Department of Energy Solar Energy Education. A glossary of solar energy terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. Quarterly reports, November 1976--June 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the progress made in the development, delivery and support of two prototype solar heating and cooling systems including potable hot water. The system consists of the following subsystems: collector, auxiliary heating, potable hot water, storage, control, transport, and government-furnished site data acquisition.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

THERMOMECHANICS OF PV MODULES INCLUDING THE VISCOELASTICITY OF EVA Ulrich Eitner1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the cell distance is 170µm. Keywords: PV module, Encapsulation, Simulation, Reliability, Mechanics 1THERMOMECHANICS OF PV MODULES INCLUDING THE VISCOELASTICITY OF EVA Ulrich Eitner1, *, Matthias by a comparison to displacement experiments where the thermomechanical deformation of solar cells in a PV laminate

415

Seismic fracture analysis of concrete gravity dams including dam-reservoir interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the seismic fracture response of concrete gravity dams is investigated with considering the effects of dam-reservoir interaction. A co-axial rotating crack model (CRCM), which includes the strain softening behavior, is selected for concrete ... Keywords: Concrete gravity dam, Dam-reservoir interaction, Non-linear analysis, Seismic fracture

Yusuf Calayir; Muhammet Karaton

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Security and Access Policy Security of and access to campus facilities, including campus residences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security and Access Policy Security of and access to campus facilities, including campus residences facilities. Residence halls are secured 24 hours a day. Over extended breaks, the doors of all residence halls will be secured around the clock. Some facilities may have individual hours, which may vary

Escher, Christine

417

The Fuels and Lubricants Research Division of Southwest Research includes extensive engines, fuels and lubricants research,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Caterpillar 1K Lubricant Test This test evaluates the piston deposits, liner wear, and oil consumption and oil consumption. The test is proposed for inclusion in the PC-10 category. Mack T8/T8A/T8E Lubricant of Mack engine oil specification EON+ 03, CI-4+ and will be included in PC-10. Mack T12 Lubricant Test

Chapman, Clark R.

418

International congress on DNA damage and repair: Book of abstracts  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the abstracts of 105 papers presented at the Congress. Topics covered include the Escherichia coli nucleotide excision repair system, DNA repair in malignant transformations, defective DNA repair, and gene regulation. (TEM)

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Engineering Observations of 3 May 1999 Oklahoma Tornado Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 3 May 1999, a severe tornado outbreak occurred in Oklahoma, Kansas, and other southwestern states. Because some of the tornadoes struck some highly populated areas, including Oklahoma City and its suburbs, they provided a vivid exhibition of ...

Kai Pan; Peter Montpellier; Masoud Zadeh

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Safety apparatus for nuclear reactor to prevent structural damage from overheating by core debris  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention teaches safety apparatus that can be included in a nuclear reactor, either when newly fabricated or as a retrofit add-on, that will minimize proliferation of structural damage to the reactor in the event the reactor is experiencing an overheating malfunction whereby radioactive nuclear debris might break away from and be discharged from the reactor core. The invention provides a porous bed or sublayer on the lower surface of the reactor containment vessel so that the debris falls on and piles up on the bed. Vapor release elements upstand from the bed in some laterally spaced array. Thus should the high heat flux of the debris interior vaporize the coolant at that location, the vaporized coolant can be vented downwardly to and laterally through the bed to the vapor release elements and in turn via the release elements upwardly through the debris. This minimizes the pressure buildup in the debris and allows for continuing infiltration of the liquid coolant into the debris interior.

Gabor, John D. (Western Springs, IL); Cassulo, John C. (Stickney, IL); Pedersen, Dean R. (Naperville, IL); Baker, Jr., Louis (Downers Grove, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

S1219 residue of 53BP1 is phosphorylated by ATM kinase upon DNA damage and required for proper execution of DNA damage response  

SciTech Connect

53BP1 is phosphorylated by the protein kinase ATM upon DNA damage. Even though several ATM phosphorylation sites in 53BP1 have been reported, those sites have little functional implications in the DNA damage response. Here, we show that ATM phosphorylates the S1219 residue of 53BP1 in vitro and that the residue is phosphorylated in cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). Transfection with siRNA targeting ATM abolished IR-induced phosphorylation at this residue, supporting the theory that this process is mediated by the kinase. To determine the functional relevance of this phosphorylation event, a U2OS cell line expressing S1219A mutant 53BP1 was established. IR-induced foci formation of MDC1 and {gamma}H2AX, DNA damage signaling molecules, was reduced in this cell line, implying that S1219 phosphorylation is required for recruitment of these molecules to DNA damage sites. Furthermore, overexpression of the mutant protein impeded IR-induced G2 arrest. In conclusion, we have shown that S1219 phosphorylation by ATM is required for proper execution of DNA damage response.

Lee, Haemi; Kwak, Hee-Jin; Cho, Il-taeg [Reseach Institute, National Cancer Center, 111 Jungbalsan-ro, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang, Gyeonggi, 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seok Hee [Department of Biological Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Hun [Reseach Institute, National Cancer Center, 111 Jungbalsan-ro, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang, Gyeonggi, 410-769 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: chlee@ncc.re.kr

2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

422

An Economic Analysis of Erosion and Sediment Damage in the Lower Running Draw Watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development and implementation of agricultural non-point source (NPS) pollution control plans was mandated by the 1972 Federal Pollution Control Act Amendments, Public Law 92-500. The purpose of this particular report is to present the results of a study on the economic impact of implementing potential agricultural NPS pollution controls in Lower Running Water Draw watershed. The study focuses on: (a) the effects of erosion control on farm income, (b) off-site sediment damages in the watershed; (c) the costs of administering and enforcing alternative erosion controls, and (d) on-farm economics of soil conservation practices. Erosion controls considered include the traditional voluntary programs combined with economic incentives as well as possible regulatory programs. The focus of the study is on erosion and sedimentation because sediment is a potential transporter of pollutants. Practices to control agricultural non-point source pollution would probably be aimed at reducing soil loss. Conservation and conservation related practices are, at present, considered the best technical practices to abate agricultural non-point source pollution. This is a study of both conservation and environmental economics, two areas that tend to be closely related. For this project, the concern was over potential pollution (an off-site problem), but because of long-run farm income consequences, this concern cannot be separated from conservation problems (an on-farm problem). Accordingly, the report contains substantial information on the short and long-run on-farm benefits and costs of various soil conservation practices for the specific soil mapping units in Lower Running Water Draw watershed. The results of this study are applicable to the majority of the soils in the High Plains Land Resource Area. Only sheet and rill erosion are considered in the study. The first section of the report describes the selected "Best Management Practices" and examines the on-farm economics of soil conservation. The second section postulates various sediment damage control options and models the economic consequences of implementation, both to agricultural producers as a group, and to society.

Reneau, D. R.; Taylor, C. R.; Harris, B. L.; Lacewell, R. D.; Mueller, P. E.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Policy Flash 2013-49 Updating Reporting Requirement Checklist including the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Flash 2013-49 Updating Reporting Requirement Checklist Policy Flash 2013-49 Updating Reporting Requirement Checklist including the research performance progress report Policy Flash 2013-49 Updating Reporting Requirement Checklist including the research performance progress report Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Ellen Colligan, of the Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division, Office of Contract Management, Office of Acquisition and Project Management at (202) 287-1776, Ellen.colligan@hq.doe.gov Policy Flash 2013-49.pdf Attch_FA_RepReqChecklist_COMBINED_FINAL_4-23-13 (3).pdf More Documents & Publications ATTACHMENT FLASH 2011-46(6) Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for Projects Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist and Instructions for RD&D Projects

424

Hydraulically actuated fuel injector including a pilot operated spool valve assembly and hydraulic system using same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to hydraulic systems including hydraulically actuated fuel injectors that have a pilot operated spool valve assembly. One class of hydraulically actuated fuel injectors includes a solenoid driven pilot valve that controls the initiation of the injection event. However, during cold start conditions, hydraulic fluid, typically engine lubricating oil, is particularly viscous and is often difficult to displace through the relatively small drain path that is defined past the pilot valve member. Because the spool valve typically responds slower than expected during cold start due to the difficulty in displacing the relatively viscous oil, accurate start of injection timing can be difficult to achieve. There also exists a greater difficulty in reaching the higher end of the cold operating speed range. Therefore, the present invention utilizes a fluid evacuation valve to aid in displacement of the relatively viscous oil during cold start conditions.

Shafer, Scott F. (Morton, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Method for pulse control in a laser including a stimulated brillouin scattering mirror system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser system, such as a master oscillator/power amplifier system, comprises a gain medium and a stimulated Brillouin scattering SBS mirror system. The SBS mirror system includes an in situ filtered SBS medium that comprises a compound having a small negative non-linear index of refraction, such as a perfluoro compound. An SBS relay telescope having a telescope focal point includes a baffle at the telescope focal point which blocks off angle beams. A beam splitter is placed between the SBS mirror system and the SBS relay telescope, directing a fraction of the beam to an alternate beam path for an alignment fiducial. The SBS mirror system has a collimated SBS cell and a focused SBS cell. An adjustable attenuator is placed between the collimated SBS cell and the focused SBS cell, by which pulse width of the reflected beam can be adjusted.

Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Hackel, Lloyd (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz B. (Rocklin, CA)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

426

Multiple factors affect pest and pathogen damage on 31 Populus clones in South Carolina.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Populus species and hybrids have many practical applications, but there is a paucity of data regarding selections that perform well in the southeastern US. We compared pest susceptibility of 31 Populus clones over 3 years in South Carolina, USA. Cuttings were planted in spring 2001 on two study sites. Clones planted in the bottomland site received granular fertilizer yearly and irrigation the first two years only, while those on the sandy, upland site received irrigation and fertilization throughout each growing season. Foliar damage by the cottonwood leaf beetle (Chrysomela scripta), cottonwood leafcurl mite (Tetra lobulifera), and poplar leaf rust (Melampsora medusae) was visually monitored several times each growing season. Damage ratings differed significantly among clones, and clonal rankings changed from year to year. Irrigation increased C. scripta and M. medusae damage, but had no effect on T. lobulifera damage. Certain clones received greater pest damage at a particular study site. Temporal damage patterns were evident among individual clones and on each site. At the upland site, OP367 and 7300502 were highly resistant to all three pests; I45/51 was highly resistant to C. scripta and M. medusae; NM6 and 15–29 were highly resistant to M. medusae; and 7302801 was highly resistant to T. lobulifera and M. medusae. At the bottomland site, NM6, Eridano, I45/51, and 7302801 were highly resistant to all three pests; clone 7300502 was highly resistant to M. medusae only. Based on this preliminary 3-year study of pest damage l

Coyle, David R.; Coleman, Mark D.; Durant, Jaclin A.; Newman, Lee A.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

428

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Row"

429

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

430

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

431

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

432

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

433

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)","Row"

434

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

435

2008 CIM-XML Interoperability Including CIM-Based Tools Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI Initiatives have produced a number of drafts that have now become International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards, including the Common Information Model (CIM) and the Generic Interface Definition (GID) specifications. These standards provide the basis for model-driven information exchange both within and between control centers and other systems in utility operations across the enterprise. Previous interoperability tests validated the use and acceptance of the CIM standard translated into...

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

436

Method of preparing a negative electrode including lithium alloy for use within a secondary electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A negative electrode that includes a lithium alloy as active material is prepared by briefly submerging a porous, electrically conductive substrate within a melt of the alloy. Prior to solidification, excess melt can be removed by vibrating or otherwise manipulating the filled substrate to expose interstitial surfaces. Electrodes of such a solid lithium--aluminum filled within a substrate of metal foam are provided. 1 figure, 1 table.

Tomczuk, Z.; Olszanski, W.; Battles, J.E.

1975-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

437

Impact of supersonic and subsonic aircraft on ozone: Including heterogeneous chemical reaction mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary calculations suggest that heterogeneous reactions are important in calculating the impact on ozone from emissions of trace gases from aircraft fleets. In this study, three heterogeneous chemical processes that occur on background sulfuric acid aerosols are included and their effects on O{sub 3}, NO{sub x}, Cl{sub x}, HCl, N{sub 2}O{sub 5}, ClONO{sub 2} are calculated.

Kinnison, D.E.; Wuebbles, D.J.

1992-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

438

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Motor Management Guide Supporting Plant License Renewal Including Environmental Qualification Considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was developed by the Electric Power Research Institute’s Large Electric Motor Users Group Information Working Group, which includes motor engineers, motor specialist consultants, and vendors. Environmental qualification (EQ) program owners were also involved in the development of this report. This report addresses the most important elements of a sound motor management program to support an informed decision on motor preservation and motor life extension. Motor life extensions of ...

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

439

Method for including operation and maintenance costs in the economic analysis of active solar energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For a developing technology such as solar energy, the costs for operation and maintenance (O and M) can be substantial. In the past, most economic analyses included these costs by simply assuming that an annual cost will be incurred that is proportional to the initial cost of the system. However, in assessing the economics of new systems proposed for further research and development, such a simplification can obscure the issues. For example, when the typical method for including O and M costs in an economic analysis is used, the O and M costs associated with a newly developed, more reliable, and slightly more expensive controller will be assumed to increase - an obvious inconsistency. The method presented in this report replaces this simplistic approach with a representation of the O and M costs that explicitly accounts for the uncertainties and risks inherent in the operation of any equipment. A detailed description of the data inputs required by the method is included as well as a summary of data sources and an example of the method as applied to an active solar heating system.

Short, W.D.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500.degree. C. to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200.degree. C. to about 900.degree. C. in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet.

McIntosh, Michael J. (Bolingbrook, IL); Arzoumanidis, Gregory G. (Naperville, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damages whatsoever including" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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441

Method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500 C to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200 C to about 900 C in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet. 5 figs.

McIntosh, M.J.; Arzoumanidis, G.G.

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

442

A method and system including a double rotary kiln pyrolysis or gasification of waste material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for destructively distilling an organic material in particulate form wherein the particulates are introduced through an inlet into one end of an inner rotating kiln ganged to and coaxial with an outer rotating kiln. The inner and outer kilns define a cylindrical annular space with the inlet being positioned in registry with the axis of rotation of the ganged kilns. During operation, the temperature of the wall of the inner rotary kiln at the inlet is not less than about 500 C to heat the particulate material to a temperature in the range of from about 200 C to about 900 C in a pyrolyzing atmosphere to reduce the particulate material as it moves from the one end toward the other end. The reduced particulates including char are transferred to the annular space between the inner and the outer rotating kilns near the other end of the inner rotating kiln and moved longitudinally in the annular space from near the other end toward the one end in the presence of oxygen to combust the char at an elevated temperature to produce a waste material including ash. Also, heat is provided which is transferred to the inner kiln. The waste material including ash leaves the outer rotating kiln near the one end and the pyrolysis vapor leaves through the particulate material inlet.

McIntosh, M.J.; Arzoumanidis, G.G.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

443

Microelectromechanical accelerometer with resonance-cancelling control circuit including an idle state  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digital feedback control circuit is disclosed for use in an accelerometer (e.g. a microelectromechanical accelerometer). The digital feedback control circuit, which periodically re-centers a proof mass in response to a sensed acceleration, is based on a sigma-delta (.SIGMA..DELTA.) configuration that includes a notch filter (e.g. a digital switched-capacitor filter) for rejecting signals due to mechanical resonances of the proof mass and further includes a comparator (e.g. a three-level comparator). The comparator generates one of three possible feedback states, with two of the feedback states acting to re-center the proof mass when that is needed, and with a third feedback state being an "idle" state which does not act to move the proof mass when no re-centering is needed. Additionally, the digital feedback control system includes an auto-zero trim capability for calibration of the accelerometer for accurate sensing of acceleration. The digital feedback control circuit can be fabricated using complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, bi-CMOS technology or bipolar technology and used in single- and dual-proof-mass accelerometers.

Chu, Dahlon D. (Albuquerque, NM); Thelen, Jr., Donald C. (Bozeman, MT); Campbell, David V. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Swozzle based burner tube premixer including inlet air conditioner for low emissions combustion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A burner for use in a combustion system of a heavy-duty industrial gas turbine includes a fuel/air premixer having an air inlet, a fuel inlet, and an annular mixing passage. The fuel/air premixer mixes fuel and air into a uniform mixture for injection into a combustor reaction zone. The burner also includes an inlet flow conditioner disposed at the air inlet of the fuel/air premixer for controlling a radial and circumferential distribution of incoming air. The pattern of perforations in the inlet flow conditioner is designed such that a uniform air flow distribution is produced at the swirler inlet annulus in both the radial and circumference directions. The premixer includes a swozzle assembly having a series of preferably air foil shaped turning vanes that impart swirl to the airflow entering via the inlet flow conditioner. Each air foil contains internal fuel flow passages that introduce natural gas fuel into the air stream via fuel metering holes that pass through the walls of the air foil shaped turning vanes. By injecting fuel in this manner, an aerodynamically clean flow field is maintained throughout the premixer. By injecting fuel via two separate passages, the fuel/air mixture strength distribution can be controlled in the radial direction to obtain optimum radial concentration profiles for control of emissions, lean blow outs, and combustion driven dynamic pressure activity as machine and combustor load are varied.

Tuthill, Richard Sterling (Bolton, CT); Bechtel, II, William Theodore (Scotia, NY); Benoit, Jeffrey Arthur (Scotia, NY); Black, Stephen Hugh (Duanesburg, NY); Bland, Robert James (Clifton Park, NY); DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne (Scotia, NY); Meyer, Stefan Martin (Troy, NY); Taura, Joseph Charles (Clifton Park, NY); Battaglioli, John Luigi (Glenville, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Ensemble-Based Exigent Analysis. Part I: Estimating Worst-Case Weather-Related Forecast Damage Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exigent analysis supplements an ensemble forecast of weather-related damage with a map of the worst-case scenario (WCS), a multivariate confidence bound of the damage. For multivariate Gaussian ensembles, ensemble-based exigent analysis uses a ...

Daniel Gombos; Ross N. Hoffman

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Experimental Determination of Damage Threshold Characteristics of IR Compatible Optical Materials  

SciTech Connect

The accelerating gradient in a laser-driven dielectric accelerating structure is often limited by the laser damage threshold of the structure. For a given laser-driven dielectric accelerator design, we can maximize the accelerating gradient by choosing the best combination of the accelerator's constituent material and operating wavelength. We present here a model of the damage mechanism from ultrafast infrared pulses and compare that model with experimental measurements of the damage threshold of bulk silicon. Additionally, we present experimental measurements of a variety of candidate materials, thin films, and nanofabricated accelerating structures.

Soong, Ken

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

447

Laser-induced damage in dielectrics with nanosecond to subpicosecond pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report extensive measurements of damage thresholds for fused silica and calcium fluoride at 1053 and 526 nm for pulse durations [tau] ranging from 270 fs to 1 ns. Qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated [tau][sup 1/2] scaling indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for [tau][le]10 ps and from conventional melting and boiling for [tau][gt]100 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production via multiphoton ionization, Joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in good agreement with experimental results.

Stuart, B.C.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Shore, B.W.; Perry, M.D. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-443, Livermore, California 94550 (United States))

1995-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

448

Laser-induced damage in dielectrics with nanosecond to subpicosecond pulses. I. Experimental. Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report extensive laser-induced damage threshold measurements on pure and multilayer dielectrics at 1053 and 526 mm for pulse durations, {tau}, ranging from 140 fs to 1 ns. Qualitative differences in the morphology of damage and a departure from the diffusion-dominated {tau}{sup 1/2} scaling indicate that damage results from plasma formation and ablation for {tau}{le}10 ps and from conventional melting and boiling for {tau}>50 ps. A theoretical model based on electron production via multiphoton ionization, Joule heating, and collisional (avalanche) ionization is in good agreement with both the pulsewidth and wavelength scaling of experimental results.

Stuart, B.C.; Herman, S.; Perry, M.D.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Fluence thresholds for laser-induced damage of optical components in the injector laser of the SSRL gun test facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluence thresholds for laser-induced damage of optical components in the injector laser of the SSRL gun test facility

Bolton, P

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Microwave technology for waste management applications including disposition of electronic circuitry  

SciTech Connect

Microwave technology is being developed nationally and internationally for a variety of environmental remediation purposes. These efforts include treatment and destruction of a vast array of gaseous, liquid and solid hazardous wastes as well as subsequent immobilization of selected components. Microwave technology provides an important contribution to an arsenal of existing remediation methods that are designed to protect the public and environment from undesirable consequences of hazardous materials. Applications of microwave energy for environmental remediation will be discussed. Emphasized will be a newly developed microwave process designed to treat discarded electronic circuitry and reclaim the precious metals within for reuse.

Wicks, G.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Clark, D.E.; Schulz, R.L.; Folz, D.C. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Workshop on the Application of Remote Sensing Technologies to Disaster Response Rapid Damage Mapping for Post-Earthquake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Workshop on the Application of Remote Sensing Technologies to Disaster Response Rapid Damage Technologies to Disaster Response September 12 2003 #12;Workshop on the Application of Remote Sensing Technologies to Disaster Response 12 September 2003 Rapid Damage Mapping for post-Earthquake Building Damage

Shinozuka, Masanobu

452

Effects of clone, silvicultural, and miticide treatments on cottonwood leafcurl mite (Acari: Eriophyidae) damage in plantation Populus  

SciTech Connect

Aculops lobuliferus (Keifer) is a little known pest of plantation Populus spp., which is capable of causing substantial damage. This is the first documented occurrence of A. lobuliferus in South Carolina. Previous anecdotal data indicated clonal variation in Populus susceptibility to A. lobuliferus damage. A damage rating scale was created to monitor mite damage in 2000-2001 in a short-rotation woody crop plantation; damage descriptions and seasonal phenology also were recorded. Foliar damage and terminal mortality were monitored on two Populus deltoides Bartr. clones, ST66 and S7C15, receiving one of three silvicultural treatments (irrigated, fertilized or both) or no treatment (control). In 2001, early season foliar damage ratings were significantly higher on clone S7C15; however, damage on clone ST66 was greater after miticide treatments later in the year. Terminal mortality did not differ between clones. Silvicultural treatments significantly affected foliar damage levels in both clones. Application of a commercially available miticide significantly reduced A. lobuliferus damage levels. This study demonstrates that A. lobuliferus damage levels can be influenced by Populus clone and silvicultural treatment. Foliar and terminal damage levels observed in this study indicate the potential for substantial economic impact of A. lobuliferus on plantation Populus. Although an effective control method may be to select and plant resistant Populus clones, chemical control remains a viable option.

Coyle, David, R.

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

453

Field damage assessments as a design tool for information and communications technology systems that are resilient to natural disasters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses how to perform field damage assessments after natural disasters as a systematic design tool to achieve information and communications technology (ICT) systems that are more resilient to natural disasters. Hence, damage assessments ... Keywords: damage assessment, information and communication technology systems, natural disasters

Alexis Kwasinski

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

X-ray Thomson scattering for partially ionized plasmas including the effect of bound levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

X-ray Thomson scattering is being developed as a method to measure the temperature, electron density, and ionization state of high energy density plasmas such as those used in inertial confinement fusion. Most experiments are currently done at large laser facilities that can create bright X-ray sources, however the advent of the X-ray free electron laser (X-FEL) provides a new bright source to use in these experiments. One challenge with X-ray Thomson scattering experiments is understanding how to model the scattering for partially ionized plasmas in order to include the contributions of the bound electrons in the scattered intensity. In this work we take the existing models of Thomson scattering that include elastic ion-ion scattering and the electron-electron plasmon scattering and add the contribution of the bound electrons in the partially ionized plasmas. We validated our model by analyzing existing beryllium experimental data. We then consider several higher Z materials such as Cr and predict the existe...

Nilsen, J; Cheng, K T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Segmented instrumentation tube including a locking sleeve for interlocking the segments of the instrumentation tube  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Segmented instrumentation tube including a locking sleeve for interlocking the segments of the instrumentation tube, so that the threaded ends of the instrumentation tube do not unthread when subjected to vibration, such an instrumentation tube being suitable for use in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. The instrumentation tube has a first member having a threaded end portion that has a plurality of first holes circumferentially around the outside surface thereof. The instrumentation tube also has a second member having a threaded end portion that has a plurality of second holes circumferentially around the outside surface thereof. The threads of the second member are caused to threadably engage the threads of the first member for defining a threaded joint therebetween. A sleeve having an inside surface surrounds the end portion of the first member and the end portion of the second member and thus surrounds the threaded joint. The sleeve includes a plurality of first projections and second projections that outwardly extend from the inside surface to engage the first holes and the second holes, respectively. The outside surface of the sleeve is crimped or swaged at the locations of the first projections and second projections such that the first projections and the second projections engage their respective holes. In this manner, independent rotation of the first member with respect to the second member is prevented, so that the instrumentation tube will not unthread at its threaded joint.

Obermeyer, Franklin D. (Pensacola, FL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

An Evaluation of Molten-Salt Power Towers Including Results of the Solar Two Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report utilizes the results of the Solar Two project, as well as continuing technology development, to update the technical and economic status of molten-salt power towers. The report starts with an overview of power tower technology, including the progression from Solar One to the Solar Two project. This discussion is followed by a review of the Solar Two project--what was planned, what actually occurred, what was learned, and what was accomplished. The third section presents preliminary information regarding the likely configuration of the next molten-salt power tower plant. This section draws on Solar Two experience as well as results of continuing power tower development efforts conducted jointly by industry and Sandia National Laboratories. The fourth section details the expected performance and cost goals for the first commercial molten-salt power tower plant and includes a comparison of the commercial performance goals to the actual performance at Solar One and Solar Two. The final section summarizes the successes of Solar Two and the current technology development activities. The data collected from the Solar Two project suggest that the electricity cost goals established for power towers are reasonable and can be achieved with some simple design improvements.

REILLY, HUGH E.; KOLB, GREGORY J.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

457