Sample records for dam washington state

  1. Energy Matters in Washington State Page 1 Energy Matters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Energy Matters in Washington State ­ Page 1 Energy Matters in Washington State June 2008 Updated November 2009 Updated and Revised October 2013 Grand Coulee Dam #12;Energy Matters in Washington State ­ Page 2 Copyright © 2013 Washington State University Energy Program. 905 Plum Street SE, P.O. Box 43169

  2. Energy Matters in Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Energy Matters in Washington State Energy Matters in Washington State www.energy.wsu.edu/library/ November 2009 #12;905 Plum Street SE, Building 3 P.O. Box 43169 Olympia, Washington 98504-3169 Energy University Extension Energy Program. 905 Plum Street SE, Building 3, P.O. Box 43169, Olympia, Washington

  3. Washington State Electric Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Washington State Electric Vehicle Implementation Bryan Bazard Maintenance and Alternate Fuel Technology Manager #12;Executive Order 14-04 Requires the procurement of electric vehicles where and equipment with electricity or biofuel to the "extent practicable" by June 2015 1. The vehicle is due

  4. Grand Coulee Dam Wildlife Mitigation Program : Pygmy Rabbit Programmatic Management Plan, Douglas County, Washington.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Northwest Power Planning Council and the Bonneville Power Administration approved the pygmy rabbit project as partial mitigation for impacts caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The focus of this project is the protection and enhancement of shrub-steppe/pygmy rabbit habitat in northeastern Washington.

  5. City of Coulee Dam, Washington (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport |City ofBlueChappell,City ofCityCoulee Dam,

  6. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1960 . SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1960 by Paul D. Zimmer and Clifton C. Davidson United States Fish This annual report of fishway operations at Rock Island Dam in 1960 is dedicated to the memory of co

  7. Review: Rare Plants of Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Ryder W.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field Guide to the Rare Plants of Washington Pamela Camp andField Guide to the Rare Plants of Washington. Seattle, WA:State’s 3600 vascular plants, 600 mosses, and 1000-1500

  8. STATE OF WASHINGTON August

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton n u May 23,Complainant, V.STATE

  9. Recovery Act State Memos Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Richart Family has hired 25 new workers since last September to help with the infusion of weatherization work in the southwestern part of Washington. Half of those workers...

  10. SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY ONE WASHINGTON SQUARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    Public Safety Funding). RESOLVED That the San José State University (SJSU) commend the CSU BoardSAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY ONE WASHINGTON SQUARE SAN JOSE, CA 95192 SS-F12-2, Sense of the Senate Resolution, Urging that California Voters Become Well Informed About the Current State of Funding

  11. CHP Units in Washington State - Datasets - OpenEI Datasets

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CHP Units in Washington State This is data taken from the website http:www.eea-inc.comchpdataStatesWA.html on 232015 regarding the Cogeneration units in Washington State....

  12. Small Business Summit - Coming to Washington State this April...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Small Business Summit - Coming to Washington State this April Small Business Summit - Coming to Washington State this April February 23, 2012 - 12:24pm Addthis You're invited to...

  13. Washington Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Recovery Act State Memo Washington State has substantial natural resources, including biomass, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric power. The American Recovery & Reinvestment Act...

  14. Biological Evaluation of the Behavioral Guidance Structure at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River, Washington in 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Noah (U.S. Geological Survey, Biological Resource Division); Johnson, Gary E. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Rondorf, Dennis W. (VISITORS); Anglea, Steven M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Wik, Timothy O. (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Walla Walla District)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998 a behavioral guidance structure (BGS; a steel wall 330m long and 17-24 m deep) was installed in the forebay of Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River, Washington. The purpose of the BGS was to change the horizontal distribution of downstream migrants approaching the south half of the powerhouse by guiding them toward the surface bypass and collector attached to the dam upstream of the north half of the powerhouses. The effectiveness of the BGS was evaluated with biotelemetry and hydroacoustics. The BGS was designed to be movable, thereby allowing a comparison between the horizontal distribution of the fish when the BGS was deployed as a diversion device and when the BGS was moved 800 m upstream of the dam and no longer influenced fish movements immediately upstream of the powerhouse. Radio telemetry and hydroacoustic techniques showed that about 80% of the fish migrating toward Turbines 1-3 were successfully diverted north. Radio telemetry data revealed that the mean residence times of chinook salmon, hatchery steelhead, and wild steelhead were 1.6, 1.7, and 2.4 times longer, respectively, when the BGS was out compared to when it was in. And overall fish passage efficiency was significantly higher when the BGS was in (93.7%) than out (91.2%).

  15. Energy Secretary Chu, EPA Administrator Jackson, Washington State...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    subject to a public comment period. The proposed consent decree between the Department of Energy (DOE) and Washington State will set a new and achievable schedule for construction...

  16. POLYGENETIC TOPOGRAPHY OF THE CASCADE RANGE, WASHINGTON STATE, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -relief topography, 2) post-Miocene surface uplift of the range superimposed on pre-existing high-relief topographyPOLYGENETIC TOPOGRAPHY OF THE CASCADE RANGE, WASHINGTON STATE, USA SARA GRAN MITCHELL Range of Washington State by analyzing the topography, geology, and exhumation patterns across the range

  17. Unsteady flow model of Priest Rapids Dam releases at Hanford Reach, Columbia River, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sneider, S.C.; Skaggs, R.L.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model was developed to simulate water levels at three locations on the Columbia River between Priest Rapids Dam River Mile 396.1 (River Kilometer 639.0) and River Mile 361.50 (River Kilometer 581.7). The model was calibrated and verified over a range of flows. The results of calibration and verification indicate that the model, with reasonable accuracy, simulates stages to within +-0.08 m (+- 0.25 ft) and surface wave timing to within +-20 min. The model can be used by researchers, river system managers, planners, and decision makers as a tool to predict fluctuating water levels at locations downstream of dams. Data produced by the model can be used to evaluate and quantify possible impacts on aquatic organisms, water supply, navigation, irrigation, recreation, and additional hydropower enhancement. Although the results of this model calibrationand the model simulations presented are site-specific, the methodology is generic. Therefore, the model can be adapted to reflect dam discharges and resulting river flows at other river systems affected by water-level fluctuations.

  18. USDA Rural Development Washington State Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is hosting a Washington Rural Development Workshop. Speakers will cover local and regional broadband initiatives program and broadband success stories,...

  19. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    42) ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON 1961 Marine Biological. McKeman, Director ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1961--Fisheries No. 421 Washington, D. C. April 1962 #12;Rock Island Dam, Columbia River, Washington ii #12;CONTENTS

  20. Heat flow and geothermal studies in the state of Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackwell, D.D.; Steele, J.L.; Kelley, S.A.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing geothermal gradient and heat flow data for the state of Washington are summarized. In addition, information on mean-annual ground surface temperatures is included. The data consist of accurate, detailed temperature-depth measurements in selected available holes throughout the state of Washington made between 1979 and 1982. Measurements of thermal conductivity on selected rock samples from these drill holes and ancillary information required to assess the significance of the data and calculate heat flow values were obtained as well. Information is presented on the mean-annual ground-surface temperatures throughout the state of Washington. 32 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Washington State Department of Ecology: Replacement Wells Requiring...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ecology: Replacement Wells Requiring a Water Right Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Washington State Department of...

  2. Washington State Ergonomics Tool: predictive validity in the waste industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppes, Susan Elise

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study applies the Washington State Ergonomics Tool to waste industry jobs in Texas. Exposure data were collected by on-site observation of fourteen different multi-task jobs in a major national solid waste management ...

  3. 1999 GWU, RPI, VCU All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment -Appendix II The Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    The Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment Appendix II: Collision, Allision, Grounding and Fire/Explosion..............................................................................................47 SECTION 3: HISTORICAL RATES FOR ALLISIONS, GROUNDINGS AND FIRES/EXPLOSIONS ....................................................................................................53 3.5 FIRE/EXPLOSION ANALYSIS RESULTS.

  4. 1999 GWU, RPI, VCU All Rights Reserved Washington State Ferries Risk Assessment Final Report The Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dorp, Johan René

    's Transportation Policy Advisor Representative Mike Cooper House Transportation Committee House of Representatives, the Washington State Office of Marine Safety, the Port of Houston, and The Government of Argentina. The tasks

  5. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 :y .iiJA/i-3ri ^' WUUUi. ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON, 1959 by Paul D. Zimmer, Clifton and observations 10 Summary 13 #12;#12;ANNUAL FISH PASSAGE REPORT - ROCK ISLAND DAM COLUMBIA RIVER, WASHINGTON

  6. Annual Fish Passage Report -Rock Island Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By Paul D. Zimmer L. McKeman, Director Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965;#12;Annual Fish Passage Report - Rock Island Dam Columbia River, Washington, 1965 By PAUL D. ZIMMER, Fishery

  7. STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY, TRADE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is vital to controlling cost of doing business, reducing consumer spending on energy, and making our an addition $5 billion per year on energy costs an increase of nearly one and onehalf percent in our stateSTATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY, TRADE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Energy Policy Division

  8. Materials Science and Engineering Graduate Program Bylaws Washington State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    1 Materials Science and Engineering Graduate Program Bylaws Washington State University of Materials Science and Engineering. In particular: a. To enable students to develop as successful in the field of Materials Science and Engineering. II. Graduate Faculty A. The Gradate Faculty include: 1. All

  9. WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL GRADUATE MENTOR ACADEMY OVERVIEW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL GRADUATE MENTOR ACADEMY OVERVIEW 1 Graduate Mentor and mentoring graduate students who need sound advice during their early experiences in graduate school of teacher and mentor. All faculty advisors should be responsible for encouraging and ensuring effective

  10. Anaerobic Co-Digestion on Dairies in Washington State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    as food-processing wastes) to increase biogas productivity, improve digester performance, and increase with the manure--a process that has been shown to enhance digester performance and notably increase biogas1 Anaerobic Co-Digestion on Dairies in Washington State The solid waste handling permit exemption W

  11. Innovate Washington Group Looks to Create State Business

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madison, Alison L.

    2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Monthly column for TCH - April 2012. Excerpt here: Change is inevitable. In fact, many say it’s the only constant. One can either wait for the waves to hit and try not to drown, or get ahead of them and maximize the ride. I believe being proactive is the harder, but more powerful option. Over the past couple years numerous people have proactively worked to effect a particular change across the state of Washington: create a thriving ecosystem to accelerate technology-based economic development and achieve sustainable job growth. The result is an organization called Innovate Washington.

  12. COMPLEXITY AND ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT IN WASHINGTON STATE FOREST POLICY, 1987-2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMPLEXITY AND ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT IN WASHINGTON STATE FOREST POLICY, 1987-2001 by Mark Kepkay BA and Adaptive Management in Washington State Forest Policy, 1987-2001 PROJECT NUMBER: 345 SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE programs within Washington State forest policy. I focus on the Watershed Analysis program, 1992 to 1997

  13. SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY ONE WASHINGTON SQUARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    -tenure Professional Renewal Retreat, the Pre-Retirement Base and Faculty Early Retirement Program Calculator, the SJSU; and Resolved, that the Academic Senate of San Jose State University wishes her a happy and healthy retirement

  14. SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY ONE WASHINGTON SQUARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    Valley, One Hundred Most Influential Latinos in Silicon Valley, and the TWIN (Tribute to Women, that the Academic Senate of San José State University wishes her a happy, healthy and busy retirement. Approved: May

  15. 1990 Washington State directory of biomass energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This second edition is an update of biomass energy production and use in Washington State for 1989. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of known biomass users within the state and some basic information about their facilities. The data can be helpful to persons or organizations considering the use of biomass fuels. The directory is divided into three sections of biomass facilities with each section containing a map of locations and a data summary table. In addition, a conversion table, a glossary and an index are provided in the back of the directory. The first section deals with biogas production from wastewater treatment plants. The second section provides information on the wood combustion facilities in the state. This section is subdivided into two categories. The first is for facilities connected with the forest products industries. The second category include other facilities using wood for energy. The third section is composed of three different types of biomass facilities -- ethanol, municipal solid waste, and solid fuel processing. Biomass facilities included in this directory produce over 64 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year. Wood combustion facilities account for 91 percent of the total. Biogas and ethanol facilities each produce close to 800 billion Btu per year, MSW facilities produce 1845 billion BTU, and solid fuel processing facilities produce 2321 billion Btu per year. To put these numbers in perspective, Washington`s industrial section uses 200 trillion Btu of fuels per year. Therefore, biomass fuels used and/or produced by facilities listed in this directory account for nearly 32 percent of the state`s total industrial fuel demand. This is a sizable contribution to the state`s energy needs.

  16. Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartment of Energy Washington , DC

  17. Wind Powering America State Outreach. Final Technical Report: Washington State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stearns, Tim

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Washington Department of Commerce, via a U.S. Department of Energy grant, supported research into siting and permitting processes for wind projects by Skagit County, Washington. The goal was to help a local government understand key issues, consider how other areas have addressed wind siting, and establish a basis for enacting permitting and zoning ordinances that provided a more predictable permitting path and process for landowners, citizens, government and developers of small and community wind projects. The County?s contractor developed a report that looked at various approaches to wind siting, interviewed stakeholders, and examined technology options. The contractor outlined key issues and recommended the adoption of a siting process. The Skagit County Commission considered the report and directed the Skagit County Planning & Development Services Department to add development of wind guidelines to its work plan for potential changes to development codes.

  18. Dams – Fishways (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    No permanent dam or obstruction may be placed in the waters of the state without providing for fish passage.

  19. Dams, Dikes, and Other Devices; Dam Safety Program (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations govern the permitting, construction, operation, inspection, and hazard classifications of dams, dikes, and other water impoundments. The Dam Safety page of the State Water...

  20. Montana Dam Safety Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes the state's interest in the construction of dams for water control and regulation and for hydropower generation purposes. It regulates dam construction, operation, and...

  1. Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Dam Safety Regulation is to ensure that all dams constructed in the state of Mississippi are permitted and thus do not potentially harm wildlife, water supplies and property. ...

  2. Power Plant Dams (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act states the provisions for erection and maintenance of dams. When any person, corporation or city may be desirous of erecting and maintaining a milldam or dam for generating power across...

  3. 1990 Washington State directory of biomass energy facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This second edition is an update of biomass energy production and use in Washington State for 1989. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of known biomass users within the state and some basic information about their facilities. The data can be helpful to persons or organizations considering the use of biomass fuels. The directory is divided into three sections of biomass facilities with each section containing a map of locations and a data summary table. In addition, a conversion table, a glossary and an index are provided in the back of the directory. The first section deals with biogas production from wastewater treatment plants. The second section provides information on the wood combustion facilities in the state. This section is subdivided into two categories. The first is for facilities connected with the forest products industries. The second category include other facilities using wood for energy. The third section is composed of three different types of biomass facilities -- ethanol, municipal solid waste, and solid fuel processing. Biomass facilities included in this directory produce over 64 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year. Wood combustion facilities account for 91 percent of the total. Biogas and ethanol facilities each produce close to 800 billion Btu per year, MSW facilities produce 1845 billion BTU, and solid fuel processing facilities produce 2321 billion Btu per year. To put these numbers in perspective, Washington's industrial section uses 200 trillion Btu of fuels per year. Therefore, biomass fuels used and/or produced by facilities listed in this directory account for nearly 32 percent of the state's total industrial fuel demand. This is a sizable contribution to the state's energy needs.

  4. Washington State energy use profile 1960 to 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinman G.; Alguire, F.; Devlin, T.; Hanson, J.; Horton, D.; Olsen, D.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive energy data base for the state of Washington is presented to provide energy suppliers, consumers, and policy makers with the most current energy data and information possible so that energy planning and policy decisions may be made on an informed basis. The first section provides an overview of demographic and economic factors, energy use, energy resources, and prices. The second section provides greater detail on the uses, supplies, and prices of the principal energy resources used in the state. The third section focuses on electricity and describes uses, supplies, and prices for this intermediate energy form. The fourth section disaggregates energy consumption by users and provides additional detail on use in the residential, commercial, industrial, agricultural, and transportation sectors. The fifth section shows some comparisons of actual figures with those appearing in some recent forecasts. (MCW)

  5. PRESERVING THE LONG LIFE CONCRETE PAVEMENT NETWORK OF THE WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRESERVING THE LONG LIFE CONCRETE PAVEMENT NETWORK OF THE WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT The Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) has about 2,360 lane miles of concrete pavements of these pavements combined with what WSDOT has learned in the intervening 40-50 years gives a high level

  6. BOBBI M. JOHNSON Washington State University PO Box 644236

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Brian M.

    , Washington-BC, Idaho/Palouse - Sections: Genetics, Education GRANTS AWARDED Northwest Scientific Association / 2011 - 2012 Palouse Audubon Society Research Grant Genetic Characterization of Historic Upper

  7. Geothermal energy development in Washington State. A guide to the federal, state and local regulatory process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomquist, R.G.; Simpson, S.J.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington State's geothermal potential is wide spread. Hot springs and five strato volcanoes existing throughout the Cascade Range, limited hot spring activity on the Olympic Peninsula, and broad reaching, low temperature geothermal resources found in the Columbia Basin comprise the extent of Washington's known geothermal resources. Determination of resource ownership is the first step in proceeding with geothermal exploration and development activities. The federal and state processes are examined from pre-lease activity through leasing and post-lease development concerns. Plans, permits, licenses, and other requirements are addressed for the federal, state, and local level. Lease, permit, and other forms for a number of geothermal exploration and development activities are included. A map of public lands and another displaying the measured geothermal resources throughout the state are provided.

  8. iJanuary 2001 Department of Fish and Wildlife Washington State Elk Herd Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    iJanuary 2001 Department of Fish and Wildlife Washington State Elk Herd Plan BLUE MOUNTAINS ELK 98501-1091 Prepared by Pat E. Fowler, District Wildlife Biologist January 2001 Director, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Date #12;iiJanuary 2001 Department of Fish and Wildlife TABLE OF CONTENTS

  9. Dam Safety Program (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dam safety in Florida is a shared responsibility among the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), the regional water management districts, the United States Army Corps of Engineers ...

  10. Reducing transportation costs and inventory shrinkage in the Washington State tree fruit industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foreman, James Sterling

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perishability and stock-outs are two sources of inventory inefficiency in the Washington State tree fruit industry. This thesis measures the size of these inefficiencies in terms of dollars per box, and describes five ...

  11. Regional Climate Model Projections for the State of Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salathe, E.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun; Zhang, Yongxin

    2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Global climate models do not have sufficient spatial resolution to represent the atmospheric and land surface processes that determine the unique regional heterogeneity of the climate of the State of Washington. If future large-scale weather patterns interact differently with the local terrain and coastlines than current weather patterns, local changes in temperature and precipitation could be quite different from the coarse-scale changes projected by global models. Regional climate models explicitly simulate the interactions between the large-scale weather patterns simulated by a global model and the local terrain. We have performed two 100-year climate simulations using the Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) model developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). One simulation is forced by the NCAR Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) and the second is forced by a simulation of the Max Plank Institute, Hamburg, global model (ECHAM5). The mesoscale simulations produce regional changes in snow cover, cloudiness, and circulation patterns associated with interactions between the large-scale climate change and the regional topography and land-water contrasts. These changes substantially alter the temperature and precipitation trends over the region relative to the global model result or statistical downscaling. To illustrate this effect, we analyze the changes from the current climate (1970-1999) to the mid 21st century (2030-2059). Changes in seasonal-mean temperature, precipitation, and snowpack are presented. Several climatological indices of extreme daily weather are also presented: precipitation intensity, fraction of precipitation occurring in extreme daily events, heat wave frequency, growing season length, and frequency of warm nights. Despite somewhat different changes in seasonal precipitation and temperature from the two regional simulations, consistent results for changes in snowpack and extreme precipitation are found in both simulations.

  12. Washington State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Washington State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Washington. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Washington. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Washington.

  13. Washington: State Ferries Run Cleaner With Biodiesel | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartment ofof EnergyPondWashington

  14. Leasing State Trust Lands in Washington | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind EnergyIndiana: EnergyLands in Washington Jump to:

  15. Washington State University Extension Energy Program | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtilityInformationWashington Gas EnergyInformation

  16. SEP Success Story: Washington State Becomes Largest Public Consumer of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 <Department of iiBiodiesel | Department of Energy Washington

  17. Washington State Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraph HomeWarana Group ofWashington GasEnergy

  18. Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraph HomeWarana Group ofWashington

  19. Evaluation of a Prototype Surface Flow Bypass for Juvenile Salmon and Steelhead at the Powerhouse of Lower Granite Dam, Snake River, Washington, 1996-2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Anglea, Steven M.; Adams, Noah S.; Wik, Timothy O.

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface flow bypass provides a route in the upper water column for naturally, surface-oriented juvenile salmonids to safely migrate through a hydroelectric dam. Surface flow bypasses were recommended in several regional salmon recovery plans as a means to increase passage survival of juvenile salmonids at Columbia and Snake River dams. A prototype surface flow bypass, called the SBC, was retrofit on Lower Granite Dam and evaluated from 1996 to 2000 using biotelemetry and hydroacoustic techniques. In terms of passage efficiency, the best SBC configurations were a surface skimmer (99 m3/s [3,500 cfs], three entrances 5 m wide, 5 m deep and one entrance 5 m wide, 15 m deep) and a single chute (99 m3/s, one entrance 5 m wide, 8.5 m deep). They each passed 62 ? 3% (95% confidence interval) of the total juvenile fish population that entered the section of the dam with the SBC entrances (Turbine Units 4-5). Smooth entrance shape and concentrated surface flow characteristics of these configurations are worth pursuing in designs for future surface flow bypasses. In addition, a guidance wall in the Lower Granite Dam forebay diverted the following percentages of juvenile salmonids away from Turbine Units 1-3 toward other passage routes, including the SBC: run-at-large 79 ? 18%; hatchery steelhead 86%; wild steelhead 65%; and yearling chinook salmon 66%. When used in combination with spill or turbine intake screens, a surface flow bypass with a guidance wall can produce a high level (> 90% of total project passage) of non-turbine passage and provide operational flexibility to fisheries managers and dam operators responsible for enhancing juvenile salmonid survival.

  20. UW Hazard Communication Program A Washington State Department of Labor and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    UW Hazard Communication Program A Washington State Department of Labor and Industries standard called Hazard Communication (Right-to-Know) requires that all employees be informed about hazardous on manufacturer's containers of hazardous chemicals provide identification of the chemical, immediate hazard

  1. Maine Department of Environmental Protection Washington State Department of Ecology California Environmental Protection Agency State House Station 17 Hazardous Waste & Toxics Reduction 1001 I Street

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maine Department of Environmental Protection Washington State Department of Ecology California Environmental Protection Agency State House Station 17 Hazardous Waste & Toxics Reduction 1001 I Street Augusta, said Ted Sturdevant, Director of the Washington State Department of Ecology. We need a federal law

  2. APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION TO UNDECIDED-GRAD CLASSIFICATION For Office Use Only GRADUATE SCHOOL, WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    ) (State) (Zip) (County if Washington) Gender M F Date of Birth Place of Birth Are you a citizen of the U State University: Fall (year) Spring (year) Summer (year) Location: Pullman Spokane Tri-Cities Vancouver

  3. Washington State University Wins 2014 Hydrogen Student Design...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    low demand. Contest participants included 14 teams of students from the United States, Egypt, India, Japan, Taiwan, South Africa, and China. Representatives from the National...

  4. Monitoring of Juvenile Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Summer 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha; CH0) at John Day Dam (JDA) during summer 2010. This study was conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC) and the University of Washington (UW). The study was designed to estimate the effects of 30% and 40% spill treatment levels on single release survival rates of CH0 passing through two reaches: (1) the dam, and 40 km of tailwater, (2) the forebay, dam, and 40 km of tailwater. The study also estimated additional passage performance measures which are stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  5. Washington: Putting More Solar on More Rooftops in Washington...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Putting More Solar on More Rooftops in Washington State Washington: Putting More Solar on More Rooftops in Washington State November 8, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Mercer Island...

  6. Economic Impact of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on the State of Washington in Fiscal Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a large economic entity, with $1.06 billion in annual funding, $936 million in total spending, and 4,344 employees in fiscal year (FY) 2013. Four thousand, one hundred and one (4,101) employees live in Washington State. The Laboratory directly and indirectly supports almost $1.31 billion in economic output, 6,802 jobs, and $514 million in Washington State wage income from current operations. The state also gains more than $1.21 billion in output, more than 6,400 jobs, and $459 million in income through closely related economic activities, such as visitors, health care spending, spending by resident retirees, and spinoff companies. PNNL affects Washington’s economy through commonly recognized economic channels, including spending on payrolls and other goods and services that support Laboratory operations. Less-commonly recognized channels also have their own impacts and include company-supported spending on health care for its staff members and retirees, spending of its resident retirees, Laboratory visitor spending, and the economic activities in a growing constellation of “spinoff” companies founded on PNNL research, technology, and managerial expertise. PNNL also has a significant impact on science and technology education and community nonprofit organizations. PNNL is an active participant in the future scientific enterprise in Washington with the state’s K-12 schools, colleges, and universities. The Laboratory sends staff members to the classroom and brings hundreds of students to the PNNL campus to help train the next generation of scientists, engineers, mathematicians, and technicians. This investment in human capital, though difficult to measure in terms of current dollars of economic output, is among the important lasting legacies of the Laboratory. Finally, PNNL contributes to the local community with millions of dollars’ worth of cash and in-kind corporate and staff contributions, all of which strengthen the economy. This report quantifies these effects, providing detailed information on PNNL’s revenues and expenditures, as well as the impacts of its activities on the rest of the Washington State economy. This report also describes the impacts of the four closely related activities: health care spending, spinoff companies with roots in PNNL, visitors to the Laboratory, and PNNL retirees.

  7. Radiochemistry Education at Washington State University: Sustaining Academic Radiochemistry for the Nation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Sue B.; Nash, Ken; Benny, Paul; Clark, Aurora [Department of Chemistry, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Wall, Nathalie [Nuclear Radiation Center, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Wall, Don [Department of Chemistry, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Nuclear Radiation Center, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Yoo, Choong-Shik [Department of Chemistry, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Institute for Shock Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States)

    2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 2002, Washington State University has been building radiochemistry as a component of its overall chemistry program. Using an aggressive hiring strategy and leveraged funds from the state of Washington and federal agencies, six radiochemistry faculty members have been added to give a total of seven radiochemists out of a department of twenty-five faculty members. These faculty members contribute to a diverse curriculum in radiochemistry, and the Chemistry Department now enjoys a significant increase in the number of trainees, the quantity of research expenditures, and the volume and quality of peer-reviewed scientific literature generated by the radiochemistry faculty and the trainees. These three factors are essential for sustaining the radiochemistry education and research program at any academic institution.

  8. Home energy rating system business plan feasibility study in Washington state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lineham, T.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Fall of 1993, the Washington State Energy Office funded the Washington Home Energy Rating System project to investigate the benefits of a Washington state HERS. WSEO established a HERS and EEM Advisory Group. Composed of mortgage lenders/brokers, realtors, builders, utility staff, remodelers, and other state agency representatives, the Advisory Group met for the first time on November 17, 1993. The Advisory Group established several subcommittees to identify issues and options. During its March 1994 meeting, the Advisory Group formed a consensus directing WSEO to develop a HERS business plan for consideration. The Advisory Group also established a business plan subcommittee to help draft the plan. Under the guidance of the business plan subcommittee, WSEO conducted research on how customers value energy efficiency in the housing market. This plan represents WSEO`s effort to comply with the Advisory Group`s request. Why is a HERS Business Plan necessary? Strictly speaking this plan is more of a feasibility plan than a business plan since it is designed to help determine the feasibility of a new business venture: a statewide home energy rating system. To make this determination decision makers or possible investors require strategic information about the proposed enterprise. Ideally, the plan should anticipate the significant questions parties may want to know. Among other things, this document should establish decision points for action.

  9. EA-0904: Access Road from State Route 240 to the 200 West Area Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct an access road on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, from State Route 240 to Beloit Avenue...

  10. California | Connecticut | Illinois | Maine | Maryland | Massachusetts | Michigan | New Hampshire | New Jersey | New York | Oregon | Vermont | Washington STATES' PRINCIPLES ON REFORM OF THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    | New Jersey | New York | Oregon | Vermont | Washington STATES' PRINCIPLES ON REFORM OF THE TOXIC chemical alternatives assessments. #12;States' Principles on Reform of the Toxic Substances Control Act

  11. Georgia Safe Dams Act of 1978 (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Georgia Safe Dams Act is to provide regulation, inspection and permitting of dams to the State. The Director of the Environmental Protection Division (EPD) is responsible for...

  12. Q00906010024 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    00906010024 rock check dam Q00906010025 rock check dam Q00906010021 rock check dam Q00906010022 rock check dam Q00906010027 rock check dam Q00906010026 rock check dam Q00906010018 rock check dam Q00906010023 rock check dam Q00906010011 rock check dam Q00906010008 rock check dam Q00906010007 rock check dam Q

  13. An Assessment of Energy Potential at Non-Powered Dams in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fleet by 15%. A majority of this potential is concentrated in just 100 NPDs, which could contribute approximately 8 GW of clean, reliable hydropower; the top 10 facilities alone could add up to 3 GW of new hydropower. Eighty-one of the 100 top NPDs are U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) facilities, many of which, including all of the top 10, are navigation locks on the Ohio River, Mississippi River, Alabama River, and Arkansas River, as well as their major tributaries. This study also shows that dams owned by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation hold the potential to add approximately 260 MW of capacity; the Bureau has also engaged in an effort to conduct a more detailed evaluation of its own facilities.

  14. The 1983 Temperature Gradient and Heat Flow Drilling Project for the State of Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korosec, Michael A.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the Summer of 1983, the Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources carried out a three-hole drilling program to collect temperature gradient and heat flow information near potential geothermal resource target areas. The project was part of the state-coupled US Department of Energy Geothermal Program. Richardson Well Drilling of Tacoma, Washington was subcontracted through the State to perform the work. The general locations of the project areas are shown in figure 1. The first hole, DNR 83-1, was located within the Green River valley northwest of Mount St. Helens. This site is near the Green River Soda Springs and along the projection of the Mount St. Helens--Elk Lake seismic zone. The other two holes were drilled near Mount Baker. Hole DNR 83-3 was sited about 1/4 km west of the Baker Hot Springs, 10.5 km east of Mount Baker, while hole DNR 83-5 was located along Rocky Creek in the Sulphur Creek Valley. The Rocky Creek hole is about 10 km south-southwest of the peak. Two other holes, DNR 83-2 and DNR 83-4, were located on the north side of the Sulphur Creek Valley. Both holes were abandoned at early stages of drilling because of deep overburden and severe caving problems. The sites were apparently located atop old landslide deposits.

  15. Dam Construction and Maintenance (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dams may be constructed, improved, or repaired on private, non-navigable waters subject to certain timelines; however, previously-developed hydropower mechanisms cannot be disrupted. The State may...

  16. The Dalles Lock and Dam welcomes raptor (and human) visitors during Eagle Watch 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    The Dalles Lock and Dam welcomes raptor (and human) visitors during Eagle Watch 2013 By Amber Tilton, The Dalles Lock and Dam park ranger Nestled between Oregon and Washington is the Columbia River District operates three dams on the Columbia River where visitors and employees alike often spot America

  17. Washington State Department of Transportation energy efficiency guidelines for small buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides energy efficiency guidelines for the construction and remodel of small buildings owned by the Washington State Department of Transportation (DOT). For the purpose of these guidelines {open_quotes}small buildings{close_quotes} are defined as those under 25,000 square feet. However, many of the guidelines can also be used for larger buildings. DOT is responsible for 641 buildings totaling 2.2 million square feet and consuming approximately $1,087,500 dollars in energy costs each year. Building types covered by these guidelines are small offices, shop buildings, and heated and unheated storage. These building types can be expected to vary greatly in both the distribution and magnitude of energy use.

  18. Three-Dimensional Groundwater Models of the 300 Area at the Hanford Site, Washington State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Mark D.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Thorne, Paul D.; Chen, Yousu

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed field-scale groundwater flow and transport simulations of the 300 Area to support the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit Phase III Feasibility Study. The 300 Area is located in the southeast portion of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington State. Historical operations involving uranium fuel fabrication and research activities at the 300 Area have contaminated engineered liquid-waste disposal facilities, the underlying vadose zone, and the uppermost aquifer with uranium. The main objectives of this research were to develop numerical groundwater flow and transport models to help refine the site conceptual model, and to assist assessment of proposed alternative remediation technologies focused on the 300 Area uranium plume.

  19. WSU's Academic Integrity Statement "As an institution of higher education, Washington State University is committed to principles of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    integrity violations may receive an F on the particular assignment or exam, as well as an F for the courseWSU's Academic Integrity Statement "As an institution of higher education, Washington State consistent with the standards of academic integrity adopted by the University. To maintain the academic

  20. Lasers for Hyperfine State Detection and Cooling of Ytterbium Ions Sarah Innes-Gold, University of Washington REU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

    . Researchers in various groups are investigating many possible systems in- cluding photons, superconductingLasers for Hyperfine State Detection and Cooling of Ytterbium Ions Sarah Innes-Gold, University of Washington REU 29 August 2014 Abstract The purpose of this REU project was to implement a system of lasers

  1. Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume III; Washington Subbasin Below McNary Dam, 1992 CIS Summary Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR); Hymer, Joe (Washington Department of Fisheries, Battleground, WA); Wastel, Mike (Washington Department of Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports is given.

  2. Stock Summary Reports for Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids, Volume IV; Washington Subbasin Above McNary Dam, 1992 CIS Summary Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hymer, Joe (Washington Department of Fishereis, Battleground, WA); Wastel, Mike (Washington Department of Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Hatch, Keith (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, Portland, OR)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An essential component of the effort to rebuild the Columbia Basin's anadromous fish resources is that available information and experience be organized and shared among numerous organizations and individuals. Past experience and knowledge must form the basis for actions into the future. Much of this knowledge exists only in unpublished form in agency and individual files. Even that information which is published in the form of technical and contract reports receives only limited distribution and is often out of print and unavailable after a few years. Only a small fraction of the basin's collective knowledge is captured in permanent and readily available databases (such as the Northwest Environmental Database) or in recognized journals. State, tribal, and federal fishery managers have recognized these information management problems and have committed to a program, the Coordinated Information System Project, to capture and share more easily the core data and other information upon which management decisions are based. That project has completed scoping and identification of key information needs and development of a project plan. Work performed under the CIS project will be coordinated with and extend information contained in the Northwest Environmental Database. Construction of prototype systems will begin in Phase 3. This report is one in a series of seven describing the results of the Coordinated Information System scoping and needs identification phase. A brief description of each of these reports is given.

  3. Washington: Washington's Clean Energy Resources and Economy (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document highlights the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's investments and impacts in the state of Washington.

  4. Dam Safety Program (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Dam Safety Division within the Department of the Environment is responsible for administering a dam safety program to regulate the construction, operation, and maintenance of dams to prevent...

  5. Reviewer Institution Ahring, Birgitte Kiaer Washington State University Tri-Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Central Washington University Kaplan, Daniel I Savannah River National Laboratory Kayani, Asghar Nawaz National Laboratory Bennett, Brian NMN Medical College of Wisconsin Berhe, Asmeret Asefaw University National Laboratory Goodlett, David R University of Washington Gorman, Brian P Colorado School of Mines

  6. V00306010057 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¬« ¬« ¬« ¬« ¬« XY! 16-020 16-030(c) 16-026(l) 16-028(c) 16-026(l) V00306010057 rock check dam V00306010012 rock check dam V00306010040 rock check dam V00306010039 rock check dam V00306010058 rock check dam V00306010064 rock check dam V00306010061 rock check dam V00306010062 rock check dam V00306010063

  7. Dam Safety (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection's Division of Dam Safety provides for the regulation and safety of dams and reservoirs throughout the Commonwealth in order to protect the...

  8. Washington Residents, Agencies, NGOs Specialists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Washington Residents, Agencies, NGOs Specialists County Directors, County Faculty, Staff, and Volunteers Department Chairs District Directors County Government Issue Teams Research and Extension Centers WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY CAMPUSES Pullman Spokane Tri-Cities Vancouver Agriculture Program Director R

  9. V01406010015 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« ¬« V01406010015 rock check dam V01406010014 rock check dam V01406010013 rock check dam 1501403010012 earthen berm V01403010008 earthen berm V01406010003 rock check dam V01406010004 rock check dam V01406010010 rock check dam V01406010011 rock check dam 15-0651 15-0307 15-0588 15-0532 15-0575 stormdrain 7160

  10. EIS-0425: Mid-Columbia Coho Restoration, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration’s proposal to fund the construction, operation, and maintenance of a coho salmon restoration program sponsored by the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation to help mitigate impacts to fish affected by the Federal Columbia River Power System dams on the Columbia River. The Proposed Action would involve building a new, small, in-basin adult holding/spawning, incubation and rearing facility on the Wenatchee River at one of two potential sites; and constructing and improving several sites in both the Wenatchee and Methow river basins in north central Washington State.

  11. ``How clean is clean`` in the United States federal and Washington State cleanup regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landau, H.G. [Landau Associates, Inc., Edmonds, WA (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The enactment of legislation and promulgation of implementing regulations generally involves the resolution of conflicting goals. Defining ``How Clean is Clean?`` in federal and state cleanup laws, regulations, and policies is no exception. Answering the ``How Clean is Clean?`` question has resulted in the identification of some important and sometimes conflicting goals. Continuing resolution of the following conflicting goals is the key to effect cleanup of hazardous waste sites: Expediency vs. Fairness; Flexibility vs. Consistency; Risk Reduction vs. Risk Causation; and Permanence vs. Cost Effectiveness.

  12. Assessing the Thermal Environmental Impacts of an Groundwater Heat Pump in Southeastern Washington State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Waichler, Scott R.; Mackley, Rob D.; Horner, Jacob A.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal analysis of a large-scale (e.g., 1900 gpm), open-loop ground source heat pump (GSHP) installed on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus in southeastern Washington State has been performed using a numerical modeling approach. Water temperature increases at the upgradient extraction wells in the system and at the downgradient Columbia River are potential concerns, especially since heat rejection to the subsurface will occur year-round. Hence, thermal impacts of the open-loop GSHP were investigated to identify operational scenarios that minimized downgradient environmental impacts at the river, and upgradient temperature drift at the production wells. Simulations examined the sensitivity of the system to variations in pumping rates and injected water temperatures, as well as to hydraulic conductivity estimates of the aquifer. Results demonstrated that both downgradient and upgradient thermal impacts were more sensitive to injection flow rates than estimates of hydraulic conductivity. Higher injection rates at lower temperatures resulted in higher temperature increases at the extraction wells but lower increases at the river. Conversely, lower pumping rates and higher injected water temperatures resulted in a smaller temperature increase at the extraction wells, but higher increases at the river. The scenario with lower pumping rates is operationally more efficient, but does increase the likelihood of a thermal plume discharging into the Columbia River. However, this impact would be mitigated by mixing within the hyporheic zone and the Columbia River. The impact under current operational conditions is negligible, but future increases in heat rejection could require a compromise between maximizing operational efficiency and minimizing temperature increases at the shoreline.

  13. Dam Safety (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware Dam Safety Law was adopted in 2004 and provides the framework for proper design, construction, operation, maintenance, and inspection of dams in the interest of public health, safety,...

  14. Dam Safety Regulations (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All dams, except those owned by the U.S., are under the jurisdiction of these regulations. These dams will be classified by hazard rating, and may be subject to periodic inspections. The...

  15. J00206010020 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! J00206010020 rock check dam J00206010023 rock check dam 09-009 09-009 09-009 PJ-SMA-2 0.901 Acres J00206010021 rock check dam J00206010019 rock check dam J00206010014 rock check dam J00203010007 Smith DATE: 14-November-2014 REVISION NUMBER: 8 XY! IP sampler location Berm Channel/swale Check dam

  16. W02106010008 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W-SMA-14.1 5.169 Acres W02106010008 rock check dam W02106010009 rock check dam W02106010010 rock check dam W02106010011 rock check dam W02106010012 rock check dam W02103010018 earthen berm W02103010016 dam Established vegetation Seed and mulch Sediment trap/basin Gabion Cap SWMU boundary SMA drainage

  17. T00406010008 rock check dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    XY! ¬« T00406010008 rock check dam T00406010009 rock check dam T00406010010 rock check dam T00406010011 rock check dam T-SMA-2.85 0.344 Acres 35-014(g) 35-016(n) T00406010005 rock check dam T00406010006 rock check dam T00403090004 curb T00402040007 established vegetation, green hatch area 7200 7200 7180

  18. U.S. Department of Energy - Washington State Department of Ecology - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence may be key topatent informationWashington State

  19. Abundance, Distribution and Estimated Consumption (kg fish) of Piscivorous Birds Along the Yakima River, Washington State; Implications for Fisheries Management, 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Major, III, Walter; Grassley, James M.; Ryding, Kristen E. (University of Washington, Quantitive Ecology Program, Seattle, WA)

    2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is divided into two chapters. The abstract for chapter one is--Understanding of the abundance and spatial and temporal distributions of piscivorous birds and their potential consumption of fish is an increasingly important aspect of fisheries management. During 1999-2002, we determined the abundance and distribution and estimated the maximum consumption (kg biomass) of fish-eating birds along the length of the Yakima River in Washington State. Sixteen different species were observed during the 4-yr study, but only half of those were observed during all years. Abundance and estimated consumption of fish within the upper and middle sections of the river were dominated by common mergansers (Mergus merganser) which are known to breed in those reaches. Common mergansers accounted for 78 to 94% of the estimated total fish take for the upper river or approximately 28,383 {+-} 1,041 kg over the 4 yrs. A greater diversity of avian piscivores occurred in the lower river and potential impacts to fish populations was more evenly distributed among the species. In 1999-2000, great blue herons potentially accounted for 29 and 36% of the fish consumed, whereas in 2001-2002 American white pelicans accounted for 53 and 55%. We estimated that approximately 75,878 {+-} 6,616 kg of fish were consumed by piscivorous birds in the lower sections of the river during the study. Bird assemblages differed spatially along the river with a greater abundance of colonial nesting species within the lower sections of the river, especially during spring and the nesting season. The abundance of avian piscivores and consumption estimates are discussed within the context of salmonid supplementation efforts on the river and juvenile out-migration. The abstract for chapter two is--Consumption of fish by piscivorous birds may be a significant constraint on efforts to enhance salmonid populations within tributaries to the Columbia River in Washington State. During 1999-2002, we determined the abundance of fish-eating birds, primarily ring-billed (Larus delawarensis) and California (L. californicus) gulls and monitored their behavior at two man-made structures within the Yakima River in eastern Washington: Horn Rapids Dam, a low-head irrigation dam, and the return pipe for the Chandler Juvenile Fish Handling Facility. Earlier observations of congregations of gulls at these structures suggested an increased likelihood of predation of out-migrating juvenile salmonids. We estimated the number of fish consumed and examined the relationship between river flow and gull numbers and fish taken. Numbers of gulls at the structures varied daily between their arrival in Late March-early April and departure in late June (mean ({+-}SE) - Horn Rapids: 11.7 ({+-}2.0), Chandler: 20.1 ({+-}1.5) ). During the 4-yr study, numbers at Horn Rapids peaked dramatically during the last 2 weeks in May (between 132.9 ({+-}4.2) to 36.6 ({+-}2.2) gulls/day) and appeared to the associated with the release of > 1-mil hatchery juvenile fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) above the 2 study sites. A comparable peak in gull abundance was not observed at Chandler. Diurnal patterns of gull abundance also varied among years and sites. The relationship between foraging efficiency and gull numbers was not consistent among years or sites. Gull numbers were not correlated with river flow when year was considered. However, variations in flow among years appeared to be associated with average gull numbers at each site, but trends were not consistent between sites. Low seasonal flows were associated with increased predation at Chandler, whereas high seasonal flows were associated with increased predation at Horn Rapids. Assuming all fish taken were salmonids, we estimate gulls consumed between 0.1-10.3 % of the juvenile salmonids passing or being released from the Chandler Juvenile Fish Monitoring Facility located above the two structures. Staggered releases of hatchery fish, nocturnal releases of fish entrained in the Chandler facility, changes in the orientation of the outflow from the f

  20. Robert Blankenship Director Washington University Dewey Holten

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Washington University David Bocian, University of California, Riverside Donald Bryant, Pennsylvania State University Richard Cogdell, University of Glasgow P. Leslie...

  1. Washington State Energy Program, Summary of Reported Data From July 1, 2010 - September 30, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report |toVEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES5WalkingLeaseWashington

  2. Washington Update

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Text eere.energy.gov Federal Energy Management Program FederalUtility Partnership Working Group David McAndrew April 14, 2010 Providence RI Washington Update Federal Energy...

  3. Dam Safety Standards (New Jersey)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules set forth procedures for application to construct, repair or modify a dam and set standards for design and maintenance of dams. These rules also establish a dam inspection procedure....

  4. Potential for Natural Gas Storage in Deep Basalt Formations at Canoe Ridge, Washington State: A Hydrogeologic Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, Steve P.; Spane, Frank A.; Johnson, Vernon G.

    2005-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1999 and 2002, Pacific Gas Transmission Company (PGT) (now TransCanada Pipeline Company) and AVISTA Corporation, together with technical support provided by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) examined the feasibility of developing a subsurface, natural gas-storage facility in deep, underlying Columbia River basalt in south-central Washington state. As part of this project, the 100 Circles #1 well was drilled and characterized in addition to surface studies. This report provides data and interpretations of the geology and hydrology collected specific to the Canoe Ridge site as part of the U.S. DOE funding to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of this project.

  5. Dams (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dam construction in South Dakota requires a Location Notice or a Water Right Permit. A Location Notice is a form that must be filed with the County Register of Deeds, and is the only paperwork...

  6. Regulation of Dams (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The owner of a dam is required to maintain the structure in good condition, and notify the Department of Environmental Management upon the sale or transfer of ownership of the structure. The...

  7. Dam Safety (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    North Carolina Administrative Code Title 15A, Subchapter 2K lays out further regulations for the design, approval, construction, maintenance, and inspection of dams to ensure public safety and...

  8. Dam Safety (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule requires that anyone who desires to construct a dam that is 6 feet or more in height and impounds 5 surface acres or more at the design flood elevation, must first obtain a permit from...

  9. Design Tools to Assess Hydro-Turbine Biological Performance: Priest Rapids Dam Turbine Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Strickler, Brad; Weisbeck, Molly; Dotson, Curtis L.

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past two decades, there have been many studies describing injury mechanisms associated with turbine passage, the response of various fish species to these mechanisms, and the probability of survival through dams. Although developing tools to design turbines that improve passage survival has been difficult and slow, a more robust quantification of the turbine environment has emerged through integrating physical model data, fish survival data, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. Grant County Public Utility District (GCPUD) operates the Priest Rapids Dam (PRD), a hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River in Washington State. The dam contains 10 Kaplan-type turbine units that are now almost 50 years old. The Utility District plans to refit all of these aging turbines with new turbines. The Columbia River at PRD is a migratory pathway for several species of juvenile and adult salmonids, so passage of fish through the dam is a major consideration when replacing the turbines. In this presentation, a method for turbine biological performance assessment (BioPA) is introduced. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a CFD model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. Using known relationships between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose–response) from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from proposed designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising alternatives. We will present application of the BioPA method for baseline risk assessment calculations for the existing Kaplan turbines at PRD that will be used as the minimum biological performance that a proposed new design must achieve.

  10. State of Washington officials join department of energy to dedicate WIPP disposal room

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900 SpecialNanoparticulate FeSSection 1.StateState andDState

  11. Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

  12. Energy Code Enforcement Training Manual : Covering the Washington State Energy Code and the Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality Code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington State Energy Code Program

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual is designed to provide building department personnel with specific inspection and plan review skills and information on provisions of the 1991 edition of the Washington State Energy Code (WSEC). It also provides information on provisions of the new stand-alone Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality (VIAQ) Code.The intent of the WSEC is to reduce the amount of energy used by requiring energy-efficient construction. Such conservation reduces energy requirements, and, as a result, reduces the use of finite resources, such as gas or oil. Lowering energy demand helps everyone by keeping electricity costs down. (It is less expensive to use existing electrical capacity efficiently than it is to develop new and additional capacity needed to heat or cool inefficient buildings.) The new VIAQ Code (effective July, 1991) is a natural companion to the energy code. Whether energy-efficient or not, an homes have potential indoor air quality problems. Studies have shown that indoor air is often more polluted than outdoor air. The VIAQ Code provides a means of exchanging stale air for fresh, without compromising energy savings, by setting standards for a controlled ventilation system. It also offers requirements meant to prevent indoor air pollution from building products or radon.

  13. PREDICTION OF TOTAL DISSOLVED GAS EXCHANGE AT HYDROPOWER DAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Pasha, MD Fayzul K [ORNL; Stewart, Kevin M [ORNL; Bender, Merlynn [Bureau of Reclamation; Schneider, Michael L. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation in waters released at hydropower dams can cause gas bubble trauma in fisheries resulting in physical injuries and eyeball protrusion that can lead to mortality. Elevated TDG pressures in hydropower releases are generally caused by the entrainment of air in spillway releases and the subsequent exchange of atmospheric gasses into solution during passage through the stilling basin. The network of dams throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB) are managed for irrigation, hydropower production, flood control, navigation, and fish passage that frequently result in both voluntary and involuntary spillway releases. These dam operations are constrained by state and federal water quality standards for TDG saturation which balance the benefits of spillway operations designed for Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed fisheries versus the degradation to water quality as defined by TDG saturation. In the 1970s, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), under the federal Clean Water Act (Section 303(d)), established a criterion not to exceed the TDG saturation level of 110% in order to protect freshwater and marine aquatic life. The states of Washington and Oregon have adopted special water quality standards for TDG saturation in the tailrace and forebays of hydropower facilities on the Columbia and Snake Rivers where spillway operations support fish passage objectives. The physical processes that affect TDG exchange at hydropower facilities have been studied throughout the CRB in site-specific studies and routine water quality monitoring programs. These data have been used to quantify the relationship between project operations, structural properties, and TDG exchange. These data have also been used to develop predictive models of TDG exchange to support real-time TDG management decisions. These empirically based predictive models have been developed for specific projects and account for both the fate of spillway and powerhouse flows in the tailrace channel and resultant exchange in route to the next downstream dam. Currently, there exists a need to summarize the general finding from operational and structural TDG abatement programs conducted throughout the CRB and for the development of a generalized prediction model that pools data collected at multiple projects with similar structural attributes. A generalized TDG exchange model can be tuned to specific projects and coupled with water regulation models to allow the formulation of optimal daily water regulation schedules subject to water quality constraints for TDG supersaturation. A generalized TDG exchange model can also be applied to other hydropower dams that affect TDG pressures in tailraces and can be used to develop alternative operational and structural measures to minimize TDG generation. It is proposed to develop a methodology for predicting TDG levels downstream of hydropower facilities with similar structural properties as a function of a set of variables that affect TDG exchange; such as tailwater depth, spill discharge and pattern, project head, and entrainment of powerhouse releases. TDG data from hydropower facilities located throughout the northwest region of the United States will be used to identify relationships between TDG exchange and relevant dependent variables. Data analysis and regression techniques will be used to develop predictive TDG exchange expressions for various structural categories.

  14. Use of an autonomous sensor to evaluate the biological performance of the advanced turbine at Wanapum Dam

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydropower is the largest renewable energy resource in the United States and the world. However, hydropower dams have adverse ecological impacts because migrating fish may be injured or killed when they pass through hydroturbines. In the Columbia and Snake River basins, dam operators and engineers are required to make those hydroelectric facilities more fish-friendly through changes in hydroturbine design and operation after fish population declines and the subsequent listing of several species of Pacific salmon under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, requested authorization from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission tomore »replace the ten turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines designed to improve survival for fish passing through the turbines while improving operation efficiency and increasing power generation. As an additional measure to the primary metric of direct injury and mortality rates of juvenile Chinook salmon using balloon tag-recapture methodology, this study used an autonomous sensor device - the Sensor Fish - to provide insight into the specific hydraulic conditions and physical stresses experienced by the fish as well as the specific causes of fish biological response. We found that the new hydroturbine blade shape and the corresponding reduction of turbulence in the advanced hydropower turbine were effective in meeting the objectives of improving fish survival while enhancing operational efficiency of the dam. The frequency of severe events based on Sensor Fish pressure and acceleration measurements showed trends similar to those of fish survival determined by the balloon tag-recapture methodology. In addition, the new turbine provided a better pressure and rate of pressure change environment for fish passage. Overall, the Sensor Fish data indicated that the advanced hydroturbine design improved passage of juvenile salmon at Wanapum Dam.« less

  15. Use of an autonomous sensor to evaluate the biological performance of the advanced turbine at Wanapum Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydropower is the largest renewable energy resource in the United States and the world. However, hydropower dams have adverse ecological impacts because migrating fish may be injured or killed when they pass through hydroturbines. In the Columbia and Snake River basins, dam operators and engineers are required to make those hydroelectric facilities more fish-friendly through changes in hydroturbine design and operation after fish population declines and the subsequent listing of several species of Pacific salmon under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, requested authorization from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the ten turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines designed to improve survival for fish passing through the turbines while improving operation efficiency and increasing power generation. As an additional measure to the primary metric of direct injury and mortality rates of juvenile Chinook salmon using balloon tag-recapture methodology, this study used an autonomous sensor device - the Sensor Fish - to provide insight into the specific hydraulic conditions and physical stresses experienced by the fish as well as the specific causes of fish biological response. We found that the new hydroturbine blade shape and the corresponding reduction of turbulence in the advanced hydropower turbine were effective in meeting the objectives of improving fish survival while enhancing operational efficiency of the dam. The frequency of severe events based on Sensor Fish pressure and acceleration measurements showed trends similar to those of fish survival determined by the balloon tag-recapture methodology. In addition, the new turbine provided a better pressure and rate of pressure change environment for fish passage. Overall, the Sensor Fish data indicated that the advanced hydroturbine design improved passage of juvenile salmon at Wanapum Dam.

  16. Use of an autonomous sensor to evaluate the biological performance of the advanced turbine at Wanapum Dam

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydropower is the largest renewable energy resource in the United States and the world. However, hydropower dams have adverse ecological impacts because migrating fish may be injured or killed when they pass through hydroturbines. In the Columbia and Snake River basins, dam operators and engineers are required to make those hydroelectric facilities more fish-friendly through changes in hydroturbine design and operation after fish population declines and the subsequent listing of several species of Pacific salmon under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, requested authorization from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the ten turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines designed to improve survival for fish passing through the turbines while improving operation efficiency and increasing power generation. As an additional measure to the primary metric of direct injury and mortality rates of juvenile Chinook salmon using balloon tag-recapture methodology, this study used an autonomous sensor device - the Sensor Fish - to provide insight into the specific hydraulic conditions and physical stresses experienced by the fish as well as the specific causes of fish biological response. We found that the new hydroturbine blade shape and the corresponding reduction of turbulence in the advanced hydropower turbine were effective in meeting the objectives of improving fish survival while enhancing operational efficiency of the dam. The frequency of severe events based on Sensor Fish pressure and acceleration measurements showed trends similar to those of fish survival determined by the balloon tag-recapture methodology. In addition, the new turbine provided a better pressure and rate of pressure change environment for fish passage. Overall, the Sensor Fish data indicated that the advanced hydroturbine design improved passage of juvenile salmon at Wanapum Dam.

  17. US Society on Dams Annual Conference, March 2007, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania TOLERABLE RISK FOR DAMS: HOW SAFE IS SAFE ENOUGH?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    2 through a comprehensive and integrated consideration of the overall safety of a reservoir and value judgements. ICOLD (2005) ABSTRACT Risk assessment provides an opportunity to manage dam safety and Environmental Engineering and Director, Institute for Dam Safety Risk Management, Utah State University, Logan

  18. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; Annual Progress Report, April 2007 - March 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallette, Christine [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on our progress from April 2007 through March 2008 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report C), and Montana State University (MSU; Report D). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

  19. French Guidelines for Structural Safety of Gravity Dams in a Semi-probabilistic Format

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    French Guidelines for Structural Safety of Gravity Dams in a Semi-probabilistic Format Paul Royet1 the French Committee on Dams and Reservoirs ­ FrCOLD - issued provisional guidelines for structural safety of gravity dams. It was the first attempt to produce a semi-probabilistic limit-state method for the design

  20. Effects of upstream dams versus groundwater pumping on stream temperature under varying climate conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Click Here for Full Article Effects of upstream dams versus groundwater pumping on stream impact of a large upstream dam versus inreach groundwater pumping on stream temperatures was analyzed large dams are present, such as the western United States or eastern Australia. Stream temperatures were

  1. Flood Protection and Dam Safety (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All dams in Virginia are subject to the Dam Safety Act and Dam Safety Regulations unless specifically excluded. A dam is excluded if it: (a) is less than six feet high; (b) has a maximum capacity...

  2. Lessons from a Dam Failure1 JAMI;S E. EVANS, SCUDDKR D. MACKKY, JOHAN F. GOTTC.KNS, AND WILFRID M. GILL, Department of Geology, Bowling Green State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    Lessons from a Dam Failure1 JAMI;S E. EVANS, SCUDDKR D. MACKKY, JOHAN F. GOTTC.KNS, AND WILFRID M of the dam. The failure was the result of seepage piping at the toe of the dam, near the masonry spillway-86% was trapped in a downstream reservoir (threatening the integrity of this structure). The failure of this dam

  3. Mills, Dams, and Reservoirs (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the Massachusetts General Laws outlines procedures to settle disputes regarding the construction and operation of dams on non-navigable waters. Dam construction or alteration is...

  4. INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION ON LARGE DAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    FOR ESTIMATION OF THE PROBABILITY OF FAILURE OF DAMS FOR USE IN QUANTITATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT (* ) Robin FELL: · Failure modes identification · Analysis to estimate the probability of failure of the dam · Calculation the methods available for estimating the probability of failure of embankment and concrete dams, for normal

  5. Wim van Dam CURRICULUM VITAE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Wim van Dam CURRICULUM VITAE Department of Computer Science Work: +1-805-893 5211 Harold Frank Hall in physics. #12;Curriculum Vitae Wim van Dam, June 2008 2 PUBLICATIONS Journal and Conference Articles [1] "Quantum Algorithms for Algebraic Problems", Andrew M. Childs and Wim van Dam, to appear in Reviews

  6. Perspectives on Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework Directive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Justin E; Pollak, Josh D; Richmond, Sarah F

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sacramento. Graf, W. L. , 1999: Dam Nation: A GeographicCensus of American Dams and Their Large-Scale HydrologicEcological Effects of Dams: A Geomorphic Perspective.

  7. Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paluch, Mark; Scholz, Allan; McLellan, Holly [Eastern Washington University Department of Biology; Olson, Jason [Kalispel Tribe of Indians Natural Resources Department

    2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to monitor movements of bull trout that were provided passage above Albeni Falls Dam, Pend Oreille River. Electrofishing and angling were used to collect bull trout below the dam. Tissue samples were collected from each bull trout and sent to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Abernathy Fish Technology Center Conservation Genetics Lab, Washington. The DNA extracted from tissue samples were compared to a catalog of bull trout population DNA from the Priest River drainage, Lake Pend Oreille tributaries, and the Clark Fork drainage to determine the most probable tributary of origin. A combined acoustic radio or radio tag was implanted in each fish prior to being transported and released above the dam. Bull trout relocated above the dam were able to volitionally migrate into their natal tributary, drop back downstream, or migrate upstream to the next dam. A combination of stationary radio receiving stations and tracking via aircraft, boat, and vehicle were used to monitor the movement of tagged fish to determine if the spawning tributary it selected matched the tributary assigned from the genetic analysis. Seven bull trout were captured during electrofishing surveys in 2008. Of these seven, four were tagged and relocated above the dam. Two were tagged and left below the dam as part of a study monitoring movements below the dam. One was immature and too small at the time of capture to implant a tracking tag. All four fish released above the dam passed by stationary receivers stations leading into Lake Pend Oreille and no fish dropped back below the dam. One of the radio tags was recovered in the tributary corresponding with the results of the genetic test. Another fish was located in the vicinity of its assigned tributary, which was impassable due to low water discharge at its mouth. Two fish have not been located since entering the lake. Of these fish, one was immature and not expected to enter its natal tributary in the fall of 2008. The other fish was large enough to be mature, but at the time of capture its sex was unable to be determined, indicating it may not have been mature at the time of capture. These fish are expected to enter their natal tributaries in early summer or fall of 2009.

  8. 1979-1980 Geothermal Resource Assessment Program in Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korosec, M.A.; Schuster, J.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Separate abstracts were prepared for seven papers. Also included are a bibliography of geothermal resource information for the State of Washington, well temperature information and locations in the State of Washington, and a map of the geology of the White Pass-Tumac Mountain Area, Washington. (MHR)

  9. Dam Safety Rules (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This establishes requirements relating to the design, placement, construction, enlargement, alteration, removal, abandonment, and repair of dams and also establishes requirements to govern the...

  10. Regulations and Permits Related to Dams (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vermont law requires a permit, or a dam order, for the construction, alteration, or removal of dams impounding more than 500,000 cubic feet of water, including any accumulated sediments. Dam...

  11. War damages and reconstruction of Peruca dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nonveiller, E. [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering; Rupcic, J. [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering] [Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Civil Engineering; [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia); Sever, Z. [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia)] [Elektroprojekt Consulting Engineering, Zagreb (Croatia)

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes the heavy damages caused by blasting in the Peruca rockfill dam in Croatia in January 1993. Complete collapse of the dam by overtopping was prevented through quick action of the dam owner by dumping clayey gravel on the lowest sections of the dam crest and opening the bottom outlet of the reservoir, thus efficiently lowering the water level. After the damages were sufficiently established and alternatives for restoration of the dam were evaluated, it was decided to construct a diaphragm wall through the damaged core in the central dam part as the impermeable dam element and to rebuild the central clay core at the dam abutments. Reconstruction works are described.

  12. Safety of Dams and Reservoirs Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act regulates dams and associated reservoirs to protect health and public safety and minimize adverse consequences associated with potential dam failure. The act describes the responsibilities...

  13. Division of Water, Part 673: Dam Safety Regulations (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations address dam safety, define dam hazard categories and inspection procedures, and apply to any owner of a dam. Dam owners are required to maintain dams in a safe condition at all...

  14. Changes in water quality and climate after forest harvest in central Washington state. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, W.B.; Anderson, T.D.; Helvey, J.D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical output of nitrate, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, and organic nitrogen were determined on a grams-per-hectare-per-day basis for five treatment watersheds and a control watershed. Water samples were collected from April to October during 3 pretreatment and 3 post-treatment years (1978 to 1983). Except for increased calcium and sodium in several streams, regression equations comparing treatment with control showed significant difference for pretreatment and posttreatment output. Output generally declined in the post-treatment years. Cyclic changes in output from these and other streams in the eastern Cascade Range in Washington appeared to occur regardless of treatment and were probably related to precipitation. Mean maximum air temperature increased during the posttreatment period in all the small watersheds, but stream temperatures were relatively unaffected.

  15. ONION (Allium cepa, 47 cultivars) B.K. Schroeder, Washington State University (WSU), Pullman, Enterobacter bulb decay; Enterobacter cloacae WA 99164; T.D. Waters, WSU Franklin Co. Extension, Pasco WA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, Brenda K.

    , Enterobacter bulb decay; Enterobacter cloacae WA 99164; T.D. Waters, WSU Franklin Co. Extension, Pasco WA 99301 in storage in Washington State, 2008-2009. An onion bulb storage trial was completed to survey 47 storage to Enterobacter cloacae, causal agent of Enterobacter bulb decay. Seeds of each cultivar were planted near Pasco

  16. DAMS: Distributed Adaptive Metaheuristic Selection Bilel Derbel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    DAMS: Distributed Adaptive Metaheuristic Selection Bilel Derbel Université Lille 1 LIFL ­ CNRS Metaheuristic Selection (DAMS) frame- work. DAMS is dedicated to adaptive optimization in distributed environments. Given a set of metaheuristics, the goal of DAMS is to coordinate their local execution

  17. EFFECT OF ENCROACHMENT OF WANAPUM DAM RESERVOIR ON FISH PASSAGE OVER ROCK ISLAND DAM, COLUMBIA RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFFECT OF ENCROACHMENT OF WANAPUM DAM RESERVOIR ON FISH PASSAGE OVER ROCK ISLAND DAM, COLUMBIA the lower sections of the three fish ladders at Rock Island Dam, 61 km upstream from Wanapum Dam of the center and left-bank fish ladders of Rock Island Dam were rebuilt and a new sequence of spill patterns

  18. Survival and Passage of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead at The Dalles Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, J. R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fischer, Eric S.; Hughes, James S.; Khan, Fenton; Kim, Jin A.; Townsend, Richard L.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The acoustic telemetry study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The purpose of the study was to estimate dam passage survival and other performance measures for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) and 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  19. Spectroscopic and Diffraction Study of Uranium Speciation in Contaminated Vadose Zone Sediments from the Hanford Site, Washington State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catalano, Jeffrey G.; Heald, Steve M.; Zachara, John M.; Brown Jr., G E.

    2004-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination of vadose zone sediments under tank BX-102 at the Hanford site, Washington, resulted from the accidental release of 7-8 metric tons of uranium dissolved in caustic aqueous sludge in 1951. We have applied synchrotron-based X-ray spectroscopic and diffraction techniques to characterize the speciation of uranium in samples of these contaminated sediments. U LIII-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopic studies demonstrate that uranium occurs predominantly as a uranium-(VI) silicate from the uranophane group of minerals. XAFS cannot distinguish between the members of this mineral group due to the near identical local coordination environments of uranium in these phases. However, these phases differ crystallographically, and can be distinguished using X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. As the concentration of uranium was too low for conventional XRD to detect these phases, X-ray microdiffraction (?XRD) was used to collect diffraction patterns on {approx}20 ?m diameter areas of localized high uranium concentration found using microscanning X-ray fluorescence (?SXRF). Only sodium boltwoodite, Na(UO2)(SiO3OH)?1.5H2O, was observed; no other uranophane group minerals were present. Sodium boltwoodite formation has effectively sequestered uranium in these sediments under the current geochemical and hydrologic conditions. Attempts to remediate the uranium contamination will likely face significant difficulties because of the speciation and distribution of uranium in the sediments.

  20. White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2000-2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kern, J. Chris; Ward, David L.; Farr, Ruth A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on our progress from April 2000 through March 2001 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (USGS; Report C), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report D), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; Report E), and Oregon State University (OSU; Report F). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported. Highlights of results of our work from April 2000 through March 2001 are listed.

  1. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1998 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Snake River stock) yearling fall chinook salmon that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1998. The three fall chinook acclimation facilities are operated by the Nez Perce Tribe and located at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids on the Snake River and at Big Canyon Creek on the Clearwater River. Yearlings at the Big Canyon facility consisted of two size classes that are referred to in this report as 9.5 fish per pound (fpp) and 30 fpp. The Big Canyon 9.5 fpp were comparable to the yearlings at Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. A total of 9,942 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Pittsburg Landing. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.19. Of the 9,942 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 6,836 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary). A total of 4,926 9.5 fpp and 2,532 30 fpp yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Big Canyon. PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 156.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.13. PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 113.1 mm and mean condition factor of 1.18. Of the 4,926 PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released, a total of 3,042 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. Of the 2,532 PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released, a total of 1,130 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 1,253 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Captain John Rapids. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 147.5 mm and mean condition factor of 1.09. Of the 1,253 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 719 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 2,420 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.0 mm and mean condition factor of 1.10. Of the 2,420 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 979 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Monumental and McNary). Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged fish released from Pittsburg Landing were 10.5 days to Lower Granite Dam, 21.7 days to McNary Dam and 29.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 16.4 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 18.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 25 at Lower Granite Dam, May 6 at McNary Dam and May 14 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 20 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 13.3 days to Lower Granite Dam, 26.0 days to McNary Dam and 30.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 13.0 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 15.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.3 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 27 at Lower Granite Dam, May 11 at McNary Dam and May 15 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 9 at Lower Granite Dam, May 24 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 20.8 days to Lower Granite Dam, 37.6 days to McNary Dam and 43.5 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 8.3 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 10.6 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 12.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 23 at McNary Dam and May 28 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 22 at Lower Granite Dam, May 31 at McNary Dam and June 5 at Bonneville Dam. Median arrival dates, based on all detections, of PIT tagge

  2. Use, Maintenance, Removal, Inspections, and Safety of Dams (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section describes operating plans for dams with movable structures, as well as procedures for raising or lowering of impoundment levels, dam removal, and dam safety inspections.

  3. BULLETIN OF THE UNITED STATES FISH COMMISSION. 353 Vol. 111,No. 83. Washington, D.C. Oct. 19, 1883.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on Puget Sound orwithin the Puget Sound infratidal region offered many advantages over any locality.:Gray. Lutraria capax Gould. West Coast, United States; Puget Sound to Snn Diego, California. I. Specimen

  4. Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan: Asotin County, Washington, 1995.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browne, Dave

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Northwest Power Planning Council completed its ``Strategy for Salmon'' in 1992. This is a plan, composed of four specific elements,designed to double the present production of 2.5 million salmon in the Columbia River watershed. These elements have been called the ``four H's'': (1) improve harvest management; (2) improve hatcheries and their production practices; (3) improve survival at hydroelectric dams; and (4) improve and protect fish habitat. The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon''. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity.

  5. EA-1950: Grand Coulee-Creston Transmission Line Rebuild; Grant and Lincoln Counties, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration prepared this EA to evaluate potential environmental impacts of rebuilding approximately 28 miles of the Grand Coulee-Creston No. 1 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line between Coulee Dam in Grant County and Creston in Lincoln County, Washington.

  6. Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act provides for the certification and inspection of dams in South Carolina and confers regulatory authority on the Department of Health and Environmental Control....

  7. The geomorphic influences of beaver dams and failures of beaver dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The geomorphic influences of beaver dams and failures of beaver dams David R. Butlera,T, George P millions to low billions of cubic meters range. Failure of beaver dams is a more common phenomenon than often assumed in the literature. During the past 20 years, numerous cases of dam failure have been

  8. GATC Flanking Sequences Regulate Dam Activity: Evidence for how Dam Specificity may Influence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich, Norbert O.

    GATC Flanking Sequences Regulate Dam Activity: Evidence for how Dam Specificity may Influence pap coli DNA adenine methyltransferase (Dam) plays essential roles in DNA replication, mismatch repair and gene regulation. The differential methylation by Dam of the two GATC sequences in the pap promoter

  9. Ethanol Consumption by Rat Dams During Gestation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    Ethanol Consumption by Rat Dams During Gestation, Lactation and Weaning Increases Ethanol examined effects of ethanol consumption in rat dams during gestation, lactation, and weaning on voluntary ethanol consumption by their adolescent young. We found that exposure to an ethanol-ingesting dam

  10. Viscoplastic dam breaks and the Bostwick consistometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balmforth, Neil

    Viscoplastic dam breaks and the Bostwick consistometer N. J. Balmforth, a R. V. Craster, b P'Informazione, Universit`a di Milano, Crema, Italy Abstract We present a theoretical and experimental analysis of the dam the broken dam) that may assist an experimentalist to unravel those dependences. Experiments are conducted

  11. The design of avalanche protection dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The design of avalanche protection dams Recent practical & theoretical developments://ec.europa.eu/research/research-eu #12;The design of avalanche protection dams Recent practical and theoretical developments Edited by T: Top left: Mounds and catching dam in Neskaupstaður, eastern Iceland, photo: Tómas Jóhannesson. Top

  12. On Quantum Computation Theory Wim van Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ten Cate, Balder

    On Quantum Computation Theory Wim van Dam #12;#12;On Quantum Computation Theory #12;ILLC woensdag 9 oktober 2002, te 14.00 uur door Willem Klaas van Dam geboren te Breda. #12;Promotor: Prof. dr. P Dam, 2002 ISBN: 90­5776­091­6 #12;" . . . Many errors have been made in the world which today

  13. Dam Design and Construction (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to dams that are not owned by the U.S. government and (a) have a structural height of more than 6 feet and a maximum storage capacity of 50 acre–feet or more of water, (b)...

  14. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creveling, Jennifer

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

  15. George Washington Carver Recognition Day

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In commemoration of George Washington Carver’s life and work, Congress declared January 5 as George Washington Carver Recognition Day.

  16. Washington State University INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Botswana 2 41 Lebanon 5 75 United Arab Emirates 1 8 Brazil 6 42 Lithuania 3 76 United Kingdom 9 9 Canada 50

  17. Perspectives on Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework Directive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Justin E; Pollak, Josh D; Richmond, Sarah F

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3. Long-profile of York Creek (figure adapted from report byFigure 5. Facies map for York Creek about 100 ft downstreamon Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework

  18. Destruction or Alteration of a Dam (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Permission from the Environmental Protection Commission is required prior to the removal, destruction, or alteration that results in a lower water level of any existing dam.

  19. EIS-0351: Operation of Flaming Gorge Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Colorado River, UT

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary of the United States Department of the Interior (Secretary), acting through the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), is considering whether to implement a proposed action under which Flaming Gorge Dam would be operated to achieve the flow and temperature regimes recommended in the September 2000 report Flow and Temperature Recommendations for Endangered Fishes in the Green River Downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam (2000 Flow and Temperature Recommendations), published by the Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program (Recovery Program).

  20. DROWNED AND DAMMED Colonial Capitalism and Flood Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    DROWNED AND DAMMED Colonial Capitalism and Flood Control in Eastern India ROHAN D, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. Drowned and Dammed comprehensively reconsiders the debate with physical infrastructure such as embankments, canal networks, and inevitably the Hirakud Dam. In seeking

  1. Fact Sheet - Myths & Facts about the lower Snake River dams ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Myths and facts about the lower Snake River dams MYTH: The four lower Snake River dams are low value. FACT: It costs about 5 per megawatt-hour to produce power at the dams. The...

  2. Optimal Dam Construction under Climate Change Uncertainty and Anticipated Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron-Loyd, Patricia Jane

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    real option theory to irrigation dam investment analysis: an43, 2) 482–498. [40] World Commission on Dams (WCD), 2000.Dams and development: A new framework for decision- making.

  3. FUPWG Spring 2010 Providence: Washington Update | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Spring 2010 Providence: Washington Update FUPWG Spring 2010 Providence: Washington Update Presentation covers an update on Washington and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal...

  4. A review of proposed Glen Canyon Dam interim operating criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaGory, K.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Tomasko, D.; Hayse, J.; Durham, L.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three sets of interim operating criteria for Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River have been proposed for the period of November 1991, to the completion of the record of decision for the Glen Canyon Dam environmental impact statement (about 1993). These criteria set specific limits on dam releases, including maximum and minimum flows, up-ramp and down-ramp rates, and maximum daily fluctuation. Under the proposed interim criteria, all of these parameters would be reduced relative to historical operating criteria to protect downstream natural resources, including sediment deposits, threatened and endangered fishes, trout, the aquatic food base, and riparian plant communities. The scientific bases of the three sets of proposed operating criteria are evaluated in the present report:(1) criteria proposed by the Research/Scientific Group, associated with the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES); (2) criteria proposed state and federal officials charged with managing downstream resources; and (3) test criteria imposed from July 1991, to November 1991. Data from Phase 1 of the GCES and other sources established that the targeted natural resources are affected by dam operations, but the specific interim criteria chosen were not supported by any existing studies. It is unlikely that irreversible changes to any of the resources would occur over the interim period if historical operating criteria remained in place. It is likely that adoption of any of the sets of proposed interim operating criteria would reduce the levels of sediment transport and erosion below Glen Canyon Dam; however, these interim criteria could result in some adverse effects, including the accumulation of debris at tributary mouths, a shift of new high-water-zone vegetation into more flood-prone areas, and further declines in vegetation in the old high water zone.

  5. Saeltzer Dam Removal on Clear Creek 11 years later: An assessment of upstream channel changes since the dam's removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Crystal; Walker, Katelyn; Zimring, Mark

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boulder BLDR Bedrock BDRK Dam Rubble DMRB Table B1. 2011pages. Brown, M. (n.d. ). Clear Creek—McCormick-Saeltzer DamRemoval: Dam removal re-opens spring run salmon habitat. US

  6. Assessment of Natural Stream Sites for Hydroelectric Dams in the Pacific Northwest Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Hall; Kristin L. Verdin; Randy D. Lee

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This pilot study presents a methodology for modeling project characteristics using a development model of a stream obstructing dam. The model is applied to all individual stream reaches in hydrologic region 17, which encompasses nearly all of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. Project site characteristics produced by the modeling technique include: capacity potential, principal dam dimensions, number of required auxiliary dams, total extent of the constructed impoundment boundary, and the surface area of the resulting reservoir. Aggregated capacity potential values for the region are presented in capacity categories including total, that at existing dams, within federal and environmentally sensitive exclusion zones, and the balance which is consider available for greenfield development within the limits of the study. Distributions of site characteristics for small hydropower sites are presented and discussed. These sites are screened to identify candidate small hydropower sites and distributions of the site characteristics of this site population are presented and discussed. Recommendations are made for upgrading the methodology and extensions to make the results more accessible and available on a larger scale.

  7. WASHINGTON TECHNICAL INSTITUTE WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    WASHINGTON TECHNICAL INSTITUTE WASHINGTON, D.C. 20008 WRRC REPORT NO. 9 CHARACTERIZATION-379, as amended. Agreement No. 14-34-0001-6066 Water Resources Research Center Washington Technical Institute Analysis of Composite Samples Before Concentration............ 16 5. Organic Losses During Concentration

  8. Washington Sea Grant Kate Litle, Citizen Science Specialist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrington, Emily

    Washington Sea Grant Kate Litle, Citizen Science Specialist Michelle Wainstein, Senior Program Stewardship Program Director Citizen Science Advisory Panel Citizen Science Harnessing to State University (WSU) Extension to develop recommendations for advancing citizen science to meet Action

  9. Guidewall demolition at Bonneville Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marks, R.S. [Kiewit Pacific Co., Vancouver, WA (United States)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville Dam, completed in 1938, included the smallest and busiest lock on the Columbia and Snake River Navigation System. To expedite barge traffic through this restriction, a new larger lock was designed and contracted by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers. The project involved drill and shoot, alluvial gravel and rock excavation, dredging, rock support, structural concrete, and assorted demolitions. A large portion of the demolition work was the removal of the existing guidewall to allow barge traffic access to the new lock. Guidewall Demolition was completed using drill and shoot techniques and dredging the debris from the channel. This work involved unique challenges and innovative solutions to produce a successful result.

  10. Civil Engineering Explore the environmental impact of dams.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Dams Civil Engineering Objective · Explore the environmental impact of dams. · Discuss the need for dams, and how environmental engineers mitigate some impacts. Standards and Objectives · Earth Systems humans' standard of living and environmental impacts. · The basic concept of constructing a dam

  11. DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;#12;DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT1 PINE CREEK DAM, OKLAHOMA2 DAM SAFETY MODIFICATION3 &4 Environmental Assessment Pine Creek Dam, Oklahoma Dam Safety Modification & Interim Risk Reduction Measure of Federal Regulations, Part 230, the Tulsa District has assessed the environmental impacts of modifications

  12. dam logic: qualitative reasoning about benthic macroinvertebrate responses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    dam logic: qualitative reasoning about benthic macroinvertebrate responses to dam removal desiree reliability of biotic and abiotic indicators (e.g. responsiveness to dam removal, detectability, feasibility relationships "there appears to be a wide range of ecological responses to dam removal. It is therefore

  13. ImpactsofLarge Dams:agLobaL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    #12;ImpactsofLarge Dams:agLobaL assessment Editors Cecilia Tortajada, Dogan Altinbilek, Asit K of the most controversial issues of the water sector in recent years has been the impacts of large dams and environmental costs of large dams far exceed their benefits, and that the era of construction of large dams

  14. Three-Gorges Dam: Risk to Ancient Fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    Three-Gorges Dam: Risk to Ancient Fish THE HUGETHREE-GORGES DAM (TGD) OFTHE Yangtze River is going and animals, as discussed by J. Wu et al. in their Policy Forum "Three-Gorges Dam-- experiment in habitat). The construction of the Gezhou Dam (38 km downstream from the TGD) in 1981 led to sharp declines in the popula

  15. Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    until 1981 when it was closed due to declining boat traffic. Since the failure of Green River Dam 4 by the dams and the impacts if the pool were to be lost, either by demolition or failure of the lock andGreen River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky 16

  16. EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF A SMALL, GRAVEL-FILLED DAM1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    EVOLVING EXPECTATIONS OF DAM REMOVAL OUTCOMES: DOWNSTREAM GEOMORPHIC EFFECTS FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF A SMALL, GRAVEL-FILLED DAM1 Kelly Kibler, Desiree Tullos, and Mathias Kondolf 2 ABSTRACT: Dam removal is a promising river restoration technique, particularly for the vast number of rivers impounded by small dams

  17. Perspectives on Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework Directive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Justin E; Pollak, Josh D; Richmond, Sarah F

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    supply, flood control, hydropower, and recreation. However,as changes induced by hydropower, flood control, or waterFERC requires private hydropower dams to provide “equal

  18. Dams, Mills, and Electric Power (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Water Resources Center of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources is responsible for implementing regulations pertaining to dam and reservoir safety. Any person or corporation may erect a...

  19. Dam Control and Safety Act (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This law grants authority to the secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection to control and exercise regulatory jurisdiction over dams as indicated in the subsections of the law. This...

  20. Dam Safety and Encroachments Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act sets the standards and criteria for the siting and design of dams, water obstructions and encroachments considering both existing and projected conditions. It requires operational plans to...

  1. Safe Dams Act of 1972 (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Safe Dams Act of 1973 (SDA) gives the Commissioner of the Department of Environment and Conservation the power to issue certificates authorizing the construction, alteration, or operation of a...

  2. Simulations of The Dalles Dam Proposed Full Length Spillwall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling study to evaluatethe impacts of a full-length spillwall at The Dalles Dam. The full-length spillwall is being designed and evaluated as a structural means to improve tailrace egress and thus survival of juvenile fish passing through the spillway. During the course of this study, a full-length spillwall at Bays 6/7 and 8/9 were considered. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has proposed extending the spillwall constructed in the stilling basin between spillway Bays 6 and 7 about 590 ft farther downstream. It is believed that the extension of the spillwall will improve egress conditions for downstream juvenile salmonids by moving them more rapidly into the thalweg of the river hence reducing their exposure to predators. A numerical model was created, validated, and applied the The Dalles Dam tailrace. The models were designed to assess impacts to flow, tailrace egress, navigation, and adult salmon passage of a proposed spill wall extension. The more extensive model validation undertaken in this study greatly improved our confidence in the numerical model to represent the flow conditions in The Dalles tailrace. This study used these validated CFD models to simulate the potential impacts of a spillwall extension for The Dalles Dam tailrace for two locations. We determined the following: (1)The construction of an extended wall (between Bays 6/7) will not adversely impact entering or exiting the navigation lock. Impact should be less if a wall were constructed between Bays 8/9. (2)The construction of a wall between Bays 6/7 will increase the water surface elevation between the wall and the Washington shore. Although the increased water surface elevation would be beneficial to adult upstream migrants in that it decreases velocities on the approach to the adult ladder, the increased flow depth would enhance dissolved gas production, impacting potential operations of the project because of water quality. A wall between Bays 8/9 should have a lesser impact as the confined spill would be across more bays and the relative flow constriction less. (3) The 405 kcfs case was used for the rapid assessment of flow conditions and hydraulic mechanisms that might be responsible for the unexpected erosion at the end of the shelf downstream of Bay 7.

  3. Recovery Act State Summaries | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Act State Memo Virgin Islands Recovery Act State Memo Washington Recovery Act State Memo West Virginia Recovery Act State Memo Wisconsin Recovery Act State Memo Wyoming Recovery...

  4. EIS-0484: Montana-to-Washington Transmission System Upgrade Project...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4: Montana-to-Washington Transmission System Upgrade Project in Washington, Idaho, and Montana EIS-0484: Montana-to-Washington Transmission System Upgrade Project in Washington,...

  5. Processes affecting the spatial and temporal variability of methane in a temperate dammed river system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilsley, Nicole A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    emissions from large dams as renewable energy resources: Areservoir (Brazil’s Tucuruí Dam) and the energy policyemissions from hydroelectric dams: controversies provide a

  6. Commercial Energy Code Enforcement in Oregon and Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, M.; Miller, W.; O'Neill, M.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMUERCIAL ENERGY CODE ENFORCEMENT IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON WILL MILLER )(AURA O'NEILL UARK JOHNSON TECHNICAL DIRECTOR PRESIDENT PUBLIC UTILITIES SPECIALIST PORTLAND ENERGY CONSERVATION, IWC . , O'NEILL 6 CO., INC., BONNEVILLE POWER... ADHINISTBATION PORTLAND, OREGON SEATTLE, WASHINGTON PORTLAND. OREGON In recent years. many states and local jurisdictions have passed mandatory building codes to achieve energy efficiency in new construction. All too often the political bodies that pass...

  7. Route-Specific Passage and Survival of Steelhead Kelts at The Dalles and Bonneville Dams, 2012 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayamajhi, Bishes; Ploskey, Gene R.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Faber, Derek M.; Kim, Jin A.; Colotelo, Alison HA; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was mainly focused on evaluating the route-specific passage and migration success of steelhead kelts passing downstream through The Dalles Dam (TDA) and Bonneville Dam (BON) at Columbia River (CR) river kilometers 309 and 234 respectively. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) personnel collected, tagged and released out-migrating steelhead kelts in the tributaries of the Deschutes River, 15 Mile Creek and Hood River between April 14 and June 4, 2012. A PIT tag was injected into each kelt’s dorsal sinus whereas a Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) acoustic micro-transmitter was attached to an external FLoy T-bar tag and inserted into the dorsal back musculature using a Floy tagging gun. JSATS cabled arrays were deployed at TDA and BON and autonomous node arrays were deployed near Celilo, Oregon (CR325); the BON forebay (CR236); the BON tailrace (CR233); near Knapp, Washington (CR156); and near Kalama, Washington (CR113) to monitor the kelts movement while passing through the dams and above mentioned river cross-sections.

  8. Washington City Power- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington City adopted a net-metering program, including interconnection procedures, in January 2008.* Net metering is available to residential and commercial customers that generate electricity...

  9. northeastern Washington's Okanogan County. The

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7.31 acre habitat acquisition in Washington's Okanogan River Watershed for fish habitat mitigation (see map). The Okanogan River Watershed was selected as a focus for restoration...

  10. Operation of the Lower Granite Dam Adult Trap, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Jerrel R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 2008 we operated the adult salmonid trap at Lower Granite Dam from 7 March through 25 November, except during a short summer period when water temperatures were too high to safely handle fish. We collected and handled a total of 20,463 steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss and radio-tagged 34 of the hatchery steelhead. We took scale samples from 3,724 spring/summer Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha for age and genetic analysis. We collected and handled a total of 8,254 fall Chinook salmon. Of those fish, 2,520 adults and 942 jacks were transported to Lyons Ferry Hatchery on the Snake River in Washington. In addition, 961 adults and 107 jacks were transported to the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery on the Clearwater River in Idaho. The remaining 3,724 fall Chinook salmon were passed upstream. Scales samples were taken from 780 fall Chinook salmon tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and collected by the sort-by-code system.

  11. Washington: Putting More Solar on More Rooftops in Washington State |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment of Energy MicrosoftVOLUMEWORKFORCE DIVERSITYMarch 30,

  12. Washington: Putting More Solar on More Rooftops in Washington State |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: SinceDevelopment | Department ofPartnerships Toolkit VoluntaryHURRICANELocalDepartment of

  13. Channel response to Dam Removal, Clear Creek, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Peter; Vizcaino, Pilar

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Dam Removal, Clear Creek, California Peter Miller and9, 2004 Abstract Clear Creek drains 720 km 2 , joining the2002) Saeltzer Dam on Clear Creek was a good candidate for

  14. Power benefits of the lower Snake River dams - FACT SHEET

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I n the 1960s and early 1970s, the federal government built four large dams on the Snake River. This is the last set of major dams to have been built in the Federal Columbia River...

  15. Biofuels in Oregon and Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PNNL-17351 Biofuels in Oregon and Washington A Business Case Analysis of Opportunities and Challenges Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory #12;#12;Biofuels in Oregon and Washington, particularly in light of the recent growth experienced by the biofuels industry in the Midwest. Policymakers

  16. Harold Washington Social Security Administration (SSA) Center...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Harold Washington Social Security Administration (SSA) Center Water Conservation and Green Energy Harold Washington Social Security Administration (SSA) Center Water Conservation...

  17. Washington: Graphene Nanostructures for Lithium Batteries Recieves...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Washington: Graphene Nanostructures for Lithium Batteries Recieves 2012 R&D 100 Award Washington: Graphene Nanostructures for Lithium Batteries Recieves 2012 R&D 100 Award February...

  18. Independent Activity Report, Washington River Protection Solutions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC - October 2011 October 2011 Industrial Hygiene Surveillance of the Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC Industrial Hygiene...

  19. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington Update Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington Update Presentation-given at the Fall 2012...

  20. Washington Energy Facility Site Evalutation Council - Generalized...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Energy Facility Site Evalutation Council - Generalized Siting Process Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Chart: Washington Energy...

  1. Lac Courte Oreilles Hydro Dam Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Jason [Lac Courte Oreilles; Meyers, Amy [Kiser Hydro

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this project was to investigate upgrading the existing hydro power generating system at the Winter Dam. The tribe would like to produce more energy and receive a fair market power purchase agreement so the dam is no longer a drain on our budget but a contributor to our economy. We contracted Kiser Hydro, LLC Engineering for this project and received an engineering report that includes options for producing more energy with cost effective upgrades to the existing turbines. Included in this project was a negotiation of energy price sales negotiations.

  2. Student Competition: Siting Potential Dams at Camp Del Webb, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wamser, William Kyle

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Siting Potential Dams at Camp Del Webb, Utah Presented By: Kyle Wamser Problem ? Camp Del Webb is Lacking an Onsite Lake ? High Adventure Bases generally need aquatics ? Large lake nearby, but transportation is required ? Possible Solution... hillshade ? Finding Possible Lake Locations ? Added three potential dam sites ? Calculated watersheds ? Extended dams through terrain to prevent runoff on the sides ? Calculated watershed dam elevation, which identified lakes Results...

  3. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Big dams and salmon evolution: changes in thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angilletta, Michael

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Big dams and salmon evolution: changes in thermal regimes and their potential (Oncorhynchus spp.) across portions of their natural range, dams have arguably played a major role in many locations (NRC 1996; Lichatowich 1999; Ruckelshaus et al. 2002). Large dams (>15 m tall)­ designed

  4. MURTHY, MURTY AND RAGHUPATHY Designing Earth Dams Optimally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murty, Katta G.

    [ 91 ] MURTHY, MURTY AND RAGHUPATHY Designing Earth Dams Optimally G S R Murthy1 , Katta G Murty2 HES Infra Limited, Hyderabad, India Abstract : Engineering design of an earth dam is a crucial issue, it aims at formulating the problem of designing earth dams as an optimization problem. The problem

  5. GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS By: Christine T. Weber1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS By: Christine T. Weber1 and Jorge Zornberg, Advisor Abstract: The overall goal of this project is to contribute towards the use of geosynthetics in the design of dams geomembrane and composite liners under conditions representative of dams. There has been previous work done

  6. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM BRISBANE RIVER ABOVE WIVENHOE DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BRISBANE RIVER ABOVE WIVENHOE DAM This brochure describes the flood above Wivenhoe Dam. It includes reference information which will be useful for understanding Flood above Wivenhoe Dam drains an area of approximately 7,000 square kilometres. The Brisbane River rises

  7. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM BRISBANE RIVER BELOW WIVENHOE DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BRISBANE RIVER BELOW WIVENHOE DAM TO BRISBANE CITY This brochure for the Brisbane River below Wivenhoe Dam to Brisbane City. It includes reference information which will be useful kilometres of which about half is below Wivenhoe Dam. The Lockyer-Laidley Valley drains into the Brisbane

  8. Dam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using Dimensionless Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    Dam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using Dimensionless Parameters Victor M. Ponce, M.ASCE1 ; Ahmad to study the sensitivity of dam-breach flood waves to breach-outflow hydrograph volume, peak discharge the channel. A dam-breach Froude number is defined to enable analysis through a wide range of site and flow

  9. MFR PAPER 1222 Effects of Dams on Pacific Salmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFR PAPER 1222 Effects of Dams on Pacific Salmon and Steelhead Trout GERALD B. COLLINS INTRODUCTION on the survival of salmon than the construction of dams. The watershed of the Columbia River presents a critical illustration of the effects of dams on salmon, reflecting events in progress in the entire Pacific Northwest

  10. Chapter 13 Water Resources Hoover Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    management Water shortage linked to food supply Learning Objectives #12; The global water cycleChapter 13 Water Resources #12;Hoover Dam #12;The Colorado River Basin Population growth Urbanization Climate change #12; Water cycle Water use Surface water and groundwater processes Water

  11. The Distribution and Flux of Fish in the Forebay of The Dalles Dam in 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faber, Derrek M.; Hanks, Michael E.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Skalski, John R.; Dillingham, Peter W.

    2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In spring and summer 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory led a team that conducted mobile and fixed hydroacoustic surveys in the forebay of The Dalles Dam for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Portland District, for the Anadromous Fish Evaluation Program. The surveys provided information on the distribution and movement of smolt-sized fish relative to ambient factors such as flow, bathymetry, or diel cycle in the forebay at The Dalles Dam. This information is intended to provide baseline data for the development of a surface bypass alternative for juvenile salmon at The Dalles Dam. We sampled the forebay of The Dallas Dam one day and night each week for six weeks in the spring and another six weeks in the summer. In general, during the day in the spring, the greatest densities of smolt-sized fish were observed in the thalweg of the main channel from the Washington bank, to the east side of the powerhouse, along the powerhouse, and concentrated in the areas next to the sluiceway. Fish density was lower on the Washington side of the river and west of mid-powerhouse (north spillway side). The spring night distribution was similar, with a few notable differences. The density of fish was high on the east side of the powerhouse and along the face of the powerhouse, and more fish were detected on the north spillway side. The distribution of sub-yearling sized fish in summer followed the same general patterns as spring, except that summer fish had a greater presence on the east side of the powerhouse and on the north spillway side. The vertical distribution of fish was also determined. In spring 80% of fish were above 5.6 m of depth during the day and above 4.7 m in the night. The summer fish were similarly distributed in the day and night with 80% of the fish in the upper 4.5 m and 4.7 m of the water column respectively. In general the smolt-sized fish were distributed deeper in the water column in the center of the channel than near the edges. The net movement of smolt-sized fish in the forebay from fixed-point samples appeared to be in a circular pattern, with fish moving with the flow and channel upstream of the powerhouse, and upstream at points near the powerhouse. The rate of fish movement (flux) was greatest at the east end of the powerhouse and on the upstream-north side of the channel.

  12. Smolt Passage Behavior and Flow-Net Relationship in the Forebay of John Day Dam, 1984-1985 Final Report of Research.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giorgi, Albert E.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The migration routes of downstream migrant salmonids in the forebay of John Day Dam were defined and assessed in relation to current velocities and water turbidity and temperature. Forebay current patterns were obtained from current meters at fixed sampling stations, the distribution of outmigrants was determined from purse seine sampling, and migration routes of yearling chinook salmon and steelhead were identified by radio telemetry techniques. All species of emigrating salmonids alter their distribution across the forebay as they approach the dam. Fish abundance was positively correlated with water clarity. There was no evidence to suggest that the migration routes were in response to current patterns in the forebay. Radio telemetry studies demonstrated that a certain segment of yearling chinook salmon approaching the dam are predisposed to spill passage (Washington side of the river) by virtue of their lateral position across the forebay. A new application of radio tag methodology was assessed and found to be useful in evaluating the effectiveness of spill for bypassing outmigrant salmon. A program system and cartographic model was developed which displays for any specified hour forebay current patterns at prevailing river flows and dam operations. The system can be used at other dam sites where investigations may wish to detail forebay current patterns.

  13. ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor to continue with the project, the Watts Bar Dam Project was canceled and the Exploranium radiation monitors were removed from the doors of Watts Bar Dam in early 2006. The DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office decided to proceed with a Pilot building on the ORNL work performed at the TN and SC weigh stations in the highway sector of the Trusted Corridors project and eventually expanded it to other southern states under the name of Southeastern Corridor Pilot Project (SETCP). Many of the Phase I goals were achieved however real-world test data of private watercraft and barges was never obtained.

  14. Tumwater, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (UtilityTri-StateTucson Estates,Tumwater, Washington: Energy

  15. FUPWG Fall 2009 Washington Update | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FUPWG Fall 2009 Washington Update FUPWG Fall 2009 Washington Update Presentation covers the 2009 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Washington update to the Lighting...

  16. Plant Disease Note 2004 | Iris Yellow Spot Virus in Onion Bulb and Seed Crops in Washington Overview Current Issue Past Issues Search PD Search APS Journals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappu, Hanu R.

    Plant Disease Note 2004 | Iris Yellow Spot Virus in Onion Bulb and Seed Crops in Washington Yellow Spot Virus in Onion Bulb and Seed Crops in Washington. L. J. du Toit, Washington State University of the NP gene. In August 2003, symptoms of IYSV infection were observed in two onion bulb crops, each

  17. Dynamic model failure tests of dam structures Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer Jr., B.F.

    Dynamic model failure tests of dam structures Gao Lin Dalian University of Technology, Dalian failure tests of a number of concrete gravity dams, concrete arch dams and embankment dams have been index for the safety assessment of concrete dams and is predicted through dynamic model failure tests

  18. Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2011 General Motors 2 Variable Height Vehicle Air Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    Vehicle Air Dam Overview The fundamental issue with fixed air dams is the bottom edge of the dam needs to be high enough to meet defined vehicle ground clearance and front approach angle criteria. Air dams must a solution to this problem by designing an variable height vehicle air dam. Objectives Our mission

  19. Dams have played an important role in human development throughout the world for thousands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dams have played an important role in human development throughout the world for thousands of years dams (>15 m in height) and an estimated 800 000 small dams had been built worldwide (WCD 2000 than 22 000 large dams (but only 22 before 1949), China is the largest dam-building country; by way

  20. WashingtonSeaGrant StrategicPlan2010-2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrington, Emily

    communities with diversified urban economies rim the densely populated Puget Sound basin. Given these differences, separate state governance approaches have developed for Puget Sound and the Washington coast. WSG is involved in implementing the Puget Sound Partnership's Action Agenda to restore and protect Puget Sound

  1. Coastal and Lower Elwha River, Washington, Prior to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Puget Sound, a large fjord-estuary in northwestern Washington State. The more than 3,000 km of Puget, and deltas. Puget Sound and the Georgia Basin are part of the Salish Sea (fig. 1.1), which is fed by rivers impacts, Puget Sound is home to a diverse array of biological communities and charismatic species

  2. Survival and Passage of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead at The Dalles Dam, Spring 2011 - FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Batten, G.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Hughes, James S.; Martinez, Jayson J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Royer, Ida M.; Townsend, Richard L.; Woodley, Christa M.; Kim, Jeongkwon; Etherington, D. J.; Skalski, J. R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Fisher, Erik J.; Greiner, Michael J.; Khan, Fenton; Mitchell, T. D.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study reported herein was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The PNNL and UW project managers were Drs. Thomas J. Carlson and John R. Skalski, respectively. The USACE technical lead was Mr. Brad Eppard. The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival and other performance measures at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion (BiOp) and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The study is being documented in two types of reports: compliance and technical. A compliance report is delivered within 6 months of the completion of the field season and focuses on results of the performance metrics outlined in the 2008 BiOp and Fish Accords. A technical report is produced within the 18 months after field work, providing comprehensive documentation of a given study and results on route-specific survival estimates and fish passage distributions, which are not included in compliance reports. This technical report concerns the 2011 acoustic telemetry study at The Dalles Dam.

  3. Title 33 USC 401 Construction of Bridges, Causeways, Dams or...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Title 33 USC 401 Construction of Bridges, Causeways, Dams or Dikes Generally; ExemptionsLegal Abstract Section...

  4. analysis model dam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medical Image Analysis Erik B. Dam Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: - mentation program, the possible performance improvement due to non-linear diffusion is not unlimited,...

  5. arch dams including: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: insight into the gamut of shallow water waves, including kinematic, diffusion, dynamic, and gravity wavesDam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using...

  6. Company shelves dam to avoid agency's conservation edict

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, N.

    1985-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Northern Paper Co. is shelving plans to build a hydroelectric dam because of two stipulations by the Maine Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC) requiring the company to fund a comprehensive energy audit of several mills in the area and submit a plan for modernizing outdated paper producing machines. Critics of the dam contend that in-plant conservation would free up more power than the dam would produce. The basis for this was an internal memo citing possible large amounts of wasted energy from motors that need rewinding. Although the company is retaining the option to build, the future of the Big A dam is uncertain.

  7. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1999 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1999. This was the fourth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 453,117 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities not only slightly exceeded the 450,000 fish quota, but a second release of 76,386 yearlings (hereafter called Surplus) were acclimated at the Big Canyon facility and released about two weeks after the primary releases. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 9,941 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 9,583 from Big Canyon, 2,511 Big Canyon Surplus and 2,494 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 983 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low and did not appear to increase after transport to the acclimation facilities. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery and relatively high at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the release groups ranged from 147.4 mm (146.7-148.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 163.7 mm (163.3-164.1 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.04 at Pittsburg Landing to 1.23 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 87.8% (82.1-93.4%) for Big Canyon Surplus to 94.1% (90.1-98.1%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 58.7% (49.3-68.1%) for Big Canyon Surplus to 71.3% (60.1-82.5%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 9.3 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 18.7 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 9.0 rkm/d for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 17.3 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 7-10 days to Lower Granite Dam and 21-23 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, were all from April 23-25. The median arrival date for Big Canyon Surplus was May 4. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups were all from May 7-8. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam were May 17 for Big Canyon Surplus and April 26 for Lyons Ferry Hatchery.

  8. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2001. This was the sixth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 318,932 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,503 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,499 from Big Canyon and 2,518 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 991 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 155.4 mm (154.7-156.1 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 171.6 mm (170.7-172.5 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.02 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.4% (73.2-75.5%) for Big Canyon to 85.2% (83.5-87.0%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 37.9% (36.0-40.0%) for Pittsburg Landing to 57.9% (53.0-62.8%) for Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 6.3 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Big Canyon to 10.8 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 5.2 rkm/d for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 10.9 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 13-17 days to Lower Granite Dam and 31-37 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids, were all from April 26-27. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups were all from May 14-18. The median arrival date at McNary Dam was May 13 for Lyons Ferry Hatchery yearlings.

  9. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 2000. This was the fifth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 397,339 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,477 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,421 from Big Canyon and 2,488 from Captain John Rapids. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife released 980 PIT tagged yearlings from Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered relatively low. Compared to prior years, Quantitative Health Assessment Indices were relatively low at Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids and about average at Pittsburg Landing and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 157.7 mm (157.3-158.1 mm) at Big Canyon to 172.9 mm (172.2-173.6 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.12 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 87.0% (84.7-89.4%) for Pittsburg Landing to 95.2% (91.5-98.9%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 65.8% (58.5-73.1%) for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 84.0% (76.2-91.8%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 10.1 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 19.1 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 6.0 rkm/d for Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 17.3 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 9-10 days to Lower Granite Dam and 22-25 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids, were all from April 21-22. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups were all from May 5-6. The median arrival date at McNary Dam was April 24 for Lyons Ferry Hatchery yearlings.

  10. EA-1707: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of closing the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and the Solid Waste Landfill. The Washington State Department of Ecology is a cooperating agency in preparing this EA.

  11. Horse and Libby dams. VarQ was made permanent at Libby and Hun-gry Horse dams by 2009, after an extensive Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VarQ Horse and Libby dams. VarQ was made permanent at Libby and Hun- gry Horse dams by 2009, afterQ providedecosystembenefitswhilemaintainingthesameFRMbenefits as under standard FRM. How Does VarQ Impact Canada? Above Libby Dam, both U of the border. Below Libby Dam, both U.S. and Canadian fish populations benefit from river flows that more

  12. Potential Geomorphic and Ecological Impacts of Marmot Dam Removal, Sandy River, OR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marmot Dam is a 13-meter (42 ft) high hydroelectric diversion dam on the Sandy River that is owned Run Hydroelectric project and began the process of creating a decommissioning plan for the dam

  13. Contaminant Stratigraphy of the Ballville Reservoir, Sandusky River, NW Ohio: Implications for Dam Removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    . Removal of the dam would require dredging or release downstream of 0.35 million m3 of sedi- ment to re for keeping the dam. Reasons to remove a dam might include economic obsolescence, safety issues, costs

  14. Review of Studies of Fish Survival in Spill at The Dalles Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Review of Studies of Fish Survival in Spill at The Dalles Dam Independent Scientific Advisory BoardThe Dalles Dam Contents Assignment ................................................................................................................................................. 17 Appendix 4. Estimated Total Project Survival at The Dalles Dam at the Two Spill Levels

  15. The Downstream Geomorphic Effects of Dams: A Comprehensive and Comparative Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minear, Justin Toby

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gages used and the dates of the pre- and post-dam periods.and its alteration by dams. San Francisco Estuary andof water and sediment on rigid dam, J. Eng. Mech. , 119(7),

  16. High Dams and Marine-Freshwater Linkages: Effects on Native and Introduced Fauna in the Caribbean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmquist, Jeffrey G; Schmidt-Gengenbach, Jutta; Yoshioka, Beverly Buchanan

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in relation to hydroelectric dams in the Amazon Basin.effects of the Kafue Gorge Dam. Transactions of the Americanof fishways and impact of dams on the migration of grayling

  17. Historical Population Structure of Central Valley Steelhead and Its Alteration by Dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. 2005. Creating a comprehensive dam dataset for assessingand its Alteration by Dams STEVEN T. LINDLEY 1 , ROBERT S.Pres- ently, impassable dams block access to 80% of

  18. The distribution of dams in Costa Rica and their hydrologic impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurencio, Laura Richards

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Dam construction has increased exponentially over the past century, primarily in temperate environments. While the impacts of dams in temperate regions have been well-documented, a parallel level of research on dam impacts has not been achieved...

  19. The Downstream Geomorphic Effects of Dams: A Comprehensive and Comparative Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minear, Justin Toby

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Framework for Interpreting Downstream Effects of Dams onF. and N. Shin, 2001. The downstream effects of dams on theG.P. and M.G. Wolman, 1984. Downstream Effects of Dams on

  20. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D.; Marsh, Douglas M. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the twelfth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder tags (PIT tags). We PIT tagged and released a total of 19,621 hatchery steelhead, 8,128 wild steelhead, and 9,227 wild yearling Chinook salmon at Lower Granite Dam. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and sites within the hydropower system. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the single-release model). Primary research objectives in 2004 were to (1) estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss; (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions; and (3) evaluate the survival-estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2004 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Results are reported primarily in the form of tables and figures; details on methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here. Survival and detection probabilities were estimated precisely for most of the 2004 yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead migrations. Hatchery and wild fish were combined in some of the analyses. Overall, the percentages for combined release groups used in survival analyses were 68% hatchery-reared yearling Chinook salmon and 32% wild. For steelhead, the overall percentages were 73% hatchery-reared and 27% wild. Estimated survival from the tailrace of Lower Granite Dam to the tailrace of Little Goose Dam averaged 0.923 for yearling Chinook salmon and 0.860 for steelhead. Respective average survival estimates for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead were 0.875 and 0.820 from Little Goose Dam tailrace to Lower Monumental Dam tailrace; 0.818 and 0.519 from Lower Monumental Dam tailrace to McNary Dam tailrace (including passage through Ice Harbor Dam); and 0.809 and 0.465 from McNary Dam tailrace to John Day Dam tailrace. Survival for yearling Chinook salmon from John Day Dam tailrace to Bonneville Dam tailrace (including passage through The Dalles Dam) was 0.735. We were unable to estimate survival through this reach for steelhead during 2004 because too few fish were detected at Bonneville Dam due to operation of the new corner collector at the second powerhouse. Combining average estimates from the Snake River smolt trap to Lower Granite Dam, from Lower Granite Dam to McNary Dam, and from McNary Dam to Bonneville Dam, estimated annual average survival through the entire hydropower system from the head of Lower Granite reservoir to the tailrace of Bonneville Dam (eight projects) was 0.353 (s.e. 0.045) for Snake River yearling Chinook salmon. We could not empirically estimate survival through the entire system for steelhead in 2004 because of low detection rates for this species at Bonneville Dam. For yearling spring Chinook salmon released in the Upper Columbia River, estimated survival from point of release to McNary Dam tailrace was 0.484 (s.e. 0.005) for fish released from Leavenworth Hatchery, 0.748 (s.e. 0.015) for fish released from Entiat Hatchery, 0.738 (s.e. 0.036) for fish released from Winthrop Hatchery, and 0.702 (s.e. 0.048) and 0.747 (s.e.0.047) for those from Methow Hatchery, Chewuch Pond and

  1. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON SEATTLE, WASHINGTON 98195-7730

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    of Washington September 2006 #12;3) Rubber O-rings. We reuse the O-rings over and over. We purchase bags of 25 for applying vacuum grease. Puritan Applicator Sticks Harwood Products Guilford, ME 04443-0149 No. 807 1000 6 Number 1-000-0250 Drummond Scientific Company Broomall, PA 7) Schneider's tissue culture medium (500 ml

  2. EIS-0456: Cushman Hydroelectric Project, Tacoma, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS is for the design and construction of certain components of the Cushman Hydroelectric Project in Mason County, Washington.

  3. Denman Forestry Issues Series: Washington's Forest Regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    Denman Forestry Issues Series: Washington's Forest Regulations and Their Impacts on The Private College of Forest Resources continued its Denman Forestry Issues Series on May 30, 2001. Alumni landowners. Policy analysts and speakers representing the Washington Farm Forestry Assn., Washington Forest

  4. Geologic map of the Richland 1:100,000 quadrangle, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, S.P.; Fecht, K.R. [comps.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This map of the Richland 1:100,000-scale quadrangle, Washington, shows the geology of one of fifteen complete or partial 1:100,000-scale quadrangles that cover the southeast quadrant of Washington. Geologic maps of these quadrangles have been compiled by geologists with the Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources (DGER) and Washington State University and are the principal data sources for a 1:250,000-scale geologic map of the southeast quadrant of Washington, which is in preparation. Eleven of these quadrangles are being released as DGER open-file reports. The map of the Wenatchee quadrangle has been published by the US Geological Survey, and the Moses Lake, Ritzville quadrangles have already been released.

  5. Bioenergy Technologies Office Judges Washington State University...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to challenge high school students to explore new ways to support the transition to alternative energy sources. The competition, held on May 30-June 1, 2014, asks students to...

  6. Recovery Act State Memos Washington, DC

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    are being used to hire or retrain staff in, building in-house expertise in the areas of Smart Grids, critical energy infrastructure interdependencies and cyber-security. *...

  7. SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY ONE WASHINGTON SQUARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    ; CSSA and the editorial board of the San José Mercury News. RATIONALE: In Education Code section 66602) five ex-officio members, including the Governor, three other elected officials and the Chancellor, (b code section 66602 specifically and explicitly requires that the Governor must appoint a faculty

  8. SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY ONE WASHINGTON SQUARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    -wide faculty awards. S00-9 consolidated the previously existing Outstanding Professor and Presidential Scholar to be reminded of the individual's contributions. Sadly, at that point it is too late. This policy would permit

  9. Washington State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    heat recovery devices, including desuperheater water heaters, condensing heat exchangers, heat pump and water heating heat recovery systems, and other energy recovery equipment k....

  10. Washington State University | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwide PermitInformationIsland: EnergyECYUniversity Jump to:

  11. STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton n u May 23,Complainant,

  12. STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome ton n u May 23,Complainant,"

  13. Washington State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric Vehicle and03/02Report |toVEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES5WalkingLeaseWashingtonof

  14. An Economic Engine for Washington State

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta FeAuthorization| Department ofAn EarlyAn

  15. Distribution of bed sediment on Clear Creek after removal of Saeltzer Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton-Niederman, Z; Gilbreath, Alicia

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Saeltzer Dam on Clear Creek: An Update, Water Resources83-138. Brown, Matt. 2004. Clear Creek anadromous salmonidto Dam Removal, Clear Creek, California, Water Resources

  16. Instituto Babcock Pamela Ruegg, Dam Rasmussen, y Doug Reinemann, Universidad de Wisconsin Instituto Babcock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Instituto Babcock © Pamela Ruegg, Dam Rasmussen, y Doug Reinemann, Universidad de Wisconsin. Pamela Ruegg, Dam Rasmussen, and Doug Reinemann Traductor: Matías Fernandez Introducción La producción y

  17. mentor memo University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Volkenburgh, Elizabeth

    mentor memo University of Washington the graduate school autumn quarter 2009 By Sabrina Bonaparte Network: Finding Mentors What do mentors do? Mentors help you learn and often share common topical a personal manner. Mentors understand you, see potential in you, and help you develop that potential

  18. Washington Update March 14, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington Update March 14, 2011 Nominations for the National Climate Assessment Development a very wide range of expertise is required on the NCADAC.Nominees are sought who have · sectoral expertise, including the natural environment, agriculture and forestry, energy, land cover and land use

  19. FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Washington, DC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peha, Jon M.

    1 Before the FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Washington, DC GN Docket No. 14-28 In the Matter 15213-3890 peha@cmu.edu July 15, 2014 #12;2 Executive Summary It is important for the Commission situated entity. This policy would particularly benefit new entrepreneurial ventures. The Commission should

  20. Financial Analysis of Experimental Releases Conducted at Glen Canyon Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration #12;ii FOREWORD This report was prepared by Argonne Canyon Dam (GCD) conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Western Area Power Administration (Western. The facilities known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects include dams equipped for power

  1. Phase 1: Dam, Lake, and Wetland The project's first phase was a dam and stormwater impoundment to control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Phase 3: Constructed Treatment Wetland (not publicly accessible) Six stormwater wetland cells surround Phase 1: Dam, Lake, and Wetland The project's first phase was a dam and stormwater impoundment to control surface water and groundwater hydrology. The surrounding wetlands were restored

  2. Radiological Survey Results for Areas A1 North, A5A, A6, and B2 at the Molycorp Washington Remediation Project, Washington, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.C. Adams

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Perform radiological surveys of the Molycorp Washington Remediation Project (MWRP) facility in Washington, Pennsylvania

  3. GLASS FORMULATION TESTING TO INCREASE SULFATE INCORPORATION - Final Report VSL-04R4960-1, Rev 0, 2/28/05, Vitreous State Laboratory, The Catholic University of American, Washington, D.C.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    About 50 million gallons of high-level mixed waste is currently in storage in underground tanks at The United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site in the State of Washington. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will provide DOE's Office of River Protection (ORP) with a means of treating this waste by vitrification for subsequent disposal. The tank waste will be separated into low- and high-activity fractions, which will then be vitrified respectively into Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) and Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) products. The ILAW product will be disposed of in an engineered facility on the Hanford site while the IHLW product will be directed to the national deep geological disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste. The ILAW and IHLW products must meet a variety of requirements with respect to protection of the environment before they can be accepted for disposal. The Office of River Protection is currently examining options to optimize the Low Activity Waste (LAW) facility and the LAW glass waste form. One option under evaluation is to enhance the waste processing rate of the vitrification plant currently under construction. It is likely that the capacity of the LAW vitrification plant can be increased incrementally by implementation of a variety of low-risk, high-probability changes, either separately or in combination. These changes include: (1) Operating at the higher processing rates demonstrated at the LAW Pilot Melter; (2) Increasing the glass pool surface area within the existing external melter envelope; (3) Increasing plant availability; (4) Increasing the glass waste loading; (5) Removing sulfate from the LAW stream; (6) Operating the melter at slightly higher temperature; (7) Installing the third LAW melter into the WTP plant; and (8) Other smaller impact changes. The melter tests described in this report utilized blended feed (glass formers plus waste simulant) prepared by Optima Chemicals according to VSL specifications. Sufficient feed was prepared to produce over nineteen hundred kilograms of glass during melter tests. The nominal reductant concentration (stoichiometric ratio of 0.5 {approx} 1 mole sucrose per 16 mole NOx or 3 mole carbon per 4 mole NOx) was maintained in all the tests by the addition of sugar at VSL. The DM 10 was used to screen the optimized glass formulation with two alternative aluminum sources (kyanite and zeolite) over a wide range of target sulfur concentrations. Subsequently, based on the DM10 results, nine 12- to 34-hour DM100 tests were conducted; six with kyanite as the aluminum additive at glass sulfur concentrations ranging from 0.75 to 1.5 wt.% SO{sub 3}, and the other three with zeolite as the aluminum additive at glass sulfur concentrations ranging from 0.75 to 1.5 wt. % SO{sub 3}. The DM 100-WV melter was used in order to provide a direct comparison with the LAW tests previously conducted on the same melter. Key operating parameters such as glass temperature and production rate were held constant to investigate the sulfur incorporation into the glass and the effects of varying the aluminum additive source. The bubbling rate was adjusted to achieve a production rate of 2000 kg/m{sup 2}/day with a near-complete cold cap (90-100% of melt surface covered with feed). Quantitative measurements of glass production rates, melter operating conditions (temperatures, pressures, power, flows, etc.), and off-gas characteristics (NOx, SO{sub 2}, CO, particulate load and composition, and acid gases) were made for each test. Glass samples taken from the glass pool and the discharge chamber were inspected throughout testing to determine the limit of salt-free operation in the melter.

  4. Quantifying and Generalizing Hydrologic Responses to Dam Regulation using a Statistical Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the ubiquitous existence of dams within riverscapes, much of our knowledge about dams and their environmental effects remains context-specific. Hydrology, more than any other environmental variable, has been studied in great detail with regard to dam regulation. While much progress has been made in generalizing the hydrologic effects of regulation by large dams, many aspects of hydrology show site-specific fidelity to dam operations, small dams (including diversions), and regional hydrologic regimes. A statistical modeling framework is presented to quantify and generalize hydrologic responses to varying degrees of dam regulation. Specifically, the objectives were to 1) compare the effects of local versus cumulative dam regulation, 2) determine the importance of different regional hydrologic regimes in influencing hydrologic responses to dams, and 3) evaluate how different regulation contexts lead to error in predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Overall, model performance was poor in quantifying the magnitude of hydrologic responses, but performance was sufficient in classifying hydrologic responses as negative or positive. Responses of some hydrologic indices to dam regulation were highly dependent upon hydrologic class membership and the purpose of the dam. The opposing coefficients between local and cumulative-dam predictors suggested that hydrologic responses to cumulative dam regulation are complex, and predicting the hydrology downstream of individual dams, as opposed to multiple dams, may be more easy accomplished using statistical approaches. Results also suggested that particular contexts, including multipurpose dams, high cumulative regulation by multiple dams, diversions, close proximity to dams, and certain hydrologic classes are all sources of increased error when predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Statistical models, such as the ones presented herein, show promise in their ability to model the effects of dam regulation effects at large spatial scales as to generalize the directionality of hydrologic responses.

  5. TSSGNEO suggestions for refinement of safety criteria for dam at the Sayano-Shushenskaya HPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savich, A. I.; Gaziev, E. G. [Expert Commission on Assessment of the 'Dam - Bed' System at the Sayano-Shushenskaya HPP (Russian Federation)] [Expert Commission on Assessment of the 'Dam - Bed' System at the Sayano-Shushenskaya HPP (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of radial-displacements of the dam, measured by direct and inverted plumb lines, indicates that curves of the variation in radial displacements of the dam at different elevations make it possible to plot diagrams of increases in the radial displacement over the entire height of the dam, i.e., inclines of the axis of the dam to the vertical.

  6. On the Modeling and Simulation of Non-Hydrostatic Dam Break Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by the failure of the dam structure. The determination of the potential consequences of a dam break requiresOn the Modeling and Simulation of Non-Hydrostatic Dam Break Flows Alexandre Caboussat S´ebastien Boyaval Alexandre Masserey January 1, 2013 Abstract The numerical simulation of three-dimensional dam

  7. Institute for Water Resources, US Army Corps of Engineers Australian National Committee on Large Dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    Committee on Large Dams LIFESim: A Model for Estimating Dam Failure Life Loss DRAFT by Maged A. Aboelata ABSTRACT Catastrophic events such as dam failures or severe floods are considered to be of low probability linked circumstances surrounding historical dam failure events to actual loss of life and produced

  8. Signature of Rhine Valley sturzstrom dam failures in Holocene sediments of Lake Constance, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Signature of Rhine Valley sturzstrom dam failures in Holocene sediments of Lake Constance, Germany that the hyperpycnite deposits are directly related to the failure of two sturzstrom dams and the draining of the dammed and Schuster, 1988). Landslide-dammed lake failures constitute a major hazard to downstream areas (Eis- bacher

  9. Morphological responses and sediment processes following a typhoon-induced dam failure, Dahan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Morphological responses and sediment processes following a typhoon-induced dam failure, Dahan River gravel and sand was exposed when Barlin Dam failed during Typhoon WeiPa in 2007. The dam was located configuration, and distance from the dam is needed to explain the rate and pattern of morphological changes

  10. Experimental Study on Impact Load on a Dam Due to Debris Flow1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    as a fluid hits the dam (fluid impact load). The former tends to cause partial break of the concrete damExperimental Study on Impact Load on a Dam Due to Debris Flow1 lwao Miyoshi2 ABSTRACT When a dam is struck by mud or debris flow, it is put under a great impact load and sometimes is destroyed. To prevent

  11. The horizontal dam break problem for slow non-Newtonian power-law fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The horizontal dam break problem for slow non-Newtonian power-law fluids P. Saramito a C. Smutek bLaboratoire g´eosciences ­ IPGP et universit´e de La R´eunion, France Abstract ­ The dam break problem shallow for the horizontal dam break problem. Keywords ­ viscoplastic fluid; dam break problem; shallow flows. 1

  12. Introduction to the special issue: Understanding and linking the biophysical, socioeconomic and geopolitical effects of dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    , socioeconomic and geopolitical effects of dams 1. Introduction Dams have made important contributions to human develop- ment, and the benefits derived from them have been considerable (World Commission on Dams, 2000). With the rising global popu- lation and desire to increase quality of life, dams are prominently staged to deliver

  13. Does Small Dam Removal Affect Local Property Values? An Empirical Analysis Bill Provencher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provencher, R. William

    Does Small Dam Removal Affect Local Property Values? An Empirical Analysis Bill Provencher of small dam removal on property values in south-central Wisconsin. Data on residential property sales were obtained for three categories of sites: those where a dam is intact, those where a dam was recently removed

  14. Thermal Monitoring of Embankment Dams by Fiber Optics Y. L. Beck1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Thermal Monitoring of Embankment Dams by Fiber Optics Y. L. Beck1 , A. A. Khan1 , P. Cunat1 , C an embankment dam changes its temperature field. In this regard, fiber optics buried in the structures can of embankment dams. Introduction Erosion of hydraulic embankments like dams and dikes, specially the internal

  15. Sediment from hydraulic mining detained by Englebright and small dams in the Yuba basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, L. Allan

    Sediment from hydraulic mining detained by Englebright and small dams in the Yuba basin L. Allan substantial modifications or removal of Englebright Dam, a large dam (86 million m3 capacity) built by the U organizations, therefore, is examining aspects of various dam-treatment scenarios that range from no action

  16. Explores Dam Removal Located in Southwest Ohio, Buck Creek and its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogaerts, Steven

    OHIO Researcher Explores Dam Removal Located in Southwest Ohio, Buck Creek and its tributary, Beaver Creek, run through a series of low-head dams in Springfield, Ohio. Historically, the four dams of the four dams. This will help restore the natural flow of sediments and fish along the entire river

  17. Downstream hydrologic and geomorphic effects of large dams on American rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downstream hydrologic and geomorphic effects of large dams on American rivers William L. Graf including more than 75,000 dams. One hundred thirty-seven of the very large dams, each storing 1.2 km3 (106 effects of these very large dams emerge from an analysis of the stream gage records of 72 river reaches

  18. DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL CHANGES AFTER A SMALL DAM REMOVAL: USING AERIAL PHOTOS AND MEASUREMENT ERROR FOR CONTEXT;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    DOWNSTREAM CHANNEL CHANGES AFTER A SMALL DAM REMOVAL: USING AERIAL PHOTOS AND MEASUREMENT ERROR to assess downstream channel changes associated with a small dam removal. The Brownsville Dam, a 2.1 m tall downstream from the dam and in an upstream control reach using aerial photos (1994­2008) and in the field

  19. Routine environmental audit of the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the routine environmental audit of the Hanford Site (Hanford), Richland, Washington. During this audit, the activities conducted by the audit team included reviews of internal documents an reports from previous audits and assessments; interviews with US Department of Energy (DOE), State of Washington regulatory, and contractor personnel; and inspections and observations of selected facilities and operations. The onsite portion of the audit was conducted May 2--13, 1994, by the DOE Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), located within the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). The audit evaluated the status of programs to ensure compliance with Federal, State, and local environmental laws and regulations; compliance with DOE orders, guidance, and directives; and conformance with accepted industry practices and standards of performance. The audit also evaluated the status and adequacy of the management systems developed to address environmental requirements.

  20. Route-Specific Passage Proportions and Survival Rates for Fish Passing through John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report fulfills a request of the U.S. Army Engineer District, Portland, Oregon, to produce an interim report of estimates of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates for lower Columbia River dams in 2010 and 2011. The estimates are needed to update the Compass Model for the Columbia River Treaty and the new Biological Opinion before detail technical reports are published in late 2012. This report tabulates route-specific fish-passage proportions and survival rates for steelhead and Chinook salmon smolts passing through various sampled routes at John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011. Results were compiled from analyses of data acquired in spring 2010 and 2011 studies that were specifically designed to estimate dam-passage and forebay-to-tailrace survival rates, travel time metrics, and spill passage efficiency, as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The study designs allowed for estimation of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates as well as estimation of forebay-passage survival, all of which are summarized herein.

  1. Regulation of Dams and Bridges Affecting Navigable Waters (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chapter 31 of the Wisconsin Statutes lays out the regulations relevant to dams and bridges on or near navigable waters. This statute establishes that the Department of Natural Resources has...

  2. Rules and Regulations for Dam Safety (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules and regulations seek to provide for the safety of dams to protect the public, real property, and natural resources by establishing reasonable standards and creating a public record for...

  3. aswan high dam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laval, Qubec, Qubec, Canada G1V 0A6 a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f climate change marine sedimentation river damming spectral analysis Gulf of St. Lawrence...

  4. Travertine Deposits of Soda Dam, New Mexico, and Their Implications...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Travertine Deposits of Soda Dam, New Mexico, and Their Implications for the Age and Evolution of the Valles Caldera Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  5. Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - Underground Injection...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - Underground Injection Control Registration webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site:...

  6. Washington: a guide to geothermal energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomquist, R.G.; Basescu, N.; Higbee, C.; Justus, D.; Simpson, S.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington's geothermal potential is discussed. The following topics are covered: exploration, drilling, utilization, legal and institutional setting, and economic factors of direct use projects. (MHR)

  7. Bonneville Power Administration, Oregon Energy Northwest, Washington...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bonneville Power Administration, Oregon Energy Northwest, Washington; Wholesale Electric Primary Credit Analyst: David N Bodek, New York (1) 212-438-7969; david.bodek@standardandpo...

  8. Energy Northwest, Washington Bonneville Power Administration...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Northwest, Washington Bonneville Power Administration, Oregon; Wholesale Electric Primary Credit Analyst: David N Bodek, New York (1) 212-438-7969; david.bodek@standardandpoors.com...

  9. Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - Dangerous Waste Treatment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - Dangerous Waste Treatment Storage Disposal Facility New Permit Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web...

  10. Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - NPDES Construction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Environmental Permit Handbook - NPDES Construction Stormwater General Permit Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory...

  11. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington Update fupwgspring12unruh.pdf More Documents & Publications Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting:...

  12. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Washington Closure Hanford,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Notice of Violation, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC - WEA-2012-04 Type B Accident Investigation At Washington Closure Hanford, LLC, Employee Fall Injury on July 1,...

  13. Hydropower Generators Will Deliver New Energy from an Old Dam...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2,000 homes for a year. The project also developed and installed an innovative fish collection and passage system that is reintroducing Washington's endangered steelhead...

  14. Early warning systems: An economic approach to dam safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, B.D. [National Weather Service Colorado River Basin Forecasting Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An early warning system can provide a relatively low-cost method for addressing dam safety issues. Bureau of Reclamation engineers have developed a systematic approach for designing warning systems while effectively balancing safety and economic concerns. Rather than addressing the dam itself, the system addresses the embayment and those meteorological/hydrological factors affecting the embayment. Characteristics of the mathematical model developed are addressed in this paper.

  15. Providing protection: Agencies receive funding to repair, upgrade dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 26 Providing protection Agencies receive funding to repair, upgrade dams along with local partners, can apply for grant funds, he said. Construction of the dams began through four federal authorizations..., called floodwater retarding structures and built mostly in rural areas during the 1950s to 1970s, are aging and need repairing. Others now protect urban areas that have developed downstream and need upgrading to meet more stringent safety standards...

  16. Saeltzer Dam Removal on Clear Creek 11 years later: An assessment of upstream channel changes since the dam's removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Crystal; Walker, Katelyn; Zimring, Mark

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pages. Brown, M. (n.d. ). Clear Creek—McCormick-Saeltzer DamBrown, M. (2011). 2011 Clear Creek Technical Team Report froAssessment: Lower Clear Creek Anadromous Fish Restoration &

  17. Aerospace & Energetics Research Program -University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumlak, Uri

    - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group q The Boltzmann equation is seven dimensional. qAerospace & Energetics Research Program - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group Plasma Research Program - University of Washington Plasma Dynamics Group Abstract Many current plasma simulation

  18. Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel Consumption0 0Feet)Same MonthWashington

  19. Washington Post editor David E.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE AwardsD ContractBOE ReserveWashington Post

  20. Envir202b Earth, Air, Water: the Human Context Winter 2003 F. Stahr The River Dammed: Proposed Removal of the Lower Snake River Dams A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Envir202b ­ Earth, Air, Water: the Human Context Winter 2003 F. Stahr The River Dammed: Proposed Removal of the Lower Snake River Dams ­ A Case Study Assignment & Schedule for Day 2 We will next work as your group will be asked to answer the following questions: 1) What changes (if any) to the dams

  1. Longitudinal and seasonal variation of stream N uptake in an urbanizing watershed: effect of organic matter, stream size, transient storage and debris dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claessens, Luc; Tague, Christina L.; Groffman, Peter M.; Melack, John M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    streams, organic debris dams can play an important role inin ?ow velocity when debris dams are hydraulically activecontact time. Therefore, debris dams can have an important

  2. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2003. This was the eighth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 437,633 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,492 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,494 from Big Canyon and 2,497 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium with 37-83% of the fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 153.7 mm (153.2-154.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.2 mm (163.9-164.5 mm) at Pittsburg Landing. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.22 at Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 83.1% (80.7-85.5%) for Big Canyon to 91.7% (87.7-95.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 59.9% (54.6-65.2%) for Big Canyon to 69.4% (60.5-78.4%) for Captain John Rapids. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.8 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 16.2 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 11.7 rkm/d for Captain John Rapids to 17.6 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 8-15 days to Lower Granite Dam and 22-27 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, ranged from April 23-25. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups ranged from May 4-10.

  3. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J.; Kellar, Dale S. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2002. This was the seventh year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 479,358 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities exceeded the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 7,545 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 7,482 from Big Canyon and 2,487 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels at the acclimation facilities could be considered medium to high with 43-62% of fish sampled rating medium to very high. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 146.7 mm (146.2-147.2 mm) at Captain John Rapids to 164.8 mm (163.5-166.1 mm) at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.14 at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 88.6% (86.0-91.1%) for Pittsburg Landing to 97.0% (92.4-101.7%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 54.3% (50.2-58.3%) for Big Canyon to 70.5% (65.4-75.5%) for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 8.1 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 14.1 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 10.9 rkm/d for Big Canyon to 15.9 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 9-12 days to Lower Granite Dam and 25-30 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from the FCAP facilities, ranged from April 20-28. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for the FCAP groups were all May 11. The objectives of this project are to quantify and evaluate pre-release fish health, condition and mark retention as well as post-release survival, migration timing, migration rates, travel times and movement patterns of fall Chinook salmon from supplementation releases at the FCAP facilities, then provide feedback to co-managers for project specific and basin wide management decision-making.

  4. Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocklage, Stephen J. Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapawi, ID)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery reared yearling fall Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project (FCAP) sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam in 2004. This was the ninth year of a long-term project to supplement natural spawning populations of Snake River stock fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. The 414,452 yearlings released from the Fall Chinook Acclimation Project facilities were short of the 450,000 fish quota. We use Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tag technology to monitor the primary performance measures of survival to mainstem dams and migration timing. We also monitor size, condition and tag/mark retention at release. We released 4,983 PIT tagged yearlings from Pittsburg Landing, 4,984 from Big Canyon and 4,982 from Captain John Rapids. Fish health sampling indicated that, overall, bacterial kidney disease levels could be considered low with 53-94% rating not detected to low. Mean fork lengths (95% confidence interval) of the PIT tagged groups ranged from 154.6 mm (154.0-155.2 mm) at Pittsburg Landing to 163.0 mm (162.6-163.4 mm) at Captain John Rapids. Mean condition factors ranged from 1.06 at Lyons Ferry Hatchery to 1.16 at Big Canyon. Estimated survival (95% confidence interval) of PIT tagged yearlings from release to Lower Granite Dam ranged from 74.7% (72.9-76.5%) for Big Canyon to 88.1% (85.7-90.6%) for Captain John Rapids. Estimated survival from release to McNary Dam ranged from 45.3% (39.2-51.5%) for Pittsburg Landing to 52.1% (42.9-61.2%) for Big Canyon. Median migration rates to Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearlings from the FCAP facilities, ranged from 5.5 river kilometers per day (rkm/d) for Captain John Rapids to 12.8 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median migration rates to McNary Dam ranged from 10.9 rkm/d for Captain John Rapids to 17.6 rkm/d for Pittsburg Landing. Median travel times from the FCAP facilities were about 13-16 days to Lower Granite Dam and 23-29 days to McNary Dam. Median arrival dates at Lower Granite Dam, based on all observations of PIT tagged yearling groups from Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids, ranged from April 18-29. Median arrival dates at McNary Dam for Pittsburg Landing, Big Canyon and Captain John Rapids groups ranged from May 1-8.

  5. Washington,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartment ofof Energy Provides DC

  6. Washington

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads| DepartmentVictorDepartmentMarksWalk-InWas hingtonApril

  7. Export Control Laws and Washingtonand Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Export Control Laws and Washingtonand Washington University For Washington University Faculty Authors: Cindy White, Research Office Tina Tyson, Office of General Counsel May 2006 What are export of foreign policy and national security. *NOTE: Export control laws apply to all activities -- not just

  8. Baer selected to join Washington Academy of Sciences | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    selected to join Washington Academy of Sciences Baer selected to join Washington Academy of Sciences Released: July 21, 2014 He is being honored for outstanding scientific...

  9. Seattle, Washington: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seattle, Washington: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Seattle, Washington: Solar in Action (Brochure), Solar America...

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Carnegie Institute of Washington...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Carnegie Institute of Washington Dept of Genetics - NY 0-07 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Carnegie Institute of Washington (Dept. of Genetics) (NY.0-07 ) Eliminated from...

  11. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group 2011 Meeting: Washington...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2011 Meeting: Washington Update Federal Utility Partnership Working Group 2011 Meeting: Washington Update Presentation-given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working...

  12. Type B Accident Investigation At Washington Closure Hanford,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fall Injury on July 1, 2009, At The 336 Building, Hanford Site, Washington Type B Accident Investigation At Washington Closure Hanford, LLC, Employee Fall Injury on July 1,...

  13. Green Building and Energy Reduction Standards for State Agencies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On January 5, 2005, Washington’s governor signed Executive Order 05-01, directing state agencies to adopt green building practices in the construction of all new buildings and in major (over 60%)...

  14. Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James L.; Marotz, Brian L.; DeShazer, Jay (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries...'' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May, 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to redevelop fisheries and fisheries habitat in basin streams and lakes.

  15. State of Washington Department of Ecology criteria pollutants and toxic air polluntants phase II notice of construction for the Hanford Site spent nuclear fuel project--cold vacuum dryingfacility, Project W-441

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansky, M.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1997-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phase 11 notice of construction (NOC) provides the additional information committed to in the Phase I NOC submittal (DOE/RL-96- 55) regarding the air toxic and criteria pollutants that could potentially be emitted during operation of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). This Phase 11 NOC is being submitted to ensure the CVDF is in full compliance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-460-040(8), `Commencement of Construction`. The Phase I NOC (approved September 30, 1996) was defined as constructing the substructure, including but not limited to, pouring the concrete for the floor, and construction of the exterior. This Phase 11 NOC is being submitted for approval before installation and operation of the process equipment that will generate any potential air emissions at the CVDF, and installation and operation of the emissions control equipment.

  16. State Geological Survey Contributions to the National Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Washington State Department of Natural Resources Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey Wyoming State Geological Survey...

  17. Overview of the Performance of PIT-Tag Interrogation Systems for Adult Salmonids at Bonneville and McNary Dams, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Sandra L.; Prentice, Earl F.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During winter 2001, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) installed a prototype orifice-based PIT-tag interrogation system into the Washington Shore Ladder at Bonneville Dam (BWSL). Detectors were installed into 12 weirs: 4 downstream (Weirs 334-337) and 8 upstream (Weirs 352-359) from the fish release point (i.e., the exit ladder for the Adult Fish Facility). NOAA Fisheries (National Marine Fisheries Service--NMFS) tagged and released salmonids during 2001 to determine tag-reading efficiencies for different salmonid populations. Data analyses focused on the upper eight weirs. The 2001 tagging results for spring chinook salmon indicated that having detectors in four consecutive weirs would have been sufficient to yield a reading efficiency of 95%. The BWSL orifice-based system performed well until the coho and fall chinook salmon migrations began. Coho and fall chinook salmon appeared to use the weir overflows, and thus avoid detection, at much higher rates than biologists expected. During 2001, technology advances led to the development of significantly larger antennas than had been available earlier, and thus it was possible to build antennas of approximately 2 x 6 ft. Consequently, it became feasible to design interrogation systems for ladder locations where all fish would have to go through the antennas and thus could not avoid detection by using the weir overflows (Fig. 1). Destron Technologies by Digital Angel designed a prototype interrogation system with two antennas that was installed into the counting-window area in the Oregon Ladder at McNary Dam, where its performance could then be directly compared to that of the orifice-based system in the same ladder. Although the orifice-based systems appeared less effective than the fisheries community wanted for fall chinook and coho salmon, the decision was made to proceed with installations planned for Bonneville and McNary Dams because valuable data would still be collected. During the winter of 2002, the Corps and BPA installed PIT-tag interrogation systems into the Bradford Island and Cascades Island Fish Ladders at Bonneville Dam and into the Washington and Oregon Ladders at McNary Dam. Like BWSL in 2001, these ladders had eight weirs (16 orifices) outfitted with fiberglass antennas. Douglas County Public Utility District also installed an orifice-based system into its ladders at Wells Dam, but they were able to use weirs with no overflow sections wherein all fish had to swim through the orifice antennas. Thus, 2002 was the first year that the fisheries community had PIT-tag detection of adult salmonids at Bonneville, McNary, Wells, and Lower Granite Dams (Fig. 2). This overview will provide information on how well the systems at Bonneville and McNary Dams performed.

  18. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Seminar: Washington Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Seminar: Washington Update on May 22, 2013.

  19. SCHOOL OF BUSINESS THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY INVESTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    SCHOOL OF BUSINESS THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY INVESTORS REPORT2011 #12;#12;SCHOOL OF BUSINESS THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY INVESTORS REPORT2011 #12;4 | THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS |2011INVESTORSREPORT 4 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF BUSINESS | 2011 INVESTORS REPORT

  20. Federal Government Congressional Budget Office, Budget Analysis Division Washington, DC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    Charlotte, NC Gallaher Kazakhstan, Security & Brand Integrity Almaty Oblast, Kazakhstan GMMB Washington, DC

  1. Fact Sheet - The Snake River Dam Study-Then and Now - November...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in 2002, evaluated four alternatives to help Snake River fall chinook get through the dams. The independent peer-reviewed study concluded that dam breaching by itself would not...

  2. Merowe Dam and the inundation of paleochannels of the Nile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The course of the Nile in northern Sudan follows a contorted path through bedrocks, creating the Great Bend. Few years ago, the satellite images showed a fertile strip of land with villages, where paleochannels of the river hosted many fields with cultivations and archaeological sites. Now, a huge part of this valley is under the waters of Merowe Dam reservoir. Comparing the images of the region before and after the dam gates were closed, we can see that the reservoir created itself through flooding the paleochannels.

  3. Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Smolt Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at Bonneville Dam during summer 2012, as required by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 1 km below the dam, as well as forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency, as required in the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  4. University of Washington ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    University of Washington ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT 2010 Annual Report #12;ERM 2010 Annual Report 2 December 2010 "Enterprise Risk Management" (ERM) - a process - to integrate risk into strategic UW Enterprise Risk Management Framework . . . . . . . . . 6 Illustration of ERM Components

  5. Charging Up in King County, Washington

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Constantine, Dow; Oliver, LeAnn; Inslee, Jay; Sahandy, Sheida; Posthuma, Ron; Morrison, David;

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    King County, Washington is spearheading a regional effort to develop a network of electric vehicle charging stations. It is also improving its vehicle fleet and made significant improvements to a low-income senior housing development.

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Washington Information

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    facilities in Washington, use the TransAtlas interactive mapping tool or use BioFuels Atlas to show the use and potential production of biofuels throughout the U.S. and...

  7. University of Washington Montlake Landfill Oversight Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    University of Washington Montlake Landfill Oversight Committee Montlake Landfill Project Guide Department with the review and approval of the Montlake Landfill Oversight Committee. #12;Montlake Landfill ...................................................................................................................................3 Figure 1 ­ Approximate Boundaries of the Montlake Landfill

  8. Washington City Power- PV Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington City offers a rebate of $1,000 per kilowatt-DC (kW-DC) to customers who install photovoltaic (PV) systems or wind-energy systems. The rebate is limited to $3,000 for residential systems...

  9. Charging Up in King County, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    King County, Washington is spearheading a regional effort to develop a network of electric vehicle charging stations. It is also improving its vehicle fleet and made significant improvements to a...

  10. Washington and Lee University Edgar W. Spencer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsh, David

    Washington and Lee University Edgar W. Spencer Class of 1953 Professor Edgar Spencer graduated, with great pride and gratitude the University bestows a 2013 Distinguished Alumni Award on Edgar W. Spencer

  11. Washington Gas- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington Gas provides a number of rebates to residential customers who utilize energy efficient equipment and measures in the home. Rebate are available for tankless water heaters, storage (tank)...

  12. pacific northwest UNIVERSITY of WASHINGTON PRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manchak, John

    Alini iyer published with south asian oral history project and university of washington libraries Oral or history, this read satisfies an urge for either." ­The Green Life, Sierra Club 304 pp., 36 illus. $18

  13. Assessment of Downstream Hazard Potential for Dam Failure in Rhode Island Primary Investigators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhode Island, University of

    Assessment of Downstream Hazard Potential for Dam Failure in Rhode Island Primary Investigators Assessment of Downstream Hazard Potential for Dam Failure in Rhode Island Mayrai Gindy, University of Rhode.3 Hazard Classification of the Federal Emergency Management Agency .............. 11 2.4 General Dam Design

  14. Evaluation of Seepage from an Embankment Dam Retaining Pedro J. Amaya1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    piping is one of the most common and catastrophic failure modes of an earthen dam (Sher ard et al. 1963Evaluation of Seepage from an Embankment Dam Retaining Fly Ash Pedro J. Amaya1 ; John T. Massey of fly ash-laden seepage from the right abutment of an earthen dam are presented herein

  15. Analysis of Dam Failure in the Saluda River February 8, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, James A.

    Analysis of Dam Failure in the Saluda River Valley February 8, 2005 Abstract We identify and model two possible failure modes for the Saluda Dam: gradual failure due to an enlarging breach and sudden catas- trophic failure due to liqui#12;cation of the dam. For the #12;rst case we de- scribe the breach

  16. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Dam breaking seiches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balmforth, Neil

    hazards should the dam break suddenly. Indeed, geological evidence points to a number of recent failures & Evans 2000). One of the principal causes of moraine dam failure is claimed to be catastrophic erosional et al. 2002; Cao et al. 2004). By contrast, the failure of a moraine-dammed lake has never been

  17. Peak discharge of a Pleistocene lava-dam outburst flood in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Received 6 May 2005 Availble online 7 February 2006 Abstract The failure of a lava dam 165,000 yr ago dam-failure and unsteady flow modeling to estimate a peak discharge and flow hydrograph. FailurePeak discharge of a Pleistocene lava-dam outburst flood in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA Cassandra R

  18. Final Independent External Peer Review Report Mohawk Dam Major Rehabilitation Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    and to minimize the potential for catastrophic failure of the dam during such events. Several alternatives wereFinal Independent External Peer Review Report Mohawk Dam Major Rehabilitation Report Warsaw, Ohio Report Mohawk Dam Major Rehabilitation Report Warsaw, Ohio by Battelle 505 King Avenue Columbus, OH 43201

  19. Revised Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the East Branch Dam, Clarion River,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    was assigned a Dam Safety Action Classification (DSAC) rating of II, generally indicating that failure couldRevised Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the East Branch Dam, Clarion River, Elk County, Pennsylvania: Dam Safety Modification Report Prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute Prepared

  20. Late Pleistocene earthquake-triggered moraine dam failure and outburst of Lake Zurich, Switzerland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Late Pleistocene earthquake-triggered moraine dam failure and outburst of Lake Zurich, Switzerland of $20,600 m3 sÀ1 . We also discuss long-term causes and short-term trigger mechanisms of the dam failure of Lake Zurich was initiated as a consequence of the moraine dam failure that either was triggered

  1. STUDY OF LOSS AND DELAY OF SALMON PASSING ROCK ISLAND DAM, COLUMBIA RIVER, 1954-56

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). Six new generating unit.s were added in t.he powerhouse (locat.ed on the left. side of t.he dam returns from below and above dam releases were compared; data failed to show that the dam caused losses

  2. Research Article Effects of Alpine hydropower dams on particle transport and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Research Article Effects of Alpine hydropower dams on particle transport and lacustrine December 2006 Abstract. The effects of high-alpine hydropower damming on lacustrine sedimentation impact, such as by hydropower dam construction that form artifi- cial sediment sinks acting as manmade

  3. The influence of large dams on surrounding climate and precipitation patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    The influence of large dams on surrounding climate and precipitation patterns Ahmed Mohamed Degu,1 February 2011. [1] Understanding the forcings exerted by large dams on local climate is key to establishing formation are identified around the reservoir shoreline for 92 large dams of North America. Our study

  4. AN ESTIMATE OF MORTALITY OF CHINOOK SALMON IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER NEAR BONNEVILLE DAM DURING THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN ESTIMATE OF MORTALITY OF CHINOOK SALMON IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER NEAR BONNEVILLE DAM DURING Dam and studied t!:te probable causes of death. The estimates of numbers of dead fish were made from ratios of tagged to untagged floating carcasses below the dam. Tagged s!llmon carcasses were released

  5. SANBA Tool: Knowledge Capitalisation and Lessons Learned on Dams and their Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SANBA Tool: Knowledge Capitalisation and Lessons Learned on Dams and their Safety C. Curt 1 , H Aubière Cedex, France E-mail: corinne.curt@irstea.fr Summary Much is known about dam design, construction for dam design, construction and failure and degradation modes (domain knowledge), coupled with a case

  6. Historical Population Structure of Central Valley Steelhead and its Alteration by Dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Bernie

    Historical Population Structure of Central Valley Steelhead and its Alteration by Dams STEVEN T. Pres- ently, impassable dams block access to 80% of historically available habitat, and block access Steelhead, O. mykiss, endangered species, population structure, dispersal, habitat model, dams, Central

  7. Debris dams and the relief of headwater streams Stephen T. Lancaster a,, Gordon E. Grant b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debris dams and the relief of headwater streams Stephen T. Lancaster a,, Gordon E. Grant b, mountain landscapes where debris flows are common, their deposition commonly forms valley-spanning dams these dams causes alluviation in what would otherwise be bedrock channels. In this paper, the effects

  8. RE-ASSEMBLING HETCH HETCHY: Water Supply Implications of Removing O'Shaughnessy Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    1 RE-ASSEMBLING HETCH HETCHY: Water Supply Implications of Removing O'Shaughnessy Dam Sarah E. Null The Hetch Hetchy System provides San Francisco with much of its water supply. O'Shaughnessy Dam is one of its conveyance. Removing O'Shaughnessy Dam has gained interest for restoring Hetch Hetchy Valley

  9. Multichannel Analysis of Surface Wave An Application to Diagnose Dam Bodies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Wave ­ An Application to Diagnose Dam Bodies Noppadol Poomvises it use as a part of geological program to explore an appropriated rock foundation at a proposed dam location, but also use to investigate the condition of dam after water being storage as well

  10. Homogenization of regional river dynamics by dams and global biodiversity implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poff, N. LeRoy

    Homogenization of regional river dynamics by dams and global biodiversity implications N. Le differ- ences in climate and geology. Extensive construction of dams by humans has greatly dampened to regional-scale environmental templates caused by dams is largely unexplored but of critical conservation

  11. Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Effect of spill on adult salmon passage delay at Columbia River and Snake River dams W. Nicholas dams in the Columbia/Snake River hydrosystem may delay the upstream passage of the adults. To evaluate-to-day variations of spill and upstream fish passage at the eight dams of the Columbia/Snake river hydrosystem

  12. Analyse retard des mesures d'auscultation de barrages Delayed response analysis of dam monitoring data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of dam monitoring data Stéphane Bonelli Cemagref Unité de recherche Ouvrages hydrauliques et équipements. Long series of monitoring data are obtained during the routine operation of a dam. To understand the long term behaviour of a dam, it is essential to carefully interpret the dissipative effects which tend

  13. Spatial variability of sea level rise due to water impoundment behind dams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Clint

    dams Julia W. Fiedler1 and Clinton P. Conrad2 Received 29 March 2010; revised 12 May 2010; accepted 18 May 2010; published 19 June 2010. [1] Dams have impounded 10,800 km3 of water since 1900, reducing depresses the earth's surface near dams and elevates the geoid, which locally increases relative sea level

  14. New French Guidelines for Structural Safety of Embankment Dams in a Semi-probabilistic Format

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    New French Guidelines for Structural Safety of Embankment Dams in a Semi-probabilistic Format P in France and in most countries, hydraulic works (dams and levees) have remained excluded from semi rules. In this context, the French Committee on Large Dams ­ FRCOLD - initiated, with a panel of experts

  15. The Dam1 kinetochore complex harnesses microtubule dynamics to produce force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asbury, Chip

    The Dam1 kinetochore complex harnesses microtubule dynamics to produce force and movement Charles L-dependent force production is unknown. Recent work suggests that the Dam1 complex, an essential component assay where beads coated with pure recombinant Dam1 complex were bound to the tips of individual dynamic

  16. Disentangling dam impacts in river networks1 Kris Van Looy, Thierry Tormos and Yves Souchon2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Disentangling dam impacts in river networks1 Kris Van Looy, Thierry Tormos and Yves Souchon2 3 100 VILLEURBANNE Cedex7 +33 (0)4 72 20 89 418 Kris.van-looy@irstea.fr9 10 11 Abstract12 Damming is one the presence and density of dams and biological metrics of river16 health in the context of a variety

  17. Glen Canyon Dam, Fluctuating Water Levels, and Riparian Breeding Birds: The Need for Management Compromise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I ;'. I Glen Canyon Dam, Fluctuating Water Levels, and Riparian Breeding Birds: The Need.--Large water releases from Glen Canyon Dam in May and June are harmful to riparian breeding birds along' INTRODUCTION 100,000,.... COLORAOQ RIVER NEAR GRAND CANYON (PHANTOM RANCHi The completion of Glen Canyon Dam

  18. Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea Young Ho Shin1 and Pierre Y. Julien, M.ASCE2 Abstract: The changes in channel geometry downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South sluice gate operations affect the 45-km reach of the Hwang River between the Hapcheon Reregulation Dam

  19. TOWARDS OBJECTIVE DESIGN OF DRY DAMS AT WATERSHED SCALE: HOW TO TAKE INTO ACCOUNT THE SPATIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    21 TOWARDS OBJECTIVE DESIGN OF DRY DAMS AT WATERSHED SCALE: HOW TO TAKE INTO ACCOUNT THE SPATIAL, the best location for 1 or 3 dry dams). To take into account the spatial variability of the rainfall, we, following subcatchments delineation. A dry dam can be placed at the outlet of any unit. Such a simple model

  20. PREDICTING UNDERSEEPAGE OF MASONRY DAMS Published in Proceedings of 29th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PREDICTING UNDERSEEPAGE OF MASONRY DAMS Published in Proceedings of 29th ASDSO Conference (1934) selected conservative values of safe creep ratios because of the small number of dam failures judgment is recommended in designing a dam for safety against piping, and Lane's values are a starting

  1. A dam agem odelwith non-convex freeenergy for quasi-brittlem aterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A dam agem odelwith non-convex freeenergy for quasi-brittlem aterials M arc Francois January 12 isintroduced in a dam age m echanics m odelrele- vantforthe quasi-brittle m aterials.Itisshown thatitdescribesthe large dilatancy ofconcrete undercom pression and the di erentlocalization an- gles and dam age

  2. Independent External Peer Review Report Rough River Dam 18 August 2011 ii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    #12;Independent External Peer Review Report ­ Rough River Dam 18 August 2011 ii This page intentionally blank. #12;Independent External Peer Review Report ­ Rough River Dam 18 August 2011 iii Table Panel Members B-1 Appendix C ­ Charge for IEPR Panel C-1 List of Figures Figure 1. Rough River Dam 4

  3. STATISTICAL AND 3D NONLINEAR FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF SCHLEGEIS DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balaji, Rajagopalan

    STATISTICAL AND 3D NONLINEAR FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF SCHLEGEIS DAM VICTOR SAOUMA, ERIC HANSEN is composed of two parts. First a statistical analysis of the dam crest displacement is performed, along with a prediction for the years 2000-2001. Then a 3D finite element analysis of Schlegeis dam is performed using

  4. The dynamics of travertine dams . Hammer , D.K. Dysthe, B. Jamtveit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dysthe, Dag Kristian

    The dynamics of travertine dams Ø. Hammer , D.K. Dysthe, B. Jamtveit PGP-Physics of Geological 2007 Abstract We present a simple, abstract model for travertine dam formation. The simulation uses, implies a classical pattern formation system with a characteristic dam size, however this wavelength

  5. Landslide-dammed paleolake perturbs marine sedimentation and drives genetic change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roering, Joshua J.

    Landslide-dammed paleolake perturbs marine sedimentation and drives genetic change in anadromous by forming dams, forcing upstream ag- gradation of water and sediment, and generating catastrophic out- burst floods. Less apparent is the effect of large landslide dams on river ecosystems and marine sedimentation

  6. ACCURACY OF ESTIMATION OF BREEDING VALUES FOR BULL DAMS by H. O. GRAVERT K. PABST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACCURACY OF ESTIMATION OF BREEDING VALUES FOR BULL DAMS by H. O. GRAVERT K. PABST Institute for Milk Production, Fedeval Daivy Research Center, Kiel, F.R.G. For 1.229 dams of A.I. bulls with known IN A BULL DAM SELECTION INDEX A. FESTERLING Institut f. Tierzucht Universitlits Bonn, Bonn, B.R.D. The bull

  7. Hugo van Dam and the dynamic adjoint function Imre Pa zsit*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    Hugo van Dam and the dynamic adjoint function Imre Pa´ zsit* Department of Reactor Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Go¨teborg, Sweden Dedicated to Prof. Dr. Hugo van Dam into perspective the seminal contribution of Hugo van Dam to the development of neutron noise diagnostics

  8. Effects of magnetite on high-frequency ground-penetrating radar Remke L. Van Dam1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    Effects of magnetite on high-frequency ground-penetrating radar Remke L. Van Dam1 , Jan M. H, paleoclimatology (Maher and Thompson, 1995), soil development (Singer et al., 1996; Van Dam et al., 2008 et al., 2011), the detection of unexploded ordnance (UXO) and land mines (Van Dam et al., 2005

  9. THE DISTRIBUTIONAL IMPACT OF DAMS: EVIDENCE FROM CROPLAND PRODUCTIVITY IN AFRICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    THE DISTRIBUTIONAL IMPACT OF DAMS: EVIDENCE FROM CROPLAND PRODUCTIVITY IN AFRICA Eric STROBL Robert of Dams: Evidence from Cropland Productivity in Africa Eric Strobl*, ** Ecole Polytechnique & Robert the distributional impact of major dams on cropland productivity in Africa. As our unit of analysis we use

  10. Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    11 Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey Hydrologic Engineering that water is released from Green River Dam in Kentucky. In May 2006, the interim plan was approved shown that operation of Green River Dam can be changed in ways that improve ecosystems while continuing

  11. LEARNING FROM DAM REMOVAL MONITORING: CHALLENGES TO SELECTING EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND ESTABLISHING SIGNIFICANCE OF OUTCOMES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    LEARNING FROM DAM REMOVAL MONITORING: CHALLENGES TO SELECTING EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND ESTABLISHING, California, USA ABSTRACT As the decommissioning of dams becomes a common restoration technique, decisions about dam removals must be based on sound predictions of expected outcomes. Results of past and ongoing

  12. Measuring the erodibility of soil materials constituting earth embankments: a key input for dams and levees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Measuring the erodibility of soil materials constituting earth embankments: a key input for dams of hydraulic embankment structures, including earth embankment dams, levees and dykes, is a major concern all over the world. Still today, about one to two large dams fail every year and hundreds, probably

  13. Development of spatial pattern in large woody debris and debris dams in streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Development of spatial pattern in large woody debris and debris dams in streams Clifford E. Kraft years after wood deposition, we surveyed individual pieces of LWD in one stream and surveyed debris dam locations in eight streams within the ice storm area. To examine the linear pattern of debris dams within

  14. Earthquake behavior of arch dams Chuhan Zhang, Yanjie Xu, Guanglun Wang & Feng Jin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer Jr., B.F.

    Earthquake behavior of arch dams Chuhan Zhang, Yanjie Xu, Guanglun Wang & Feng Jin Department millennium, construction of a series of high arch dams up to 250-300m in height is being planned or conducted (Table 1). Table 1. Project data and Design PVA Project Dam height (m) Reservoir capacity (109 m3 ) Power

  15. Dam breaking by wave-induced erosional incision N. J. Balmforth,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balmforth, Neil

    Dam breaking by wave-induced erosional incision N. J. Balmforth,1 J. von Hardenberg,2 A. Provenzale displacement wave can lead to catastrophic erosional incision of a moraine damming a glacial lake that a single wave is generally unable to break the dam, but a sufficiently large disturbance in an almost

  16. Proceedings of the Australian Committee on Large Dams Conference, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. November 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    Proceedings of the Australian Committee on Large Dams Conference, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. November 2004 ANCOLD 2004 Conference Page 1 TRANSPORTATION MODEL FOR EVACUATION IN ESTIMATING DAM FAILURE and requiring only a reasonable level of effort to #12;Proceedings of the Australian Committee on Large Dams

  17. EIS-0384: Chief Joseph Hatchery Program, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's approach and associated impacts of a comprehensive management program for summer/fall Chinook salmon in the Okanogan subbasin and the Columbia River between the confluence of the Okanogan River and Chief Joseph Dam including construction, operation, and maintenance of a hatchery and acclimation ponds.

  18. THREE GORGES DAM Matthew Morioka, Alireza Abrishamkar, Yve Kay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    and greenhouse gas emission: 366 grams of coal is used to generate 1 kWh of electricity, therefore the dam Cost: Est. $29 billion ·32 Generators :·32 Generators : Capacity of 700MW EA ·Total electric generating deterioration and epidemics related to the flood #12;Social Benefits (2/3) -Direct reduction of air pollutant

  19. James W. Van Dam US Burning Plasma Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    focus: magnetically confined plasmas #12;Page 5 USBPO What is a "burning" plasma? · "Burning" plasmaJames W. Van Dam US Burning Plasma Organization US ITER Project Office Institute for Fusion Studies Plasmas -- A Tutorial -- Supported by Office of Science #12;Page 2 USBPO The next frontier · Understanding

  20. Optimization of Hydroacoustic Equipment Deployment at Foster Dam, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, James S.; Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Fischer, Eric S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the fixed-location hydroacoustic systems at Foster Dam (FOS) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods that minimized structural, electrical, and acoustic interference. Optimization of the hydroacoustic systems will establish methodology for sampling by active acoustic methods during this year-long evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage at FOS.

  1. INCORPORATING UNCERTAINTY INTO DAM SAFETY RISK Sanjay S. Chauhan1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chauhan, Sanjay S.

    on the topic of uncertainty in quantitative risk and policy analysis the reader is referred to Morgan to incorporating input uncertainties into risk analysis model. Input uncertainties are captured by using for uncertainty analysis in dam safety risk assessment, and demonstrates some useful formats for presenting

  2. PE228 Washington Energy Seminar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Foreign Service Institute (FSI), the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Economic, Energy, and Business Affairs, and the U.S. Department of Energy announce a joint training course to help...

  3. Evaluating Energy Savings in All-Electric Public Housing in the Pacific Northwest, Tacoma, Washington (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project analyzes the cost effectiveness of energy savings measures installed by a large public housing authority in Salishan, a community in Tacoma Washington. Research focuses on the modeled and measured energy usage of the first six phases of construction, and compares the energy usage of those phases to phase 7. Market-ready energy solutions were also evaluated to improve the efficiency of affordable housing for new and existing (built since 2001) affordable housing in the marine climate of Washington State.

  4. Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Summer 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at The Dalles Dam during summer 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion, dam passage survival is required to be greater than or equal to 0.93 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam and through the tailrace to 2 km downstream of the dam, forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required by the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

  5. Toward a Unique UnderstandingToward a Unique Understanding Washington SquareWashington Square

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hung, I-Kuai

    ;LagniappeLagniappe 1837 Map of Nacogdoches1837 Map of Nacogdoches 1846 Map of Nacogdoches1846 Map #12;The Sanborn MapsThe Sanborn Maps #12;Georeferenced RepresentationGeoreferenced Representation #12 excavations atbelow from the 1979 excavations at Washington Square.Washington Square. #12;The GridThe Grid #12

  6. Early Adopter PDC AtEarly Adopter PDC At Washington and LeeWashington and Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stough, Joshua

    Early Adopter ­ PDC AtEarly Adopter ­ PDC At Washington and LeeWashington and Lee Four-year Liberal with and manipulation of collections of stuff.manipulation of collections of stuff. · PDC applications: sorting, recursive treePDC applications: sorting, recursive tree structures, image processing,...structures, image

  7. Enlargement of concrete blocks of arch dams with allowance of the formation of radial thermal cracks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verbetskii, G.P.; Chogovadze, G.I.; Daneliya, A.I.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable acceleration of the construction of arch dams with the use of highly productive continuous concreting mechanisms is possible with enlargement of the blocks and allowance of the formation of thermal radial cracks in them. A theoretical analysis and the results of on-site observations show that under the effect of the hydrostatic head of water, radial joints and cracks in compressed zones of an arch dam close and the dam in these zones works as a solid dam. Thermal cracking in concrete blocks of arch dams enlarged in plan should be controlled by making radial notches to concentrate tensile stresses providing the formation of radial cracks at prescribed places and through the usual methods of thermal regulation. The block size along the face of an arch dam is then no longer limited by the condition of crack resistance but is determined by the rate of concreting. The technical and economic effects from concreting arch dams are cited.

  8. IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference Washington, D.C., May 13-17, 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference Washington, D.C., May 13-17, 1996 NICHE MARKETS FOR GRID-CONNECTED PHOTOVOLTAICS Howard Wenger Pacific Energy Group Walnut Creek, CA, USA Christy Herig & Roger Taylor National- Sited Photovoltaics (CSPV) in the United States. 1 The intent is to demonstrate markets that are cost

  9. BIODIVERSITY OF MOBILE BENTHIC FAUNA IN GEODUCK (PANOPEA GENEROSA) AQUACULTURE BEDS IN SOUTHERN PUGET SOUND, WASHINGTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thuesen, Erik V.

    PUGET SOUND, WASHINGTON RANA A. BROWN1,2* AND ERIK V. THUESEN1 1 Laboratory 1, Evergreen State College dramatically during the past decade in southern Puget Sound, WA, and the effects of these intertidal Puget Sound. Surveys of geoduck farms in two different stages of aquaculture production were carried out

  10. 100/300 Area Aquifer Tube Task: Annual Sampling for Fiscal Year 2006, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Hartman, Mary J.; Raidl, Robert F.; Borghese, Jane V.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter report has been prepared to provide the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington State Department of Ecology, and Hanford Site contractors with logistical information pertaining to the use of certain environmental monitoring sites. Although the distribution is not limited, It is not intended for general distribution beyond that audience.

  11. Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

    2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries and fish habitat in basin streams and lakes. 'Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan.

  12. Washington Nuclear Profile - Power Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    total reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Columbia Generating Station Unit...

  13. Geologic map of the Priest Rapids 1:100,000 quadrangle, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, S.P.; Fecht, K.R. [comps.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This map of the Priest Rapids 1:100,000-scale quadrangle, Washington, shows the geology of one of fifteen complete or partial 1:100,000-scale quadrangles that cover the southeast quadrant of Washington. Geologic maps of these quadrangles have been compiled by geologists with the Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources (DGER) and Washington State University and are the principal data sources for a 1:250,000scale geologic map of the southeast quadrant of Washington, which is in preparation. Eleven of those quadrangles are being released as DGER open-file reports (listed below). The map of the Wenatchee quadrangle has been published by the US Geological Survey (Tabor and others, 1982), and the Moses Lake (Gulick, 1990a), Ritzville (Gulick, 1990b), and Rosalia (Waggoner, 1990) quadrangles have already been released. The geology of the Priest Rapids quadrangle has not previously been compiled at 1:100,000 scale. Furthermore, this is the first 1:100,000 or smaller scale geologic map of the area to incorporate both bedrock and surficial geology. This map was compiled in 1992, using published and unpublished geologic maps as sources of data.

  14. Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Arnsberg, B.D. [Nez Perce Tribe; Groves, P.A. [Idaho Power Company

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2007; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches counted upstream of Lower Granite Dam into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2007 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

  15. Use of an Autonomous Sensor to Evaluate the Biological Performance of the Advanced Turbine at Wanapum Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydropower is the largest renewable energy resource in the world and the United States. However, Hydropower dams have adverse ecological impacts because migrating fish may be injured or killed when they pass through hydro turbines. In the Columbia and Snake River basins, dam operators and engineers are required to make these hydroelectric facilities more fish-friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation after fish population declines and the subsequent listing of several species of Pacific salmon in the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Grant County Public Utility District (Grant PUD) requested authorization from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that are designed to improve survival for fish passing through the turbines while improving operation efficiency and increasing power generation. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy provided co-funding to Grant PUD for aspects of performance testing that supported the application. As an additional measure to the primary evaluation measure of direct injury and mortality rates of juvenile Chinook salmon using balloon tag-recapture methodology, this study used an autonomous sensor device to provide insight into the specific hydraulic conditions or physical stresses that the fish experienced or the specific causes of the biological response. We found that the new blade shape and the corresponding reduction of turbulence in the advanced hydropower turbine were effective. The frequency of severe events based on Sensor Fish pressure and acceleration measurements showed trends similar to those of fish survival determined by balloon tag-recapture tests. In addition, the new turbine provided a better pressure and rate of change environment for fish passage. Overall, the Sensor Fish data indicated that the advanced hydro turbine design met the desired fish passage goals for Wanapum Dam.

  16. Washington, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtilityInformationWashingtonInformationWashington,

  17. Washington Technology Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraph HomeWarana Group ofWashingtonWashington

  18. Orcas Power & Light- MORE Green Power Program (Washington)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Orcas Power and Light (OPALCO), an electric cooperative serving Washington’s San Juan Islands, provides a production-based incentive for residential and commercial members who generate energy from...

  19. Washington Notice of Construction Application under New Source...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington Notice of Construction Application under New Source Review (Form ECY 070-410) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Washington Notice...

  20. Turbocharger with sliding piston, and having vanes and leakage dams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Quentin (Nancy, FR); Alnega, Ahmed (Thaon Les Vosges, FR)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbocharger having a sliding piston for regulating exhaust gas flow into the turbine wheel includes a set of first vanes mounted on a fixed first wall of the turbine nozzle and projecting axially toward an opposite second wall of the nozzle, and/or a set of second vanes mounted on the end of the piston and projecting in an opposite axial direction toward the first wall of the nozzle. For the/each set of vanes, there are leakage dams formed on the wall that is adjacent the vane tips when the piston is closed. The leakage dams are closely adjacent the vane tips and discourage exhaust gas from leaking in a generally radial direction past the vane tips as the piston just begins to open from its fully closed position.

  1. Dam constructions as sealing systems in rock salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engelmann, H.J.; Bollingerfehr, W.; Fischer, H. [Deutsche Gesellschaft zum Bau und Betrieb von Endlagern fuer Abfallstoffe mbH, Peine (Germany)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Dam constructions represent an essential component of the multibarrier safety concept in the Federal Republic of Germany for a repository of radioactive waste in salt formations. They enhance safety during the operational phase as well as in the post operational phase of the repository. In the framework of a joint R and D-project between BGR, DBE and GSF the components of a suitable dam have been developed and will be constructed and tested in the GSF-Asse salt mine in Lower-Saxony. The aims of the investigation program, its realization and some results on the development of construction materials will be presented and discussed. Experiences gained during these tests in laboratory and in situ will be described.

  2. Four-State Residential Retrofit and Energy Labeling Project: Process Evaluation and Results Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The State Energy Offices in Alabama, Massachusetts, Virginia, and Washington recently completed a multi-year residential energy efficiency pilot program funded by a competitive State Energy Program...

  3. Organics Verification Study for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, Nancy P.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Niewolny, Laurie A.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Sinclair and Dyes Inlets near Bremerton, Washington, are on the State of Washington 1998 303(d) list of impaired waters because of fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue. Because significant cleanup and source control activities have been conducted in the inlets since the data supporting the 1998 303(d) listings were collected, two verification studies were performed to address the 303(d) segments that were listed for metal and organic contaminants in marine sediment. The Metals Verification Study (MVS) was conducted in 2003; the final report, Metals Verification Study for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington, was published in March 2004 (Kohn et al. 2004). This report describes the Organics Verification Study that was conducted in 2005. The study approach was similar to the MVS in that many surface sediment samples were screened for the major classes of organic contaminants, and then the screening results and other available data were used to select a subset of samples for quantitative chemical analysis. Because the MVS was designed to obtain representative data on concentrations of contaminants in surface sediment throughout Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, and Rich Passage, aliquots of the 160 MVS sediment samples were used in the analysis for the Organics Verification Study. However, unlike metals screening methods, organics screening methods are not specific to individual organic compounds, and are not available for some target organics. Therefore, only the quantitative analytical results were used in the organics verification evaluation. The results of the Organics Verification Study showed that sediment quality outside of Sinclair Inlet is unlikely to be impaired because of organic contaminants. Similar to the results for metals, in Sinclair Inlet, the distribution of residual organic contaminants is generally limited to nearshore areas already within the actively managed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility Superfund Site, where further source-control actions and monitoring are under way.

  4. Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrill, Charles; Ross, Doug; Mensik, Fred

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2000 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by lower than average spring flows and spill, low levels of debris, cool water temperatures, increased unclipped yearling and subyearling chinook smolts, and 8,300,546 smolts collected and transported compared to 5,882,872 in 1999. With the continued release of unclipped supplementation chinook and steelhead above Lower Granite Dam, we can no longer accurately distinguish wild chinook, steelhead, and sockeye/kokanee in the sample. Although some table titles in this report still show ''wild'' column headings, the numbers in these columns for 1999 and 2000 include wild and unclipped hatchery origin smolts. The increases over previous years reflect the increased supplementation. A total of 8,300,546 juvenile salmonids were collected at Lower Granite Dam. Of these, 187,862 fish were bypassed back to the river and 7,950,648 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 7,778,853 by barge and 171,795 by truck. A total of 151,344 salmonids were examined in daily samples. Nine research projects conducted by four agencies impacted a total of 1,361,006 smolts (16.4% of the total collection).

  5. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage through Bonneville Dam in 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Schilt, Carl R.; Kim, Jina; Johnson, Peter N.; Hanks, Michael E.; Patterson, Deborah S.; Skalski, John R.; Hedgepeth, J

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2004. These studies support the Portland District's goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 2 (B2). In this report, we present results of four studies related to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam. The studies were conducted between April 15 and July 15, 2004, encompassing most of the spring and summer migrations. Studies included evaluations of (1) Project fish passage efficiency and other major passage metrics, (2) B2 fish guidance efficiency and gap loss, (3) smolt approach and fate at the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC), and (4) B2 vertical barrier screen head differential.

  6. Late Quaternary history of Washington Land, North Greenland OLE BENNIKE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingólfsson, Ólafur

    Late Quaternary history of Washington Land, North Greenland OLE BENNIKE Bennike, O. 2002 (September): Late Quaternary history of Washington Land, North Greenland. Boreas, Vol. 31, 260­272. Oslo. ISSN 0300-9483. During the last glacial stage, Washington Land in western North Greenland was probably completely inun

  7. The 1980-1982 Geothermal Resource Assessment Program in Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korosec, Michael A.; Phillips, William M.; Schuster, J.Eric

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1978, the Division of Geology and Earth Resources of the Washington Department of Natural Resources has participated in the U.S. Department of Energy's (USDOE) State-Coupled Geothermal Resource Program. Federal and state funds have been used to investigate and evaluate the potential for geothermal resources, on both a reconnaissance and area-specific level. Preliminary results and progress reports for the period up through mid-1980 have already been released as a Division Open File Report (Korosec, Schuster, and others, 1981). Preliminary results and progress summaries of work carried out from mid-1980 through the end of 1982 are presented in this report. Only one other summary report dealing with geothermal resource investigations in the state has been published. An Information Circular released by the Division (Schuster and others, 1978) compiled the geology, geochemistry, and heat flow drilling results from a project in the Indian Heaven area in the south Cascades. The previous progress report for the geothermal program (Korosec, Schuster, and others, 1981) included information on temperature gradients measured throughout the state, heat flow drilling in the southern Cascades, gravity surveys for the southern Cascades, thermal and mineral spring investigations, geologic mapping for the White Pass-Tumac Mountain area, and area specific studies for the Camas area of Clark County and Mount St. Helens. This work, along with some additional studies, led to the compilation of the Geothermal Resources of Washington map (Korosec, Kaler, and others, 1981). The map is principally a nontechnical presentation based on all available geothermal information, presented as data points, tables, and text on a map with a scale of 1:500,000.

  8. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2001-2002 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zabel, Richard; Williams, John G.; Smith, Steven G. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the ninth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from passive integrated transponder (PIT)-tagged fish. We PIT tagged and released at Lower Granite Dam a total of 17,028 hatchery and 3,550 wild steelhead. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream of the hydropower system and sites within the hydropower system. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using the Single-Release Model. Primary research objectives in 2001 were to: (1) estimate reach and project survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the yearling chinook salmon and steelhead migrations; (2) evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions; and (3) evaluate the survival-estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2001 for PIT-tagged yearling chinook salmon and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Results are reported primarily in the form of tables and figures with a minimum of text. More details on methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited in the text. Results for summer-migrating chinook salmon will be reported separately.

  9. Survival Estimates for the Passage of Spring-Migrating Juvenile Salmonids through Snake and Columbia River Dams and Reservoirs, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven G.; Muir, William D.; Marsh, Douglas M. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, the National Marine Fisheries Service and the University of Washington completed the thirteenth year of a study to estimate survival and travel time of juvenile salmonids Oncorhynchus spp. passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. All estimates were derived from detections of fish tagged with passive integrated transponder tags (PIT tags). We PIT tagged and released a total of 18,439 hatchery steelhead, 5,315 wild steelhead, and 6,964 wild yearling Chinook salmon at Lower Granite Dam in the Snake River. In addition, we utilized fish PIT tagged by other agencies at traps and hatcheries upstream from the hydropower system and at sites within the hydropower system in both the Snake and Columbia Rivers. PIT-tagged smolts were detected at interrogation facilities at Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental, Ice Harbor, McNary, John Day, and Bonneville Dams and in the PIT-tag detector trawl operated in the Columbia River estuary. Survival estimates were calculated using a statistical model for tag-recapture data from single release groups (the ''single-release model''). Primary research objectives in 2005 were: (1) Estimate reach survival and travel time in the Snake and Columbia Rivers throughout the migration period of yearling Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha and steelhead O. mykiss. (2) Evaluate relationships between survival estimates and migration conditions. (3) Evaluate the survival estimation models under prevailing conditions. This report provides reach survival and travel time estimates for 2005 for PIT-tagged yearling Chinook salmon (hatchery and wild), hatchery sockeye salmon O. nerka, hatchery coho salmon O. kisutch, and steelhead (hatchery and wild) in the Snake and Columbia Rivers. Additional details on the methodology and statistical models used are provided in previous reports cited here.

  10. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. ______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

  11. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

  12. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint, Ocean Drilling Programs Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc. Washington DC 20005 19 July 2005 #12

  13. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

  14. WWU Sustainability Academy Western Washington University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    WWU Sustainability Academy Western Washington University Dear colleagues, We cordially extend to you this invitation to join the WWU Sustainability Academy! Following several years of discussion, a group of faculty has started the (tentatively named) "WWU Sustainability Academy." Our goal is to build

  15. Washington University Department of Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Douglas C.

    Washington University Department of Computer Science CS422: Operating Systems Programming Project_SOCK_Connector (void); // Default constructor. int connect (Muxed_SOCK_Stream *&new_stream, const INET_Addr &remote_sap); // Actively connect and produce a if things go well. // The sap> is the address that we

  16. Electrical Engineering Graduation Requirements University of Washington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queitsch, Christine

    EE Electrical Engineering Graduation Requirements University of Washington www Chemistry with lab Phys 121 (5cr) ­ Mechanics with lab [pr: Math 124] Engineering Electives (10 Credits Analysis [pr: PHYS 122; MATH 307 & CSE 142 concurrent] Application Deadlines Professional Issues (1 Credit

  17. John Yembrick Headquarters, Washington May 7, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : 09-100 NASA RELEASES INTERACTIVE 3-D VIEWS OF SPACE STATION, NEW MARS ROVER WASHINGTON -- NASA and Microsoft Corporation of Redmond, Wash., released an interactive, 3-D photographic collection of internal standard digital cameras to construct a 3-D view that can be navigated and explored online. "This stunning

  18. FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Washington, DC 20554

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bove Jr., V. Michael

    FCC 96­207 Before the FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Washington, DC 20554 In the Matter to the advancement of digital television and related technologies by the Federal Communications Commission, its 617­253­0334, fax 617­258­6264 vmb@media.mit.edu #12; EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Federal Communications

  19. Environmental effects of dredging. The value of wing dams for freshwater mussels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, A.C.; Whiting, R.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note provides information on the value of wing dams, which reduce dredging requirements in large rivers, for freshwater mussels. Wing dams are longitudinal rock-rubble structures placed in waterways to develop and stabilize channels. Wing dams constrict low flows, which decreases maintenance dredging requirements (Shields 1983). These structures are usually oriented obliquely or at 90 deg to the current. Sediment deposition usually occurs between wing dams where current velocity is reduced relative to that in the unprotected main channel. Wing dams create quiescent areas that are similar to naturally occurring lentic habitats during normal and low flow (Beckett et al. 1983). In addition, wing dams themselves are a coarse-grained substrate used by aquatic insects and fishes (Conner, Pennington, and Bosley 1983; Pennington, Baker, and Bond 1983; and Shields 1983).

  20. EIS-0205: Joint NEPA/SEPA Final Environmental Impact Statement Washington Windplant No. 1, Goldendale, Washington

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration prepared this statement in order to fulfill its National Environmental Policy Act obligations ahead of signing an agreement with the utilities that would purchase the Windplant’s power from KENETECH. KENETECH Windpower, Inc., proposes to construct and operate Washington Windplant No. 1 in the Columbia Hills area, southeast of Goldendale, in Klickitat County, Washington.

  1. A campus of The California State University Office of the Academic Senate One Washington Square San Jose, California 95192-0024 408-924-2440 Fax: 408-924-2451

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleixner, Stacy

    and Operation of Joint Library Building and Grant of Easement: By and Between City of San José and The Trustees of the State of California. This practice is protected by the joint operating agreement with the City, which to create our unique and valuable joint library, promising to "honor the current policy of both

  2. Energy Conservation Study on Darigold Fluid Milk Plant, Issaquah, Washington.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seton, Johnson & Odell, Inc.

    1985-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the findings of an energy study done at Darigold dairy products plant in Issaquah, Washington. The study includes all electrical energy using systems at the plant, but does not address specific modifications to process equipment or the gas boilers. The Issaquah Darigold plant receives milk and cream, which are stored in large, insulated silos. These raw products are then processed into butter, cottage cheese, buttermilk, yogurt, sour cream, and powdered milk. This plant produces the majority of the butter used in the state of Washington. The Issaquah plant purchases electricity from Puget Sound Power and Light Company. The plant is on Schedule 31, primary metering. The plant provides transformers to step down the voltage to 480, 240, and 120 volts as needed. Based on utility bills for the period from July 1983 through July 1984, the Issaquah Darigold plant consumed 7,134,300 kWh at a total cost of $218,703.78 and 1,600,633 therms at a total cost of $889,687.48. Energy use for this period is shown in Figures 1.1 to 1.5. Demand charges account for approximately 23% of the total electrical bill for this period, while reactive charges account for less than 0.5%. The electrical usage for the plant was divided into process energy uses, as summarized in Figure 1.2. This breakdown is based on a 311-day processing schedule, with Sunday clean-up and holidays composing the 54 days of downtime.

  3. A not-so-funny thing happened on the way to relicensing the Edwards Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayer, F.J. [Devine & Tarbell, Inc., Portland, ME (United States); Isaacson, M. [Edwards Manufacturing Co., Lisbon Falls, ME (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    What started out as a seemingly straightforward and simple exercise, obtaining a new FERC license for the Edwards Dam in Augusta, Maine, turned out to be anything but straightforward and far from simple. This article tells the story of one of the more interesting and possibly precedent setting cases in the {open_quotes}class of 93{close_quotes} and is presented in three sections: (1) the history of the Edwards Dam and the FERC regulatory process through the spring of 1995; (2) Edwards` response to the dam removal campaign; and (3) recommendations for FERC licensees threatened by dam removal during relicensing.

  4. Environmental Constraints on Hydropower: An Ex Post Benefit-Cost Analysis of Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotchen, Matthew J.

    Environmental Constraints on Hydropower: An Ex Post Benefit-Cost Analysis of Dam Relicensing Consumers Protection Act (1986), which instructs federal regulators to ``balance'' hydropower

  5. Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage Through Bonneville Dam in 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Hughes, James S.; Bouchard, Kyle E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Schilt, Carl R.; Hanks, Michael E.; Kim, Jina; Skalski, John R.; Hedgepeth, J.; Nagy, William T.

    2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2005. These studies support the Portland District's goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 2 (B2). In this report, we present results of two studies related to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam. The studies were conducted between April 16 and July 15, 2005, encompassing most of the spring and summer migrations. Studies included evaluations of (1) Project fish passage efficiency and other major passage metrics, and (2) smolt approach and fate at B1 Sluiceway Outlet 3C from the B1 forebay. Some of the large appendices are only presented on the compact disk (CD) that accompanies the final report. Examples include six large comma-separated-variable (.CSV) files of hourly fish passage, hourly variances, and Project operations for spring and summer from Appendix E, and large Audio Video Interleave (AVI) files with DIDSON-movie clips of the area upstream of B1 Sluiceway Outlet 3C (Appendix H). Those video clips show smolts approaching the outlet, predators feeding on smolts, and vortices that sometimes entrained approaching smolts into turbines. The CD also includes Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Files (PDF) of the entire report and appendices.

  6. EIS-0352: U.S. 93 Hoover Dam Bypass Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) served as a cooperating agency for this Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) due to WAPA’s role in the relocation of several transmission lines. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) prepared an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for construction of a new segment of U.S. Highway 93 for the purpose of improving congestion and hazardous vehicle/pedestrian conflicts where the highway crosses the Colorado River over Hoover Dam. As a cooperating agency for the EIS, WAPA proposed modifications to its transmission system and facilities to accommodate the construction of the new highway and bridge spanning the Colorado River.

  7. Cascade Apartments - Deep Energy Multifamily Retrofit , Kent, Washington (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In December of 2009-10, King County Housing Authority (KCHA) implemented energy retrofit improvements in the Cascade multifamily community, located in Kent, Washington (marine climate.)This research effort involved significant coordination from stakeholders KCHA, WA State Department of Commerce, utility Puget Sound Energy, and Cascade tenants. This report focuses on the following three primary BA research questions : 1. What are the modeled energy savings using DOE low income weatherization approved TREAT software? 2. How did the modeled energy savings compare with measured energy savings from aggregate utility billing analysis? 3. What is the Savings to Investment Ratio (SIR) of the retrofit package after considering utility window incentives and KCHA capitol improvement funding.

  8. Water quality and sedimentation implications of installing a hydroelectric dam on the Río Baker in Chilean Patagonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leandro, Gianna Dee

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HidroAysen, a Chilean corporation operated by energy giant Endesa, has proposed to build two hydroelectric dams on the Rio Baker in the Aysin Region of Chilean Patagonia. The proposed dams have been met with a variety of ...

  9. European Working Groupe on Internal Erorion in embankment dams April 12th to 14th 2010, Granada, Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    European Working Groupe on Internal Erorion in embankment dams April 12th to 14th 2010, Granada Working Groupe on Internal Erosion in embankment dams, Granada : Spain (2010)" #12;

  10. Tension applied through the Dam1 complex promotes microtubule elongation: a direct mechanism for length control in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Trisha N.

    Tension applied through the Dam1 complex promotes microtubule elongation: a direct mechanism tension to a model of the kinetochore-microtubule interface composed of the yeast Dam1 complex11-13 bound

  11. Geochemical Evidence for an Eolian Sand Dam across the North and South Platte Rivers in Nebraska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loope, David B.

    Geochemical Evidence for an Eolian Sand Dam across the North and South Platte Rivers in Nebraska that the Nebraska Sand Hills once migrated across the North and South Platte rivers and dammed the largest tributary of the South Platte River, have compositions intermediate between the Nebraska Sand Hills (quartz

  12. Uncertainty analysis of river flooding and dam failure risks using local sensitivity computations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Uncertainty analysis of river flooding and dam failure risks using local sensitivity computations) for uncertainty analysis with respect to two major types of risk in river hydrodynamics: flash flood and dam failure. LSA is com- pared to a Global Uncertainty Analysis (GUA) consisting in running Monte Carlo

  13. Research Report Long lasting effects of rearing by an ethanol-consuming dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    Research Report Long lasting effects of rearing by an ethanol-consuming dam on voluntary ethanol rats as subjects, we examined effects of exposure during weaning to a dam consuming ethanol on adolescents' later affinity for ethanol. In a preliminary experiment, we offered rat pups a choice between 8

  14. A. Reservoir Effects of Stream Channels DAM IMPACTS ON AND RESTORATION OF AN ALLUVIAL RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    A. Reservoir Effects of Stream Channels DAM IMPACTS ON AND RESTORATION OF AN ALLUVIAL RIVER ­ RIO, and restoration efforts. Cochiti Dam was constructed on the main stem of the Rio Grande in 1973 for flood control minnow. Recent restoration strategies include removal of non-native riparian vegetation, mechanical

  15. Mangla Dam Raising Project (Pakistan): General Review and Socio-Spatial Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Mangla Dam Raising Project (Pakistan): General Review and Socio-Spatial Impact Assessment Saheeb, National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad-44000, Pakistan saheebk@ceme.nust.edu.pk Abstract. INTRODUCTION Pakistan has recently successfully completed the raising of Mangla dam, a major water works system

  16. Effective mitigation of debris flows at Lemon Dam, La Plata County, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effective mitigation of debris flows at Lemon Dam, La Plata County, Colorado Victor G. deWolfe a May 2007 Abstract To reduce the hazards from debris flows in drainage basins burned by wildfire, erosion control measures such as construction of check dams, installation of log erosion barriers (LEBs

  17. Discrete Applied Mathematics 154 (2006) 106119 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Mei

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrete Applied Mathematics 154 (2006) 106­119 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam Trees of extremal. Tian). 0166-218X/$ - see front matter © 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.dam.2004

  18. Discrete Applied Mathematics 155 (2007) 840856 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spang, Rainer

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrete Applied Mathematics 155 (2007) 840­856 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam Integer linear/$ - see front matter © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.dam.2005.09.021 #12;G.W. Klau

  19. Van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity in topologically new massive gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We study van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity in the topologically new massive gravity (TNMG). The reduction from 2 degrees of freedom to one is interpreted as van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity appeared when going from anti-de Sitter spacetime to Minkowski spacetime in the linearized TNMG.

  20. Discrete Applied Mathematics 157 (2009) 982990 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Hong-jian

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrete Applied Mathematics 157 (2009) 982­990 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam Hamiltonian-218X/$ - see front matter c 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.dam.2008.02.005 #12;H

  1. Discrete Applied Mathematics 155 (2007) 831839 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Frederick

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrete Applied Mathematics 155 (2007) 831­839 www.elsevier.com/locate/dam Binary templates Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.dam.2005.07.015 #12;832 O.D. King, P. Gaborit

  2. Continuous Monitoring of an Ice Sheet in a Reservoir Upstream of Beaumont Dam, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santerre, Rock

    conducted at the Beaumont hydroelectric dam owned and operated by Hydro-Québec. This power plant has six find- ings will help to harmonize the different standards that are used to manage hydroelectric power considerable economic savings related to minimizing production losses, optimizing dam reinforcement works

  3. ADtrees for Sequential Data and N-gram Counting Rob Van Dam and Dan Ventura

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Tony R.

    ADtrees for Sequential Data and N-gram Counting Rob Van Dam and Dan Ventura Abstract-- We consider Ventura are with the Department of Com- puter Science, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (email: rvan- dam00@gmail.com, ventura@cs.byu.edu) the best smoothing techniques utilize some (often linear

  4. Invited Contribution to Q 76: The Use of Risk Analysis to Support Dam Safety Decisions and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    Decisions and Management DRAFT FOR REVIEW ONLY Portfolio Risk Assessment: A Tool for Managing Dam SafetyICOLD 20th Congress Invited Contribution to Q 76: The Use of Risk Analysis to Support Dam Safety in the Context of the Owner's Business David S. Bowles Professor and Director, Institute for Dam Safety Risk

  5. RISK-BASED EVALUATION OF OPERATING RESTRICTIONS TO REDUCE THE RISK OF EARTHQUAKE-INDUCED DAM FAILURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowles, David S.

    and consequences of an Earthquake-induced dam failure. The potential for both a sudden overtopping failure-induced dam failure, and the estimated residual risk and degree of risk-based justification for the Existing into the relationship between pool elevation and dam failure risk, provided important inputs for the decision

  6. Received 8 Jul 2014 | Accepted 8 Aug 2014 | Published 19 Sep 2014 Kinetochores require oligomerization of Dam1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asbury, Chip

    -deficient Dam1 complex is unable to support stable bipolar alignment of sister chromatids, indicating failure oligomerization of Dam1 complex to maintain microtubule attachments against tension and promote biorientation Neil-cell imaging, we find that oligomerization of the Dam1 complex is required for its ability to form microtubule

  7. A DETAILED RESEARCH PLAN TO ASSESS BEHAVIOR OF ADULT SUMMER/FALL CHINOOK UPSTREAM OF WELLS DAM USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A DETAILED RESEARCH PLAN TO ASSESS BEHAVIOR OF ADULT SUMMER/FALL CHINOOK UPSTREAM OF WELLS DAM-8295 Final Draft April 19, 2004 #12;BioAnalysts, Inc Summer/Fall Chinook Research Plan Chief Joseph Dam Page........................................................................ 11 3.6.3 Chief Joseph Dam Powerhouse

  8. Design of dry dams at watershed scale : lessons learnt from sensitivity analyses using a simple but consistent rainfall-runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Design of dry dams at watershed scale : lessons learnt from sensitivity analyses using a simple Lyon, FRANCE Abstract We investigate the assessment of the overall efficiency of a set of dry dams of the best locations for a set of dams was previously studied using a simplistic rainfall-runoff model

  9. August 2002 / Vol. 52 No. 8 BioScience 659 Dams are structures designed by humans to capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poff, N. LeRoy

    August 2002 / Vol. 52 No. 8 BioScience 659 Articles Dams are structures designed by humans to capture water and modify the magnitude and timing of its movement downstream. The damming of streams, dams have reduced flood hazard and allowed humans to settle and farm pro- ductive alluvial soils

  10. Experiments on upstream-migrating erosional narrowing and widening of an incisional channel caused by dam removal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paola, Chris

    by dam removal Alessandro Cantelli Department of Environmental Engineering, University of Genova, Italy on a laboratory investigation of the erosion of a deltaic front induced by the removal of a dam. We built a laboratory model of a dam, and observed both the sedimentation in the reservoir due to the downstream

  11. An adaptive time-space dual algorithm for shallow non-Newtonian power-law fluids: the horizontal dam break

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    dam break problem revisited P. Saramito a C. Smutek b B. Cordonnier b aLJK ­ CNRS et Universit´es de´eunion, France Abstract ­ The dam break problem shallow approximation for laminar flows of viscoplastic non equations for non-Newtonian fluids subject to the horizontal dam break problem. Keywords ­ viscoplastic

  12. Effects of Jackson Lake Dam on the Snake River and its floodplain, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marston, Richard A.

    Effects of Jackson Lake Dam on the Snake River and its floodplain, Grand Teton National Park In 1906, the Bureau of Reclamation created Jackson Lake Dam on the Snake River in what later became Grand Teton National Park. The geomorphic, hydrologic and vegetation adjustments downstream of the dam have

  13. THE INFLUENCE OF MAJOR DAMS ON HYDROLOGY THROUGH THE DRAINAGE NETWORK OF THE SACRAMENTO RIVER BASIN, CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Michael

    THE INFLUENCE OF MAJOR DAMS ON HYDROLOGY THROUGH THE DRAINAGE NETWORK OF THE SACRAMENTO RIVER BASIN downstream of major dams and confluences in the Sacramento River basin in California, USA. Streamflow data from 10 gauging stations downstream of major dams were divided into hydrologic series corresponding

  14. Dam and Hydroelectric Powerplant University of Hawai`i CEE 491University of Hawai`i CEE 491

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    Karun 3 Dam and Hydroelectric Powerplant University of Hawai`i ­ CEE 491University of Hawai`i ­ CEE;Location #12;Description/Background Hydroelectric dam on Karun River Help with national energy needs #12;Social & Economic Benefits Flood Control Dam reservoirs help to control floods Mitigate high peak

  15. INFLUENCE OF ROCKY REACH DAM AND THE TEMPERATURE OF THE OKANOGAN RIVER ON THE UPSTREAM MIGRATION OF SOCKEYE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INFLUENCE OF ROCKY REACH DAM AND THE TEMPERATURE OF THE OKANOGAN RIVER ON THE UPSTREAM MIGRATION Reach Dam, constructed on the Columbia River 7 miles above Wenatchee, Wash.· in 1957-61, has not appreciably increased the time required for adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) to mi~rate to Zosel Dam

  16. EIS-0173: Bonneville Power Administration/Puget Power Northwest Washington Transmission Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) prepared this environmental impact statement to analyze the environmental impacts of an upgrade that BPA and Puget Sound Power & Light Company are considering implementing on the existing high- voltage transmission system in the Whatcom and Skagit Counties area of the State of Washington, between the towns of Custer and Sedro Woolley, including some areas within the City of Bellingham, starting in 1995.

  17. An aerial radiological survey of the Hanford Site and surrounding area, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, during the period 5 July through 26 August 1988. The survey was expanded, and additional flights were conducted to the east of the site and along the banks of the Columbia River down to McNary Dam near Umatilla. The survey was flown at altitude of 61 meters (200 feet) by a helicopter containing 17 liters (eight 2 in. {times} 4 in. {times} 16 in.) of sodium iodide detectors. Gamma ray data were collected over the survey area by flying north-south lines spaced 122 meters (400 feet) apart. The processed data indicated that detected radioisotopes and their associated gamma ray exposure rates were generally consistent with those expected from normal background emitters and man-made fission/activation products resulting from activities at the site. External exposure rates were generally 10 microroentgens per hour ({mu}R/h) with some operating areas over 1000 {mu}R/h. The radiation levels over more than 95% of the site are due to normal background exposure rates. 3 refs., 25 figs.

  18. FUPWG Spring 2010 Meeting South Dakota: Washington Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers an update on Washington given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

  19. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Washington Area New Automobile...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Association (WANADA) serves as the representative organization for all franchised new car dealers in the metropolitan Washington region. Workplace charging matches the vision...

  20. annual meeting washington: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Washington ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT 2010 Annual Report 12;ERM 2010 Annual Report 2 December 2010 "Enterprise Risk Management" (ERM) - a process - to integrate risk...

  1. asce seattle washington: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sept. 21, 2006 Seattle, Washington Next-generation 76Ge neutrinoless double beta-decay experiments J.F. Wilkerson Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and...

  2. Potential Federal On-Site Solar Aggregation in Washington, D...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Shah 2 Presentation Overview * Federal Renewable Requirements * On-site Renewable Energy Purchase Overview * Washington DCMaryland Solar Options * Case Studies * Federal...

  3. Energy Incentive Programs, Washington | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexas Energy Incentive Programs, Texas Updated JuneWashington Energy

  4. Washington -- SEP Data Dashboard | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director ofDepartment of Energy Washington ,

  5. Acme, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind6:00-06:00AboutAchille,Acme, Washington: Energy

  6. Bothell, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouthbyBoston Heights, Ohio: Energy ResourcesBothell, Washington:

  7. Bucoda, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable andBucoda, Washington: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,

  8. Burien, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable andBucoda, Washington:InformationgeothermalBurien,

  9. Washington Gas Energy Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwide PermitInformationIsland: Energy ResourcesProcessWashington Gas

  10. Skykomish, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG SolarSkykomish, Washington: Energy Resources Jump

  11. Kent, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa:Washington: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search

  12. Kingsgate, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa:Washington:Kimble County,

  13. Kirkland, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtelInteriasIowa:Washington:KimbleKinnelon, NewOklahoma:(Redirected from

  14. Enumclaw, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest,EnergySerranopolis JumpESLEnergyEnphaseEnumclaw, Washington:

  15. Newcastle, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania:Information296593°,Newcastle, Washington: Energy Resources

  16. Medina, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio: Energy8429°, -88.864698°MecostaWashington: Energy Resources

  17. Tenino, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:HoldingsTechintIsNumericTenino, Washington: Energy Resources

  18. Washington Gas Energy Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraph HomeWarana Group ofWashington Gas Energy

  19. Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillageGraph HomeWarana GroupInformationWashington:

  20. Renton, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,Maze - Making the Path for FutureRenton, Washington:

  1. Ritzville, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,Maze -RichtonMissouri: EnergyRitzville, Washington:

  2. Rochester, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation,MazeOhio:Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to:Washington:

  3. Rock Island Dam Smolt Monitoring; 1996 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, Robert (Chelan County Public Utility District No. 1, Power Operations Department, Wenatchee, WA)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Downstream migrating salmon and steelhead (Oncoryhnchus spp.) smolts were monitored at the Rock Island Dam bypass trap from April 1--August 31, 1996. This was the twelfth consecutive year that the bypass trap was monitored. Data collected included: (1) number of fish collected by species, (2) number of fin clipped and/or Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tagged fish caught by species, (3) total number of fish showing signs of gas bubble trauma (GBT), (4) percent of descaled fish, and (5) daily average river flow, powerhouse {number_sign}1 flow, powerhouse {number_sign}2 flow and daily average spill. These data were transmitted to the Fish Passage Center (FPC), which manages the Smolt Monitoring Program throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Smolt Monitoring Program is used to manage the water budget, releasing upstream reservoir water storage allocated to supplement river flows during the downstream migration of juvenile salmonids.

  4. Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the survival for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts during spring 2010 in a portion of the Columbia River that includes Bonneville Dam. The study estimated smolt survival from a virtual release at Bonneville Dam to a survival array 81 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. We also estimated median forebay residence time, median tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A single release design was used to estimate survival from Bonneville Dam to a primary array located 81 km downstream of Bonneville. The approach did not include a reference tailrace release. Releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam to Hood River contributed to the formation of virtual releases at a Bonneville Dam forebay entrance array and at the face of the dam. A total of 3,880 yearling Chinook salmon and 3,885 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation.

  5. Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the survival for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts during spring 2010 in a portion of the Columbia River that includes Bonneville Dam. The study estimated smolt survival from a virtual release at Bonneville Dam to a survival array 81 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. We also estimated median forebay residence time, median tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A single release design was used to estimate survival from Bonneville Dam to a primary array located 81 km downstream of Bonneville. The approach did not include a reference tailrace release. Releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam to Hood River contributed to the formation of virtual releases at a Bonneville Dam forebay entrance array and at the face of the dam. A total of 3,880 yearling Chinook salmon and 3,885 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation.

  6. State of Washington Joint Aquatic Resource Permit Application (JARPA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Sandra

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    all of the required permits, there is a greater likelihoodinform applicants on which permits they need, resulting inreduce the need for permit revisions that are currently

  7. BOBBI M. ADAMS School of Biological Sciences Washington State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Brian M.

    Reintroduction and Implications for Climate Change. $2500 / 2011 - 2012 Palouse Audubon Society Research Grant

  8. UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTALPROTECTIONAGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AND MEMORANDUM SUBJECT Guidance -- Potential for Radiation ContaminationAssociated WithMineral and Resource with the potential for radioactive contamination. Appendix 4 provides an alphabetized check list of the minerals contamination associatedwith a list of specific mineralsand certainresource extraction, processing

  9. SEP Success Story: Washington State Becomes Largest Public Consumer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    shuttle more than 11 million people across the Puget Sound every year. Now, the electric-diesel engines that propel these vessels are powered by a blend of soy-based...

  10. UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON D.C. 20460

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at a central extraction well, and is then processed to remove the uranium and recycle the fluid back's Draft Technical Report entitled Considerations Related to Post- Closure Monitoring of Uranium In to update the environmental protection standards for uranium mining because current regulations, promulgated

  11. UNITED STATES NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION WASHINGTON. D. C...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    . These releases, t h e c0ntainmen.t f a i l u r e modes, and t h e t i m i n g t o a computer code c a l l e d CORRAL which c a l c u l a t e s t h e amounts o f t h e v a r i o u...

  12. WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION FINANCIAL REpORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    ORT: FISCAL YEAR 2011 EDUCATING TOMORROW'S TEACHERS...AND FUTURE COUGS Construction continued throughout

  13. ITP Distributed Energy: State of Washington Clean Energy Opportunity...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in the Pacific Northwest: Market Assessment) 672.0 Petroleum Refineries 738 MW at BP refinery (permitted) minus Oakridge on-site and export potential of 66 MW 0 Pulp & Paper...

  14. STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY, TRADE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the emissions from the "net system mix", or electricity available for export, to be 1,014 lbs. CO2/MWh in 2006's electricity imports. We recognize the critical importance of tracking emissions related to the production electric industry emissions profile and to develop an accurate tracking or reporting mechanism

  15. Washington State University STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR STUDENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    .................................................................................. 5 WAC 50426207 Failure to comply with university officials. ....................................................... 11 STUDENT CONDUCT CODE PROCEDURES

  16. State of Washington Clean Energy Opportunity: Technical Market...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy technical market potential including clean heat and power (CHP)cogeneration, waste heat recovery for power and heat, and district energy. This brief white paper by the...

  17. Washington State Ergonomics Tool: predictive validity in the waste industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppes, Susan Elise

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    they were being observed. Following are the jobs analyzed: ? 3 residential collection o manual residential rear load driver o manual residential rear load helper o manual residential recycle curbside driver ? 2 landfill operations o landfill... heavy equipment operator o landfill spotter ? 3 material recovery facilities o commercial paper pre-sort sorter o paper line sorter 9 o rigid container sorter ? 5 maintenance facilities o mechanic o painter o container repair o...

  18. State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Biotic Systems, Groundwater Systems, Irrigated Systems, and Outreach and Education. These programs have removal at small systems, emergency response and vulnerability, and storm water runoff regulations proposals on its own behalf. #12;Integration of Surface Irrigation Techniques to Reduce Sediment

  19. UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinstock on August 22, 1997 OFFICE OF SOLID WASTE AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE OSWER No. 9200.4-18 MEMORANDUM) expectations regarding treatment of principal threat waste and the use of containment and institutional controls for low level threat waste. 2 Since radon is not covered in some Federal radiation regulations

  20. State of Washington Water Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Fifth Research Category: Ground-water Flow and Transport Focus Category: Non Point Pollution, Water Quality, Hydrogeochemistry Descriptors: Non-point pollutants, lindane, triallate, pesticides, water agricultural mass discharges using enviro