Sample records for damages whatsoever including

  1. #include #include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Andrew T.

    process #12;#include #include pid_t pid = fork(); if (pid () failed */ } else if (pid == 0) { /* parent process */ } else { /* child process */ } #12;thread #12

  2. #include #include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poinsot, Laurent

    #include #include //Rappels : "getpid()" permet d'obtenir son propre pid // "getppid()" renvoie le pid du père d'un processus int main (void) { pid_t pid_fils; pid_fils = fork(); if(pid_fils==-1) { printf("Erreur de création du processus fils\

  3. Controlling Opossum Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    damage; however, their pelts can be sold only during the furbearer season and with the proper licenses. Other furbearers include beaver, otter, mink, nutria, ringtailed cat, badger, skunk, weasel, raccoon, muskrat, fox and civet cat. Homeowners...

  4. Property Loss / Damage Report Damage Loss Details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    Property Loss / Damage Report Damage Loss Details Date & Time of Damage / Loss: Type of damage / loss: Location - specific address / room: Project / Grant associated with damage / loss - grant Police: When was damage / loss first discovered - BY WHOM: Pictures available or attached? Was personal

  5. Method for producing damage resistant optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Burnham, Alan K. (Livermore, CA); Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA); Brusasco, Raymond M. (Livermore, CA); Wegner, Paul J. (Livermore, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Pleasanton, CA); Kozlowski, Mark R. (Windsor, CA); Feit, Michael D. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a system that mitigates the growth of surface damage in an optic. Damage to the optic is minimally initiated. In an embodiment of the invention, damage sites in the optic are initiated, located, and then treated to stop the growth of the damage sites. The step of initiating damage sites in the optic includes a scan of the optic using a laser to initiate defects. The exact positions of the initiated sites are identified. A mitigation process is performed that locally or globally removes the cause of subsequent growth of the damaged sites.

  6. Damage experiments in a cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaul, Ann M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Studying spallation damage with a cylindrical configuration allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material under proper driving conditions. Additionally, the damaged material can come to a complete rest without the application of further stopping forces. Specific areas of research include the damage initiation regime in convergent geometry, behavior of material recollected after damage, and effects of convergent geometry on the material response. Such experiments produce unique strain and shear stress states, motivating improvements in existing computational material models and increasing the predictive capabilities of codes. A LANL/VNIIEF joint experimental series has produced cylindrical aluminum failure initiation data and studied the behavior of material recollected after damage initiation and after complete failure. In addition to post-shot collection of the damaged target material for subsequent metallographic analysis, dynamic in-situ experimental diagnostics include velocimetry and transverse radial radiography. This paper will discuss the current experimental status.

  7. Environmental Stigma Damages: Speculative Damages in Environmental Tort Cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, E. Jean

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    contami- nation causing environmental damage cannot be seen,Damages: Speculative Damages in Environmental Tort Cases E.in cases of environmental damage, primar- ily because it is

  8. Damage susceptibility tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    conditions, 3) that x-ray induced damage rates for a common material (relatively pure PVC in this example 7,8 ) can be used to normalize different sets of XPS damage...

  9. System and damage identification of civil structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moaveni, Babak

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12 Damage Index Methods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Model Updating for Damage Identification . . . . . . . .298 x Damage Factors and Residual

  10. Internship Contract (Includes Practicum)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Internship Contract (Includes Practicum) Student's name-mail: _________________________________________ Internship Agency Contact Agency Name: ____________________________________ Address-mail: __________________________________________ Location of Internship, if different from Agency: ________________________________________________ Copies

  11. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  12. Remote sensing and forest damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, N.J.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, damage to North American forests caused by insects, diseases, pollution, and fire results in multibillion dollar losses of revenue and resources. To respond to these losses effectively, forest managers need timely information on the location, extent, and spread of the damage. Traditional techniques for monitoring forest damage include high-resolution aerial photography, color infrared photography, and visual reconnaissance mapping. These techniques require visual interpretation of the data and often are somewhat subjective. In addition, because such analyses are time-consuming and costly, many areas of forest are never mapped, and in cases where maps exist, they often are obsolete or incomplete. An airborne imager has been developed to solve the problems of time-consuming visual analysis and interpretations. The Programmable Multispectral Imager measures small changes - invisible by conventional detection methods - in light reflected by the forest canopy. The PMI measures the color an intensity of reflected light and records this information digitally in computer tape aboard an aircraft. This information is then available for later entry into a computer for processing and enhancement. Although airborne imagers have been available for nearly three decades, they have not been used extensively for forest damage assessment or other forestry applications because of their poor sensitivity and their limited number of fixed spectral channels. The PMI is the first of a new generation of imagers that combine high sensitivity with the flexibility of continuous spectral coverage. This allows scientists to evaluate the potential causes and effects of stress on vegetation.

  13. Living Expenses (includes approximately

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    & engineering programs All other programs Graduate: MBA/INFSY at Erie & Harrisburg (12 credits) Business Guarantee 3 (Does not include Dependents Costs4 ) Altoona, Berks, Erie, and Harrisburg 12-Month Estimated

  14. RADIATION DAMAGE OF GERMANIUM DETECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pehl, Richard H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the high-energy proton damage than was the planar detector.as far as radiation damage is concerned. Unfortunately, some28-29, 1978 LBL-7967 RADIATION DAMAGE OF GERMANIUM DETECTORS

  15. Composite heat damage assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janke, C.J.; Wachter, E.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Philpot, H.E. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Powell, G.L. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of heat damage were determined on the residual mechanical, physical, and chemical properties of IM6/3501-6 laminates, and potential nondestructive techniques to detect and assess material heat damage were evaluated. About one thousand preconditioned specimens were exposed to elevated temperatures, then cooled to room temperature and tested in compression, flexure, interlaminar shear, shore-D hardness, weight loss, and change in thickness. Specimens experienced significant and irreversible reduction in their residual properties when exposed to temperatures exceeding the material upper service temperature of this material (350{degrees}F). The Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform and Laser-Pumped Fluorescence techniques were found to be capable of rapid, in-service, nondestructive detection and quantitation of heat damage in IM6/3501- 6. These techniques also have the potential applicability to detect and assess heat damage effects in other polymer matrix composites.

  16. Controlling Beaver Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Beavers are important because their dams stabilize creek flow, slow runoff and create ponds. However, these same dams can negatively alter the flow of creeks. Damage prevention, control and various trapping methods are discussed in this publication....

  17. A UNIFIED FAILURE/DAMAGE APPROACH TO BATTLE DAMAGE REGENERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A UNIFIED FAILURE/DAMAGE APPROACH TO BATTLE DAMAGE REGENERATION : APPLICATION TO GROUND MILITARY-availability. Military weapon systems availability can be affected by system failures or by damage to the system damage into account in their more general dependability studies. This paper takes a look at the issues

  18. Radiation damage evolution in ceramics. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation damage evolution in ceramics. Radiation damage evolution in ceramics. Abstract: A review is presented of recent results on radiation damage production, defect...

  19. Regulation with anticipated learning about environmental damages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, L; Zhang, J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    abatement costs and environmental damages, and a generalemissions. 2.2 Environmental damages and learning Let S t begas stocks and environmental damages. In some respects these

  20. Methods for globally treating silica optics to reduce optical damage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Philip Edward; Suratwala, Tayyab Ishaq; Bude, Jeffrey Devin; Shen, Nan; Steele, William Augustus; Laurence, Ted Alfred; Feit, Michael Dennis; Wong, Lana Louie

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preventing damage caused by high intensity light sources to optical components includes annealing the optical component for a predetermined period. Another method includes etching the optical component in an etchant including fluoride and bi-fluoride ions. The method also includes ultrasonically agitating the etching solution during the process followed by rinsing of the optical component in a rinse bath.

  1. Drill-in fluids control formation damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halliday, W.S. (Baker Hughes Inteq, Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several factors led to development, oil company interest in, and use of payzone drilling fluids, including operator concern about maximizing well production, increasing acceptance of horizontal drilling and openhole completion popularity. This article discusses water-base drill-in'' fluid systems and applications. Payzone damage, including fine solids migration, clay swelling and solids invasion, reduces effective formation permeability, which results in lower production rates. Formation damage is often caused by invasion of normal drilling fluids that contain barite or bentonite. Drill-in systems are designed with special bridging agents to minimize invasion. Several bridging materials designed to form effective filter cake for instantaneous leak-off control can be used. Bridging materials are also designed to minimize stages and time required to clean up wells before production. Fluids with easy-to-remove bridging agents reduce completion costs. Drill-in fluid bridging particles can often be removed more thoroughly than those in standard fluids.

  2. Nowcasting Disaster Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kryvasheyeu, Yury; Obradovich, Nick; Moro, Esteban; Van Hentenryck, Pascal; Fowler, James; Cebrian, Manuel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Could social media data aid in disaster response and damage assessment? Countries face both an increasing frequency and intensity of natural disasters due to climate change. And during such events, citizens are turning to social media platforms for disaster-related communication and information. Social media improves situational awareness, facilitates dissemination of emergency information, enables early warning systems, and helps coordinate relief efforts. Additionally, spatiotemporal distribution of disaster-related messages helps with real-time monitoring and assessment of the disaster itself. Here we present a multiscale analysis of Twitter activity before, during, and after Hurricane Sandy. We examine the online response of 50 metropolitan areas of the United States and find a strong relationship between proximity to Sandy's path and hurricane-related social media activity. We show that real and perceived threats -- together with the physical disaster effects -- are directly observable through the intens...

  3. Shock Initiation of Damaged Explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidester, S K; Vandersall, K S; Tarver, C M

    2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Explosive and propellant charges are subjected to various mechanical and thermal insults that can increase their sensitivity over the course of their lifetimes. To quantify this effect, shock initiation experiments were performed on mechanically and thermally damaged LX-04 (85% HMX, 15% Viton by weight) and PBX 9502 (95% TATB, 5% Kel-F by weight) to obtain in-situ manganin pressure gauge data and run distances to detonation at various shock pressures. We report the behavior of the HMX-based explosive LX-04 that was damaged mechanically by applying a compressive load of 600 psi for 20,000 cycles, thus creating many small narrow cracks, or by cutting wedge shaped parts that were then loosely reassembled, thus creating a few large cracks. The thermally damaged LX-04 charges were heated to 190 C for long enough for the beta to delta solid - solid phase transition to occur, and then cooled to ambient temperature. Mechanically damaged LX-04 exhibited only slightly increased shock sensitivity, while thermally damaged LX-04 was much more shock sensitive. Similarly, the insensitive explosive PBX 9502 was mechanically damaged using the same two techniques. Since PBX 9502 does not undergo a solid - solid phase transition but does undergo irreversible or 'rachet' growth when thermally cycled, thermal damage to PBX 9502 was induced by this procedure. As for LX-04, the thermally damaged PBX 9502 demonstrated a greater shock sensitivity than mechanically damaged PBX 9502. The Ignition and Growth reactive flow model calculated the increased sensitivities by igniting more damaged LX-04 and PBX 9502 near the shock front based on the measured densities (porosities) of the damaged charges.

  4. 9 1989by The Humana Press Inc. All rights of any nature whatsoever reserved.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    The economic impact of conversion of xylose to ethanol for a wood-to-ethanol plant was examined, and the maximum potential reduction in the price of ethanol from utilization of xylose is estimated to be $0.42 per gallon from a base case price of $1.65. The sensitivity of the price of ethanol to the yield

  5. Evaluation of radiation damage using nonlinear ultrasound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matlack, K. H. [G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Wall, J. J. [G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Electric Power Research Institute, Charlotte, North Carolina 28262 (United States); Kim, J.-Y. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Qu, J. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Jacobs, L. J. [G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Viehrig, H.-W. [Department of Structural Materials, Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Ion-Beam Physics and Materials Research, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear ultrasound was used to monitor radiation damage in two reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. The microstructural changes associated with radiation damage include changes in dislocation density and the formation of precipitates, and nonlinear ultrasonic waves are known to be sensitive to such changes. Six samples each of two different RPV steels were previously irradiated in the Rheinsberg power reactor to two fluence levels, up to 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV). Longitudinal waves were used to measure the acoustic nonlinearity in these samples, and the results show a clear increase in the measured acoustic nonlinearity from the unirradiated state to the medium dose, and then a decrease from medium dose to high dose.

  6. Controlling Raccoon Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Services

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    itiscausingdamageorcreatinganuisance;howev- er, the pelt can be sold only during the furbearer seasonandwiththeproperlicenses.Otherfurbear- ers include beaver, otter, mink, ringtailed cat, bad- ger, skunk, nutria, weasel, opossum, muskrat, fox andcivetcat. Landowners wishing to live...

  7. Controlling Badger Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service

    2004-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    furbearers include otter, mink, ring-tailed cat, beaver, skunk, nutria, weasel, raccoon, opossum, muskrat, fox and civet cat. Landowners wishing to live trap badgers and relocate them after they have been caught must notify a representative of the Texas...

  8. Damage and Damage Prediction for Wood Shearwalls Subjected to Simulated Earthquake Loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rakesh

    Damage and Damage Prediction for Wood Shearwalls Subjected to Simulated Earthquake Loads John W damaged resulting in large financial losses. Societal demands for damage-limiting design philosophies and better predict damage to woodframe structures. This paper examines damage to the lateral load carrying

  9. Excitation optimization for damage detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bement, Matthew T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bewley, Thomas R [UCSD

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique is developed to answer the important question: 'Given limited system response measurements and ever-present physical limits on the level of excitation, what excitation should be provided to a system to make damage most detectable?' Specifically, a method is presented for optimizing excitations that maximize the sensitivity of output measurements to perturbations in damage-related parameters estimated with an extended Kalman filter. This optimization is carried out in a computationally efficient manner using adjoint-based optimization and causes the innovations term in the extended Kalman filter to be larger in the presence of estimation errors, which leads to a better estimate of the damage-related parameters in question. The technique is demonstrated numerically on a nonlinear 2 DOF system, where a significant improvement in the damage-related parameter estimation is observed.

  10. Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Selected Countries (U.S. dollars per gallon, including taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 51115 6.15 6.08 6.28 6.83 6.96 6.75 3.06 5415 6.14 6.06...

  11. Sponsorship includes: Agriculture in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Sponsorship includes: · Agriculture in the Classroom · Douglas County Farm Bureau · Gifford Farm · University of Nebraska Agricultural Research and Development Center · University of Nebraska- Lincoln Awareness Coalition is to help youth, primarily from urban communities, become aware of agriculture

  12. Long-term models of oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage in insulin resistance progression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Fred

    factors [8, 9]. Common environmental influences include a high fat-high calorie diet, lack of physical in mitochondria. The resulting oxidative stress can damage resident proteins, including antioxidants, along

  13. Damage-prone regions in structural composite materials are difficult to detect and even harder to repair. Damage is preceded by complex spatial and temporal changes in stress state, and it is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Materials Seminar Damage-prone regions in structural composite materials are difficult to detect and even harder to repair. Damage is preceded by complex spatial and temporal changes in stress state about in response to damage or high-stress conditions include: (1) signal generation to warn of ensuing

  14. DAMAGE LOCALIZATION USING LOAD VECTORS Dionisio Bernal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernal, Dionisio

    DAMAGE LOCALIZATION USING LOAD VECTORS Dionisio Bernal Associate Professor Department of Civil: A technique to localize damage in structures that can be treated as linear in the pre and post-damage state is presented. Central to the approach is the computation of a set of vectors, designated as Damage Locating

  15. Collateral damage: Evolution with displacement of fracture distribution and secondary fault strands in fault damage zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savage, Heather M.; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E. McCallum (1999), Reservoir damage around faults: OutcropSkar (2005), Controls on damage zone asymmetry of a normal2007), The evolution of the damage zone with fault growth in

  16. NONLINEAR ACOUSTIC IMAGING OF STRUCTURAL DAMAGES IN LAMINATED COMPOSITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    are performed on a carbon fiber/epoxy laminated composite plate with barely visible impact damage and requires an ever increasing accuracy of detection. A good example is the inspection of composite materials been applied to a variety of materials including rocks [4], metals [5-10] and composites [11

  17. Diffusion Tensor Imaging in the Assessment of Normal-Appearing Brain Tissue Damage in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang,Tianzi

    (including medulla oblongata, cerebral peduncle, internal capsule and optic radiation), in corpus callosum Damage in Relapsing Neuromyelitis Optica C.S. Yu F.C. Lin K.C. Li T.Z. Jiang C.Z. Zhu W. Qin H. Sun P. Chan BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Normal-appearing brain tissue (NABT) damage was established in multiple

  18. Insulator damage endangers public, power reliability; ratepayers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for tips about multiple incidents of insulators damaged by firearms on its high-voltage power line near Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Tacoma, Wash. Damaged insulators can put...

  19. A damage model for fracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, J Quinn; Rundle, John B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Injections of large volumes of water into tight shale reservoirs allows the extraction of oil and gas not previously accessible. This large volume "super" fracking induces damage that allows the oil and/or gas to flow to an extraction well. The purpose of this paper is to provide a model for understanding super fracking. We assume that water is injected from a small spherical cavity into a homogeneous elastic medium. The high pressure of the injected water generates hoop stresses that reactivate natural fractures in the tight shales. These fractures migrate outward as water is added creating a spherical shell of damaged rock. The porosity associated with these fractures is equal to the water volume injected. We obtain an analytic expression for this volume. We apply our model to a typical tight shale reservoir and show that the predicted water volumes are in good agreement with the volumes used in super fracking.

  20. Damaged Fuel Experiment DF-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasser, R.D.; Fryer, C.P.; Gauntt, R.O.; Marshall, A.C.; Reil, K.O.; Stalker, K.T.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of in-pile experiments addressing LWR severe fuel damage phenomena has been conducted in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories. The ACRR Debris Formation and Relocation (DF) experiments are quasi-separate effects tests that provide a data base for the development and verification of models for LWR severe core damage accidents. The first experiment in this series, DF-1, was performed on March 15, 1984, and the results are presented in this report. The DF-1 experiment examined the effects of low initial clad oxidation conditions on fuel damage and relocation processes. The DF-1 test assembly consisted of a nine-rod square-matrix bundle that employed PWR-type fuel rods with a 0.5-m fissile length. The fuel rods were composed of 10% enriched UO{sub 2} pellets within a zircaloy-4 cladding. Steam flowed through the test bundle at flow rates varying between 0.5 and 3 g/s, and the ACRR maintained a peak power level of 1.5 MW during the high temperature oxidation phase of the test inducing {approximately}8.5 kW fission power and {approximately}20 kW peak oxidation power in the assembly. Visual observation showed early clad relocation and partial blockage formation at the grid spacer location accompanied by production of a dense aerosol. Posttest cross sections show liquefaction losses of fuel in excess of 10 volume percent, as well as large fractional losses of cladding material from the upper two-thirds of the bundle. The quantity of hydrogen measured during the test was consistent with the observed magnitude of cladding oxidation. Oxidation driven heating rates of 25 K/s and peak temperatures in excess of 2525 K were observed. The analyses, interpretation, and application of these results to severe fuel damage accidents are discussed. 27 refs., 118 figs., 23 tabs.

  1. Oxidative stress and oxidative damage in chemical carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klaunig, James E., E-mail: jklauni@indiana.edu; Wang Zemin; Pu Xinzhu; Zhou Shaoyu

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are induced through a variety of endogenous and exogenous sources. Overwhelming of antioxidant and DNA repair mechanisms in the cell by ROS may result in oxidative stress and oxidative damage to the cell. This resulting oxidative stress can damage critical cellular macromolecules and/or modulate gene expression pathways. Cancer induction by chemical and physical agents involves a multi-step process. This process includes multiple molecular and cellular events to transform a normal cell to a malignant neoplastic cell. Oxidative damage resulting from ROS generation can participate in all stages of the cancer process. An association of ROS generation and human cancer induction has been shown. It appears that oxidative stress may both cause as well as modify the cancer process. Recently association between polymorphisms in oxidative DNA repair genes and antioxidant genes (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and human cancer susceptibility has been shown.

  2. Nondestructive Damage Detection in General Beams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dincal, Selcuk

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Representation of the First Damage Case on the Finite Element Mesh of the Slender Beam ...................................................... 41 Figure 3.12 Schematic Representation of the Second Damage Case on the Finite Element Mesh... of the Slender Beam ...................................................... 42 Figure 3.13 Schematic Representation of the Third Damage Case on the Finite Element Mesh of the Slender Beam ...................................................... 44...

  3. Multiscale Modeling of Radiation Damage in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiscale Modeling of Radiation Damage in Fusion Reactor Materials Brian D. Wirth, R.J. Kurtz-7405-Eng-48. #12;Presentation overview · Introduction to fusion reactor materials and radiation damage. tailor He HFIR isotopic tailor He HFIR target/RB He appmHe displacement damage (dpa) ffuussiioonn

  4. Density Functional Theory Models for Radiation Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Density Functional Theory Models for Radiation Damage S.L. Dudarev EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association and informative as the most advanced experimental techniques developed for the observation of radiation damage investigation and assessment of radiation damage effects, offering new insight into the origin of temperature

  5. Structural Damage Detection and Localization Using NETSHM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnawali, Omprakash

    Structural Damage Detection and Localization Using NETSHM Krishna Chintalapudi, Jeongyeup Paek and localize damage in large civil structures. Structural engineers often implement and test SHM algorithms the intricacies of wireless networking, or the details of sensor data acquisition. We have implemented a damage

  6. Damage Detection in Plate Structures using Guided Ultrasonic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jarmer, Gregory James Sylvester

    2009. “Evaluation of the Damage Detection Capability of alikelihood Estimation of Damage Location in Guided- waveStatistically-based Damage Detection in Geometrically-

  7. Micromechanical Damage Models for Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008). Micromechanical modeling of damage and fracture ofmatrix viscoplasticity and evolving damage, Journal of theW.A. (1998). Stochastic damage evolution and failure in

  8. Blast damage mitigation of steel structures from near- contact charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfson, Janet Crumrine

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Blast Damage Mitigation of Steel35  Damage Levels Observed in LaboratoryFigure 3.34: Progression of damage for a Ballistic Loading

  9. Cognitive Empathy Following Orbitofrontal Cortex and Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodkind, Madeleine Shirley

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    following bilateral damage to the human amygdala. Nature,as a measure of frontal lobe damage. Journal of Clinical andcaused by frontal damage fail to respond autonomically to

  10. International Trade and the Internalization of Environmental Damages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry; Dumas, Christopher F.; Koo, Bonwoo; Sacheti, Sandeep

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    estimates of environmental damages efficiently and quickly,an overview of environmental damages and internalizationdo little to decrease environmental damage, and may actually

  11. Radiation Damage in Polarized Ammonia Solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Slifer

    2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid NH3 and ND3 provide a highly polarizable, radiation resistant source of polarized protons and deuterons and have been used extensively in high luminosity experiments investigating the spin structure of the nucleon. Over the past twenty years, the UVA polarized target group has been instrumental in producing and polarizing much of the material used in these studies, and many practical considerations have been learned in this time. In this discussion, we analyze the polarization performance of the solid ammonia targets used during the recent JLab Eg4 run. Topics include the rate of polarization decay with accumulated charge, the annealing procedure for radiation damaged targets to recover polarization, and the radiation induced change in optimum microwave frequency used to polarize the sample. We also discuss the success we have had in implementing frequency modulation of the polarizing microwave frequency.

  12. Nonlocal Damage Models 8.1 Basic Types of Nonlocal Damage Formulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jirasek, Milan

    Chapter 8 Nonlocal Damage Models 8.1 Basic Types of Nonlocal Damage Formulations 8.1.1 Formulations Motivated by Isotropic Damage A number of nonlocal concepts giving local response in the linear elastic damage model from Section 5.2. Certain models use a formulation in which the role of the equivalent

  13. 28-nm laser damage testing of LIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foltyn, S.R.; Newman, B.E.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have tested several samples of LIF, both single crystal and press forged, for damage resistance to 10-ns 248-nm pulses at 35 pps. The damage thresholds - the highest levels at which no damage could be produced - ranged from 4 to 6 J/cm/sup 2/ although some test sites survived irradiation at approx. 30 J/cm/sup 2/. We observed that bulk damage is the primary failure mechanism in single crystal and press forged samples and that both types exhibit the same resistance to laser damage.

  14. On the economic optimality of marine reserves when fishing damages habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeller, Holly Villacorta

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I expand a spatially-explicit bioeconomic fishery model to include the negative effects of fishing effort on habitat quality. I consider two forms of effort driven habitat damage: First, fishing effort may ...

  15. Nanofoams Response to Radiation Damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Engang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nastasi, Michael [Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, NE 68508; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis [PLS, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551; Bringa, Eduardo M. [CONICET and Inst. Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza, 5500 Argentina; Baldwin, Jon K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caro, Jose A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) np-Au foams were successfully synthesized by de-alloying process; (2) np-Au foams remain porous structure after Ne ion irradiation to 1 dpa; (3) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams with highest and intermediate flux, while no SFTs were observed with lowest flux; (4) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams at RT, whereas no SFTs were observed at LNT irradiation; (5) The diffusivity of vacancies in Au at RT is high enough so that the vacancies have enough time to agglomerate and thus collapse. As a result, SFTs were formed; (6) The high flux created much more damage/time, vacancies don't have enough time to diffuse or recombine. As a result, SFTs were formed.

  16. Method for assaying clustered DNA damages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Betsy M.

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method for detecting and quantifying clustered damages in DNA. In this method, a first aliquot of the DNA to be tested for clustered damages with one or more lesion-specific cleaving reagents under conditions appropriate for cleavage of the DNA to produce single-strand nicks in the DNA at sites of damage lesions. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is then quantitatively determined for the treated DNA. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is also quantitatively determined for a second, untreated aliquot of the DNA. The frequency of clustered damages (.PHI..sub.c) in the DNA is then calculated.

  17. GENETIC AND MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND TOLERANCE PATHWAYS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2001-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation can damage cellular components, including DNA. Organisms have developed a panoply of means of dealing with DNA damage. Some repair paths have rather narrow substrate specificity (e.g. photolyases), which act on specific pyrimidine photoproducts in a specific type (e.g., DNA) and conformation (double-stranded B conformation) of nucleic acid. Others, for example, nucleotide excision repair, deal with larger classes of damages, in this case bulky adducts in DNA. A detailed discussion of DNA repair mechanisms is beyond the scope of this article, but one can be found in the excellent book of Friedberg et al. [1] for further detail. However, some DNA damages and paths for repair of those damages important for photobiology will be outlined below as a basis for the specific examples of genetic and molecular analysis that will be presented below.

  18. KU Public Safety Office Criminal Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the damage of a Coca-Cola vending machine in the Parking Services lobby at 1501 Irving Hill Drive and damage to Coca-Cola vending machines across the campus. Suspect Description: W/M, 5 feet 10 inches, 150

  19. Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ze'ev, Reches

    Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks: Part 1. Damage fracturing Seth Busetti, Kyran mechanics, fluid flow in fractured reservoirs, and geomechanics in nonconventional reservoirs. Kyran Mish finite deformation of reservoir rocks. We present an at- tempt to eliminate the main limitations

  20. MODELING LONGITUDINAL DAMAGE IN SHIP COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Alan

    . Performing Organization Name and Address Department of Aerospace and Ocean Engineering. 10. Work Unit No made excellent progress towards predicting damage penetration in ship collisions. This project focuses collision data for penetrating collisions. 17. Key Words ship collisions, longitudinal ship damage 18

  1. Strategic petroleum reserve caverns casing damage update 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, D.E.; Molecke, M.A.; Neal, J.T. [and others

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanging casing strings are used for oil and brine transfer in the domal salt storage caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Damage to these casings is of concern because hanging string replacement is costly and because of implications on cavern stability. Although the causes of casing damage are not always well defined, many events leading to damage are assumed to be the result of salt falls impacting the hanging strings. However, in some cases, operational aspects may be suspected. The history of damage to hanging strings is updated in this study to include the most recent events. Potential general domal and local operational and material factors that could influence the tendency for caverns to have salt falls are examined in detail. As a result of this examination, general factors, such as salt dome anomalies and crude type, and most of the operational factors, such as geometry, location and depressurizations, are not believed to be primary causes of casing damage. Further analysis is presented of the accumulation of insolubles during cavern solutioning and accumulation of salt fall material on the cavern floor. Inaccuracies in sump geometry probably make relative cavern insolubles contents uncertain. However, determination of the salt fall accumulations, which are more accurate, suggest that the caverns with the largest salt fall accumulations show the greatest number of hanging string events. There is good correlation between the accumulation rate and the number of events when the event numbers are corrected to an equivalent number for a single hanging string in a quiescent, operating cavern. The principal factor that determines the propensity for a cavern to exhibit this behavior is thought to be the effect of impurity content on the fracture behavior of salt.

  2. Floating intake reduces pump damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kronig, A.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The solution to a costly sand erosion problem at the Grande Dixence hydroelectric project in Switzerland turned out to be as simple as a floating pump. The 726-MW Grande Dixence project drains a 350-square-kilometer reach of the Zermatt and Herens valleys in the southwestern Swiss Alps. About half of the drainage area is covered by active glaciers. Because the glaciers in Zermatt Valley are so low in altitude, their water is collected in Z`mutt Reservoir at the base of the Matterhorn, then pumped up 500 meters for transport to the main Grande Disence Reservoir near Sion. The glacier water is heavily laden with sand. In spite of a gravel pass and a desilter, the 700,000-acubic-meter Z`mutt Reservoir receives large quantities of sand. The sand tends to remain in solution because of the low water temperatures (1 to 2 degrees Centigrade). In the original intake system, the sand would be sucked into the pump intakes, causing extensive erosion to the pump wheels and an expensive yearly program of repair. (Pump damage averaged 200,000 Swiss Francs ($284,000 U.S.) per year between 1980 and 1985.)

  3. Damage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Linde, D.

    to the optical components required to utilize XFEL beams, including radiation damage. Theoretical workDamage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength SC were exposed to single 25 fs long pulses of 32.5 nm free-electron-laser radiation at fluences of up

  4. Fast Neutron Damage Studies on NdFeB Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer, James; Baldwin, A; Boussoufi, Moe; Pellet, David; Volk, James T; Wolf, Zachary

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many materials and electronics need to be tested for the radiation environment expected at linear colliders (LC) where the accelerator and detectors will be subjected to large fluences of hadrons, leptons and gammas over the life of the facility. Although the linacs will be superconducting, there are still many potential uses for NdFeB in the damping rings, injection and extraction lines and final focus. Our understanding of the radiation damage situation for rare earth permanent magnet materials was presented at PAC2003 and our first measurements of fast neutron, stepped doses at the UC Davis McClellan Nuclear Reactor Center (UCD MNRC) were presented at EPAC2004 where the damage appeared proportional to the distances between the effective operating points and Hc. Here we have extended those doses and included more commercial samples together with the induced radioactivities associated with their respective dopants. Hall probe data for the external induction distributions are compared with vector magnetizatio...

  5. in Yellowstone during the early 1900s, had severely "dam-aged" the park's northern winter range, including decidu-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    formulated using the lo- gistic-growth equation (Cole 1974), but more recently, agency biologists have also slated to die from other causes, primarily starvation, and hence predation would not lower ungulate

  6. Analysis of high resolution scatter images from laser damage experiments performed on KDP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Runkel, M.; Woods, B.; Yan, M. [and others

    1996-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest in producing high damage threshold KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP) and (D{sub x}H{sub 1-x}){sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KD*P, DKDP) for optical switching and frequency conversion applications is being driven by the system requirements for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL). Historically, the path to achieving higher damage thresholds has been to improve the purity of crystal growth solutions. Application of advanced filtration technology has increased the damage threshold, but gives little insight into the actual mechanisms of laser damage. We have developed a laser scatter diagnostic to better study bulk defects and laser damage mechanisms in KDP and KD*P crystals. This diagnostic consists of a cavity doubled, kilohertz class, Nd:YLF laser (527 nm) and high dynamic range CCD camera which allows imaging of bulk scatter signals. With it, we have performed damage tests at 355 nm on four different {open_quotes}vintages{close_quotes} of KDP crystals, concentrating on crystals produced via fast growth methods. We compare the diagnostic`s resolution to LLNL`s standard damage detection method of 100X darkfield microscopy and discuss its impact on damage threshold determination. We have observed the disappearance of scatter sites upon exposure to subthreshold irradiation. In contrast, we have seen scatterers appear where none previously existed. This includes isolated, large (high signal) sites as well as multiple small scatter sites which appear at fluences above 7 J/cm{sup 2} (fine tracking). However, we have not observed a strong correlation of preexisting scatter sites and laser damage sites. We speculate on the connection between the laser-induced disappearance of scatter sites and the observed increase in damage threshold with laser conditioning.

  7. Assessment of damage to geomembrane liners by shredded scrap tires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, K.R.; Saichek, R.E. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Materials Engineering

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a field and laboratory study performed to assess damage to the geomembrane liner caused by using shredded scrap tires as a leachate drainage layer material in landfills. The field testing was performed to assess the damage that occurred to the geomembrane liner during construction and included nine tests conducted with different combinations of tire chip size and thickness, both with a geotextile and without a geotextile overlying the geomembrane, and under different loading conditions. The laboratory testing was performed to characterize the shredded tires, particularly their size distribution, hydraulic conductivity, compressibility, and chemical resistance. The laboratory testing also included performing simulation testing to determine the extent of damage that occurs to the geomembrane liner by the shredded tires under long-term waste-loading conditions. the damage that occurred to the geomembrane liners in both field tests and simulated laboratory tests was determined by visual observations as well as by conducting multi-axial tension tests, wide strip tension tests, and water vapor transmission tests on the exhumed geomembrane samples. Based on these results, a 0.46-m thick layer of secondary shred tire chips, with an average size of 7.6 cm, placed over a 543-g/m{sup 2} geotextile installed over a geomembrane liner using low-ground-pressure (<58 kPa) equipment was determined to provide adequate protection in the geomembrane liner during construction. The degree of protection offered under long-term loading conditions depends on the normal stress and the random orientation of the shredded tire chips at the geomembrane interface.

  8. MHK technologies include current energy conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research leverages decades of experience in engineering and design and analysis (D&A) of wind power technologies, and its vast research complex, including high-performance...

  9. War damages and reconstruction of Peruca dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nonveiller, E. [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering; Rupcic, J. [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering; [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia); Sever, Z. [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia)] [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia)

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes the heavy damages caused by blasting in the Peruca rockfill dam in Croatia in January 1993. Complete collapse of the dam by overtopping was prevented through quick action of the dam owner by dumping clayey gravel on the lowest sections of the dam crest and opening the bottom outlet of the reservoir, thus efficiently lowering the water level. After the damages were sufficiently established and alternatives for restoration of the dam were evaluated, it was decided to construct a diaphragm wall through the damaged core in the central dam part as the impermeable dam element and to rebuild the central clay core at the dam abutments. Reconstruction works are described.

  10. Assessing United States hurricane damage under different environmental conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maheras, Anastasia Francis

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hurricane activity between 1979 and 2011 was studied to determine damage statistics under different environmental conditions. Hurricanes cause billions of dollars of damage every year in the United States, but damage ...

  11. Beam damage of poly(2-chloroethyl methylacrylate) [PCEMA] films...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    evaluating x-ray damage. PCEMA has been shown to be more sensitive to degradation than PVC which has also been used as a damage sensitive material useful for comparison of damage...

  12. Radiation Damage Studies with Hadrons on Materials and Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PUB-10534 July 2004 Radiation Damage Studies with Hadrons oncontract DE–AC03–76SF00515. Radiation Damage Studies withand Zachary R. Wolf, “Radiation Damage Studies of Materials

  13. DAMAGE ASSESSMENT OF COMPOSITE PLATE STRUCTURES WITH UNCERTAINTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    DAMAGE ASSESSMENT OF COMPOSITE PLATE STRUCTURES WITH UNCERTAINTY Chandrashekhar M.* , Ranjan Uncertainties associated with a structural model and measured vibration data may lead to unreliable damage that material uncertainties in composite structures cause considerable problem in damage assessment which can

  14. New navel orangeworm sanitation standards ?could reduce almond damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higbee, Bradley S.; Siegel, Joel P

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    disruption, dispersal and damage prediction. Proc 34thtype and amount of insect damage. J Ag Food Chem 49:4513–9.standards could reduce almond damage by Bradley S. Higbee

  15. RADIATION DAMAGE TO BSCCO-2223 FROM 50 MEV PROTONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeller, A.F.; Ronningen, R.M.; Godeke, A.; Heilbronn, L.H.; McMahan-Norris, P.; Gupta, R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RADIATION DAMAGE TO BSCCO-2223 FROM 50 MEV PROTONS A. F.BSCCO-2223. Radiation damage. INTRODUCTION The magnets incomponents be resistant to damage. One solution [1] is to

  16. A Damage-Revelation Rationale for Coupon Remedies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polinsky, A. Mitchell; Rubinfeld, Daniel L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bargaining and the Design of Damage Awards,” 10 Journal ofpage 1 Revised: March 2006 A DAMAGE-REVELATION RATIONALE FORin a setting in which damages vary among plaintiffs and are

  17. INSTANTANEOUS DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION AND LOCALIZATION THROUGH SPARSE LASER ULTRASONIC SCANNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    INSTANTANEOUS DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION AND LOCALIZATION THROUGH SPARSE LASER ULTRASONIC SCANNING This study proposes an instantaneous damage identification and localization technique through sparse laser ultrasonic signals are obtained, a damage index (DI) representing the violation of the linear reciprocity

  18. A Damage-Revelation Rationale for Coupon Remedies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polinsky, A. Mitchell; Rubinfeld, Daniel L

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bargaining and the Design of Damage Awards,’’ 10 Journal ofGramlich, Fred. 1986. ‘‘Scrip Damages in Antitrust Cases,’’in the Assessment of Damages,’’ 39 Journal of Law and

  19. Earthquake Damage Identification using High-Resolution Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    Earthquake Damage Identification using High-Resolution Satellite Images from the 2003 Northern & evaluation · High-resolution satellite imagery · Images from Boumerdes, Algeria · Semi-automated damage are most damaged? ­ Effects in less populated areas · Earthquake reconnaissance time wasted "looking

  20. Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adeyeye, Adedeji Ayoola

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Company. The well was producing a gas condensate reservoir and questions were raised about how much drop in flowing bottomhole pressure below dewpoint would be appropriate. Condensate damage in the hydraulic fracture was expected to be of significant...

  1. Dealing with Storm-Damaged Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirk, Melanie; Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Many homeowners need help caring for or removing damaged trees after a natural disaster. This publication explains what a certified arborist is and how to select one. It also cautions against burning debris downed by a storm....

  2. Dealing with Storm-Damaged Trees 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirk, Melanie; Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    ER-040 5-06 Dealing with Storm-Damaged Trees Melanie R. Kirk, Extension Program Specialist, Eric L. Taylor, Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, and C. Darwin Foster, Associate Department Head and Extension Program Leader for Forestry...

  3. Damage spreading and coupling in Markov chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Etienne P. Bernard; Cédric Chanal; Werner Krauth

    2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we relate the coupling of Markov chains, at the basis of perfect sampling methods, with damage spreading, which captures the chaotic nature of stochastic dynamics. For two-dimensional spin glasses and hard spheres we point out that the obstacle to the application of perfect-sampling schemes is posed by damage spreading rather than by the survey problem of the entire configuration space. We find dynamical damage-spreading transitions deeply inside the paramagnetic and liquid phases, and show that critical values of the transition temperatures and densities depend on the coupling scheme. We discuss our findings in the light of a classic proof that for arbitrary Monte Carlo algorithms damage spreading can be avoided through non-Markovian coupling schemes.

  4. Micropatterned cell arrays for detecting DNA damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mittal, Sukant

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous agents are capable of interacting with DNA and damaging it. Permanent changes in the DNA structure can be both mutagenic and cytotoxic; therefore, methods to measure the susceptibility of cells to mutations are ...

  5. Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation...

  6. Nondestructive Damage Detection in General Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dincal, Selcuk

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    is also vital for a nation’s economy. Substantial sums of money may be saved upon detecting structural deterioration in a timely manner. Nondestructive damage evaluation (NDE) offers effective and economically feasible solutions to perform such tasks...

  7. Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage to environmental...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage to environmental monitoring stations, canyons Stations supporting Santa...

  8. area damage detection: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    answer Cherkaev, Andrej 10 DAMAGE DETECTION IN STIFFENED AIRCRAFT PANELS VIA VIBRATION TESTING CiteSeer Summary: SUMMARY: The problem of damage detection in stiffened aircraft...

  9. Controlled ion implant damage profile for etching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jr., George W. (Tijeras, NM); Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Brannon, Paul J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for etching a material such as LiNbO.sub.3 by implanting ions having a plurality of different kinetic energies in an area to be etched, and then contacting the ion implanted area with an etchant. The various energies of the ions are selected to produce implant damage substantially uniformly throughout the entire depth of the zone to be etched, thus tailoring the vertical profile of the damaged zone.

  10. Structural damage detection using frequency response functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dincal, Selcuk

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    .........................90 5.1.2 Case 3: 1 st - 3 rd Story Braces Are Damaged .................................................92 5.1.2.1 All Four Modes Are Used for Damage Detection..........................95 5.1.2.2 The Last Two Modes... for Trial #2 with Hillclimbing #739 .......................................................................................................... 92 Figure 5.8 FRF for the 1 st Floor – 1 st - 3 rd Story Braces Are Broken SIMO – 12 DOF Symmetric...

  11. EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EE Regional Technology Roadmap Includes comparison against 6th Power Plan (Update cyclically Data Clearinghouse BPA/RTF NEEA/Regional Programs Group Update Regional EE Technology Roadmap Lighting

  12. DIDACTICAL HOLOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT INCLUDING (HOLOGRAPHIC TELEVISION)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

    DIDACTICAL HOLOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT INCLUDING HoloTV (HOLOGRAPHIC TELEVISION) José J. Lunazzi , DanielCampinasSPBrasil Abstract: Our Institute of Physics exposes since 1980 didactical exhibitions of holography in Brazil where

  13. Sessions include: Beginning Farmer and Rancher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Sessions include: ­ Beginning Farmer and Rancher ­ New Markets and Regulations ­ Food Safety ­ Good Bug, Bad Bug ID ­ Horticulture ­ Hydroponics ­ Livestock and Pastured Poultry ­ Mushrooms ­ Organic ­ Live animal exhibits ­ Saturday evening social, and ­ Local foods Florida Small Farms and Alternative

  14. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  15. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  16. Evader Interdiction and Collateral Damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutfraind, Alexander [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In network interdiction problems, evaders (hostile agents or data packets) are moving through a network towards their targets and we wish to choose sensor placement locations in order to intercept them before they reach their destinations. Sensor locations should be chosen economically, balancing security gains with cost, including the inconvenience sensors inflict upon innocent travelers. We give optimal sensor allocation algorithms for several classes of special graphs and hardness and optimal approximation results for general graphs, including for deterministic or Markov chain-based and oblivious or reactive evaders. In a similar-sounding but much different problem setting posed by [10] where the innocent travelers can also be reactive, we again give optimal algorithms for special cases and hardness and (essentially) optimal approximation results on general graphs.

  17. Power line damage, electrical outages, reduced in the {open_quotes}sleet belt{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Companies that depend on reliable supplies of electricity, as well as electrical utilities, need to defend against weather-related damage and power outages. Weather-related damage claims in the U.S. totaled $16 billion during the ten-year span from 1980 through 1989 and have already reached $48 billion in the first five years of this decade, evidence that climate change could be causing more severe storms. This makes technology that minimizes weather damage all the more welcome. Ice and snow build-up on high-voltage electric power lines in a moderate to high winds causes high-amplitude low-frequency mechanical vibrations, called galloping. When power lines react aero-elastically to these conditions, undamped vibration tears apart transmission towers and fittings or propels lines into each other, shorting out large circuits. Besides causing costly electric system outages and structural damage, this dramatic phenomenon steals power through higher electricity line losses that occur when other conductors have to carry more power to compensate for a tripped or damaged line. In a 1981 survey, 17 of 38 utilities reported that galloping was a moderate to severe problem, and 11 reported that they had a galloping event at least once a year. Fifty-seven percent of the incidents included flashover, and 60% included structural damage.

  18. Ultra-fast photoluminescence as a diagnostic for laser damage initiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurence, T A; Bude, J D; Shen, N; Miller, P E; Steele, W A; Guss, G; Adams, J J; Wong, L L; Feit, M D; Suratwala, T I

    2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Using high-sensitivity confocal time-resolved photoluminescence (CTP) techniques, we report an ultra-fast photoluminescence (40ps-5ns) from impurity-free surface flaws on fused silica, including polished, indented or fractured surfaces of fused silica, and from laser-heated evaporation pits. This fast photoluminescence (PL) is not associated with slower point defect PL in silica which has characteristic decay times longer than 5ns. Fast PL is excited by the single photon absorption of sub-band gap light, and is especially bright in fractures. Regions which exhibit fast PL are strongly absorptive well below the band gap, as evidenced by a propensity to damage with 3.5eV ns-scale laser pulses, making CTP a powerful non-destructive diagnostic for laser damage in silica. The use of CTP to provide insights into the nature of damage precursors and to help develop and evaluate new damage mitigation strategies will be presented.

  19. Radiation damage monitoring of the ATLAS pixel detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidel, Sally; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement has been made of the radiation damage incurred by the ATLAS Pixel Detector barrel silicon modules from the beginning of operations through the end of 2012. This translates to hadronic fluence received over the full period of operation at energies up to and including 8 TeV. The measurement is based on a per-module record of the silicon sensor leakage current. The results are presented as a function of integrated luminosity and compared to predictions by the Hamburg Model. This information can be used to predict limits on the lifetime of the Pixel Detector due to current, for various operating scenarios.

  20. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  1. Communication in automation, including networking and wireless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antsaklis, Panos

    Communication in automation, including networking and wireless Nicholas Kottenstette and Panos J and networking in automation is given. Digital communication fundamentals are reviewed and networked control are presented. 1 Introduction 1.1 Why communication is necessary in automated systems Automated systems use

  2. Electrochemical cell including ribbed electrode substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breault, R.D.; Goller, G.J.; Roethlein, R.J.; Sprecher, G.C.

    1981-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical cell including an electrolyte retaining matrix layer located between and in contact with cooperating anode and cathode electrodes is disclosed herein. Each of the electrodes is comprised of a ribbed (or grooved) substrate including a gas porous body as its main component and a catalyst layer located between the substrate and one side of the electrolyte retaining matrix layer. Each substrate body includes a ribbed section for receiving reactant gas and lengthwise side portions on opposite sides of the ribbed section. Each of the side portions includes a channel extending along its entire length from one surface thereof (e.g., its outer surface) to but stopping short of an opposite surface (e.g., its inner surface) so as to provide a web directly between the channel and the opposite surface. Each of the channels is filled with a gas impervious substance and each of the webs is impregnated with a gas impervious substance so as to provide a gas impervious seal along the entire length of each side portion of each substrate and between the opposite faces thereof (e.g., across the entire thickness thereof).

  3. Prices include compostable serviceware and linen tablecloths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    & BLACK BEAN ENCHILADAS Fresh corn tortillas stuffed with tender brown butter sautéed butternut squash, black beans and yellow on- ions, garnished with avocado and sour cream. $33 per person EDAMAME & CORN SQUASH & BLACK BEAN ENCHILADA FREE RANGE CHICK- EN SANDWICH PLATED ENTREES All plated entrees include

  4. Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namboodiri, Vinod

    Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Communication Devices Pavel Somavat1 consumption, questions are being asked about the energy contribution of computing equipment. Al- though studies have documented the share of energy consumption by this type of equipment over the years, research

  5. DAMAGE ESTIMATION USING MULTI-OBJECTIVE GENETIC ALGORITHMS Faisal Shabbir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    DAMAGE ESTIMATION USING MULTI-OBJECTIVE GENETIC ALGORITHMS Faisal Shabbir 1 , Piotr Omenzetter 2 1.omenzetter@abdn.ac.uk ABSTRACT It is common to estimate structural damage severity by updating a structural model against experimental responses at different damage states. When experimental results from the healthy and damaged

  6. RUPTURE BY DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN ROCKS David Amitrano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RUPTURE BY DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN ROCKS David Amitrano LIRIGM, Université J. Fourier, Grenoble of rocks is associated with microcracks nucleation and propagation, i.e. damage. The accumulation of damage as strength and modulus. The damage process can be studied both statically by direct observation of thin

  7. Ductile damage parameters identification for cold metal forming applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ductile damage parameters identification for cold metal forming applications Pierre damage mechanics is essential to predict failure during cold metal forming applications. Several damage models can be found in the literature. These damage models are coupled with the mechanical behavior so

  8. Damage from pulses with arbitrary temporal shapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trenholme, J.B.

    1994-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In fusion laser designs, the laser pulse has a complicated temporal shape which undergoes significant change as it passes through the laser. Our damage data, however, was taken with pulses whose temporal shapes were (more or less) Gaussian. We want to determine the damage propensity of a material exposed to a pulse of arbitrary temporal shape , given data taken with Gaussian pulses of different pulse widths. To do so, we must adopt a physical model of damage. This model will contain some number of parameters that depend on material properties, geometry, and so forth. We determine the parameters of the model appropriate to each material by fitting the model to the Gaussian data for that material. The resulting normalized model is then applied, using the appropriate pulse shape, to find the damage level for a specific material subjected to a specific pulse. The model we shall assume is related to diffusion, although (as we shall see) the experimental results do not fit any simple diffusion model. Initially, we will discuss simple diffusion models. We then examine some experimental data, and then develop a modified diffusive model from that data. That modified model is then used to predict damage levels in various portions of the NIF laser design.

  9. DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE FACILITIES INCLUDING NON-METALLIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mr. Herb Duvoisin

    2003-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    CyTerra has leveraged our unique, shallow buried plastic target detection technology developed under US Army contracts into deeper buried subsurface facilities and including nonmetallic pipe detection. This Final Report describes a portable, low-cost, real-time, and user-friendly subsurface plastic pipe detector (LULU- Low Cost Utility Location Unit) that relates to the goal of maintaining the integrity and reliability of the nation's natural gas transmission and distribution network by preventing third party damage, by detecting potential infringements. Except for frequency band and antenna size, the LULU unit is almost identical to those developed for the US Army. CyTerra designed, fabricated, and tested two frequency stepped GPR systems, spanning the frequencies of importance (200 to 1600 MHz), one low and one high frequency system. Data collection and testing was done at a variety of locations (selected for soil type variations) on both targets of opportunity and selected buried targets. We developed algorithms and signal processing techniques that provide for the automatic detection of the buried utility lines. The real time output produces a sound as the radar passes over the utility line alerting the operator to the presence of a buried object. Our unique, low noise/high performance RF hardware, combined with our field tested detection algorithms, represents an important advancement toward achieving the DOE potential infringement goal.

  10. Fretting Corrosion Damage of Total Hip Prosthesis: Friction Coefficient and Damage Rate Constant Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Fretting Corrosion Damage of Total Hip Prosthesis: Friction Coefficient and Damage Rate Constant Building, University Park 16802 PA USA 4 Chair Professor Center for Research Excellence in Corrosion hip prosthesis. Fretting corrosion tests were conducted with stainless steel and poly (methyl

  11. Creep damage mechanisms in composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutt, S.R.

    1994-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past year, research has focused on processing and characterization of intermetallic composites synthesized by plasma spray deposition. This versatile process allows rapid synthesis of a variety of different composite systems with potential applications for coatings, functionally gradient materials, rapid proto-typing and 3d printing, as well as near-net-shape processing of complex shapes. We have been pursuing an experimental program of research aimed at a fundamental understanding of the microstructural processes involved in the synthesis of intermetallic composites, including diffusion, heat transfer, grain boundary migration, and the dependence of these phenomena on deposition parameters. The work has been motivated by issues arising from composite materials manufacturing technologies. Recent progress is described in section B on the following topics: (1) Reactive atomization and deposition of intermetallic composites (Ni3Al); (2) Reactive synthesis of MoSi2-SiC composites; (3) Mechanical alloying of nanocrystalline alloys; (4) Tensile creep deformation of BMAS glass-ceramic composites.

  12. Method to reduce damage to backing plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perry, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Banks, Paul S. (Livermore, CA); Stuart, Brent C. (Fremont, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method for penetrating a workpiece using an ultra-short pulse laser beam without causing damage to subsequent surfaces facing the laser. Several embodiments are shown which place holes in fuel injectors without damaging the back surface of the sack in which the fuel is ejected. In one embodiment, pulses from an ultra short pulse laser remove about 10 nm to 1000 nm of material per pulse. In one embodiment, a plasma source is attached to the fuel injector and initiated by common methods such as microwave energy. In another embodiment of the invention, the sack void is filled with a solid. In one other embodiment, a high viscosity liquid is placed within the sack. In general, high-viscosity liquids preferably used in this invention should have a high damage threshold and have a diffusing property.

  13. Subterranean barriers including at least one weld

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Sloan, Paul A.; Richardson, John G.; Walsh, Stephanie; Kostelnik, Kevin M.

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A subterranean barrier and method for forming same are disclosed, the barrier including a plurality of casing strings wherein at least one casing string of the plurality of casing strings may be affixed to at least another adjacent casing string of the plurality of casing strings through at least one weld, at least one adhesive joint, or both. A method and system for nondestructively inspecting a subterranean barrier is disclosed. For instance, a radiographic signal may be emitted from within a casing string toward an adjacent casing string and the radiographic signal may be detected from within the adjacent casing string. A method of repairing a barrier including removing at least a portion of a casing string and welding a repair element within the casing string is disclosed. A method of selectively heating at least one casing string forming at least a portion of a subterranean barrier is disclosed.

  14. Power generation method including membrane separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

  15. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snitchler, Gregory L. (Shrewsbury, MA); Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Voccio, John P. (Somerville, MA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  16. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  17. To be submitted to Continuum Mechanics and Thermodynamics From the onset of damage to rupture: construction of responses with damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    To be submitted to Continuum Mechanics and Thermodynamics From the onset of damage to rupture: construction of responses with damage localization for a general class of gradient damage models Kim Pham solutions for the traction problem of an elastic damaging bar. This bar has a softening behavior which obeys

  18. Delay-active damage versus non-local enhancement for anisotropic damage dynamics computations with alternated loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Delay-active damage versus non-local enhancement for anisotropic damage dynamics computations, Laboratoire d'´etudes dynamiques F-91191 GIF-SUR-YVETTE Abstract Anisotropic damage thermodynamics framework of anisotropic visco-damage, by introducing a material strain rate effect in the cases of positive hydro- static

  19. Seawater can damage Saudi sandstone oil reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahab, A.S. (King Saud Univ., Riyadh (SA))

    1990-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have shown that formation damage from waterflooding of the Aramco and Alkhafji sandstones of Saudi Arabia will not occur if the salinity of the injected brines is higher than 20% NaCl. Because the connate water in these reservoirs has a high salt content of up to 231,000 ppm, Saudi oil fields are almost always susceptible to formation damage when flooded with seawater (about 38,500 ppm). The productive behavior of a reservoir can be affected by clay crystals developed within rock pores.

  20. Ubiquitylation, neddylation and the DNA damage response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Jessica S.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    major families: RING (really interesting new gene), HECT (homology to E6AP car- boxyl-terminus) and RBR (ring between ring) [102,103]. The transcription, respectively [88] trans-lesion synthesis (TLS) TLS is a DNA damage bypass mechanism tha It employs... depends on RNF4 binding to SUMO2/3 polymeric chains and subsequent RNF4 dimerization [183]. In addition to its role in promoting the turnover of proteins, RNF4 might also be important for the formation of hybrid SUMO/ubiquitin chains at DNA damage sites...

  1. Integrating natural resource damage assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120 of CERCLA also could subject DOE to liability for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. A Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process is used to determine whether natural resources have been injured and to calculate compensatory monetary damages to be used to restore the natural resources. In addition to restoration costs, damages may include costs of conducting the damage assessment and compensation for interim losses of natural resource services that occur before resource restoration is complete. Natural resource damages represent a potentially significant source of additional monetary claims under CERCLA, but are not well known or understood by many DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. This report describes the requirements and procedures of NRDA in order to make DOE managers aware of what the process is designed to do. It also explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, showing how the technical and cost analysis concepts of NRDA can be borrowed at strategic points in the CERCLA process to improve decisionmaking and more quickly restore natural resource services at the lowest total cost to the public.

  2. Integrating Natural Resource Damage Assessment and environmental restoration activities at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental restoration activities are currently under way at many US Department of Energy (DOE) sites under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). DOE is the CERCLA lead response agency for these activities. Section 120 of CERCLA also could subject DOE to liability for natural resource damages resulting from hazardous substance releases at its sites. A Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) process is used to determine whether natural resources have been injured and to calculate compensatory monetary damages to be used to restore the natural resources. In addition to restoration costs, damages may include costs of conducting the damage assessment and compensation for interim losses of natural resource services that occur before resource restoration is complete. Natural resource damages represent a potentially significant source of additional monetary claims under CERCLA, but are not well known or understood by many DOE staff and contractors involved in environmental restoration activities. This report describes the requirements and procedures of NRDA in order to make DOE managers aware of what the process is designed to do. It also explains how to integrate the NRDA and CERCLA Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study processes, showing how the technical and cost analysis concepts of NRDA can be borrowed at strategic points in the CERCLA process to improve decisionmaking and more quickly restore natural resource services at the lowest total cost to the public.

  3. Multiverse rate equation including bubble collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael P. Salem

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The volume fractions of vacua in an eternally inflating multiverse are described by a coarse-grain rate equation, which accounts for volume expansion and vacuum transitions via bubble formation. We generalize the rate equation to account for bubble collisions, including the possibility of classical transitions. Classical transitions can modify the details of the hierarchical structure among the volume fractions, with potential implications for the staggering and Boltzmann-brain issues. Whether or not our vacuum is likely to have been established by a classical transition depends on the detailed relationships among transition rates in the landscape.

  4. The Status of Radiation Damage Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Scheele, Randall D.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; Sell, Richard L.; Legore, Virginia L.; Schaef, Herbert T.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Buchmiller, William C.

    2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have been on-going for about two years to determine the effects that radiation damage have on the physical and chemical properties of candidate titanate ceramics for the immobilization of plutonium. We summarize the results of these experiments in this document.

  5. Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ze'ev, Reches

    Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks: Part 2. Propagation of a hydraulic fracture Seth fracture and fault mechanics, fluid flow in fractured reservoirs, and geome- chanics in nonconventional the development of complex hydraulic fractures (HFs) that are commonly ob- served in the field and in experiments

  6. Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reza, Rostami Ravari

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of this research are a step forward in helping to improve the management of gas condensate reservoirs by understanding the mechanics of liquid build-up. It also provides methodology for quantifying the condensate damage that impairs linear flow of gas...

  7. Radiation damage by light- and heavy-ion bombardment of single-crystal LiNbO?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hsu-Cheng [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Zhang, Lihua [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Malladi, Girish [SUNY Polytechnic Inst., Albany, NY (United States); Dadap, Jerry I. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Manandhar, Sandeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kisslinger, Kim [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Vemuri, Rama Sesha R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bakhru, Hassaram [SUNY Polytechnic Inst., Albany, NY (United States); Osgood, Jr., Richard M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, a battery of analytical methods including in situ RBS/C, confocal micro-Raman, TEM/STEM, EDS, AFM, and optical microscopy were used to provide a comparative investigation of light- and heavy-ion radiation damage in single-crystal LiNbO?. High (~MeV) and low (~100s keV) ion energies, corresponding to different stopping power mechanisms, were used and their associated damage events were observed. In addition, sequential irradiation of both ion species was also performed and their cumulative depth-dependent damage was determined. It was found that the contribution from electronic stopping by high-energy heavy ions gave rise to a lower critical fluence for damage formation than for the case of low-energy irradiation. Such energy-dependent critical fluence of heavy-ion irradiation is two to three orders of magnitude smaller than that for the case of light-ion damage. In addition, materials amorphization and collision cascades were seen for heavy-ion irradiation, while for light ion, crystallinity remained at the highest fluence used in the experiment. The irradiation-induced damage is characterized by the formation of defect clusters, elastic strain, surface deformation, as well as change in elemental composition. In particular, the presence of nanometric-scale damage pockets results in increased RBS/C backscattered signal and the appearance of normally forbidden Raman phonon modes. The location of the highest density of damage is in good agreement with SRIM calculations. (author)

  8. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeSanto, Leonard (Dunkirk, MD); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  9. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeSanto, Leonard; Veligdan, James T.

    2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  10. Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

  11. Health damages from air pollution in China Kira Matus a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Health damages from air pollution in China Kira Matus a,1 , Kyung-Min Nam b,1, *, Noelle E. Selin c to its environment, including air pollution, the availability of clean water, and desertification. Issues in negative health outcomes, such as contaminated water and high levels of air pollution, also incur real

  12. Market-based emissions regulation when damages vary across sources: What are the gains from differentiation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowlie, Meredith

    For much of the air pollution currently regulated under U.S. emissions trading programs, health pernicious air quality problems in the United States involve non-uniformly mixed pollutants. Examples include policies can accommodate non-uniformly mixed pollution by using emissions penalties that vary with damages

  13. Author's personal copy Statistical pattern analysis of ultrasonic signals for fatigue damage detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    by laboratory experimentation in real time on a computer-controlled fatigue damage testing apparatus which is equipped with a variety of measuring instruments including an optical travelling microscope of life and expensive equipment. Therefore, it is necessary to develop capabilities for online detection

  14. Engine lubrication circuit including two pumps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lane, William H.

    2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A lubrication pump coupled to the engine is sized such that the it can supply the engine with a predetermined flow volume as soon as the engine reaches a peak torque engine speed. In engines that operate predominately at speeds above the peak torque engine speed, the lubrication pump is often producing lubrication fluid in excess of the predetermined flow volume that is bypassed back to a lubrication fluid source. This arguably results in wasted power. In order to more efficiently lubricate an engine, a lubrication circuit includes a lubrication pump and a variable delivery pump. The lubrication pump is operably coupled to the engine, and the variable delivery pump is in communication with a pump output controller that is operable to vary a lubrication fluid output from the variable delivery pump as a function of at least one of engine speed and lubrication flow volume or system pressure. Thus, the lubrication pump can be sized to produce the predetermined flow volume at a speed range at which the engine predominately operates while the variable delivery pump can supplement lubrication fluid delivery from the lubrication pump at engine speeds below the predominant engine speed range.

  15. Models of Procyon A including seismic constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Eggenberger; F. Carrier; F. Bouchy

    2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed models of Procyon A based on new asteroseismic measurements by Eggenberger et al (2004) have been computed using the Geneva evolution code including shellular rotation and atomic diffusion. By combining all non-asteroseismic observables now available for Procyon A with these seismological data, we find that the observed mean large spacing of 55.5 +- 0.5 uHz favours a mass of 1.497 M_sol for Procyon A. We also determine the following global parameters of Procyon A: an age of t=1.72 +- 0.30 Gyr, an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.290 +- 0.010, a nearly solar initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0234 +- 0.0015 and a mixing-length parameter alpha=1.75 +- 0.40. Moreover, we show that the effects of rotation on the inner structure of the star may be revealed by asteroseismic observations if frequencies can be determined with a high precision. Existing seismological data of Procyon A are unfortunately not accurate enough to really test these differences in the input physics of our models.

  16. Complex Variables and Elliptic Equations Anatolii asirovich gol'dberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ... reproduction, re-distribution, re-selling, loan or sub-licensing, systematic supply or ... actions, claims, proceedings, demand or costs or damages whatsoever or ...... [GI071 The growth of an entire function representable by a gap power series.

  17. German National Licence 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    systematic reproduction, re-distribution, re-selling, loan or sub-licensing, systematic supply or ... actions, claims, proceedings, demand or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever caused ..... functions represented by gap series, B. Ya. Levin ...

  18. PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [Tong, Jinjun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dery, Stephen

    , Canada b National Meteorological Centre, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing, China c Department of Human Resources, China Meteorological Administration, Beijing, China Online publication date: 23 loss, actions, claims, proceedings, demand or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever caused arising

  19. Modeling of damage in unidirectional ceramic matrix composites and multi-scale experimental validation on third generation SiC/SiC minicomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Modeling of damage in unidirectional ceramic matrix composites and multi-scale experimental to macroscopic tensile tests, the evolution of microscopic damage mechanisms - in the form of matrix cracks and computed tomography tensile tests. A complete model, including both matrix cracking and fiber breaking

  20. The Role of Nickel in Radiation Damage of Ferritic Alloys.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osetskiy, Yury N [ORNL; Anento, Napoleon [Universitat Politechnica de Catalunia; Serra, Anna [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya; Terentyev, Dmitry [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK-CEN

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the modern theory damage evolution under neutron irradiation depends on the fraction of self interstitial atoms (SIAs) produced in the form of one-dimensionally (1-D) glissile clusters. These clusters, having a low interaction cross-section with other defects, sink mainly on grain boundaries and dislocations creating the so-called production bias. It is known empirically that addition of certain alloying elements affect many radiation effects, including swelling, however the mechanisms are unknown in many cases. In this paper we report the results of an extensive multi-technique atomistic level modeling of SIA clusters mobility in bcc Fe-Ni alloys with Ni content from 0.8 to 10 at.%. We have found that Ni interacts strongly with periphery of clusters affecting their mobility. The total effect is defined by all Ni atoms interacting with the cluster at the same time and can be significant even in low-Ni alloys. Thus 1nm (37SIAs) cluster is practically immobile at T<500K in the Fe-0.8at.% Ni alloy. Increasing cluster size and Ni content enhance cluster immobilization. This effect should have quite broad consequences in swelling rate, matrix damage accumulation, radiation induced hardening, etc. and the results obtained help in better understanding and prediction of radiation effects in Fe-Ni ferritic alloys.

  1. Viscoelastic{Viscoplastic Damage Model for Asphalt Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Michael A.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a continuum model for asphalt concrete incorporating non- linear viscoelasticity, viscoplasticity, mechanically-induced damage and moisture- induced damage. The Schapery single-integral viscoelastic model describes the nonlinear...

  2. Evaluation of moisture damage within asphalt concrete mixes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Brij D.

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    as bond energy in order to predict moisture damage. Mixtures with the two types of bitumen and each aggregate with and without hydrated lime were evaluated. The hydrated lime substantially improved the resistance of the mixture to moisture damage....

  3. Damage analysis in asphalt concrete mixtures based on parameter relationships 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Injun

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Asphalt pavements experience damage due to traffic loading under various environmental conditions. Damage can be caused by viscopl microcracks, fracture due to fatigue cracking, or fracture due to thermal cracking. Asphalt ...

  4. Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Barlow, D.; Mariam, F. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL’s pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

  5. Carbon Fiber Damage in Particle Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dehning, B; Kroyer, T; Meyer, M; Sapinski, M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in beam wire scanners. The heating of the fiber due to energy loss of the particles travelling through is simulated with Geant4. The heating induced by the beam electromagnetic field is estimated with ANSYS. The heat transfer and sublimation processes are modelled. Due to the model nonlinearity, a numerical approach based on discretization of the wire movement is used to solve it for particular beams. Radiation damage to the fiber is estimated with SRIM. The model is tested with available SPS and LEP data and a dedicated damage test on the SPS beam is performed followed by a post-mortem analysis of the wire remnants. Predictions for the LHC beams are made.

  6. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  7. The Marginal Damage Costs of Different Greenhouse Gases: An Application of FUND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waldhoff, Stephanie T.; Anthoff, David; Rose, Steven K.; Tol, Richard

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use FUND 3.8 to estimate the social cost of four greenhouse gases: carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and sulphur hexafluoride emissions. The damage potential for each gas—the ratio of the social cost of the non-carbon dioxide greenhouse gas to the social cost of carbon dioxide—is also estimated. The damage potentials are compared to several metrics, focusing in particular on the global warming potentials, which are frequently used to measure the trade-off between gases in the form of carbon dioxide equivalents. We find that damage potentials could be significantly higher than global warming potentials. This finding implies that previous papers have underestimated the relative importance of reducing non-carbon dioxide greenhouse gas emissions from an economic damage perspective. We show results for a range of sensitivity analyses: carbon dioxide fertilization on agriculture productivity, terrestrial feedbacks, climate sensitivity, discounting, equity weighting, and socioeconomic and emissions scenarios. The sensitivity of the results to carbon dioxide fertilization is a primary focus as it is an important element of climate change that has not been considered in much of the previous literature. We estimate that carbon dioxide fertilization has a large positive impact that reduces the social cost of carbon dioxide with a much smaller effect on the other greenhouse gases. As a result, our estimates of the damage potentials of methane and nitrous oxide are much higher compared to estimates that ignore carbon dioxide fertilization. As a result, our base estimates of the damage potential for methane and nitrous oxide that include carbon dioxide fertilization are twice their respective global warming potentials. Our base estimate of the damage potential of sulphur hexafluoride is similar to the one previous estimate, both almost three times the global warming potential.

  8. Metabolites of arsenic and increased DNA damage of p53 gene in arsenic plant workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen Weihua, E-mail: Dongsijiehua@sina.com [Department of Occupational Health, Yunnan Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 158, Dongsi Street, Kunming, Yunnan, 650022 (China); Public Health College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No. 13, Hangkong Road, Wuhan City, Hubei, 430030 (China); Wen Jinghua [Guizhou College of Finance and Economics, No. 276, Chongguan Road, Guiyang, Guizhou, 550004 (China); Lu Lin [Department of Occupational Health, Yunnan Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 158, Dongsi Street, Kunming, Yunnan, 650022 (China); Liu Hua [The First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical College, No. 295 Xichang Road, Kunming, Yunnan, 650032 (China); Yang Jun; Cheng Huirong [Department of Occupational Health, Yunnan Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 158, Dongsi Street, Kunming, Yunnan, 650022 (China); Che Wangjun [The First Division of Public Health, Kunming Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 4, Ziyun Road, Xishan District, Kunming, Yunnan 650228 (China); Li Liang [Honghe Zhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 1, Guannan Road, Mengzi City, Yunnan, 661100 (China); Zhang Guanbei [Yunnan Institute for Drug Abuse, Kunming, 650028 (China)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have shown that monomethylarsonous acid is more cytotoxic and genotoxic than arsenate and arsenite, which may attribute to the increased levels of reactive oxygen species. In this study, we used hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry to determine three arsenic species in urine of workers who had been working in arsenic plants,and calculated primary and secondary methylation indexes. The damages of exon 5, 6, 8 of p53 gene were determined by the method developed by Sikorsky, et al. Results show that the concentrations of each urinary arsenic species,and damage indexes of exon 5 and 8 of p53 gene in the exposed population were significantly higher, but SMI was significantly lower than in the control group. The closely positive correlation between the damage index of exon 5 and PMI,MMA, DMA were found, but there was closely negative correlation between the damage index of exon 5 and SMI. Those findings suggested that DNA damage of exon 5 and 8 of p53 gene existed in the population occupationally exposed to arsenic. For exon 5, the important factors may include the model of arsenic metabolic transformation, the concentrations of MMA and DMA, and the MMA may be of great importance. - Research Highlights: > In our study, the mean SMI for workers came from arsenic plants is 4.06, so they may be in danger. > There are more MMA, there are more damage of exon 5 of p53 gene. > MMA and damage of exon 5 of p53 gene may be useful biomarkers to assess adverse health effects caused by arsenic.

  9. Structural damage identification in wind turbine blades using piezoelectric active sensing with ultrasonic validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claytor, Thomas N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ammerman, Curtt N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyu Hae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Atterbury, Marie K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives a brief overview of a new project at LANL in structural damage identification for wind turbines. This project makes use of modeling capabilities and sensing technology to understand realistic blade loading on large turbine blades, with the goal of developing the technology needed to automatically detect early damage. Several structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques using piezoelectric active materials are being investigated for the development of wireless, low power sensors that interrogate sections of the wind turbine blade using Lamb wave propagation data, frequency response functions (FRFs), and time-series analysis methods. The modeling and sensor research will be compared with extensive experimental testing, including wind tunnel experiments, load and fatigue tests, and ultrasonic scans - on small- to mid-scale turbine blades. Furthermore, this study will investigate the effect of local damage on the global response of the blade by monitoring low-frequency response changes.

  10. Saga of Glass Damage in Urban Environments Continues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem, Ahsan

    Saga of Glass Damage in Urban Environments Continues: Consequences of Aerodynamics and Debris Laboratory University of Notre Dame The Saga of Glass Damage in Urban Environments Continues: Consequences east of the city of Houston. Initial reconnaissance suggested that the observed glass/cladding damage

  11. Assessing Hail and Freeze Damage to Field Corn and Sorghum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livingston, Stephen

    1995-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    When a crop has been damaged by hail, it is important to be able to gauge the extent of the damage, the potential for recovery of the damaged crop, and the actions that might be necessary to maximize the recovery process. This publication tells how...

  12. Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface in Forested Landscapes Andrew A- tems. In 1998, a severe ice storm damaged over ten million hectares of forest across northern New York investigated the spatial arrangement of forest damage at the terrestrial-aquatic interface, an ecological edge

  13. Tensile damage response from discrete element virtual testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Tensile damage response from discrete element virtual testing A. DELAPLACE LMT-Cachan, ENS Cachan conditions on brittle materials, damage can generally not be re- duced to a simple scalar. Microcrack into account the damage anisotropy in phenomenological models is a possible option, but the identification

  14. Probabilistic Damage Detection Based on Large Area Electronics Sensing Sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Probabilistic Damage Detection Based on Large Area Electronics Sensing Sheets Yao Yao and Branko-stage damage detection and characterization requires continuous sensing over large areas of structure are not sensitive to damage. In this research, a probabilistic approach based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations

  15. Photogrammetry Assisted Rapid Measurement of Earthquake-Induced Building Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamat, Vineet R.

    Photogrammetry Assisted Rapid Measurement of Earthquake-Induced Building Damage Fei Dai, PhD Hong for rapidly measuring structural damage induced in tall buildings by seismic events such as earthquakes) sustained at key floors along the edge of a damaged building. The measured drift can then be used to compute

  16. DAMAGE AND ROCKVOLATILE MIXTURE EFFECTS ON IMPACT CRATER FORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    DAMAGE AND ROCK­VOLATILE MIXTURE EFFECTS ON IMPACT CRATER FORMATION JOHN D. O'KEEFE, SARAH T models for material damage, dilatancy, and inhomogeneous materials (mixtures). We found that a strength degradation (damage) model was necessary to produce faulting in homogeneous materials. Both normal and thrust

  17. DAMAGE LOCALIZATION IN PLATES USING DLVs Dionisio Bernal1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernal, Dionisio

    DAMAGE LOCALIZATION IN PLATES USING DLVs Dionisio Bernal1 and Ariel Levy2 Department of Civil Associate Professor, 2 Graduate Student ABSTRACT The performance of a technique to localize damage based on the computation of load vectors that create stress fields that bypass the damaged region is investigated

  18. A BAYESIAN PROBABILISTIC APPROACH TO DAMAGE DETECTION FOR CIVIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    damage or other environmental e ects. Results based on the eld vibration test of a bridge indicate on the vibration parameters can be di erentiated from other environmental e ects or potential structural damage. vA BAYESIAN PROBABILISTIC APPROACH TO DAMAGE DETECTION FOR CIVIL STRUCTURES a dissertation submitted

  19. An analysis of the kinetics of thermal damage and movement of damage front in laser irradiated egg white 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azeemi, Aamer Amjed

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the major applications of laser surgery involve the photocoagulation of diseased tissue, with minimal or no damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. There is a growing need for a model for the quantification of thermal damage. The models...

  20. An analysis of the kinetics of thermal damage and movement of damage front in laser irradiated egg white

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azeemi, Aamer Amjed

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the major applications of laser surgery involve the photocoagulation of diseased tissue, with minimal or no damage to the surrounding healthy tissue. There is a growing need for a model for the quantification of thermal damage. The models...

  1. Damaged Spent Nuclear Fuel at U.S. DOE Facilities Experience and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett W. Carlsen; Eric Woolstenhulme; Roger McCormack

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From a handling perspective, any spent nuclear fuel (SNF) that has lost its original technical and functional design capabilities with regard to handling and confinement can be considered as damaged. Some SNF was damaged as a result of experimental activities and destructive examinations; incidents during packaging, handling, and transportation; or degradation that has occurred during storage. Some SNF was mechanically destroyed to protect proprietary SNF designs. Examples of damage to the SNF include failed cladding, failed fuel meat, sectioned test specimens, partially reprocessed SNFs, over-heated elements, dismantled assemblies, and assemblies with lifting fixtures removed. In spite of the challenges involved with handling and storage of damaged SNF, the SNF has been safely handled and stored for many years at DOE storage facilities. This report summarizes a variety of challenges encountered at DOE facilities during interim storage and handling operations along with strategies and solutions that are planned or were implemented to ameliorate those challenges. A discussion of proposed paths forward for moving damaged and nondamaged SNF from interim storage to final disposition in the geologic repository is also presented.

  2. DNA repair decline during mouse spermiogenesis results in the accumulation of heritable DNA damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Francesco

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    male germ cells handle DNA damage? Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.strand breaks and DNA base damage at different cellularrelationship to genetic damage, Mutat. Res. 216 (1989) 221-

  3. Abdominal damage control surgery and reconstruction: world society of emergency surgery position paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godat, Laura; Kobayashi, Leslie; Costantini, Todd; Coimbra, Raul

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as: Godat et al. : Abdominal damage control surgery andAD, Feliciano DV: Trauma damage control. In Trauma. 6thpatient which indicate damage control and predict outcome.

  4. Mechanical Damage from Cavitation in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Accelerated Thrombolysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Hope

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanical Damage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iiiMethod for Estimation of Cavitation Damage for an EmbeddedMethod for Estimation of Cavitation Damage for an Embedded

  5. Damage, Fear, and Transformation: International Currency Systems and Postwar Japan's Currency Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sangbaik

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    will suffer a serious damage. ” 291 Above, we have surveyedparticularly for alleviating the damage incurred by the yenDamage, Fear, and Transformation: International Currency

  6. Damage Identification of a Composite Beam Using Finite Element Model Updating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moaveni, Babak; He, Xianfei; Conte, Joel P; De Callafon, Raymond A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shevitz, D. W. (1996), Damage identification in structuresreview of vibration-based damage identification methods, TheM. , & Samman, M. M. (1991), Damage detection from changes

  7. DNA Repair Decline During Mouse Spermiogenesis Results in the Accumulation of Heritable DNA Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Francesco

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    male germ cells handle DNA damage? Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.strand breaks and DNA base damage at different cellularrelationship to genetic damage, Mutat. Res. 216 (1989) 221-

  8. Clean Assembly Practices to Prevent Contamination and Damage to Optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pryatel, J; Gourdin, W H

    2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A key lesson learned from the earliest optics installed in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) was that the traditional approach for maintaining cleanliness, such as the use of cleanrooms and associated garments and protocols, is inadequate. Assembly activities often negate the benefits provided by cleanrooms, and in fact generate contamination with high damage potential. As a result, NIF introduced ''clean assembly protocols'' and related practices to supplement the traditional clean room protocols. These new protocols included ''clean-as-you-go'' activities and regular bright light inspections. Introduction of these new protocols has greatly reduced the particle contamination found on more recently installed optics. In this paper we will describe the contamination mechanisms we have observed and the details of the clean assembly protocols we have successfully introduced to mitigate them.

  9. Surface state reconstruction in ion-damaged SmB?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wakeham, N.; Wang, Y. Q.; Fisk, Z.; Ronning, F.; Thompson, J. D.

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used ion-irradiation to damage the (001) surfaces of SmB? single crystals to varying depths, and have measured the resistivity as a function of temperature for each depth of damage. We observe a reduction in the residual resistivity with increasing depth of damage. Our data are consistent with a model in which the surface state is not destroyed by the ion-irradiation, but instead the damaged layer is poorly conducting and the initial surface state is reconstructed below the damage. This behavior is consistent with a surface state that is topologically protected.

  10. Damage of MEMS thermal actuators heated by laser irradiation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Klody, Kelly Anne; Sackos, John T.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical actuation of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is advantageous for applications for which electrical isolation is desired. Thirty-two polycrystalline silicon opto-thermal actuators, optically-powered MEMS thermal actuators, were designed, fabricated, and tested. The design of the opto-thermal actuators consists of a target for laser illumination suspended between angled legs that expand when heated, providing the displacement and force output. While the amount of displacement observed for the opto-thermal actuators was fairly uniform for the actuators, the amount of damage resulting from the laser heating ranged from essentially no damage to significant amounts of damage on the target. The likelihood of damage depended on the target design with two of the four target designs being more susceptible to damage. Failure analysis of damaged targets revealed the extent and depth of the damage.

  11. Damage of MEMS thermal actuators heated by laser irradiation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walraven, Jeremy Allen; Klody, Kelly Anne; Sackos, John T.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical actuation of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) is advantageous for applications for which electrical isolation is desired. Thirty-two polycrystalline silicon opto-thermal actuators, optically-powered MEMS thermal actuators, were designed, fabricated, and tested. The design of the opto-thermal actuators consists of a target for laser illumination suspended between angled legs that expand when heated, providing the displacement and force output. While the amount of displacement observed for the opto-thermal actuators was fairly uniform for the actuators, the amount of damage resulting from the laser heating ranged from essentially no damage to significant amounts of damage on the target. The likelihood of damage depended on the target design with two of the four target designs being more susceptible to damage. Failure analysis of damaged targets revealed the extent and depth of the damage.

  12. Review of the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station Probabilistic Risk Assessment: internal events and core damage frequency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilberg, D.; Shiu, K.; Hanan, N.; Anavim, E.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the Probabilistic Risk Assessment of the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station was conducted with the broad objective of evaluating its risks in relation to those identified in the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400). The scope of the review was limited to the ''front end'' part, i.e., to the evaluation of the frequencies of states in which core damage may occur. Furthermore, the review considered only internally generated accidents, consistent with the scope of the PRA. The review included an assessment of the assumptions and methods used in the Shoreham study. It also encompassed a reevaluation of the main results within the scope and general methodological framework of the Shoreham PRA, including both qualitative and quantitative analyses of accident initiators, data bases, and accident sequences which result in initiation of core damage. Specific comparisons are given between the Shoreham study, the results of the present review, and the WASH-1400 BWR, for the core damage frequency. The effect of modeling uncertainties was considered by a limited sensitivity study so as to show how the results would change if other assumptions were made. This review provides an independently assessed point value estimate of core damage frequency and describes the major contributors, by frontline systems and by accident sequences. 17 figs., 81 tabs.

  13. Surface Damage and Treatment by Impact of a Low Temperature Nitrogen Jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laribou, Hicham; Fressengeas, Claude; Entemeyer, Denis; Jeanclaude, Veronique [LPMM - Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux, Universite Paul Verlaine-Metz / CNRS, Ile du Saulcy, Metz, 57045 (France); Tazibt, Abdel [CRITT TJF and U, Laboratoire Jet Fluide Tres Hautes Pressions, Bar-le-Duc, 55000 (France)

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen jets under high pressure and low temperature have been introduced recently. The process consists in projecting onto a surface a low temperature jet obtained from releasing the liquid nitrogen stored in a high pressure tank (e.g. 3000 bars) through a nozzle. It can be used in a range of industrial applications, including surface treatment or material removal through cutting, drilling, striping and cleaning. The process does not generate waste other than the removed matter, and it only releases neutral gas into the atmosphere. This work is aimed at understanding the mechanisms of the interaction between the jet and the material surface. Depending on the impacted material, the thermo-mechanical shock and blast effect induced by the jet can activate a wide range of damage mechanisms, including cleavage, crack nucleation and spalling, as well as void expansion and localized ductile failure. The test parameters (standoff distance, dwell time, operating pressure) play a role in selecting the dominant damage mechanism, but combinations of these various modes are usually present. Surface treatment through phase transformation or grain fragmentation in a layer below the surface can also be obtained by adequate tuning of the process parameters. In the current study, work is undertaken to map the damage mechanisms in metallic materials as well as the influence of the test parameters on damage, along with measurements of the thermo-mechanical conditions (impact force, temperature) in the impacted area.

  14. Survey of four damage models for concrete.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leelavanichkul, Seubpong (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Brannon, Rebecca Moss (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT)

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four conventional damage plasticity models for concrete, the Karagozian and Case model (K&C), the Riedel-Hiermaier-Thoma model (RHT), the Brannon-Fossum model (BF1), and the Continuous Surface Cap Model (CSCM) are compared. The K&C and RHT models have been used in commercial finite element programs many years, whereas the BF1 and CSCM models are relatively new. All four models are essentially isotropic plasticity models for which 'plasticity' is regarded as any form of inelasticity. All of the models support nonlinear elasticity, but with different formulations. All four models employ three shear strength surfaces. The 'yield surface' bounds an evolving set of elastically obtainable stress states. The 'limit surface' bounds stress states that can be reached by any means (elastic or plastic). To model softening, it is recognized that some stress states might be reached once, but, because of irreversible damage, might not be achievable again. In other words, softening is the process of collapse of the limit surface, ultimately down to a final 'residual surface' for fully failed material. The four models being compared differ in their softening evolution equations, as well as in their equations used to degrade the elastic stiffness. For all four models, the strength surfaces are cast in stress space. For all four models, it is recognized that scale effects are important for softening, but the models differ significantly in their approaches. The K&C documentation, for example, mentions that a particular material parameter affecting the damage evolution rate must be set by the user according to the mesh size to preserve energy to failure. Similarly, the BF1 model presumes that all material parameters are set to values appropriate to the scale of the element, and automated assignment of scale-appropriate values is available only through an enhanced implementation of BF1 (called BFS) that regards scale effects to be coupled to statistical variability of material properties. The RHT model appears to similarly support optional uncertainty and automated settings for scale-dependent material parameters. The K&C, RHT, and CSCM models support rate dependence by allowing the strength to be a function of strain rate, whereas the BF1 model uses Duvaut-Lion viscoplasticity theory to give a smoother prediction of transient effects. During softening, all four models require a certain amount of strain to develop before allowing significant damage accumulation. For the K&C, RHT, and CSCM models, the strain-to-failure is tied to fracture energy release, whereas a similar effect is achieved indirectly in the BF1 model by a time-based criterion that is tied to crack propagation speed.

  15. Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, D. Wayne (Santa Fe, NM); Bennett, Bryan L. (Los Alamos, NM); Cockroft, Nigel J. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal.

  16. Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooke, D.W.; Bennett, B.L.; Cockroft, N.J.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal. 5 figs.

  17. Radiation damage by neutrons to plastic scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, G.; Dannemann, A.; Holm, U.; Wick, K. [Univ. Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik] [Univ. Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polystyrene based scintillator SCSN38, wavelength shifter Y7 with polymethylmethacrylate matrix and pure PM-MA light guide GS218 have been irradiated in the mixed radiation field of a pool reactor. About 77% of the dose released in SCSN38 was caused by the {gamma}-field, 23% by fast neutrons. The total dose ranged from 2 to 105 kGy. The dose measurements were made using alanine dosimeters. Transmission and fluorescence of the samples have been measured before and several times after irradiation. The radiation damage results shown o differences to irradiations in pure {gamma}-fields with corresponding released doses.

  18. LNG cascading damage study. Volume I, fracture testing report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petti, Jason P.; Kalan, Robert J.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) Cascading Damage Study, a series of structural tests were conducted to investigate the thermal induced fracture of steel plate structures. The thermal stresses were achieved by applying liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) onto sections of each steel plate. In addition to inducing large thermal stresses, the lowering of the steel temperature simultaneously reduced the fracture toughness. Liquid nitrogen was used as a surrogate for LNG due to safety concerns and since the temperature of LN{sub 2} is similar (-190 C) to LNG (-161 C). The use of LN{sub 2} ensured that the tests could achieve cryogenic temperatures in the range an actual vessel would encounter during a LNG spill. There were four phases to this test series. Phase I was the initial exploratory stage, which was used to develop the testing process. In the Phase II series of tests, larger plates were used and tested until fracture. The plate sizes ranged from 4 ft square pieces to 6 ft square sections with thicknesses from 1/4 inches to 3/4 inches. This phase investigated the cooling rates on larger plates and the effect of different notch geometries (stress concentrations used to initiate brittle fracture). Phase II was divided into two sections, Phase II-A and Phase II-B. Phase II-A used standard A36 steel, while Phase II-B used marine grade steels. In Phase III, the test structures were significantly larger, in the range of 12 ft by 12 ft by 3 ft high. These structures were designed with more complex geometries to include features similar to those on LNG vessels. The final test phase, Phase IV, investigated differences in the heat transfer (cooling rates) between LNG and LN{sub 2}. All of the tests conducted in this study are used in subsequent parts of the LNG Cascading Damage Study, specifically the computational analyses.

  19. Damage from the impacts of small asteroids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hills, J.G.; Goda, M.P.

    1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The fragmentation of a small asteroid in the atmosphere greatly increases its aerodynamic drag and rate of energy dissipation. The differential atmospheric pressure across it disperses its fragments at a velocity that increases with atmospheric density and impact velocity and decreases with asteroid density. Extending our previous work, we use a spherical atmosphere and a fitted curve to its density profile to find the damage done by an asteroid entering the atmosphere at various zenith angles. In previous work we estimated the blast damage by scaling from data on nuclear explosions in the atmosphere during the 1940s, 1950s and early 1960s. This underestimated the blast from asteroid impacts because nuclear fireballs radiate away a larger fraction of their energy than do meteors, so less of their energy goes into the blast wave. We have redone the calculations to allow for this effect. We have found the area of destruction around the impact point in which the over pressure in the blast wave exceeds 4 pounds/inch{sup 2} = 2.8 X 10{sup 5} dynes/cm{sup 3}, which is enough to knock over trees and destroy buildings. About every 100 years an impactor should blast an area of 300 km{sup 2} or more somewhere on the land area of Earth. The optical flux from asteroids 60 meters or more in diameter is enough to ignite pine forests. However, the blast from an impacting asteroid goes beyond the radius within which the fire starts. It tends to blow out the fire, so it is likely that the impact will char the forest (as at Tunguska), but it will not produce a sustained fire. Because of the atmosphere, asteroids less than about 200 m in diameter are not effective in producing craters and earthquakes. They are also not effective in producing water waves and tsunami in ocean impacts. Tsunami is probably the most devastating type of damage for asteroids that are between 200 meters and 1 km in diameter.

  20. Investigation of Stinson Beach Park storm damage and evaluation of alternative shore protection measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecker, R.M.; Whelan, G.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation was made of storm damage during the winter of 1982-83 to the National Park Service's Stinson Beach Park. The investigation included an assessment of the storm damage, evaluation of physical processes contributing to the damage, subsequent beach recovery, and the feasibility of implementing shoreline protection measure to reduce future risk. During the winter of 1982-83, the beach was almost completely denuded of sand, wave overwash damaged the foredune, vegetation on the foredune was destroyed, and backshore flooding occurred. Two structures and a parking lot were endangered as the shoreline receded. Subsequent recovery of the park beach was rapid. By January 1982 sand had moved back onshore and a beach berm was beginning to reform. The foredune and dune vegetation received the only permanent damage. Four shoreline protection alternatives were evaluated. These include no action, dune development/enhancement, construction of a rock riprap revetment, and offshore installation of artificial seaweed. The first costs (estimated costs, excluding maintenance) range from about $90,000 to $475,000. The least-cost protection measure is riprap revetment, which protects the two structures and parking lot endangered during the 1982-83 winter storms. Construction of a foredune along the entire park beach is the highest cost protection measure. If no shore protection action measures are implemented, wave overwash of the foredune can be expected to occur on the average of every 2 to 3 years, and beach degradation, similar to that during the 1982-83 winter, can be expected to occur on the average of every 10 to 12 years. 12 references, 19 figures, 18 tables.

  1. Damage detection in initially nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bornn, Luke [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is to detect structural anomalies before they reach a critical level. Because of the potential life-safety and economic benefits, SHM has been widely studied over the past decade. In recent years there has been an effort to provide solid mathematical and physical underpinnings for these methods; however, most focus on systems that behave linearly in their undamaged state - a condition that often does not hold in complex 'real world' systems and systems for which monitoring begins mid-lifecycle. In this work, we highlight the inadequacy of linear-based methodology in handling initially nonlinear systems. We then show how the recently developed autoregressive support vector machine (AR-SVM) approach to time series modeling can be used for detecting damage in a system that exhibits initially nonlinear response. This process is applied to data acquired from a structure with induced nonlinearity tested in a laboratory environment.

  2. Tertiary nitrogen heterocyclic material to reduce moisture-induced damage in asphalt-aggregate mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Plancher, Henry (Laramie, WY); Petersen, Joseph C. (Laramie, WY)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Asphalt-aggregate roads crack when subjected to freezing and thawing cycles. Herein, the useful life of asphalts are substantially improved by a minor amount of a moisture damage inhibiting agent selected from compounds having a pyridine moiety, including acid salts of such compounds. A shale oil fraction may serve as the source of the improving agent and may simply be blended with conventional petroleum asphalts.

  3. Thermal Decomposition of Radiation-Damaged Polystyrene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abrefah, John; Klinger, George S.

    2000-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation-damaged polystyrene (given the identification name of 'polycube') was fabricated by mixing high-density polystyrene material ("Dylene Fines # 100") with plutonium and uranium oxides. The polycubes were used in the 1960s for criticality studies during processing of spent nuclear fuel. The polycubes have since been stored for almost 40 years at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) after failure of two processes to reclaim the plutonium and uranium oxides from the polystyrene matrix. Thermal decomposition products from this highly cross-linked polystyrene matrix were characterized using Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectroscopy (GC/MS) system coupled to a horizontal furnace. The decomposition studies were performed in air and helium atmospheres at about 773 K. The volatile and semi-volatile organic products for the radiation-damaged polystyrene were different compared to virgin polystyrene. The differences were in the number of organic species generated and their concentrations. In the inert (i.e., helium) atmosphere, the major volatile organic products identified (in order of decreasing concentrations) were styrene, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, nathphalene, propane, .alpha.-methylbenzene, indene and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene. But in air, the major volatile organic species identified changed slightly. Concentrations of the organic species in the inert atmosphere were significantly higher than those for the air atmosphere processing. Overall, 38 volatile organic species were identified in the inert atmosphere compared to 49 species in air. Twenty of the 38 species in the inert conditions were also products in the air atmosphere. Twenty-two oxidized organic products were identified during thermal processing in air.

  4. assessing tubal damage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    State University, Deborah French, Applied Sciences Associates, Bruce Wright 5 Natural Resource Damage Assessment for the Deepwater BP Oil Spill Environmental Sciences and...

  5. Demonstration of damage with a wireless sensor network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanner, Neal A.; Farrar, C. R. (Charles R.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A damage detection system was developed with commercially available wireless sensors. Statistical process control methods were used to monitor the correlation of vibration data from two accelerometers mounted across a joint. Changes in correlation were used to detect damage to the joint. All data processing was done remotely on a microprocessor integrated with the wireless sensors to allow for the transmission of a simple damaged or undamaged status for each monitored joint. Additionally, a portable demonstration structure was developed to showcase the capabilities of the damage detection system to monitor joint failure in real time.

  6. Poroelastic damage rheology: Dilation, compaction, and failure of rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    Poroelastic damage rheology: Dilation, compaction, and failure of rocks Yariv Hamiel Institute December 2004; Published 26 January 2005. Hamiel, Y., V. Lyakhovsky, and A. Agnon (2005), Poroelastic

  7. Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Allocation, Section 934 Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934 LES comments in response to Notice of Inquiry on...

  8. Thermomechanics of damage and fatigue by a phase field model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovambattista Amendola; Mauro Fabrizio

    2014-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In the paper we present an isothermal model for describing damage and fatigue by the use of the Ginzburg-Landau (G-L) equation. Fatigue produces progressive damage, which is related with a variation of the internal structure of the material. The G-L equation studies the evolution of the order parameter, which describes the constitutive arrangement of the system and, in this framework, the evolution of damage. The thermodynamic coherence of the model is proved. In the last part of the work, we extend the results of the paper to a non-isothermal system, where fatigue contains thermal effects, which increase the damage of materials.

  9. IN VITRO MUTAGENIC AND DNA AND CHROMOSOMAL DAMAGE ACTIVITY BY...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IN VITRO MUTAGENIC AND DNA AND CHROMOSOMAL DAMAGE ACTIVITY BY SURFACTANT DISPERSION OR SOLVENT EXTRACT OF A REFERENCE DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICULATE MATERIAL IN VITRO MUTAGENIC AND DNA...

  10. Damage Detection and Characterization in Smart Material Structures \\Lambda y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­maps'' as done in the thermal based tomography techniques of [BK1, BK2, BKW] wherein the damaged physical domain

  11. attack damage due: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cell damage extent due to irradiation with nanosecond laser pulses under cell culturing medium and dry environment Engineering Websites Summary: Autnoma de Mxico; Av....

  12. alkaloid damages dna: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    damage may not only reduce the number of amplifiable template molecules, but may also lead to the generation of erroneous sequence information. A qualitative and quantitative...

  13. assessing dna damage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    damage may not only reduce the number of amplifiable template molecules, but may also lead to the generation of erroneous sequence information. A qualitative and quantitative...

  14. affects dna damage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    damage may not only reduce the number of amplifiable template molecules, but may also lead to the generation of erroneous sequence information. A qualitative and quantitative...

  15. alternative dna damage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    damage may not only reduce the number of amplifiable template molecules, but may also lead to the generation of erroneous sequence information. A qualitative and quantitative...

  16. acari eriophyidae damage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    resistant to particle beams. Their strength deteriorates with time due to radiation damage and low-cycle thermal fatigue. In case of high intensity beams this process can...

  17. aeroengines surface damage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    composition is compatible with a collisional sputtering model. At lower of radiation damage at oxide surfaces, induced by inert gas ions with energies typical of sputter...

  18. Inhibition of HAS2 induction enhances the radiosensitivity of cancer cells via persistent DNA damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Yan Nan; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Park, Eun-Ran; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Hwang, Sang-Gu [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)] [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Chun-Ho [Laboratory of Tissue Engineering, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)] [Laboratory of Tissue Engineering, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kee-Ho, E-mail: khlee@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)] [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •HAS2 may be a promising target for the radiosensitization of human cancer. •HAS2 is elevated (up to ?10-fold) in irradiated radioresistant and -sensitive cancer cells. •HAS2 knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to radiation. •HAS2 knockdown potentiates irradiation-induced DNA damage and apoptotic death. •Thus, the irradiation-induced up-regulation of HAS2 contributes to the radioresistance of cancer cells. -- Abstract: Hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), a synthetic enzyme for hyaluronan, regulates various aspects of cancer progression, including migration, invasion and angiogenesis. However, the possible association of HAS2 with the response of cancer cells to anticancer radiotherapy, has not yet been elucidated. Here, we show that HAS2 knockdown potentiates irradiation-induced DNA damage and apoptosis in cancer cells. Upon exposure to radiation, all of the tested human cancer cell lines exhibited marked (up to 10-fold) up-regulation of HAS2 within 24 h. Inhibition of HAS2 induction significantly reduced the survival of irradiated radioresistant and -sensitive cells. Interestingly, HAS2 depletion rendered the cells to sustain irradiation-induced DNA damage, thereby leading to an increase of apoptotic death. These findings indicate that HAS2 knockdown sensitizes cancer cells to radiation via persistent DNA damage, further suggesting that the irradiation-induced up-regulation of HAS2 contributes to the radioresistance of cancer cells. Thus, HAS2 could potentially be targeted for therapeutic interventions aimed at radiosensitizing cancer cells.

  19. Radiation damage by light- and heavy-ion bombardment of single-crystal LiNbO?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Hsu-Cheng; Zhang, Lihua; Malladi, Girish; Dadap, Jerry I.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Kisslinger, Kim; Vemuri, Rama Sesha R.; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Bakhru, Hassaram; Osgood, Jr., Richard M.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, a battery of analytical methods including in situ RBS/C, confocal micro-Raman, TEM/STEM, EDS, AFM, and optical microscopy were used to provide a comparative investigation of light- and heavy-ion radiation damage in single-crystal LiNbO?. High (~MeV) and low (~100s keV) ion energies, corresponding to different stopping power mechanisms, were used and their associated damage events were observed. In addition, sequential irradiation of both ion species was also performed and their cumulative depth-dependent damage was determined. It was found that the contribution from electronic stopping by high-energy heavy ions gave rise to a lower critical fluence for damage formationmore »than for the case of low-energy irradiation. Such energy-dependent critical fluence of heavy-ion irradiation is two to three orders of magnitude smaller than that for the case of light-ion damage. In addition, materials amorphization and collision cascades were seen for heavy-ion irradiation, while for light ion, crystallinity remained at the highest fluence used in the experiment. The irradiation-induced damage is characterized by the formation of defect clusters, elastic strain, surface deformation, as well as change in elemental composition. In particular, the presence of nanometric-scale damage pockets results in increased RBS/C backscattered signal and the appearance of normally forbidden Raman phonon modes. The location of the highest density of damage is in good agreement with SRIM calculations. (author)« less

  20. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between damaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur because of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A scoping study was conducted to learn what parameters are important for core damage propagation, and to obtain initial estimates of core melt mass for addressing recriticality and steam explosion events. The study included investigating the effects of the plate contact area, the convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity upon fuel swelling, and the initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects on damage propagation. The results provide useful insights into how various uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  1. Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos A consortium led by the University of Michigan that includes LANL as...

  2. Damage detection in mechanical structures using extreme value statistic.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worden, K.; Allen, D. W. (David W.); Sohn, H. (Hoon); Farrar, C. R. (Charles R.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first and most important objective of any damage identification algorithms is to ascertain with confidence if damage is present or not. Many methods have been proposed for damage detection based on ideas of novelty detection founded in pattern recognition and multivariate statistics. The philosophy of novelty detection is simple. Features are first extracted from a baseline system to be monitored, and subsequent data are then compared to see if the new features are outliers, which significantly depart from the rest of population. In damage diagnosis problems, the assumption is that outliers are generated from a damaged condition of the monitored system. This damage classification necessitates the establishment of a decision boundary. Choosing this threshold value is often based on the assumption that the parent distribution of data is Gaussian in nature. While the problem of novelty detection focuses attention on the outlier or extreme values of the data i.e. those points in the tails of the distribution, the threshold selection using the normality assumption weighs the central population of data. Therefore, this normality assumption might impose potentially misleading behavior on damage classification, and is likely to lead the damage diagnosis astray. In this paper, extreme value statistics is integrated with the novelty detection to specifically model the tails of the distribution of interest. Finally, the proposed technique is demonstrated on simulated numerical data and time series data measured from an eight degree-of-freedom spring-mass system.

  3. Real Time Computational Algorithms for Eddy Current Based Damage Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Real Time Computational Algorithms for Eddy Current Based Damage Detection H. T. Banks y, Michele L such damages by application of an eddy current based technique coupled with reduced order modeling. We begin by developing a model for a speci#12;c eddy current method in which we make some simplifying assumptions

  4. Ris-R-1334(EN) Identification of Damage to Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risř-R-1334(EN) Identification of Damage to Wind Turbine Blades by Modal Parameter Estimation April 2002 #12;Risř-R-1334(EN) Identification of Damage to Wind Turbine Blades by Modal Parameter condition monitoring of wind turbine blades (Phase I)". The goal of Phase I is to make a pre

  5. Permeability of WIPP Salt During Damage Evolution and Healing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BODNER,SOL R.; CHAN,KWAI S.; MUNSON,DARRELL E.

    1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of damage in the form of microcracks can increase the permeability of salt. In this paper, an analytical formulation of the permeability of damaged rock salt is presented for both initially intact and porous conditions. The analysis shows that permeability is related to the connected (i.e., gas accessible) volumetric strain and porosity according to two different power-laws, which may be summed to give the overall behavior of a porous salt with damage. This relationship was incorporated into a constitutive model, known as the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture (MDCF) model, which has been formulated to describe the inelastic flow behavior of rock salt due to coupled creep, damage, and healing. The extended model was used to calculate the permeability of rock salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site under conditions where damage evolved with stress over a time period. Permeability changes resulting from both damage development under deviatoric stresses and damage healing under hydrostatic pressures were considered. The calculated results were compared against experimental data from the literature, which indicated that permeability in damaged intact WIPP salt depends on the magnitude of the gas accessible volumetric strain and not on the total volumetric strain. Consequently, the permeability of WIPP salt is significantly affected by the kinetics of crack closure, but shows little dependence on the kinetics of crack removal by sintering.

  6. Genetic Algorithm Based Damage Control For Shipboard Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amba, Tushar

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The work presented in this thesis was concerned with the implementation of a damage control method for U.S. Navy shipboard power systems (SPS). In recent years, the Navy has been seeking an automated damage control and power system management...

  7. Total dose radiation response of plasma-damaged NMOS devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yue, J.; Lo, E.; Flanery, M. [Honeywell Solid-State Electronic Center, Plymouth, MN (United States)] [Honeywell Solid-State Electronic Center, Plymouth, MN (United States)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma-damaged NMOS devices were subjected to the X-ray total dose irradiation. Unlike the traditional hot-carrier or Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) stress where the hole trap generation is less pronounced, this study shows enhanced hole trap and interface trap generation on plasma-damaged devices after total dose irradiation.

  8. AFM CHARACTERIZATION OF LASER INDUCED DAMAGE ON CDZNTE CRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawkins, S; Lucile Teague, L; Martine Duff, M; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Semi-conducting CdZnTe (or CZT) crystals can be used in a variety of detector-type applications. CZT shows great promise for use as a gamma radiation spectrometer. However, its performance is adversely affected by point defects, structural and compositional heterogeneities within the crystals, such as twinning, pipes, grain boundaries (polycrystallinity), secondary phases and in some cases, damage caused by external forces. One example is damage that occurs during characterization of the surface by a laser during Raman spectroscopy. Even minimal laser power can cause Te enriched areas on the surface to appear. The Raman spectra resulting from measurements at moderate intensity laser power show large increases in peak intensity that is attributed to Te. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the extent of damage to the CZT crystal surface following exposure to the Raman laser. AFM data reveal localized surface damage in the areas exposed to the Raman laser beam. The degree of surface damage to the crystal is dependent on the laser power, with the most observable damage occurring at high laser power. Moreover, intensity increases in the Te peaks of the Raman spectra are observed even at low laser power with little to no visible damage observed by AFM. AFM results also suggest that exposure to the same amount of laser power yields different amounts of surface damage depending on whether the exposed surface is the Te terminating face or the Cd terminating face of CZT.

  9. A Roadmap to Success: Hiring, Retaining, and Including People...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A Roadmap to Success: Hiring, Retaining, and Including People with Disabilities A Roadmap to Success: Hiring, Retaining, and Including People with Disabilities December 5, 2014...

  10. [Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and include the consumer exist. Some examples include advanced two-way metering (AMI), demand response (DR), and distributed energy resources (DER). A common misconception is...

  11. Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts Document describes...

  12. Investigations into the Nature of Halogen Bonding Including Symmetry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into the Nature of Halogen Bonding Including Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory Analyses. Investigations into the Nature of Halogen Bonding Including Symmetry Adapted...

  13. Mesoscale polycrystal calculations of damage in spallation in metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonks, Davis L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bingert, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Livescu, Veronica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luo, Shengnian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bronkhorst, C A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to produce a damage model for spallation in metals informed by the polycrystalline grain structure at the mesoscale. Earlier damage models addressed the continuwn macroscale in which these effects were averaged out. In this work we focus on cross sections from recovered samples examined with EBSD (electron backscattered diffraction), which reveal crystal grain orientations and voids. We seek to understand the loading histories of specific sample regions by meshing up the crystal grain structure of these regions and simulating the stress, strain, and damage histories in our hydro code, FLAG. The stresses and strain histories are the fundamental drivers of damage and must be calculated. The calculated final damage structures are compared with those from the recovered samples to validate the simulations.

  14. Sidewall damage in plasma etching of Si/SiGe heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, R.; Klein, L. J.; Friesen, Mark G.; Eriksson, M. A.; Wendt, A. E. [Materials Science Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); IBM TJ Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma etching is a critical tool in the fabrication of Si/SiGe heterostructure quantum devices, but it also presents challenges, including damage to etched feature sidewalls that affects device performance. Chemical and structural changes in device feature sidewalls associated with plasma-surface interactions are considered damage, as they affect band structure and electrical conduction in the active region of the device. Here the authors report the results of experiments designed to better understand the mechanisms of plasma-induced sidewall damage in modulation-doped Si/SiGe heterostructures containing a two-dimensional electron gas. Damage to straight wires fabricated in the heterostructure using plasma etching was characterized both by measuring the width of the nonconductive ''sidewall depletion'' region at the device sidewall and by measuring the noise level factor {gamma}{sub H}/N determined from spectra of the low frequency noise. Observed increases in sidewall depletion width with increasing etch depth are tentatively attributed to the increase in total number of sidewall defects with increased plasma exposure time. Excess negative charge trapped on the feature sidewall could be another contributing factor. Defects at the bottom of etched features appear to contribute minimally. The noise level shows a minimum at an ion bombardment energy of {approx}100 eV, while the sidewall depletion width is independent of bias voltage, within experimental uncertainty. A proposed explanation of the noise trend involves two competing effects as ion energy increases: the increase in damage caused by each bombarding ion and the reduction in total number of incident ions due to shorter etch times.

  15. How Damage Diversification Can Reduce Systemic Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burkholz, Rebekka; Schweitzer, Frank

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the problem of risk diversification in complex networks. Nodes represent e.g. financial actors, whereas weighted links represent e.g. financial obligations (credits/debts). Each node has a risk to fail because of losses resulting from defaulting neighbors, which may lead to large failure cascades. Classical risk diversification strategies usually neglect network effects and therefore suggest that risk can be reduced if possible losses (i.e., exposures) are split among many neighbors (exposure diversification, ED). But from a complex networks perspective diversification implies higher connectivity of the system as a whole which can also lead to increasing failure risk of a node. To cope with this, we propose a different strategy (damage diversification, DD), i.e. the diversification of losses that are imposed on neighboring nodes as opposed to losses incurred by the node itself. Here, we quantify the potential of DD to reduce systemic risk in comparison to ED. For this, we develop a branching proce...

  16. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendel, Mark W [ORNL] [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL] [ORNL; Sangrey, Robert L [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL] [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL] [ORNL; Shea, Thomas J [ORNL] [ORNL; Hasegawa, Shoichi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Kogawa, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Naoe, Dr. Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)] [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Farny, Dr. Caleb H. [Boston University] [Boston University; Kaminsky, Andrew L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  17. Real-Time damage localization by means of MEMS sensors and use of wireless data transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    Real-Time damage localization by means of MEMS sensors and use of wireless data transmission such as water delivery networks are damaged, it is critical to pinpoint the location of the damage, to assess the extent of the damage, and to mitigate the damage in real-time. We propose a wireless sensor network

  18. The Influence of Grain Boundary Type upon Damage Evolution at Grain Boundary Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Bergquist, Alejandro G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brandl, Christian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Escobedo, Juan P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trujillo, Carl P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cerreta, Ellen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gray III, George T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In a prior work, it was found that grain boundary structure strongly influences damage evolution at grain boundaries in copper samples subjected to either shock compression or incipient spall. Here, several grain boundaries with different grain boundary structures, including a {Sigma}3 (10-1) boundary, are interrogated via conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) to investigate the effects of atomic-scale structural differences on grain boundary strength and mobility. Boundaries are studied both before and after shock compression at a peak shock stress of 10 GPa. Results of the TEM and HRTEM work are used in conjunction with MD modeling to propose a model for shock-induced damage evolution at grain boundary interfaces that is dependent upon coincidence.

  19. Radiation Damage in Nanostructured Metallic Films 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Kaiyuan

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    with favorable microstructures and to investigate their response to radiation. The goals of this thesis are to study the radiation responses of several nanostructured metallic thin film systems, including Ag/Ni multilayers, nanotwinned Ag and nanocrystalline Fe...

  20. Radiation Damage in Nanostructured Metallic Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Kaiyuan

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    with favorable microstructures and to investigate their response to radiation. The goals of this thesis are to study the radiation responses of several nanostructured metallic thin film systems, including Ag/Ni multilayers, nanotwinned Ag and nanocrystalline Fe...

  1. Calibration of damage parameters is an important issue for the use of damage laws, and particularly for industrial manufacturing processes. This paper deals with an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Abstract Calibration of damage parameters is an important issue for the use of damage laws Lemaitre damage parameters using tensile tests. An adapted objective function is built, and Efficient, ductile damage, global measurement. 1 Introduction An actual industrial issue is the study of material

  2. Characterization of Damage in Sandstones along the Mojave Section of the San Andreas Fault: Implications for the Shallow Extent of Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    Characterization of Damage in Sandstones along the Mojave Section of the San Andreas Fault: Implications for the Shallow Extent of Damage Generation ORY DOR,1,5 JUDITH S. CHESTER,2 YEHUDA BEN-ZION,1 shallow generation of rock damage during an earthquake rupture, we measure the degree of fracture damage

  3. Underground infrastructure damage for a Chicago scenario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dey, Thomas N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bos, Rabdall J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating effects due to an urban IND (improvised nuclear device) on underground structures and underground utilities is a challenging task. Nuclear effects tests performed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the era of nuclear weapons testing provides much information on how underground military structures respond. Transferring this knowledge to answer questions about the urban civilian environment is needed to help plan responses to IND scenarios. Explosions just above the ground surface can only couple a small fraction of the blast energy into an underground shock. The various forms of nuclear radiation have limited penetration into the ground. While the shock transmitted into the ground carries only a small fraction of the blast energy, peak stresses are generally higher and peak ground displacement is lower than in the air blast. While underground military structures are often designed to resist stresses substantially higher than due to the overlying rocks and soils (overburden), civilian structures such as subways and tunnels would generally only need to resist overburden conditions with a suitable safety factor. Just as we expect the buildings themselves to channel and shield air blast above ground, basements and other underground openings as well as changes of geology will channel and shield the underground shock wave. While a weaker shock is expected in an urban environment, small displacements on very close-by faults, and more likely, soils being displaced past building foundations where utility lines enter could readily damaged or disable these services. Immediately near an explosion, the blast can 'liquefy' a saturated soil creating a quicksand-like condition for a period of time. We extrapolate the nuclear effects experience to a Chicago-based scenario. We consider the TARP (Tunnel and Reservoir Project) and subway system and the underground lifeline (electric, gas, water, etc) system and provide guidance for planning this scenario.

  4. WILD PIGS: BIOLOGY, DAMAGE, CONTROL TECHINQUES AND MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, John; Brisbin, I. Lehr

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of problems with wild pigs (Sus scrofa) is nothing new to the Western Hemisphere. Damage by these introduced animals was reported as far back as 1505 by the early Spanish colonies in the Caribbean, where wild pigs were killing the colonists cattle. Droves of these animals also ravaged cultivated crops of maize and sugarcane on islands in the West Indies during this same time period. These wild pigs reportedly were very aggressive and often attacked Spanish soldiers hunting rebellious Indians or escaped slaves on these islands, especially when these animals were cornered. The documentation of such impacts by introduced populations of this species in the United States has subsequently increased in recent years, and continued up through the present (Towne and Wentworth. 1950, Wood and Barrett 1979, Mayer and Brisbin 1991, Dickson et al. 2001). In spite of a fairly constant history in this country since the early 1900s, wild pigs have had a dramatic recent increase in both distribution and numbers in the United States. Between 1989 and 2009, the number of states reporting the presence of introduced wild pigs went from 19 up to as many as 44. This increase, in part natural, but largely manmade, has caused an increased workload and cost for land and resource managers in areas where these new populations are found. This is the direct result of the damage that these introduced animals do. The cost of both these impacts and control efforts has been estimated to exceed a billion dollars annually (Pimentel 2007). The complexity of this problem has been further complicated by the widespread appeal and economic potential of these animals as a big game species (Tisdell 1982, Degner 1989). Wild pigs are a controversial problem that is not going away and will likely only get worse with time. Not only do they cause damage, but wild pigs are also survivors. They reproduce at a rate faster than any other mammal of comparable size, native or introduced; they can eat just about anything; and, they can live just about anywhere. On top of that, wild pigs are both very difficult to control and, with the possible exception of island ecosystems, almost impossible to eradicate (Dickson et al. 2001, Sweeney et al. 2003). The solution to the wild pig problem has not been readily apparent. The ultimate answer as to how to control these animals has not been found to date. In many ways, wild pigs are America's most successful large invasive species. All of which means that wild pigs are a veritable nightmare for land and resource managers trying to keep the numbers of these animals and the damage that they do under control. Since the more that one knows about an invasive species, the easier it is to deal with and hopefully control. For wild pigs then, it is better to 'know thy enemy' than to not, especially if one expects to be able to successfully control them. In an effort to better 'know thy enemy,' a two-day symposium was held in Augusta, Georgia, on April 21-22, 2004. This symposium was organized and sponsored by U.S.D.A. Forest Service-Savannah River (USFS-SR), U. S. Department of Energy-Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), the South Carolina Chapter of the Soil & Water Conservation Society, and the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The goal of this symposium was to assemble researchers and land managers to first address various aspects of the biology and damage of wild pigs, and then review the control techniques and management of this invasive species. The result would then be a collected synopsis of what is known about wild pigs in the United States. Although the focus of the symposium was primarily directed toward federal agencies, presenters also included professionals from academic institutions, and private-sector control contractors and land managers. Most of the organizations associated with implementing this symposium were affiliated with the Savannah River Site (SRS), a 803 km{sup 2} federal nuclear facility, located in western South Carolina along the Savannah

  5. Mathematical analysis of fully coupled approach to creep damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Shutov; A. -M. Saendig

    2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove the existence and uniqueness of solution to a classical creep damage problem. We formulate a sufficient condition for the problem to have a unique smooth solution, locally in time. This condition is stated in terms of smoothness of given data, such as solid geometry, boundary conditions, applied loads, and initial conditions. Counterexamples with an arbitrary small lifetime of a structure are also given, showing the mechanical interpretation of imposed smoothness conditions. The proposed theory gives a rigorous framework for a strain localization analysis. The influence of the damage gradient on the strain localization process is characterized within this framework and a measure of the damage localization is proposed.

  6. Repairs for damaged bolt holes in continuous fiber reinforced plastics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copps, Kevin Daniel

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    repair method for damaged bolt holes in such composites. Bolt holes in three types of graphite-epoxy were purposely damaged and then repaired. Each was tested to characterize its static and fatigue behavior. The tests used a special fixture to simulate... composite joints . Bearing-bypass ratio can change the failure mode of bolted composite joints 7 Drilling defects in graphite-epoxy coupons 12 26 The exit side of a IM7/8551-7A 18 ply tape coupon showing the damage due to drilling 27 9 Resin filled...

  7. Damage to HDPE geomembrane from interface shear over gravelly compacted clay liner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thielmann, Stuart

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. S. (2011). “Geomembrane damage due to static and cyclic66 Figure 4.10. GM damage results after shearing for Testsshear displacement on shear strength and GM damage for test

  8. RhoJ Regulates Melanoma Chemoresistance by Suppressing Pathways that Sense DNA Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Hsiang; Aruri, Jayavani; Kapadia, Rubina; Mehr, Hootan; White, Michael A.; Ganesan, Anand K.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pathways that Sense DNA Damage $watermark-text Hsiang Ho 1 ,16. Roos WP, Kaina B. DNA damage-induced apoptosis: FromDNA lesions to the DNA damage response and apoptosis. Cancer

  9. ENVIRONMENTAL DAMAGE AS NEGATIVE EXTERNALITY: UNCERTAINTY, MORAL COMPLEXITY AND THE LIMITS OF THE MARKET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    21 ENVIRONMENTAL DAMAGE AS NEGATIVE EXTERNALITY: UNCERTAINTY, MORAL COMPLEXITY AND THE LIMITS environmental damage with a sociological approach, I show how the process of externalities definition inclusive and democratic public deliberation on environmental damage and its reparation. Key Words

  10. Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressure Responses during Excavation of the TSX Tunnel in Granitic Rock at URL, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, Jonny

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressureof excavation-induced damage, permeability changes, andrange of approaches to model damage and permeability changes

  11. acid analysis including: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nairn, John A. 12 A bottom-up analysis of including aviation within theEU's Emissions Trading Scheme Geosciences Websites Summary: A bottom-up analysis of including aviation...

  12. analysis including quantification: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ausloos 2004-12-31 29 A bottom-up analysis of including aviation within theEU's Emissions Trading Scheme Geosciences Websites Summary: A bottom-up analysis of including aviation...

  13. Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    v3102014 Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include Kit Cost PURCHASED by INVESTIGATOR/1/2013 Page 1 of 5 #12;Biomarkers Core Lab Price List Does NOT Include Kit Cost PURCHASED by INVESTIGATOR

  14. Example Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work to Include Services...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work to Include Services as Part of an ESPC Investment-Grade Audit Example Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work to Include Services as Part of an ESPC...

  15. Neutron and gamma irradiation damage to organic materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Gregory Von, II; Bernstein, Robert

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses open literature reports which investigate the damage effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on polymers and/or epoxies - damage refers to reduced physical chemical, and electrical properties. Based on the literature, correlations are made for an SNL developed epoxy (Epon 828-1031/DDS) with an expected total fast-neutron fluence of {approx}10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} and a {gamma} dosage of {approx}500 Gy received over {approx}30 years at < 200 C. In short, there are no gamma and neutron irradiation concerns for Epon 828-1031/DDS. To enhance the fidelity of our hypotheses, in regards to radiation damage, we propose future work consisting of simultaneous thermal/irradiation (neutron and gamma) experiments that will help elucidate any damage concerns at these specified environmental conditions.

  16. Salvaging Timber: What should I do with my damaged timber?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ER-041 5-06 Salvaging Timber: What should I do with my damaged timber? Eric L. Taylor, Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist?Forestry, and C. Darwin Foster, Associate Department Head and Extension Program Leader for Forestry, The Texas...

  17. Effects of ballistic damage on the dynamics of composite driveshafts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayers, Thomas Ray

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research program is to study the dynamics of a composite driveshaft before and after ballistic damage is incurred. Driveshafts are tested under static and dynamic loads to obtain material, mechanical, and vibrational...

  18. Hail Ice Damage of Stringer-Stiffened Curved Composite Panels /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le, Jacqueline Linh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Damage. Composite Structures 2003;62:213–21. Ice Drop.How to make clear ice. 28 February 2011. Victoria, BC,2011/02/how-to- make-clear-ice-that-actually-works/ Graham,

  19. Atomistic simulations of radiation damage in amorphous metal alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumer, Richard E. (Richard Edward)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While numerous fundamental studies have characterized the atomic-level radiation response mechanisms in irradiated crystalline alloys, comparatively little is known regarding the mechanisms of radiation damage in amorphous ...

  20. Multiscale modeling of damage in multidirectional composite laminates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Chandra Veer

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    provides reasonable predictions for multidirectional laminatesin which intralaminar cracks may form in multiple orientations. Nevertheless, theprediction of damage accumulation and its effect on structural performance is a verydifficult problem due...

  1. Visual Indication of Mechanical Damage Using Core-Shell Microcapsules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sottos, Nancy R.

    -7 Changes in pH have been used to detect compression in polymer brushes,8 and microcapsules containing a p have been incorporated into filled hollow fibers to enhance damage visibility in the structure

  2. DAMAGE TOLERANCE ISSUES PECULIAR TO SUPERSONIC CIVIL TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    investigations on creep, fatigue and creep-fatigue crack growth behaviour of the 2650-T6 aluminium alloy to investigate the damage tolerance of the new aluminium alloy succeeding as 2218A. LMPM has to examinate

  3. Spatially localized generation of nucleotide sequence-specific DNA damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boxer, Steven G.

    Spatially localized generation of nucleotide sequence-specific DNA damage Dennis H. Oh* , Brett A- neously manipulated at the nucleotide level and in three dimen- sions. This approach for targeting

  4. Lengthscale effects in the damage and failure of composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, Jeffrey Thomas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this work is to investigate and identify lengthscale effects associated with damage in composite materials and their structures, and to determine how these lengthscales vary across levels of ...

  5. Drag amplification and fatigue damage in vortex-induced vibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jhingran, Vikas Gopal

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatigue damage and drag force amplification due to Vortex-Induced-Vibrations (VIV) continue to cause significant problems in the design of structures which operate in ocean current environments. These problems are magnified ...

  6. air pollution damage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Health Damages from Air Pollution in China MIT - DSpace Summary: In China, elevated levels of urban air...

  7. Existence and Regularity for Dynamic Viscoelastic Adhesive Contact with Damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuttler, Kenneth L. [Department of Mathematics, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States)], E-mail: klkuttler@math.byu.edu; Shillor, Meir [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Oakland University, Rochester, MI 48309 (United States)], E-mail: shillor@oakland.edu; Fernandez, Jose R. [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada, Facultade de Matematicas, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)], E-mail: jramon@usc.es

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A model for the dynamic process of frictionless adhesive contact between a viscoelastic body and a reactive foundation, which takes into account the damage of the material resulting from tension or compression, is presented. Contact is described by the normal compliance condition. Material damage is modelled by the damage field, which measures the pointwise fractional decrease in the load-carrying capacity of the material, and its evolution is described by a differential inclusion. The model allows for different damage rates caused by tension or compression. The adhesion is modelled by the bonding field, which measures the fraction of active bonds on the contact surface. The existence of the unique weak solution is established using the theory of set-valued pseudomonotone operators introduced by Kuttler and Shillor (1999). Additional regularity of the solution is obtained when the problem data is more regular and satisfies appropriate compatibility conditions.

  8. Multiscale modeling of damage in multidirectional composite laminates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Chandra Veer

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    the strengths of micro-damage mechanics (MDM) and continuum damage mechanics (CDM) in predicting the sti - ness degradation due to these cracks. The micromechanics is performed on a repre- sentative unit cell using a three-dimensional nite element analysis.... Results and Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 1. Crack Surface Displacements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 2. Prediction of Sti ness Degradation . . . . . . . . . . . 89 3. Parametric Study of Constraint E ects . . . . . . . . 91 4...

  9. A matrix damage accumulation model for laminated composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, David Chi Shing

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . , Texas A8-M University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. D. H. Allen Dr. C. E. Harris A damage evolutionary relationship was developed to model the accuntulation of' intraply matrix cracks in laminated composites. This relationship was formulated... (Member) 'le=-~8 ~ W. E. Haisler (Head of Department) C. E. Harris & (Co-Clrair of Committee) / g. C. La, ' M. . Lu (Member) Itfay 1990 ABSTRACT A Matrix Damage Accumulation Model for Laminated Composites . (May 1990) David Chi Shing Lo, B, S...

  10. Quantitative studies of severe fuel damage using delayed neutron data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, T.H.; Braid, T.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Schleisiek, K. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique to quantify fuel damage in an LMR through analysis of delayed neutron data is presented, which is suitable for analysis of both small-scale in-pile experiments and full-scale plants. Validating analyses are described for five in-pile severe accident simulations performed within the SLSF and Mol 7C test programs. Comparison is made of measured and calculated amounts of fuel damage. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Quantitative studies of severe fuel damage using delayed neutron data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, T.H.; Braiel, T.H. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Schleisiek, K. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany))

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a technique is presented to quantify fuel damage in a liquid-metal reactor through fast-running computer analysis of delayed neutron data, suitable for analysis of both small-scale in-pile experiments and full-scale plants. Validating analyses are described for five in-pile severe accident simulations performed within the Sodium Loop Safety Facility and Mol-7C test programs. Comparison is made of measured and calculated amounts of fuel damage.

  12. An investigation of damage accumulation in graphite/epoxy laminates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norvell, Robert Gerald

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN INVESTIGATION OF DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by ROBERT GERALD NORVELL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1985 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering AN INVESTIGATION OF DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by ROBERT GERALD NORVELL Approved as to style and content by: David H. Allen (Co-Chair of C mmitt. ) Richard A. Schap...

  13. Predicting threshold and location of laser damage on optical surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siekhaus, Wigbert (Berkeley, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus useful in the prediction of the damage threshold of various optical devices, the location of weak spots on such devices and the location, identification, and elimination of optical surface impurities comprising, a focused and pulsed laser, an photo electric detector/imaging means, and a timer. The weak spots emit photoelectrons when subjected to laser intensities that are less than the intensity actually required to produce the damage. The weak spots may be eliminated by sustained exposure to the laser beam.

  14. Assessing blackbird damage to ripening rice in Matagorda County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Robert Glen

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . At each sample point the rice was visually inspected for blackbird damage, using observations of birds feeding in the field and the presence of empty hulls (since blackbirds will "de-hull" dough stage rice) on the ground as supporting evidence...ASSESSING BLACKBIRD DAMAGE TO RIPENING RICE IN MATAGORDA COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis by ROBERT GLEN WRIGHT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  15. Evaluation of moisture damage within asphalt concrete mixes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Brij D.

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    with load cycles. The analysis demonstrates the need to consider mixture compliance as well as bond energy in order to predict moisture damage. Mixtures with the two types of bitumen and each aggregate with and without hydrated lime were... evaluated. The hydrated lime substantially improved the resistance of the mixture to moisture damage. iv To my parents. v ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to extend my sincere thanks to everyone who helped...

  16. The application of ultrasonics to assess damage in composite materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eden, John Gregory

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE APPLICATION OF ULTRASONICS TO ASSESS DAMAGE IN COMPOSITE MATERIALS A Thesis by JOHN GREGORY EDEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1985 Major Subjectr Aerospace Engineering THE APPLICATION OF ULTRASONICS TO ASSESS DAMAGE IN COMPOSITE MATERIALS A Thesis by JOHN GREGORY EDEN Approved as to style and content by: (V. . Kinra, Chairman) (D. H. Allen, Member) (R. A...

  17. Damage in porous media due to salt crystallization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noushine Shahidzadeh-Bonn; Julie Desarnaud; François Bertrand; Xavier Chateau; Daniel Bonn

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the origins of salt damage in sandstones for the two most common salts: sodium chloride and sulfate. The results show that the observed difference in damage between the two salts is directly related to the kinetics of crystallization and the interfacial properties of the salt solutions and crystals with respect to the stone. We show that, for sodium sulfate, the existence of hydrated and anhydrous crystals and specifically their dissolution and crystallization kinetics are responsible for the damage. Using magnetic resonance imaging and optical microscopy we show that when water imbibes sodium sulfate contaminated sandstones, followed by drying at room temperature, large damage occurs in regions where pores are fully filled with salts. After partial dissolution, anhydrous sodium sulfate salt present in these regions gives rise to a very rapid growth of the hydrated phase of sulfate in the form of clusters that form on or close to the remaining anhydrous microcrystals. The rapid growth of these clusters generates stresses in excess of the tensile strength of the stone leading to the damage. Sodium chloride only forms anhydrous crystals that consequently do not cause damage in the experiments.

  18. Femtosecond pulse damage thresholds of dielectric coatings in vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelle D. Shinn, Duy N. Nguyen, Luke A. Emmert ,Paul Schwoebel, Dinesh Patel, Carmen S. Menoni, Wolfgang Rudolph

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At 10-7 Torr, the multiple femtosecond pulse damage threshold, F(?), is about 10% of the single pulse damage fluence F(1) for hafnia and silica films compared to about 65% and 50%, respectively, at 630 Torr. In contrast, the single-pulse damage threshold is pressure independent. The decrease of F(?) with decreasing air pressure correlates with the water vapor and oxygen content of the ambient gas with the former having the greater effect. The decrease in F(?) is likely associated with an accumulation of defects derived from oxygen deficiency, for example vacancies. From atmospheric air pressure to pressures of {approx}3 x 10{sup -6} Torr, the damage 'crater' starts deterministically at the center of the beam and grows in diameter as the fluence increases. At pressure below 3x10-6 Torr, damage is initiated at random 'sites' within the exposed area in hafnia films, while the damage morphology remains deterministic in silica films. A possible explanation is that absorbing centers are created at predisposed sample sites in hafnia, for example at boundaries between crystallites, or crystalline and amorphous phases.

  19. On the formulation, parameter identification and numerical integration of the EMMI model :plasticity and isotropic damage.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bammann, Douglas J.; Johnson, G. C. (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Marin, Esteban B.; Regueiro, Richard A. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we present the formulation of the physically-based Evolving Microstructural Model of Inelasticity (EMMI) . The specific version of the model treated here describes the plasticity and isotropic damage of metals as being currently applied to model the ductile failure process in structural components of the W80 program . The formulation of the EMMI constitutive equations is framed in the context of the large deformation kinematics of solids and the thermodynamics of internal state variables . This formulation is focused first on developing the plasticity equations in both the relaxed (unloaded) and current configurations. The equations in the current configuration, expressed in non-dimensional form, are used to devise the identification procedure for the plasticity parameters. The model is then extended to include a porosity-based isotropic damage state variable to describe the progressive deterioration of the strength and mechanical properties of metals induced by deformation . The numerical treatment of these coupled plasticity-damage constitutive equations is explained in detail. A number of examples are solved to validate the numerical implementation of the model.

  20. Computational Hydrocode Study of Target Damage due to Fragment-Blast Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatch-Aguilar, T; Najjar, F; Szymanski, E

    2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A target's terminal ballistic effects involving explosively generated fragments, along with the original blast, are of critical importance for many different security and safety related applications. Personnel safety and protective building design are but a few of the practical disciplines that can gain from improved understanding combined loading effects. Traditionally, any engineering level analysis or design effort involving explosions would divide the target damage analysis into two correspondingly critical areas: blast wave and fragment related impact effects. The hypothesis of this paper lies in the supposition that a linear combination of a blast-fragment loading, coupled with an accurate target response description, can lead to a non-linear target damage effect. This non-linear target response could then stand as the basis of defining what a synergistic or combined frag-blast loading might actually look like. The table below, taken from Walters, et. al. categorizes some of the critical parameters driving any combined target damage effect and drives the evaluation of results. Based on table 1 it becomes clear that any combined frag-blast analysis would need to account for the target response matching similar ranges for the mechanics described above. Of interest are the critical times upon which a blast event or fragment impact loading occurs relative to the target's modal response. A blast, for the purposes of this paper is defined as the sudden release of chemical energy from a given material (henceforth referred to as an energetic material) onto its surrounding medium. During the coupling mechanism a discrete or discontinuous shockwave is generated. This shockwave travels outward from the source transferring energy and momentum to any surrounding objects including personnel and engineering structures. From an engineering perspective blast effects are typically characterized by way of physical characteristics such as Peak Pressure (PP), Time of Arrival (TOA), Pressure-Impulse (PI) and Time of Duration (TD). Other peculiarities include the radial decrease in pressure from the source, any fireball size measurement, and subsequent increase in temperature from the passing of the shockwave through the surrounding medium. In light of all of these metrics, the loading any object receives from a blast event becomes intricately connected to the distance between itself and the source. Because of this, a clear distinction is made between close-in effects and those from a source far away from the object of interest. Explosively generated fragments on the other hand are characterized by means of their localized damage potential. Metrics such as whether the fragment penetrates or perforates a given object is quantified as well as other variables including fragment's residual velocity, % kinetic energy decrease, residual fragment mass and other exit criteria. A fragment launched under such violent conditions could easily be traveling at speeds in excess of 2500 ft/s. Given these speeds it is conceivable to imagine how any given fragment could deliver a concentrated load to a target and penetrates through walls, vehicles or even the protection systems of nearby personnel. This study will focus on the individual fragment-target impact event with the hopes of expanding it to eventually include statistical procedures. Since this is a modeling excursion into the combined frag-blast target damage effects the numerical methods used to frame this problem become important in-so-far as the simulations are done in a consistent manner. For this study a Finite-Element based Hydrocode solution called ALE3D (ALE=Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) was utilized. ALE3D is developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore, CA), and as this paper will show, successfully implemented a converged ALE formulation including as many of the different aspects needed to query the synergistic damage on a given target. Further information on the modeling setup is included.

  1. Damage identification and health monitoring of structural and mechanical systems from changes in their vibration characteristics: A literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doebling, S.W.; Farrar, C.R.; Prime, M.B.; Shevitz, D.W.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a review of the technical literature concerning the detection, location, and characterization of structural damage via techniques that examine changes in measured structural vibration response. The report first categorizes the methods according to required measured data and analysis technique. The analysis categories include changes in modal frequencies, changes in measured mode shapes (and their derivatives), and changes in measured flexibility coefficients. Methods that use property (stiffness, mass, damping) matrix updating, detection of nonlinear response, and damage detection via neural networks are also summarized. The applications of the various methods to different types of engineering problems are categorized by type of structure and are summarized. The types of structures include beams, trusses, plates, shells, bridges, offshore platforms, other large civil structures, aerospace structures, and composite structures. The report describes the development of the damage-identification methods and applications and summarizes the current state-of-the-art of the technology. The critical issues for future research in the area of damage identification are also discussed.

  2. Detection of exposure damage in composite materials using Fourier transform infrared technology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Duvall, Randy L.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Goal: to detect the subtle changes in laminate composite structures brought about by thermal, chemical, ultraviolet, and moisture exposure. Compare sensitivity of an array of NDI methods, including Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), to detect subtle differences in composite materials due to deterioration. Inspection methods applied: ultrasonic pulse echo, through transmission ultrasonics, thermography, resonance testing, mechanical impedance analysis, eddy current, low frequency bond testing & FTIR. Comparisons between the NDI methods are being used to establish the potential of FTIR to provide the necessary sensitivity to non-visible, yet significant, damage in the resin and fiber matrix of composite structures. Comparison of NDI results with short beam shear tests are being used to relate NDI sensitivity to reduction in structural performance. Chemical analyses technique, which measures the infrared intensity versus wavelength of light reflected on the surface of a structure (chemical and physical information via this signature). Advances in instrumentation have resulted in hand-held portable devices that allow for field use (few seconds per scan). Shows promise for production quality assurance and in-service applications on composite aircraft structures (scarfed repairs). Statistical analysis on frequency spectrums produced by FTIR interrogations are being used to produce an NDI technique for assessing material integrity. Conclusions are: (1) Use of NDI to assess loss of composite laminate integrity brought about by thermal, chemical, ultraviolet, and moisture exposure. (2) Degradation trends between SBS strength and exposure levels (temperature and time) have been established for different materials. (3) Various NDI methods have been applied to evaluate damage and relate this to loss of integrity - PE UT shows greatest sensitivity. (4) FTIR shows promise for damage detection and calibration to predict structural integrity (short beam shear). (5) Detection of damage for medium exposure levels (possibly resin matrix degradation only) is more difficult and requires additional study. (6) These are initial results only - program is continuing with additional heat, UV, chemical and water exposure test specimens.

  3. Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale...

  4. Laboratory Curiosity rover ChemCam team, including Los Alamos...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MEXICO, August 23, 2012-Members of the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover ChemCam team, including Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists, squeezed in a little extra target...

  5. PLOT: A UNIX PROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis, Pavel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simple, easy-to-read graphics language designed specificallyPROGRAM FOR INCLUDING GRAPHICS IN DOCUMENTS Pavel Curtismeanings as in the GRAFPAC graphics system. Definl. ~ tions

  6. analysis including plasma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assembly 2010 Space Plasmas in the Solar System, including Planetary Magnetospheres (D) Solar Variability, Cosmic Rays and Climate (D21) GEOMAGNETIC ACTIVITY AT HIGH-LATITUDE:...

  7. Energy Department Expands Gas Gouging Reporting System to Include...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Washington, DC - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman announced today that the Department of Energy has expanded its gas gouging reporting system to include a toll-free telephone...

  8. arch dams including: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: insight into the gamut of shallow water waves, including kinematic, diffusion, dynamic, and gravity wavesDam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using...

  9. Structural Health Monitoring for Impact Damage in Composite Structures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Dennis P.; Raymond Bond (Purdue); Doug Adams (Purdue)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite structures are increasing in prevalence throughout the aerospace, wind, defense, and transportation industries, but the many advantages of these materials come with unique challenges, particularly in inspecting and repairing these structures. Because composites of- ten undergo sub-surface damage mechanisms which compromise the structure without a clear visual indication, inspection of these components is critical to safely deploying composite re- placements to traditionally metallic structures. Impact damage to composites presents one of the most signi fi cant challenges because the area which is vulnerable to impact damage is generally large and sometimes very dif fi cult to access. This work seeks to further evolve iden- ti fi cation technology by developing a system which can detect the impact load location and magnitude in real time, while giving an assessment of the con fi dence in that estimate. Fur- thermore, we identify ways by which impact damage could be more effectively identi fi ed by leveraging impact load identi fi cation information to better characterize damage. The impact load identi fi cation algorithm was applied to a commercial scale wind turbine blade, and results show the capability to detect impact magnitude and location using a single accelerometer, re- gardless of sensor location. A technique for better evaluating the uncertainty of the impact estimates was developed by quantifying how well the impact force estimate meets the assump- tions underlying the force estimation technique. This uncertainty quanti fi cation technique was found to reduce the 95% con fi dence interval by more than a factor of two for impact force estimates showing the least uncertainty, and widening the 95% con fi dence interval by a fac- tor of two for the most uncertain force estimates, avoiding the possibility of understating the uncertainty associated with these estimates. Linear vibration based damage detection tech- niques were investigated in the context of structural stiffness reductions and impact damage. A method by which the sensitivity to damage could be increased for simple structures was presented, and the challenges of applying that technique to a more complex structure were identi fi ed. The structural dynamic changes in a weak adhesive bond were investigated, and the results showed promise for identifying weak bonds that show little or no static reduction in stiffness. To address these challenges in identifying highly localized impact damage, the possi- bility of detecting damage through nonlinear dynamic characteristics was also identi fi ed, with a proposed technique which would leverage impact location estimates to enable the detection of impact damage. This nonlinear damage identi fi cation concept was evaluated on a composite panel with a substructure disbond, and the results showed that the nonlinear dynamics at the damage site could be observed without a baseline healthy reference. By further developing impact load identi fi cation technology and combining load and damage estimation techniques into an integrated solution, the challenges associated with impact detection in composite struc- tures can be effectively solved, thereby reducing costs, improving safety, and enhancing the operational readiness and availability of high value assets.

  10. A Leakage Current-based Measurement of the Radiation Damage in the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor V. Gorelov; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement has been made of the radiation damage incurred by the ATLAS Pixel Detector barrel silicon modules from the beginning of operations through the end of 2012. This translates to hadronic fluence received over the full period of operation at energies up to and including 8 TeV. The measurement is based on a per-module measurement of the silicon sensor leakage current. The results are presented as a function of integrated luminosity and compared to predictions by the Hamburg Model. This information can be used to predict limits on the lifetime of the Pixel Detector due to current, for various operating scenarios.

  11. Laser-Induced Damage in Optical Materials: Proceedings of the SPIE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Exarhos, Gregory J.; Ristau, Detlev; Soileau, M. J.; Stolz, Christopher J.

    2008-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The 40th Annual Boulder Damage Symposium is the leading forum for the exchange of information on the physics/technology of materials for high power/high energy lasers. The series of conference proceedings has grown to be a comprehensive source of information on optics for lasers and includes topics on materials and thin film preparation, durability, properties modeling, testing, and component fabrication. Papers appear in the volume in the following core areas: Materials and Measurements; Thin Films; Fundamental Mechanisms; and, surfaces, Mirrors, and Contamination.

  12. Articles which include chevron film cooling holes, and related processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunker, Ronald Scott; Lacy, Benjamin Paul

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An article is described, including an inner surface which can be exposed to a first fluid; an inlet; and an outer surface spaced from the inner surface, which can be exposed to a hotter second fluid. The article further includes at least one row or other pattern of passage holes. Each passage hole includes an inlet bore extending through the substrate from the inlet at the inner surface to a passage hole-exit proximate to the outer surface, with the inlet bore terminating in a chevron outlet adjacent the hole-exit. The chevron outlet includes a pair of wing troughs having a common surface region between them. The common surface region includes a valley which is adjacent the hole-exit; and a plateau adjacent the valley. The article can be an airfoil. Related methods for preparing the passage holes are also described.

  13. Damage and Mortality Assessment of Redwood and Mixed Conifer Forest Types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    347 Damage and Mortality Assessment of Redwood and Mixed Conifer Forest Types in Santa Cruz County left with tough decisions on how to treat tree damage and mortality compounded by the Pine Mountain a method for evaluating damage and mortality. Qualitative criteria for evaluating stand damage focused

  14. Damage In a Random Mlerstructure: Size Effects, Fractals, and Entropy Maximization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    Damage In a Random Mler©structure: Size Effects, Fractals, and Entropy Maximization Martin Ostoja a micromechanical approach to damage growth in graph- representable microstructures is presented. Damage is denned in scatter of strength, and the fractal character of damage geometry, and thus provides a basis

  15. Radiation damage calculation in PHITS Y. Iwamoto1, K. Niita2, T. Sawai1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Radiation damage calculation in PHITS 1 Y. Iwamoto1, K. Niita2, T. Sawai1, R.M. Ronningen3, T Feb. ­ 15 Feb. 2012 #12;2 Introduction Radiation damage model in PHITS Radiation damage calculation As the power of proton and heavy-ion accelerators is increasing, the prediction of the structural damage

  16. Nonlinear damage rheology and wave resonance in rocks V. Lyakhovsky1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ampuero, Jean Paul

    1 Nonlinear damage rheology and wave resonance in rocks V. Lyakhovsky1 , Y. Hamiel1 , P. Ampuero2 of damaged materials with theoretical analyses and numerical simulations based on a nonlinear continuum damage model. Quasi-static simulations of damage accumulation under cyclic load reproduce the laboratory

  17. HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2):205213, Fall 2007 Intrafield patterns of wildlife damage to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human­Wildlife Conflicts 1(2):205­213, Fall 2007 Intrafield patterns of wildlife damage to corn at reducing wildlife damage to row crops rely on information concerning the spatial nature of wildlife damage at local and landscape scales. In this study we explored spatial patterns of wildlife damage within

  18. The waves of damage in elastic-plastic lattices with waiting links: design and simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherkaev, Andrej

    The waves of damage in elastic-plastic lattices with waiting links: design and simulation A damage (a neck) in an element, initiating the damage instead in another sequen- tial element. A wave of "partial damage" propagates through the chain, as all the links develop necks but do not fail. When

  19. DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION IN A STEEL FRAME USING HIGH-FREQUENCY ELECTRO-MECHANICAL IMPEDANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ji

    411 DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION IN A STEEL FRAME USING HIGH-FREQUENCY ELECTRO-MECHANICAL IMPEDANCE presents an experimental investigation of damage detection of a steel frame using electro damage in structures. Damages are introduced by completely loosening bolts over several locations

  20. Impurity Radiation from the LHCD Launcher During Operation in JET and Investigation of Launcher Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impurity Radiation from the LHCD Launcher During Operation in JET and Investigation of Launcher Damage

  1. A Review of Damage Detection and Health Monitoring of Mechanical Systems from Changes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Review of Damage Detection and Health Monitoring of Mechanical Systems from Changes of Damage Detection and Health Monitoring... 1 1. Introduction Damage are a main cause of structural failure of structural components by detection damage in structures in the early state. More specifically, structural

  2. A Novel Damage Sensitive Feature Based on State-Space Representation1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Novel Damage Sensitive Feature Based on State-Space Representation1 ABSTRACT Damage detection and the variable and unknown excitation. There is still a lack of a robust damage detection process. Taking in a reconstructed state-space, a novel damage sensitive feature vector is proposed. Statistical modelling using

  3. SUBSPACE-BASED DETECTION OF FATIGUE DAMAGE ON JACKET SUPPORT STRUCTURES OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SUBSPACE-BASED DETECTION OF FATIGUE DAMAGE ON JACKET SUPPORT STRUCTURES OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES-based Damage Detec- tion (SSDD) method on model structures for an utilization of this approach on offshore wind damage in real size structural components of offshore wind turbines. KEYWORDS : Damage detection

  4. Potential radiation damage: Storage tanks for liquid radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1992-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    High level waste at SRS is stored in carbon steel tanks constructed during the period 1951 to 1981. This waste contains radionuclides that decay by alpha, beta, or gamma emission or are spontaneous neutronsources. Thus, a low intensity radiation field is generated that is capable of causing displacement damage to the carbon steel. The potential for degradation of mechanical properties was evaluated by comparing the estimated displacement damage with published data relating changes in Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact energy to neutron exposure. Experimental radiation data was available for three of the four grades of carbonsteel from which the tanks were constructed and is applicable to all four steels. Estimates of displacement damage arising from gamma and neutron radiation have been made based on the radionuclide contents for high level waste that are cited in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the Liquid Waste Handling Facilities in the 200-Area. Alpha and beta emissions do not penetrate carbon steel to a sufficient depth to affect the bulk properties of the tank walls but may aggravate corrosion processes. The damage estimates take into account the source of the waste (F- or H-Area), the several types of tank service, and assume wateras an attenuating medium. Estimates of displacement damage are conservative because they are based on the highest levels of radionuclide contents reported in the SAR and continuous replenishment of the radionuclides.

  5. Can reductions in logging damage increase carbon storage over time? Evaluation of a simulation model for a pilot carbon offset project in Malaysia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinard, M.A. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selective timber harvesting operations, if uncontrolled, can severely degrade a forest. Although techniques for reducing logging damage are well-known and inexpensive to apply, incentives to adopt these techniques are generally lacking. Power companies and other emitters of {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} gases soon may be forced to reduce or otherwise offset their net emissions; one offset option is to fund programs aimed at reducing logging damage. To investigate the consequences of reductions in logging damage for ecosystem carbon storage, I constructed a model to simulate changes in biomass and carbon pools following logging of primary dipterocarp forests in southeast Asia. I adapted a physiologically-driven, tree-based model of natural forest gap dynamics (FORMIX) to simulate forest recovery following logging. Input variables included stand structure, volume extracted, stand damage (% stems), and soil disturbance (% area compacted). Output variables included total biomass, tree density, and total carbon storage over time. Assumptions of the model included the following: (1) areas with soil disturbances have elevated probabilities of vine colonization and reduced rates of tree establishment, (2) areas with broken canopy but no soil disturbance are colonized initially by pioneer tree species and 20 yr later by persistent forest species, (3) damaged trees have reduced growth and increased mortality rates. Simulation results for two logging techniques, conventional and reduced-impact logging, are compared with data from field studies conducted within a pilot carbon offset project in Sabah, Malaysia.

  6. Turbomachine injection nozzle including a coolant delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zuo, Baifang (Simpsonville, SC)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An injection nozzle for a turbomachine includes a main body having a first end portion that extends to a second end portion defining an exterior wall having an outer surface. A plurality of fluid delivery tubes extend through the main body. Each of the plurality of fluid delivery tubes includes a first fluid inlet for receiving a first fluid, a second fluid inlet for receiving a second fluid and an outlet. The injection nozzle further includes a coolant delivery system arranged within the main body. The coolant delivery system guides a coolant along at least one of a portion of the exterior wall and around the plurality of fluid delivery tubes.

  7. The dynamic interplay between DNA damage and metabolism : the metabolic fate and transport of DNA lesions and novel DNA damage derived from intermediary metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jumpathong, Watthanachai

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work presented in this thesis explores two novel and complementary facets of endogenous DNA damage: the development of biomarkers of inflammation based on metabolites of DNA damage products and the formation of DNA ...

  8. [Article 1 of 7: Motivates and Includes the Consumer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surges; the extra cost of these premium features can be included in the electric service contract. The Smart Grid will mitigate PQ events that originate in the transmission and...

  9. Including costs of supply chain risk in strategic sourcing decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Avani

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost evaluations do not always include the costs associated with risks when organizations make strategic sourcing decisions. This research was conducted to establish and quantify the impact of risks and risk-related costs ...

  10. Limited Personal Use of Government Office Equipment including Information Technology

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes requirements and assigns responsibilities for employees' limited personal use of Government resources (office equipment and other resources including information technology) within DOE, including NNSA. The Order is required to provide guidance on appropriate and inappropriate uses of Government resources. This Order was certified 04/23/2009 as accurate and continues to be relevant and appropriate for use by the Department. Certified 4-23-09. No cancellation.

  11. Hybrid powertrain system including smooth shifting automated transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beaty, Kevin D.; Nellums, Richard A.

    2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A powertrain system is provided that includes a prime mover and a change-gear transmission having an input, at least two gear ratios, and an output. The powertrain system also includes a power shunt configured to route power applied to the transmission by one of the input and the output to the other one of the input and the output. A transmission system and a method for facilitating shifting of a transmission system are also provided.

  12. 1 | De-icing salt damage to trees | November 2011 Pathology Advisory Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 | De-icing salt damage to trees | November 2011 Pathology Advisory Note (No. 11) De-icing salt damage to trees De-icing Salt Damage to Trees Joan F Webber, David R Rose, Martin C Dobson #12;2 | De-icing salt damage to trees | November 2011 S a l t D a m a g e De-icing Salt Damage Introduction Rock salt

  13. Thermal annealing of laser damage precursors on fused silica surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, N; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Laurence, T A; Suratwala, T I; Steele, W A; Feit, M D; Wang, L L

    2012-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies have identified two significant precursors of laser damage on fused silica surfaces at fluenes below {approx} 35 J/cm{sup 2}, photoactive impurities in the polishing layer and surface fractures. In the present work, isothermal heating is studied as a means of remediating the highly absorptive, defect structure associated with surface fractures. A series of Vickers indentations were applied to silica surfaces at loads between 0.5N and 10N creating fracture networks between {approx} 10{micro}m and {approx} 50{micro}m in diameter. The indentations were characterized prior to and following thermal annealing under various times and temperature conditions using confocal time-resolved photo-luminescence (CTP) imaging, and R/1 optical damage testing with 3ns, 355nm laser pulses. Significant improvements in the damage thresholds, together with corresponding reductions in CTP intensity, were observed at temperatures well below the glass transition temperature (T{sub g}). For example, the damage threshold on 05.N indentations which typically initiates at fluences <8 J/cm{sup 2} could be improved >35 J/cm{sup 2} through the use of a {approx} 750 C thermal treatment. Larger fracture networks required longer or higher temperature treatment to achieve similar results. At an annealing temperature > 1100 C, optical microscopy indicates morphological changes in some of the fracture structure of indentations, although remnants of the original fracture and significant deformation was still observed after thermal annealing. This study demonstrates the potential of using isothermal annealing as a means of improving the laser damage resistance of fused silica optical components. Similarly, it provides a means of further understanding the physics associated with optical damage and related mitigation processes.

  14. Predicting threshold and location of laser damage on optical surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siekhaus, W.

    1985-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an apparatus useful in the prediction of the damage threshold of various optical devices, the location of weak spots on such devices and the location, identification, and elimination of optical surface impurities. The apparatus comprises a focused and pulsed laser, a photo electric detector/imaging means, and a timer. The weak spots emit photoelectrons when subjected to laser intensities that are less than the intensity actually required to produce the damage. The weak spots may be eliminated by sustained exposure to the laser beam.

  15. Measuring Radiation Damage from Heavy Energetic Ions in Aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostin, M., PI-MSU; Ronningen, R., PI-MSU; Ahle, L., PI-LLNL; Gabriel, T., Scientific Investigation and Development; Mansur, L., PI-ORNL; Leonard, K., ORNL; Mokhov, N., FNAL; Niita, K., RIST, Japan

    2009-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An intense beam of 122 MeV/u (9.3 GeV) 76Ge ions was stopped in aluminum samples at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL, MSU. Attempts were made at ORNL to measure changes in material properties by measuring changes in electrical resistivity and microhardness, and by transmission electron microscopy characterization, for defect density caused by radiation damage, as a function of depth and integrated ion flux. These measurements are relevant for estimating damage to components at a rare isotope beam facility.

  16. Summary of property damage control programs of the United States Department of Energy CY 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dix, George P.; Maybee, Walter W.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calendar year 1979 was the second full year of operation of the Department of Energy. This report summarizes the loss experience in overall terms and itemizes facility and program achievements in property protection. Planned projects for CY 1980 are included and several subjects of interest to loss-control specialists are discussed in detail. Property damage from all causes was $2.5 million, of which $0.65 million was due to fire, the major cause of losses in both the Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies. Combined losses for the 2 full years of Department of Energy experience total over $20 million, of which over $13 million is due to fire. The fire loss ratio for 1979 was 0.13 cents for each $100 of property values at risk, more than an order-of-magnitude less than that expeienced by the better class of insured private property. Final decontamination and cleanup costs necessitated by a product spill at a solvent-refined coal pilot plant at the end of 1979 may exceed $2 million. Even including this estimate, the total loss from all causes (fire, explosion, mechanical or electrical damage, acts of nature, radioactive and non-radioactive contamination/cleanup costs, and a variety of miscellaneous causes), would yield a loss ratio of about 1 cent for each $100 of property. This indicated the overall property protection program is exemplary.

  17. ADVANCED COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE DESIGN BASED ON DURABILITY AND DAMAGE TOLERANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galib Abumeri; Frank Abdi (PhD)

    2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the program was to demonstrate and verify Certification-by-Analysis (CBA) capability for wind turbine blades made from advanced lightweight composite materials. The approach integrated durability and damage tolerance analysis with robust design and virtual testing capabilities to deliver superior, durable, low weight, low cost, long life, and reliable wind blade design. The GENOA durability and life prediction software suite was be used as the primary simulation tool. First, a micromechanics-based computational approach was used to assess the durability of composite laminates with ply drop features commonly used in wind turbine applications. Ply drops occur in composite joints and closures of wind turbine blades to reduce skin thicknesses along the blade span. They increase localized stress concentration, which may cause premature delamination failure in composite and reduced fatigue service life. Durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) were evaluated utilizing a multi-scale micro-macro progressive failure analysis (PFA) technique. PFA is finite element based and is capable of detecting all stages of material damage including initiation and propagation of delamination. It assesses multiple failure criteria and includes the effects of manufacturing anomalies (i.e., void, fiber waviness). Two different approaches have been used within PFA. The first approach is Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) PFA while the second one is strength-based. Constituent stiffness and strength properties for glass and carbon based material systems were reverse engineered for use in D&DT evaluation of coupons with ply drops under static loading. Lamina and laminate properties calculated using manufacturing and composite architecture details matched closely published test data. Similarly, resin properties were determined for fatigue life calculation. The simulation not only reproduced static strength and fatigue life as observed in the test, it also showed composite damage and fracture modes that resemble those reported in the tests. The results show that computational simulation can be relied on to enhance the design of tapered composite structures such as the ones used in turbine wind blades. A computational simulation for durability, damage tolerance (D&DT) and reliability of composite wind turbine blade structures in presence of uncertainties in material properties was performed. A composite turbine blade was first assessed with finite element based multi-scale progressive failure analysis to determine failure modes and locations as well as the fracture load. D&DT analyses were then validated with static test performed at Sandia National Laboratories. The work was followed by detailed weight analysis to identify contribution of various materials to the overall weight of the blade. The methodology ensured that certain types of failure modes, such as delamination progression, are contained to reduce risk to the structure. Probabilistic analysis indicated that composite shear strength has a great influence on the blade ultimate load under static loading. Weight was reduced by 12% with robust design without loss in reliability or D&DT. Structural benefits obtained with the use of enhanced matrix properties through nanoparticles infusion were also assessed. Thin unidirectional fiberglass layers enriched with silica nanoparticles were applied to the outer surfaces of a wind blade to improve its overall structural performance and durability. The wind blade was a 9-meter prototype structure manufactured and tested subject to three saddle static loading at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The blade manufacturing did not include the use of any nano-material. With silica nanoparticles in glass composite applied to the exterior surfaces of the blade, the durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) results from multi-scale PFA showed an increase in ultimate load of the blade by 9.2% as compared to baseline structural performance (without nano). The use of nanoparticles lead to a delay in the onset of delamination. Load-displacement relati

  18. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy: a background text. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the most common forms of renewable energy are presented in this textbook for students. The topics include solar energy, wind power hydroelectric power, biomass ocean thermal energy, and tidal and geothermal energy. The main emphasis of the text is on the sun and the solar energy that it yields. Discussions on the sun's composition and the relationship between the earth, sun and atmosphere are provided. Insolation, active and passive solar systems, and solar collectors are the subtopics included under solar energy. (BCS)

  19. Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

  20. Metal vapor laser including hot electrodes and integral wick

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA); Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal vapor laser, specifically one utilizing copper vapor, is disclosed herein. This laser utilizes a plasma tube assembly including a thermally insulated plasma tube containing a specific metal, e.g., copper, and a buffer gas therein. The laser also utilizes means including hot electrodes located at opposite ends of the plasma tube for electrically exciting the metal vapor and heating its interior to a sufficiently high temperature to cause the metal contained therein to vaporize and for subjecting the vapor to an electrical discharge excitation in order to lase. The laser also utilizes external wicking arrangements, that is, wicking arrangements located outside the plasma tube.

  1. Metal vapor laser including hot electrodes and integral wick

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ault, E.R.; Alger, T.W.

    1995-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A metal vapor laser, specifically one utilizing copper vapor, is disclosed herein. This laser utilizes a plasma tube assembly including a thermally insulated plasma tube containing a specific metal, e.g., copper, and a buffer gas therein. The laser also utilizes means including hot electrodes located at opposite ends of the plasma tube for electrically exciting the metal vapor and heating its interior to a sufficiently high temperature to cause the metal contained therein to vaporize and for subjecting the vapor to an electrical discharge excitation in order to lase. The laser also utilizes external wicking arrangements, that is, wicking arrangements located outside the plasma tube. 5 figs.

  2. Watson Library enhancements to include new service desk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12/5/13 KU Libraries News: Watson Library enhancements to include new service desk www.lib.ku.edu/news/newservicedesk.shtml 1/1 Contact Us The University of Kansas Libraries Lawrence, KS 66045 (785) 864-8983 Copyright © 2013 by the University... of Kansas Watson Library enhancements to include new service desk The University of Kansas Libraries is adding a new service desk to Watson Library to enhance the user experience and draw attention to new and existing resources. The desk, which...

  3. Thin film solar cell including a spatially modulated intrinsic layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guha, Subhendu (Troy, MI); Yang, Chi-Chung (Troy, MI); Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

    1989-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    One or more thin film solar cells in which the intrinsic layer of substantially amorphous semiconductor alloy material thereof includes at least a first band gap portion and a narrower band gap portion. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is spatially graded through a portion of the bulk thickness, said graded portion including a region removed from the intrinsic layer-dopant layer interfaces. The band gap of the intrinsic layer is always less than the band gap of the doped layers. The gradation of the intrinsic layer is effected such that the open circuit voltage and/or the fill factor of the one or plural solar cell structure is enhanced.

  4. Proton Irradiation Damage Assessment of Carbon Reinforced Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Proton Irradiation Damage Assessment of Carbon Reinforced Composites: 2-D & 3-D Weaved Structures carbon-carbon composite ATJ Graphite 3D CC composite AGS Beam-on-Target tests show clearly that carbon composites are better absorbers of thermo- mechanical shock. This is attributed to the very low coeff

  5. Monitoring Forest Damage Methods and Development in Sweden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , fieldwork in the target-tailored inventory of resin top disease, damage by Spruce bark beetle. (photo: S is the most important information that can be obtained from these kinds of inventories. Short variability. Large-scale monitoring, such as that performed in national forest inventories, has good potential

  6. Conserved and Unconventional Responses to DNA Damage in Tetrahymena 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandoval Oporto, Pamela

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    characterization of the response to genotoxic agents showed that Tetrahymena is able to activate a G1/S and intra-S phase DNA damage response. The results presented here suggest that a caffeine-dependent checkpoint activator protein modulates the response to DNA...

  7. "Exploring damage management of high performance metallic alloys in critical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    Fatigue Localized corrosion degrades fatigue performance of high strength aluminum alloys. The expense and Aluminum Alloys Exposure to a moist environment degrades the fatigue resistance of all aluminum alloys"Exploring damage management of high performance metallic alloys in critical systems to develop new

  8. DAMAGE DETECTION IN COMPOSITES BY NONCONTACT LASER Byeongjin Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Composite structures, Wind blade. INTRODUCTION Composite materials are widely used for various industries. The feasibility of the proposed technique is examined by localizing a delamination in a real 10 kW wind turbine blade. KEYWORDS : Laser ultrasonics, Damage detection and localization, Time-of-flight triangulation

  9. THE INTERACTIONS OF SURFACE DAMAGE AND RF CAVITY OPERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    with short pulses. We work with a breakdown model where the breakdown trigger is caused by tensile stress due asperities that Work supported by USDoE, Office of High Energy Physics norem@anl.gov exist on the surface of damage produced in a breakdown event is , s2() = Ue-a , where we assume a proportionality to the energy

  10. Automated Damage Diagnosis and Recovery for Remote Robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bongard, Josh

    ; damage may require rapid compensation (eg., power drain due to coverage of solar panels); and repeated that are qualitatively different from the original controller. A number of algorithms based on repeated testing have been only handles pre­ specified error types. The algorithm proposed here is demon­ strated to automatically

  11. Automated Damage Diagnosis and Recovery for Remote Robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bongard, Josh

    ; damage may require rapid compensation (eg., power drain due to coverage of solar panels); and repeated that are qualitatively different from the original controller. A number of algorithms based on repeated testing have been only handles pre- specified error types. The algorithm proposed here is demon- strated to automatically

  12. Temporary patching of damaged UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardenas, A.L. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., OH (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Patching techniques based on application of epoxy resins have been developed for temporarily repairing UF{sub 6} cylinders which have sustained relatively minor damage and must be safely emptied. The method is considerably faster and simpler than metallurgical weld repairs. Laboratory tests, detailed operational procedures, and case histories of experience at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant are described.

  13. Specific grinding energy causing thermal damage in precision gear steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatathodi, Srinivas

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of thermal damage for surface grinding of AISI 9310 gear steel using two different grinding wheels and two different coolants. The grinding wheels used for this research are plain alumina wheel-32A80-JVBE and Seeded Gel alumina abrasive-5SG80-JVS...

  14. Electric heating units in pollination bags avoid damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Electric heating units in pollination bags avoid damage to flowers by spring frost J. CH. FERRAND n'Orlgans Ardon, F 45160 Olivet Summary An effective, cheap and simple heating device was designed by INRA heating, Larix. Controlled crosses are essential for forest tree breeding, but spring frost can destroy

  15. When word recognition goes wrong: Acquired dyslexia: brain damage (strokes).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Reilly, Randall C.

    1 Dyslexia When word recognition goes wrong: Acquired dyslexia: brain damage (strokes). ­ Surface dyslexia: can't read irregular words (yacht). ­ Phonological dyslexia: can't read nonwords (nust). ­ Deep dyslexia: semantic errors (orchestra = symphony) Developmental dyslexia: this is most common and poorly

  16. Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, J.D.

    1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack. 8 figs.

  17. Fungal endophytes limit pathogen damage in a tropical tree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    Fungal endophytes limit pathogen damage in a tropical tree A. Elizabeth Arnold* , Luis Carlos Meji species examined to date harbors endophytic fungi within its asymptomatic aerial tissues, such that endophytes rep- resent a ubiquitous, yet cryptic, component of terrestrial plant communities. Fungal

  18. Impurity-doped optical shock, detonation and damage location sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A shock, detonation, and damage location sensor providing continuous fiber-optic means of measuring shock speed and damage location, and could be designed through proper cabling to have virtually any desired crush pressure. The sensor has one or a plurality of parallel multimode optical fibers, or a singlemode fiber core, surrounded by an elongated cladding, doped along their entire length with impurities to fluoresce in response to light at a different wavelength entering one end of the fiber(s). The length of a fiber would be continuously shorted as it is progressively destroyed by a shock wave traveling parallel to its axis. The resulting backscattered and shifted light would eventually enter a detector and be converted into a proportional electrical signals which would be evaluated to determine shock velocity and damage location. The corresponding reduction in output, because of the shortening of the optical fibers, is used as it is received to determine the velocity and position of the shock front as a function of time. As a damage location sensor the sensor fiber cracks along with the structure to which it is mounted. The size of the resulting drop in detector output is indicative of the location of the crack.

  19. acquired brain damage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acquired brain damage First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Virtual Reality Rehabilitation of...

  20. Dynamics and Fatigue Damage of Wind Turbine Rotors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6 3 RiS0-Rr512 Dynamics and Fatigue Damage of Wind Turbine Rotors during Steady Operation Peter OF WIND TURBINE ROTORS DURING STEADY OPERATION Peter Hauge Madsen, Sten Frandsen, William E. Holley-carrying capacity of a wind turbine rotor with respect to short-term strength and material fatigue are presented

  1. Including Blind Students in Computer Science Through Access to Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, R. Michael

    Including Blind Students in Computer Science Through Access to Graphs Suzanne Balik, Sean Mealin SKetching tool, GSK, to provide blind and sighted people with a means to create, examine, and share graphs (node-link diagrams) in real-time. GSK proved very effective for one blind computer science student

  2. Bayesian hierarchical reconstruction of protein profiles including a digestion model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Bayesian hierarchical reconstruction of protein profiles including a digestion model Pierre to recover the protein biomarkers content in a robust way. We will focus on the digestion step since and each branch to a molecular processing such as digestion, ionisation and LC-MS separation

  3. Biomass Potentials from California Forest and Shrublands Including Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomass Potentials from California Forest and Shrublands Including Fuel Reduction Potentials-04-004 February 2005 Revised: October 2005 Arnold Schwarzenegger, Governor, State of California #12;Biomass Tiangco, CEC Bryan M. Jenkins, University of California #12;Biomass Potentials from California Forest

  4. Optimal Energy Management Strategy including Battery Health through Thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Optimal Energy Management Strategy including Battery Health through Thermal Management for Hybrid: Energy management strategy, Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, Li-ion battery aging, thermal management, Pontryagin's Minimum Principle. 1. INTRODUCTION The interest for energy management strategy (EMS) of Hybrid

  5. Area of cooperation includes: Joint research and development on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    Technologies August 2, 2006: HCL Technologies Ltd (HCL), India's leading global IT services company, has signed projects that are using this technology currently such as BioGrid in Japan, National Grid Service in UKArea of cooperation includes: · Joint research and development on Grid computing technologies

  6. Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach Including Marcellus Shale Gas Development A Report Engineering) W. VA #12;Energy Transitions: A Systems Approach August 2011 version Page 2 Energy Transitions sources globally, some very strong short-term drivers of energy transitions reflect rising concerns over

  7. 1 INTRODUCTION A typical flexible pavement system includes four

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    1 INTRODUCTION A typical flexible pavement system includes four distinct layers: asphalt concrete course in order to reduce costs or to minimize capil- lary action under the pavement. Figure 1: Cross-section of flexible pavement system (Muench 2006) Pavement distress may occur due to either traffic or environmental

  8. SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM Including the Chemical Hygiene Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul G.

    SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM Including the Chemical Hygiene Plan Wisconsin Center for Applied, Technical Staff & Chemical Hygiene Officer kakupcho@wisc.edu 262-2982 Lab Facility Website http..........................................................................................................3 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN III. Work-site Analysis and Hazard Identification 3.1 Hazardous Chemical

  9. HTS Conductor Design Issues Including Quench and Stability,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HTS Conductor Design Issues Including Quench and Stability, AC Losses, and Fault Currents M. J objective and technical approach · The purpose of this collaborative R&D project is an investigation of HTS conductor design optimization with emphasis on stability and protection issues for YBCO wires and coils

  10. Free Energy Efficiency Kit includes CFL light bulbs,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Annkatrin

    Free Energy Efficiency Kit Kit includes CFL light bulbs, spray foam, low-flow shower head, and more for discounted energy assessments. FREE HOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY SEMINAR N e w R i ver L i g ht & Pow e r a n d W! Building Science 101 Presentation BPI Certified Building Professionals will present home energy efficiency

  11. DO NOT INCLUDE: flatten cardboard staples, tape & envelope windows ok

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    / bottles Metal items other than cans/foil Napkins Paper towels Plastic bags Plastic films Plastic utensilsDO NOT INCLUDE: flatten cardboard staples, tape & envelope windows ok Aerosol cans Books Bottle, PDAs, inkjet cartridges, CFL bulbs (cushioned, sealed in plastic) computers, printers, printer

  12. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Namhai Chua; Kush, A.

    1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids.

  13. Perhaps federal research grants can include infrastructure costs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sur, Mriganka

    Perhaps federal research grants can include infrastructure costs. There are signs to find favour in China, a country beset by similar problems. The particular structure of Indian science and healthystart-uppackages. The government could contribute to these costs. 487 NATURE|Vol 436|28 July 2005

  14. Propagation of Reactions in Thermally-damaged PBX-9501

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tringe, J W; Glascoe, E A; Kercher, J R; Willey, T M; Springer, H K; Greenwood, D W; Molitoris, J D; Smilowitz, L; Henson, B F; Maienschein, J L

    2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermally-initiated explosion in PBX-9501 (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) is observed in situ by flash x-ray imaging, and modeled with the LLNL multi-physics arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian code ALE3D. The containment vessel deformation provides a useful estimate of the reaction pressure at the time of the explosion, which we calculate to be in the range 0.8-1.4 GPa. Closely-coupled ALE3D simulations of these experiments, utilizing the multi-phase convective burn model, provide detailed predictions of the reacted mass fraction and deflagration front acceleration. During the preinitiation heating phase of these experiments, the solid HMX portion of the PBX-9501 undergoes a {beta}-phase to {delta}-phase transition which damages the explosive and induces porosity. The multi-phase convective burn model results demonstrate that damaged particle size and pressure are critical for predicting reaction speed and violence. In the model, energetic parameters are taken from LLNL's thermochemical-kinetics code Cheetah and burn rate parameters from Son et al. (2000). Model predictions of an accelerating deflagration front are in qualitative agreement with the experimental images assuming a mode particle diameter in the range 300-400 {micro}m. There is uncertainty in the initial porosity caused by thermal damage of PBX-9501 and, thus, the effective surface area for burning. To better understand these structures, we employ x-ray computed tomography (XRCT) to examine the microstructure of PBX-9501 before and after thermal damage. Although lack of contrast between grains and binder prevents the determination of full grain size distribution in this material, there are many domains visible in thermally damaged PBX-9501 with diameters in the 300-400 {micro}m range.

  15. Fractal mechanism for characterizing singularity of mode shape for damage detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, M. S. [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China)] [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Ostachowicz, W. [Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Fiszera 14, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland) [Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Fiszera 14, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Faculty of Automotive and Construction Machinery, Warsaw University of Technology, Narbutta 84, 02-524 Warsaw (Poland); Bai, R. B., E-mail: bairunbo@gmail.com [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271000 (China); Radzie?ski, M. [Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Fiszera 14, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)] [Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Fiszera 14, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Damage is an ordinary physical phenomenon jeopardizing structural safety; damage detection is an ongoing interdisciplinary issue. Waveform fractal theory has provided a promising resource for detecting damage in plates while presenting a concomitant problem: susceptibility to false features of damage. This study proposes a fractal dimension method based on affine transformation to address this problem. Physical experiments using laser measurement demonstrate that this method can substantially eliminate false features of damage and accurately identify complex cracks in plates, providing a fundamental mechanism that brings the merits of waveform fractal theory into full play in structural damage detection applications.

  16. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  17. Assessing Vulnerabilities, Risks, and Consequences of Damage to Critical Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suski, N; Wuest, C

    2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the publication of 'Critical Foundations: Protecting America's Infrastructure,' there has been a keen understanding of the complexity, interdependencies, and shared responsibility required to protect the nation's most critical assets that are essential to our way of life. The original 5 sectors defined in 1997 have grown to 18 Critical Infrastructures and Key Resources (CIKR), which are discussed in the 2009 National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) and its supporting sector-specific plans. The NIPP provides the structure for a national program dedicated to enhanced protection and resiliency of the nation's infrastructure. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides in-depth, multi-disciplinary assessments of threat, vulnerability, and consequence across all 18 sectors at scales ranging from specific facilities to infrastructures spanning multi-state regions, such as the Oil and Natural Gas (ONG) sector. Like many of the CIKR sectors, the ONG sector is comprised of production, processing, distribution, and storage of highly valuable and potentially dangerous commodities. Furthermore, there are significant interdependencies with other sectors, including transportation, communication, finance, and government. Understanding the potentially devastating consequences and collateral damage resulting from a terrorist attack or natural event is an important element of LLNL's infrastructure security programs. Our work began in the energy sector in the late 1990s and quickly expanded other critical infrastructure sectors. We have performed over 600 physical assessments with a particular emphasis on those sectors that utilize, store, or ship potentially hazardous materials and for whom cyber security is important. The success of our approach is based on building awareness of vulnerabilities and risks and working directly with industry partners to collectively advance infrastructure protection. This approach consists of three phases: The Pre-Assessment Phase brings together infrastructure owners and operators to identify critical assets and help the team create a structured information request. During this phase, we gain information about the critical assets from those who are most familiar with operations and interdependencies, making the time we spend on the ground conducting the assessment much more productive and enabling the team to make actionable recommendations. The Assessment Phase analyzes 10 areas: Threat environment, cyber architecture, cyber penetration, physical security, physical penetration, operations security, policies and procedures, interdependencies, consequence analysis, and risk characterization. Each of these individual tasks uses direct and indirect data collection, site inspections, and structured and facilitated workshops to gather data. Because of the importance of understanding the cyber threat, LLNL has built both fixed and mobile cyber penetration, wireless penetration and supporting tools that can be tailored to fit customer needs. The Post-Assessment Phase brings vulnerability and risk assessments to the customer in a format that facilitates implementation of mitigation options. Often the assessment findings and recommendations are briefed and discussed with several levels of management and, if appropriate, across jurisdictional boundaries. The end result is enhanced awareness and informed protective measures. Over the last 15 years, we have continued to refine our methodology and capture lessons learned and best practices. The resulting risk and decision framework thus takes into consideration real-world constraints, including regulatory, operational, and economic realities. In addition to 'on the ground' assessments focused on mitigating vulnerabilities, we have integrated our computational and atmospheric dispersion capability with easy-to-use geo-referenced visualization tools to support emergency planning and response operations. LLNL is home to the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) and the Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC). NA

  18. Multi-processor including data flow accelerator module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davidson, George S. (Albuquerque, NM); Pierce, Paul E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An accelerator module for a data flow computer includes an intelligent memory. The module is added to a multiprocessor arrangement and uses a shared tagged memory architecture in the data flow computer. The intelligent memory module assigns locations for holding data values in correspondence with arcs leading to a node in a data dependency graph. Each primitive computation is associated with a corresponding memory cell, including a number of slots for operands needed to execute a primitive computation, a primitive identifying pointer, and linking slots for distributing the result of the cell computation to other cells requiring that result as an operand. Circuitry is provided for utilizing tag bits to determine automatically when all operands required by a processor are available and for scheduling the primitive for execution in a queue. Each memory cell of the module may be associated with any of the primitives, and the particular primitive to be executed by the processor associated with the cell is identified by providing an index, such as the cell number for the primitive, to the primitive lookup table of starting addresses. The module thus serves to perform functions previously performed by a number of sections of data flow architectures and coexists with conventional shared memory therein. A multiprocessing system including the module operates in a hybrid mode, wherein the same processing modules are used to perform some processing in a sequential mode, under immediate control of an operating system, while performing other processing in a data flow mode.

  19. Conversion of geothermal waste to commercial products including silica

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the treatment of geothermal residue includes contacting the pigmented amorphous silica-containing component with a depigmenting reagent one or more times to depigment the silica and produce a mixture containing depigmented amorphous silica and depigmenting reagent containing pigment material; separating the depigmented amorphous silica and from the depigmenting reagent to yield depigmented amorphous silica. Before or after the depigmenting contacting, the geothermal residue or depigmented silica can be treated with a metal solubilizing agent to produce another mixture containing pigmented or unpigmented amorphous silica-containing component and a solubilized metal-containing component; separating these components from each other to produce an amorphous silica product substantially devoid of metals and at least partially devoid of pigment. The amorphous silica product can be neutralized and thereafter dried at a temperature from about 25.degree. C. to 300.degree. C. The morphology of the silica product can be varied through the process conditions including sequence contacting steps, pH of depigmenting reagent, neutralization and drying conditions to tailor the amorphous silica for commercial use in products including filler for paint, paper, rubber and polymers, and chromatographic material.

  20. K. Pham et alii, Frattura ed Integrit Strutturale, 19 (2012) 5-19; DOI: 10.3221/IGF-ESIS.19.01 Damage localization and rupture with gradient damage models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Damage localization and rupture with gradient damage models K. Pham Université Pierre et Marie Curie of an elastic-damaging material whose softening behavior is regularized by a gradient damage model. We show that at the center of the localization zone when the damage reaches there the critical value corresponding

  1. An Improved Method of Mitigating Laser Induced Surface Damage Growth in Fused Silica Using a Rastered, Pulsed CO2 Laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, I L; Guss, G M; Nostrand, M J; Wegner, P L

    2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method of mitigating (arresting) the growth of large (>200 m diameter and depth) laser induced surface damage on fused silica has been developed that successfully addresses several issues encountered with our previously-reported large site mitigation technique. As in the previous work, a tightly-focused 10.6 {micro}m CO{sub 2} laser spot is scanned over the damage site by galvanometer steering mirrors. In contrast to the previous work, the laser is pulsed instead of CW, with the pulse length and repetition frequency chosen to allow substantial cooling between pulses. This cooling has the important effect of reducing the heat-affected zone capable of supporting thermo-capillary flow from scale lengths on the order of the overall scan pattern to scale lengths on the order of the focused laser spot, thus preventing the formation of a raised rim around the final mitigation site and its consequent down-stream intensification. Other advantages of the new method include lower residual stresses, and improved damage threshold associated with reduced amounts of redeposited material. The raster patterns can be designed to produce specific shapes of the mitigation pit including cones and pyramids. Details of the new technique and its comparison with the previous technique will be presented.

  2. Damage mechanics characterization on fatigue behavior of a solder joint material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, C.L.; Yang, F. [Univ. of Michigan, Dearborn, MI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Fang, H.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Computational Physics Dept.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the first part of a comprehensive mechanics approach capable of predicting the integrity and reliability of solder joint material under fatigue loading without viscoplastic damage considerations. A separate report will be made to present a comprehensive damage model describing life prediction of the solder material under thermomechanical fatigue loading. The method is based on a theory of damage mechanics which makes possible a macroscopic description of the successive material deterioration caused by the presence of microcracks/voids in engineering materials. A damage mechanics model based on the thermodynamic theory of irreversible processes with internal state variables is proposed and used to provide a unified approach in characterizing the cyclic behavior of a typical solder material. With the introduction of a damage effect tensor, the constitutive equations are derived to enable the formulation of a fatigue damage dissipative potential function and a fatigue damage criterion. The fatigue evolution is subsequently developed based on the hypothesis that the overall damage is induced by the accumulation of fatigue and plastic damage. This damage mechanics approach offers a systematic and versatile means that is effective in modeling the entire process of material failure ranging from damage initiation and propagation leading eventually to macro-crack initiation and growth. As the model takes into account the load history effect and the interaction between plasticity damage and fatigue damage, with the aid of a modified general purpose finite element program, the method can readily be applied to estimate the fatigue life of solder joints under different loading conditions.

  3. Dual wavelength laser damage testing for high energy lasers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atherton, Briggs W.; Rambo, Patrick K.; Schwarz, Jens; Kimmel, Mark W.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As high energy laser systems evolve towards higher energies, fundamental material properties such as the laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT) of the optics limit the overall system performance. The Z-Backlighter Laser Facility at Sandia National Laboratories uses a pair of such kiljoule-class Nd:Phosphate Glass lasers for x-ray radiography of high energy density physics events on the Z-Accelerator. These two systems, the Z-Beamlet system operating at 527nm/ 1ns and the Z-Petawatt system operating at 1054nm/ 0.5ps, can be combined for some experimental applications. In these scenarios, dichroic beam combining optics and subsequent dual wavelength high reflectors will see a high fluence from combined simultaneous laser exposure and may even see lingering effects when used for pump-probe configurations. Only recently have researchers begun to explore such concerns, looking at individual and simultaneous exposures of optics to 1064 and third harmonic 355nm light from Nd:YAG [1]. However, to our knowledge, measurements of simultaneous and delayed dual wavelength damage thresholds on such optics have not been performed for exposure to 1054nm and its second harmonic light, especially when the pulses are of disparate pulse duration. The Z-Backlighter Facility has an instrumented damage tester setup to examine the issues of laser-induced damage thresholds in a variety of such situations [2] . Using this damage tester, we have measured the LIDT of dual wavelength high reflectors at 1054nm/0.5ps and 532nm/7ns, separately and spatially combined, both co-temporal and delayed, with single and multiple exposures. We found that the LIDT of the sample at 1054nm/0.5ps can be significantly lowered, from 1.32J/cm{sup 2} damage fluence with 1054/0.5ps only to 1.05 J/cm{sup 2} with the simultaneous presence of 532nm/7ns laser light at a fluence of 8.1 J/cm{sup 2}. This reduction of LIDT of the sample at 1054nm/0.5ps continues as the fluence of 532nm/7ns laser light simultaneously present increases. The reduction of LIDT does not occur when the 2 pulses are temporally separated. This paper will also present dual wavelength LIDT results of commercial dichroic beam-combining optics simultaneously exposed with laser light at 1054nm/2.5ns and 532nm/7ns.

  4. Composite armor, armor system and vehicle including armor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Henry S.; Jones, Warren F.; Lacy, Jeffrey M.; Thinnes, Gary L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite armor panels are disclosed. Each panel comprises a plurality of functional layers comprising at least an outermost layer, an intermediate layer and a base layer. An armor system incorporating armor panels is also disclosed. Armor panels are mounted on carriages movably secured to adjacent rails of a rail system. Each panel may be moved on its associated rail and into partially overlapping relationship with another panel on an adjacent rail for protection against incoming ordnance from various directions. The rail system may be configured as at least a part of a ring, and be disposed about a hatch on a vehicle. Vehicles including an armor system are also disclosed.

  5. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a pu GOVERNMENT RIGHTS This application was funded under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC02-76ER01338. The U.S. Government has certain rights under this application and any patent issuing thereon.

  6. Composite material including nanocrystals and methods of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bawendi, Moungi G.; Sundar, Vikram C.

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature-sensing compositions can include an inorganic material, such as a semiconductor nanocrystal. The nanocrystal can be a dependable and accurate indicator of temperature. The intensity of emission of the nanocrystal varies with temperature and can be highly sensitive to surface temperature. The nanocrystals can be processed with a binder to form a matrix, which can be varied by altering the chemical nature of the surface of the nanocrystal. A nanocrystal with a compatibilizing outer layer can be incorporated into a coating formulation and retain its temperature sensitive emissive properties.

  7. A coke oven model including thermal decomposition kinetics of tar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munekane, Fuminori; Yamaguchi, Yukio [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Tanioka, Seiichi [Mitsubishi Chemical Corp., Sakaide (Japan)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A new one-dimensional coke oven model has been developed for simulating the amount and the characteristics of by-products such as tar and gas as well as coke. This model consists of both heat transfer and chemical kinetics including thermal decomposition of coal and tar. The chemical kinetics constants are obtained by estimation based on the results of experiments conducted to investigate the thermal decomposition of both coal and tar. The calculation results using the new model are in good agreement with experimental ones.

  8. Numerical evaluation of propeller noise, including non-linear effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Terence Alan

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University Chairman of Advisor y Commitee: Dr. Kenneth Korkan Using the transonic flow field(s) generated by the NASPROP-E computer code for an eight blade SR3-series propeller, a method is investigated to calculate the total noise values and frequency... in three dimensions, and the influence of the damping on the calculated noise values is investigated. Since the flow field includes the wave systems near the blade surface, the quadr upole noise sour ce term is accounted for as are the monopole...

  9. What To Include In The Whistleblower Complaint? | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14Russian Nuclear Warheads ArrivesAdministration To Include In

  10. Measurement and modeling of infrared nonlinear absorption coefficients and laser-induced damage thresholds in Ge and GaSb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, T. J.; Bohn, M. J.; Coutu, R. A. Jr. [Air Force Institute of Technology, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Gonzalez, L. P.; Murray, J. M.; Guha, S. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States); Schepler, K. L. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Sensors Directorate, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a simultaneous fitting technique to extract nonlinear absorption coefficients from data at two pulse widths, we measure two-photon and free-carrier absorption coefficients for Ge and GaSb at 2.05 and 2.5 {mu}m for the first time, to our knowledge. Results agreed well with published theory. Single-shot damage thresholds were also measured at 2.5 {mu}m and agreed well with modeled thresholds using experimentally determined parameters including nonlinear absorption coefficients and temperature dependent linear absorption. The damage threshold for a single-layer Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} anti-reflective coating on Ge was 55% or 35% lower than the uncoated threshold for picosecond or nanosecond pulses, respectively.

  11. High-speed, low-damage grinding of advanced ceramics Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovach, J.A. [Eaton Corp., Willoughby Hills, OH (United States). Mfg. Technologies Center; Malkin, S. [Univ. of Massachusetts (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In manufacture of structural ceramic components, grinding costs can comprise up to 80% of the entire manufacturing cost. Most of these costs arise from the conventional multi-step grinding process with numerous grinding wheels and additional capital equipment, perishable dressing tools, and labor. In an attempt to reduce structural ceramic grinding costs, a feasibility investigation was undertaken to develop a single step, roughing-finishing process suitable for producing high-quality silicon nitride ceramic parts at high material removal rates at lower cost than traditional, multi-stage grinding. This feasibility study employed combined use of laboratory grinding tests, mathematical grinding models, and characterization of resultant material surface condition. More specifically, this Phase 1 final report provides a technical overview of High-Speed, Low-Damage (HSLD) ceramic grinding and the conditions necessary to achieve the small grain depths of cut necessary for low damage grinding while operating at relatively high material removal rates. Particular issues addressed include determining effects of wheel speed and material removal rate on resulting mode of material removal (ductile or brittle fracture), limiting grinding forces, calculation of approximate grinding zone temperatures developed during HSLD grinding, and developing the experimental systems necessary for determining HSLD grinding energy partition relationships. In addition, practical considerations for production utilization of the HSLD process are also discussed.

  12. Studying impact damage on carbon-fiber reinforced aircraft composite panels with sonicir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han Xiaoyan; Zhang Ding; He Qi; Song Yuyang; Lubowicki, Anthony [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Zhao Xinyue; Newaz, Golam. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Favro, Lawrence D.; Thomas, Robert L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Composites are becoming more important materials in commercial aircraft structures such as the fuselage and wings with the new B787 Dreamliner from Boeing which has the target to utilize 50% by weight of composite materials. Carbon-fiber reinforced composites are the material of choice in aircraft structures. This is due to their light weight and high strength (high strength-to-weight ratio), high specific stiffness, tailorability of properties, design flexibility etc. Especially, by reducing the aircraft's body weight by using such lighter structures, the cost of fuel can be greatly reduced with the high jet fuel price for commercial airlines. However, these composites are prone to impact damage and the damage may occur without any observable sign on the surface, yet resulting in delaminations and disbonds that may occur well within the layers. We are studying the impact problem with carbon-fiber reinforced composite panels and developing SonicIR for this application as a fast and wide-area NDE technology. In this paper, we present our results in studying composite structures including carbon-fiber reinforced composite materials, and preliminary quantitative studies on delamination type defect depth identification in the panels.

  13. Paraoxonase-1 genetic polymorphisms and susceptibility to DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Satyender [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Kumar, Vivek [Environmental Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, University of Delhi, Dilshad Garden, Delhi-110095 (India); Thakur, Sachin [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Presently at, Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA), 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States); Banerjee, Basu Dev [Environmental Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, University of Delhi, Dilshad Garden, Delhi-110095 (India); Rautela, Rajender Singh; Grover, Shyam Sunder; Rawat, Devendra Singh [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Pasha, Syed Tazeen [National Programme for Prevention and Control of Fluorosis, DGHS, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, Nirman Bhavan, New Delhi 110011 (India); Jain, Sudhir Kumar [Centre for Epidemiology and Parasitic Diseases, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Ichhpujani, Rattan Lal [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); National Programme for Prevention and Control of Fluorosis, DGHS, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, Nirman Bhavan, New Delhi 110011 (India); Rai, Arvind, E-mail: arvindrai.nicd@gmail.com [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a lipoprotein-associated enzyme involved in the detoxification of organophosphate pesticides (OPs) by hydrolyzing the bioactive oxons. Polymorphisms of the PON1 gene are responsible for variation in the expression and catalytic activity of PON1 enzyme. In the present study, we have determined (a) the prevalence of two common PON1 polymorphisms, (b) the activity of PON1 and acetylcholinesterase enzymes, and (c) the influence of PON1 genotypes and phenotypes variation on DNA damage in workers exposed to OPs. We examined 230 subjects including 115 workers exposed to OPs and an equal number of normal healthy controls. The results revealed that PON1 activity toward paraoxon (179.19 {+-} 39.36 vs. 241.52 {+-} 42.32 nmol/min/ml in controls) and phenylacetate (112.74 {+-} 17.37 vs. 134.28 {+-} 25.49 {mu}mol/min/ml in controls) was significantly lower in workers than in control subjects (p < 0.001). No significant difference was observed in the distribution of genotypes and allelic frequencies of PON1{sub 192}QR (Gln/Arg) and PON1{sub 55}LM (Leu/Met) in workers and control subjects (p > 0.05). The PON1 activity toward paraoxonase was found to be significantly higher in the R/R (Arg/Arg) genotypes than Q/R (Gln/Arg) and lowest in Q/Q (Gln/Gln) genotypes in both workers and control subjects (p < 0.001). For PON1{sub 55}LM (Leu/Met), PON1 activity toward paraoxonase was observed to be higher in individuals with L/L (Leu/Leu) genotypes and lowest in individuals with M/M (Met/Met) genotypes in both groups (p < 0.001). No influence of PON1 genotypes and phenotypes was seen on the activity of acetylcholinesterase and arylesterase. The DNA damage was observed to be significantly higher in workers than in control subjects (p < 0.05). Further, the individuals who showed least paraoxonase activity i.e., those with (Q/Q [Gln/Gln] and M/M [Met/Met]) genotypes showed significantly higher DNA damage compared to other isoforms in workers exposed to OPs (p < 0.05). The results indicate that the individuals with PON1 Q/Q and M/M genotypes are more susceptible toward genotoxicity. In conclusion, the study suggests wide variation in enzyme activities and DNA damage due to polymorphisms in PON1 gene, which might have an important role in the identification of individual risk factors in workers occupationally exposed to OPs.

  14. Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ORAU's Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (HCTT-CHE)

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster - readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that - help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. This tool has been reviewed by a variety of key subject matter experts from federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. It also has been piloted with various communities that consist of different population sizes, to include large urban to small rural communities.

  15. Solving The High Energy Evolution Equation Including Running Coupling Corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Javier L. Albacete; Yuri V. Kovchegov

    2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the solution of the nonlinear BK evolution equation with the recently calculated running coupling corrections [hep-ph/0609105, hep-ph/0609090]. Performing a numerical solution we confirm the earlier result of [hep-ph/0408216] that the high energy evolution with the running coupling leads to a universal scaling behavior for the dipole scattering amplitude. The running coupling corrections calculated recently significantly change the shape of the scaling function as compared to the fixed coupling case leading to a considerable increase in the anomalous dimension and to a slow-down of the evolution with rapidity. The difference between the two recent calculations is due to an extra contribution to the evolution kernel, referred to as the subtraction term, which arises when running coupling corrections are included. These subtraction terms were neglected in both recent calculations. We evaluate numerically the subtraction terms for both calculations, and demonstrate that when the subtraction terms are added back to the evolution kernels obtained in the two works the resulting dipole amplitudes agree with each other! We then use the complete running coupling kernel including the subtraction term to find the numerical solution of the resulting full non-linear evolution equation with the running coupling corrections. Again the scaling regime is recovered at very large rapidity.

  16. Cogeneration handbook for the petroleum refining industry. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Handbook deals only with industrial cogeneration, that is, simultaneous production of both heat and electricity at the industrial plant site. The cogenerator has the option of either selling all cogenerated power to the utility while simultaneously purchasing power to satisfy his plant demand, or directly supplying the plant demand with cogenerated power, thus displacing utility-supplied power. This Handbook provides the refinery plant manager or company energy coordinator with a framework for making a preliminary assessment of the feasibility and viability of cogeneration at a particular plant. The handbook is intended to provide an understanding of the potential of several standardized cogeneration systems, as well as their limitations. However, because the decision to cogenerate is very site specific, the handbook cannot provide all of the answers. It does attempt, however, to bring to light the major issues that should be addressed in the decision-making process. The decision of whether to cogenerate involves several considerations, including technical, economic, environmental, legal, and regulatory issues. Each of these issues is addressed separately in this handbook. In addition, a chapter is included on preparing a three-phase work statement, which is needed to guide the design of a cogeneration system. 39 figures, 37 tables.

  17. Aligned composite structures for mitigation of impact damage and resistance to wear in dynamic environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mulligan, Anthony C.; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Popovich, Dragan; Halloran, Joseph P.; Fulcher, Michael L.; Cook, Randy C.

    2005-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Fibrous monolith composites having architectures that provide increased flaw insensitivity, improved hardness, wear resistance and damage tolerance and methods of manufacture thereof are provided for use in dynamic environments to mitigate impact damage and increase wear resistance.

  18. Aligned composite structures for mitigation of impact damage and resistance to wear in dynamic environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mulligan, Anthony C. (Tucson, AZ); Rigali, Mark J. (Tucson, AZ); Sutaria, Manish P. (Malden, MA); Popovich, Dragan (Redmond, WA); Halloran, Joseph P. (Tucson, AZ); Fulcher, Michael L. (Tucson, AZ); Cook, Randy C. (Tucson, AZ)

    2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Fibrous monolith composites having architectures that provide increased flaw insensitivity, improved hardness, wear resistance and damage tolerance and methods of manufacture thereof are provided for use in dynamic environments to mitigate impact damage and increase wear resistance.

  19. Beam damage of poly(vinyl chloride) [PVC] as observed by x-ray...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    damage of poly(vinyl chloride) PVC as observed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at 143 K, 303 K and 373 K. Beam damage of poly(vinyl chloride) PVC as observed by x-ray...

  20. Beam Damage of Poly(Vinyl Chloride) [PVC] Film as Observed by...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Damage of Poly(Vinyl Chloride) PVC Film as Observed by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Beam Damage of Poly(Vinyl Chloride) PVC Film as Observed by X-ray Photoelectron...

  1. Simple Method for Estimating and Comparing of X-Ray Damage Rates...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Method for Estimating and Comparing of X-Ray Damage Rates. Simple Method for Estimating and Comparing of X-Ray Damage Rates. Abstract: This note describes an approach for...

  2. Piezoelectric-based in-situ damage detection of composite materials for structural health monitoring systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Seth Stovack, 1977-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost-effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials. This thesis presents the conclusions of an analytical and experimental survey of candidate methods for in-situ damage ...

  3. Structure And Radiation Damage Behavior Of Epitaxial CrxMo1-x...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    And Radiation Damage Behavior Of Epitaxial CrxMo1-x Alloy Thin Films On MgO. Structure And Radiation Damage Behavior Of Epitaxial CrxMo1-x Alloy Thin Films On MgO. Abstract:...

  4. Damage Profiles and Ion Distribution in Pt-irradiated SiC. |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Damage Profiles and Ion Distribution in Pt-irradiated SiC. Damage Profiles and Ion Distribution in Pt-irradiated SiC. Abstract: Single crystalline 6H-SiC samples were irradiated at...

  5. A DNA Damage-Induced, SOS-Independent Checkpoint Regulates Cell Division in Caulobacter crescentus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modell, Joshua W.

    Cells must coordinate DNA replication with cell division, especially during episodes of DNA damage. The paradigm for cell division control following DNA damage in bacteria involves the SOS response where cleavage of the ...

  6. Non-linear Damage Accumulation in Au-irradiated SrTiO3. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    leads to non-linear increase of the width of the damage profile. Citation: Zhang Y, WJ Weber, V Shutthanandan, and S Thevuthasan.2006."Non-linear Damage Accumulation in...

  7. Engineering a single cell microarray platform for high throughput DNA damage and repair analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weingeist, David McGregor

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DNA damage contributes to cancer, aging, and heritable diseases. Ironically, DNA damaging agents are also commonly used in current cancer treatment. We therefore need robust, high throughput, and inexpensive tools for ...

  8. Reducing Rally Car Damage in Forests Partnership-working with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    also incurs heavy costs when repairing the road surfaces after an event. The damage caused by motor driving, fast cornering, heavy braking and rapid acceleration causes significant damage to the loose prevent oil or f

  9. Aligned composite structures for mitigation of impact damage and resistance to wear in dynamic environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Mulligan, Anthony C.; Popovich, Dragan

    2004-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Fibrous monolith composites having architectures that provide increased flaw insensitivity, improved hardness, wear resistance and damage tolerance and methods of manufacture thereof are provided for use in dynamic environments to mitigate impact damage and increase wear resistance.

  10. Predictive storm damage modeling and optimizing crew response to improve storm response operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whipple, Sean David

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility infrastructures are constantly damaged by naturally occurring weather. Such damage results in customer service interruption and repairs are necessary to return the system to normal operation. In most cases these ...

  11. Regulation of DNA damage tolerance : studies of the translesion synthesis DNA ploymerase eta in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodruff, Rachel Van Etten

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All organisms must control the effects of DNA damage to protect the integrity of their genomes. In addition to DNA repair, this requires DNA damage tolerance pathways, which allow the continuation of essential processes ...

  12. Review: Clearing the Air: The Health and Economic Damages of Air Pollution in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joseph

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Economic Damages of Air Pollution in China Mun S. Ho andEconomic Damages of Air Pollution in China. Cambridge, MA:the assessment of air pollution and its health and economic

  13. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. comprehensive earthquake management plan: Engineering survey building damage assessment training manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The training objectives are: differentiate between the various levels of damage caused to buildings and structures by an earthquake and classify them as to their safety of occupancy, extent of damage, and resources needed for recovery/repair.

  14. Use of CFRP Overlays to Repair Fatigue Damage in Steel Bridge Girders and Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gangel, Regan Elisabeth

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fatigue damage in steel girder bridges built prior to the mid-1980s is common due to distortion-induced fatigue. Different repair techniques have been developed and implemented to retrofit bridges of this era with existing fatigue damage...

  15. Damage patterns caused by the burning of liquids on wood surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, David

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the damage caused to timber floors by the burning of liquids is of importance in the investigation of fires where the use of accelerants is suspected. This project has examined the damage caused to a piece of ...

  16. DAMAGE DETECTION METHODS ON WIND TURBINE BLADE TESTING WITH WIRED AND WIRELESS ACCELEROMETER SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DAMAGE DETECTION METHODS ON WIND TURBINE BLADE TESTING WITH WIRED AND WIRELESS ACCELEROMETER turbine blade. We compare the data collected from the wireless sensors against wired sensors for nonstationary blade excitations. KEYWORDS : Structural Health Monitoring, Damage Detection, Wind Turbine

  17. Quantitative measurement and modeling of the DNA damage signaling network : DNA double-strand breaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentner, Andrea R. (Andrea Ruth)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) are one of the major mediators of chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity in tumors. Cells that experience DNA damage can initiate a DNA damage-mediated cell-cycle arrest, attempt to repair the ...

  18. Damage Evolution in GaN Under MeV Heavy Ion Implantation. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evolution in GaN Under MeV Heavy Ion Implantation. Damage Evolution in GaN Under MeV Heavy Ion Implantation. Abstract: Damage evaluation processes in patterned GaN implanted by 3...

  19. Damage and Microstructure Evolution in GaN under Au Ion Irradiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Microstructure Evolution in GaN under Au Ion Irradiation. Damage and Microstructure Evolution in GaN under Au Ion Irradiation. Abstract: Damage and microstructure evolution in...

  20. Damage and rupture mechanisms in an austenoferritic duplex steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verhaeghe, B.; Louchet, F.; Brechet, Y. [LTPCM-CNRS, St. Martin d`Heres (France). Groupe Physique du Metal] [LTPCM-CNRS, St. Martin d`Heres (France). Groupe Physique du Metal; Massoud, J.P. [EDF, Moret sur Loing (France)] [EDF, Moret sur Loing (France)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of ageing on damage and rupture mechanisms in an austenoferritic duplex stainless steel is studied using conventional straining and impact toughness testing at 20 C and 320 C, and in situ SEM straining at 20 C. While the as-received alloy fails in a ductile mode, damage in the aged material starts with cleavage nucleation in ferrite. The authors show that, owing to the bipercolated topology of the alloy, these cleavage cracks can propagate while passing round austenite ligaments whose plastic stretching controls the crack extension. The variations with strain of both the crack size and the average crack separation are computed analytically and their comparison gives a good prediction of ductility.

  1. Building Damage, Death and Downtime Risk Attenuation in Earthquakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yinghui

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    value over a specified amount of time, can be obtained. This was a great development in the field of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis. Kennedy et al. (1980) conducted research to study the safety of the Oyster Creek nuclear power plant... 2D structural model developed in SAP 2000; and (c) plan of ?Redbook Building? ....... 16 Figure 4 ?Scenario-based? 3d loss model: (a) seismic hazard intensity-attenuation model; (b) structural analysis; (c) damage analysis; and (d) loss...

  2. Microstructural Characterization of Material Properties and Damage in Asphalt Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad Khorasani, Sara

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF MATERIAL PROPERTIES AND DAMAGE IN ASPHALT COMPOSITES A Thesis by SARA MOHAMMAD KHORASANI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Engineering Copyright 2013 Sara Mohammad Khorasani ii ABSTRACT Asphalt composites are used to construct 90% of roads in the United States. These composites consist of asphalt binder, which is a product of the refinery process of oil, aggregates...

  3. Conserved and Unconventional Responses to DNA Damage in Tetrahymena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandoval Oporto, Pamela

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ongoing genome instability ............................................................ 60 Elevated levels of DNA damage in MMS-treated TIF1 mutants ... 61 Differential regulation of TIF1 and RAD51 in MMS-treated cells... ................................ 59 2.2 Micronuclear genome instability in TIF1-deficient T. thermophila .......... 62 2.3 Regulation of RAD51 and TIF1 by MMS ................................................. 66 2.4 Immunolocalization of Rad51p and Tif1p in control and MMS...

  4. Continuum-based Multiscale Computational Damage Modeling of Cementitous Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sun-Myung

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    -damage constitutive model, the effect of the micromechanical properties of concrete, such as aggregate shape, distribution, and volume fraction, the ITZ thickness, and the strength of the ITZ and mortar matrix on the iv tensile behavior of concrete... Page 7.1 2-D Meso-scale Analysis Model of Concrete ................................ 103 7.2 Material Properties of the ITZ and Mortar Matrix ......................... 104 7.3 The Effect of the Aggregate Shape...

  5. A 3D Orthotropic Strain-Rate Dependent Elastic Damage Material Model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    English, Shawn Allen

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three dimensional orthotropic elastic constitutive model with continuum damage and cohesive based fracture is implemented for a general polymer matrix composite lamina. The formulation assumes the possibility of distributed (continuum) damage followed b y localized damage. The current damage activation functions are simply partially interactive quadratic strain criteria . However, the code structure allows for changes in the functions without extraordinary effort. The material model formulation, implementation, characterization and use cases are presented.

  6. SALT DAMAGE CRITERION PROOF-OF-CONCEPT RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerry L. DeVries; Kirby D. Mellegard; Gary D. Callahan

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a field-scale application demonstrating the use of continuum damage mechanics to determine the minimum allowable operating pressure of compressed natural gas storage caverns in salt formations. A geomechanical study was performed of two natural gas storage caverns (one existing and one planned) utilizing state-of-the-art salt mechanics to assess the potential for cavern instability and collapse. The geomechanical study consisted primarily of laboratory testing, theoretical development, and analytical/numerical tasks. A total of 50 laboratory tests was performed on salt specimens to aid in the development and definition of the material model used to predict the behavior of rock salt. Material model refinement was performed that improved the predictive capability of modeling salt during damage healing, recovery of work-hardened salt, and the behavior of salt at stress states other than triaxial compression. Results of this study showed that the working gas capacity of the existing cavern could be increased by 18 percent and the planned cavern could be increased by 8 percent using the proposed method compared to a conventional stress-based method. Further refinement of the continuum damage model is recommended to account for known behavior of salt at stress conditions other than triaxial compression that is not characterized accurately by the existing model.

  7. Pulse transmission transmitter including a higher order time derivate filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dress Jr., William B.; Smith, Stephen F.

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for pulse-transmission low-power communication modes are disclosed. A pulse transmission transmitter includes: a clock; a pseudorandom polynomial generator coupled to the clock, the pseudorandom polynomial generator having a polynomial load input; an exclusive-OR gate coupled to the pseudorandom polynomial generator, the exclusive-OR gate having a serial data input; a programmable delay circuit coupled to both the clock and the exclusive-OR gate; a pulse generator coupled to the programmable delay circuit; and a higher order time derivative filter coupled to the pulse generator. The systems and methods significantly reduce lower-frequency emissions from pulse transmission spread-spectrum communication modes, which reduces potentially harmful interference to existing radio frequency services and users and also simultaneously permit transmission of multiple data bits by utilizing specific pulse shapes.

  8. Hydraulic engine valve actuation system including independent feedback control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marriott, Craig D

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydraulic valve actuation assembly may include a housing, a piston, a supply control valve, a closing control valve, and an opening control valve. The housing may define a first fluid chamber, a second fluid chamber, and a third fluid chamber. The piston may be axially secured to an engine valve and located within the first, second and third fluid chambers. The supply control valve may control a hydraulic fluid supply to the piston. The closing control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the second fluid chamber to the supply control valve. The opening control valve may be located between the supply control valve and the second fluid chamber and may control fluid flow from the supply control valve to the second fluid chamber.

  9. Fuel cell repeater unit including frame and separator plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yamanis, Jean; Hawkes, Justin R; Chiapetta, Jr., Louis; Bird, Connie E; Sun, Ellen Y; Croteau, Paul F

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An example fuel cell repeater includes a separator plate and a frame establishing at least a portion of a flow path that is operative to communicate fuel to or from at least one fuel cell held by the frame relative to the separator plate. The flow path has a perimeter and any fuel within the perimeter flow across the at least one fuel cell in a first direction. The separator plate, the frame, or both establish at least one conduit positioned outside the flow path perimeter. The conduit is outside of the flow path perimeter and is configured to direct flow in a second, different direction. The conduit is fluidly coupled with the flow path.

  10. Copper laser modulator driving assembly including a magnetic compression laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser modulator (10) having a low voltage assembly (12) with a plurality of low voltage modules (14) with first stage magnetic compression circuits (20) and magnetic assist inductors (28) with a common core (91), such that timing of the first stage magnetic switches (30b) is thereby synchronized. A bipolar second stage of magnetic compression (42) is coupled to the low voltage modules (14) through a bipolar pulse transformer (36) and a third stage of magnetic compression (44) is directly coupled to the second stage of magnetic compression (42). The low voltage assembly (12) includes pressurized boxes (117) for improving voltage standoff between the primary winding assemblies (34) and secondary winding (40) contained therein.

  11. Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bates, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Gruzalski, Greg R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Luck, Christopher F. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between -15.degree. C. and 150.degree. C.

  12. Electra-optical device including a nitrogen containing electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bates, J.B.; Dudney, N.J.; Gruzalski, G.R.; Luck, C.F.

    1995-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode. Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between {minus}15 C and 150 C.

  13. Including stereoscopic information in the reconstruction of coronal magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Wiegelmann; T. Neukirch

    2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to include stereoscopic information about the three dimensional structure of flux tubes into the reconstruction of the coronal magnetic field. Due to the low plasma beta in the corona we can assume a force free magnetic field, with the current density parallel to the magnetic field lines. Here we use linear force free fields for simplicity. The method uses the line of sight magnetic field on the photosphere as observational input. The value of $\\alpha$ is determined iteratively by comparing the reconstructed magnetic field with the observed structures. The final configuration is the optimal linear force solution constrained by both the photospheric magnetogram and the observed plasma structures. As an example we apply our method to SOHO MDI/EIT data of an active region. In the future it is planned to apply the method to analyse data from the SECCHI instrument aboard the STEREO mission.

  14. Improving Planck calibration by including frequency-dependent relativistic corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quartin, Miguel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Planck satellite detectors are calibrated in the 2015 release using the "orbital dipole", which is the time-dependent dipole generated by the Doppler effect due to the motion of the satellite around the Sun. Such an effect has also relativistic time-dependent corrections of relative magnitude 10^(-3), due to coupling with the "solar dipole" (the motion of the Sun compared to the CMB rest frame), which are included in the data calibration by the Planck collaboration. We point out that such corrections are subject to a frequency-dependent multiplicative factor. This factor differs from unity especially at the highest frequencies, relevant for the HFI instrument. Since currently Planck calibration errors are dominated by systematics, to the point that polarization data is currently unreliable at large scales, such a correction can in principle be highly relevant for future data releases.

  15. Protoplanetary disks including radiative feedback from accreting planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montesinos, Matias; Perez, Sebastian; Baruteau, Clement; Casassus, Simon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While recent observational progress is converging on the detection of compact regions of thermal emission due to embedded protoplanets, further theoretical predictions are needed to understand the response of a protoplanetary disk to the planet formation radiative feedback. This is particularly important to make predictions for the observability of circumplanetary regions. In this work we use 2D hydrodynamical simulations to examine the evolution of a viscous protoplanetary disk in which a luminous Jupiter-mass planet is embedded. We use an energy equation which includes the radiative heating of the planet as an additional mechanism for planet formation feedback. Several models are computed for planet luminosities ranging from $10^{-5}$ to $10^{-3}$ Solar luminosities. We find that the planet radiative feedback enhances the disk's accretion rate at the planet's orbital radius, producing a hotter and more luminous environement around the planet, independently of the prescription used to model the disk's turbul...

  16. Actuator assembly including a single axis of rotation locking member

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quitmeyer, James N.; Benson, Dwayne M.; Geck, Kellan P.

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An actuator assembly including an actuator housing assembly and a single axis of rotation locking member fixedly attached to a portion of the actuator housing assembly and an external mounting structure. The single axis of rotation locking member restricting rotational movement of the actuator housing assembly about at least one axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a first end to the actuator housing assembly about a Y axis and at a 90.degree. angle to an X and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the Y axis. The single axis of rotation locking member is coupled at a second end to a mounting structure, and more particularly a mounting pin, about an X axis and at a 90.degree. angle to a Y and Z axis providing rotation of the actuator housing assembly about the X axis. The actuator assembly is thereby restricted from rotation about the Z axis.

  17. A Case for Including Transactions in OpenMP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, M; Bihari, B L; de Supinski, B R; Wu, P; Michael, M; Liu, Y; Chen, W

    2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Transactional Memory (TM) has received significant attention recently as a mechanism to reduce the complexity of shared memory programming. We explore the potential of TM to improve OpenMP applications. We combine a software TM (STM) system to support transactions with an OpenMP implementation to start thread teams and provide task and loop-level parallelization. We apply this system to two application scenarios that reflect realistic TM use cases. Our results with this system demonstrate that even with the relatively high overheads of STM, transactions can outperform OpenMP critical sections by 10%. Overall, our study demonstrates that extending OpenMP to include transactions would ease programming effort while allowing improved performance.

  18. The effect of pulse duration on the growth rate of laser-induced damage sites at 351 nm on fused silica surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negres, R A; Norton, M A; Liao, Z M; Cross, D A; Bude, J D; Carr, C W

    2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Past work in the area of laser-induced damage growth has shown growth rates to be primarily dependent on the laser fluence and wavelength. More recent studies suggest that growth rate, similar to the damage initiation process, is affected by a number of additional parameters including pulse duration, pulse shape, site size, and internal structure. In this study, we focus on the effect of pulse duration on the growth rate of laser damage sites located on the exit surface of fused silica optics. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, a significant dependence of growth rate at 351 nm on pulse duration from 1 ns to 15 ns as {tau}{sup 0.3} for sites in the 50-100 {micro}m size range.

  19. Hurricane Damage Sustained by the Oyster Industry and the Oyster Reefs Across the Galveston Bay System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurricane Damage Sustained by the Oyster Industry and the Oyster Reefs Across the Galveston Bay., Russell J. Miget, and Lawrence L. Falconer. "Hurricane Damage Sustained by the Oyster Industry-1412. Tel: 361/265-9203, Fax: 361/265-9434, E-mail: l-falconer@tamu.edu. Hurricane Damage Sustained

  20. United States hurricane landfalls and damages: Can one-to five-year predictions beat climatology?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    United States hurricane landfalls and damages: Can one-to five-year predictions beat climatology-year predictions of United States hurricane landfalls and damages improve upon a baseline expectation derived from these improvements were due to chance or actual skill. A review of efforts to predict hurricane landfalls and damage

  1. DETECTION OF IMPULSE-LIKE AIRBORNE SOUND FOR DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION IN ROTOR BLADES OF WIND TURBINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    DETECTION OF IMPULSE-LIKE AIRBORNE SOUND FOR DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION IN ROTOR BLADES OF WIND TURBINES burdens of wind turbines. To detect damage of rotor blades, several research projects focus on an acoustic, rotor blade, wind turbine INTRODUCTION There are several publications of non destructive damage

  2. Do Damaged Proteins Accumulate in Caenorhabditis elegans L-Isoaspartate Methyltransferase (pcm-1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Steven

    Do Damaged Proteins Accumulate in Caenorhabditis elegans L-Isoaspartate Methyltransferase (pcm-1 for helping to limit the accumulation of damaged proteins in aging or- ganisms. In this study, the effect Caenorhabditis elegans. It was found that damaged proteins recognized by this enzyme accumulated to significant

  3. Random sequential adsorption model of damage and crack accumulation: Exact one-dimensional results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Gromenko; V. Privman; M. L. Glasser

    2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The random sequential adsorption (RSA) model is modified to describe damage and crack accumulation. The exclusion for object deposition (for damaged region formation) is not for the whole object, as in the standard RSA, but only for the initial point (or higher-dimensional defect) from which the damaged region or crack initiates. The one-dimensional variant of the model is solved exactly.

  4. DNA Strand Damage Product Analysis Provides Evidence That the Tumor Cell-Specific Cytotoxin Tirapazamine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Kent. S.

    DNA Strand Damage Product Analysis Provides Evidence That the Tumor Cell-Specific Cytotoxin DNA strand damage that is initiated by the abstraction of hydrogen atoms from the deoxyribose damage. We find that the action of TPZ on duplex DNA under hypoxic conditions generates 5-methylene-2

  5. DAMAGE DETECTION AND LOCALISATION USING MODE-BASED METHOD AND PERTURBATION THEORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DAMAGE DETECTION AND LOCALISATION USING MODE-BASED METHOD AND PERTURBATION THEORY Alaa Hamze1 analysis technique. The damage is considered as a local perturbation of Young's modulus. Finally, the localisation of damage is done using classical modal-based methods and perturbation theory. The frequency

  6. Anisotropic damage modelling of biaxial behaviour and rupture of concrete structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Anisotropic damage modelling of biaxial behaviour and rupture of concrete structures Ragueneau F with damage induced anisotropy modelling for concrete-like materials. A thermodynamics based constitutive relationship is presented coupling anisotropic damage and elasticity. The biaxial behaviour of such a model

  7. A QUASISTATIC EVOLUTION MODEL FOR THE INTERACTION BETWEEN FRACTURE AND DAMAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A QUASISTATIC EVOLUTION MODEL FOR THE INTERACTION BETWEEN FRACTURE AND DAMAGE JEAN- tinuum which undergoes damage and possibly fracture. In both cases, the model appears to be ill posed so that the material prefers to form microstructures through the creation of fine mix- tures between the damaged

  8. MODELING OF DAMAGE AND LIFETIME ANALYSIS OF PLASMA FACING COMPONENTS DURING PLASMA INSTABILITIES IN TOKAMAKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    MODELING OF DAMAGE AND LIFETIME ANALYSIS OF PLASMA FACING COMPONENTS DURING PLASMA INSTABILITIES of the damage will essentially depend on the intensity and duration of energy deposited on PFC. Both bulk and surface damages can take place depending on these parameters. For this reason different deposition times

  9. Collateral damage: Evolution with displacement of fracture distribution and secondary fault strands in fault

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savage, Heather M.

    Collateral damage: Evolution with displacement of fracture distribution and secondary fault strands in fault damage zones Heather M. Savage1,2 and Emily E. Brodsky1 Received 22 April 2010; revised 10 of fracture distributions as a function of displacement to determine whether damage around small and large

  10. Identifying damage locations under ambient vibrations utilizing vector autoregressive models and Mahalanobis distances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Identifying damage locations under ambient vibrations utilizing vector autoregressive models Keywords: Damage location Ambient vibration Vector Autoregressive model Statistical pattern recognition Bridges Structural health monitoring a b s t r a c t This paper presents a study for identifying damage

  11. DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION IN A BENCHMARK CABLE-STAYED BRIDGE USING THE INTERPOLATION METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION IN A BENCHMARK CABLE-STAYED BRIDGE USING THE INTERPOLATION METHOD Marco mariagiuseppina.limongelli@polimi.it ABSTRACT In this paper the damage localization algorithm based on Operational Deformed Shapes (ODS) and known as Interpolation Damage Detection Method (IDDM), is applied

  12. Damage mechanisms identification of polymer based composite materials: time-frequency investigation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Damage mechanisms identification of polymer based composite materials: time-frequency investigation 2012, Nantes, France 2045 #12;Presented in this paper, a time-frequency damage characterization Emission (AE) signals by the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT). It is to be noted that the study of damage

  13. Damage Identification for Bridges Using Frequency and Time Domain Data Amir Ardalan Mosavi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damage Identification for Bridges Using Frequency and Time Domain Data Amir Ardalan Mosavi1 Error predictions of the ARX model x , y Standard deviations of the prediction errors DF,H , DF,D Damage Features calculated for healthy and damaged conditions of the structure f(DF,H) , g(DF,D) Probability

  14. Damage Identification in Aging Aircraft Structures with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Damage Identification in Aging Aircraft Structures with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors VICTOR of structural damage such as fatigue cracks and corrosion. Two main detection strategies are considered: (a) the wave propagation method for far-field damage detection; and (b) the electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance

  15. Damage detection on a full-scale highway sign structure with a distributed wireless sensor network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Chenyang

    Damage detection on a full-scale highway sign structure with a distributed wireless sensor network highway sign support structure to investigate the ability to use vibration response data to detect damage induced in the structure. A multi-level damage detection strategy is employed for this structure

  16. Damage to nearby divertor components of ITER-like devices during giant ELMs and disruptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Damage to nearby divertor components of ITER-like devices during giant ELMs and disruptions. Fusion 50 (2010) 115004 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0029-5515/50/11/115004 Damage to nearby divertor components. The simulation results of the integrated modelling indicate a significant potential damage of the divertor nearby

  17. Damage Rate in V.V. -1 -M. Youssef, UCLA MZY_APEX_98_1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Damage Rate in V.V. -1 - M. Youssef, UCLA MZY_APEX_98_1 APEX Study Memorandum March 24.1998 Title: Damage Rate in V.V. as a Function of Convective Layer Thickness To: APEX Study Participants From: Mahmoud: Preliminary calculations were performed to access the damage rate in the vacuum vessel as a function

  18. Bridge Damage and Repair Costs from Hurricane Katrina Jamie Padgett1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padgett, Jamie Ellen

    Bridge Damage and Repair Costs from Hurricane Katrina Jamie Padgett1 ; Reginald DesRoches2 ; Bryant caused significant damage to the transportation system in the Gulf Coast region. The overall cost to repair or replace the bridges damaged during the hurricane is estimated at over $1 billion. This paper

  19. STRUCTURAL-DAMAGE DETECTION BY DISTRIBUTED PIEZOELECTRIC TRANSDUCERS AND TUNED ELECTRIC CIRCUITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    STRUCTURAL-DAMAGE DETECTION BY DISTRIBUTED PIEZOELECTRIC TRANSDUCERS AND TUNED ELECTRIC CIRCUITS F Geotecnica, Rome, Italy A novel technique for damage detection of structures is introduced and discussed measurements, it allows for accurate results in the identification and localization of damages. Use

  20. Urban damage assessment using multimodal QuickBird images and ancillary data: the Bam and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Urban damage assessment using multimodal QuickBird images and ancillary data: the Bam proved its usefulness for the crisis mitigation through situation report and damage assessment. Visual. We propose a semi-automatic damage assessment method based on a pair of very high spatial resolution

  1. A Methodology for Weapon System Availability Assessment, incorporating Failure, Damage and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A Methodology for Weapon System Availability Assessment, incorporating Failure, Damage systems can become unavailable due to system failures or damage to the system; in both cases, system the more specific availability studies take battlefield damage into account. This paper aims to define

  2. Erosion Damage of Nearby Plasma-Facing Components during a Disruption on the Divertor Plate*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Erosion Damage of Nearby Plasma-Facing Components during a Disruption on the Divertor Plate* A those of the United States Governmentor any agency thereof. #12;Erosion Damage of Nearby Plasma radiation emitted by heating of the vapor cloud. This radiation energy can cause serious erosion damage

  3. Damage and seismic velocity structure of pulverized rocks near the San Andreas Fault

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Zion, Yehuda

    Damage and seismic velocity structure of pulverized rocks near the San Andreas Fault Marieke Rempe south of Littlerock, California. The examined site has a strongly asymmetric damage structure with respect to the SAF core. The conglomerates to the southwest show little to no damage, whereas a ~100 m

  4. Antaphid interactions on Asclepias syriaca are mediated by plant genotype and caterpillar damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mooney, Kailen A.

    1 Ant­aphid interactions on Asclepias syriaca are mediated by plant genotype and caterpillar damage in induced responses to herbivory. Here we test whether induced responses to leaf damage and genotypic-way factorial field experiment manipulating plant genotype, leaf damage by specialist monarch caterpillars

  5. STRUCTURAL DAMAGE CLASSIFICATION COMPARISON USING SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINE AND BAYESIAN MODEL SELECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    STRUCTURAL DAMAGE CLASSIFICATION COMPARISON USING SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINE AND BAYESIAN MODEL, CA, USA 92093-0085 mdtodd@ucsd.edu ABSTRACT Since all damage identification strategies inevitably in the decision-making process of damage detection, classification, and prognosis, which employs training data (or

  6. Upregulation of soluble epoxide hydrolase in proximal tubular cells mediated proteinuria-induced renal damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    -induced renal damage Qian Wang,1,3 * Wei Pang,2 * Zhuan Cui,1 Junbao Shi,1 Yan Liu,2 Bo Liu,2 Yunfeng Zhou,2- lase in proximal tubular cells mediated proteinuria-induced renal damage. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. To investigate the role of sEH in proteinuria-induced renal damage, we incubated purified urine protein from

  7. Robust damage assessment of multiple cracks based on the Frequency Response Function and the Constitutive Relation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Robust damage assessment of multiple cracks based on the Frequency Response Function a damage assessment technique for the non destructive detection and sizing of multiple open cracks in beams, many researchers have performed extensive investigations and damage assess- ment techniques based

  8. Damage Identification in Aging Aircraft Structures with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Damage Identification in Aging Aircraft Structures with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors VICTOR the onset and progress of structural damage such as fatigue cracks and corrosion. Two main detection strategies are considered: (a) the wave propagation method for far-field damage detection; and (b

  9. DAMAGE DETECTION BASED ON STRUCTURAL RESPONSE TO TEMPERATURE CHANGES AND MODEL UPDATING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    DAMAGE DETECTION BASED ON STRUCTURAL RESPONSE TO TEMPERATURE CHANGES AND MODEL UPDATING Marian The paper proposes use of measured structural response to temperature loads for purposes of damage identification. As opposed to the most common approaches, which rely on suppressing temperature effects in damage

  10. N d'ordre : 2011-ISAL-0147 Annee 2011 Ductile damage characterization in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    N d'ordre : 2011-ISAL-0147 Ann´ee 2011 Th`ese Ductile damage characterization in Dual-Phase steels-5Oct2012 #12;Ductile damage characterization in Dual-Phase steels using X-ray tomography Abstract to stress and to damage, the Dual-Phase steels (DP) present an acceptable strength/ductility compromise

  11. What's the Damage? Assessing the Costs of Spatial Closures to Protect Corals and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    What's the Damage? Assessing the Costs of Spatial Closures to Protect Corals and Sponges from.: 588 Title of Project: What's the damage? Assessing the costs of spatial closures to protect corals for protecting corals and sponges from potential damage by bottom trawling. However, closures can be challenging

  12. PLASTICITY OF DAMAGED SOLIDS AND SHEAR BAND LOCALIZATION MARIA K.DUSZEK and PIOTR PERZYNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    694 PLASTICITY OF DAMAGED SOLIDS AND SHEAR BAND LOCALIZATION MARIA K.DUSZEK and PIOTR PERZYNA of shear band localization conditions for finite elastic-plastic rate independent deformations of damaged for elastic-plastic solids when iso- tropic and kinematic hardening effects and micro-damage process are taken

  13. Adaptive modeling of environmental e ects in modal parameters for damage detection in civil structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Adaptive modeling of environmental e ects in modal parameters for damage detection in civil parameters due to temperature changes from those caused by structural damage or other environmental e ects to environmental factors can be far larger than those caused by structural damage. During damp weather, for example

  14. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchetti, Francesco

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kastan, M. B. (1997). DNA damage induces phosphorylation ofby ATM in response to DNA damage. Science 281, Barber, R. ,Nussenzweig, A. (2002). DNA damage-induced G2-M checkpoint

  15. Functional role of p53 N-terminal phosphorylation in regulating the p53 response to DNA damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, Connie

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the p53 Responses to DNA Damage. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USAapoptosis following DNA damage. EMBO J. 19, 4967-4975. Chao,Herrlich, P. (1999). DNA damage induced p53 stabilization:

  16. ATM Phosphorylates and Activates the Transcription Factor MEF2D for Neuronal Survival in Response to DNA Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Shing Fai

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by ATM in response to DNA damage. Science, 281, 1674-1677.J. and Kastan M. B. (2003). DNA damage activates ATM throughgene product causes oxidative damage in target organs. Proc.

  17. Irrigation and fertilization effects on Nantucket Pine Tip Moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) Damage levels and pupal weight in an intensively-managed pine plantation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyle, David, R.; Nowak, John, T.; Fettig, Christopher, J.

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The widespread application of intensive forest management practices throughout the southeastern U.S. has increased loblolly pine, Pinus taeda L., yields and shortened conventional rotation lengths. Fluctuations in Nantucket pine tip moth, Rhyacionia frustrana (Comstock), population density and subsequent damage levels have been linked to variations in management intensity. We examined the effects of two practices, irrigation and fertilization, on R. frustrana damage levels and pupal weights in an intensively-managed P. taeda plantation in South Carolina. Trees received intensive weed control and one of the following treatments; irrigation only. fertilization only, irrigation + fertilization, or control. Mean whole-tree tip moth damage levels ranged from <1 to 48% during this study. Damage levels differed significantly among treatments in two tip moth generations in 2001, but not 2000. Pupal weight was significantly heavier in fertilization compared to the irrigation treatment in 2000, but no significant differences were observed in 2001. Tree diameter. height. and aboveground volume were significantly greater in the irrigation + fertilization than in the irrigation treatment after two growing seasons. Our data suggest that intensive management practices that include irrigation and fertilization do not consistently increase R. frustrana damage levels and pupal weights as is commonly believed. However, tip moth suppression efforts in areas adjacent to our study may have partially reduced the potential impacts of R. frustrana on this experiment.

  18. Damage Identification Study of a Seven-story Full-scale Building Slice Tested on the UCSD-NEES Shake Table

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moaveni, Babak; He, Xianfei; Resterpo, Jose I; Conte, Joel P

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Restrepo JI, Elgamal A. Damage identification of a seven-review of vibration-based damage identifi- cation methods.Detection of structural damage through changes in frequency:

  19. Development and Application of a Strength and Damage Model for Rock under Dynamic Loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antoun, T H; Lomov, I N; Glenn, L A

    2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulating the behavior of geologic materials under impact loading conditions requires the use of a constitutive model that includes the effects of bulking, yielding, damage, porous compaction and loading rate on the material response. This paper describes the development, implementation and calibration of a thermodynamically consistent constitutive model that incorporates these features. The paper also describes a computational study in which the model was used to perform numerical simulations of PILE DRIVER, a deeply-buried underground nuclear explosion detonated in granite at the Nevada Test Site. Particle velocity histories, peak velocity and peak displacement as a function of slant range obtained from the code simulations compare favorably with PILE DRIVER data. The simulated attenuation of peak velocity and peak displacement also agrees with the results from several other spherical wave experiments in granite.

  20. Radiation Damage in Nuclear Fuel for Advanced Burner Reactors: Modeling and Experimental Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Niels Gronbech; Asta, Mark; Ozolins, Nigel Browning'Vidvuds; de Walle, Axel van; Wolverton, Christopher

    2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The consortium has completed its existence and we are here highlighting work and accomplishments. As outlined in the proposal, the objective of the work was to advance the theoretical understanding of advanced nuclear fuel materials (oxides) toward a comprehensive modeling strategy that incorporates the different relevant scales involved in radiation damage in oxide fuels. Approaching this we set out to investigate and develop a set of directions: 1) Fission fragment and ion trajectory studies through advanced molecular dynamics methods that allow for statistical multi-scale simulations. This work also includes an investigation of appropriate interatomic force fields useful for the energetic multi-scale phenomena of high energy collisions; 2) Studies of defect and gas bubble formation through electronic structure and Monte Carlo simulations; and 3) an experimental component for the characterization of materials such that comparisons can be obtained between theory and experiment.

  1. Influence of cleaning process on the laser-induced damage threshold of substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen Zhengxiang; Ding Tao; Ye Xiaowen; Wang Xiaodong; Ma Bin; Cheng Xinbin; Liu Huasong; Ji Yiqin; Wang Zhanshan

    2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The cleaning process of optical substrates plays an important role during the manufacture of high-power laser coatings. Two kinds of substrates, fused silica and BK7 glass, and two cleaning processes, called process 1 and process 2 having different surfactant solutions and different ultrasonic cleaning parameters, are adopted to compare the influence of the ultrasonic cleaning technique on the substrates. The evaluation standards of the cleaning results include contaminant-removal efficiency, weak absorption, and laser-induced damage threshold of the substrates. For both fused silica and BK7, process 2 is more efficient than process 1. Because acid and alkaline solutions can increase the roughness of BK7, process 2 is unsuitable for BK7 glass cleaning. The parameters of the cleaning protocol should be changed depending on the material of the optical components and the type of contamination.

  2. Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

  3. Hydrodynamic Simulation of Supernova Remnants Including Efficient Particle Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donald C. Ellison; Anne Decourchelle; Jean Ballet

    2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of supernova remnants (SNRs) show nonthermal X-rays assumed to be synchrotron emission from shock accelerated TeV electrons. The existence of these TeV electrons strongly suggests that the shocks in SNRs are sources of galactic cosmic rays (CRs). In addition, there is convincing evidence from broad-band studies of individual SNRs and elsewhere that the particle acceleration process in SNRs can be efficient and nonlinear. If SNR shocks are efficient particle accelerators, the production of CRs impacts the thermal properties of the shock heated, X-ray emitting gas and the SNR evolution. We report on a technique that couples nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration, including the backreaction of the accelerated particles on the structure of the forward and reverse shocks, with a hydrodynamic simulation of SNR evolution. Compared to models which ignore CRs, the most important hydrodynamical effects of placing a significant fraction of shock energy into CRs are larger shock compression ratios and lower temperatures in the shocked gas. We compare our results, which use an approximate description of the acceleration process, with a more complete model where the full CR transport equations are solved (i.e., Berezhko et al., 2002), and find excellent agreement for the CR spectrum summed over the SNR lifetime and the evolving shock compression ratio. The importance of the coupling between particle acceleration and SNR dynamics for the interpretation of broad-band continuum and thermal X-ray observations is discussed.

  4. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  5. CDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, Natasha V. (Okemos, MI); Broekaert, Willem F. (Dilbeek, BE); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY); Kush, Anil (New York, NY)

    1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74-79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli.

  6. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1995-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1,018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 11 figures.

  7. cDNA encoding a polypeptide including a hevein sequence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raikhel, N.V.; Broekaert, W.F.; Chua, N.H.; Kush, A.

    1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A cDNA clone (HEV1) encoding hevein was isolated via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using mixed oligonucleotides corresponding to two regions of hevein as primers and a Hevea brasiliensis latex cDNA library as a template. HEV1 is 1018 nucleotides long and includes an open reading frame of 204 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acid residues followed by a 187 amino acid polypeptide. The amino-terminal region (43 amino acids) is identical to hevein and shows homology to several chitin-binding proteins and to the amino-termini of wound-induced genes in potato and poplar. The carboxyl-terminal portion of the polypeptide (144 amino acids) is 74--79% homologous to the carboxyl-terminal region of wound-inducible genes of potato. Wounding, as well as application of the plant hormones abscisic acid and ethylene, resulted in accumulation of hevein transcripts in leaves, stems and latex, but not in roots, as shown by using the cDNA as a probe. A fusion protein was produced in E. coli from the protein of the present invention and maltose binding protein produced by the E. coli. 12 figs.

  8. C -parameter distribution at N 3 LL ' including power corrections

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoang, André H.; Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Mateu, Vicent; Stewart, Iain W.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the e?e? C-parameter distribution using the soft-collinear effective theory with a resummation to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-log prime accuracy of the most singular partonic terms. This includes the known fixed-order QCD results up to O(?3s), a numerical determination of the two-loop nonlogarithmic term of the soft function, and all logarithmic terms in the jet and soft functions up to three loops. Our result holds for C in the peak, tail, and far tail regions. Additionally, we treat hadronization effects using a field theoretic nonperturbative soft function, with moments ?n. To eliminate an O(?QCD) renormalon ambiguity in the soft function, we switch from the MSŻ to a short distance “Rgap” scheme to define the leading power correction parameter ?1. We show how to simultaneously account for running effects in ?1 due to renormalon subtractions and hadron-mass effects, enabling power correction universality between C-parameter and thrust to be tested in our setup. We discuss in detail the impact of resummation and renormalon subtractions on the convergence. In the relevant fit region for ?s(mZ) and ?1, the perturbative uncertainty in our cross section is ? 2.5% at Q=mZ.

  9. Interim performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeBlasio, R.; Forman, S.; Hogan, S.; Nuss, G.; Post, H.; Ross, R.; Schafft, H.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a response to the Photovoltaic Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (P.L. 95-590) which required the generation of performance criteria for photovoltaic energy systems. Since the document is evolutionary and will be updated, the term interim is used. More than 50 experts in the photovoltaic field have contributed in the writing and review of the 179 performance criteria listed in this document. The performance criteria address characteristics of present-day photovoltaic systems that are of interest to manufacturers, government agencies, purchasers, and all others interested in various aspects of photovoltaic system performance and safety. The performance criteria apply to the system as a whole and to its possible subsystems: array, power conditioning, monitor and control, storage, cabling, and power distribution. They are further categorized according to the following performance attributes: electrical, thermal, mechanical/structural, safety, durability/reliability, installation/operation/maintenance, and building/site. Each criterion contains a statement of expected performance (nonprescriptive), a method of evaluation, and a commentary with further information or justification. Over 50 references for background information are also given. A glossary with definitions relevant to photovoltaic systems and a section on test methods are presented in the appendices. Twenty test methods are included to measure performance characteristics of the subsystem elements. These test methods and other parts of the document will be expanded or revised as future experience and needs dictate.

  10. Atomistic modeling of nanowires, small-scale fatigue damage in cast magnesium, and materials for MEMS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, Martin L. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Talmage, Mellisa J. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); McDowell, David L., 1956- (,-Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); West, Neil (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Gullett, Philip Michael (Mississippi State University , MS); Miller, David C. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Spark, Kevin (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Diao, Jiankuai (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Horstemeyer, Mark F. (Mississippi State University , MS); Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Gall, K (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA)

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lightweight and miniaturized weapon systems are driving the use of new materials in design such as microscale materials and ultra low-density metallic materials. Reliable design of future weapon components and systems demands a thorough understanding of the deformation modes in these materials that comprise the components and a robust methodology to predict their performance during service or storage. Traditional continuum models of material deformation and failure are not easily extended to these new materials unless microstructural characteristics are included in the formulation. For example, in LIGA Ni and Al-Si thin films, the physical size is on the order of microns, a scale approaching key microstructural features. For a new potential structural material, cast Mg offers a high stiffness-to-weight ratio, but the microstructural heterogeneity at various scales requires a structure-property continuum model. Processes occurring at the nanoscale and microscale develop certain structures that drive material behavior. The objective of the work presented in this report was to understand material characteristics in relation to mechanical properties at the nanoscale and microscale in these promising new material systems. Research was conducted primarily at the University of Colorado at Boulder to employ tightly coupled experimentation and simulation to study damage at various material size scales under monotonic and cyclic loading conditions. Experimental characterization of nano/micro damage will be accomplished by novel techniques such as in-situ environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), 1 MeV transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). New simulations to support experimental efforts will include modified embedded atom method (MEAM) atomistic simulations at the nanoscale and single crystal micromechanical finite element simulations. This report summarizes the major research and development accomplishments for the LDRD project titled 'Atomistic Modeling of Nanowires, Small-scale Fatigue Damage in Cast Magnesium, and Materials for MEMS'. This project supported a strategic partnership between Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Colorado at Boulder by providing funding for the lead author, Ken Gall, and his students, while he was a member of the University of Colorado faculty.

  11. Insulin signaling, dietary restriction and DNA damage : multiple roles for smk-1 in the mediation of C. elegans life span

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolff, Suzanne Christine

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    role of oxidative damage and environmental stresses. Natureand environmental insults drive the accumulation of DNA damageenvironmental state. While age- related decay still occurs (due to oxidative damage and

  12. Laser damage resistant pits in dielectric coatings created by femtosecond laser machining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, J; Roger Qiu, ,; Stolz, C; Thomas, M; Martinez, C; Ozkan, A

    2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Replacing growing damage sites with benign, laser damage resistant features in multilayer dielectric films may enable large mirrors to be operated at significantly higher fluences. Laser damage resistant features have been created in high reflecting coatings on glass substrates using femtosecond laser machining. These prototype features have been damage tested to over 40 J/cm{sup 2} (1064nm, 3ns pulselength) and have been shown not to damage upon repeated irradiation at 40J/cm{sup 2}. Further work to optimize feature shape and laser machining parameters is ongoing.

  13. Laser-induced damage threshold of silicon in millisecond, nanosecond, and picosecond regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.; Shen, Z. H.; Lu, J.; Ni, X. W. [School of Science, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Millisecond, nanosecond, and picosecond laser pulse induced damage thresholds on single-crystal are investigated in this study. The thresholds of laser-induced damage on silicon are calculated theoretically for three pulse widths based on the thermal damage model. An axisymmetric mathematical model is established for the transient temperature field of the silicon. Experiments are performed to test the damage thresholds of silicon at various pulse widths. The results indicate that the damage thresholds obviously increase with the increasing of laser pulse width. Additionally, the experimental results agree well with theoretical calculations and numerical simulation results.

  14. Thermodynamic damage mechanism of transparent films caused by a low-power laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia Zhilin; Shao Jianda; Fan Zhengxiu; Wu Shigang

    2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A new model for analyzing the laser-induced damage process is provided. In many damage pits, the melted residue can been found. This is evidence of the phase change of materials. Therefore the phase change of materials is incorporated into the mechanical damage mechanism of films. Three sequential stages are discussed: no phase change, liquid phase change, and gas phase change. To study the damage mechanism and process, two kinds of stress have been considered: thermal stress and deformation stress. The former is caused by the temperature gradient and the latter is caused by high-pressure drive deformation. The theory described can determine the size of the damage pit.

  15. Community Assessment Tool for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HCTT-CHE

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Community Assessment Tool (CAT) for Public Health Emergencies Including Pandemic Influenza (hereafter referred to as the CAT) was developed as a result of feedback received from several communities. These communities participated in workshops focused on influenza pandemic planning and response. The 2008 through 2011 workshops were sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Feedback during those workshops indicated the need for a tool that a community can use to assess its readiness for a disaster—readiness from a total healthcare perspective, not just hospitals, but the whole healthcare system. The CAT intends to do just that—help strengthen existing preparedness plans by allowing the healthcare system and other agencies to work together during an influenza pandemic. It helps reveal each core agency partners' (sectors) capabilities and resources, and highlights cases of the same vendors being used for resource supplies (e.g., personal protective equipment [PPE] and oxygen) by the partners (e.g., public health departments, clinics, or hospitals). The CAT also addresses gaps in the community's capabilities or potential shortages in resources. While the purpose of the CAT is to further prepare the community for an influenza pandemic, its framework is an extension of the traditional all-hazards approach to planning and preparedness. As such, the information gathered by the tool is useful in preparation for most widespread public health emergencies. This tool is primarily intended for use by those involved in healthcare emergency preparedness (e.g., community planners, community disaster preparedness coordinators, 9-1-1 directors, hospital emergency preparedness coordinators). It is divided into sections based on the core agency partners, which may be involved in the community's influenza pandemic influenza response.

  16. Damage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hau-Riege, S; London, R A; Bionta, R M; McKernan, M A; Baker, S L; Krzywinski, J; Sobierajski, R; Nietubyc, R; Pelka, J B; Jurek, M; Klinger, D; Juha, L; Chalupsky, J; Cihelka, J; Hajkova, V; Koptyaev, S; Velyhan, A; Krasa, J; Kuba, J; Tiedtke, K; Toleikis, S; Tschentscher, T; Wabnitz, H; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Stojanovic, N; Zastrau, U; Tronnier, A; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J

    2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We exposed samples of B4C, amorphous C, chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD)-diamond C, Si, and SiC to single 25 fs-long pulses of 32.5 nm free-electron-laser radiation at fluences of up to 2.2 J/cm{sup 2}. The samples were chosen as candidate materials for x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) optics. We found that the threshold for surface-damage is on the order of the fluence required for thermal melting. For larger fluences, the crater depths correspond to temperatures on the order of the critical temperature, suggesting that the craters are formed by two-phase vaporization [1]. XFELs have the promise of producing extremely high-intensity ultrashort pulses of coherent, monochromatic radiation in the 1 to 10 keV regime. The expected high output fluence and short pulse duration pose significant challenges to the optical components, including radiation damage. It has not been possible to obtain direct experimental verification of the expected damage thresholds since appropriate x-ray sources are not yet available. FLASH has allowed us to study the interaction of high-fluence short-duration photon pulses with materials at the shortest wavelength possible to date. With these experiments, we have come closer to the extreme conditions expected in XFEL-matter interaction scenarios than previously possible.

  17. Field dependent emission rates in radiation damaged GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, R. M.; Myers, S. M.; Wampler, W. R.; Lang, D. V.; Seager, C. H.; Campbell, J. M. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1415 (United States)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the temperature and field dependence of emission rates from five traps in electron damaged GaAs. Four of the traps have previously been identified as radiation defects. One of the traps, seen in higher doped diodes, has not been previously identified. We have fit the data to a multiphonon emission theory that allows recombination in GaAs to be characterized over a broad range of temperature and electric field. These results demonstrate an efficient method to calculate field-dependent emission rates in GaAs.

  18. Simulation of neutron radiation damage in silicon semiconductor devices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shadid, John Nicolas; Hoekstra, Robert John; Hennigan, Gary Lee; Castro, Joseph Pete Jr.; Fixel, Deborah A.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A code, Charon, is described which simulates the effects that neutron damage has on silicon semiconductor devices. The code uses a stabilized, finite-element discretization of the semiconductor drift-diffusion equations. The mathematical model used to simulate semiconductor devices in both normal and radiation environments will be described. Modeling of defect complexes is accomplished by adding an additional drift-diffusion equation for each of the defect species. Additionally, details are given describing how Charon can efficiently solve very large problems using modern parallel computers. Comparison between Charon and experiment will be given, as well as comparison with results from commercially-available TCAD codes.

  19. The damage function approach for estimating fuel cycle externalities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the methodology used in a study of fuel cycle externalities sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Commission of the European Communities. The methodology is the damage function approach. This paper describes that approach and discusses its application and limitations. The fuel cycles addressed are those in which coal, biomass, oil, hydro, natural gas and uranium are used to generate electric power. The methodology is used to estimate the physical impacts of these fuel cycles on environmental resources and human health, and the external costs and benefits of these impacts.

  20. An investigation of damage accumulation in graphite/epoxy laminates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norvell, Robert Gerald

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Specimen A-4, [0/90?] , 98$ Ft s tu Crack Angle and Length Distribution in Specimen 8-5, [0/90, ] , 94$ s tu Crack Angle and Length Distribution in Specimen C-S, [0/90, ] , 91$ Ft . . ~ Crack Angle and Length Distribution in Specimen E-9, tO /90... August 1985 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering AN INVESTIGATION OF DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by ROBERT GERALD NORVELL Approved as to style and content by: David H. Allen (Co-Chair of C mmitt. ) Richard A. Schap...

  1. Blade reliability collaborative : collection of defect, damage and repair data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashwill, Thomas D.; Ogilvie, Alistair B.; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Blade Reliability Collaborative (BRC) was started by the Wind Energy Technologies Department of Sandia National Laboratories and DOE in 2010 with the goal of gaining insight into planned and unplanned O&M issues associated with wind turbine blades. A significant part of BRC is the Blade Defect, Damage and Repair Survey task, which will gather data from blade manufacturers, service companies, operators and prior studies to determine details about the largest sources of blade unreliability. This report summarizes the initial findings from this work.

  2. Damage due to salt crystallization in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noushine Shahidzadeh Bonn; Francois Bertrand; Daniel Bonn

    2009-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate salt crystallization in porous media that can lead to their disintegration. For sodium sulfate we show for the first time experimentally that when anhydrous crystals are wetted with water, there is very rapid growth of the hydrated form of sulfate in clusters that nucleate on anhydrous salt micro crystals. The molar volume of the hydrated crystals being four times bigger, the growth of these clusters can generate stresses in excess of the tensile strength of the stone and lead therefore to damage.

  3. Optical Damage Threshold of Silicon for Ultrafast Infrared Pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, Benjamin M.; /Tech-X, Boulder /SLAC

    2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of the optical damage threshold of crystalline silicon in air for ultrafast pulses in the near infrared. The wavelengths tested span a range from the telecommunications band at 1550 nm, extending to 2260 nm. We discuss the motivation for the measurements and give theoretical context. We then describe the experimental setup, diagnostics, and procedure. The results show a breakdown threshold of 0.2J/cm{sup 2} at 1550 nm and 1.06 ps FWHM pulse duration, and a weak dependence on wavelength.

  4. Damage thresholds of fluoride multilayers at 355 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, R.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Loomis, G.E.; Rainer, F.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluoride multilayer coatings were evaluated for use in 355 nm high reflector applications. The LaF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], NdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] and GdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] multilayers had laser damage thresholds of 20, 17.9 and 7.4 (measured at 10-ns pulsewidths), respectively. High tensile stresses in the coatings restricted this evaluation to only 5-layer-pair partial reflectors (49--52%).The LaF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], NdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]Al[sub 6] and GdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] multilayers had tensile stresses of [approximately] 1.1 [times] 109, 1.3 [times] 109 and 9.3 [times] 10[sup 8] dynes/cm[sup 2], respectively. Substrate material and glow-discharge processing of the substrates were found to influence the density of stress-induced coating fractures and damage thresholds in some cases. If stress fracturing and scatter can be controlled, these fluoride material combinations are suited for 3[omega] applications.

  5. Damage mechanisms in the dynamic fracture of nominally brittle polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davy Dalmas; Claudia Guerra; Julien Scheibert; Daniel Bonamy

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) provides a consistent framework to evaluate quantitatively the energy flux released to the tip of a growing crack. Still, the way in which the crack selects its velocity in response to this energy flux remains far from completely understood. To uncover the underlying mechanisms, we experimentally studied damage and dissipation processes that develop during the dynamic failure of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), classically considered as the archetype of brittle amorphous materials. We evidenced a well-defined critical velocity along which failure switches from nominally-brittle to quasi-brittle, where crack propagation goes hand in hand with the nucleation and growth of microcracks. Via post-mortem analysis of the fracture surfaces, we were able to reconstruct the complete spatiotemporal microcracking dynamics with micrometer/nanosecond resolution. We demonstrated that the true local propagation speed of individual crack fronts is limited to a fairly low value, which can be much smaller than the apparent speed measured at the continuum-level scale. By coalescing with the main front, microcracks boost the macroscale velocity through an acceleration factor of geometrical origin. We discuss the key role of damage-related internal variables in the selection of macroscale fracture dynamics.

  6. Evaluation and remediation of a fire damaged geosynthetic liner system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, F.T.; Overmann, L.K.; Cotton, R.L.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fire in a hazardous waste landfill damaged the liner system consisting of compacted clay, geomembranes, geonets, geotextiles, and granular soils. Following waste excavation, the visibly damaged liner system materials were removed and samples of each component were obtained from the perimeter of the visibly undamaged area. Geomembrane samples were tested for tensile characteristics and index properties; geonet samples were tested for grab tensile properties and thickness. Test results were compared to the original specifications, manufacturers` quality control data, quality assurance conformance test results, and baseline sample data from an unaffected part of the landfill. Geomembrane baseline results exceeded the original specifications, and the specifications were used as the basis of acceptance of the perimeter samples. Geonet baseline results were inconclusive, with grab elongation consistently below the original specifications. A statistical approach was used to delineate the limit of affected geonet using the baseline sample data. The liner system was reconstructed to the limits defined by this testing program and returned to service following acceptance by the regulatory agencies.

  7. Emulation of reactor irradiation damage using ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. S. Was; Z. Jiao; E. Beckett; A. M. Monterrosa; O. Anderoglu; B. H. Sencer; M. Hackett

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The continued operation of existing light water nuclear reactors and the development of advanced nuclear reactor depend heavily on understanding how damage by radiation to levels degrades materials that serve as the structural components in reactor cores. The first high dose ion irradiation experiments on a ferritic-martensitic steel showing that ion irradiation closely emulates the full radiation damage microstructure created in-reactor are described. Ferritic-martensitic alloy HT9 (heat 84425) in the form of a hexagonal fuel bundle duct (ACO-3) accumulated 155 dpa at an average temperature of 443°C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Using invariance theory as a guide, irradiation of the same heat was conducted using self-ions (Fe++) at 5 MeV at a temperature of 460°C and to a dose of 188 displacements per atom. The void swelling was nearly identical between the two irradiations and the size and density of precipitates and loops following ion irradiation are within a factor of two of those for neutron irradiation. The level of agreement across all of the principal microstructure changes between ion and reactor irradiations establishes the capability of tailoring ion irradiations to emulate the reactor-irradiated microstructure.

  8. Damage monitoring in sandwich beams by modal parameter shifts: A comparative study of burst random and sine dwell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    1 Damage monitoring in sandwich beams by modal parameter shifts: A comparative study of burst Abstract: This paper presents an experimental study on the effects of multi-site damage on the vibration response of honeycomb sandwich beams, damaged by two different ways i.e., impact damage and core

  9. Performance of Damaged Soil-Concrete Wraparound Dam Sections under Dynamic Loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanarska, Y; Lomov, I; Glascoe, L; Morris, J; Antoun, T; Hall, R; Woodson, S; Fortune, J; Hynes, M E

    2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting seismic or shock loading damage of the soil-concrete interface where an embankment wraparound dam provides support to the end monoliths in a concrete gravity dam is an inherently challenging three-dimensional coupled problem. We wish to predict formation and growth of a crack between the soil and concrete with a sustained flow of water. Further, we seek to better understand all critical phenomenology of this type of problem such as the potential mitigating and stabilizing role of upstream and downstream filter zone and shell materials. This collaborative research effort will ultimately determine whether advances in computational platforms, constitutive soil models (advances in representing particulates, tension, flow, and hydraulic erosion), and physical testing (advances in centrifuge and flume testing) can be applied successfully to solve this complex problem. Our focus is (1) to develop and validate high fidelity numerical models to investigate crack formation, soil erosion, transport of materials, and stability as part of the erosion process, and deposition within interface cracks; and (2) to investigate the performance of the filter zone materials if an extreme loading event such as an earthquake or shock damages the wraparound section. Our numerical tools include both continuum and discrete approaches. The continuum approach is based on the drift-flux multiphase model where a fluid and a solid are represented as interpenetrating continua and can account for turbulent flow characteristics, particle lift forces due to shear flow, particle collisions, and gravity settling. The discrete particle approach is also applied and is useful when deriving constitutive laws and parameterizations of soil behavior. Different experimental validation studies are under consideration for model validation and calibration. Several case studies for different crack sizes and orientations, particle sizes and environmental hydraulic conditions may be required to confirm the conditions necessary for self-healing or catastrophic growth of a crack. We will present both numerical and experimental findings to date on this effort in light of necessary considerations for further study.

  10. CFD Analyses of Damaged Fuel Inside a Cleaning Vessel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Legradi, Gabor; Boros, Ildiko; Aszodi, Attila [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Muegyetem rkp. 3-9. H-1111 Budapest (Hungary)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On 10-11 of April, 2003, a serious incident occurred in a special fuel assembly cleaning tank, which was installed into the service shaft of the 2. unit of the Paks NPP in Hungary. During this incident, most of the 30 fuel assemblies put into the cleaning tank have seriously damaged. In the Institute of Nuclear Techniques of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics several CFD investigations were performed concerning the course of the incident, the post incidental conditions and the recovery work. The main reason of the incident can be originated from the defective design of the cleaning tank which resulted in the insufficient cooling of the system in a special operational mode. Our investigation performed with a complex 3D CFX model clearly showed how could as strong temperature stratification develop inside the cleaning tank that it was able to block the coolant flow through the fuel assemblies. After the blocking of the flow, the coolant turned into boiling and the assemblies became uncovered. The temperature of the surfaces of the fuel assemblies went above 1000 deg. C. With the aid of the radiative heat transfer model of the CFX-5.6 code, the surface temperatures were analyzed. When the cleaning instrument got opened the fuel assemblies suffered a serious thermal shock and the assemblies highly damaged. The post-incident thermo-hydraulic state inside the cleaning vessel was investigated with a rather complex CFX model. The uncertainties were decreased by a wide parameter study. The recovery work is planned to be started in the close future. The operators of the damaged fuel removing equipments will work standing on a platform which will be placed into the service shaft just above the surface of the coolant of decreased level. Protecting the workers against unnecessary personal doses is a very important task. In this situation, while the coolant is important part of the biological shielding, it is also a source of radiation due to the considerable amount of radioactive contamination dispersed into it. Therefore, the 3D distribution of the contamination in the service shaft was estimated for different operational and incidental scenarios with a wide parameter study made by a 3D CFX model. This comprehensive work performed with several models and calculations is tersely outlined according to the limited extent of the paper. (authors)

  11. Unexpected irreversible damage of an asymmetric bismuth silicate photorefractive spatial light modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Xiujian; Yang Jiankun; Yang Juncai; Chang Shengli; Liu Ju; Hu Wenhua

    2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Unexpected irreversible damage occurred repeatedly in the asymmetric bismuth silicate (BSO)photorefractive spatial light modulator under some operation modes, even though thepower of the write-light beam does not exceed the optical damage threshold. Accordingto the microscopic surface images and the Raman spectra of the BSO film, suddenrising of temperature in local areas caused by the drift of the photon-induced electronsis responsible for the damage; the damage exists not only on the surface but also insidethe BSO crystal. The damage is relative to the structure of the spatial lightmodulator, the operation mode, and the growth of the BSO crystal. The informationprovided by the damage is useful for optimizing the structure, the operation modes, and the performance of the photorefractive spatial light modulators.

  12. Defect and damage evolution quantification in dynamically-deformed metals using orientation-imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, George T., III [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Livescu, Veronica [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cerreta, Ellen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Orientation-imaging microscopy offers unique capabilities to quantify the defects and damage evolution occurring in metals following dynamic and shock loading. Examples of the quantification of the types of deformation twins activated, volume fraction of twinning, and damage evolution as a function of shock loading in Ta are presented. Electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) examination of the damage evolution in sweeping-detonation-wave shock loading to study spallation in Cu is also presented.

  13. THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION OF MICROSTRUCTURE EVOLUTION AND DEFORMATION OF ZIRCONIUM UNDER CASCADE DAMAGE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barashev, Alexander V [ORNL; Golubov, Stanislav I [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is based on our reaction-diffusion model of radiation growth of Zr-based materials proposed recently in [1]. In [1], the equations for the strain rates in unloaded pure crystal under cascade damage conditions of, e.g., neutron or heavy-ion irradiation were derived as functions of dislocation densities, which include contributions from dislocation loops, and spatial distribution of their Burgers vectors. The model takes into account the intra-cascade clustering of self-interstitial atoms and their one-dimensional diffusion; explains the growth stages, including the break-away growth of pre-annealed samples; and accounts for some striking observations, such as of negative strain in prismatic direction, and co-existence of vacancy- and interstitial-type prismatic loops. In this report, the change of dislocation densities due to accumulation of sessile dislocation loops is taken into account explicitly to investigate the dose dependence of radiation growth. The dose dependence of climb rates of dislocations is calculated, which is important for the climb-induced glide model of radiation creep. The results of fitting the model to available experimental data and some numerical calculations of the strain behavior of Zr for different initial dislocation structures are presented and discussed. The computer code RIMD-ZR.V1 (Radiation Induced Microstructure and Deformation of Zr) developed is described and attached to this report.

  14. Compensation for TID Damage in SOI Pixel Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobita, Naoshi; Hara, Kazuhiko; Aoyagi, Wataru; Arai, Yasuo; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Kurachi, Ikuo; Hatsui, Takaki; Kudo, Togo; Kobayashi, Kazuo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are investigating adaption of SOI pixel devices for future high energy physic(HEP) experiments. The pixel sensors are required to be operational in very severe radiation environment. Most challenging issue in the adoption is the TID (total ionizing dose) damage where holes trapped in oxide layers affect the operation of nearby transistors. We have introduced a second SOI layer - SOI2 beneath the BOX (Buried OXide) layer - in order to compensate for the TID effect by applying a negative voltage to this electrode to cancel the effect caused by accumulated positive holes. In this paper, the TID effects caused by Co gamma-ray irradiation are presented based on the transistor characteristics measurements. The irradiation was carried out in various biasing conditions to investigate hole accumulation dependence on the potential configurations. We also compare the data with samples irradiated with X-ray. Since we observed a fair agreement between the two irradiation datasets, the TID effects have been investigated...

  15. Longitudinal information and radiation damage in EM calorimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.

    1993-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The SCC radiation field is higher than that encountered by previous hadron collider detectors. In particular, the electromagnetic (EM) calorimeter compartment sees the highest radiation dose. Since an EM calorimeter also makes the most precise energy measurement, special care must be lavished on this part of a calorimeter. Previous studies have concentrated on Monte Carlo examinations of 2 longitudinal compartments within the EM which can alleviate radiation damage. Recently, it was realized that a ``shower maximum`` detector, such as exists in CDF, also contains information of the conversion point of an electromagnetic shower. As such, it can potentially be used in a fashion analogous to the longitudinal compartments, although it is not designed to be optimized for this role.

  16. SUBTHRESHOLD DISPLACEMENT DAMAGE IN COPPER-ALUMINUM ALLOYS DURING ELECTRON IRRADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drosd, R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DAMAGE IN COPPER-ALUMINUM ALLOYS DURING ELECTRON IRRADIATIONDAMAGE IN COPPER-ALUMINUM ALLOYS DURING ELECTRON IRRADIATIONby irradiating copper-aluminum alloys at high tempera­ tures

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - acute axonal damage Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sections were viewed with a light microscope. Those axons labeled with HRP... that acrolein, a lipid peroxida- tion byproduct, can inflict significant damage in isolated spinal...

  18. Damage Profile and Ion Distribution of Slow Heavy Ions in Compounds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Profile and Ion Distribution of Slow Heavy Ions in Compounds. Damage Profile and Ion Distribution of Slow Heavy Ions in Compounds. Abstract: Slow heavy ions inevitably produce a...

  19. Risk of damaging the wires by edges of laser drilled holes in the end plugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staude, A; Trefzger, T M

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No sign of damage to the wire by edges of the laser drilled hole has been seen, based on a sample of four end plugs.

  20. atr-mediated dna damage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    damage may not only reduce the number of amplifiable template molecules, but may also lead to the generation of erroneous sequence information. A qualitative and quantitative...

  1. aluminium-induced dna damage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    damage may not only reduce the number of amplifiable template molecules, but may also lead to the generation of erroneous sequence information. A qualitative and quantitative...

  2. atr-dependent dna damage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    damage may not only reduce the number of amplifiable template molecules, but may also lead to the generation of erroneous sequence information. A qualitative and quantitative...

  3. Mechanical Damage from Cavitation in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Accelerated Thrombolysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Hope

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3.3 Cavitation Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Field Characterization / Passive Cavitation Detection 2.3Method for Estimation of Cavitation Damage for an Embedded

  4. Laser induced damage of fused silica polished optics due to a droplet forming organic contaminant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bien-Aime, Karell; Neauport, Jerome; Tovena-Pecault, Isabelle; Fargin, Evelyne; Labrugere, Christine; Belin, Colette; Couzi, Michel

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the effect of organic molecular contamination on single shot laser induced damage density at the wavelength of 351 nm, with a 3 ns pulse length. Specific contamination experiments were made with dioctylphthalate (DOP) in liquid or gaseous phase, on the surface of fused silica polished samples, bare or solgel coated. Systematic laser induced damage was observed only in the case of liquid phase contamination. Different chemical and morphological characterization methods were used to identify and understand the damage process. We demonstrate that the contaminant morphology, rather than its physicochemical nature, can be responsible for the decrease of laser induced damage threshold of optics.

  5. Cytotoxic and DNA-damaging effects of methyl tert-butyl ether and its metabolites on HL-60 cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, G.H. [Xian Medical Univ. (China); Shen, Y.; Shen, H.M. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a widely used oxygenate in unleaded gasoline; however, few studies have been conducted on the toxicity of this compound. This study evaluates the cytotoxic and DNA-damaging effects of MTBE and its metabolites in a human haemopoietic cell line, HL-60. The metabolites of MTBE studied include tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA), {alpha}-hydroxyisobutyric acid (HIBA), and formaldehyde. Comet assay is used to assess DNA damage, and the cytotoxicity is investigated by lactate dehydrogenease (LDH) release. The results show no significant cytotoxic effects of MTBE, TBA, and HIBA over a concentration ranging from 1 to 30 mM. Formaldehyde, in contrast, causes a substantial LDH release at a concentration of 5 {mu}M. Hydrogen peroxide, a known oxidative agent, at concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 {mu}M, produces a significant dose-related increase in DNA damage, whereas a much higher concentration of MTBE (1 to 30 mM) is required to produce a similar observation. The genotoxic effects of TBA and HIBA appear to be identical to that of MTBE. Conversely, DNA damage is observed for formaldehyde at a relatively low concentration range (5 to 100 {mu}M). These findings suggest that MTBE and its metabolites, except formaldehyde, have relatively low cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Role of genetic polymorphisms of CYP1A1, CYP3A5, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and PON1 in the modulation of DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Satyender [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)] [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Kumar, Vivek [Environmental Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, University of Delhi, Dilshad Garden, Delhi-110095 (India)] [Environmental Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, University of Delhi, Dilshad Garden, Delhi-110095 (India); Vashisht, Kapil; Singh, Priyanka [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)] [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Banerjee, Basu Dev, E-mail: banerjeebd@hotmail.com [Environmental Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, University of Delhi, Dilshad Garden, Delhi-110095 (India); Rautela, Rajender Singh; Grover, Shyam Sunder; Rawat, Devendra Singh; Pasha, Syed Tazeen [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)] [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Jain, Sudhir Kumar [Centre for Epidemiology and Parasitic Diseases, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)] [Centre for Epidemiology and Parasitic Diseases, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Rai, Arvind [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)] [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Organophosphate pesticides (OPs) are primarily metabolized by several xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs). Very few studies have explored genetic polymorphisms of XMEs and their association with DNA damage in pesticide-exposed workers. The present study was designed to determine the role of genetic polymorphisms of CYP1A1, CYP3A5, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and PON1 in the modulation of DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to OPs. We examined 284 subjects including 150 workers occupationally exposed to OPs and 134 normal healthy controls. The DNA damage was evaluated using the alkaline comet assay and genotyping was done using PCR-RFLP. The results revealed that the PONase activity toward paraoxonase and AChE activity was found significantly lowered in workers as compared to control subjects (p < 0.001). Workers showed significantly higher DNA damage compared to control subjects (14.37 {+-} 2.15 vs. 6.24 {+-} 1.37 tail% DNA, p < 0.001). Further, the workers with CYP2D6*3 PM and PON1 (QQ and MM) genotypes were found to have significantly higher DNA damage when compared to other genotypes (p < 0.05). In addition, significant increase in DNA damage was also observed in workers with concomitant presence of certain CYP2D6 and PON1 (Q192R and L55M) genotypes which need further extensive studies. In conclusion, the results indicate that the PON1 and CYP2D6 genotypes can modulate DNA damage elicited by some OPs possibly through gene-environment interactions. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Role of CYP1A1, CYP3A5, CYP2C, CYP2D6 and PON1 genotypes on DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Workers exposed to some OPs demonstrated increased DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYP2D6 *3 PM and PON1 (Q192R and L55M) genotypes are associated with DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concomitant presence of certain CYP2D6 and PON1 genotypes can increase DNA damage.

  7. PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [University College London

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Ming-Jun

    not be liable for any loss, actions, claims, proceedings, demand or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever variable is a random surface and the response is a real random variable, in various situations where both and Vieu 2006). FDA aggregates consecutive discrete recordings and views them as sampled values of a random

  8. Complex Variables and Elliptic Equations - Department of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 1, 1989 ... re-distribution, re-selling, loan or sub-licensing, systematic supply or ... demand or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever caused arising ... to the author that power series with large gaps could be associated with other.

  9. This article was downloaded by: [University of Central Florida] On: 20 February 2012, At: 09:43

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    a a Department of Criminal Justice, University of Central Florida, P.O. Box 161600, Orlando, FL, 32816, USA for research, teaching, and private study purposes. Any substantial or systematic reproduction, redistribution loss, actions, claims, proceedings, demand, or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever caused arising

  10. This article was downloaded by: [University of Minnesota -Morris], [Jong-Min Kim] On: 26 February 2013, At: 21:13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jong-Min

    ://www.tandfonline.com/page/terms-and-conditions This article may be used for research, teaching, and private study purposes. Any substantial or systematic not be liable for any loss, actions, claims, proceedings, demand, or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever benefit fraud, individual rent subsidy fraud, consumption of drugs, criminal history, sexual behaviors

  11. PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [Canadian Research Knowledge Network

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    Coles, Cynthia

    ://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t713401148 Influence of Bulking Agents, Fertilizers and Bacteria on the Removal of Diesel from a Newfoundland on the Removal of Diesel from a Newfoundland Soil',Soil and Sediment Contamination: An International Journal,18 not be liable for any loss, actions, claims, proceedings, demand or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever

  12. This article was downloaded by:[University of Michigan] On: 7 July 2008

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    Wooldridge, Margaret S.

    information: http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~content=t713456315 Modeling of Diesel Combustion, Soot. and Kurtz, Eric (2008) 'Modeling of Diesel Combustion, Soot and NO Emissions Based on a Modified Eddy loss, actions, claims, proceedings, demand or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever caused arising

  13. PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [University of Hong Kong

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    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Kong, China b China Institute of Geo-Environment Monitoring, Beijing, China Online publication date: 23 not be liable for any loss, actions, claims, proceedings, demand or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever, China hpguo79@gmail.com; jjiao@hku.hk 2 China Institute of Geo-Environment Monitoring, Beijing 100081

  14. This article was downloaded by: [Zhejiang University] On: 20 May 2013, At: 00:35

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    Woodward, John

    Woodward b a College of Computer Science, Zhejiang University, 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou, 310027, PR China b School of Computer Science, The University of Nottingham Ningbo China, Ningbo, 315100, PR China Published not be liable for any loss, actions, claims, proceedings, demand, or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever

  15. This article was downloaded by: [Texas A&M University Libraries] On: 20 December 2012, At: 06:49

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    Xu, Jun-Ming

    University, Fuzhou, Fujian, 350007, China b School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026, China Version of record first published: 23 Aug 2012. To cite not be liable for any loss, actions, claims, proceedings, demand, or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever

  16. This article was downloaded by:[ETH-Bibliothek] On: 29 April 2008

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    , PR China c Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL), Department not be liable for any loss, actions, claims, proceedings, demand or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100039, PR China §Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow

  17. This article was downloaded by:[ETH-Bibliothek] On: 29 April 2008

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    for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, Chinese Academy of Surveying and Mapping, Beijing 100039, P.R. China Online not be liable for any loss, actions, claims, proceedings, demand or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever, Beijing 100039, P.R. China (Received 11 October 2006; in final form 26 May 2007 ) This paper describes

  18. PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [Chen, Zheng

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    Ju, Yiguang

    University, Beijing, China b School of Power Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing, China c Department not be liable for any loss, actions, claims, proceedings, demand or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, China 2 School of Power Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing

  19. PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [Jiang, Yang

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    Parasuraman, Raja

    , Beijing, China c Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China d Department not be liable for any loss, actions, claims, proceedings, demand or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China, 3 Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences

  20. This article was downloaded by:[Montana State University] On: 27 June 2008

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    of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Shanghai, People's Republic of China First Published on: 01 not be liable for any loss, actions, claims, proceedings, demand or costs or damages whatsoever or howsoever, Shanghai 201800, People's Republic of China As a review, we compare results in electric