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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

LES comments in response to Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, Section 934

2

Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation on Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Comments by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) on Convention on Supplementary Compensation on Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation; Section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007

3

Cost & Contingency | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Cost & Contingency Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page (March 2009) In August 2008 (and previously in April 2006 and May 2003), the Office of Project Assessment...

4

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Notice of extension of public comment period for reply comments. On July 27, 2010, the Department of Energy (DOE) published in the Federal Register, a notice of inquiry (NOI) and request for...

5

Public Comment re NOI on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

ENERGYSOLUTIONS' Comment in Response to Notice of Inquiry, Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation -75 FR 43945

6

Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation Contingent...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation Contingent Cost Allocation Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation Contingent Cost Allocation DOE published a...

7

PROPOSAL FOR CONTINGENT TRANSMISSION PLANS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How should the WECC’s RTEP process develop a 10-year transmission plan based upon transmission studies completed over the past several years? This paper explores the notion of a “plan ” that consists of a package containing a small number of “contingent plans ” that would correspond to a limited number of future states of the world by 2020. The rationale for developing transmission plans on a contingent basis is based on the following observations. Contingencies. Insights from TEPPC transmission planning over the past several years indicate that the demand for future transmission expansion in the West is contingent upon a number of important drivers including: (1) Levels of state renewable portfolio standards (RPS); (2) Development of remote versus local renewable generation; (3) Load growth given DSM policies and economic growth; (4) Policies to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; (5) Shifts of innovation and cost competitiveness between wind and solar energy; (6) Advances in distributed generation technologies;

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

The External Damage Cost of Direct Noise From Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects and Social Costs of Road Transport,” Transportationreview of the social costs of transportation in the U. S.social cost MV = motor vehicle NIPA = National Income Product Accounts NOx = nitrogen oxides NPTS = Nationwide Personal Transportation

Delucchi, Mark A.; Hsu, Shi-Ling

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Effect of cumulative seismic damage and corrosion on life-cycle cost of reinforced concrete bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bridge design should take into account not only safety and functionality, but also the cost effectiveness of investments throughout a bridge life-cycle. This work presents a probabilistic approach to compute the life-cycle cost (LCC) of corroding reinforced concrete (RC) bridges in earthquake prone regions. The approach is developed by combining cumulative seismic damage and damage associated to corrosion due to environmental conditions. Cumulative seismic damage is obtained from a low-cycle fatigue analysis. Chloride-induced corrosion of steel reinforcement is computed based on Fick’s second law of diffusion. The proposed methodology accounts for the uncertainties in the ground motion parameters, the distance from source, the seismic demand on the bridge, and the corrosion initiation time. The statistics of the accumulated damage and the cost of repairs throughout the bridge life-cycle are obtained by Monte-Carlo simulation. As an illustration of the proposed approach, the effect of design parameters on the life-cycle cost of an example RC bridge is studied. The results are shown to be valuable in better estimating the condition of existing bridges (i.e., total accumulated damage at any given time) and, therefore, can help schedule inspection and maintenance programs. In addition, by taking into consideration the deterioration process over a bridge life-cycle, it is possible to make an estimate of the optimum design parameters by minimizing, for example, the expected cost throughout the life of the structure.

Kumar, Ramesh

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Sliding Scale Contingencies for the Highway Construction Project Development Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the Highway construction project development process, State Highway Agencies (SHA) prepare cost estimates for effective communication to stakeholders and for project cost control. Cost estimates prepared in the planning phase of project development typically in a time range of 10 to 20 years from project letting are characterized by a great deal of uncertainty due to low scope definition. SHAs typically include an amount as contingency in the project cost estimate to cover costs due to unidentified or unquantified risks during project development. However, most of the methods used by SHAs to apply contingency to projects lack consistency in definition and application. This leads to poor communication to stakeholders, project cost escalation and other project control issues due to inaccuracy of baseline cost estimates. This study developed a set of sliding scale contingencies for estimating contingency on highway projects taking into consideration the effect of major factors, such as project complexity that impacts contingency application. Expert opinion was sought through the use of the Delphi technique. Experimental techniques were not suitable for this study due to the exploratory nature of the problem and the lack of data to analyze using empirical methods. The Delphi method typically consists of a series of rounds called questionnaires. Twenty-three professionals with experience in risk assessment and cost estimating agreed to participate in the study. Email was the means of communication using an excel spreadsheet. The assessment was completed in three iterative rounds with controlled feedback to the participants on the panel at the end of each round. Sliding scale contingencies were developed for three levels of project complexity: noncomplex (minor), moderately complex, and most complex (major) projects. The sliding scale contingencies are presented as a final output of this study. This method of estimating contingency provides consistent rationale for estimating contingency. Risks are an inextricable part of the contingency estimating process. Estimators are encouraged to identify and document risks as justification for contingency values applied to a project.

Olumide, Adeniyi O.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Definition: Contingency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Contingency Contingency Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Contingency The unexpected failure or outage of a system component, such as a generator, transmission line, circuit breaker, switch or other electrical element. Contingency Reserve The provision of capacity deployed by the Balancing Authority to meet the Disturbance Control Standard (DCS) and other NERC and Regional Reliability Organization contingency requirements.[1] Related Terms transmission lines, contingency Reserve, transmission line, disturbance control standard, balancing authority, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inlin LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. e Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Contingency&oldid=50257

12

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs (energy + demand) Natural gas Contingency Installationcosts (energy + demand) Natural gas Contingency InstallationNatural gas ($/MMBtu) Electricity ($/kWh) Demand charge ($/

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Capacitor bank planning for possible system contingencies  

SciTech Connect

A new method for planning capacitor banks as sources of VARs for voltage maintenance during anticipated normal and contingency conditions is proposed in this work. The objective is to minimize the total investment cost in the new reactive sources. The scheduling technique is based on sequentially selecting the most severe operating state which requires the maximum reactive power, determining the optimal bus for this state using a cost-based index, and suitably modifying, if necessary, the reactive power installed to satisfy less severe operating conditions. The solution procedure employs the Compensation method (Largechange Sensitivity Technique) for network solution to update bus voltages. The discrete nature of the capacitor bank, the installation, site, and switching facility cost are all considered in the optimization process. The algorithm also minimizes the number of switchable installations. The proposed VAR scheduling method is compared with the Inverse Jacobian method for accuracy, and with other scheduling ideas for investment costs, via the IEEE 30-bus system.

Lee, T.H.; Hill, E.F.; Jong, T.L.; Obadina, O.O.; Pan, C.T.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Future contingencies and photovoltaic system worth  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The value of dispersed photovoltaic systems connected to the utility grid has been calculated using the General Electric Optimized Generation Planning program. The 1986 to 2001 time period was used for this study. Photovoltaic systems were dynamically integrated, up to 5% total capacity, into 9 NERC based regions under a range of future fuel and economic contingencies. Value was determined by the change in revenue requirements due to the photovoltaic additions. Displacement of high cost fuel was paramount to value, while capacity displacement was highly variable and dependent upon regional fuel mix.

Jones, G. J.; Thomas, M. G.; Bonk, G. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 11, Contingency  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The chapter discusses contingency guidelines to provide for a standard approach to determining project contingency and improve the understanding of contingency ...

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

16

Graphical Contingency Analysis - Available Technologies - PNNL  

Utility operators run simulations with the Graphical Contingency Analysis tool at PNNL’s Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center.

17

Graphical Contingency Analysis Tool - Energy Innovation Portal  

Technology Marketing Summary The Graphical Contingency Analysis (GCA) Tool is a visual analytic software tool that aids power grid operators and ...

18

Structural health and prognostics management for offshore wind turbines : case studies of rotor fault and blade damage with initial O&M cost modeling.  

SciTech Connect

Operations and maintenance costs for offshore wind plants are significantly higher than the current costs for land-based (onshore) wind plants. One way to reduce these costs would be to implement a structural health and prognostic management (SHPM) system as part of a condition based maintenance paradigm with smart load management and utilize a state-based cost model to assess the economics associated with use of the SHPM system. To facilitate the development of such a system a multi-scale modeling approach developed in prior work is used to identify how the underlying physics of the system are affected by the presence of damage and faults, and how these changes manifest themselves in the operational response of a full turbine. This methodology was used to investigate two case studies: (1) the effects of rotor imbalance due to pitch error (aerodynamic imbalance) and mass imbalance and (2) disbond of the shear web; both on a 5-MW offshore wind turbine in the present report. Based on simulations of damage in the turbine model, the operational measurements that demonstrated the highest sensitivity to the damage/faults were the blade tip accelerations and local pitching moments for both imbalance and shear web disbond. The initial cost model provided a great deal of insight into the estimated savings in operations and maintenance costs due to the implementation of an effective SHPM system. The integration of the health monitoring information and O&M cost versus damage/fault severity information provides the initial steps to identify processes to reduce operations and maintenance costs for an offshore wind farm while increasing turbine availability, revenue, and overall profit.

Myrent, Noah J. [Purdue Center for Systems Integrity, Lafayette, IN; Kusnick, Joshua F. [Purdue Center for Systems Integrity, Lafayette, IN; Barrett, Natalie C. [Purdue Center for Systems Integrity, Lafayette, IN; Adams, Douglas E. [Purdue Center for Systems Integrity, Lafayette, IN; Griffith, Daniel Todd

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Definition: Contingency Reserve | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Contingency Reserve Contingency Reserve Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Contingency Reserve The provision of capacity deployed by the Balancing Authority to meet the Disturbance Control Standard (DCS) and other NERC and Regional Reliability Organization contingency requirements.[1] Also Known As replacement reserve Related Terms Disturbance Control Standard, Balancing Authority, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An in LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. line Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Contingency_Reserve&oldid=502577" Categories: Definitions ISGAN Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

20

OOTW COST TOOLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Contingent Valuation: Controversies and Evidence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Values Resulting from the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill, Report toresource damages from the Exxon Valdez oil spill. raised. 41993) contains papers from an Exxon-sponsored symposium that

Carson, Richard T; Flores, Nicholas A

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

fund in the event of certain nuclear incidents. Section 934 authorizes the Secretary of Energy (''Secretary'') to issue regulations establishing a retrospective risk pooling...

23

Fast selection of N-2 contingencies for online security assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a novel algorithm for selection of dangerous N-2 contingencies associated with line or generator failures. The algorithm is based on iterative filtering of the set of all possible double contingencies. It is certified to identify all the dangerous contingencies, and has the complexity comparable to the N-1 contingency screening. Tests performed on realistic model of Polish power grid with about 3000 buses show that only two iterations of algorithm allow one to certify the safety of 99.9% of all double contingencies, leaving only 0.1% of the most dangerous ones for direct analysis.

P. A. Kaplunovich; K. S. Turitsyn

2013-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

24

Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) provides technical support to the requesting federal agency such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of Defense, the National Space and Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), or a state agency to address the radiological consequences of an event. These activities include measures to alleviate damage, loss, hardship, or suffering caused by the incident; protect public health and safety; restore essential government services; and provide emergency assistance to those affected. Scheduled to launch in the fall of 2009, Mars Science Laboratory is part of NASA's Mars Exploration Program, a long-term effort of robotic exploration of the red planet. Mars Science Laboratory is a rover that will assess whether Mars ever was, or is still today, an environment able to support microbial life. In other words, its mission is to determine the planet's "habitability." The Mars Science Laboratory rover will carry a radioisotope power system that generates electricity from the heat of plutonium's radioactive decay. This power source gives the mission an operating lifespan on Mars' surface of a full Martian year (687 Earth days) or more, while also providing significantly greater mobility and operational flexibility, enhanced science payload capability, and exploration of a much larger range of latitudes and altitudes than was possible on previous missions to Mars. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the DOE in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. NSTec is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools NSTec has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform NSTec will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, NASA, state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

Paul Guss

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Resource Contingency Program : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect

In 1990, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) embarked upon the Resource Contingency Program (RCP) to fulfill its statutory responsibilities to supply electrical power to its utility, industrial and other customers in the Pacific Northwest. Instead of buying or building generating plants now, BPA has purchased options to acquire power later if needed. Three option development agreements were signed in September 1993 with three proposed natural gas-fired, combined cycle combustion turbine CT projects near Chehalis and Satsop Washington and near Hermiston, Oregon. This environmental impact statement addresses the environmental consequences of purchasing power from these options. This environmental impact statement addresses the environmental consequences of purchasing power from these options.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Towards Efficient N ? x Contingency Selection Using Group Betweenness Centrality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of N ?x contingency selection is to pick a subset of critical cases to assess their potential for causing a severe crippling of an electric power grid. Even for a moderate-sized system there can be an overwhelming number of contingency cases that need to be studied. The number grows exponentially with x. This combinatorial explosion renders any exhaustive search strategy computationally infeasible, even for small to medium sized systems. We propose a novel method for N ? x selection for x >1 using group betweenness centrality and show that the amount of computation can be decoupled from the problem size, thus making the contingency analysis for large systems with x > 1 computationally feasible. Consequently, it may be that N ? x (for x > 1) contingency selection can be effectively deployed despite the combinatorial explosion of the number of possible N ? x contingencies. Our strategy replaces computation with storage of intermediate results and therefore relies on high performance computing resources.

Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Chen, Yousu; Adolf, Robert D.; Haglin, David J.; Huang, Zhenyu; Rice, Mark J.

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

27

Engineering Task Plan for Tank 241-C-106 contingency chiller definitive design  

SciTech Connect

This document identifies the scope, cost, schedule and responsible organizations for completing a design of a contingency ventilation inlet air cooling system for Tank 241-C-106. The air cooling system, described in Rensink (1995), consists of a chiller, cooling coils, and supporting equipment that, when installed will be capable of assuring that the waste temperatures in Tank 241-C-106 are maintained within acceptable limits for safe storage. The effort described herein is scheduled for completion by May 31, 1995 to support Performance Based Incentive (PBI) Milestone SI-2x.

Rensink, G.E.; Kriskovich, J.R.

1995-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

28

Resource Contingency Program - Oregon. Final Environmental Statement Hermiston Power Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resource Contingency Program - Oregon. Final Environmental Statement Hermiston Power Project Resource Contingency Program - Oregon. Final Environmental Statement Hermiston Power Project file:///I|/Data%20Migration%20Task/EIS-0230-FEIS-1995/01_EIS0230_rcp.html[6/27/2011 1:26:50 PM] Resource Contingency Program-Oregon Final Environmental Impact Statement Hermiston Power Project Introduction The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has statutory responsibilities to supply electrical power to its utility, industrial, and other customers in the Pacific Northwest. In 1990, to cover the outer range of potential load growth with new resources, BPA embarked upon the Resource Contingency Program (RCP). Instead of buying or building generating plants now, BPA has purchased options to acquire power later, if and when it is needed. The decision to acquire any of these option energy projects to fulfill statutory supply obligations will be influenced by

29

Microsoft Word - MR_Contingency_Protocol_EM_FINAL.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4/12/10 4/12/10 1 EM Protocol for Application of Contingency and Management Reserve for the Acquisition of Capital Asset Projects This document provides guidance for the development and consistent application of government contingency and contractor management reserve (MR) in the planning and execution of DOE capital asset projects in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 413.3 and the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FARs). This guidance is consistent with Acquisition Letter 2009-01, "Management Reserve and Contingency," October 6, 2008 from the Office of Procurement and Assistance Management. Project contingency and MR are an integral part of the DOE capital asset project risk management process, providing project managers with the tools to respond to project risks and

30

Microsoft Word - Appendix M_ContingencyTrees.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

M Groundwater Operable Unit Contingency Trees U.S. Department of Energy Weldon Spring Site LTS&M Plan July 2005 Doc. No. S0079000 Page M-3 Figure M-1. Validation and Statistical...

31

Contingency Analysis of Cascading Line Outage Events  

SciTech Connect

As the US power systems continue to increase in size and complexity, including the growth of smart grids, larger blackouts due to cascading outages become more likely. Grid congestion is often associated with a cascading collapse leading to a major blackout. Such a collapse is characterized by a self-sustaining sequence of line outages followed by a topology breakup of the network. This paper addresses the implementation and testing of a process for N-k contingency analysis and sequential cascading outage simulation in order to identify potential cascading modes. A modeling approach described in this paper offers a unique capability to identify initiating events that may lead to cascading outages. It predicts the development of cascading events by identifying and visualizing potential cascading tiers. The proposed approach was implemented using a 328-bus simplified SERC power system network. The results of the study indicate that initiating events and possible cascading chains may be identified, ranked and visualized. This approach may be used to improve the reliability of a transmission grid and reduce its vulnerability to cascading outages.

Thomas L Baldwin; Magdy S Tawfik; Miles McQueen

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Microsoft Word - Appendix L_ContingencyPlan.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Well Field Contingency Plan U.S. Department of Energy Weldon Spring Site LTS&M Plan July 2005 Doc. No. S0079000 Page L-3 L1.0 Planning and Preparation Under this contingency plan, which supersedes the Well Field Contingency Plan (DOE 1992b), any production capacity lost to the existing well field due to confirmed contaminant migration from the Weldon Spring Quarry (Quarry) will be replaced. While it is highly unlikely that such measures will be implemented, this plan defines the minimum planning and preparation required to facilitate a rapid and effective response. Planning and preparation measures include the following: * Selection of a reliable alternate source of water to replace or supplement the existing well field. * Preparation of a plan for data collection to facilitate development of the selected alternate

33

Have you ever seen a project where the schedule performance index (SPI) and cost performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

seen a project where the schedule performance index (SPI) and cost performance seen a project where the schedule performance index (SPI) and cost performance index (CPI) are both very good (both near 1.0), but the contingency and management reserve (MR) accounts are depleted? Have you ever heard someone confuse the terms management reserve (MR) and contingency? While we in the project and contract management community are familiar with these terms, we often see them used incorrectly and treated as if they were interchangeable during the execution of the work, creating confusion and potential improper accountability. While MR is a form of contingency, its application is managed and controlled by the contractor,

34

Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the contingency planning for the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory scheduled for the 21-day window beginning on September 15, 2009. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec’s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. RSL is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools RSL has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform RSL will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

Paul Guss, Robert Augdahl, Bill Nickels, Cassandra Zellers

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

35

Radiological Contingency Planning for the Mars Science Laboratory Launch  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the contingency planning for the launch of the Mars Science Laboratory scheduled for the 21-day window beginning on September 15, 2009. National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), based in Las Vegas, Nevada, will support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in its role for managing the overall radiological contingency planning support effort. This paper will focus on new technologies that NSTec’s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) is developing to enhance the overall response capability that would be required for a highly unlikely anomaly. This paper presents recent advances in collecting and collating data transmitted from deployed teams and sensors. RSL is responsible to prepare the contingency planning for a range of areas from monitoring and assessment, sample collection and control, contaminated material release criteria, data management, reporting, recording, and even communications. The tools RSL has available to support these efforts will be reported. The data platform RSL will provide shall also be compatible with integration of assets and field data acquired with other DOE, National Space and Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), state, and local resources, personnel, and equipment. This paper also outlines the organizational structure for response elements in radiological contingency planning.

Paul P. Guss

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Economic impacts of oil spills: Spill unit costs for tankers, pipelines, refineries, and offshore facilities. [Task 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The impacts of oil spills -- ranging from the large, widely publicized Exxon Valdez tanker incident to smaller pipeline and refinery spills -- have been costly to both the oil industry and the public. For example, the estimated costs to Exxon of the Valdez tanker spill are on the order of $4 billion, including $2.8 billion (in 1993 dollars) for direct cleanup costs and $1.125 billion (in 1992 dollars) for settlement of damages claims caused by the spill. Application of contingent valuation costs and civil lawsuits pending in the State of Alaska could raise these costs appreciably. Even the costs of the much smaller 1991 oil spill at Texaco`s refinery near Anacortes, Washington led to costs of $8 to 9 million. As a result, inexpensive waming, response and remediation technologies could lower oil spin costs, helping both the oil industry, the associated marine industries, and the environment. One means for reducing the impact and costs of oil spills is to undertake research and development on key aspects of the oil spill prevention, warming, and response and remediation systems. To target these funds to their best use, it is important to have sound data on the nature and size of spills, their likely occurrence and their unit costs. This information could then allow scarce R&D dollars to be spent on areas and activities having the largest impact. This report is intended to provide the ``unit cost`` portion of this crucial information. The report examines the three key components of the US oil supply system, namely, tankers and barges; pipelines and refineries; and offshore production facilities. The specific purpose of the study was to establish the unit costs of oil spills. By manipulating this key information into a larger matrix that includes the size and frequency of occurrence of oil spills, it will be possible` to estimate the likely future impacts, costs, and sources of oil spills.

Not Available

1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Planning substation capacity under the single-contingency scenario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Florida Power and Light (FPL) adopts the single contingency emergency policy for its planning of substation capacity. This paper provides an approach to determine the maximum load which a substation can take on under such a policy. The approach consists of two LP models which determine: (1) the maximum substation load capacity, and (2) the reallocation of load when a substation`s demand cannot be met. Both models are formulated under the single-contingency scenario, an issue which had received little attention in the literature. Not only does the explicit treatment of the scenario provide an exact measure of a substation`s load limit, it also raises several important issues which previous works omit. These two models have been applied to the substation network of the Fort Myers District of the State of Florida.

Leung, L.C. [Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong, Shatin (Hong Kong). Decision Sciences and Managerial Economics; Khator, S.K. [Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Industrial and Management Systems Engineering; Schnepp, J.C. [Crest Ultrasonics, Trenton, NJ (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Interim report on GAO's review of the total cost estimate for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following sctions discuss (1) the process used by the DOE to estimate CRBR project costs; (2) the inflation allowance used in DOE's cost estimate, which could overstate CRBR costs; (3) the cost of plutonium, revenue projections, and contingency allowances, which may understate the total cost estimate; and (4) several items which are not included in the cost estimate but which, in our view, either will or could result in cost to the Government.

Not Available

1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

39

NIST 800-34, Rev 1 Contingency Planning Guide for Federal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... nts • r ... Testing can take on several forms and accomplish several objectives but ... areas should be addressed in a contingency plan test, as applicable ...

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Comments by International Group on Nuclear Liability (CIGNL), in response to U.S. Department of Energy Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, 75 Fed. Reg. 43945 (Jul. 27, 2010) and 75 Fed. Reg. 51986 (Aug. 24, 2010). Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation More Documents & Publications DOE Notice of Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) Contingent Cost Allocation - March 2, 2011 Meeting

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A High-Performance Hybrid Computing Approach to Massive Contingency Analysis in the Power Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operating the electrical power grid to prevent power black-outs is a complex task. An important aspect of this is contingency analysis, which involves understanding and mitigating potential failures in power grid elements such as transmission lines. ... Keywords: hybrid computational systems, middleware, power grid, contingency analysis

Ian Gorton; Zhenyu Huang; Yousu Chen; Benson Kalahar; Shuangshuang Jin; Daniel Chavarría-Miranda; Doug Baxter; John Feo

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Cell Bounds in Two-Way Contingency Tables Based on Conditional Frequencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical methods for disclosure limitation (or control) have seen coupling of tools from statistical methodologies and operations research. For the summary and release of data in the form of a contingency table some methods have focused on evaluation ... Keywords: Confidentiality, Contingency tables, Integer programming, Linear programming, Statistical disclosure control, Tabular data

Byran Smucker; Aleksandra B. Slavkovi?

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Foveated Gaze-Contingent Displays for Peripheral LOD Management, 3D Visualization, and Stereo Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-contingent displays used for these purposes are reviewed and for the first time a pixel shader is introduced for display of a high-resolution window over peripherally degraded stimulus. The pixel shader advances current is a frag- ment shader for real-time gaze-contingent image reconstruction, performed on the graphics

�öltekin, Arzu

44

Unit-Contingent Power Purchase Agreement and Asymmetric Information About Plant Outage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes a unit-contingent power purchase agreement between an electricity distributor and a power plant. Under such a contract the distributor pays the plant a fixed price if the plant is operational and nothing if plant outage occurs. Pricing ... Keywords: electricity industry, risk allocation, spot market, unit-contingent contract

Owen Q. Wu; Volodymyr Babich

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Knowledge sharing practices of project teams when encountering changes in project scope: A contingency approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prior studies indicate that undesired consequences may occur if knowledge cannot be effectively shared among members of a project team. Nevertheless, there are few studies that explore the knowledge-sharing (KS) mechanisms used and the contingency factors ... Keywords: contingency approach, knowledge sharing, project teams

Wei-Tsong Wang; Nai-Yuan Ko

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Transportation energy contingency plans for rural areas and small communities  

SciTech Connect

This study was undertaken to determine the most effective transportation fuel conservation measures which could be implemented by such areas during energy emergencies. The study involved a review of the transportation fuels contingency planning literature, state transportation energy contingency plans (with special emphasis on that for Missouri) and transportation studies recently conducted in rural Missouri, together with a survey by mail of local government officials, telephone interviews with rural residents and participation in two community-wide attitude surveys in the Meramec Region of Missouri. On the basis of the review of the literature and the results of the surveys, recommendations have been made on both the strategies that could be implemented to reduce gasoline consumption in rural areas and the institutional arrangements required for coping with a transportation fuels shortage. For small communities and rural areas of Missouri, it was specifically recommended that the multi-county regional planning commission should become the lead agency in implementing and coordinating fuel conservation measures in the event of a serious petroleum shortfall. Each regional planning commission would serve as a single focal point in communicating with the State Energy Office in behalf of its numerous county and city members. Furthermore, the existing statewide network of emergency preparedness officers should be utilized to inventory local fuel distribution services, monitor local service station operating practices and to serve motorists who might be stranded without fuel. Finally, the University of Missouri Cooperative Extension Service should offer educational programs covering topics as fuel conserving driving techniques, vehicle maintenance, trip planning, and ridesharing.

Dare, C.E.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

EXPERIMENTS, CONCEPTUAL DESIGN, PRELIMINARY COST ESTIMATES AND SCHEDULES FOR AN UNDERGROUND RESEARCH FACILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design, Preliminary Cost Estimates and Schedules roroundDESIGN, PRELIMINARY COST ESTIMATES AND SCHEDULES FOR ANSchedule and Cost Estimates Excavation Damage/Sealing

Korbin, G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Using a contingent valuation approach for improved solid waste management facility: Evidence from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study employed contingent valuation method to estimate the willingness to pay (WTP) of the households to improve the waste collection system in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The objective of this study is to evaluate how household WTP changes when recycling and waste separation at source is made mandatory. The methodology consisted of asking people directly about their WTP for an additional waste collection service charge to cover the costs of a new waste management project. The new waste management project consisted of two versions: version A (recycling and waste separation is mandatory) and version B (recycling and waste separation is not mandatory). The households declined their WTP for version A when they were asked to separate the waste at source although all the facilities would be given to them for waste separation. The result of this study indicates that the households were not conscious about the benefits of recycling and waste separation. Concerted efforts should be taken to raise environmental consciousness of the households through education and more publicity regarding waste separation, reducing and recycling.

Afroz, Rafia, E-mail: rafia_afroz@yahoo.com [Department of Economics, Faculty of Economics and Management Science, International Islamic University Malaysia (Malaysia); Masud, Muhammad Mehedi [Department of Economics, Faculty of Economics and Management Science, International Islamic University Malaysia (Malaysia)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

An experiment in contingent valuation: Willingness to pay for stormwater management. [Homeowners in Baltimore County  

SciTech Connect

The contingent valuation (CV) method is a technique used frequently in benefit-cost analysis to estimate the economic value of non-market goods such as environmental quality. In CV, surveys are used to ask people about their willingness to pay for a good in a hypothetical market situation. In this application, homeowners in Baltimore County were asked about their willingness to pay (WTP) for programs to control pollutants in urban stormwater runoff designed to achieve, respectively, 4% and 1% reductions in nutrient loadings to the Chesapeake Bay. The main variation comprised alternate descriptions of the payment vehicle. Tests show that the mean WTP by means of property taxes does not differ significantly from mean WTP via user charges. This result was somewhat surprising because of other evidence that the respondents believe strongly that user charges are fairer than property taxes. A best estimate of the benefits to homeowners in Baltimore County of controlling nutrient loads for urban stormwater is from $1.2 to $4.2 million annually, depending on the reduction objective.

Lindsey, G.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ementary-compensation-nuclear-damage-contingent-cost-allocation Article Modernizing the Grid: Keeping the Dialogue Going A more reliable, efficient and cost-effective grid?...

51

Contingency-Constrained Optimal Power Flow and the Community Activity Room (CC-OPF and CAR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand for an OPF tool measuring state and recommended control actions is on the rise because of network reliability concerns as well as the expansion of LMP (Locational Marginal Pricing) markets. The two related projects brought together in this report describe a method that is secure, stable, fast, and simple to use. The first project 8212 the Contingency-Constrained Optimum Power Flow (CC-OPF) project 8212 focused on contingency analysis, revising OPF limits, developing a common data source (CDS) appl...

2006-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

52

PHENIX Work Breakdown Structure. Cost and schedule review copy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Book begins with this Overview section, which contains the high-level summary cost estimate, the cost profile, and the global construction schedule. The summary cost estimate shows the total US cost and the cost in terms of PHENIX construction funds for building the PHENIX detector. All costs in the WBS book are shown in FY 1993 dollars. Also shown are the institutional and foreign contributions, the level of pre-operations funding, and the cost of deferred items. Pie charts are presented at PHENIX WBS level 1 and 2 that show this information. The PHENIX construction funds are shown broken down to PHENIX WBS level 3 items per fiscal year, and the resulting profile is compared to the RHIC target profile. An accumulated difference of the two profiles is also shown. The PHENIX global construction schedule is presented at the end of the Overview section. Following the Overview are sections for each subsystem. Each subsystem section begins with a summary cost estimate, cost profile, and critical path. The total level 3 cost is broken down into fixed costs (M&S), engineering costs (EDIA) and labor costs. Costs are further broken down in terms of PHENIX construction funds, institutional and foreign contributions, pre-operations funding, and deferred items. Also shown is the contingency at level 3 and the level 4 breakdown of the total cost. The cost profile in fiscal years is shown at level 3. The subsystem summaries are followed by the full cost estimate and schedule sheets for that subsystem. These detailed sheets are typically carried down to level 7 or 8. The cost estimate shows Total, M&S, EDIA, and Labor breakdowns, as well as contingency, for each WBS entry.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

PHENIX WBS notes. Cost and schedule review copy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Book begins with this Overview section, which contains the high-level summary cost estimate, the cost profile, and the global construction schedule. The summary cost estimate shows the total US cost and the cost in terms of PHENIX construction funds for building the PHENIX detector. All costs in the WBS book are shown in FY 1993 dollars. Also shown are the institutional and foreign contributions, the level of pre-operations funding, and the cost of deferred items. Pie charts are presented at PHENIX WBS level 1 and 2 that show this information. The PHENIX construction funds are shown broken down to PHENIX WBS level 3 items per fiscal year, and the resulting profile is compared to the RHIC target profile. An accumulated difference of the two profiles is also shown. The PHENIX global construction schedule is presented at the end of the Overview section. Following the Overview are sections for each subsystem. Each subsystem section begins with a summary cost estimate, cost profile, and critical path. The total level 3 cost is broken down into fixed costs (M&S), engineering costs (EDIA) and labor costs. Costs are further broken down in terms of PHENIX construction funds, institutional and foreign contributions, pre-operations funding, and deferred items. Also shown is the contingency at level 3 and the level 4 breakdown of the total cost. The cost profile in fiscal years is shown at level 3. The subsystem summaries are followed by the full cost estimate and schedule sheets for that subsystem. These detailed sheets are typically carried down to level 7 or 8. The cost estimate Total, M&S, EDIA, and Labor breakdowns, as well as contingency, for each WBS entry.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Cambium Damage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cambium Damage Cambium Damage Name: Jamie Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: If the bark from the lower part of trees (elm trees) is almost completly removed (in this case by animals)to a height of about 8ft, is it possible that the trees will still live? What can be done to help the trees? Replies: If the tree has been girdled, that is, the bark and cambium layer beneath it, has been removed completely around the tree, then it will die. If there is any portion of the bark remaining it may live, but if that remaining is small it probably will die fairly soon due to general decline. If the cambium layer has not been destroyed it may recover, but once the bark is stripped away it is most likely doomed because of the likelihood of invasion by fungi, insects, etc. A local forester or landscaper might be able to offer more help if they see it.

55

Dancing with the Enemy? Relational Hazards and the Contingent Value of Repeat Exchanges in M&A Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I examine the problem of relational hazards between repeat exchange partners and the contingent roles of trade uncertainty and future exchange prospects in moderating the potentially conflicting effects of past exchanges on these hazards, thereby facilitating ... Keywords: contingency mechanism, mergers and acquisitions, opportunism hazard, relational embeddedness, repeat exchange, shadow of the future, trade uncertainty

Jeongsik ”Jay” Lee

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Evaluation of Counter-Based Dynamic Load Balancing Schemes for Massive Contingency Analysis on Over 10,000 Cores  

SciTech Connect

Contingency analysis studies are necessary to assess the impact of possible power system component failures. The results of the contingency analysis are used to ensure the grid reliability, and in power market operation for the feasibility test of market solutions. Currently, these studies are performed in real time based on the current operating conditions of the grid with a set of pre-selected contingency list, which might result in overlooking some critical contingencies caused by variable system status. To have a complete picture of a power grid, more contingencies need to be studied to improve grid reliability. High-performance computing techniques hold the promise of being able to perform the analysis for more contingency cases within a much shorter time frame. This paper evaluates the performance of counter-based dynamic load balancing schemes for a massive contingency analysis program on 10,000+ cores. One million N-2 contingency analysis cases with a Western Electricity Coordinating Council power grid model have been used to demonstrate the performance. The speedup of 3964 with 4096 cores and 7877 with 10240 cores are obtained. This paper reports the performance of the load balancing scheme with a single counter and two counters, describes disk I/O issues, and discusses other potential techniques for further improving the performance.

Chen, Yousu; Huang, Zhenyu; Rice, Mark J.

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

57

External costs of intercity truck freight transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From a societal perspective, it is desirable for all transportation users to pay their full social (private and external) costs. We estimate four general types of external costs for intercity freight trucking and compare them with the private costs incurred by carriers. Estimated external costs include: accidents (fatalities, injuries, and property damage); emissions (air pollution and greenhouse gases); noise; and unrecovered costs associated with the provision, operation, and maintenance of public facilities. The analysis reveals that external costs are equal to 13.2 % of private costs and user fees would need to be increased about

David J. Forkenbrock

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

On Summary Measures of Skill in Rare Event Forecasting Based on Contingency Tables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The so-called True Skill Statistic (TSS) and the Heidke Skill Score (S), as used in the context of the contingency, table approach to forecast verification, are compared. It is shown that the TSS approaches the Probability of Detection (POD) ...

Charles A. Doswell III; Robert Davies-Jones; David L. Keller

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Foveated gaze-contingent displays for peripheral LOD management, 3D visualization, and stereo imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advancements in graphics hardware have allowed development of hardware-accelerated imaging displays. This article reviews techniques for real-time simulation of arbitrary visual fields over still images and video. The goal is to provide the vision sciences ... Keywords: Eye tracking, foveation, gaze-contingent displays, level-of-detail

Andrew T. Duchowski; Arzu Çöltekin

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Post-Contingency Equilibrium Analysis of Power Systems Peter W. Sauer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-3]. The static analysis normally relies on load flow as the primary commercial software to predict the post. The third uses a method that takes advantage of existing commercial load flow software to perform the major equations for each generator. Keywords: Dynamic equilibrium, contingency analysis, load flow, steady

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Contingency ranking based on combination of severity indices in dynamic security analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel severity index to analyze power system dynamic stability. Application of severity indices in dynamic stability assessment is very complex and this paper proposes severity indices for dynamic contingency ranking. These indices ... Keywords: combination of indices, dynamic security, severity indices, transient stability

S. Jadid; S. Jalilzadeh

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Letter from the Nuclear Energy Institute to DOE GC | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from the Nuclear Energy Institute to DOE GC Letter from the Nuclear Energy Institute to DOE GC Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost...

63

Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation on...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation on Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Comments by the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) on Convention on...

64

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Comments by International Group on Nuclear Liability (CIGNL), in response...

65

DOE Notice of Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notice of Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) Contingent Cost Allocation - March 2, 2011 Meeting with CIGNL DOE Notice of Inquiry on...

66

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

67

Look-ahead voltage and load margin contingency selection functions for large-scale power systems  

SciTech Connect

Given the current operating condition (obtained from the real-time data), the near-term load demand at each bus (obtained from short-term load forecast), and the generation dispatch (say, based on economic dispatch), the authors present in this paper a load margin measure (MW and/or MVAR) to assess the system`s ability to withstand the forecasted load and generation variations. The authors also present a method to predict near-term system voltage profiles. The proposed look-ahead measure and the proposed voltage prediction are then applied to contingency selections for the near-term power system in terms of load margins to collapse and of the bus voltage magnitudes. They evaluate the proposed load-ahead measure and the voltage profile prediction on several power systems including a 1169-bus power system with 53 contingencies with promising results.

Chiang, H.D.; Wang, C.S.; Flueck, A.J. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). School of Electrical Engineering

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Microsoft Word - Appendix J-LCRS-Train 3 Treament Contingency Plan1.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

LCRS/Train 3 Treatment Contingency Plan U.S. Department of Energy Weldon Spring Site LTS&M Plan July 2005 Doc. No. S0079000 Page J-3 J1.0 Contingency Plan Overview J1.1 Background The disposal cell at the Weldon Spring Site currently (August 2004) generates approximately 200 gallons of leachate per day, and manganese concentrations in the leachate exceeds the permitted effluent limit. The LCRS sump capacity is approximately 11,000 gallons, or 45 days of storage at the current flow rate. The uranium activity is below the discharge goal stated in the NPDES permit. This leachate is currently being hauled to the Metropolitan Sewer District (MSD) via commercial hauler for disposal and treatment under an approval granted to DOE on December 21, 2001, by the MSD. DOE had originally expected to treat the leachate on-site and

69

Emitting Diode (LED) Fixture Design and Installation Criteria for Exterior Lighting Applications in Contingency Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. Purpose. This ETL provides technical guidance and criteria for specifying, designing, and installing solar LED luminaire exterior lighting applications at Air Force overseas contingency locations only. For the purposes of this ETL, “contingency locations ” are defined as locations where a “named ” operation is the primary mission and the location utilizes expeditionary equipment for all or some of the support facilities in use. Requirements in this ETL are mandatory. Deviations require approval from the Air Force Electrical Engineering subject matter expert (SME), AFCESA/CEOA. Requests for deviations must be coordinated through the major command (MAJCOM) before submitting to AFCESA/CEOA. 2. Application. This ETL does not apply to LED airfield lighting systems, including, but not limited to, taxiway, obstruction, runway edge, threshold, or approach lighting systems

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12;· Marginal Cost: ­ Change in total cost ­ Any production process involves fixed and variable costs. As production increases/expands, fixed costs are unchanged, so

Boisvert, Jeff

71

A Review of the Literature on the Social Cost of Motor Vehicle Use in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accidents, air pollution, noise, land use, and “dissociationpollution Total societal costs Unquantified costs Wetlands lost Agricultural landland use Vehicle ownership and operation Vibration damage to buildings Water pollution

Murphy, James; Delucchi, Mark

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Piezoelectric-based in-situ damage detection of composite materials for structural health monitoring systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost-effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials. This thesis presents the conclusions of an analytical and experimental survey of candidate methods for in-situ damage ...

Kessler, Seth Stovack, 1977-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Assessing initial-cost growth and subsequent long-term cost improvement in coal-to-SNG processes. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of the study was the development of guidance that would enable gas-industry R and D managers to make more-reliable assessments of the potential for both initial-cost growth and subsequent long-run cost improvement in alternative coal-gasification technologies. The first phase of the research assessed the reasonableness of the GRI contingency methodology by comparing the results obtained from applying the GRI method and the RAND Pioneer Plant Study (PPS) method to an identical set of eight coal-to-SNG processes. The second phase of the research, which addressed the issue of cost improvement, found that between process introduction and process maturity, overall cost reductions of between 30% (for moderately innovative technologies) and 60% (for highly innovative technologies) are possible. However, these results were highly dependent on a number of key assumptions including: similarity of site characteristics for successive plants; access to prior plant's experience base; and appropriate management attitudes.

Hess, R.W.; Myers, C.W.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Schools - CPU Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the investigation of computers in a school computer lab that were being damaged.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Corrosion and Hydrogen Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Advanced Materials and Reservoir Engineering for Extreme Oil & Gas Environments: Corrosion and Hydrogen Damage Sponsored by: TMS ...

76

Fundamental Drivers of the Cost and Price of Operating Reserves  

SciTech Connect

Operating reserves impose a cost on the electric power system by forcing system operators to keep partially loaded spinning generators available for responding to system contingencies variable demand. In many regions of the United States, thermal power plants provide a large fraction of the operating reserve requirement. Alternative sources of operating reserves, such as demand response and energy storage, may provide more efficient sources of these reserves. However, to estimate the potential value of these services, the cost of reserve services under various grid conditions must first be established. This analysis used a commercial grid simulation tool to evaluate the cost and price of several operating reserve services, including spinning contingency reserves and upward regulation reserves. These reserve products were evaluated in a utility system in the western United States, considering different system flexibilities, renewable energy penetration, and other sensitivities. The analysis demonstrates that the price of operating reserves depend highly on many assumptions regarding the operational flexibility of the generation fleet, including ramp rates and the fraction of fleet available to provide reserves.

Hummon, M. R.; Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Palchak, D.; Kirby, B.; Ma, O.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

The application of AM/FM system to distribution contingency load transfer  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, one of the geographic information management system (GIS) is applied to perform the automated mapping and facility management (AM/FM) of power distribution systems for contingency load transfer. Three phase load flow analysis is used to calculate the current flows of line switches by retrieving the network topology and facility attributes which have been stored in the AM/FM database. The current flows solved are then stored in the database as the attributes of line switches for load transfer analysis. When a system contingency such as fault or overload occurs, the load transfer is then executed to find the switches to be operated by the heuristic search method while subjected to the system operation rules. By the proposed method, the network topology can be easily updated and displayed in the computers by connectivity trace routine according to the switching operations. Since all the system facilities are stored in the AM/FM database according to the actual spatial coordinates, it provides practical information for the system operators and crews to allocate and operate the switches easily. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the integrated AM/FM system with application programs for distribution operation, a distribution system of Taiwan Power Company (Taipower) in Kaohsiung downtown area is selected for case study. It is found that contingency load transfer for distribution system operation can be enhanced significantly with the application of AM/FM systems significantly with the application of AM/FM systems to determine the switches to be operated and the corresponding spatial locations of the switches. The impact of load transfer to the system voltage profile and the feeder loading can also be analyzed to provide valuable information for the system operators.

Lee, T.E.; Chen, C.S.; Tzeng, Y.M.; Kang, M.S.; Lee, C.C. [National Sun Yat-Sen Univ., Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Wu, J.S. [National Kaohsiung Institute of Technology (Taiwan, Province of China); Liu, T.S.S.; Chen, Y.M. [Taiwan Power Co., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Climate Contingency Roadmap: The U.S. Electric Sector and Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibility that mandatory climate policies may be adopted in the United States in the relatively near future appears to be growing. At the request of EPRI's Board of Directors, a study has been initiated to characterize options the U.S. electric sector and individual companies might pursue in response to a range of possible climate policy scenarios. The Climate Contingency Roadmap is designed to describe key elements of the relationship between climate change and the U.S. electric sector, as well as...

2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

79

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Comments by International Group on Nuclear Liability (CIGNL), in response to U.S. Department of Energy Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation, 75 Fed. Reg. 43945 (Jul. 27, 2010) and 75 Fed. Reg. 51986 (Aug. 24, 2010). Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation More Documents & Publications CIGNLCommentsDOECSCRulemaking11-30-10.doc DOE Notice of Inquiry on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) Contingent Cost Allocation - March 2, 2011 Meeting

80

Review and evaluation of contingency plans for oil and hazardous substances in the upper Great Lakes region. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to update and supplement a contingency plan review conducted for the Corps in 1979 by the St. Lawrence-Eastern Ontario Commission for handling oil and hazardous-substance spills on the upper Great Lakes and their connecting channels. Special attention was given to cleanup and control methods described for ice conditions that may exist in the region in winter. The report identifies existing contingency plans in the study area; tabulates amounts, types, and locations of equipment and manpower that exist to implement the plans; describes methods to contain and recover oil in ice conditions; describes spill-mitigation plans and techniques to protect natural resources; describes techniques of deflecting oil in swift flowing waters; and describes disposal plans identified in the contingency plans.

Gundlach, E.R.; Murday, M.; Fanning, W.L.

1986-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs (energy + demand) Natural gas Contingency Installationcosts (energy + demand) Natural gas Contingency Installationcosts (energy + demand) Natural gas Contingency Installation

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs (energy + demand) Natural gas Contingency Installationcosts (energy + demand) Natural gas Contingency Installationcosts (energy + demand) Natural gas Contingency Installation

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Damage Development on Stone Armored Breakwaters and Revetments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

method to calculate damage progression on a rubble-mound breakwater, revetment, or jetty trunk armor layer. The methods apply to uniform-sized armor stone (0.75W50 ? W50 ? 1.25W50, W50 = median weight of armor stone) as well as riprap (0.125W50 ? W50 ? 4W50) exposed to depthlimited wave conditions. The equations discussed herein are primarily intended to be used as part of a life-cycle analysis, to predict the damage for a series of storms throughout the lifetime of the structure. This lifecycle analysis including damage prediction allows engineers to balance initial cost with expected maintenance costs in order to reduce the overall cost of the structure. The equations are intended to provide a tool for accurate damage estimates in order to reduce the possibility of unexpected maintenance costs. INTRODUCTION: Rubble-mound breakwater, revetment, and jetty projects require accurate damage prediction as part of life-cycle analyses. But few studies have been conducted to determine damage progression on stone armor layers for variable wave conditions over the life of a structure. Previous armor stability lab studies were intended to determine damage for the peak of a design storm. As such, most previous laboratory studies were begun with an undamaged

Jeffery A. Melby

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408) costs apply to those items that are consumed in production process and are roughly proportional to level in cash flow analysis and in the decision to use the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12

Boisvert, Jeff

85

Guest Editorial: Laser Damage  

SciTech Connect

Laser damage of optical materials, first reported in 1964, continues to limit the output energy and power of pulsed and continuous-wave laser systems. In spite of some 48 years of research in this area, interest from the international laser community to laser damage issues remains at a very high level and does not show any sign of decreasing. Moreover, it grows with the development of novel laser systems, for example, ultrafast and short-wavelength lasers that involve new damage effects and specific mechanisms not studied before. This interest is evident from the high level of attendance and presentations at the annual SPIE Laser Damage Symposium (aka, Boulder Damage Symposium) that has been held in Boulder, Colorado, since 1969. This special section of Optical Engineering is the first one devoted to the entire field of laser damage rather than to a specific part. It is prepared in response to growing interest from the international laser-damage community. Some papers in this special section were presented at the Laser Damage Symposium; others were submitted in response to the general call for papers for this special section. The 18 papers compiled into this special section represent many sides of the broad field of laser-damage research. They consider theoretical studies of the fundamental mechanisms of laser damage including laser-driven electron dynamics in solids (O. Brenk and B. Rethfeld; A. Nikiforov, A. Epifanov, and S. Garnov; T. Apostolova et al.), modeling of propagation effects for ultrashort high-intensity laser pulses (J. Gulley), an overview of mechanisms of inclusion-induced damage (M. Koldunov and A. Manenkov), the formation of specific periodic ripples on a metal surface by femtosecond laser pulses (M. Ahsan and M. Lee), and the laser-plasma effects on damage in glass (Y. Li et al). Material characterization is represented by the papers devoted to accurate and reliable measurements of absorption with special emphasis on thin films (C. Mühlig and S. Bublitz; B. Cho, E. Danielewicz, and J. Rudisill; W. Palm et al; and J. Lu et al.). Statistical treatment of measurements of the laser-damage threshold (J. Arenberg) and the relationship to damage mechanisms (F. Wagner et al.) represent the large subfield of laser-damage measurements. Various aspects of multilayer coating and thin-film characterization are considered in papers by B. Cho, J. Rudisill, and E. Danielewicz (spectral shift in multilayer mirrors) and R. Weber et al. (novel approach to damage studies based on third-harmonic generation microscopy). Of special interest for readers is the paper by C. Stolz that summarizes the results of four “thin-film damage competitions” organized as a part of the Laser Damage Symposium. Another paper is devoted to thermal annealing of damage precursors (N. Shen et al.). Finally, the influence of nano-size contamination on initiation of laser damage by ultrashort pulses is considered in paper of V. Komolov et al.

Vitaly Gruzdev, Michelle D. Shinn

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Postmortem Cost and Schedule Analysis - Lessons Learned On NCSX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) was designed to test physics principles of an innovative fusion energy confinement device developed by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract from the US Department of Energy. The project was technically very challenging, primarily due to the complex component geometries and tight tolerances that were required. As the project matured these challenges manifested themselves in significant cost overruns through all phases of the project (i.e. design, R&D, fabrication and assembly). The project was subsequently cancelled by the DOE in 2008. Although the project was not completed, several major work packages, comprising about 65% of the total estimated cost (excluding management and contingency), were completed, providing a data base of actual costs that can be analyzed to understand cost drivers. Technical factors that drove costs included the complex geometry, tight tolerances, material requirements, and performance requirements. Management factors included imposed annual funding constraints that throttled project cash flow, staff availability, and inadequate R&D. Understanding how requirements and design decisions drove cost through this top-down forensic cost analysis could provide valuable insight into the configuration and design of future state-of-the art machines and other devices.

R. Strykowsky, T. Brown, J. Chrzanowski, M. Cole, P. Heitzenroeder, G.H. Neilson, Donald Rej, and M. Viola

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

87

Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation is exposed to a series of fluids and operations that can reduce its productive capacity. Any process that causes a loss in the productivity of an oil-, gas-, or water-saturated formation has a damaging effect on the reservoir. These damage mechanisms predominantly fall into three major classifications: mechanical, chemical, and biological. Underbalanced drilling operations involve drilling a portion of the wellbore at fluid pressures less than that of the target formation. This technology has been used to prevent or minimize problems associated with invasive formation damage, which often greatly reduces the productivity of oil and gas reservoirs, mainly in openhole horizontal-well applications. Underbalanced drilling is not a solution for all formation-damage problems. Damage caused by poorly designed and/or executed underbalanced drilling programs can equal or exceed that which may occur with a well-designed conventional overbalanced drilling program. Four techniques are currently available to achieve underbalanced conditions while drilling. These include using lightweight drilling fluids, injecting gas down the drillpipe, injecting gas into a parasite string, and using foam. This study provides an analysis of a number of potential damage mechanisms present when drilling underbalanced. It describes each one and its influence on the productivity of a well. Additionally it presents a general description of the different techniques that can be applied to carry out successful, cost-effective UBD operations, and discusses how these techniques may be used to reduce or eliminate formation damage.

Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

PAFC Cost Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAFC Cost Challenges Sridhar Kanuri Manager, PAFC Technology *Sridhar.Kanuri@utcpower.com 2 AGENDA Purecell 400 cost challenge Cost reduction opportunities Summary 3 PURECELL ...

89

Contingency plan for deployment of the void fraction instrument in Tank 241-AY-102  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-heat producing sludge from tank 241-C-106 will be sluiced and transferred to tank 241-AY-102 beginning in October 1998. Safety analyses have postulated that after retrieval, the waste in 241-AY-102 may generate and retain unsafe levels of flammable gases (Noorani 1998, Pasamebmetoglu etal. 1997). Unsafe levels of retained gas are not expected, but cannot be ruled out because of the large uncertainty in the gas generation and retention rates. The Tank Waste Remediation System Basis for Interim Operation (Noorani 1998) identifies the need for a contingency plan to add void fraction monitoring to tank 241-AY-102 within 2 weeks of the identification of flammable gas buildup that would warrant monitoring. The Tank 241-C-106 Waste Retrieval Sluicing System Process Control Plan (Carothers et al. 1998) committed to providing a contingency plan for deployment of the void fraction instrument (VFI) in tank 241-AY-102. The VFI determines the local void fraction of the waste by compressing a waste sample captured in a gas-tight test chamber. The sample chamber is mounted on the end of a 76-cm (2.5-ft) arm that can be rotated from vertical to horizontal when the instrument is deployed. Once in the waste, the arm can be positioned horizontally and rotated to sample in different areas below the riser. The VFI is deployed using a crane. The VFI has been deployed previously in 241-AW, 241-AN, and 241-SY tank farms, most recently in tank 241-SY-101 in June and July 1998. An additional test in tank 241-SY-101 is planned in September 1998. Operating instructions for the VFI are included in the Void Fraction Instrument Operation and Maintenance Manual (Pearce 1994).

CONNER, J.M.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

90

Minimum Changeover Cost Arborescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

having minimum changeover cost, a cost that we now describe. ... We define the changeover cost at j, denoted by d(j), as the sum of the costs at j paid for each of  ...

91

Primary Radiation Damage Formation  

SciTech Connect

The physical processes that give rise to changes in the microstructure, and the physical and mechanical properties of materials exposed to energetic particles are initiated by essentially elastic collisions between atoms in what has been called an atomic displacement cascade. The formation and evolution of this primary radiation damage mechanism are described to provide an overview of how stable defects are formed by displacement cascades, as well as the nature and morphology of the defects themselves. The impact of the primary variables cascade energy and irradiation temperature are discussed, along with a range of secondary factors that can influence damage formation.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment technology and subsystem cost sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology (EM-50) authorized studies on alternative systems for treating contact-handled DOE mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW). The on-going Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems` (ITTS) and the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems` (INTS) studies satisfy this request. EM-50 further authorized supporting studies including this technology and subsystem cost sensitivity analysis. This analysis identifies areas where technology development could have the greatest impact on total life cycle system costs. These areas are determined by evaluating the sensitivity of system life cycle costs relative to changes in life cycle component or phase costs, subsystem costs, contingency allowance, facility capacity, operating life, and disposal costs. For all treatment systems, the most cost sensitive life cycle phase is the operations and maintenance phase and the most cost sensitive subsystem is the receiving and inspection/preparation subsystem. These conclusions were unchanged when the sensitivity analysis was repeated on a present value basis. Opportunity exists for technology development to reduce waste receiving and inspection/preparation costs by effectively minimizing labor costs, the major cost driver, within the maintenance and operations phase of the life cycle.

Harvego, L.A.; Schafer, J.J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Fuzzy Approach to Critical Bus Ranking under Normal and Line Outage Contingencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identification of critical or weak buses for a given operating condition is an important task in the load dispatch centre. It has become more vital in view of the threat of voltage instability leading to voltage collapse. This paper presents a fuzzy approach for ranking critical buses in a power system under normal and network contingencies based on Line Flow index and voltage profiles at load buses. The Line Flow index determines the maximum load that is possible to be connected to a bus in order to maintain stability before the system reaches its bifurcation point. Line Flow index (LF index) along with voltage profiles at the load buses are represented in Fuzzy Set notation. Further they are evaluated using fuzzy rules to compute Criticality Index. Based on this index, critical buses are ranked. The bus with highest rank is the weakest bus as it can withstand a small amount of load before causing voltage collapse. The proposed method is tested on Five Bus Test System.

Shankar, Shobha

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Cost Study Manual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2012 28, 2012 Cost Study Manual Executive Summary This Cost Study Manual documents the procedures for preparing a Cost Study to compare the cost of a contractor's employee benefits to the industry average from a broad-based national benefit cost survey. The annual Employee Benefits Cost Study Comparison (Cost Study) assists with the analysis of contractors' employee benefits costs. The Contracting Officer (CO) may require corrective action when the average benefit per capita cost or the benefit cost as a percent of payroll exceeds the comparator group by more than five percent. For example, if per capita benefit costs for the comparator group are $10,000 and the benefit costs as a percent of payroll for the comparator group are 20%, the threshold for the contractor's benefits as a

95

Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

factors add 20 percent to liquefaction plant total installed cost 6 Distribution Pipeline Costs Collected historical Oil & Gas Journal data, and surveyed for current urban and...

96

Highly Insulating Windows - Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Cost The following is an estimate of the cost effective incremental cost of highly-insulating windows (U-factor=0.20 Btu/hr-ft2-F) compared to regular ENERGY STAR windows (U-factor 0.35 Btu/hr-ft2-F). Energy savings from lower U-factors were simulated with RESFEN over an assumed useful window life of 25 years. To determine the maximum incremental cost at which highly-insulating windows would still be cost-effective, we used a formula used by many utility companies to calculate the cost of saved energy from energy efficiency programs, based on the programs' cost and savings. We turned this formula around so that the cost of saved energy equals the present energy prices in the studied locations, whereas the program cost (the incremental cost of the windows) is the dependent variable. By entering 5%

97

Transparent Cost Database | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hide data for this chart (-)Show data for this chart (+) Loading data... Transparent Cost Database Generation Showing: Historical Projections Year Published: Release mouse to...

98

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating Procedures INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating...

99

Early Station Costs Questionnaire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Station Costs Questionnaire Early Station Costs Questionnaire Marc Melaina Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center Market Readiness Workshop February 16-17th, 2011 Washington, DC Questionnaire Goals * The Early Station Costs questionnaire provides an anonymous mechanism for organizations with direct experience with hydrogen station costs to provide feedback on current costs, near-term costs, economies of scale, and R&D priorities. * This feedback serves the hydrogen community and government agencies by increasing awareness of the status of refueling infrastructure costs National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Questions for Market Readiness Workshop Attendees * Are these questions the right ones to be asking?

100

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost, Durable Seal Cost, Durable Seal George M. Roberts UTC Power Corporation February 14, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information 1 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Outline * Project Objective * Technical Approach * Timeline * Team Roles * Budget * Q&A 2 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Project Objective Develop advanced, low cost, durable seal materials and sealing techniques amenable to high volume manufacture of PEM cell stacks. DOE Targets/Goals/Objectives Project Goal Durability Transportation: 5,000 hr Stationary: 40,000 hr Durability Improve mechanical and chemical stability to achieve 40,000 hr of useful operating life. Low Cost Low Cost A material cost equivalent to or less than the cost of silicones in common use. 3 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Resource Contingency Program - Oregon : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hermiston Power Project.  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has statutory responsibilities to supply electrical power to its utility, industrial, and other customers in the Pacific Northwest. In 1990, to cover the outer range of potential load growth with new resources, BPA embarked upon the Resource Contingency Program (RCP). Instead of buying or building generating plants now, BPA has purchased options to acquire power later, if and when it is needed. The decision to acquire any of these option energy projects to fulfill statutory supply obligations will be influenced by Federal system load growth, the outcome of BPA`s Business Plan, required operational changes in Columbia-Snake River Hydroelectric facilities, and the loss of major generating resources. In September 1993, three option development agreements were signed with three proposed natural gas-fired, combined cycle combustion turbine CT projects near Chehalis and Satsop, Washington, and near Hermiston, Oregon. Together these three projects could supply BPA with 1,090 average megawatts (aMW) of power. Under these agreements, sponsors are obtaining permits and conducting project design work, and BPA is completing this EIS process. In September 1993, BPA published a Notice of Intent to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) on these three proposed gas-fired combustion turbine projects and held public scoping meetings in October 1993 at each site. In February 1994, BPA released an Implementation Plan on the proposed scope of the EIS. A draft EIS on the three proposed projects was published in February 1995. The impacts of the Chehalis and Satsop projects located in Washington State will be covered in one EIS document, while the impacts of the Hermiston project located in Oregon are covered in this final EIS document. It is BPA`s intent to continue to base the analysis of impacts on the assumption that all three projects may be constructed at some point in the future.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Market Damages and the Economic Waste Fallacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robert E. Scott, The Case for Market Damages; Revisiting thethey pay less than full market damages but when buyerssellers recover full market damages. As a consequence,

Scott, Robert E.; Schwartz, Alan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Operations Cost Allocation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project (OCP) Cost Allocation Presentation - September 20, 2011 OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation List of Acronyms OCP Cost Allocation Spreadsheets OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation - Questions and Answers - September 19 - 20, 2011 Additional Questions and Answers Customer Comments/Questions and Answers: Arizona Municipal Power Users Association Arizona Power Authority Central Arizona Project Colorado River Commission Colorado River Energy Distributors Association City of Gilbert, AZ Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association of Arizona Town of Marana, AZ City of Mesa, AZ Town of Wickenburg, AZ Western's Final Decision Regarding the Long-Term Cost Allocation Methodology for Operations Staff Costs

104

Minimum Cost Arborescences ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze the cost allocation problem when a group of agents or nodes have to be connected to a source, and where the cost matrix describing the cost of connecting each pair of agents is not necessarily symmetric, thus extending the well-studied problem of minimum cost spanning tree games, where the costs are assumed to be symmetric. The focus is on rules which satisfy axioms representing incentive and fairness properties. We show that while some results are similar, there are also significant differences between the frameworks corresponding to symmetric and asymmetric cost matrices.

Bhaskar Dutta; Debasis Mishra; We Thank Daniel Granot; Anirban Kar; Herve Moulin For Comments

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Nuclear fuel cycle costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel cycle costs are given for the pressurized water reactor once-through and fuel recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor system. These calculations show that fuel cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Inductive Double-Contingency Analysis of UO2 Powder Bulk Blending Operations at a Commercial Fuel Plant (U)  

SciTech Connect

An inductive double-contingency analysis (DCA) method developed by the criticality safety function at the Savannah River Site, was applied in Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSEs) of five major plant process systems at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation`s Commercial Nuclear Fuel Manufacturing Plant in Columbia, South Carolina (WEC-Cola.). The method emphasizes a thorough evaluation of the controls intended to provide barriers against criticality for postulated initiating events, and has been demonstrated effective at identifying common mode failure potential and interdependence among multiple controls. A description of the method and an example of its application is provided.

Skiles, S. K. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

1994-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

107

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

108

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathway Cost Distributions Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25, 2006 2 Outline * Pathway-Independent Cost Goal * Cost Distribution Objective * Overview * H2A Influence * Approach * Implementation * Results * Discussion Process * Summary 3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal * Goal is pathway independent * Developed through a well defined, transparent process * Consumer fueling costs are equivalent or less on a cents per mile basis * Evolved gasoline ICE and gasoline-electric hybrids are benchmarks * R&D guidance provided in two forms * Evolved gasoline ICE defines a threshold hydrogen cost used to screen or eliminate options which can't show ability to meet target * Gasoline-electric hybrid defines a lower hydrogen cost used to prioritize projects for resource allocation

109

Documents: Cost Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Cost Analysis PDF Icon Summary of the Cost Analysis Report for the Long-term Management of Depleted UF6...

110

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

111

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Presented by: J.M. Hieb, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CHPRC1204-04 Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Everyone is trying to stretch a...

112

Cost Estimation Recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...D.P. Hoult and C.L. Meador, Manufacturing Cost Estimating, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

113

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Public Comments on DOE's NOI re Section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Comments by the United States Enrichrnent Corporation (USEC) in response to DOE's Notice of Inquiry (N0l) on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) Contingent Cost...

115

Using contingent valuation to explore willingness to pay for renewable energy: A comparison of collective and voluntary payment vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the most basic questions about the organization and functioning of society involve issues raised by the existence of public goods. With respect to environmental public goods, how should funds used to support environmental improvement be collected and used? In particular, are collective, mandatory payments superior to voluntary, charitable payments due to the possibility of free riding? And to what degree should the government be involved in spending these funds: should the government directly fund environmental improvement projects or should the private sector be used to collect funds and determine funding priorities? This report explores these questions from the perspective of renewable energy: wind, geothermal, biomass, hydropower, and solar. In particular, this report analyzes the payment preferences of U.S. households through the implementation of a large-scale contingent valuation (CV) survey of willingness to pay (WTP) for renewable energy. Renewable energy can be supported through a mandatory ''tax'' on electric bills or through voluntary payments via green power marketing; the government may or may not be heavily involved in the collection and expenditure of such funds. The question of how households prefer to pay for renewable energy is therefore highly relevant. The primary objective of this study is to explore variations in stated WTP for renewable energy under the following four payment and provision contexts: (1) A mandatory increase in the electricity bills of all customers, the funds from which are collected and spent by the government on renewable energy projects. (2) A voluntary increase in the electricity bills of those customers who choose to pay, the funds from which are collected and spent by the government on renewable energy projects. (3) A voluntary increase in the electricity bills of those customers who choose to pay, the funds from which are collected and spent by electricity suppliers on renewable energy projects. (4) A mandatory increase in the electricity bills of all customers, the funds from which are collected and spent by electricity suppliers on renewable energy projects. These payment and provision scenarios are consistent with contemporary forms of support for renewable energy. The first scenario--mandatory payments and government provision--is consistent with a system-benefits charge policy, a policy that has been adopted in 15 U.S. states. The third scenario--voluntary payments to an electricity supplier--is consistent with competitive green power marketing. The fourth scenario--mandatory payments through electricity suppliers--is consistent with a renewables portfolio standard, a policy adopted in thirteen U.S. states as of mid 2003. The second scenario--voluntary payments and government provision--has only been used in a limited fashion in the United States. In addition to having contemporary policy relevance, these four contingent valuation scenarios allow one to distinguish differences in stated WTP based on: (1) the payment method--is WTP affected by whether payments are to be made collectively or voluntarily? and (2) the provision arrangement--does the manner in which a good is provided, in this case through the government or the private sector, affect stated WTP? A split-sample, dichotomous choice contingent valuation survey of 1,574 U.S. residents was developed and implemented to test the sensitivity of stated WTP to these variables at three different payment levels, or bid points. Three secondary objectives also influenced research design, and are discussed in this report. First, this study indirectly and tentatively evaluates the importance of ''participation expectations'' in contingent valuation surveys: specifically, are individuals who state a WTP for renewable energy more likely to think that others will also contribute? Such relationships are commonly discussed in the sociology, social psychology, and marketing literatures, and are also frequently referenced in the collective action literature, but have yet to be tested thoroughly in a contingent valuation co

Wiser, Ryan H.

2002-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

116

Identifying structural damage from images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photographs of damaged buildings in Bam, Iran. . . . . . . .patches of Bam, Iran. . . . . . . . . Photo pictures ofBitemporal images of an urban region of Bam, Iran. . . . .

Chen, ZhiQiang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Corrosion Damage Models and Sustainability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Corrosion Damage Models and Sustainability ... Abstract Scope, The ability of industry to make sustainable choices in the future that optimize ...

118

Environmental protection using social costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions and other residual wastes come from industrial production, commercial and household activities, and transportation. These wastes damage the environment, including human health. As economies grow, so does concern about balancing that growth with the desire for environmental protection. At issue is how much environmental protection we should have. We address this issue using the concept of social costing. The issue is discussed in the context of electric power generation. There is particular concern about the use of fossil fuels such as petroleum, the major fuel used in the Republic of China, and coal which is the most common fuel used in the U. S. Electric power generation is a major source of airborne pollutants such as SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} particulate matter, volatile organic compounds, CO, and CO{sub 2}. It also results in liquid and solid wastes, and other effects such as changes in land use. To generate electric power, fuel (such as petroleum, coal or enriched uranium) or some other resource (e.g., wind or geothermal) is needed. A fuel cycle consists of a sequence of activities and processes involved in generating electric power. These activities include fuel extraction, treatment and processing; fuel conversion into electricity; transmission; waste disposal; and transportation of fuel and wastes between the different stages of the fuel cycle. Each stage results in emissions or other residuals. Several recent-studies have been about the environmental costs of electricity.

Lee, R.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Using contingent valuation to explore willingness to pay for renewable energy: A comparison of collective and voluntary payment vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Even though renewable energy often costs more than otherEven though renewable energy often costs more than otherEven though renewable energy often costs more than other

Wiser, Ryan H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Using contingent valuation to explore willingness to pay for renewable energy: A comparison of collective and voluntary payment vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind and solar) Minimizing the cost of electricity to consumers Increasing investments in energywind and solar) Minimizing the cost of electricity to consumers Increasing investments in energywind and solar) Minimizing the cost of electricity to consumers Increasing investments in energy

Wiser, Ryan H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Commercial equipment cost database  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared for DOE, Office of Codes and Standards, as part of the Commercial Equipment Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, specifically addresses the equipment cost estimates used to evaluate the economic impacts of revised standards. A database including commercial equipment list prices and estimated contractor costs was developed, and through statistical modeling, estimated contractor costs are related to equipment parameters including performance. These models are then used to evaluate cost estimates developed by the ASHRAE 90.1 Standing Standards Project Committee, which is in the process of developing a revised ASHRAE 90.1 standard. The database will also be used to support further evaluation of the manufacturer and consumer impacts of standards. Cost estimates developed from the database will serve as inputs to economic modeling tools, which will be used to estimate these impacts. Preliminary results suggest that list pricing is a suitable measure from which to estimate contractor costs for commercial equipment. Models developed from these cost estimates accurately predict estimated costs. The models also confirm the expected relationships between equipment characteristics and cost. Cost models were developed for gas-fired and electric water heaters, gas-fired packaged boilers, and warm air furnaces for indoor installation. Because of industry concerns about the use of the data, information was not available for the other categories of EPAct-covered equipment. These concerns must be addressed to extend the analysis to all EPAct equipment categories.

Freeman, S.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Methods | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods Methods Disclaimer The data gathered here are for informational purposes only. Inclusion of a report in the database does not represent approval of the estimates by DOE or NREL. Levelized cost calculations DO NOT represent real world market conditions. The calculation uses a single discount rate in order to compare technology costs only. About the Cost Database For emerging energy technologies, a variety of cost and performance numbers are cited in presentations and reports for present-day characteristics and potential improvements. Amid a variety of sources and methods for these data, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's technology development programs determine estimates for use in program planning. The Transparent Cost Database collects program cost and performance

123

Low cost MCFC anodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper outlines a project, funded under a DOE SBIR grant, which tested a potentially lower cost method of manufacturing MCFC stack anodes and evaluated the feasibility of using the technology in the existing M-C Power Corp. manufacturing facility. The procedure involves adding activator salts to the anode tape casting slurry with the Ni and Cr or Al powders. Two different processes occur during heat treatment in a reducing environment: sintering of the base Ni structure, and alloying or cementation of the Cr or Al powders. To determine whether it was cost-effective to implement the cementation alloying manufacturing process, the M-C Power manufacturing cost model was used to determine the impact of different material costs and processing parameters on total anode cost. Cost analysis included equipment expenditures and facility modifications required by the cementation alloying process.

Erickson, D.S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

What solar heating costs  

SciTech Connect

Few people know why solar energy systems cost what they do. Designers and installers know what whole packages cost, but rarely how much goes to piping, how much for labor and how much for the collectors. Yet one stands a better chance of controlling costs if one can compare where the money is going against where it should be going. A detailed Tennessee Valley Authority study of large solar projects shows how much each component contributes to the total bill.

Adams, J.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Cost analysis guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

Strait, R.S.

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

CAES Updated Cost Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressed Air Energy Storage Systems (CAES) for bulk energy storage applications have been receiving renewed interest. Increased penetration of large quantities of intermittent wind generation are requiring utilities to re-examine the cost and value of CAES systems. New second generation CAES cycles have been identified which offer the potential for lower capital and operating costs. This project was undertaken to update and summarize the capital and operating costs and performance features of second ge...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

127

Target Cost Management Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Target cost management (TCM) is an innovation of Japanese management accounting system and by common sense has been considered with great interest by practitioners. Nowadays, TCM related

Okano, Hiroshi

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Cost Affordable Titanium IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Enhancing the Cost Effectiveness of High Performance Titanium Alloy Component Production by Powder Metallurgy · Evolution of Texture in ...

129

Cost Effective Single Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

three relevant technologies, namely casting, alloy development and orientation measurement, developed by Rolls-Royce to enable the cost effective production.

130

Sharing Supermodular Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the costs collectively incurred by a group of cooperating agents. ..... Mixed integer programming formulations for production planning and scheduling prob- lems.

131

Petroleum well costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is the first academic study of well costs and drilling times for Australia?s petroleum producing basins, both onshore and offshore. I analyse a substantial… (more)

Leamon, Gregory Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

COST REVIEW and ESTIMATING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Programming Guide. OMB Circular A-94, Guidelines and Discount Rates for Benefit-Cost Analysis of Federal Programs, dated October 29, 1992 Page | 41 APPENDIX A ICRICE...

133

The Cost of Debt ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate firm-specific marginal cost of debt functions for a large panel of companies between 1980 and 2007. The marginal cost curves are identified by exogenous variation in the marginal tax benefits of debt. The location of a given company’s cost of debt function varies with characteristics such as asset collateral, size, book-to-market, asset tangibility, cash flows, and whether the firm pays dividends. By integrating the area between benefit and cost functions we estimate that the equilibrium net benefit of debt is 3.5 % of asset value, resulting from an estimated gross benefit of debt of 10.4 % of asset value and an estimated cost of debt of 6.9%. We find that the cost of being overlevered is asymmetrically higher than the cost of being underlevered and that expected default costs constitute approximately half of the total ex ante cost of debt. We thank Rick Green (the Acting Editor), and an anonymous referee, Heitor Almeida, Ravi Bansal,

Jules H. Van Binsbergen; John R. Graham; Jie Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

135

Reducing Energy Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy expense is becoming increasingly dominant in the operating costs of high-performance computing (HPC) systems. At the same time, electricity prices vary significantly at...

136

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) General Contingency Plan for Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant  

SciTech Connect

This contingency plan provides a description of the Y-12 plant and its waste units and prescribes control procedures and emergency response procedures. It lists emergency and spill response equipment, provides information on coordination agreements with local agencies, and describes the evacuation plan and reporting requirements.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Cost-benefit analysis of aircraft design for environment using a fleet perspective and real options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) approaches do not examine the costs associated with damage due to environmental factors and are usually implemented to examine one aircraft. The Environmental Design ...

Hynes, Christopher Dennis

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Achieving N-2 Contingency from a Virtual Power Plant (VPP): A Consolidated Edison Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consolidated Edison commissioned EPRI to analyze the feasibility of a Virtual Power Plant (VPP) to enhance delivery reliability in the Jamaica service area. Currently, service can be maintained at peak demand without overloads under the loss of a single transformer (N-1). Consolidated Edison foresees benefits from increasing reliability to a higher level, N-2 reliability, but the cost of adding another transformer is high, perhaps in excess of $250 million. EPRI constructed several VPP configurations us...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

139

Transportation energy contingency planning: financing emergency transit services with temporary fare surcharges  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of using a temporary fare surcharge as a source of additional operating revenue for transit agencies during an energy crisis is examined. The characteristics of a temporary surcharge proposal, including the general advantages and disadvantages of the surcharge, are discussed. Using data from the Municipality of Metropolitan Seattle, two representative scenarios were developed on the assumption that Seattle Metro would consider imposing a temporary surcharge during an energy crisis. The first scenario assumes Seattle Metro would impose a surcharge to cover the increased costs of operating its base service. The second one assumes a more severe energy crisis which would encourage Seattle Metro to provide peak overload service. Under this scenario, Seattle Metro would impose a surcharge to cover the increased costs of operating its base service and the total overload service operating costs. Background information on Seattle Metro, including their experience with previous energy crisis is presented. The scenario details and conclusions are followed by a discussion of the limitations of a temporary fare surcharge.

Felice,C.; Larson, A.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Cost-Affordable Titanium III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost-Effective Production and Thermomechanical Consolidation of Titanium Alloy Powders · Cost Affordable Developments in Titanium Technology and ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Software Cost Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Software cost estimation is the process of predicting the effort required to develop a software system. Many estimation models have been proposed over the last 30 years. This paper provides a general overview of software cost estimation methods including the recent advances in the field. As a number of these models rely on a software size estimate as input, we first provide an overview of common size metrics. We then highlight the cost estimation models that have been proposed and used successfully. Models may be classified into 2 major categories: algorithmic and non-algorithmic. Each has its own strengths and weaknesses. A key factor in selecting a cost estimation model is the accuracy of its estimates. Unfortunately, despite the large body of experience with estimation models, the accuracy of these models is not satisfactory. The paper includes comment on the performance of the estimation models and description of several newer approaches to cost estimation.

Hareton Leung Zhang; Zhang Fan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Transmission line capital costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Lookin g for data personnel costs, indirect costs, equipment costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Negotiating Group Question/Answer Sessions November 19, 2009 Q: What happens now? A: The negotiation process starts tomorrow [November 20, 2009], when DOE will be sending the Awardees an e-mail with information about which website to go to for clarification and direction, information from the Office of Civil Rights, and answers to some of the questions that came up in the meeting. DOE will be gathering information about the questions concerning cyber requirements, metrics, and reporting requirements and will be getting back to the awardees about those issues the week after Thanksgiving. We have done a review of the budgets, and emails will be sent giving opportunities to address any issues. We will also re-review technical and cost proposals.

144

Excitation optimization for damage detection  

SciTech Connect

A technique is developed to answer the important question: 'Given limited system response measurements and ever-present physical limits on the level of excitation, what excitation should be provided to a system to make damage most detectable?' Specifically, a method is presented for optimizing excitations that maximize the sensitivity of output measurements to perturbations in damage-related parameters estimated with an extended Kalman filter. This optimization is carried out in a computationally efficient manner using adjoint-based optimization and causes the innovations term in the extended Kalman filter to be larger in the presence of estimation errors, which leads to a better estimate of the damage-related parameters in question. The technique is demonstrated numerically on a nonlinear 2 DOF system, where a significant improvement in the damage-related parameter estimation is observed.

Bement, Matthew T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bewley, Thomas R [UCSD

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Information Effects in Valuation of Electricity and Water Service Attributes Using Contingent Valuation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on costs and bene?ts of fuel options for electricity gener- 1CCS is a process through which emitted CO2 can be captured and stored in under- ground sites including depleted oil and gas ?elds. 3 ation and investments to improve energy security has an impact... of lakes or endangered species, while exploration of information for other types of non-market goods such as utility attributes has been neglected. Understanding how information can a¤ect consumers is particularly per- tinent to the electricity sector...

Akcura, Elcin

146

The social costs to the US of monopolization of the world oil market, 1972--1991  

SciTech Connect

The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the US over the period 1972--1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the US and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel's ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972--1991 period to a hypothetical more competitive'' world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader's judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing US oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing theeconomic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy's potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy's inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972--1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US's primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

Greene, D.L.; Leiby, P.N.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The social costs to the US of monopolization of the world oil market, 1972--1991  

SciTech Connect

The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the US over the period 1972--1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the US and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel`s ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972--1991 period to a hypothetical ``more competitive`` world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader`s judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing US oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing theeconomic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy`s potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy`s inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972--1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US`s primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

Greene, D.L.; Leiby, P.N.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

cost | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cost cost Dataset Summary Description The following data-set is for a benchmark residential home for all TMY3 locations across all utilities in the US. The data is indexed by utility service provider which is described by its "unique" EIA ID ( Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released April 05th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated April 06th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords AC apartment CFL coffeemaker Computer cooling cost demand Dishwasher Dryer Furnace gas HVAC Incandescent Laptop load Microwave model NREL Residential television tmy3 URDB Data text/csv icon Residential Cost Data for Common Household Items (csv, 14.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

149

Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Plug-in Hybrid Electric Natural Gas (CNG) Flex Fuel (E85) Biodiesel (B20) Next Vehicle Cost Calculator U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

150

COSTS OF NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

The discussion on the costs of nuclear power from stationary plants, designed primarily for the generation of electricity. deals with those plants in operation, being built, or being designed for construction at an early date. An attempt is made to consider the power costs on the basis of consistent definitions and assumptions for the various nuclear plants and for comparable fossil-fuel plants. Information on several new power reactor projects is included. (auth)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Cost-Causation-Based Tariffs for Wind Ancillary Service Impacts: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference paper discussing the integration cost of wind. Although specific tariffs for wind generation for ancillary services are uncommon, we anticipate that balancing authorities (control areas) and other entities will move toward such tariffs. Tariffs for regulation and imbalance services should be cost-based, recognize the relevant time scales that correspond with utility operational cycles, and properly allocate those costs to those entities that cause the balancing authority to incur the costs. In this paper, we present methods for separating wind's impact into regulation and load following (imbalance) time scales. We show that approximating these impacts with simpler methods can significantly distort cost causation and even cause confusion between the relevant time scales. We present results from NREL's wind data collection program to illustrate the dangers of linearly scaling wind resource data from small wind plants to approximate the wind resource data from large wind plants. Finally, we provide a framework for developing regulation and imbalance tariffs, we outline methods to begin examining contingency reserve requirements for wind plants, we provide guidance on the important characteristics to consider, and we provide hypothetical cases that the tariff can be tested against to determine whether the results are desired.

Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.; Wan, Y.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Microstructural Characterization of Damage Mechanisms of Graphite ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Nanostructured Materials for Lithium Ion Batteries and for Supercapacitors. Presentation Title, Microstructural Characterization of Damage  ...

153

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation CTS 21st Annual Transportation Research Conference costs #12;Potential Applications · Roadway Project Feasibility Studies ­ Identified potential roadway infrastructure improvement ­ Documentation of estimated project costs ­ Determine property assessments

Minnesota, University of

154

Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

which needs to be 44% or better along with relatively high wind speeds. Along with low production costs, however, delivery and storage costs will also factor into the final cost...

155

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Plant Cycling Costs Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-55433 July 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Power Plant Cycling Costs April 2012 N. Kumar, P. Besuner, S. Lefton, D. Agan, and D. Hilleman Intertek APTECH Sunnyvale, California NREL Technical Monitor: Debra Lew Prepared under Subcontract No. NFT-1-11325-01

156

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COST REVIEW (ICR) COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOP) Revision 1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) OFFICE OF ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT (OAPM) September 2013 SUMMARY OF UPDATES: This revision includes the following significant changes since the December 2011 SOP release: 1. The original SOP discussed how an EIR and an ICE could be executed in tandem, but since we are no longer advocating this approach the ICE process has been completely separated from the EIR process and references to EIRs have been removed. 2. Section 1 adds a reference to Public Law 2055 reflecting that we must now, as a matter of law, perform an ICE at CD-3 for projects with a TPC over $100 million. 3. Section 2 notes that DOE Programs must now pay for ICRs and ICEs and reflects that PARS II must be

157

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COST REVIEW (ICR) COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES (SOP) Revision 1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) OFFICE OF ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT (OAPM) September 2013 SUMMARY OF UPDATES: This revision includes the following significant changes since the December 2011 SOP release: 1. The original SOP discussed how an EIR and an ICE could be executed in tandem, but since we are no longer advocating this approach the ICE process has been completely separated from the EIR process and references to EIRs have been removed. 2. Section 1 adds a reference to Public Law 2055 reflecting that we must now, as a matter of law, perform an ICE at CD-3 for projects with a TPC over $100 million. 3. Section 2 notes that DOE Programs must now pay for ICRs and ICEs and reflects that PARS II must be

158

Production Cost Optimization Assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits of improved thermal performance of coal-fired power plants continue to grow, as the costs of fuel rise and the prospect of a carbon dioxide cap and trade program looms on the horizon. This report summarizes the efforts to date of utilities committed to reducing their heat rate by 1.0% in the Production Cost Optimization (PCO) Project. The process includes benchmarking of plant thermal performance using existing plant data and a site-specific performance appraisal. The appraisal determines po...

2008-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

159

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

SciTech Connect

Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

160

Transportation energy contingency plans for rural areas and small communities. Final report Oct 80-Dec 81. [Missouri  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the petroleum supply disruptions of the 1970's the Federal Government took actions to ensure continuation of transportation services during a critical situation. This led to development of state transportation energy contingency plans; however the Missouri Transportation Fuels Emergency Plan, like those of many states, does not contain specific recommendations for small communities and rural areas. This investigation was undertaken to determine the most effective transportation fuel conservation measures which could be implemented by such areas during energy emergencies. Recommendations are presented concerning strategies to reduce gasoline use in rural areas and the institutional arrangements required for coping with a fuel shortage. It is suggested that the multi-county regional planning commission should become the lead agency in implementing and coordinating fuel conservation measures in rural areas. The existing network of emergency preparedness officers should be utilized to inventory local fuel distribution services, monitor local service station operating practices and to serve motorists who might be stranded. The University of Missouri Cooperative Extension Service should offer educational programs covering fuel conserving driving techniques, vehicle maintenance, trip planning, and ridesharing.

Dare, C.E.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Field Guide: Bearing Damage Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report 1021780, Manual of Bearing Failures and Repair in Power Plant Rotating Equipment, 2011 Update, is a comprehensive document on the subject of fluid film bearing damage modes. This field guide provides a pocket reference based upon the content of that report. ...

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

162

Service Provider Competition: Delay Cost Structure, Segmentation, and Cost Advantage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We model competition between two providers who serve delay-sensitive customers. We compare a generalized delay cost structure, where a customer's delay cost depends on her service valuation, with the traditional additive delay cost structure, where the ... Keywords: delay cost structure, service competition, value-based market segmentation

Maxim Afanasyev; Haim Mendelson

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Long-run marginal costs lower than average costs  

SciTech Connect

The thesis of this article is that the long-run marginal costs of electricity are not always greater than the present average costs, as is often assumed. As long as short-run costs decrease with new plant additions, the long-run marginal cost is less than long-run average cost. When average costs increase with new additions, long-run marginal costs are greater than long-run average costs. The long-run marginal costs of a particular utility may be less than, equal to, or greater than its long-run average costs - even with inflation present. The way to determine which condition holds for a given utility is to estimate costs under various combinations of assumptions: probable load growth, zero load growth, and load growth greater than expected; and changes in load factor with attendant costs. Utilities that can demonstrate long-run marginal costs lower than long-run average costs should be encouraged to build plant and increase load, for the resulting productivity gains and slowing of inflation. Utilities that face long-run marginal costs greater than long-run average costs should discourage growth in sales through any available means.

Hunter, S.R.

1980-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

164

Heliostat cost reduction study.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power towers are capable of producing solar-generated electricity and hydrogen on a large scale. Heliostats are the most important cost element of a solar power tower plant. Since they constitute {approx} 50% of the capital cost of the plant it is important to reduce heliostat cost as much as possible to improve the economic performance of power towers. In this study we evaluate current heliostat technology and estimate a price of $126/m{sup 2} given year-2006 materials and labor costs for a deployment of {approx}600 MW of power towers per year. This 2006 price yields electricity at $0.067/kWh and hydrogen at $3.20/kg. We propose research and development that should ultimately lead to a price as low as $90/m{sup 2}, which equates to $0.056/kWh and $2.75/kg H{sup 2}. Approximately 30 heliostat and manufacturing experts from the United States, Europe, and Australia contributed to the content of this report during two separate workshops conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility.

Jones, Scott A.; Lumia, Ronald. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Davenport, Roger (Science Applications International Corporation, San Diego, CA); Thomas, Robert C. (Advanced Thermal Systems, Centennial, CO); Gorman, David (Advanced Thermal Systems, Larkspur, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Donnelly, Matthew W.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Estimating decommissioning costs: The 1994 YNPS decommissioning cost study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early this year, Yankee Atomic Electric Company began developing a revised decommissioning cost estimate for the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (YNPS) to provide a basis for detailed decommissioning planning and to reflect slow progress in siting low-level waste (LLW) and spent-nuclear-fuel disposal facilities. The revision also reflects the need to change from a cost estimate that focuses on overall costs to a cost estimate that is sufficiently detailed to implement decommissioning and identify the final cost of decommissioning.

Szymczak, W.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Percent of 2010 Luminaire Cost LED Luminaire Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LEDs promise to change the world, and few doubt that they will, but a key limiter to more rapid adoption is the cost of the LED themselves. The cost breakdown of LED luminaires vary, but it is safe to put the cost of the LED at around 25% to 40 % of the total luminaire cost. It is projected to remain a significant cost of the total luminaire for many years.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

SunShot Initiative: Low-Cost Heliostat Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Heliostat Development Cost Heliostat Development HiTek logo Photo of a machine with two round discs connected by intertwined chains. A staged-chain drive unit eliminates destructive coupling loads from severe wind conditions and greatly reduces cumulative fatigue damage. HiTek Services, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is conducting fundamental parametric analyses of the optimum heliostat size and developing a novel low-cost heliostat design. Approach There are four tasks under this award: Develop a means to determine the optimum size range of the heliostat, in terms of the applied forces and moments, manufacturing learning curve effects, O&M, and optical efficiency. The outcome of this task will be a spreadsheet analysis tool for parametrically determining heliostat costs that are appropriately allocated into categories with inputs for a specific design.

168

Procurement Specification for Horizontal Gas Path Heat Recovery Steam Generator: Avoiding Thermal-Mechanical Fatigue Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), particularly those equipped with F-class gas turbines that are also subjected to periods of frequent cyclic operation, have experienced premature pressure part failures because of excessive thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) damage. The very competitive power generation marketplace has resulted in lowest installed cost often taking precedence over medium- and long-term durability and operating costs.

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

169

Demonstration of Ultrasonic Guided Wave Examination Capability for FAC Damage and Circumferential Cracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detection and monitoring of flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) is a significant cost to the power generation industry. Identifying technologies that can improve results and reduce the cost of FAC monitoring will be beneficial to the industry. The objective of this project was to determine the capability of ultrasonic guided waves to identify locations of FAC damage. Additionally, this project looked at the capability of ultrasonic guided waves in identifying circumferential-radial planar flaws such as ...

2009-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

170

Damage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in a nuclear reactor in a realistic time frame. XMAT's delivery of fragment ions at fission fragment energies achieves 25 dpahr. Reactor materials experience a range of dose...

171

costs | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Varnish cache server costs Dataset Summary Description This dataset represents a historical repository of all the numerical data from the smartgrid.gov website condensed into spreadsheets to enable analysis of the data. Below are a couple of things worth noting: Source Smartgrid.gov Date Released March 04th, 2013 (11 months ago) Date Updated March 04th, 2013 (11 months ago) Keywords AMI costs distribution smart grid transmission Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon SmartGrid.gov Quarterly Data Summary 4Q12 (xlsx, 112.1 KiB) application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon SmartGrid.gov Quarterly Data Summary 3Q12 (xlsx, 107.9 KiB) application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon SmartGrid.gov Quarterly Data Summary 2Q12 (xlsx, 111.9 KiB)

172

Geothermal probabilistic cost study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A tool is presented to quantify the risks of geothermal projects, the Geothermal Probabilistic Cost Model (GPCM). The GPCM model is used to evaluate a geothermal reservoir for a binary-cycle electric plant at Heber, California. Three institutional aspects of the geothermal risk which can shift the risk among different agents are analyzed. The leasing of geothermal land, contracting between the producer and the user of the geothermal heat, and insurance against faulty performance are examined. (MHR)

Orren, L.H.; Ziman, G.M.; Jones, S.C.; Lee, T.K.; Noll, R.; Wilde, L.; Sadanand, V.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Keeping track of the damage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Archives: News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Keeping track of the damage Scientists resolve long-standing mystery of ion-solid interactions Reprinted with kind permission from ScienceWise - Science Magazine of the Australian National University JANUARY 27, 2009 Bookmark and Share Dr. Patrick Kluth and Claudia Schnohr. Silica (silicon dioxide) is the most abundant mineral in the earth's crust and consequently is a core component in many rocks. It's quite common for such rocks to also contain natural traces of materials like uranium that undergo slow radioactive decay. This radioactivity produces energetic particles that smash through the surrounding silica creating tracks of localized damage in their wake.

174

Cost Study Manual | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cost Study Manual Cost Study Manual Update 62912. Memo regarding Cost Study Manual Cost Study Manual More Documents & Publications Technical Standards, Newsletter-June 1999 Build...

175

Hydrogen Refueling Station Costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. Hydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways -costs are compared with cost estimates of similar stationsHydrogen Supply: Cost Estimate for Hydrogen Pathways-Scoping

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, J; Jianxin, Ma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Schedule and Cost Buffer Sizing How to account for the bias between project performance and your model.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schedule and Cost Buffer Sizing How to account for the bias between project performance and your model. Bias in project performance causes schedule and cost to over-run baseline estimates (your model). Bias is the one-sided tendency of actual schedule or cost to over-run the model. The PMBOK Guide ™ and supporting literature recommend estimating the variability for all project time and cost estimates, and sizing appropriate schedule or cost buffers (also known as contingency or management reserve) using Monte-Carlo analysis or PERT. Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM) uses a similar approach to size buffers (the Square Root of the Sum of the Squares, or SSQ method). These techniques pool the variance from individual task estimates. Statistical pooling of variance does not account for sources of bias 1 in the estimates; i.e., systematic reasons that the estimates may be high or low. This paper describes a number of sources of bias in performance of projects to schedule and cost estimates, and provides recommendations to size buffers that ensure your projects come in under your baseline schedule and budget.

Chain Ccpm; Larry Leach

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Pennsylvania life cycle costing manual  

SciTech Connect

Until the 1970s, it was commonplace for institutions and governments to purchase equipment based on lowest initial (first) costs. Recurring costs such as operational, maintenance, and energy costs often were not considered in the purchase decision. If an agency wanted to buy something, it published specifications and requested bids from several manufacturers. Often, the lowest bidder who met the specifications won the job, with no consideration given to the economic life of the equipment or yearly recurring costs such as energy and maintenance costs. The practice of purchasing based on lowest initial costs probably did not make good economic sense prior to 1970, and it certainly does not make good sense now. The wise person will consider all costs and benefits associated with a purchase, both initial and post-purchase, in order to make procurement decisions that are valid for the life of the equipment. This describes a method of financial analysis that considers all pertinent costs: life cycle costing (LCC).

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Field Guide: Turbine Steam Path Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam path damage, particularly of blades, has long been recognized as a leading cause of steam turbine unavailability for large fossil fuel plants. Damage to steam path components by various mechanisms continues to result in significant economic impact domestically and internationally. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Report TR-108943, Turbine Steam Path Damage: Theory and Practice, Volumes 1 and 2, was prepared to compile the most recent knowledge about turbine steam path damage: identifying th...

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

179

The damage function approach for estimating fuel cycle externalities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses the methodology used in a study of fuel cycle externalities sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Commission of the European Communities. The methodology is the damage function approach. This paper describes that approach and discusses its application and limitations. The fuel cycles addressed are those in which coal, biomass, oil, hydro, natural gas and uranium are used to generate electric power. The methodology is used to estimate the physical impacts of these fuel cycles on environmental resources and human health, and the external costs and benefits of these impacts.

Lee, R.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

LIFE Cost of Electricity, Capital and Operating Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful commercialization of fusion energy requires economic viability as well as technical and scientific feasibility. To assess economic viability, we have conducted a pre-conceptual level evaluation of LIFE economics. Unit costs are estimated from a combination of bottom-up costs estimates, working with representative vendors, and scaled results from previous studies of fission and fusion plants. An integrated process model of a LIFE power plant was developed to integrate and optimize unit costs and calculate top level metrics such as cost of electricity and power plant capital cost. The scope of this activity was the entire power plant site. Separately, a development program to deliver the required specialized equipment has been assembled. Results show that LIFE power plant cost of electricity and plant capital cost compare favorably to estimates for new-build LWR's, coal and gas - particularly if indicative costs of carbon capture and sequestration are accounted for.

Anklam, T

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Cost-sensitive classifier evaluation using cost curves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evaluation of classifier performance in a cost-sensitive setting is straightforward if the operating conditions (misclassification costs and class distributions) are fixed and known. When this is not the case, evaluation requires a method of visualizing ...

Robert C. Holte; Chris Drummond

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Cost Sensitive Conditional Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While POMDPs provide a general platform for conditional planning under a wide range of quality metrics they have limited scalability. On the other hand, uniform probability conditional planners scale very well, but many lack the ability to optimize plan quality metrics. We present an innovation to planning graph based heuristics that helps uniform probability conditional planners both scale and generate high quality plans when using actions with non uniform costs. We make empirical comparisons with two state of the art planners to show the benefit of our techniques.

Daniel Bryce; Subbarao Kambhampati

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Strategic petroleum reserve caverns casing damage update 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hanging casing strings are used for oil and brine transfer in the domal salt storage caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Damage to these casings is of concern because hanging string replacement is costly and because of implications on cavern stability. Although the causes of casing damage are not always well defined, many events leading to damage are assumed to be the result of salt falls impacting the hanging strings. However, in some cases, operational aspects may be suspected. The history of damage to hanging strings is updated in this study to include the most recent events. Potential general domal and local operational and material factors that could influence the tendency for caverns to have salt falls are examined in detail. As a result of this examination, general factors, such as salt dome anomalies and crude type, and most of the operational factors, such as geometry, location and depressurizations, are not believed to be primary causes of casing damage. Further analysis is presented of the accumulation of insolubles during cavern solutioning and accumulation of salt fall material on the cavern floor. Inaccuracies in sump geometry probably make relative cavern insolubles contents uncertain. However, determination of the salt fall accumulations, which are more accurate, suggest that the caverns with the largest salt fall accumulations show the greatest number of hanging string events. There is good correlation between the accumulation rate and the number of events when the event numbers are corrected to an equivalent number for a single hanging string in a quiescent, operating cavern. The principal factor that determines the propensity for a cavern to exhibit this behavior is thought to be the effect of impurity content on the fracture behavior of salt.

Munson, D.E.; Molecke, M.A.; Neal, J.T. [and others

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The Social Costs to the U.S. of Monopolization of the World Oil Market, 1972-1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the U.S. over the period 1972-1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the U.S. and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel's ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972-1991 period to a hypothetical ''more competitive'' world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader's judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing U.S. oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US. oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing the economic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy's potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC Cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy's inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972-1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$ ($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US's primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

Greene, D.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Ductile damage model with void coalescence  

SciTech Connect

A general model for ductile damage in metals is presented. It includes damage induced by shear stress as well as damage caused by volumetric tension. Spallation is included as a special case. Strain induced damage is also treated. Void nucleation and growth are included and give rise to strain rate effects. Strain rate effects also arise in the model through elastic release wave propagation between damage centers. Underlying physics of the model is the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids in a plastically flowing solid. Implementation of the model in hydrocodes is discussed.

Tonks, D.L.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Chemical damage due to drilling operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The drilling of geothermal wells can result in near wellbore damage of both the injection wells and production wells if proper precautions are not taken. Very little specific information on the chemical causes for drilling damage that can directly be applied to the drilling of a geothermal well in a given situation is available in the literature. As part of the present work, the sparse literature references related to the chemical aspects of drilling damage are reviewed. The various sources of chemically induced drilling damages that are related to drilling operations are summarized. Various means of minimizing these chemical damages during and after the drilling of a geothermal well are suggested also.

Vetter, O.J.; Kandarpa, V.

1982-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

187

Cost effective multimedia courseware development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multimedia technology offers considerable potential for education though the costs of production of courseware are prohibitive especially in a rapidly changing discipline such as computer science. This paper proposes a cost-effective technique which ...

C. J. Pilgrim; Y. K. Leung; D. D. Grant

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Overview and Low Cost Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013 ... The major reason that there is not more widespread use of titanium and its alloys is the high cost. Developments in reducing the cost of titanium ...

189

Cost and Impacts of Policies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Policies RESULTS 2010-2025 and long-run impacts 2010-2025 GovernmentIndustry Costs Hydrogen production, infrastructure & cost HyTrans merges the early transition...

190

User cost in oil production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The assumption of an initial fixed mineral stock is superfluous and wrong. User cost (resource rent) in mineral production is the present value of expected increases in development cost. It can be measured as the difference ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Cost-sensitive classifier evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluating classifier performance in a cost-sensitive setting is straightforward if the operating conditions (misclassification costs and class distributions) are fixed and known. When this is not the case, evaluation requires a method of visualizing ...

Robert C. Holte; Chris Drummond

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Wind Integration Cost and Cost-Causation: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The question of wind integration cost has received much attention in the past several years. The methodological challenges to calculating integration costs are discussed in this paper. There are other sources of integration cost unrelated to wind energy. A performance-based approach would be technology neutral, and would provide price signals for all technology types. However, it is difficult to correctly formulate such an approach. Determining what is and is not an integration cost is challenging. Another problem is the allocation of system costs to one source. Because of significant nonlinearities, this can prove to be impossible to determine in an accurate and objective way.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Estanqueiro, A.; Martin-Martinez, S.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Peneda, I.; Smith, C.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

3800 Green Series Cost Elements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Stoller - Legacy ManagementSustainable Acquisition (formerly EPP) Program 3800 Series Cost Elements01/30/2012 (Rev. 4)

194

Empirical Methods of Cost Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...D.P. Hoult and C.L. Meador, Manufacturing Cost Estimating, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

195

Bifacial Efficiency at Monofacial Cost  

solar cells; photovoltaics; PV; bifacial efficiency; Monofacial Cost, Bifacial Cells; bifacial Modules; industry growth forum; gamma solar Created ...

196

COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COST SHARING ON SPONSORED PROJECTS 1 California Institute of Technology Issuing Authority: Office is that portion of the total cost of an externally funded project that is not funded by the sponsor. Depending as a demonstration of its commitment to the project. When voluntary cost sharing is included in the proposal budget

Tai, Yu-Chong

197

Hidden Costs of Energy: Unpriced Consequences of Energy Production and Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the many benefits of energy, most of which are reflected in energy market prices, the production, distribution, and use of energy causes negative effects. Many of these negative effects are not reflected in energy market prices. When market failures like this occur, there may be a case for government interventions in the form of regulations, taxes, fees, tradable permits, or other instruments that will motivate recognition of these external or hidden costs. The Hidden Costs of Energy defines and evaluates key external costs and benefits that are associated with the production, distribution, and use of energy, but are not reflected in market prices. The damage estimates presented are substantial and reflect damages from air pollution associated with electricity generation, motor vehicle transportation, and heat generation. The book also considers other effects not quantified in dollar amounts, such as damages from climate change, effects of some air pollutants such as mercury, and risks to national security. While not a comprehensive guide to policy, this analysis indicates that major initiatives to further reduce other emissions, improve energy efficiency, or shift to a cleaner electricity generating mix could substantially reduce the damages of external effects. A first step in minimizing the adverse consequences of new energy technologies is to better understand these external effects and damages. The Hidden Costs of Energy will therefore be a vital informational tool for government policy makers, scientists, and economists in even the earliest stages of research and development on energy technologies.

National Academies, [NRC; Lee, Russell [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

17.2 - Cost Participation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

17.2 (June 2004) 17.2 (June 2004) 1 Cost Participation [Reference: FAR 35.003(b), DEAR 917.70] Overview This section discusses DOE treatment of cost participation by organizations performing research, development, and demonstration projects under DOE prime contracts. This section does not cover efforts and projects performed for DOE by other Federal agencies. Background Cost participation is a generic term denoting any situation where the Government does not fully reimburse the contractor for all allowable costs necessary to accomplish the project or effort under the contract. The term includes, but is not limited to: * Cost Sharing * Cost Matching * Cost Limitation, which may be direct or indirect * Participation in-kind

199

Realistic costs of carbon capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding transport and storage costs appears to be US$100-150/tCO2 for first-of-a-kind plants and perhaps US$30-50/tCO2 for nth-of-a-kind plants.The estimates for FOAK and NOAK costs appear to be broadly consistent in the light of estimates of the potential for cost reductions with increased experience. Cost reductions are expected from increasing scale, learning on individual components, and technological innovation including improved plant integration. Innovation and integration can both lower costs and increase net output with a given cost base. These factors are expected to reduce abatement costs by approximately 65% by 2030. The range of estimated costs for NOAK plants is within the range of plausible future carbon prices, implying that mature technology would be competitive with conventional fossil fuel plants at prevailing carbon prices.

Al Juaied, Mohammed (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (US). Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam (Hydrogen Energy International Ltd., Weybridge (GB))

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Contingency Plan Template  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the building due to weather conditions. ... Business Impact Analysis (BIA) - The process of ... Commerce service provider (CSP) - A company that ...

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past June 7, 2012 - 2:48pm Addthis Franklin County Courthouse (Before) 1 of 2 Franklin County Courthouse (Before) A court employee and news photographer survey the bomb damage in the Franklin County Courthouse's main courtroom in November 1969. Image: Courtesy of the Washington Missourian. Franklin County Courthouse (After) 2 of 2 Franklin County Courthouse (After) The fully restored main courtroom includes the original 1930s paint colors and reproduction lighting. Image: Sallie Glaize Franklin County, MO Chris Galm Marketing & Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy People across the country are looking for ways to make homes and buildings

202

Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the Past June 7, 2012 - 2:48pm Addthis Franklin County Courthouse (Before) 1 of 2 Franklin County Courthouse (Before) A court employee and news photographer survey the bomb damage in the Franklin County Courthouse's main courtroom in November 1969. Image: Courtesy of the Washington Missourian. Franklin County Courthouse (After) 2 of 2 Franklin County Courthouse (After) The fully restored main courtroom includes the original 1930s paint colors and reproduction lighting. Image: Sallie Glaize Franklin County, MO Chris Galm Marketing & Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy People across the country are looking for ways to make homes and buildings

203

GUIDE TO NUCLEAR POWER COST EVALUATION. VOLUME 4. FUEL CYCLE COSTS  

SciTech Connect

Information on fuel cycle cost is presented. Topics covered include: nuclear fuel, fuel management, fuel cost, fissionable material cost, use charge, conversion and fabrication costs, processing cost, and shipping cost. (M.C.G.)

1962-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Electric Demand Cost Versus Labor Cost: A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric Utility companies charge industrial clients for two things: demand and usage. Depending on type of business and hours operation, demand cost could be very high. Most of the operations scheduling in a plant is achieved considering labor cost. For small plants, it is quite possible that a decrease in labor could result in an increase in electric demand and cost or vice versa. In this paper two cases are presented which highlight the dependence of one on other.

Agrawal, S.; Jensen, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Nanofoams Response to Radiation Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) np-Au foams were successfully synthesized by de-alloying process; (2) np-Au foams remain porous structure after Ne ion irradiation to 1 dpa; (3) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams with highest and intermediate flux, while no SFTs were observed with lowest flux; (4) SFTs were observed in irradiated np-Au foams at RT, whereas no SFTs were observed at LNT irradiation; (5) The diffusivity of vacancies in Au at RT is high enough so that the vacancies have enough time to agglomerate and thus collapse. As a result, SFTs were formed; (6) The high flux created much more damage/time, vacancies don't have enough time to diffuse or recombine. As a result, SFTs were formed.

Fu, Engang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nastasi, Michael [Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, NE 68508; Zepeda-Ruiz, Luis [PLS, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551; Bringa, Eduardo M. [CONICET and Inst. Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza, 5500 Argentina; Baldwin, Jon K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caro, Jose A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 26 cost modules—24 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis  

SciTech Connect

This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Today in Energy - High airline jet fuel costs prompt cost ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... and idling time. ... Delta stated that it anticipates cost savings of $300 million per year as a result of this ...

210

A cost analysis model for heavy equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total cost is one of the most important factors for a heavy equipment product purchase decision. However, the different cost views and perspectives of performance expectations between the different involved stakeholders may cause customer relation problems ... Keywords: Cost responsibilities, Operating costs, Ownership costs, Post-Manufacturing Product Cost (PMPC), System life-cycle cost

Shibiao Chen; L. Ken Keys

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

An Explanation of F&A Costs What are F&A Costs?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Explanation of F&A Costs What are F&A Costs? Costs involved in conducting sponsored projects costs and F&A costs together are the actual cost of a sponsored project. Direct costs are "those costs, indirect costs cannot be specifically attributed to an individual project. For example, it is difficult

212

Schools - Electronic Equipment Damage Due to Lightning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the investigation of damage to a school's phone equipment, security alarm, and network computer system during a lightning storm.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

WEB RESOURCE: Radiation Damage in Materials - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Topic Title: WEB RESOURCE: Radiation Damage in Materials Topic Summary: Allen, Todd. Lecture notes for Univ. of Wisconsin course

214

Detection and Location of Damage on Pipelines  

SciTech Connect

The INEEL has developed and successfully tested a real-time pipeline damage detection and location system. This system uses porous metal resistive traces applied to the pipe to detect and locate damage. The porous metal resistive traces are sprayed along the length of a pipeline. The unique nature and arrangement of the traces allows locating the damage in real time along miles of pipe. This system allows pipeline operators to detect damage when and where it is occurring, and the decision to shut down a transmission pipeline can be made with actual real-time data, instead of conservative estimates from visual inspection above the area.

Karen A. Moore; Robert Carrington; John Richardson

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Natural Resource Damages Assessment | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Council Report Calls for Official Natural Resource Damage Assessment for LANL NRDA PreAssessment Screen, January 2010 Factsheet: Los Alamos National Laboratory...

216

Wind Damage in Washington, DC, 1975  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a large region in the Eastern United States was subjected to severe winds. ... Bureau of Standards (NBS) conducted a limited study of wind damage to ...

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

217

NDE, Foreign Object Damage, and Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Ceramic Matrix Composites: NDE, Foreign Object Damage, and .... used in cylindrical liners, pistons, rings and combustion chamber for ...

218

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tool to compare existing cost estimates from the literature,It compiles and organizes cost estimates obtained from aE. Hydrogen supply: cost estimate for hydrogen pathways—

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The Cost of Crop Damage Caused by Ozone Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation fuels, oil-production ?elds, motor-vehiclethe production of crude oil used to make motor fuel, thethe production of crude oil used to make motor fuel, the

Murphy, James; Delucchi, Mark; McCubbin, Donald; Kim, H.J.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Cost of Crop Damage Caused by Ozone Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation fuels, oil-production fields, motor-vehiclethe production of crude oil used to make motor fuel, thethe production of crude oil used to make motor fuel, the

Delucchi, Mark A.; Murphy, James; Kim, Jin; McCubbin, Donald R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Summary of Losses from Insect Damage and Cost of Control in Georgia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with ambrosia beetles in Grear Britain. Tr/ilISltctiOIiSof tht Brifish MycologicalSociriy33, 111-120. Bakshi. B

Arnold, Jonathan

222

Summary of Losses from Insect Damage and Cost of Control in Georgia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- organisms, bark or ambrosia beetles, and woody host tissue: an annotated bibliography, 1956­1974. USDA and ambrosia beetles. In: Wilding N, Collins NM, Ham- mond PM, Webber JF, eds. Insect-fungus interactions origins of ambrosia fungi. Mycologia 88:596­601. De Beer ZW, Harrington TC, Vismer HF, Wingfield BD

Arnold, Jonathan

223

Summary of Losses from Insect Damage and Cost of Control in Georgia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, sawflies, and lepidopterous defoliators. 3 Includes carpenter ants, ambrosia beetles, lepidopterous wood

Arnold, Jonathan

224

Summary of Losses from Insect Damage and Cost of Control in Georgia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,260,000 $18,734,000 $20,994,000 1 Includes carpenter ants, ambrosia beetles, lepidopterous wood borers

Arnold, Jonathan

225

Summary of Losses from Insect Damage and Cost of Control in Georgia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

close association with insects, such as ambrosia beetles (Bakshi, 1950; Wingfield & Gibbs, 1991 with ambrosia beetles in Great Britain. Transactions of the Bntish Mycological Society 33, 111-120. BAKSHI, B

Arnold, Jonathan

226

Summary of Losses from Insect Damage and Cost of Control in Georgia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C\\'sris associated with an ambrosia beetlc in DelldroCfOlllls-kil1cd p.ines.~tycologia. 71: 1085~ 1089. de Hoog. G

Arnold, Jonathan

227

Microsoft Word - CosteNon-linear DNA damage response to low-dose...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the spatiotemporal response in ATM- or DNApkcs-deficient cells or as a function of chromatin territory, to extend the work done by the Karpen Lab using the Drosophila model...

228

The Cost of Crop Damage Caused by Ozone Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L. (1982). Assessment of crop loss from ozone. Journal of1984). Assessing impacts of ozone on agricultural crops: II.crop yield functions and alternative exposure statistics.

Murphy, James; Delucchi, Mark; McCubbin, Donald; Kim, H.J.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

The Cost of Crop Damage Caused by Ozone Air Pollution From Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. T. Tingey, Assessment of Crop Loss From Air Pollutants,,Assessing Impacts of Ozone on Agricultural Crops: II.Crop Yield Functions and Alternative Exposure Statistics",

Delucchi, Mark A.; Murphy, James; Kim, Jin; McCubbin, Donald R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Biodiesel Performance, Costs, and Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biodiesel Performance, Costs, and Use. by Anthony Radich. Introduction. The idea of using vegetable oil for fuel has been around as long as the diesel engine.

231

HTGR Cost Model Users' Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Temperature Gas-Cooler Reactor (HTGR) Cost Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Cost Model calculates an estimate of the capital costs, annual operating and maintenance costs, and decommissioning costs for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The user can generate these costs for multiple reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for a single or four-pack configuration; and for a reactor size of 350 or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Cost Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Cost Model. This model was design for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel. Modification of the HTGR Cost Model should only be performed by users familiar with Excel and Visual Basic.

A.M. Gandrik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Download Data | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the database does not represent approval of the estimates by DOE or NREL. Levelized cost calculations DO NOT represent real world market conditions. The calculation uses a...

233

Preemptive scheduling with position costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

horizon is divided into time periods. In these models, the whole production is not processed in a single period, and production and holding costs are introduced ...

234

FIRM PRODUCTIVITY AND SUNK COSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this paper is to explore whether or not sunk costs are systematically related to productivity di¤erences at the …rm level, as suggested by models of industry dynamics (Hopenhayn, 1992).The comparisons of productivity distributions for groups of …rms with di¤erent levels of sunk costs are performed by non-parametric procedures and for a large scale …rm-level panel data set of Spanish manufacturing …rms. We …nd that sunk costs are an important source of heterogeneity across …rm productivity. The evidence we …nd is consistent with models of industry dynamics predicting lower productivity for …rms with a higher level of sunk costs.

Jose C. Fariñas; Sonia Ruano

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

WSRC Nuclear Materials Cost Module  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Office (GAO) WSRC NM Cost Module Generates WSRC monthly and fiscal year to date Inventory and Manufacturing Statement for government owned accountable nuclear materials....

236

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling Oak Ridge National been identified by carbon fiber manufacturers as a market with substantial growth potential. When manufactured with carbon fiber as opposed to traditional materials such as steel, automotive parts are able

237

A plastic damage approach for confined concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many situations in which it is necessary to increase the capacity of structures in use. This need maybe either for a change of use or because the structures have suffered some damage or have shown little resistance in case of extreme loads ... Keywords: Concrete, Confinement, Damage, Dilation, Fiber reinforced composites, Plasticity

B. M. Luccioni; V. C. Rougier

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Damage from methamphetamine abuse documented  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dennis Tartaglia, 212 481-7000, dennist@mbooth.com or Karen McNulty Walsh, 631 344-8350 go to home page Dennis Tartaglia, 212 481-7000, dennist@mbooth.com or Karen McNulty Walsh, 631 344-8350 go to home page 01-16 March 1, 2001 Researchers Document Brain Damage, Reduction in Motor and Cognitive Function from Methamphetamine Abuse "Speed" Shows More Neurotoxic Effects Than Heroin, Cocaine, or Alcohol UPTON, NY -- Two studies by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory provide evidence for the first time that abuse of methamphetamine -- the drug commonly known as "speed" -- is associated with physiological changes in two systems of the human brain. The changes are evident even for abusers who have not taken the drug for a year or more. The studies also found that methamphetamine abusers have reduced cognitive and motor functions, even at one year after quitting the drug. The findings appear in the March issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.

239

Electric power substation capital costs  

SciTech Connect

The displacement or deferral of substation equipment is a key benefit associated with several technologies that are being developed with the support of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. This could occur, for example, as a result of installing a distributed generating resource within an electricity distribution system. The objective of this study was to develop a model for preparing preliminary estimates of substation capital costs based on rudimentary conceptual design information. The model is intended to be used by energy systems analysts who need ``ballpark`` substation cost estimates to help establish the value of advanced utility technologies that result in the deferral or displacement of substation equipment. This cost-estimating model requires only minimal inputs. More detailed cost-estimating approaches are recommended when more detailed design information is available. The model was developed by collecting and evaluating approximately 20 sets of substation design and cost data from about 10 US sources, including federal power marketing agencies and private and public electric utilities. The model is principally based on data provided by one of these sources. Estimates prepared with the model were compared with estimated and actual costs for the data sets received from the other utilities. In general, good agreement (for conceptual level estimating) was found between estimates prepared with the cost-estimating model and those prepared by the individual utilities. Thus, the model was judged to be adequate for making preliminary estimates of typical substation costs for US utilities.

Dagle, J.E.; Brown, D.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Cost prediction for ray shooting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ray shooting problem arises in many different contexts. For example, solving it efficiently would remove a bottleneck when images are ray-traced in computer graphics. Unfortunately, theoretical solutions to the problem are not very practical, ... Keywords: average performance, cost model, cost prediction, octree, ray shooting, space decomposition

Boris Aronov; Hervé Brönnimann; Allen Y. Chang; Yi-Jen Chiang

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Audit Costs for the 1986 Texas Energy Cost Containment Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct program costs for detailed audits of 13.5 million square feet of institutional building space in the 1986 Texas Energy Cost Containment Program were $0.047/SF. The building area was 63 percent simple (offices, schools, and universities) and 37 percent complex (medical buildings and power plants). Allowing for the influence of one large facility which received less-extensive treatment due to previous work, thorough audits were obtained for an average cost of $0.050/SF. Large medical buildings (greater than about 170,000 square feet) were audited for $0.050/SF or less, and program costs for survey audits of 17.2 million square feet were $0.0028/SF. The effect on audit costs of complexity of recommended modifications, amount of savings determined, amount of implementation costs, building size, and building complexity are discussed. Primary effects on audit costs are size and complexity of buildings. Program guidelines limited consideration of projects with greater than a four year payback.

Heffington, W. M.; Lum, S. K.; Bauer, V. A.; Turner, W. D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

January 2008 RFP Fixed Price Unit Contingent Products Results of Evaluation LPSC Staff Update February 11, 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pre-Congestion Study Regional Workshop for the Pre-Congestion Study Regional Workshop for the 2012 National Electric Congestion Study Entergy System December 8, 2011 2 DOE 2009 Congestion Study DOE Study notes that: - Several load pockets exist on the Entergy system-Acadiana, Amite South, WOTAB (West of the Atchafalaya Basin). - McAdams flowgate (the interface between Entergy and TVA) is congested. - There is limited transfer capability in the Ozarks between Entergy and SPP. - ICT is studying the need for upgrades. DOE Study has no cost data regarding the cost of congestion in the Entergy area. 3 Congestion Was and Continues to Be Addressed Areas of congestion are continually identified through: - Entergy analysis of TLRs and operational issues. - ICT ISTEP Process - Customer Input In 2011, unusual events increased number of TLRs (i.e., TLRs

243

Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 4: Project cost estimate  

SciTech Connect

The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. This volume represents the total estimated costs for the W113 facility. Operating Contractor Management costs have been incorporated as received from WHC. The W113 Facility TEC is $19.7 million. This includes an overall project contingency of 14.4% and escalation of 17.4%. A January 2001 construction contract procurement start date is assumed.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A new damage testing system for detailed evaluation of damage behavior of bulk KDP and DKDP  

SciTech Connect

We describe a new damage testing approach and instrumentation that provides quantitative measurements of bulk damage performance versus fluence for several frequencies. A major advantage of this method is that it can simultaneously provide direct information on pinpoint density and size, and beam obscuration. This allows for more accurate evaluation of material performance under operational conditions. Protocols for laser conditioning to improve damage performance can also be easily and rapidly evaluated.This damage testing approach has enabled us to perform complex experiments toward probing the fundamental mechanisms of damage initiation and conditioning.

DeMange, P; Negres, R A; Carr, C W; Radousky, H B; Demos, S G

2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

245

Costs of Land Subsidence Due to Groundwater Withdrawal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years the area around Houston and Baytown, Texas, has been affected to an increasing degree by land subsidence. Sinking of the land surface has reached critical proportions in many areas, and subsidence of as much as eight feet has occurred. The severity of this phenomenon has been aggravated by the proximity of much of the affected area to bay waters, and tidal flooding has resulted in significant damages and property loss. Subsidence has been linked by engineers to the decline of subsurface water levels due to heavy ground water withdrawals in the area. An alternative source for water demands has been introduced, although price differentials have slowed its acceptance. Major objectives of this study included estimation of historical costs attributable to subsidence, projecting estimated costs, and examining the economics of the two alternatives for water supply. A study area of 300 square miles was identified and sampling of residences, businesses, and public officials was carried out. The cost data resulting from those samples formed the basis for economic analysis. Historical costs and property losses that were attributable to subsidence were estimated to be $60.7 million and $48.9 million, respectively, or $109.6 million total. Of the $109.6 million, $53.2 million were incurred in 1973, principally due to a six foot tide. Probability of the occurrence of a six foot tide in any one year is 20 percent. Given five additional feet of subsidence in the study area the occurrence of a six foot tide was projected to cause an estimated $63,5 million in costs and losses, $10.3 million more than were incurred in 1973. Estimated annual subsidence-related costs and losses of $14.6 million for the study area, based on 1969 to 1973 data, were used to evaluate total costs associated with supplying water needs from two alternative sources, A break-even analysis indicated that to minimize total water costs, pumping only that quantity of water that would result in no subsidence could be economically justified; i,e,, water needs or demand above that rate would need to be purchased from an alternative source. This implied that when pumping is continued to the point that subsidence occurs, the cost of pumping plus associated subsidence- related costs and losses exceed water costs from an alternative source, per unit of water.

Warren, J. P.; Jones, L. L.; Griffin, W. L.; Lacewell, R. D.

1974-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Tubing-conveyed perforating cuts costs, boosts production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new Attaka Field development program was started in November 1984 with the objective of reversing the field's declining production. The Intermediate and Deep sands were the reservoirs of interest since their abundance and large areal extent account for a large volume of oil and gas. Many factors contributed to the success of this program, particularly tubing conveyed perforating, (TCP) which has reduced completion time, formation damage and maximized well production. This article discusses the determination of proper underbalance, operational aspects of tubing conveyed perforating, cost comparisons between TCP and wireline methods and a comparison of skin factors resulting from underbalanced perforating and overbalanced perforating.

Sukmadjaja, T.; Shewchenko, D.; Ajam, S.O.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

High-speed, low-damage grinding of advanced ceramics Phase 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In manufacture of structural ceramic components, grinding costs can comprise up to 80% of the entire manufacturing cost. Most of these costs arise from the conventional multi-step grinding process with numerous grinding wheels and additional capital equipment, perishable dressing tools, and labor. In an attempt to reduce structural ceramic grinding costs, a feasibility investigation was undertaken to develop a single step, roughing-finishing process suitable for producing high-quality silicon nitride ceramic parts at high material removal rates at lower cost than traditional, multi-stage grinding. This feasibility study employed combined use of laboratory grinding tests, mathematical grinding models, and characterization of resultant material surface condition. More specifically, this Phase 1 final report provides a technical overview of High-Speed, Low-Damage (HSLD) ceramic grinding and the conditions necessary to achieve the small grain depths of cut necessary for low damage grinding while operating at relatively high material removal rates. Particular issues addressed include determining effects of wheel speed and material removal rate on resulting mode of material removal (ductile or brittle fracture), limiting grinding forces, calculation of approximate grinding zone temperatures developed during HSLD grinding, and developing the experimental systems necessary for determining HSLD grinding energy partition relationships. In addition, practical considerations for production utilization of the HSLD process are also discussed.

Kovach, J.A. [Eaton Corp., Willoughby Hills, OH (United States). Mfg. Technologies Center; Malkin, S. [Univ. of Massachusetts (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

RAPID DAMAGE ASSESSMENT FROM HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGERY  

SciTech Connect

Disaster impact modeling and analysis uses huge volumes of image data that are produced immediately following a natural or an anthropogenic disaster event. Rapid damage assessment is the key to time critical decision support in disaster management to better utilize available response resources and accelerate recovery and relief efforts. But exploiting huge volumes of high resolution image data for identifying damaged areas with robust consistency in near real time is a challenging task. In this paper, we present an automated image analysis technique to identify areas of structural damage from high resolution optical satellite data using features based on image content.

Vijayaraj, Veeraraghavan [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Carbon Fiber Damage in Accelerator Beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in Beam Wire Scanners. Because of their thermomechanical properties they are very resistant to particle beams. Their strength deteriorates with time due to radiation damage and low-cycle thermal fatigue. In case of high intensity beams this process can accelerate and in extreme cases the fiber is damaged during a single scan. In this work a model describing the fiber temperature, thermionic emission and sublimation is discussed. Results are compared with fiber damage test performed on SPS beam in November 2008. In conclusions the limits of Wire Scanner operation on high intensity beams are drawn.

Sapinski, M; Guerrero, A; Koopman, J; Métral, E

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of a commercial uranium hexafluoride conversion (UF{sub 6}) plant. Two basic decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between cost and safety impacts: DECON, and passive SAFSTOR. A third alternative, DECON of the plant and equipment with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes. is also examined. DECON includes the immediate removal (following plant shutdown) of all radioactivity in excess of unrestricted release levels, with subsequent release of the site for public use. Passive SAFSTOR requires decontamination, preparation, maintenance, and surveillance for a period of time after shutdown, followed by deferred decontamination and unrestricted release. DECON with stabilization and long-term care of lagoon wastes (process wastes generated at the reference plant and stored onsite during plant operation} is also considered as a decommissioning method, although its acceptability has not yet been determined by the NRC. The decommissioning methods assumed for use in each decommissioning alternative are based on state-of-the-art technology. The elapsed time following plant shutdown required to perform the decommissioning work in each alternative is estimated to be: for DECON, 8 months; for passive SAFSTOR, 3 months to prepare the plant for safe storage and 8 months to accomplish deferred decontamination. Planning and preparation for decommissioning prior to plant shutdown is estimated to require about 6 months for either DECON or passive SAFSTOR. Planning and preparation prior to starting deferred decontamination is estimated to require an additional 6 months. OECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to take 6 months for planning and about 8 months to perform the decommissioning work. Decommissioning cost, in 1981 dollars, is estimated to be $5.91 million for OECON. For passive SAFSTOR, preparing the facility for safe storage is estimated to cost $0.88 million, the annual maintenance and surveillance cost is estimated to be about $0.095 million, and deferred decontamination is estimated to cost about $6.50 million. Therefore, passive SAFSTOR for 10 years is estimated to cost $8.33 million in nondiscounted 1981 dollars. DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is estimated to cost about $4.59 million, with an annual cost of $0.011 million for long-term care. All of these estimates include a 25% contingency. Waste management costs for DECON, including the net cost of disposal of the solvent extraction lagoon wastes by shipping those wastes to a uranium mill for recovery of residual uranium, comprise about 38% of the total decommissioning cost. Disposal of lagoon waste at a commercial low-level waste burial ground is estimated to add $10.01 million to decommissioning costs. Safety analyses indicate that radiological and nonradiological safety impacts from decommissioning activities should be small. The 50-year committed dose equivalent to members of the public from airborne releases during normal decommissioning activities is estimated to 'Je about 4.0 man-rem. Radiation doses to the public from accidents are found to be very low for all phases of decommissioning. Occupational radiation doses from normal decommissioning operations (excluding transport operations) are estimated to be about 79 man-rem for DECON and about 80 man-rem for passive SAFSTOR with 10 years of safe storage. Doses from DECON with lagoon waste stabilization are about the same as for DECON except there is less dose resulting from transportation of radioactive waste. The number of fatalities and serious lost-time injuries not related to radiation is found to be very small for all decommissioning alternatives. Comparison of the cost estimates shows that DECON with lagoon waste stabilization is the least expensive method. However, this alternative does not allow unrestricted release of the site. The cumulative cost of maintenance and surveillance and the higher cost of deferred decontamination makes passive SAFSTOR more expensive than DECON. Seve

Elder, H. K.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Preemptive scheduling with position costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

imization of the sum of the position costs of all the jobs, which will be denoted by. ??fi in the ?-field of the ..... http://www-poleia.lip6.fr/~sourd/project/position. 5 ...

252

Engineering Cost Analysis - Chapter 17  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of these is that costs over the life of the project must be estimated based on some forecast, and forecasts have proven to be highly variable and frequently inaccurate. The...

253

Cost | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Cost Home Ocop's picture Submitted by Ocop(5) Member 18 April, 2013 - 13:41 MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Cost Current DOE LCOE numerical modeling Performance Tidal Wave To normalize competing claims of LCOE, DOE has developed-for its own use-a standardized cost and performance data reporting process to facilitate uniform calculation of LCOE from MHK device developers. This standardization framework is only the first version in what is anticipated to be an iterative process that involves industry and the broader DOE stakeholder community. Multiple files are attached here for review and comment.Upload Files: application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon device_performance_validation_data_request.docx application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon

254

Cost Effective Water Heating Solutions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ELECTRIC 0.92 ELECTRIC 0.92 ELECTRIC HPWH(2) HPWH(3) HPWH Standard 0.62 EF WH unless high natural gas costs (>1.50therm), in which case recommendations consistent with new...

255

A framework and review of customer outage costs: Integration and analysis of electric utility outage cost surveys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A clear understanding of the monetary value that customers place on reliability and the factors that give rise to higher and lower values is an essential tool in determining investment in the grid. The recent National Transmission Grid Study recognizes the need for this information as one of growing importance for both public and private decision makers. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy has undertaken this study, as a first step toward addressing the current absence of consistent data needed to support better estimates of the economic value of electricity reliability. Twenty-four studies, conducted by eight electric utilities between 1989 and 2002 representing residential and commercial/industrial (small, medium and large) customer groups, were chosen for analysis. The studies cover virtually all of the Southeast, most of the western United States, including California, rural Washington and Oregon, and the Midwest south and east of Chicago. All variables were standardized to a consistent metric and dollar amounts were adjusted to the 2002 CPI. The data were then incorporated into a meta-database in which each outage scenario (e.g., the lost of electric service for one hour on a weekday summer afternoon) is treated as an independent case or record both to permit comparisons between outage characteristics and to increase the statistical power of analysis results. Unadjusted average outage costs and Tobit models that estimate customer damage functions are presented. The customer damage functions express customer outage costs for a given outage scenario and customer class as a function of location, time of day, consumption, and business type. One can use the damage functions to calculate outage costs for specific customer types. For example, using the customer damage functions, the cost experienced by an ''average'' customer resulting from a 1 hour summer afternoon outage is estimated to be approximately $3 for a residential customer, $1,200 for small-medium commercial and industrial customer, and $82,000 for large commercial and industrial customer. Future work to improve the quality and coverage of information on the value of electricity reliability to customers is described.

Lawton, Leora; Sullivan, Michael; Van Liere, Kent; Katz, Aaron; Eto, Joseph

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Development of low cost concentrating solar collectors. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A low cost concentrating collector has been developed that has the following features: (1) Material cost per 4 foot by 8 foot panel of $175 or $225 at retail prices depending on which of the two versions are used. (2) Low weight of 159 pounds per panel when liquid-filled or approximately 5 pounds per square foot to result in minor additional roof stress. (3) A concentration factor of 1.72 to reduce the necessary storage volume for winter heating and obtain adequate temperature for future air conditioning.(4) High efficiency when mounted parallel to the roof to reduce wind damage, roof stresses, and blend better with architectural features of a house.

Batzer, D.

1982-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Production Cost Optimization Project 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Production Cost Optimization project assists participating members in implementing or enhancing heat rate optimization programs to reduce production costs through sustainable performance improvements. This Technical Update summarizes the status of the project and presents results for five (5) sites that have completed initial and follow-up assessments. A PCO assessment consists of benchmarking plant thermal performance using historical plant data along with an on-site performance appraisal to id...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

258

Assessing United States hurricane damage under different environmental conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hurricane activity between 1979 and 2011 was studied to determine damage statistics under different environmental conditions. Hurricanes cause billions of dollars of damage every year in the United States, but damage ...

Maheras, Anastasia Francis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Using Landsat to Identify Thunderstorm Damage in Agricultural Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 12 and 18 August 1999, severe thunderstorms produced damaging winds and hail that caused an estimated $50 million in damage to agriculture in west-central Illinois. Landsat-7 imagery was obtained to determine the arealextent of damage and ...

Mace L. Bentley; Thomas L. Mote; Paporn Thebpanya

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Schools - Lightning Causing Electric Equipment Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the investigation of damage to a school's electronic controls and integrated circuit boards within their fire alarm and clock/bell system when there are lightning storms.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Laser Damage Precursors in Fused Silica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a longstanding, and largely unexplained, correlation between the laser damage susceptibility of optical components and both the surface quality of the optics, and the presence of near surface fractures in an optic. In the present work, a combination of acid leaching, acid etching, and confocal time resolved photoluminescence (CTP) microscopy has been used to study laser damage initiation at indentation sites. The combination of localized polishing and variations in indentation loads allows one to isolate and characterize the laser damage susceptibility of densified, plastically flowed and fractured fused silica. The present results suggest that: (1) laser damage initiation and growth are strongly correlated with fracture surfaces, while densified and plastically flowed material is relatively benign, and (2) fracture events result in the formation of an electronically defective rich surface layer which promotes energy transfer from the optical beam to the glass matrix.

Miller, P; Suratwala, T; Bude, J; Laurence, T A; Shen, N; Steele, W A; Feit, M; Menapace, J; Wong, L

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

262

Thin Film Femtosecond Laser Damage Competition  

SciTech Connect

In order to determine the current status of thin film laser resistance within the private, academic, and government sectors, a damage competition was started at the 2008 Boulder Damage Symposium. This damage competition allows a direct comparison of the current state of the art of high laser resistance coatings since they are tested using the same damage test setup and the same protocol. In 2009 a high reflector coating was selected at a wavelength of 786 nm at normal incidence at a pulse length of 180 femtoseconds. A double blind test assured sample and submitter anonymity so only a summary of the results are presented here. In addition to the laser resistance results, details of deposition processes, coating materials and layer count, and spectral results will also be shared.

Stolz, C J; Ristau, D; Turowski, M; Blaschke, H

2009-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

263

Dealing with Storm-Damaged Trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many homeowners need help caring for or removing damaged trees after a natural disaster. This publication explains what a certified arborist is and how to select one. It also cautions against burning debris downed by a storm.

Kirk, Melanie; Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

264

Dealing with Storm-Damaged Trees (Spanish)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many homeowners need help caring for or removing damaged trees after a natural disaster. This publication explains what a certified arborist is and how to select one. It also cautions against burning debris downed by a storm.

Kirk, Melanie; Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

265

Tornado Damage Estimation Using Polarimetric Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of tornadic debris signature (TDS) parameters to estimate tornado damage severity using Norman, Oklahoma (KOUN), polarimetric radar data (polarimetric version of the Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler radar). ...

David J. Bodine; Matthew R. Kumjian; Robert D. Palmer; Pamela L. Heinselman; Alexander V. Ryzhkov

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Controlled ion implant damage profile for etching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention pertains to a process for etching a material such as LiNbO{sub 3} by implanting ions having a plurality of different kinetic energies in an area to be etched, and then contacting the ion implanted area with an etchant. The various energies of the ions are selected to produce implant damage substantially uniformly throughout the entire depth of the zone to be etched, thus tailoring the vertical profile of the damaged zone.

Arnold, G.W. Jr.; Ashby, C.I.H.; Brannon, P.J.

1988-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

267

Reference Poster: Turbine Bearing Damage Mechanisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Damage to turbine and generator bearings accounts for a significant amount of lost generation in the power industry. There are numerous known damage mechanisms affecting these bearings, and as part of EPRI’s technology transfer efforts, we have developed a reference poster. This poster provides clear, concise, and visual information for a wide variety of mechanisms and is meant to supplement related EPRI projects. By providing an overview of various issues as well as information on how to ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

268

A conceptual framework for the evaluation of cost-effectiveness of projects to reduce GHG emissions and sequester carbon  

SciTech Connect

This paper proposes a conceptual framework for evaluating the cost of projects to reduce atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs). The evaluation of cost-effectiveness should account for both the timing of carbon emissions and the damage caused by the atmospheric stock of carbon. We develop a conceptual basis to estimate the cost-effectiveness of projects in terms of the cost of reducing atmospheric carbon (CRAC) and other GHGs. CRAC accounts for the economic discount rate, alternative functional forms of the shadow price, the residence period of carbon in the atmosphere, and the multiple monetary benefits of projects. The last item is of particular importance to the developing countries.

Sathaye, J.; Norgaard, R.; Makundi, W.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

R-damage cassette (incorporated brass sleeve)  

SciTech Connect

The R-Damage series of ten experiments is part of a long-term collaboration with RFNC/VNIIEF in pulsed power technology. These experiments use a cylindrical configuration to study spallation damage, which allows for a natural recollection of the damaged material under proper driving conditions and post-shot collection of the damaged target material for subsequent metallographic analysis. Dynamic in-situ experimental velocimetry diagnostics are also employed. LANL is responsible for the design of the experimental load and velocimetry system. VNIIEF is responsible for the design and construction of the driving explosive magnetic generator. Eight of the experiments in the planned series have been completed. Thus far, data has been collected about failure initiation of a well-characterized material (aluminum) in a cylindrical geometry, the behavior of material recollected after damage from pressures in the damage initiation regime, and the behavior of material recollected after complete failure. The final two experiments will continue the study of material recollected after complete failure. The load assembly shown is similar to that employed in the previous two experiments, with some modiflications for easier assembly.

Griego, Jeffrey Randall [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

270

NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM COST MODELING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is preparing to perform an evaluation of the full range of possible Nuclear Energy Systems (NES) in 2013. These include all practical combinations of fuels and transmuters (reactors and sub-critical systems) in single and multi-tier combinations of burners and breeders with no, partial, and full recycle. As part of this evaluation, Levelized Cost of Electricity at Equilibrium (LCAE) ranges for each representative system will be calculated. To facilitate the cost analyses, the 2009 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report is being amended to provide up-to-date cost data for each step in the fuel cycle, and a new analysis tool, NE-COST, has been developed. This paper explains the innovative “Island” approach used by NE-COST to streamline and simplify the economic analysis effort and provides examples of LCAE costs generated. The Island approach treats each transmuter (or target burner) and the associated fuel cycle facilities as a separate analysis module, allowing reuse of modules that appear frequently in the NES options list. For example, a number of options to be screened will include a once-through uranium oxide (UOX) fueled light water reactor (LWR). The UOX LWR may be standalone, or may be the first stage in a multi-stage system. Using the Island approach, the UOX LWR only needs to be modeled once and the module can then be reused on subsequent fuel cycles. NE-COST models the unit operations and life cycle costs associated with each step of the fuel cycle on each island. This includes three front-end options for supplying feedstock to fuel fabrication (mining/enrichment, reprocessing of used fuel from another island, and/or reprocessing of this island’s used fuel), along with the transmuter and back-end storage/disposal. Results of each island are combined based on the fractional energy generated by each islands in an equilibrium system. The cost analyses use the probability distributions of key parameters and employs Monte Carlo sampling to arrive at an island’s cost probability density function (PDF). When comparing two NES to determine delta cost, strongly correlated parameters can be cancelled out so that only the differences in the systems contribute to the relative cost PDFs. For example, one comparative analysis presented in the paper is a single stage LWR-UOX system versus a two-stage LWR-UOX to LWR-MOX system. In this case, the first stage of both systems is the same (but with different fractional energy generation), while the second stage of the UOX to MOX system uses the same type transmuter but the fuel type and feedstock sources are different. In this case, the cost difference between systems is driven by only the fuel cycle differences of the MOX stage.

Francesco Ganda; Brent Dixon

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

ABSTRACT: Ion-Induced Damage Accumulation and Electron-Beam ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 27, 2007... Ion-Induced Damage Accumulation and Electron-Beam-Enhanced ... damage accumulation in strontium titanate from 1.0 MeV Au irradiation

272

Clustered DNA Damage Spectrum in Primary Human Hematopoietic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

94805 Villejuif Cedex France Clustered DNA Damages Induced by Low Radiation Doses Irradiation of cells with low doses of X- or -rays induces clustered damages in mammalian...

273

Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage to environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage to environmental monitoring stations, canyons Stations supporting Santa...

274

Reactor Loose Part Damage Assessments on Steam Generator Tube Sheets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??PROCTOR, WILLIAM CYRUS. Reactor Loose Part Damage Assessments on Steam Generator Tube Sheets. (Under the direction of Joseph Michael Doster). Damage from loose parts inside… (more)

Proctor, William Cyrus

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Policy 1306 Cost Sharing on Sponsored Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy 1306 Cost Sharing on Sponsored Projects Responsible Office Office of Research Administration committed cost sharing, and in-kind/matching requirements associated with sponsored projects. Definitions Cost Sharing A portion of total sponsored project costs not funded by the sponsor. Mandatory Cost

276

Sponsored Project Account Cost Transfer Explanation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sponsored Project Account Cost Transfer Explanation Check-Off List December 2011 The explanations checked below best describe the reasons for why the cost transfers are being made. Costs as to how to allocate the cost, temporarily assigned the cost to an existing account that acted

He, Chuan

277

FACILITY AND ADMINISTRATIVE (INDIRECT) COSTS September 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2015. Definitions: Direct Costs: Costs that can be specifically identified with a particular project(s) Cost: A broad category of costs that are common to all research projects. "Facilities" is defined one F&A cost rate. If 50% or more of a project is performed off-campus (exclusive of any subcontract

Albertini, David

278

Fuel Cell System Cost for Transporationa--2008 Cost Estimate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell System Cost for Fuel Cell System Cost for Transportation-2008 Cost Estimate National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Independent Review Published for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program NREL/BK-6A1-45457 May 2009 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

279

Cost objective PLM and CE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concurrent engineering taking into account product life-cycle factors seems to be one of the industrial challenges of the next years. Cost estimation and management are two main strategic tasks that imply the possibility of managing costs at the earliest stages of product development. This is why it is indispensable to let people from economics and from industrial engineering collaborates in order to find the best solution for enterprise progress for economical factors mastering. The objective of this paper is to present who we try to adapt costing methods in a PLM and CE point of view to the new industrial context and configuration in order to give pertinent decision aid for product and process choices. A very important factor is related to cost management problems when developing new products. A case study is introduced that presents how product development actors have referenced elements to product life-cycle costs and impacts, how they have an idea bout economical indicators when taking decisions during the progression of the project of product development.

Nicolas Perry; Alain Bernard

2010-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

280

Costs of electronuclear fuel production  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) proposes to study the electronuclear fuel producer (EFP) as a means of producing fissile fuel to generate electricity. The main advantage of the EFP is that it may reduce the risks of nuclear proliferation by breeding /sup 233/U from thorium, thereby avoiding plutonium separation. A report on the costs of electronuclear fuel production based upon two designs considered by LASL is presented. The findings indicate that the EFP design variations considered are not likely to result in electricity generation costs as low as the uranium fuel cycle used in the US today. At current estimates of annual fuel output (500 kg /sup 233/U per EFP), the costs of electricity generation using fuel produced by the EFP are more than three times higher than generating costs using the traditional fuel cycle. Sensitivity analysis indicates that electronuclear fuel production would become cost competitive with the traditional uranium fuel cycle when U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ (yellowcake) prices approach $1000 per pound.

Flaim, T.; Loose, V.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

FY 1996 cost savings report  

SciTech Connect

Cost savings are an integral part of Hanford site operations. Congressional actions towards establishing a balanced budget have resulted in reductions to funding for all federal agencies, including the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) cleanup mission. In September 1994 the DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) approved the FY 1995 multi-year baseline that included a cost estimate of $1.9 billion for FY 1996. However, Congress only appropriated $1.3 billion for that year. The shortfall of $600 million resulted in a significant challenge to accomplish the required workscope. Therefore, RL initiated an aggressive cost savings program to eliminate the shortfall by deleting workscope that was unnecessary and performing the remaining workscope more efficiently. RL initiated baseline planning actions (including deletions, deferrals, transfers, and additions) during the FY 1996 multi-year baseline development process to match workscope and anticipated funding and identified $205 million of workscope deletions. CFR (Contract Finance and Review Division) then reviewed over 200 cost baseline change requests during FY 1996 and documented an additional $95 million of FY 1996 cost savings. This included $73 million of workscope deletions and $22 million of efficiencies. Total savings as a result of FY 1996 initiatives, including baseline planning actions and current year initiatives, were $300 million.

Andrews-Smith, K.L.

1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 14310 of 26,764 results. 01 - 14310 of 26,764 results. Article DOE Announces Winners of Lighting for Tomorrow 2010 Competition http://energy.gov/articles/doe-announces-winners-lighting-tomorrow-2010-competition Download Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Comments by International Group on Nuclear Liability (CIGNL), in response to U.S. Department of Energy Notice of Inquiry on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent... http://energy.gov/gc/downloads/public-comment-re-convention-supplementary-compensation-nuclear-damage-contingent-cost Download Microsoft Word- AL2005-07.doc http://energy.gov/management/downloads/microsoft-word-al2005-07doc Download Microsoft Word- PressRelease_Siting_2-8-06_Final.doc

283

Total Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grand total social cost of highway transportation Subtotal:of alternative transportation investments. A social-costtransportation option that has These costs will be inefficiently incurred if people do not fully lower total social costs.

Delucchi, Mark A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Maintenance cost studies of present aircraft subsystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report describes two detailed studies of actual maintenance costs for present transport aircraft. The first part describes maintenance costs for jet transport aircraft broken down into subsystem costs according to an ...

Pearlman, Chaim Herman Shalom

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Total cost model for making sourcing decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis develops a total cost model based on the work done during a six month internship with ABB. In order to help ABB better focus on low cost country sourcing, a total cost model was developed for sourcing decisions. ...

Morita, Mark, M.B.A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Benefit-cost in a Benevolent Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that there is a well-de?ned cost function C( y) for publicthe private values bene?t-cost test, but is potentiallythe private values bene?t-cost test, Lemma 4 implies y-

Bergstrom, Ted

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

USA oilgas production cost : recent changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During 1984-1989, oil development investment cost in the USA fell, but only because of lower activity. The whole cost curve shifted unfavorably (leftward). In contrast, natural gas cost substantially decreased, the curve ...

Adelman, Morris Albert

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Erosion and Sediment Damages and Economic Impacts of Potential 208 Controls: A Summary of Five Watershed Studies in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of economic analyses of erosion and sedimentation in five agricultural watersheds in Texas (see fig. 1). Economic analyses of the study areas considered both the on-farm economics of soil conservation and the economic consequences of various sedimentation control options. These topics were joined in the studies because they deal with different facets of the same problem. Unlike some potential pollutants, soil particles transported from a farmer's field that may become a problem downstream are a valuable resource, not a waste product. Because soil is valuable in itself, some level of soil conservation is going to be economically desirable even if downstream damages are not present or are not considered by the farmer. Results of the studies show that soil conservation does indeed pay in many situations and that its value is greater the longer the planning horizon of a farmer. This suggests that an educational program in this regard may reduce sediment damage while increasing farm income at the same time . Sediment can cause environmental damage (off-site costs) both directly and indirectly. Directly, the soil particles can cause environmental damage by filling up reservoirs and flood control structures and by deposition in other places. Indirectly, sediment can cause environmental costs by carrying plant nutrients that are potential pollutants. For the study watersheds, no evidence was found that the concentration of plant nutrients in the water posed health hazards to livestock or humans, nor caused undue eutrophication in the watersheds. Consequently, the study focused on off-site sediment damages resulting from shortened economic lives of reservoir and flood control structures and from sediment deposition in the watershed. Annualized off-site sediment damages ranged from a high of 26 cents per ton of gross erosion in Lake Lavon watershed to 14 cents per ton of gross erosion in Duck Creek, to 13.5 cents per ton of gross erosion in Lower Running Water Draw, to a negligible amount in Turkey Creek and Cameron County. These estimates are considerably lower than off-site sediment damages in corn belt watersheds (Lee & Guntermann). Policy Options for Controlling Sediment Public policies that can be implemented to abate off-site sediment damages include direct regulation, provision of economic incentives, education, and public investment. For point sources of pollutants, regulations are typically directed toward the pollutant at or near the point of emission into waterways. However, this is infeasible with non-point sources such as sediment because they enter waterways at an infinite number of points. Hence, regulations must be directed toward the practices that cause erosion and thus sedimentation. The economic incentive option includes alternatives such as Federal or State cost-sharing for adoption of conservation practices, and disincentives such as taxes or penalties on erosion. Education is a viable policy option in situations where producers are not adopting soil conservation practices that would be profitable. In these situations a successful education program would increase producer's income as well as reducing off-site sediment damages. Public investment could be used to pay for dredging sediment from reservoirs and flood control structures to prevent loss of flood control, water supply and recreational benefits. Social benefits and costs of various policy options based on direct regulation, taxation, and provision of economic incentives were estimated for three watersheds: Lake Lavon, Duck Creek, and Lower Running Water Draw. Items considered in the benefit-cost analysis were: (a) farm income consequences; (b) off-site sediment damages abated; (c) governmental cost or revenue; and (d) administration and enforcement costs associated with each policy. The major conclusion of this social benefit and cost analysis is that off-site damages are not large enough to warrant controls on agricultural activities in any of the watersheds; that i

Taylor, C. R.; Reneau, D. R.; Harris, B. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Critical analysis of the Hanford spent nuclear fuel project activity based cost estimate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1997, the SNFP developed a baseline change request (BCR) and submitted it to DOE-RL for approval. The schedule was formally evaluated to have a 19% probability of success [Williams, 1998]. In December 1997, DOE-RL Manager John Wagoner approved the BCR contingent upon a subsequent independent review of the new baseline. The SNFP took several actions during the first quarter of 1998 to prepare for the independent review. The project developed the Estimating Requirements and Implementation Guide [DESH, 1998] and trained cost account managers (CAMS) and other personnel involved in the estimating process in activity-based cost (ABC) estimating techniques. The SNFP then applied ABC estimating techniques to develop the basis for the December Baseline (DB) and documented that basis in Basis of Estimate (BOE) books. These BOEs were provided to DOE in April 1998. DOE commissioned Professional Analysis, Inc. (PAI) to perform a critical analysis (CA) of the DB. PAI`s review formally began on April 13. PAI performed the CA, provided three sets of findings to the SNFP contractor, and initiated reconciliation meetings. During the course of PAI`s review, DOE directed the SNFP to develop a new baseline with a higher probability of success. The contractor transmitted the new baseline, which is referred to as the High Probability Baseline (HPB), to DOE on April 15, 1998 [Williams, 1998]. The HPB was estimated to approach a 90% confidence level on the start of fuel movement [Williams, 1998]. This high probability resulted in an increased cost and a schedule extension. To implement the new baseline, the contractor initiated 26 BCRs with supporting BOES. PAI`s scope was revised on April 28 to add reviewing the HPB and the associated BCRs and BOES.

Warren, R.N.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

290

NETL: Turbine Projects - Cost Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Reduction Cost Reduction Turbine Projects Cost Reduction Single Crystal Turbine Blades Enhancing Gas Turbine Efficiency Data/Fact Sheets Enabling and Information Technologies to Increase RAM of Advanced Powerplants Data/Fact Sheets Development of NDE Technology for Environmental Barrier Coating and Residual Life Estimation Data/Fact Sheets Welding and Weld Repair of Single Crystal Gas Turbine Alloy Data/Fact Sheets Combustion Turbine Hot Section Coating Life Management Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating [PDF] Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle RAM Data/Fact Sheets Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine [PDF]

291

Cost-Causation and Integration Cost Analysis for Variable Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines how wind and solar integration studies have evolved, what analysis techniques work, what common mistakes are still made, what improvements are likely to be made in the near future, and why calculating integration costs is such a difficult problem and should be undertaken carefully, if at all.

Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Hodge, B. M.; Kirby, B.; Lew, D.; Clark, C.; DeCesaro, J.; Lynn, K.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 9   Pricing of automotive coiled spring steel...3 kg (20 tons) per car � Total $40.75 (a) 1989 prices...

293

Entanglement cost in practical scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We quantify the one-shot entanglement cost of an arbitrary bipartite state, that is the minimum number of singlets needed by two distant parties to create a single copy of the state up to a finite accuracy, using local operations and classical communication only. This analysis, in contrast to the traditional one, pertains to scenarios of practical relevance, in which resources are finite and transformations can only be achieved approximately. Moreover, it unveils a fundamental relation between two well-known entanglement measures, namely, the Schmidt number and the entanglement of formation. Using this relation, we are able to recover the usual expression of the entanglement cost as a special case.

Francesco Buscemi; Nilanjana Datta

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

294

OPPORTUNITY COST OF LAND AND URBAN GROWTH.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the impact of the opportunity cost of urban land on urban growth. Based on prices, costs and productivity data on agricultural commodities… (more)

Jiang, Bo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Portfolio includes: paper 1. Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost: literature review  – paper 2. Malaysian food service organisations and transaction cost: comparative analysis… (more)

Lok, Stanley Yap Peng.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Cost-Effectiveness of Two Different Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Embolization of the Internal Iliac Artery: Cost-Effectiveness of Two Different ... cost -effectiveness of coils versus the Amplatzer Vascular. Plug (AVP) for occlusion ...

297

WEB RESOURCE: COST Action 531 - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... This site offers progress reports, meeting information and other resources produced by the COST Action 531, a special initiative of COST, ...

298

Chapter 30 - Cost Accounting Standards Administration | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30 - Cost Accounting Standards Administration Chapter 30 - Cost Accounting Standards Administration 30.1DOE'sOversightofCertainContractorDefinedPensionPlansandItsEffect...

299

Definition: Reduced Restoration Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Restoration Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Restoration Cost The functions that provide this benefit lead to fewer outages andor help restore power quicker...

300

Definition: Reduced Electricity Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Electricity Cost Functions that provide this benefit could help alter customer usage patterns (demand response with price...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Lot Sizing with Piecewise Concave Production Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 14, 2013 ... We study the lot-sizing problem with piecewise concave production costs ... is to propose a minimum cost production plan to satisfy the demand ...

302

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Infrastructure Costs Associated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Costs Associated with Central Hydrogen Production from Biomass and Coal Project Summary Full Title: Infrastructure Costs Associated with Central Hydrogen Production...

303

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Costs Project Summary Full Title: Fuel Choice for Fuel Cell Vehicles: Hydrogen Infrastructure Costs Previous Title(s): Guidance for Transportation Technologies: Fuel...

304

Costs Drop for Photovoltaic Power Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 23, 2009 ... The cost reduction over time was largest for smaller PV systems, such as those used to power individual households. Also, installed costs show ...

305

Driltac (Drilling Time and Cost Evaluation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The users manual for the drill tech model for estimating the costs of geothermal wells. The report indicates lots of technical and cost detail. [DJE-2005

None

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Comparing Infrastructure Costs for Hydrogen and Electricity ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure cost estimates for * hydrogen refueling stations (HRS) and electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) Compare retail costs on a common transportation energy *...

307

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses Title Energy information systems (EIS): Technology costs, benefit, and best practice uses...

308

Low Cost Nanomaterials for PV Devices  

Impact: Low-cost solution for solar energy (Expand to lighting, batteries, etc) Low-cost Nanomaterials for PV Devices . Title: Slide 1 Author: Donna ...

309

Letting The Sun Shine On Solar Costs: An Empirical Investigation Of Photovoltaic Cost Trends In California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTING THE SUN SHINE ON SOLAR COSTS: AN EMPIRICALLetting the Sun Shine on Solar Costs: An Empirical

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Cappers, Peter; Margolis, Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Damage tracker: a cloud and mobile system for collecting damage information after natural disasters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tornadoes and other natural disasters frequently cause large amounts of damage to buildings and infrastructure. An important part of learning from these events is assessing key damage-indicators within the affected area. Researchers can analyze these ... Keywords: cloud, geo-tagging, natural disaster, tornado

Chris Hodapp, Matt Robbins, Jeff Gray, Andrew Graettinger

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

WIND TURBINE BLADE DESIGN BASED ON DURABILITY AND DAMAGE TOLERANCE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the program was to demonstrate and verify Certification-by-Analysis (CBA) capability for wind turbine blades made from advanced lightweight composite materials. The approach integrated durability and damage tolerance analysis with robust design and virtual testing capabilities to deliver superior, durable, low weight, low cost, long life, and reliable wind blade design. The GENOA durability and life prediction software suite was be used as the primary simulation tool. First, a micromechanics-based computational approach was used to assess the durability of composite laminates with ply drop features commonly used in wind turbine applications. Ply drops occur in composite joints and closures of wind turbine blades to reduce skin thicknesses along the blade span. They increase localized stress concentration, which may cause premature delamination failure in composite and reduced fatigue service life. Durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) were evaluated utilizing a multi-scale micro-macro progressive failure analysis (PFA) technique. PFA is finite element based and is capable of detecting all stages of material damage including initiation and propagation of delamination. It assesses multiple failure criteria and includes the effects of manufacturing anomalies (i.e., void, fiber waviness). Two different approaches have been used within PFA. The first approach is Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) PFA while the second one is strength-based. Constituent stiffness and strength properties for glass and carbon based material systems were reverse engineered for use in D&DT evaluation of coupons with ply drops under static loading. Lamina and laminate properties calculated using manufacturing and composite architecture details matched closely published test data. Similarly, resin properties were determined for fatigue life calculation. The simulation not only reproduced static strength and fatigue life as observed in the test, it also showed composite damage and fracture modes that resemble those reported in the tests. The results show that computational simulation can be relied on to enhance the design of tapered composite structures such as the ones used in turbine wind blades. A computational simulation for durability, damage tolerance (D&DT) and reliability of composite wind turbine blade structures in presence of uncertainties in material properties was performed. A composite turbine blade was first assessed with finite element based multi-scale progressive failure analysis to determine failure modes and locations as well as the fracture load. D&DT analyses were then validated with static test performed at Sandia National Laboratories. The work was followed by detailed weight analysis to identify contribution of various materials to the overall weight of the blade. The methodology ensured that certain types of failure modes, such as delamination progression, are contained to reduce risk to the structure. Probabilistic analysis indicated that composite shear strength has a great influence on the blade ultimate load under static loading. Weight was reduced by 12% with robust design without loss in reliability or D&DT. Structural benefits obtained with the use of enhanced matrix properties through nanoparticles infusion were also assessed. Thin unidirectional fiberglass layers enriched with silica nanoparticles were applied to the outer surfaces of a wind blade to improve its overall structural performance and durability. The wind blade was a 9-meter prototype structure manufactured and tested subject to three saddle static loading at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The blade manufacturing did not include the use of any nano-material. With silica nanoparticles in glass composite applied to the exterior surfaces of the blade, the durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) results from multi-scale PFA showed an increase in ultimate load of the blade by 9.2% as compared to baseline structural performance (without nano). The use of nanoparticles lead to a delay in the onset of delamination. Load-displacement relati

Galib Abumeri; Frank Abdi (PhD)

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

312

Valuing Energy Security: Customer Damage Function Methodology and Case Studies at DoD Installations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a methodology to value non-energy savings that can be attributed to energy security projects. The methodology is based on: (1) completing a site survey to collect data on two hypothetical outage scenarios lasting for different durations to compute a customer damage function (CDF), which represents interruption costs as a function of the outage duration; (2) characterizing the reliability of the commercial power supply at the site; and (3) estimating the value of electrical energy security (VEES), which is a metric that characterizes on an annual basis the cost of utility outages. The avoided cost of commercial power outages can be used as ancillary non-energy savings to increase the return on investment of energy security projects.

Giraldez, J.; Booth, S.; Anderson, K.; Massey, K.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Application of a model to the evaluation of flood damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the initial results of a common methodology for the evaluation of damage produced by a flood. A model has been developed for flood damage estimation based on a geographic information system (GIS). It could be used by land administration ... Keywords: Damage evaluation, Flood, GIS, Hydraulic modelling, Stage---damage curves

F. Luino; C. G. Cirio; M. Biddoccu; A. Agangi; W. Giulietto; F. Godone; G. Nigrelli

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service Table of Contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service Table of Contents i TEXAS WILDLIFE DAMAGE MANAGMENT.............................................................................................................................. 2 #12;Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service, Texas A&M University System Page 1 TEXAS WILDLIFE-651-2880 karen.s.dulaney@usda.gov #12;Texas Wildlife Damage Management Service, Texas A&M University System Page

Wilkins, Neal

315

EFFECT OF CREVICE FORMER ON CORROSION DAMAGE PROPAGATION  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report are: (1) To determine the effect of the crevice former on the localized corrosion damage propagation; (2) FOCUS on post initiation stage, crevice propagation and arrest processes; (3) Determine the evolution of damage--severity, shape, location/distribution, damage profile; and (4) Model of crevice corrosion propagation, i.e. the evolution of the crevice corrosion damage profile.

J.H. Payer; U. Landau; X. Shan; A.S. Agarwal

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Assessing Hail and Freeze Damage to Field Corn and Sorghum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a crop has been damaged by hail, it is important to be able to gauge the extent of the damage, the potential for recovery of the damaged crop, and the actions that might be necessary to maximize the recovery process. This publication tells how to assess hail damage.

Livingston, Stephen

1995-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

317

Pollution prevention cost savings potential  

SciTech Connect

The waste generated by DOE facilities is a serious problem that significantly impacts current operations, increases future waste management costs, and creates future environmental liabilities. Pollution Prevention (P2) emphasizes source reduction through improved manufacturing and process control technologies. This concept must be incorporated into DOE`s overall operating philosophy and should be an integral part of Total Quality Management (TQM) program. P2 reduces the amount of waste generated, the cost of environmental compliance and future liabilities, waste treatment, and transportation and disposal costs. To be effective, P2 must contribute to the bottom fine in reducing the cost of work performed. P2 activities at LLNL include: researching and developing innovative manufacturing; evaluating new technologies, products, and chemistries; using alternative cleaning and sensor technologies; performing Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAs); and developing outreach programs with small business. Examples of industrial outreach are: innovative electroplating operations, printed circuit board manufacturing, and painting operations. LLNL can provide the infrastructure and technical expertise to address a wide variety of industrial concerns.

Celeste, J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Wind Electrolysis: Hydrogen Cost Optimization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a hydrogen production cost analysis of a collection of optimized central wind based water electrolysis production facilities. The basic modeled wind electrolysis facility includes a number of low temperature electrolyzers and a co-located wind farm encompassing a number of 3MW wind turbines that provide electricity for the electrolyzer units.

Saur, G.; Ramsden, T.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Cost Vehicle Cost Calculator to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on AddThis.com... Vehicle Cost Calculator Vehicle Cost Calculator This tool uses basic information about your driving habits to calculate total cost of ownership and emissions for makes and models of most vehicles, including alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles. Also

320

Radiation-damage calculations with NJOY  

SciTech Connect

Atomic displacement, gas production, transmutation, and nuclear heating can all be calculated with the NJOY nuclear data processing system using evaluated data in ENDF/B format. Using NJOY helps assure consistency between damage cross sections and those used for transport, and NJOY provides convenient interface formats for linking data to application codes. Unique features of the damage calculation include a simple momentum balance treatment for radiative capture and a new model for (n, particle) reactions based on statistical model calculations. Sample results for iron and nickel are given and compared with the results of other methods.

MacFarlane, R.E.; Muir, D.W.; Mann, F.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The Full Cost of Intercity Travel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation," National Resources Defense San Francisco, October Emile Quinet, Monograph the Council, "The Social Cost

Levinson, David

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

COMPARATIVE COSTS OF CALIFORNIA CENTRAL STATION ELECTRICITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission, nor has the California Energy Commission passed upon the accuracy or adequacy of the information and cost sensitivity analysis curves. The Energy Commission also uses the fixed cost data of the Model in conjunction with the variable cost information of a production cost market simulation model to produce

323

2013-2014 Projected Aviation Program Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

06/21/13 2013-2014 Projected Aviation Program Costs UND Aerospace offers two aviation degree the cost of a degree program. BACHELOR of BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ** Flight Costs Airport Management Survey Certificate $ 11,574 **NOTE: Total flight costs are based on averages and are subject to change. Also, the ATC

Delene, David J.

324

Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs Bruce Kelly Nexant, Inc. Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Meeting May 8 total installed cost #12;6 Distribution Pipeline Costs Collected historical Oil & Gas Journal data, and surveyed for current urban and downtown data Verified that historical natural gas pipeline cost data

325

Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator Interruption Cost Estimate Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Freeman, Sullivan & Co. Sector: Energy Focus Area: Grid Assessment and Integration, Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: icecalculator.com/ Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America References: [1] Logo: Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator This calculator is a tool designed for electric reliability planners at utilities, government organizations or other entities that are interested in estimating interruption costs and/or the benefits associated with reliability improvements. About The Interruption Cost Estimate (ICE) Calculator is an electric reliability

326

Transparent Cost Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transparent Cost Database Transparent Cost Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transparent Cost Database Agency/Company /Organization: Department of Energy Partner: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, Transportation Topics: Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Resource assessment, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset, Lessons learned/best practices, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Web Application Link: en.openei.org/apps/TCDB/ Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Featured Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/united-states-transparent-cost-databa Language: English The Transparent Cost Database collects program cost and performance

327

Costs in the Norwegian Payment System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate social and private cost for the use and production of payment services in Norway for 2007. The calculations include banks’, merchants ’ and households ’ cost for cash, cards and giro payments. The social cost is calculated to be 0.49 % of GDP, or NOK 11.16 billion. Costs are also calculated on a per-service basis. The results are compared with data from earlier cost surveys by Norges Bank. The unit costs of the most popular services have decreased over the years. Efficiency and productivity of banks ’ payment service operations has improved. We also make comparisons between frameworks, methodologies, and results from cost surveys in five European countries.

Olaf Gresvik; Harald Haare; Norges Bank; Sigbjørn Atle Berg; Gunnvald Grønvik; Asbjørn Enge

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Photovoltaic Costs to Reducing Photovoltaic Costs to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Reducing Photovoltaic Costs on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Research & Development Competitive Awards Systems Integration Balance of Systems Reducing Photovoltaic Costs Photo of gloved hands pouring liquid from a glass bottle to glass beaker. Past Incubator awardee, Innovalight, is creating high-efficiency, low-cost

329

Tornado Damage Survey at Moore, Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 4 May 1999, the Wind Science and Engineering Research Center at Texas Tech University dispatched three survey teams to the Oklahoma City area to conduct a tornado damage survey. The author was the leader of one of the teams whose purpose was ...

Timothy P. Marshall

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Quantitative study of oilfield casing damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carrying on the analysis to the cause of casing failure based on engineering factors and geological factors, and choosing the improved analytic hierarchy process to have a quantitative study for oilfield of the casing failure, improved the influence ... Keywords: analytical hierarchy process (AHP), casing damage, quantitative analysis

Deng Rui; Zhang Liang; Guo Haimin

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

1998 Cost and Quality Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1998 Tables June 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions regarding the availability of these data should

332

Entanglement Cost of Nonlocal Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For certain joint measurements on a pair of spatially separated particles, we ask how much entanglement is needed to carry out the measurement exactly. For a class of orthogonal measurements on two qubits with partially entangled eigenstates, we present upper and lower bounds on the entanglement cost. The upper bound is based on a recent result by D. Berry [Phys. Rev. A 75, 032349 (2007)]. The lower bound, based on the entanglement production capacity of the measurement, implies that for almost all measurements in the class we consider, the entanglement required to perform the measurement is strictly greater than the average entanglement of its eigenstates. On the other hand, we show that for any complete measurement in d x d dimensions that is invariant under all local Pauli operations, the cost of the measurement is exactly equal to the average entanglement of the states associated with the outcomes.

Somshubhro Bandyopadhyay; Gilles Brassard; Shelby Kimmel; William K. Wootters

2008-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

333

Estimated Cost Description Determination Date:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and posted 2/10/2011 and posted 2/10/2011 *Title, Location Estimated Cost Description Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain $50,000 FONSI: uncertain Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain FONSI: uncertain Total Estimated Cost $70,000 Attachment: Memo, Moody to Marcinowski, III, SUBJECT: NEPA 2011 APS for DOE-SRS, Dated: Annual NEPA Planning Summary Environmental Assessments (EAs) Expected to be Initiated in the Next 12 Months Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) Jan-11 Estimated Schedule (**NEPA Milestones) South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) issued a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Industrial Stormwater General Permit (IGP) # SCR000000 November 12, with an effective date of January

334

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: The outlook for heating oil costs this winter, due to high crude oil costs and tight heating oil supplies, breaks down to an expected increase in heating expenditures for a typical oil-heated household of more than $200 this winter, the result of an 18% increase in the average price and an 11% increase in consumption. The consumption increase is due to the colder than normal temperatures experienced so far this winter and our expectations of normal winter weather for the rest of this heating season. Last winter, Northeast heating oil (and diesel fuel) markets experienced an extremely sharp spike in prices when a severe weather situation developed in late January. It is virtually impossible to gauge the probability of a similar (or worse) price shock recurring this winter,

335

Entanglement Cost of Quantum Channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The entanglement cost of a quantum channel is the minimal rate at which entanglement (between sender and receiver) is needed in order to simulate many copies of a quantum channel in the presence of free classical communication. In this paper we show how to express this quantity as a regularized optimization of the entanglement formation over states that can be generated between sender and receiver. Our formula is the channel analog of a well-known formula for the entanglement cost of quantum states in terms of the entanglement of formation; and shares a similar relation to the recently shattered hope for additivity. The entanglement cost of a quantum channel can be seen as the analog of the quantum reverse Shannon theorem in the case where free classical communication is allowed. The techniques used in the proof of our result are then also inspired by a recent proof of the quantum reverse Shannon theorem and feature the one-shot formalism for quantum information theory, the post-selection technique for quantum channels as well as von Neumann's minimax theorem. We discuss two applications of our result. First, we are able to link the security in the noisy-storage model to a problem of sending quantum rather than classical information through the adversary's storage device. This not only improves the range of parameters where security can be shown, but also allows us to prove security for storage devices for which no results were known before. Second, our result has consequences for the study of the strong converse quantum capacity. Here, we show that any coding scheme that sends quantum information through a quantum channel at a rate larger than the entanglement cost of the channel has an exponentially small fidelity.

Mario Berta; Fernando Brandao; Matthias Christandl; Stephanie Wehner

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

336

Low Cost Emergency VAR Compensator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The barriers to commercialization of the Capacitor Bank Group Shorting (CAPS) concept were investigated in this study. Also, the application of mechanically switched CAPS systems was examined from the technical and cost points of view. In addition, a semiconductor (thyristor) switched or controlled CAPS arrangement was studied. Although only three utilities were surveyed in the market assessment part of the study, it was concluded that if there is a need for additional shunt compensation systems or a nee...

2000-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

337

Transmission Valuation and Cost Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update provides information on the status of the electric power industry regarding the economic valuation of transmission projects. Such valuations became critical with the introduction of economic transmission projects in the context of competitive electricity markets. Economic valuation is also becoming increasingly important for traditional reliability upgrades, because of the need for consistency in cost allocations between the two types of upgrades. The year 2005 has brought significa...

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

338

Prime movers reduce energy costs  

SciTech Connect

Many industrial plants have found that reciprocating engines used to power generator sets and chiller systems are effective in reducing energy costs as part of a load management strategy, while meeting other plant energy needs. As the trend towards high electric utility costs continues, familiarity with basic analyses used to determine the economic viability of engine-driven systems is essential. A basic method to determine the economic viability of genset or chiller systems is to review the supplying utility`s rate structure, determine approximate costs to install and operate an engine-driven system, and calculate a simple equipment payback period. If the initial analysis shows that significant savings are possible and a quick payback is likely, a thorough analysis should be conducted to analyze a plant`s actual electric load profile. A load profile analysis takes into consideration average loads, peak loads, and peak duration. A detailed study should cover myriad considerations, including local air quality regulations and permitting, space availability, auxiliary system components, and financing options. A basic analysis takes relatively little time and can rule out the need for a detailed study.

Swanson, J.E. [Caterpillar, Inc., Mossville, IL (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Low Cost Hydrogen Production Platform  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technology and design evaluation was carried out for the development of a turnkey hydrogen production system in the range of 2.4 - 12 kg/h of hydrogen. The design is based on existing SMR technology and existing chemical processes and technologies to meet the design objectives. Consequently, the system design consists of a steam methane reformer, PSA system for hydrogen purification, natural gas compression, steam generation and all components and heat exchangers required for the production of hydrogen. The focus of the program is on packaging, system integration and an overall step change in the cost of capital required for the production of hydrogen at small scale. To assist in this effort, subcontractors were brought in to evaluate the design concepts and to assist in meeting the overall goals of the program. Praxair supplied the overall system and process design and the subcontractors were used to evaluate the components and system from a manufacturing and overall design optimization viewpoint. Design for manufacturing and assembly (DFMA) techniques, computer models and laboratory/full-scale testing of components were utilized to optimize the design during all phases of the design development. Early in the program evaluation, a review of existing Praxair hydrogen facilities showed that over 50% of the installed cost of a SMR based hydrogen plant is associated with the high temperature components (reformer, shift, steam generation, and various high temperature heat exchange). The main effort of the initial phase of the program was to develop an integrated high temperature component for these related functions. Initially, six independent concepts were developed and the processes were modeled to determine overall feasibility. The six concepts were eventually narrowed down to the highest potential concept. A US patent was awarded in February 2009 for the Praxair integrated high temperature component design. A risk analysis of the high temperature component was conducted to identify any potential design deficiency related to the concept. The analysis showed that no fundamental design flaw existed with the concept, but additional simulations and prototypes would be required to verify the design prior to fabricating a production unit. These identified risks were addressed in detail during Phase II of the development program. Along with the models of the high temperature components, a detailed process and 3D design model of the remainder of system, including PSA, compression, controls, water treatment and instrumentation was developed and evaluated. Also, in Phase II of the program, laboratory/fullscale testing of the high temperature components was completed and stable operation/control of the system was verified. The overall design specifications and test results were then used to develop accurate hydrogen costs for the optimized system. Praxair continued development and testing of the system beyond the Phase II funding provided by the DOE through the end of 2008. This additional testing is not documented in this report, but did provide significant additional data for development of a prototype system as detailed in the Phase III proposal. The estimated hydrogen product costs were developed (2007 basis) for the 4.8 kg/h system at production rates of 1, 5, 10, 100 and 1,000 units built per year. With the low cost SMR approach, the product hydrogen costs for the 4.8 kg/h units at 50 units produced per year were approximately $3.02 per kg. With increasing the volume production to 1,000 units per year, the hydrogen costs are reduced by about 12% to $2.67 per kg. The cost reduction of only 12% is a result of significant design and fabrication efficiencies being realized in all levels of production runs through utilizing the DFMA principles. A simplified and easily manufactured design does not require large production volumes to show significant cost benefits. These costs represent a significant improvement and a new benchmark in the cost to produce small volume on-site hydrogen using existing process technologies. The cost mo

Timothy M. Aaron, Jerome T. Jankowiak

2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

340

Subject: Cost and Price Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subject: Cost and Price Analysis Subject: Cost and Price Analysis Subject: Cost and Price Analysis More Documents & Publications Subject: Cost and Price Analysis Policy Flash...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Assessment of Damage Accumulation and Property Regeneration ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

H.R. Tipler and M.S. Peck - Final report of programme UK 17 of Round 2 of COST50. NPL report no. DMA(A)33, June 1981, National Physical. Laboratory,.

342

SVM-Based Multiclass Cost-sensitive Classification with Reject Option for Fault Diagnosis of Steam Turbine Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The steam turbine generator faults not only damage the generator itself, but also cause outages and loss of profits, for this reason, many researchers work on the fault diagnosis. But misdiagnosing may also lead to serious losses. In order to improve ... Keywords: SVM, multiclass, cost-sensitive, fault diagnosis, reject option

Chao Zou; En-hui Zheng; Hong-wei Xu; Le Chen

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Damage to Power Plants Due to Cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The duty cycle for power plants ranges from baseloading or consistently operating at or near fully rated capacity to two-shifting or shutting down during off-peak demand periods. Quantifying the cost of cycling and finding ways to mitigate and control those costs are critical to profitability. European Technology Development Ltd. (ETD) originally prepared and published this report and has agreed to the current revision by EPRI. The report evaluates the effects and implications of cyclic operation on equi...

2001-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

344

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Fuel to Generate Electricity of Fuel to Generate Electricity Cost of Fuel to Generate Electricity Herb Emmrich Gas Demand Forecast, Economic Analysis & Tariffs Manager SCG/SDG&E SCG/SDG&E Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2009 Fall Meeting November 18, 2009 Ontario, California The Six Main Costs to Price Electricity are:  Capital costs - the cost of capital investment (debt & equity), depreciation, Federal & State income taxes and property taxes and property taxes  Fuel costs based on fuel used to generate electricity - hydro, natural gas, coal, fuel oil, wind, solar, photovoltaic geothermal biogas photovoltaic, geothermal, biogas  Operating and maintenance costs  Transmission costs  Distribution costs  Social adder costs - GHG adder, low income adder,

345

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier AMFC Workshop May 8 th , 2011, Arlington, VA Shimshon Gottesfeld, CTO The Fuel Cell Cost Challenge 2 CellEra's goal - achieve price parity with incumbents earlier on in market entry process ! Mainstream Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell ( PEM) Cost Barriers 3 Graphite / stainless steel hardware Acidic membrane Platinum based electrodes Cost barriers deeply embedded in core tech materials BOM-based cost barriers - 90% of stack cost Cost volatility - Platinum $500/Oz - $2,500/Oz The possibility of an OH - ion conducting membrane 4 Non-acidic membrane CellEra Took Advantage of this Opportunity A new type of membrane component with potential for strong fuel cell cost cuts was revealed in 2006, but was accompanied by general industry skepticism

346

Project Scoping and CostProject Scoping and Cost Management:Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Scoping and CostProject Scoping and Cost Management:Management: Office Overview Scoping and NEPA/MEPAScoping and NEPA/MEPA Scoping and Cost EstimatesScoping and Cost Estimates Project Define a Project so we canOffice Focus: Better Define a Project so we can have a more accurate cost

Minnesota, University of

347

Cost estimating method of industrial product implemented in WinCOST software system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a method for estimating the cost of industrial products and its implementation into a software system named WinCOST. The software is used for calculating the manufacturing time and cost evaluation of industrial products with high level ... Keywords: chip removing process, cold forming processes, cost estimation, cost per hour, software system

Gheorghe Oancea; Lucia Antoneta Chicos; Camil Lancea

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Exploratory benefit-cost analysis of environmental controls on hydrothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of the value of environmental benefits generated by environmental regulation of hydrothermal sites was initiated to compare these benefits with the estimated costs of regulation. Primary objectives were to 1) evaluate the environmental damages caused by unregulated hydrothermal resource development, 2) use existing environmental and economic data to estimate the dollar value of preventing expected environmental damages at two sites, and 3) compare the benefits and costs of preventing the damages. The sites chosen for analyses were in the Imperial Valley at Heber and Niland, California. Reasons for this choice were 1) there is a high level of commercial interest in developing the Heber known geothermal resource area (KGRA) and the Salton Sea KGRA; 2) the potential for environmental damage is high; 3) existing data bases for these two sites are more comprehensive than at other sites. The primary impacts analyzed were those related to hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) emissions and those related to disposal of spent hydrothermal brine. (MHR)

Scott, M.J.; Wells, K.D.; Currie, J.W.; King, M.J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Phase 2 of the automated array assembly task of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of investigations and analyses of an advanced process sequence for manufacturing high efficiency solar cells and modules in a cost-effective manner. The entire process sequence is presented and discussed step by step. Emphasis is on process simplicity and minimizing consumed materials. The process sequence incorporates texture etching, plasma processes for damage removal and patterning, ion implantation, low pressure silicon nitride deposition, and plated metal. A reliable module design is presented. Specific process step developments are presnted. Further, a detailed cost analysis has been performed to indicate future areas of fruitful cost reduction effort. Finally, recommendations for advanced investigations are presented.

Coleman, M.G.; Grenon, L.P.; Pastirik, E.M.; Pryor, R.A.; Sparks, T.G.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Laser-Induced Damage of Calcium Fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As advances continue to be made in laser technology there is an increasing demand for materials that have high thresholds for laser-induced damage. Laser damage occurs when light is absorbed, creating defects in the crystal lattice. These defects can lead to the emission of atoms, ions and molecules from the sample. One specific field where laser damage is of serious concern is semiconductor lithography, which is beginning to use light at a wavelength of 157 nm. CaF2 is a candidate material for use in this new generation of lithography. In order to prevent unnecessary damage of optical components, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms for laser damage and the factors that serve to enhance it. In this research, we study various aspects of laser interactions with CaF2, including impurity absorbance and various forms of damage caused by incident laser light. Ultraviolet (UV) laser light at 266 nm with both femtosecond (fs) and nanosecond (ns) pulse widths is used to induce ion and neutral particle emission from cleaved samples of CaF2. The resulting mass spectra show significant differences suggesting that different mechanisms for desorption occur following excitation using the different pulse durations. Following irradiation by ns pulses at 266 nm, multiple single-photon absorption from defect states is likely responsible for ion emission whereas the fs case is driven by a multi-photon absorption process. This idea is further supported by the measurements made of the transmission and reflection of fs laser pulses at 266 nm, the results of which reveal a non-linear absorption process in effect at high incident intensities. In addition, the kinetic energy profiles of desorbed Ca and K contaminant atoms are different indicating that a different mechanism is responsible for their emission as well. Overall, these results show that purity plays a key role in the desorption of atoms from CaF2 when using ns pulses. On the other hand, once the irradiance reaches high levels, like that of the fs case, significant desorption is possible due to multi-photon absorption by the intrinsic material.

Espana, A.; Joly, A.G.; Hess, W.P.; Dickinson, J.T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Predicting and Mitigating Corrosion Related Damage in Geothermal Facilities, Phase-I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion related damage (CRD) is probably the most important and costly damage mechanism for components operating in geothermal fields. This problem is further complicated as steam chemistry in such fields changes continuously with season, time, and load. Unfortunately, such changes are not predictable. The problem is further complicated in the area where early condensate (first moisture) forms. The chemistry of these first droplets is significantly different from that of built steam and this, again, cannot be predicted with reasonable accuracy. Therefore, a formidable challenge facing the geothermal field operators remains in knowing the chemistry of the condensate and, more importantly, how it affects specific field equipment such as rotor, piping, valves, etc. This project showed that testing in such an environment is feasible and concluded that continuous monitoring of steam conditions is needed to detect and prevent conditions leading to CRD of components. This project also developed tools and techniques for continuous monitoring of corrosion potential and detection of pitting events.

M. Shirmohamadi; S. Bratt; J. Ridgely

2000-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

352

Capital cost models for geothermal power plants  

SciTech Connect

A computer code, titled GEOCOST, has been developed at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, to rapidly and systematically calculate the potential costs of geothermal power. A description of the cost models in GEOCOST for the geothermal power plants is given here. Plant cost models include the flashed steam and binary systems. The data sources are described, along with the cost data correlations, resulting equations, and uncertainties. Comparison among GEOCOST plant cost estimates and recent A-E estimates are presented. The models are intended to predict plant costs for second and third generation units, rather than the more expensive first-of-a-kind units.

Cohn, P.D.; Bloomster, C.H.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: PEMFC Manufacturing Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PEMFC Manufacturing Cost PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Project Summary Full Title: Manufacturing Cost of Stationary Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell Systems Project ID: 85 Principal Investigator: Brian James Keywords: Costs; fuel cells; stationary Performer Principal Investigator: Brian James Organization: Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) Address: 3601 Wilson Blvd., Suite 650 Arlington, VA 22201 Telephone: 703-243-3383 Email: brian_james@directedtechnologies.com Period of Performance End: November 1999 Project Description Type of Project: Analysis Category: Cross-Cutting Objectives: Estimate the cost of the fuel cell system using the Directed Technologies, Inc. cost database built up over the several years under U.S. Department of Energy and Ford Motor Company contracts.

354

Seize Opportunities to Reduce Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specify for maximum energy savings Specify for maximum energy savings Windows must meet local energy code requirements. For even higher energy performance, consider ENERGY STAR windows, which are recommended for low-rise dwellings and are often suitable for mid-rise dwellings as well. For window and storm window options with superior performance in cold climates, check out the U.S. Department of Energy's highly insulating windows purchasing program (see next page). Seize Opportunities to Reduce Cost Government or utility incentives and financing may be available for energy efficiency in low-income housing. Check www.dsireusa.org for up-to-date information on incentive

355

Global Direct Cost of Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Country-specific direct cost of corrosion for the year 2004...Basque region 1988 Pesetas, 75 100.00 0.75 1.9977 1.5 Czechoslovakia 1998 Koruna, 31.816 (f) 29.8600 1.0655 1.1006 1.17 Netherlands 1969 Guilders, 0.51441 3.6340 0.1416 8.2103 1.16 Sweden 1967 Kroner, 1 5.0000 0.2000 3.0284 0.61 Finland 1965 Markka, 0.175 (g) 3.2110 0.0545 2.0995 0.11 Global...

356

Cost effectiveness of sonic drilling  

SciTech Connect

Sonic drilling (combination of mechanical vibrations and rotary power) is an innovative environmental technology being developed in cooperation with DOE`s Arid-Site Volatile Organic Compounds Integrated Demonstration at Hanford and the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration at Sandia. This report studies the cost effectiveness of sonic drilling compared with cable-tool and mud rotary drilling. Benefit of sonic drilling is its ability to drill in all types of formations without introducing a circulating medium, thus producing little secondary waste at hazardous sites. Progress has been made in addressing the early problems of failures and downtime.

Masten, D.; Booth, S.R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

FY 1995 cost savings report  

SciTech Connect

Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 challenged us to dramatically reduce costs at Hanford. We began the year with an 8 percent reduction in our Environmental Management budget but at the same time were tasked with accomplishing additional workscope. This resulted in a Productivity Challenge whereby we took on more work at the beginning of the year than we had funding to complete. During the year, the Productivity Challenge actually grew to 23 percent because of recissions, Congressional budget reductions, and DOE Headquarters actions. We successfully met our FY 1995 Productivity Challenge through an aggressive cost reduction program that identified and eliminated unnecessary workscope and found ways to be more efficient. We reduced the size of the workforce, cut overhead expenses, eliminated paperwork, cancelled construction of new facilities, and reengineered our processes. We are proving we can get the job done better and for less money at Hanford. DOE`s drive to do it ``better, faster, cheaper`` has led us to look for more and larger partnerships with the private sector. The biggest will be privatization of Hanford`s Tank Waste Remediation System, which will turn liquid tank waste into glass logs for eventual disposal. We will also save millions of dollars and avoid the cost of replacing aging steam plants by contracting Hanford`s energy needs to a private company. Other privatization successes include the Hanford Mail Service, a spinoff of advanced technical training, low level mixed waste thermal treatment, and transfer of the Hanford Museums of Science and history to a private non-profit organization. Despite the rough roads and uncertainty we faced in FY 1995, less than 3 percent of our work fell behind schedule, while the work that was performed was completed with an 8.6 percent cost under-run. We not only met the FY 1995 productivity challenge, we also met our FY 1995-1998 savings commitments and accelerated some critical cleanup milestones. The challenges continue. Budgets remain on the decline, even while the expectations increase. Yet we are confident in our ability to keep our commitments and goals by identifying new efficiencies in the Hanford cleanup program. We will also pursue new contracting arrangements that will allow us to foster greater competition and use more commercial practices while maintaining our commitment to the safety and health of the public, our workers, and the environment.

Andrews-Smith, K.L., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

358

Global Indirect Cost of Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 9   Indirect cost of corrosion for the USA (1998 basis)...76.64 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Mining 27.86 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Petroleum refining 32.22 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Chemical, petrochemical, and pharmaceutical 111.04 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Pulp and paper 148.05 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Agricultural 126.28 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Food processing 123.66 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Electronics â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Home appliances 25.25 â?¦ â?¦ â?¦ Subtotal 671.00 Production loss 2.5â??5.5 26.84...

359

Carbon Fiber Damage in Particle Beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in beam wire scanners. The heating of the fiber due to energy loss of the particles travelling through is simulated with Geant4. The heating induced by the beam electromagnetic field is estimated with ANSYS. The heat transfer and sublimation processes are modelled. Due to the model nonlinearity, a numerical approach based on discretization of the wire movement is used to solve it for particular beams. Radiation damage to the fiber is estimated with SRIM. The model is tested with available SPS and LEP data and a dedicated damage test on the SPS beam is performed followed by a post-mortem analysis of the wire remnants. Predictions for the LHC beams are made.

Dehning, B; Kroyer, T; Meyer, M; Sapinski, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Minimizing formation damage during gravel pack operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described for minimizing formation damage caused by intrusive fluids prior to a gravel packing operation in loosely consolidated formations penetrated by at least one well. The method comprises: filling the casing of the well with an underbalanced completion fluid; placing within the well a removable packer capable of isolating the space between the casing and the formation from the downhole well pressure; setting through the packer a first tubing suitable for perforating and stabilizing the flow of fluids into the well; perforating the casing; and introducing a blocking agent into the formation via the perforations which agent upon solidification is sufficient to minimize formation damage by avoiding the introduction of formation fluids.

Jennings, A.R. Jr.

1987-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Effect of Operational Transients on Boiler Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is increasingly the case that utility systems demand more flexibility in a unit's ability to respond to dispatch requirements, which can create a conflict between maximizing efficient operation and limiting damage accumulation. A boiler can be operated in various cycling modes and can be subjected to planned and unplanned transients associated with load following, minimum load operation, forced cooling, variable pressure operation, increased ramp rates, increased attemperation, over-temperature operat...

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

362

Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Modeling Coal Seam Damage in Cast Blasting  

SciTech Connect

A discrete element computer program named DMC_BLAST (Distinct Motion Code) has been under development since 1987 for modeling rock blasting (Preece & Taylor, 1989). This program employs explicit time integration and uses spherical or cylindrical elements that are represented as circles in two dimensions. DMC_BLAST calculations compare favorably with data from actual bench blasts (Preece et al, 1993). Coal seam chilling refers to the shattering of a significant portion of the coal leaving unusable fines. It is also refereed to as coal damage. Chilling is caused during a blast by a combination of explosive shock energy and movement of the adjacent rock. Chilling can be minimized by leaving a buffer zone between the bottom of the blastholes and the coal seam or by changing the blast design to decrease the powder factor or by a combination of both. Blast design in coal mine cast blasting is usually a compromise between coal damage and rock fragmentation and movement (heave). In this paper the damage to coal seams from rock movement is examined using the discrete element computer code DMC_BLAST. A rock material strength option has been incorporated into DMC_BLAST by placing bonds/links between the spherical particles used to model the rock. These bonds tie the particles together but can be broken when the tensile, compressive or shear stress in the bond exceeds the defined strength. This capability has been applied to predict coal seam damage, particularly at the toe of a cast blast where drag forces exerted by movement of the overlying rock can adversely effect the top of the coal at the bench face. A simulation of coal mine cast blasting has been performed with special attention being paid to the strength of the coal and its behavior at t he bench face during movement of the overlying material.

Chung, S.H.; Preece, D.S.

1998-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

364

Evaluation of Coal Combustion Product Damage Cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2007, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) published an assessment that identified 67 coal combustion product (CCP) management with groundwater or surface water impacts that were categorized as proven or potential damage cases. This report provides further evaluation of these cases, including additional data obtained from power companies and public sources. Volume 1 provides an overview and summary of findings, and Volume 2 provides descriptions of individual cases.

2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

365

Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project is a research into the effect of gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells. It is the result of a problem encountered in producing a low permeability formation from a well in South Texas owned by the El Paso Production Company. The well was producing from a gas condensate reservoir. Questions were raised about whether flowing bottomhole pressure below dewpoint would be appropriate. Condensate damage in the hydraulic fracture was expected to be of significant effect. In the most recent work done by Adedeji Ayoola Adeyeye, this subject was studied when the effects of reservoir depletion were minimized by introduction of an injector well with fluid composition the same as the original reservoir fluid. He also used an infinite conductivity hydraulic fracture along with a linear model as an adequate analogy. He concluded that the skin due to liquid build-up is not enough to prevent lower flowing bottomhole pressures from producing more gas. This current study investigated the condensate damage at the face of the hydraulic fracture in transient and boundary dominated periods when the effects of reservoir depletion are taken into account. As a first step, simulation of liquid flow into the fracture was performed using a 2D 1-phase simulator in order to help us to better understand the results of gas condensate simulation. Then during the research, gas condensate models with various gas compositions were simulated using a commercial simulator (CMG). The results of this research are a step forward in helping to improve the management of gas condensate reservoirs by understanding the mechanics of liquid build-up. It also provides methodology for quantifying the condensate damage that impairs linear flow of gas into the hydraulic fracture.

Reza, Rostami Ravari

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Evaluation of Coal Combustion Product Damage Cases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2007, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) published an assessment that identified 67 coal combustion product (CCP) management facilities with groundwater or surface water impacts that were categorized as proven or potential damage cases. This report provides further evaluation of these cases, including additional data obtained from power companies and public sources. Volume 1 provides an overview and summary of findings, and Volume 2 provides descriptions of individual cases.

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

367

Drilling costs drop 7% in 1985  

SciTech Connect

Drilling costs dropped about 7% last year. This decline cancels a slight increase in 1984. Total costs to drill now run about 59% of the 1981 highs. Comparable figures for the previous 2 years are 63 and 61%. Deeper wells showed the biggest drops. Shallow well costs fell about 6%. Energy Information Administration (EIA) indexes drilling costs on a 1976 base year. Costs for shallow wells (5,000 ft or less) show an index about 138. Deeper wells have an index around 149. Cost declines were the greatest in West and North Texas and the Rockies, of 11%. The Northeast and Western areas showed greater than average declines, 9% or so. The High Plains, New Mexico, and Midcontinent areas recorded near the average 7% decline. Costs in South Louisiana, the Southeast, and Ark-La-Tex 2%. West Central Texas costs were off only 1%. The Southeast was essentially unchanged. Indexes by area show generally that drilling costs have declined since 1983. The summary here comes from EIA's ''Indexes and Estimates of Domestic Well Drilling Costs 1984 and 1985''. That report covers oil, gas, and dry hole costs, cost components, and overall costs.

Anderson, T.; Funk, V.

1986-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

368

Using Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline Costs to Estimate Hydrogen Pipeline Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the construction costs of natural gas, oil, and petroleumR. “Current pipeline costs. ” Oil & Gas Journal; Nov 21,cost projections for over 20,000 miles of natural gas, oil, and

Parker, Nathan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Application of activity-based costing in a manufacturing company: a comparison with traditional costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity-Based Costing (ABC) represents an alternative paradigm to traditional cost accounting system and has received extensive attention during the past decade. Rather than distorting the cost information by using traditional overhead allocation methods, ...

Gonca Tuncel; Derya Eren Akyol; Gunhan Mirac Bayhan; Utku Koker

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Hydrogen production costs -- A survey  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen, produced using renewable resources, is an environmentally benign energy carrier that will play a vital role in sustainable energy systems. The US Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of cost-effective technologies for hydrogen production, storage, and utilization to facilitate the introduction of hydrogen in the energy infrastructure. International interest in hydrogen as an energy carrier is high. Research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) of hydrogen energy systems are in progress in many countries. Annex 11 of the International Energy Agency (IEA) facilitates member countries to collaborate on hydrogen RD and D projects. The United States is a member of Annex 11, and the US representative is the Program Manager of the DOE Hydrogen R and D Program. The Executive Committee of the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement in its June 1997 meeting decided to review the production costs of hydrogen via the currently commercially available processes. This report compiles that data. The methods of production are steam reforming, partial oxidation, gasification, pyrolysis, electrolysis, photochemical, photobiological, and photoelectrochemical reactions.

Basye, L.; Swaminathan, S.

1997-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

371

Fast Neutron Radioactivity and Damage Studies on Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

McClellan, CA 95652 and J. Volk, FNAL, Batavia, Il 60510,current range Wolf and J. Volk, “Radiation Damage StudiesJ. Spencer, Z. Wolf and J. Volk, “Radiation Damage diation

Spencer, J.; Anderson, S. D.; Wolf, Z.; Volk, J. T.; Pellett, D.; Boussoufi, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on benchmarking the fuel cost of steam provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Updating MIT's cost estimation model for shipbuilding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis project will update the MIT ship cost estimation model by combining the two existing models (the Basic Military Training School (BMTS) Cost Model and the MIT Math Model) in order to develop a program that can ...

Smith, Matthew B., Lieutenant, junior grade

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

A. Appendix: Cost Estimate for the Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appendix: Cost Estimate for the Facility Determining the cost of a facility as complex as the neutrino source presented here is a very difficult task within the short time period...

375

Reducing Home Heating and Cooling Costs  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . . . . . . . . . . . 19 B1. Annual Cost of Oil Heat in Various Climates for a Range of Heating Oil Prices and System Efficiencies . . . . . 21 B2. Annual Cost of Gas Heat in...

376

2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a detailed description of NREL's levelized cost of wind energy equation, assumptions and results in 2010, including historical cost trends and future projections for land-based and offshore utility-scale wind.

Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P.; Smith, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Average-case active learning with costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze the expected cost of a greedy active learning algorithm. Our analysis extends previous work to a more general setting in which different queries have different costs. Moreover, queries may have more than two possible responses and the distribution ...

Andrew Guillory; Jeff Bilmes

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Damages to DNA that result in neoplastic transformation  

SciTech Connect

Some topics discussed are: correlation between carcinogens and mutagens; defective DNA repair in uv-damaged xeroderma pigmentosum cells; analysis of nucleotide damage to DNA following exposure to chemicals or radiations; photoreactivation in uv-irradiated Escherichia coli; tumor development in fish; excision repair as an aid in identifying damage; detection of excision repair; role of endonucleases in repair of uv damage; and alkylation products and tumors. (HLW)

Setlow, R.B.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

College of Engineering Request for Institutional Waiver of Indirect Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigator Sponsor Project Title Total Direct Costs Total Modified Direct Costs Full Indirect Costs Rate Full Indirect Costs Amount Total Project Costs (with Full IDC) Requested Indirect Costs Rate Requested Indirect Costs Amount Total Project Costs (with req'd IDC) Principal Investigator's Justification for Indirect

Eustice, Ryan

380

DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 8, Startup Costs  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Letting The Sun Shine On Solar Costs: An Empirical Investigation Of Photovoltaic Cost Trends In California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHOTOVOLTAIC COST TRENDS IN CALIFORNIA Ryan Wiser Lawrencein the United States: California. We find that: (1) solarof PV system costs in California. Through mid-November 2005,

Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Cappers, Peter; Margolis, Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

An algorithm for minimization of quantum cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new algorithm for minimization of quantum cost of quantum circuits has been designed. The quantum cost of different quantum circuits of particular interest (eg. circuits for EPR, quantum teleportation, shor code and different quantum arithmetic operations) are computed by using the proposed algorithm. The quantum costs obtained using the proposed algorithm is compared with the existing results and it is found that the algorithm has produced minimum quantum cost in all cases.

Anindita Banerjee; Anirban Pathak

2009-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

383

Reduce Pumping Costs through Optimum Pipe Sizing  

SciTech Connect

BestPractices Program tip sheet discussing pumping system efficiency by reducing pumping costs through optimum pipe sizing.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

TIBER-II cost models and estimates  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of a series of viewgraphs dealing with cost associated with construction of a thermonuclear power plant. (JDH)

Thomson, S.L.

1987-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

385

Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Foodborne Illness Cost Calculator Dataset Summary Description The calculator provides information on the assumptions behind foodborne illness cost estimates and gives you a chance to make your own assumptions and calculate your own cost estimates. This interactive web-based tool allows users to estimate the cost of illness due to specific foodborne pathogens. The updated ERS cost estimate for Shiga-toxin producing E. coli O157 (STEC O157) was added to the Calculator in spring, 2008. Calculator users can now review and change the assumptions behind the ERS cost estimates for either STEC O157 or Salmonella. The assumptions that can be modified include the annual number of cases, the distribution of cases by severity, the use or costs of medical care, the amount or value of time lost from work, the costs of premature death, and the disutility costs for nonfatal cases. Users can also update the cost estimate for inflation for any year from 1997 to 2007.

386

How Much Does That Incinerator Cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biosecurity on poultry farms includes proper disposal of dead carcasses. In many cases, that means using an incinerator. Calculating the cost of an incinerator means considering long and short-term expenses and the cost of fuel. This publication explains how to select the right size incinerator and calculate all associated costs.

Mukhtar, Saqib; Nash, Catherine; Harman, Wyatte; Padia, Reema

2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

387

Activity-Based Costing for Electric Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activity-Based costing (ABC) is a cost-management approach that can help utility managers make better decisions through more-accurate process and product cost information and a better understanding of activities that either do or do not add value. This report is a primer on ABC.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Policy 1305 Cost Transfers Involving Sponsored Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy 1305 Cost Transfers Involving Sponsored Projects Responsible Office Office of Grant transfer of payroll and other direct costs associated with sponsored projects. Purpose of the Policy are responsible for ensuring that transfers of costs to sponsored projects which represent corrections of errors

389

2012 2013 Projected Aviation Program Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012 ­ 2013 Projected Aviation Program Costs UND Aerospace offers two aviation degree programs with a total of seven academic majors. Each has its own flight course requirements, which affect the cost of a degree program. BACHELOR of BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ** Flight Costs Airport Management Survey of Flight

Delene, David J.

390

Costing the Target May 17, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to provide it with the right information! ­ Broken down into 3 project phases with associated costs and man-power. · Costing workshop on 25th May at CERN ­ Plan is to discuss Project Breakdown Structures (PBSs, to document how costs are derived. · Project has 3 phases · Industrialisation · Procurement · Reception (i

McDonald, Kirk

391

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

External Costs of Energy Technologies Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society believes that decisions concerning national energy policy should appropriately take external costs into account. In some energy options, external costs are not included in the cost of the energy produced; instead, they are borne by parties not involved in the original transaction, generally without consent or due compensation. External costs 1 may be related to many factors, including impacts on public health, environmental impacts, degradation of quality of life, degradation of agricultural land, depletion of natural resources, and reduction in security. These costs are incurred at various stages of the life cycle of an energy technology. While some energy technologies may appear to have smaller environmental impacts than others, their external costs may be significant when the complete life cycle costs are taken into account. Particularly, an energy source that is inherently intermittent will require, for applications demanding reliable performance, either a backup energy supply or an energy storage facility, whose external costs are not negligible. On the other hand, practically all the costs to make nuclear power technology safe and secure, including the costs of waste management and disposal, are already incorporated into the cost of electricity generation. 2 Appropriately accounting for external costs should be an essential element in energy policy since in doing so, the final product is compared based on a consistent set of parameters for all technologies, and the resulting mix of energy sources will more appropriately balance the competing economic, environmental, and social needs from energy production and consumption.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Update on the Cost of Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We update the cost of nuclear power as calculated in the MIT (2003) Future of Nuclear Power study. Our main focus is on the changing cost of construction of new plants. The MIT (2003) study provided useful data on the cost ...

Parsons, John E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Updated Costs for Decommissioning Nuclear Power Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This update of 1978 NRC cost estimates--in 1984 dollars--also estimates the costs of several special manpower and licensing options for decommissioning nuclear power facilities. The fully developed methodology offers utilities a sound basis on which to estimate the costs of decommissioning specific plants.

1985-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

395

PROJECT COST $53,108,617  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROJECT COST $53,108,617 CONSTRUCTION COST $42,730,152 FURNISHING & EQUIPMENT $1,671.580 TOTAL SPRING 2001 Review of Documents and Cost Estimate Reconciliation APRIL 20, 2001 Formal Ground Breaking of the Campus Intramural and Recreation Advisory Committee SPRING/SUMMER1998 Campus Needs Assessment Process

Bittner, Eric R.

396

Heat exchanger Exergoeconomic lifecycle cost optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considering lifecycle cost analysis during the design phase of thermal systems gives the design effort more worth. Furthermore thermodynamic exergetic optimization is proven to be useful method for determining the most lifecycle cost optimal design of ... Keywords: entropy generation, exergy destruction, heat exchanger, operating cost, optimization, thermodynamics

Liaquat Ali Khan; Ali El-Ghalban

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

What does a negawatt really cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use data from ten utility conservation programs to calculate the cost per kWh of electricity saved -- the cost of a "negawatthour" -- resulting from these programs. We first compute the life-cycle cost per kWh saved ...

Joskow, Paul L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The Integration of Process and Cost Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For information on the symposium, refer to the November Meetings Calendar, beginning ... The managers of materials enterprises are market and cost driven. ... The fact that matter and thermal energy must be conserved (i.e., they cannot be .... sheet to a cost analysis and obtain information on the projected production costs.

399

Defense waste transportation: cost and logistics studies  

SciTech Connect

Transportation of nuclear wastes from defense programs is expected to significantly increase in the 1980s and 1990s as permanent waste disposal facilities come into operation. This report uses models of the defense waste transportation system to quantify potential transportation requirements for treated and untreated contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) wastes and high-level defense wastes (HLDW). Alternative waste management strategies in repository siting, waste retrieval and treatment, treatment facility siting, waste packaging and transportation system configurations were examined to determine their effect on transportation cost and hardware requirements. All cost estimates used 1980 costs. No adjustments were made for future changes in these costs relative to inflation. All costs are reported in 1980 dollars. If a single repository is used for defense wastes, transportation costs for CH-TRU waste currently in surface storage and similar wastes expected to be generated by the year 2000 were estimated to be 109 million dollars. Recovery and transport of the larger buried volumes of CH-TRU waste will increase CH-TRU waste transportation costs by a factor of 70. Emphasis of truck transportation and siting of multiple repositories would reduce CH-TRU transportation costs. Transportation of HLDW to repositories for 25 years beginning in 1997 is estimated to cost $229 M in 1980 costs and dollars. HLDW transportation costs could either increase or decrease with the selection of a final canister configuration. HLDW transportation costs are reduced when multiple repositories exist and emphasis is placed on truck transport.

Andrews, W.B.; Cole, B.M.; Engel, R.L.; Oylear, J.M.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Support for Cost Analyses on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Hartwell Ave 5 Hartwell Ave Lexington, MA 02421 Support for Cost Analyses on Solar-Driven High Temperature Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles Final Report to: Department of Energy Order DE-DT0000951 Report prepared by TIAX LLC Reference D0535 February 22, 2011 Matt Kromer (Principal Investigator) Kurt Roth Rosalind Takata Paul Chin Copyright 2011, TIAX LLC Notice: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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401

Estimated Cost Description Determination Date:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Title, Location Title, Location Estimated Cost Description Determination Date: 2010 LCLS Undulator 2 is envisioned to be a 0.2 - 2keV FEL x-ray source, capable of delivering x-rays to End Station A (ESA), located in the existing Research Yard at SLAC. It will also be configurable as a non- FEL hard x-ray source capable of delivering a chirped x-ray pulse for single-shot broad-spectrum measurements. The project would entail reconstruction of the electron beam transport to End Station A, construction and installation of a new undulator in the tunnel upstream of ESA and beam dump, and construction and installation of x-ray transport, optics, and diagnostics in ESA. It also includes the construction of an annex to End Station A , providing hutches for experiment stations.

402

COST AND QUALITY TABLES 95  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 Tables 5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) will no longer be pub- lished by the EIA. The tables presented in this docu- ment are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions regarding the availability of these data should be directed to: Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division

403

Software Cost Estimation and Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this report, provided that the source of such material is fully acknowledged. Additional copies are available free of charge from: Publication Office Institute for Information Technology National Research Council of Canada Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0R6 Copyright 1994 par Conseil national de recherches du Canada Il est permis de citer de courts extraits et de reproduire des figures ou tableaux du présent rapport, à condition d'en identifier clairement la source. Des exemplaires supplémentaires peuvent être obtenus gratuitement à l'addresse suivante: Bureau des publications Institut de technologie de l'information Conseil national de recherches du Canada Ottawa (Ontario) Canada K1A 0R6 Software Cost Estimation 1 Table of Contents

M. R. Vigder; A.W. Kark

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Coking Coal Import Costs - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Import Costs for Selected Countries Import Costs for Selected Countries U.S. Dollars per Metric Ton1 (Average Unit Value, CIF2) Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Belgium 48.67 46.59 49.25 78.98 108.68 126.85 120.51 163.26 NA France 52.47 60.26 62.05 75.46 109.69 133.48 124.63 212.51 NA Germany 51.30 59.53 64.00 74.74 113.48 135.72 133.45 182.72 NA Italy 55.48 57.67 60.39 77.24 103.02 112.05 118.05 118.97 NA Japan 41.13 42.14 41.73 61.40 88.80 93.10 88.43 184.13 NA Netherlands 55.37 55.55 63.00 78.99 104.06 125.70 125.84 187.06 NA Spain 52.32 57.10 60.44 79.30 116.50 134.81 124.87 211.23 NA United Kingdom 53.14 56.81 57.34 77.73 116.05 128.51 120.24 187.79 NA 1To convert U.S. dollars per metric ton to U.S. dollars per short ton

405

Steam Coal Import Costs - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Steam Coal Import Costs for Selected Countries Steam Coal Import Costs for Selected Countries U.S. Dollars per Metric Ton1 (Average Unit Value, CIF2) Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Belgium 46.96 39.34 39.76 66.29 70.83 70.95 82.81 150.58 NA Denmark 40.78 31.65 50.27 56.29 61.84 59.15 75.20 113.34 NA Finland 40.83 37.08 39.99 58.45 62.80 67.65 72.64 134.21 NA France 45.36 42.59 42.63 64.08 75.23 72.92 84.49 135.53 NA Germany 41.46 36.80 39.00 61.22 72.48 70.12 81.49 138.84 NA Ireland3 45.25 47.88 50.08 80.90 74.91 101.78 125.15 143.08 NA Italy 44.83 41.25 42.45 63.54 73.20 69.16 86.00 143.68 NA Japan 37.95 36.95 34.93 51.48 62.73 63.33 70.92 125.42 NA Netherlands 40.09 35.81 37.27 55.09 68.86 68.57 79.12 133.50 NA

406

Biotrans: Cost Optimization Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biotrans: Cost Optimization Model Biotrans: Cost Optimization Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Biotrans: Cost Optimization Model Focus Area: Ethanol Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.ecn.nl/units/ps/models-and-tools/biotrans/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/biotrans-cost-optimization-model,http Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation BIOTRANS optimizes the biofuel supply chain allocation by finding the least-cost configuration of resources and trade to meet a specified biofuel demand in the European transportation sector. The user can constrain the optimization by inputting a number of economic and technological assumptions for a specific target year. References Retrieved from

407

Contribution of endogenous and exogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in the bacterial spore  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radical scavengers such as polyethylene glycol 4000 and bovine albumin have been used to define the contribution of exogenous and endogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in aqueous buffered suspensions of Bacillus pumilus spores. The results indicate that this damage in the bacterial spore is predominantly endogenous.

Jacobs, G.P.; Samuni, A.; Czapski, G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Laser-Induced Damage of Calcium Fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation damage of materials has long been of fundamental interest, especially since the growth of laser technology. One such source of damage comes from UV laser light. Laser systems continue to move into shorter wavelength ranges, but unfortunately are limited by the damage threshold of their optical components. For example, semiconductor lithography is making its way into the 157nm range and requires a material that can not only transmit this light (air cannot), but also withstand the highly energetic photons present at this shorter wavelength. CaF2, an alkaline earth halide, is the chosen material for vacuum UV 157 nm excimer radiation. It can transmit light down to 120 nm and is relatively inexpensive. Although it is readily available through natural and synthetic sources, it is often times difficult to find in high purity. Impurities in the crystal can result in occupied states in the band gap that induce photon absorption [2] and ultimately lead to the degradation of the material. In order to predict how well CaF2 will perform under irradiation of short wavelength laser light, one must understand the mechanisms for laser-induced damage. Laser damage is often a two-step process: initial photons create new defects in the lattice and subsequent photons excite these defects. When laser light is incident on a solid surface there is an initial production of electron-hole (e-h) pairs, a heating of free electrons and a generation of local heating around optically absorbing centers [3]. Once this initial excitation converts to the driving energy for nuclear motion, the result is an ejection of atoms, ions and molecules from the surface, known as desorption or ablation [3]. Secondary processes further driving desorption are photoabsorption, successive excitations of self-trapped excitons (STE's) and defects, and ionization of neutrals by incident laser light [3]. The combination of laser-induced desorption and the alterations to the electronic and geometrical structure of the lattice result in defect formation. In the material CaF2 some of these defects take the form of F-centers, an electron trapped at a halogen vacancy [4], and H-centers, a F2- molecular ion at a single lattice site [5]. While the F-centers are stable, the H-centers are transient but can form into aggregates that are stable. There are many different configurations the defects can take based on the relative position of F and H centers in the lattice and this is extensively discussed in literature [1,4,5]. Once these defects have formed they cause further absorption of light, which ultimately induces particle emission and the production of even more defects. Various forms of laser-induced damage of CaF2 have been studied. For example, the mechanism for photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) of F+ from CaF2 (111) is discussed in ref. 6 and the energy threshold, distribution and kinetics governing electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) is investigated in ref. 7. The desorption of neutral Ca and F atoms has also been explored [1]. In this paper I focus on the emission of ions and neutrals from CaF2 under the irradiation of pulsed laser light at 266 nm, in addition to a brief study of its purity and transmittance.

Espana, Aubrey L.; Joly, Alan G.; Hess, Wayne P.; Dickinson, J T.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Ductile damage modeling based on void coalescence and percolation theories  

SciTech Connect

A general model for ductile damage in metals is presented. It includes damage induced by shear stress as well as damage caused by volumetric tension. Spallation is included as a special case. Strain induced damage is also treated. Void nucleation and growth are included, and give rise to strain rate effects. Strain rate effects also arise in the model through elastic release wave propagation between damage centers. The underlying physics of the model is the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of voids in a plastically flowing solid. The model is intended for hydrocode based computer simulation. An experimental program is underway to validate the model.

Tonks, D.L.; Zurek, A.K.; Thissell, W.R.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

2006 Update of Business Downtime Costs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to assess the downtime cost of power outages to businesses in the commercial and industrial sectors, updating and improving upon studies that have already been published on this subject. The goal is to produce a study that, relative to existing studies, (1) applies to a wider set of business types (2) reflects more current downtime costs, (3) accounts for the time duration factor of power outages, and (4) includes data on the costs imposed by real outages in a well-defined market. This study examines power outage costs in 11 commercial subsectors and 5 industrial subsectors, using data on downtime costs that was collected in the 1990's. This study also assesses power outage costs for power outages of 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours duration. Finally, this study incorporates data on the costs of real power outages for two business subsectors. However, the current limited state of data availability on the topic of downtime costs means there is room to improve upon this study. Useful next steps would be to generate more recent data on downtime costs, data that covers outages shorter than 20 minutes duration and longer than 4 hours duration, and more data that is based on the costs caused by real-world outages. Nevertheless, with the limited data that is currently available, this study is able to generate a clear and detailed picture of the downtime costs that are faced by different types of businesses.

Hinrichs, Mr. Doug [Sentech, Inc.; Goggin, Mr. Michael [Sentech, Inc.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Low-cost inertial measurement unit.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories performs many expensive tests using inertial measurement units (IMUs)--systems that use accelerometers, gyroscopes, and other sensors to measure flight dynamics in three dimensions. For the purpose of this report, the metrics used to evaluate an IMU are cost, size, performance, resolution, upgradeability and testing. The cost of a precision IMU is very high and can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Thus the goals and results of this project are as follows: (1) Examine the data flow in an IMU and determine a generic IMU design. (2) Discuss a high cost IMU implementation and its theoretically achievable results. (3) Discuss design modifications that would save money for suited applications. (4) Design and implement a low cost IMU and discuss its theoretically achievable results. (5) Test the low cost IMU and compare theoretical results with empirical results. (6) Construct a more streamlined printed circuit board design reducing noise, increasing capabilities, and constructing a self-contained unit. Using these results, we can compare a high cost IMU versus a low cost IMU using the metrics from above. Further, we can examine and suggest situations where a low cost IMU could be used instead of a high cost IMU for saving cost, size, or both.

Deyle, Travis Jay

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Cost Study for Large Wind Turbine Blades  

SciTech Connect

The cost study for large wind turbine blades reviewed three blades of 30 meters, 50 meters, and 70 meters in length. Blade extreme wind design loads were estimated in accordance with IEC Class I recommendations. Structural analyses of three blade sizes were performed at representative spanwise stations assuming a stressed shell design approach and E-glass/vinylester laminate. A bill of materials was prepared for each of the three blade sizes using the laminate requirements prepared during the structural analysis effort. The labor requirements were prepared for twelve major manufacturing tasks. TPI Composites developed a conceptual design of the manufacturing facility for each of the three blade sizes, which was used for determining the cost of labor and overhead (capital equipment and facilities). Each of the three potential manufacturing facilities was sized to provide a constant annual rated power production (MW per year) of the blades it produced. The cost of the production tooling and overland transportation was also estimated. The results indicate that as blades get larger, materials become a greater proportion of total cost, while the percentage of labor cost is decreased. Transportation costs decreased as a percentage of total cost. The study also suggests that blade cost reduction efforts should focus on reducing material cost and lowering manufacturing labor, because cost reductions in those areas will have the strongest impact on overall blade cost.

ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

2006 Update of Business Downtime Costs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to assess the downtime cost of power outages to businesses in the commercial and industrial sectors, updating and improving upon studies that have already been published on this subject. The goal is to produce a study that, relative to existing studies, (1) applies to a wider set of business types (2) reflects more current downtime costs, (3) accounts for the time duration factor of power outages, and (4) includes data on the costs imposed by real outages in a well-defined market. This study examines power outage costs in 11 commercial subsectors and 5 industrial subsectors, using data on downtime costs that was collected in the 1990's. This study also assesses power outage costs for power outages of 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours duration. Finally, this study incorporates data on the costs of real power outages for two business subsectors. However, the current limited state of data availability on the topic of downtime costs means there is room to improve upon this study. Useful next steps would be to generate more recent data on downtime costs, data that covers outages shorter than 20 minutes duration and longer than 4 hours duration, and more data that is based on the costs caused by real-world outages. Nevertheless, with the limited data that is currently available, this study is able to generate a clear and detailed picture of the downtime costs that are faced by different types of businesses.

Hinrichs, Mr. Doug [Sentech, Inc.; Goggin, Mr. Michael [Sentech, Inc.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Capital and operating cost estimates. Volume I. Preliminary design and assessment of a 12,500 BPD coal-to-methanol-to-gasoline plant. [Grace C-M-G Plant, Henderson County, Kentucky  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Deliverable No. 18b - Capital and Operating Cost Estimates includes a detailed presentation of the 12,500 BPD coal-to-methanol-to-gasoline plant from the standpoint of capital, preoperations, start-up and operations cost estimation. The base capital cost estimate in June 1982 dollars was prepared by the Ralph M. Parsons Company under the direction of Grace. The escalated capital cost estimate as well as separate estimates for preoperations, startup and operations activities were developed by Grace. The deliverable consists of four volumes. Volume I contains details of methodology used in developing the capital cost estimate, summary information on a base June 1982 capital cost, details of the escalated capital cost estimate and separate sections devoted to preoperations, start-up, and operations cost. The base estimate is supported by detailed information in Volumes II, III and IV. The degree of detail for some units was constrained due to proprietary data. Attempts have been made to exhibit the estimating methodology by including data on individual equipment pricing. Proprietary details are available for inspection upon execution of nondisclosure and/or secrecy agreements with the licensors to whom the data is proprietary. Details of factoring certain pieces of equipment and/or entire modules or units from the 50,000 BPD capital estimate are also included. In the case of the escalated capital estimate, Grace has chosen to include a sensitivity analysis which allows for ready assessment of impacts of escalation rates (inflation), contingency allowances and the construction interest financing rates on the escalated capital cost. Each of the estimates associated with bringing the plant to commercial production rates has as a basis the schedule and engineering documentation found in Deliverable No. 14b - Process Engineering and Mechanical Design Report, No. 28b - Staffing Plans, No. 31b - Construction Plan, and No. 33b - Startup and Operation Plan.

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Well cost estimates in various geothermal regions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A project to estimate well costs in regions of current geothermal activity has been initiated. Costs associated with commonly encountered drilling problems will be included. Activity-based costing techniques will be employed to allow the identification of cost drivers and the evaluation of the economic effects of new technologies and operational procedures on well costs. The sensitivity of well costs to a number of parameters such as rate-of-penetration and daily operating costs will be examined. Additional sensitivity analyses and trade-off studies will evaluate the efficiency of various operational practices and preventive, as well as remedial, actions. These efforts should help provide an understanding of the consumption of resources in geothermal drilling.

Pierce, K.G.; Bomber, T.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Livesay, B.J. [Livesay Consultants, Encinitas, CA (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project is a research into the effect of gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells. It is the result of a problem encountered in producing a low permeability formation from a well in South Texas owned by the El Paso Production Company. The well was producing a gas condensate reservoir and questions were raised about how much drop in flowing bottomhole pressure below dewpoint would be appropriate. Condensate damage in the hydraulic fracture was expected to be of significant effect. Previous attempts to answer these questions have been from the perspective of a radial model. Condensate builds up in the reservoir as the reservoir pressure drops below the dewpoint pressure. As a result, the gas moving to the wellbore becomes leaner. With respect to the study by El-Banbi and McCain, the gas production rate may stabilize, or possibly increase, after the period of initial decline. This is controlled primarily by the condensate saturation near the wellbore. This current work has a totally different approach. The effects of reservoir depletion are minimized by introduction of an injector well with fluid composition the same as the original reservoir fluid. It also assumes an infinite conductivity hydraulic fracture and uses a linear model. During the research, gas condensate simulations were performed using a commercial simulator (CMG). The results of this research are a step forward in helping to improve the management of gas condensate reservoirs by understanding the mechanics of liquid build-up. It also provides methodology for quantifying the condensate damage that impairs linear flow of gas into the hydraulic fracture.

Adeyeye, Adedeji Ayoola

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Turbine Steam Path Damage: Theory and Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, most treatises about steam turbines have concentrated on thermo-dynamics or design. In contrast, the primary focus of this book is on the problems that occur in the turbine steam path. Some of these problems have been long known to the industry, starting as early as A. Stodola's work at the turn of the century in which mechanisms such as solid particle erosion, corrosion and liquid droplet damage were recognized. What we have tried to do here is to provide, in a single, comprehensive refere...

1999-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

418

WILD PIGS: BIOLOGY, DAMAGE, CONTROL TECHINQUES AND MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The existence of problems with wild pigs (Sus scrofa) is nothing new to the Western Hemisphere. Damage by these introduced animals was reported as far back as 1505 by the early Spanish colonies in the Caribbean, where wild pigs were killing the colonists cattle. Droves of these animals also ravaged cultivated crops of maize and sugarcane on islands in the West Indies during this same time period. These wild pigs reportedly were very aggressive and often attacked Spanish soldiers hunting rebellious Indians or escaped slaves on these islands, especially when these animals were cornered. The documentation of such impacts by introduced populations of this species in the United States has subsequently increased in recent years, and continued up through the present (Towne and Wentworth. 1950, Wood and Barrett 1979, Mayer and Brisbin 1991, Dickson et al. 2001). In spite of a fairly constant history in this country since the early 1900s, wild pigs have had a dramatic recent increase in both distribution and numbers in the United States. Between 1989 and 2009, the number of states reporting the presence of introduced wild pigs went from 19 up to as many as 44. This increase, in part natural, but largely manmade, has caused an increased workload and cost for land and resource managers in areas where these new populations are found. This is the direct result of the damage that these introduced animals do. The cost of both these impacts and control efforts has been estimated to exceed a billion dollars annually (Pimentel 2007). The complexity of this problem has been further complicated by the widespread appeal and economic potential of these animals as a big game species (Tisdell 1982, Degner 1989). Wild pigs are a controversial problem that is not going away and will likely only get worse with time. Not only do they cause damage, but wild pigs are also survivors. They reproduce at a rate faster than any other mammal of comparable size, native or introduced; they can eat just about anything; and, they can live just about anywhere. On top of that, wild pigs are both very difficult to control and, with the possible exception of island ecosystems, almost impossible to eradicate (Dickson et al. 2001, Sweeney et al. 2003). The solution to the wild pig problem has not been readily apparent. The ultimate answer as to how to control these animals has not been found to date. In many ways, wild pigs are America's most successful large invasive species. All of which means that wild pigs are a veritable nightmare for land and resource managers trying to keep the numbers of these animals and the damage that they do under control. Since the more that one knows about an invasive species, the easier it is to deal with and hopefully control. For wild pigs then, it is better to 'know thy enemy' than to not, especially if one expects to be able to successfully control them. In an effort to better 'know thy enemy,' a two-day symposium was held in Augusta, Georgia, on April 21-22, 2004. This symposium was organized and sponsored by U.S.D.A. Forest Service-Savannah River (USFS-SR), U. S. Department of Energy-Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), the South Carolina Chapter of the Soil & Water Conservation Society, and the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The goal of this symposium was to assemble researchers and land managers to first address various aspects of the biology and damage of wild pigs, and then review the control techniques and management of this invasive species. The result would then be a collected synopsis of what is known about wild pigs in the United States. Although the focus of the symposium was primarily directed toward federal agencies, presenters also included professionals from academic institutions, and private-sector control contractors and land managers. Most of the organizations associated with implementing this symposium were affiliated with the Savannah River Site (SRS), a 803 km{sup 2} federal nuclear facility, located in western South Carolina along the Savannah

Mayer, John; Brisbin, I. Lehr

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

WILD PIGS: BIOLOGY, DAMAGE, CONTROL TECHINQUES AND MANAGEMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existence of problems with wild pigs (Sus scrofa) is nothing new to the Western Hemisphere. Damage by these introduced animals was reported as far back as 1505 by the early Spanish colonies in the Caribbean, where wild pigs were killing the colonists cattle. Droves of these animals also ravaged cultivated crops of maize and sugarcane on islands in the West Indies during this same time period. These wild pigs reportedly were very aggressive and often attacked Spanish soldiers hunting rebellious Indians or escaped slaves on these islands, especially when these animals were cornered. The documentation of such impacts by introduced populations of this species in the United States has subsequently increased in recent years, and continued up through the present (Towne and Wentworth. 1950, Wood and Barrett 1979, Mayer and Brisbin 1991, Dickson et al. 2001). In spite of a fairly constant history in this country since the early 1900s, wild pigs have had a dramatic recent increase in both distribution and numbers in the United States. Between 1989 and 2009, the number of states reporting the presence of introduced wild pigs went from 19 up to as many as 44. This increase, in part natural, but largely manmade, has caused an increased workload and cost for land and resource managers in areas where these new populations are found. This is the direct result of the damage that these introduced animals do. The cost of both these impacts and control efforts has been estimated to exceed a billion dollars annually (Pimentel 2007). The complexity of this problem has been further complicated by the widespread appeal and economic potential of these animals as a big game species (Tisdell 1982, Degner 1989). Wild pigs are a controversial problem that is not going away and will likely only get worse with time. Not only do they cause damage, but wild pigs are also survivors. They reproduce at a rate faster than any other mammal of comparable size, native or introduced; they can eat just about anything; and, they can live just about anywhere. On top of that, wild pigs are both very difficult to control and, with the possible exception of island ecosystems, almost impossible to eradicate (Dickson et al. 2001, Sweeney et al. 2003). The solution to the wild pig problem has not been readily apparent. The ultimate answer as to how to control these animals has not been found to date. In many ways, wild pigs are America's most successful large invasive species. All of which means that wild pigs are a veritable nightmare for land and resource managers trying to keep the numbers of these animals and the damage that they do under control. Since the more that one knows about an invasive species, the easier it is to deal with and hopefully control. For wild pigs then, it is better to 'know thy enemy' than to not, especially if one expects to be able to successfully control them. In an effort to better 'know thy enemy,' a two-day symposium was held in Augusta, Georgia, on April 21-22, 2004. This symposium was organized and sponsored by U.S.D.A. Forest Service-Savannah River (USFS-SR), U. S. Department of Energy-Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC), the South Carolina Chapter of the Soil & Water Conservation Society, and the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The goal of this symposium was to assemble researchers and land managers to first address various aspects of the biology and damage of wild pigs, and then review the control techniques and management of this invasive species. The result would then be a collected synopsis of what is known about wild pigs in the United States. Although the focus of the symposium was primarily directed toward federal agencies, presenters also included professionals from academic institutions, and private-sector control contractors and land managers. Most of the organizations associated with implementing this symposium were affiliated with the Savannah River Site (SRS), a 803 km{sup 2} federal nuclear facility, located in western South Carolina along the Savannah

Mayer, John; Brisbin, I. Lehr

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Facilities & Administrative (F&A) Costs at NIU F&A costs at NIU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

project, instructional or public service activity. Such costs include utilities, buildings and facilities accrue only as projects dollars are expended. As a result, F&A costs are collected and allocatedFacilities & Administrative (F&A) Costs at NIU #12;F&A costs at NIU What are Facilities

Karonis, Nicholas T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The unit cost factors and calculation methods for decommissioning - Cost estimation of nuclear research facilities  

SciTech Connect

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The uncertainties of decommissioning costs increase high due to several conditions. Decommissioning cost estimation depends on the complexity of nuclear installations, its site-specific physical and radiological inventories. Therefore, the decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities must be estimated in accordance with the detailed sub-tasks and resources by the tasks of decommissioning activities. By selecting the classified activities and resources, costs are calculated by the items and then the total costs of all decommissioning activities are reshuffled to match with its usage and objectives. And the decommissioning cost of nuclear research facilities is calculated by applying a unit cost factor method on which classification of decommissioning works fitted with the features and specifications of decommissioning objects and establishment of composition factors are based. Decommissioning costs of nuclear research facilities are composed of labor cost, equipment and materials cost. Of these three categorical costs, the calculation of labor costs are very important because decommissioning activities mainly depend on labor force. Labor costs in decommissioning activities are calculated on the basis of working time consumed in decommissioning objects and works. The working times are figured out of unit cost factors and work difficulty factors. Finally, labor costs are figured out by using these factors as parameters of calculation. The accuracy of decommissioning cost estimation results is much higher compared to the real decommissioning works. (authors)

Kwan-Seong Jeong; Dong-Gyu Lee; Chong-Hun Jung; Kune-Woo Lee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Deokjin-dong 150, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Fusion reactor design studies: standard unit costs and cost scaling rules  

SciTech Connect

This report establishes standard unit costs and scaling rules for estimating costs of material, equipment, land, and labor components used in magnetic confinement fusion reactor plant construction and operation. Use of the standard unit costs and scaling rules will add uniformity to cost estimates, and thus allow valid comparison of the economic characteristics of various reactor concepts.

Schulte, S.C.; Bickford, W.E.; Willingham, C.E.; Ghose, S.K.; Walker, M.G.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Calculation of complex DNA damage induced by ions  

SciTech Connect

This paper is devoted to the analysis of the complex damage of DNA irradiated by ions. The assessment of complex damage is important because cells in which it occurs are less likely to survive because the DNA repair mechanisms may not be sufficiently effective. We study the flux of secondary electrons through the surface of nucleosomes and calculate the radial dose and the distribution of clustered damage around the ion's path. The calculated radial dose distribution is compared to simulations. The radial distribution of the complex damage is found to be different from that of the dose. A comparison with experiments may solve the question of what is more lethal for the cell, damage complexity or absorbed energy. We suggest a way to calculate the probability of cell death based on the complexity of the damage. This work is done within the framework of the phenomenon-based multiscale approach to radiation damage by ions.

Surdutovich, Eugene [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309 (United States); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Gallagher, David C. [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309 (United States); Solov'yov, Andrey V. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Connecting Chromatin Modifying Factors to DNA Damage Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Cells are constantly damaged by factors that can induce DNA damage. Eukaryotic cells must rapidly load DNA repair proteins onto damaged chromatin during the DNA damage response (DDR). Chromatin-remodeling complexes use the energy from ATP hydrolysis to remodel nucleosomes and have well-established functions in transcription. Emerging lines of evidence indicate that chromatin-remodeling complexes are important and may remodel nucleosomes during DNA damage repair. New studies also reveal that ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling is involved in cell cycle progression, signal transduction pathways, and interaction and modification of DDR-related proteins that are specifically and intimately connected with the process of DNA damage. This article summarizes the recent advances in our understanding of the interplay between chromatin remodeling and DNA damage response.

Weiwei Lai; Hongde Li; Shuang Liu; Yongguang Tao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Application of nonlinear wave modulation spectroscopy to discern material damage  

SciTech Connect

Materials containing structural damage have a far greater nonlinear elastic response than materials with no structural damage. This is the basis for nonlinear wave diagnostics of damage, methods which are remarkably sensitive to the detection and progression of damage in materials. Here the authors describe one nonlinear method, the application of harmonics and sum and difference frequency to discern damage in materials. The method is termed Nonlinear Wave Modulation Spectroscopy (NWMS). It consists of exciting a sample with continuous waves of two separate frequencies simultaneously, and inspecting the harmonics of the two waves, and their sum and difference frequencies (sidebands). Undamaged materials are essentially linear in their response to the two waves, while the same material, when damaged, becomes highly nonlinear, manifested by harmonics and sideband generation. The authors illustrate the method by experiments on uncracked and cracked plexiglass and sandstone samples, and by applying it to intact and damaged engine components.

Johnson, P.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Sutin, A. [Stevens Inst. of Tech., Hoboken, NJ (United States); Abeele, K.E.A. van den [Catholic Univ. Leuven (Belgium). Dept. of Building Physics

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Field Testing of Energy-Efficient Flood-Damage-Resistant Residential Envelope Systems Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the project was to identify materials and methods that will make the envelope of a house flood damage resistant. Flood damage resistant materials and systems are intended to be used to repair houses subsequent to flooding. This project was also intended to develop methods of restoring the envelopes of houses that have been flooded but are repairable and may be subject to future flooding. Then if the house floods again, damage will not be as extensive as in previous flood events and restoration costs and efforts will be minimized. The purpose of the first pair of field tests was to establish a baseline for typical current residential construction practice. The first test modules used materials and systems that were commonly found in residential envelopes throughout the U.S. The purpose of the second pair of field tests was to begin evaluating potential residential envelope materials and systems that were projected to be more flood-damage resistant and restorable than the conventional materials and systems tested in the first pair of tests. The purpose of testing the third slab-on-grade module was to attempt to dry flood proof the module (no floodwater within the structure). If the module could be sealed well enough to prevent water from entering, then this would be an effective method of making the interior materials and systems flood damage resistant. The third crawl space module was tested in the same manner as the previous modules and provided an opportunity to do flood tests of additional residential materials and systems. Another purpose of the project was to develop the methodology to collect representative, measured, reproducible (i.e. scientific) data on how various residential materials and systems respond to flooding conditions so that future recommendations for repairing flood damaged houses could be based on scientific data. An additional benefit of collecting this data is that it will be used in the development of a standard test procedure which could lead to the certification of building materials and systems as flood damage resistant.

Aglan, H.

2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

427

Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure development program: Cost analysis requirements  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared to support development of the Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure -- a new capability to independently estimate and analyze costs. Currently, the cost data are reported according to a structure that blends level of effort tasks with product and process oriented tasks. Also. the budgetary inputs are developed from prior year funding authorizations and from contractor-developed parametric estimates that have been adjusted to planned funding levels or appropriations. Consequently, it is difficult for headquarters and field-level activities to use actual cost data and technical requirements to independently assess the costs generated and identify trends, potential cost savings from process improvements, and cost reduction strategies.

Custer, W.R. Jr.; Messick, C.D.

1996-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

Proton damage effects on light emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the effects of 16-MeV proton irradiation on the performance of a variety of light emitting diodes (LED's) emitting between 820 and 1300 nm. Total light output and current were measured at room temperature as a function of forward bias prior to and following a sequence of room temperature 16-MeV proton irradiations. Our results indicate that the relative amount of proton-induced degradation from one LED type to another is similar to that observed for neutron and gamma irradiations. More specifically, the most sensitive device is the amphoterically Si-doped GaAs LED which is characterized by a long preirradiation minority carrier lifetime. The most resistant LEDs are the high radiance GaAlAs (820 nm) and InGaAsP (1300 nm) LEDs. As in the case of Si devices, the degradation rate per irradiating particle fluence is significantly greater for proton irradiation of these LEDs than it is for neutron exposure. Neutron damage data presented herein indicate that the ratio of proton-to-neutron degradation rates can be as high as 100. Lifetime-damage constant products for constant current operation are calculated for each LED type and vary from 1.5 x 10/sup -13/ cm/sup 2//p for the InGaAsP LED to 1.1 x 10/sup -10/ cm/sup 2//p for the amphoterically Si-doped GaAs LED.

Rose, B.H.; Barnes, C.E.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

New England Wind Forum: Cost Trends  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Cost Trends Cost Trends Figure 1: Cost of Energy and Cumulative Domestic Capacity This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. Click on the image to view a larger version. This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. View a larger version of the graph. Overall, the wind industry is experiencing long-term decreases in the cost to produce wind-generated electricity (Figure 1), despite recent short-term increases in upfront equipment costs. Even in the short term, however, the effect of increases in up-front capital costs on the cost of energy from wind power projects has been dampened by improvements in energy capture from the wind and decreases in operating and maintenance costs.

430

Contingent Valuation: A User's Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Values Resulting From the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill, report toassessments such as the Exxon Valdez oil spill (13), thepassive use, harm from the Exxon Valdez spill to households

Carson, Richard T

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Contingency structures and concept analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formal Concept Analysis has found many uses in knowledge representation and data mining, but its penetration into established data-based research disciplines has been slower. Marrying application motivations, structures, and methods from epidemiology ...

Alex Pogel; David Ozonoff

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Government Accountability Office is responsible for, among other things, assisting the Congress in its oversight of the federal government, including agencies ’ stewardship of public funds. To use public funds effectively, the government must meet the demands of today’s changing world by employing effective management practices and processes, including the measurement of government program performance. In addition, legislators, government officials, and the public want to know whether government programs are achieving their goals and what their costs are. To make those evaluations, reliable cost information is required and federal standards have been issued for the cost accounting that is needed to prepare that information. 1 We developed the Cost Guide in order to establish a consistent methodology that is based on best practices and that can be used across the federal government for developing, managing, and evaluating capital program cost estimates. For the purposes of this guide, a cost estimate is the summation of individual cost elements, using established methods and valid data, to estimate the future costs of a program, based on what is known today. 2 The management of a cost estimate involves continually updating the estimate with actual data as they become available, revising the estimate to reflect changes, and analyzing differences between estimated and actual costs—for example, using data from a reliable earned value management (EVM) system. 3 The ability to generate reliable cost estimates is a critical function, necessary to support the Office of Management and Budget’s (OMB) capital programming process. 4 Without this ability, agencies are at risk of experiencing cost overruns, missed deadlines, and performance shortfalls—all recurring problems that our program assessments too often reveal. Furthermore, cost increases often mean that the government

Best Practices For Developing

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Standardized Cost Structure for the Environmental Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The underlying key to developing successful estimates, tracking project costs, and utilizing historical project cost information is the development of standardized and well-defined hierarchical listing of cost categories. Committees within the U.S. Federal agencies have pioneered efforts toward developing the Environmental Cost Element Structure (ECES), which is key in achieving these goals. The ECES was developed using an iterative process with input from federal agencies and industry. Experts from several disciplines participated including engineers, cost estimators, project/program managers, and contract personnel. The ECES benefits from an intense analytical effort, the knowledge gained from the maturation of the environmental industry, and incorporation of past user's experiences. Building upon this foundation, the E06 committee of the ASTM International has now fully developed and published a standard (ASTM 2150-04) that provides standardized cost categories with complete cost category definitions. This standard affords environmental and nuclear D and D project managers the opportunity to have a well defined hierarchical listing of their estimates and actual costs, readily adapted to performing summations and roll-ups, supported by a multi-level dictionary specifically defining the content of the cost elements as well as the summations. Owing to the dynamic nature of the environmental technologies, efforts need to be made to continue to update this standard by adding new technologies and methods as they are developed and employed in the field. Lastly, the Environmental Cost Element Structure that is embodied in this standard also presents opportunities to develop historical cost databases and comprehensive life cycle cost estimates and standardized cost estimating tools. (authors)

Skokan, B.; Melamed, D.; Guevara, K. [US DOE, Office of Project Planning and Controls, EM-32, 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Mallick, P. [US DOE, Office of Performance Assessment, EM-43, 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20585 (United States); Bierman, G. [Legin Group, Inc., P.O. Box 3788, Gaithersburg, MD 20885-3788 (United States); Marshall, H.E. [Building and Fire Research Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Stop 8603, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8603 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Thermodynamic cost of acquiring information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Connections between information theory and thermodynamics have proven to be very useful to establish bounding limits for physical processes. Ideas such as Landauer's erasure principle and information assisted work extraction have greatly contributed not only to enlarge our understanding about the fundamental limits imposed by nature, but also to enlighten the path for practical implementations of information processing devices. The intricate information-thermodynamics relation also entails a fundamental limit on parameter estimation, establishing a thermodynamic cost for information acquisition. More specifically, we show that the amount of information that can be encoded in a physical system (and consequently extracted) by means of any process is limited by the dissipated work during the implementation of the process. This includes a thermodynamic trade-off for information acquisition. Likewise, any information acquisition process is ultimately limited by the second law of thermodynamics. Such a trade-off may find applications in several areas of knowledge, since parameter estimation lies in the building basis of all natural sciences and several technological applications, such as metrology.

Kaonan Micadei; Roberto M. Serra; Lucas C. Celeri

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

435

A. Appendix: Cost Estimate for the Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appendix: Cost Estimate for the Facility Appendix: Cost Estimate for the Facility Determining the cost of a facility as complex as the neutrino source presented here is a very difficult task within the short time period of six months. Three factors contribute to the uncertainty significantly: 1. The number of subsystems in the facility, which are described throughout the report, is comparatively large. All of the subsystems contribute a considerable amount of complexity and cost that have to be addressed by specific expertise in order to find a technical solution and a reasonable cost estimate. The variety of technologies is large and many of them have to be pushed to the edge or beyond and therefore has to be addressed with an appropriate R&D program. Cost savings from mass production will not be

436

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 January 2013 Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 This paper presents average levelized costs for generating technologies that are brought on line in 2018 1 as represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) Early Release Reference case. 2 Both national values and the minimum and maximum values across the 22 U.S. regions of the NEMS electricity market module are presented. Levelized cost is often cited as a convenient summary measure of the overall competiveness of different generating technologies. It represents the per-kilowatthour cost (in real dollars) of building and operating a generating plant over an assumed financial life and duty cycle. Key

437

Vehicle Cost Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vehicle Cost Calculator Vehicle Cost Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Vehicle Cost Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Evaluate Options Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/calc/ Web Application Link: www.afdc.energy.gov/calc/ OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Language: English References: Vehicle Cost Calculator[1] Logo: Vehicle Cost Calculator Calculate the total cost of ownership and emissions for makes and models of most vehicles, including alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles. Overview This tool uses basic information about your driving habits to calculate

438

Personal Nonmonetary Costs of Motor-Vehicle Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. bythe Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation, ed. byTransportation Crashes,” in Measuring the Full Social Costs

Delucchi, Mark A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

External Costs of Transport in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The social costs of intercity transportation: a review andthe Full Social Costs and Benefits of Transportation,in full social cost-benefit analyses of transportation

Delucchi, Mark A.; McCubbin, Donald R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Cost model for a small glass manufacturing enterprise.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The cost model developed is for small, glass-manufacturing enterprises to help themdetermine their product costs. It estimates the direct cost in glass manufacturing such as… (more)

Gopisetti, Swetha.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Evaluation of I-80 Long-Life Corridor Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the expenditures for these projects, costs were divided into2 illustrates the Project Cost Breakdown of the Actual Bid18 percent higher than Project Cost Breakdown Original Bid

Santero, Nicholas J; Nokes, William; Harvey, John T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Survey quantifies cost of organic milk production in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this survey, production costs for California organicsuch as higher production and feed costs, lowered veterinarya comprehensive dairy cost production survey, which involves

Butler, Leslie J.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or design of improved production cost models. to assess thelearning which lowers production costs, and resourcewhich increases production costs. Each of these modules are

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Cost Sharing for the Economic Lot-Sizing Problem with ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost and production costs. In addition, in each period, the retailer incurs holding costs for storing serviceable product and returned product in inventory.

445

Dynamics of the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, and Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

extra-heavy oil and shale have zero Resource- Cost), whileof the Oil Transition: Modeling Capacity, Costs, andof the oil transition: modeling capacity, costs, and

Brandt, Adam R.; Farrell, Alexander E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

External Costs of Transport in the U.S.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

European External Cost Estimates,” Transportation Researchin the external-cost estimates reviewed here. Althoughtruck shipment in 1991 (low-cost estimate from Table 1-A5 of

Delucchi, Mark A.; McCubbin, Donald R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Process-Based Cost Modeling to Support Target Value Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maintaining Activity-based Cost Estimates with Feature-Based2004). “Effective Cost Estimate and Construction Processesof new designs. These cost estimates are inflated by the

Nguyen, Hung Viet

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Underestimating Costs in Public Works Projects: Error or Lie?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1964). Errors in project cost estimates. Indian Eco- nomicSystematic errors in cost estimates for public investmentprojects compare in cost estimate experience? (Reprint No.

Flyvbjerg, Bent; Holm, Mette Skamris; Buhl, Søren

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Estimating the Cost of Large Superconducting Thin Solenoid Magnets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for making a preliminary cost estimate of proposed one of afor making a budgetary cost estimate of relatively lightbut in other cases, the cost estimates are wildly different

Green, M.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the potential and costs for rapid wind energy deployment inincremental costs of achieving 20% wind energy are projectedwind energy and that allow the model to incorporate the costs

Wiser, Ryan H

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Subject: Cost and Price Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subject: Cost and Price Analysis Subject: Cost and Price Analysis Subject: Cost and Price Analysis More Documents & Publications Acquisition Letter 2009-03 Acquisition...

452

AVCEM: Advanced-Vehicle Cost and Energy Use Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the battery, according to the battery cost equations (seediscussion of battery cost above). There actually are twoin the amount and cost of fuel-storage, battery, vehicle

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

CLASAdministratorJobAid CostSharing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per square foot from FPM. Pro-rate by percentage of time that the office is used for the project x;CLASAdministratorJobAid CostSharing Preparedby:M.Kuznia8/1/11 Page2 Use of an office: determine square footageCLASAdministratorJobAid CostSharing Preparedby:M.Kuznia8/1/11 Page1 I. Definitions A. Cost

Baskaran, Mark

454

EUV lithography cost of ownership analysis  

SciTech Connect

The cost of fabricating state-of-the-art integrated circuits (ICs) has been increasing and it will likely be economic rather than technical factors that ultimately limit the progress of ICs toward smaller devices. It is estimated that lithography currently accounts for approximately one-third the total cost of fabricating modem ICs({sup 1}). It is expected that this factor will be fairly stable for the forseeable future, and as a result, any lithographic process must be cost-effective before it can be considered for production. Additionally, the capital equipment cost for a new fabrication facility is growing at an exponential rate (2); it will soon require a multibillion dollar investment in capital equipment alone to build a manufacturing facility. In this regard, it is vital that any advanced lithography candidate justify itself on the basis of cost effectiveness. EUV lithography is no exception and close attention to issues of wafer fabrication costs have been a hallmark of its early history. To date, two prior cost analyses have been conducted for EUV lithography (formerly called {open_quotes}Soft X-ray Projection Lithography{close_quotes}). The analysis by Ceglio, et. al., provided a preliminary system design, set performance specifications and identified critical technical issues for cost control. A follow-on analysis by Early, et.al., studied the impact of issues such as step time, stepper overhead, tool utilization, escalating photoresist costs and limited reticle usage on wafer exposure costs. This current study provides updated system designs and specifications and their impact on wafer exposure costs. In addition, it takes a first cut at a preliminary schematic of an EUVL fabrication facility along with an estimate of the capital equipment costs for such a facility.

Hawryluk, A.M.; Ceglio, N.M.

1995-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

455

Evaluating Utility Costs from Cogeneration Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the method of calculation of incremental costs of steam, condensate, feedwater and electricity produced by the industrial cogeneration plant. (This method can also be applied to other energy production plants.) It also shows how to evaluate the energy consumption by the process facility using the costs determined by the method. The paper gives practical examples of calculation of the incremental costs of various utilities and emphasizes the importance of the calculation accuracy.

Polsky, M. P.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Biomass Power Project Cost Analysis Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of biomass power projects presents a variety of challenges that result in high capital costs associated with developing, engineering, procuring, constructing, and operating biomass power projects. Although projects that rely on more homogeneous fuels such as natural gas must still account for site-specific issues when estimating development and construction costs, the complexities are not comparable.Recognizing the difficulties in estimating the capital costs for ...

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

457

Cost modelling using automobile warranty data.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis sets out to model, from the manufacturer's point of view, the warranty cost of a repairable product. The product can be a complex… (more)

Summit, Raymond

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Certificate of Current Cost and Pricing Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CERTIFICATE OF CURRENT COST AND PRICING DATA (OCT 1997) CERTIFICATE OF CURRENT COST AND PRICING DATA (OCT 1997) This is to certify that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, the cost or pricing data (as defined in section 15.401 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) and required under FAR subsection 15.403-4) submitted, either actually or by specific identification in writing, to the Contracting Officer or to the Contracting Officer's representative in support of * are accurate, complete, and current as of **. This certification includes the cost or pricing data supporting any advance agreements and forward pricing rate agreements between the offeror and the Government that are

459

NETL: News Release - Favorable Supplies, Costs, Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

environmental and cost profiles in comparison to other energy sources. The development of shale gas and other unconventional natural gas wells requires the use of technologies that...

460

Information erasure without an energy cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landauer argued that the process of erasing the information stored in a memory device incurs an energy cost in the form of a minimum amount of mechanical work. We find, however, that this energy cost can be reduced to zero by paying a cost in angular momentum or any other conserved quantity. Erasing the memory of Maxwell's demon in this way implies that work can be extracted from a single thermal reservoir at a cost of angular momentum and an increase in total entropy. The implications of this for the second law of thermodynamics are assessed.

Joan A. Vaccaro; Stephen M. Barnett

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Incorporating psychological influences in probabilistic cost analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Press, New York, 1981. MIL-HDBK-881, Handbook Work BreakdownWBS level-3 cost elements [MIL- HDBK-881, 1998]. In general,

Kujawski, Edouard; Alvaro, Mariana; Edwards, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

On the benefits and costs of microgrids.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines the benefits that Microgrids can provide to a variety of stakeholders and considers their costs. A flexible framework is proposed in which… (more)

Weyrich Morris, Gregory

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

On Traveling Salesman Games with Asymmetric Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 1, 2012 ... We construct a stable cost allocation with budget balance guarantee equal ... and a previously unknown connection to linear production games.

464

Low Cost Powder Metal Turbine Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Driving down processing costs on military and commercial aerospace ... studies using production alloys to turbine disk property results will be presented.

465

Middle East Production Costs - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Persian Gulf Oil Production Capacity and Development Cost Forecast (without additional development to replace production) Based on Low-Case Weighted Average

466

Minimum cost model energy code envelope requirements  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the analysis underlying development of the U.S. Department of Energy`s proposed revisions of the Council of American Building Officials (CABO) 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. This analysis resulted in revised MEC envelope conservation levels based on an objective methodology that determined the minimum-cost combination of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) for residences in different locations around the United States. The proposed MEC revision resulted from a cost-benefit analysis from the consumer`s perspective. In this analysis, the costs of the EEMs were balanced against the benefit of energy savings. Detailed construction, financial, economic, and fuel cost data were compiled, described in a technical support document, and incorporated in the analysis. A cost minimization analysis was used to compare the present value of the total long-nm costs for several alternative EEMs and to select the EEMs that achieved the lowest cost for each location studied. This cost minimization was performed for 881 cities in the United States, and the results were put into the format used by the MEC. This paper describes the methodology for determining minimum-cost energy efficiency measures for ceilings, walls, windows, and floors and presents the results in the form of proposed revisions to the MEC. The proposed MEC revisions would, on average, increase the stringency of the MEC by about 10%.

Connor, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.; Turchen, S.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

An Examination of Avoided Costs in Utah  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost inpu t assumptions, the Utah Wind Working Group may wish to consider pursuing two other poss ible sources of revenue: renewable energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Lower Cost, Nanoporous Block Copolymer Battery Separator ...  

Although the polyolefin polymer material often used for lithium battery separators costs approximately $1.30/kg, the difficult process used to make it ...

469

Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Materials. Storage Respondents submitted additional needs for R&D in the area of hydrogen storage: Advanced metal alloys in order to lower the cost of hydrogen...

470

Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model  

SciTech Connect

This model intends to provide projections of the impact on cost from changes in economic indicators such as the Gross Domestic Product and Producer Price Index.

Fingersh, L.; Hand, M.; Laxson, A.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Aerogel commercialization: Technology, markets and costs  

SciTech Connect

Commercialization of aerogels has been slow due to several factors including cost and manufacturability issues. The technology itself is well enough developed as a result of work over the past decade by an international-community of researchers. Several extensive substantial markets appear to exist for aerogels as thermal and sound insulators, if production costs can keep prices in line with competing established materials. The authors discuss here the elements which they have identified as key cost drivers, and they give a prognosis for the evolution of the technology leading to reduced cost aerogel production.

Carlson, G.; Lewis, D.; McKinley, K.; Richardson, J.; Tillotson, T.

1994-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

472

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov...

473

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Selected bibliography: cost...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Selected bibliography: cost and energy savings of conservation and renewable energy technologies Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin...

474

OpenEI - Unit Cost Natural Gas  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for years 1989 through 2010 for UT at Austin; specifically, electricity usage (kWh), natural gas usage (Mcf), associated costs. Also provides water consumption for 2005...

475

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Installed Cost Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 140,000 plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) have been sold since December 2010. Critical to maintaining this upward trend is achievement of a diverse and available charging infrastructure. The purpose of this study is to analyze one key element of the charging infrastructure—the cost of installation. While the fuel cost of electricity to charge a PEV is significantly lower than the cost of gasoline, the cost to hire an electrician to install electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) for ...

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

476

Development of advanced drilling, completion, and stimulation systems for minimum formation damage and improved efficiency: A program overview  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Natural Gas Resource and Extraction Program consists of industry/government co-sponsored research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) projects, which focus on gas recovery from both conventional and nonconventional resources. The Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation (DCS) Project focuses on advanced, non-damaging technology systems and equipment for improving gas recovery from conventional and nonconventional reservoirs. As operators move from development of current day economically attractive gas-field development to the lower permeability geologic regions of domestic onshore plays, increasing the emphasis on minimum formation damage DCS will permit economic development of gas reserves. The objective of the Project is to develop and demonstrate cost-effective, advanced technology to accelerate widespread use and acceptance of minimum formation damage DCS systems. The goal of this product development effort is to reduce costs and improve the overall efficiency of vertical, directional, and horizontally drilled wells in gas formations throughout the US. The current focus of the Project is on the development of underbalanced drilling technology and minimum formation damage stimulation technology concurrently with the appropriate completion hardware to improve the economics of domestic natural gas field development. Ongoing drilling technology projects to be discussed include development of an electromagnetic measurement while drilling system for directional and horizontal drilling in underbalanced drilling applications and the development of a steerable air percussion drilling system for hard formation drilling and improved penetration rates. Ongoing stimulation technology projects to be discussed include introduction of carbon dioxide/sand fracturing technology for minimal formation damage.

Layne, A.W.; Yost, A.B. II

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Radiation Damage in Polarized Ammonia Solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solid NH3 and ND3 provide a highly polarizable, radiation resistant source of polarized protons and deuterons and have been used extensively in high luminosity experiments investigating the spin structure of the nucleon. Over the past twenty years, the UVA polarized target group has been instrumental in producing and polarizing much of the material used in these studies, and many practical considerations have been learned in this time. In this discussion, we analyze the polarization performance of the solid ammonia targets used during the recent JLab Eg4 run. Topics include the rate of polarization decay with accumulated charge, the annealing procedure for radiation damaged targets to recover polarization, and the radiation induced change in optimum microwave frequency used to polarize the sample. We also discuss the success we have had in implementing frequency modulation of the polarizing microwave frequency.

K. Slifer

2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

478

Evaluation of moisture damage within asphalt concrete mixes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pavements are a major part of the infrastructure in the United States. Moisture damage of these pavements is a significant problem. To predict and prevent this kind of moisture damage a great deal of research has been performed on this issue in past. This study validates an analytical approach based on surface energy aimed at assessing moisture damage. Two types of bitumen and three aggregates are evaluated in the study. The two types of bitumen represent very different chemical extremes and the three aggregates (a limestone, siliceous gravel, and granite) represent a considerable range in mineralogy. Moisture damage was monitered as a change in dynamic modulus with load cycles. The analysis demonstrates the need to consider mixture compliance as well as bond energy in order to predict moisture damage. Mixtures with the two types of bitumen and each aggregate with and without hydrated lime were evaluated. The hydrated lime substantially improved the resistance of the mixture to moisture damage.

Shah, Brij D.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Cost of a Ride: The Effects of Densities on Fixed-Guideway Transit Ridership and Capital Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rail transit capital cost study update final. Washington,2005). Managing Capital Costs of Major Federally Fundedin US rail transit project cost overrun. Transportation

Guerra, Erick; Cervero, Robert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

The Cost of Bearing a Sword: Locomotor Costs and Compensations in Relation to a Sexually Selected Trait in Xiphophorus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluating performance costs of sexually selected traits.result in a locomotor cost. References Allen, B. J. &Levinton, J. S. (2006). Costs of bearing a sexually selected

Oufiero, Christopher E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "damage contingent cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide Twelve Steps of a High-Quality Cost Estimating Process Step Description Associated task 1 Define estimate's purpose Determine estimate's purpose, required level of detail, and overall scope; Determine who will receive the estimate 2 Develop estimating plan Determine the cost estimating team and develop its master schedule; Determine who will do the independent cost estimate; Outline the cost estimating approach; Develop the estimate timeline 3 Define program characteristics In a technical baseline description document, identify the program's

482

Cost Estimating Handbook for Environmental Restoration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental restoration (ER) projects have presented the DOE and cost estimators with a number of properties that are not comparable to the normal estimating climate within DOE. These properties include: An entirely new set of specialized expressions and terminology. A higher than normal exposure to cost and schedule risk, as compared to most other DOE projects, due to changing regulations, public involvement, resource shortages, and scope of work. A higher than normal percentage of indirect costs to the total estimated cost due primarily to record keeping, special training, liability, and indemnification. More than one estimate for a project, particularly in the assessment phase, in order to provide input into the evaluation of alternatives for the cleanup action. While some aspects of existing guidance for cost estimators will be applicable to environmental restoration projects, some components of the present guidelines will have to be modified to reflect the unique elements of these projects. The purpose of this Handbook is to assist cost estimators in the preparation of environmental restoration estimates for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) projects undertaken by DOE. The DOE has, in recent years, seen a significant increase in the number, size, and frequency of environmental restoration projects that must be costed by the various DOE offices. The coming years will show the EM program to be the largest non-weapons program undertaken by DOE. These projects create new and unique estimating requirements since historical cost and estimating precedents are meager at best. It is anticipated that this Handbook will enhance the quality of cost data within DOE in several ways by providing: The basis for accurate, consistent, and traceable baselines. Sound methodologies, guidelines, and estimating formats. Sources of cost data/databases and estimating tools and techniques available at DOE cost professionals.

NONE

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

ORNL analysis predicts losses from extreme weather damage could...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL analysis predicts losses from extreme weather damage could double by 2050 Researcher tackles unprecedented county-by-county economic loss forecast Research in impacts,...

484

A Rate-Theory Approach to Irradiation Damage Modeling with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors II. Presentation Title, A Rate-Theory Approach to Irradiation Damage Modeling ...

485

Brief Review of Building Damage by The 2011 Tohoku Japan ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the coast of Japan, damages of many buildings and residential land by ... BRI) and the National Institute for Land & Infrastructure Management (NILIM ...

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

486

MEASUREMENT OF MATERIAL PROPERTIES OF DAMAGED ENERGETIC MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

We recently conducted damaged experiments on three explosives (mechanical damage on LX-04 and thermal experiments on HPP and PBXN-9) and characterized the effect of damage on some material properties. The MTS equipment was used to apply compressive cycling to LX-04 pressed parts and the results showed that older LX-04 parts became mechanically weaker than newer parts. After repeated compressive cycling for over 20,000 times, older LX-04 parts failed but newer LX-04 parts survived. Thermal insults were applied to PBXN-9 and HPP at 180 C and 200 C, respectively in unconfined conditions for several hours. The thermally-damaged HPP sample suffered 12.0% weight losses and a volume expansion of 20% was observed. Porosity of the damaged HPP increased to 25% after thermal exposure, which led to higher gas permeability. Burn rates of damaged PBXN-9 were 2 orders of magnitude higher than those of pristi