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1

Grand River Dam Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dam Authority Dam Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Grand River Dam Authority Place Oklahoma Utility Id 7490 Utility Location Yes Ownership S NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png general service Commercial general service commercial Commercial large general servic time of use distributional Commercial

2

Effects of the Ben Franklin Dam on the Hanford Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A previous assessment of the effects of a Ben Franklin Dam on the Hanford Site made in 1967 was updated so that the potential adverse effects may be better understood in light of existing operations, current environmental and safety standards, and proposed facilities and operations. The major effects would probably arise from flooding of portions of the site by the reservoir associated with the dam and by the raising of the ground water table under the site. A preliminary analysis of the effects of the dam is presented, and a number of studies are recommended in order to fully evaluate and understand these potential impacts. The following seven tasks are identified and discussed: groundwater - hydrology analysis; soil liquefaction analysis; hydrostatic uplift and soil effects on structures; assessment of the potential for landsliding and sloughing; facility decommissioning; hydrothermal analysis; and, meteorological effects. Four other aspects commented upon in this report are: aquatic ecology, terrestrial ecology, socioeconomic effects, and public interaction. Possible effects on ongoing DOE-sponsored R and D are also noted. To the extent possible, cost estimates are developed for corrective actions which must be taken on the Hanford Site to accommodate the dam. Where this was not possible, appropriate courses of action leading to cost estimates are presented.

Harty, H.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Proposed study program of the effects on Hanford of a dam at Columbia River mile 348  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the request of Hanford Operations Office, Atomic Energy Commission, a study was made of the effects on the Hanford Facilities of a navigation and power dam at Columbia River mile 348, about five miles upstream of the 300 Area. The original study was based on a nominal slack-water pool elevation of 395 to 400 feet at the dam location. A supplemental study evaluated the effects on plant facilities of a dam at the same location but with slack-water pool elevation of 385 feet. In addition to effects of the dam on Hanford, a study was performed to evaluate the effects the dam would have on the environment.

Jasko, R.T.

1959-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

AUTHORITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AUTHORITY AUTHORITY All Acquisition Letters, remaining in effect, as of March 7, 1996, are listed below. All other Acquisition Letters have either been superseded by formal rulemaking or are otherwise canceled. Financial Assistance Letters are not shown. Please file this listing in your Acquisition Letter binder. AL 96-01 (03/08/96) No. Date Subject 84-1R Rev. 12/92 Acquisition Letters 87-3R Rev. 12/87 Prescreening Policies and Procedures 87-5 09/04/87 Patents and Technical Data 88-1 05/25/88 Rights in Technical Data Facilities 90-3R Rev. 11/30/92 Internal Audit 91-5 08/06/91 Guidance on Implementing DOE Fee Policy 91-7 12/04/91 Rights in Data - Technology Transfer Activities 91-8 10/23/91 Special Considerations Educational Institutions

5

Study of the effects of a disaster at Grand Coulee Dam upon the Hanford Works  

SciTech Connect

Declassified 23 Nov 1973. It is assumed that the Grand Coulee Dam would be destroyed by one direct hit following detonation of an atomic bomb. Major effects of the explosion include flooding and isolation of Richland, flooding of Midway Substation, and flooding of surrounding areas. Maximum water elevations following a direct hit and indirect hits are estimated. Data are presented for flow through openings and flow through dam failure. (HLW)

Kramer, H.A.

1950-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Effects of Flaming Gorge Dam hydropower operations on downstream flow, stage, and sediment transport  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydropower operations at Flaming Gorge Dam, located on the Green River in Utah, can produce rapid downstream changes in flow and stage. These changes can in turn affect sediment transport and ecologic resources below the dam. To evaluate these effects, four hydropower operational scenarios with varying degrees of hydropower-release fluctuations were examined. This study demonstrates that the combined use of river-flow routing, water-surface profile, and sediment-transport models can provide useful information for evaluating the potential impacts of hydropower-operations on ecological and other resources downstream of the dam. Study results show that flow fluctuations may or may not persist for a long distance, depending on the initial magnitude of fluctuation and the duration of hydropower peaking. Stage fluctuations depend not only on flow fluctuations but also on river channel characteristics, such as channel width and longitudinal slope.

Yin, S.C.L.; Tomasko, D.; Cho, H.E.; Williams, G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); McCoy, J.; Palmer, C. [USDOE Western Area Power Administration, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The Downstream Geomorphic Effects of Dams: A Comprehensive and Comparative Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs of dredging or decommissioning such structures. Whilegreatest component of dam decommissioning costs (e.g. , U.S.operation and ultimate decommissioning. Many of the dams on

Minear, Justin Toby

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

The Effects of Subcloud-Layer Diabatic Processes on Cold Air Damming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hypothesis that clouds and precipitation enhance cold air damming is examined. A case example of cloud/precipitation-induced enhancement of damming is presented and a conceptual model is proposed.

J. M. Fritsch; J. Kapolka; P. A. Hirschberg

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Simulation analysis of within-day flow fluctuation effects on trout below flaming Gorge Dam.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In addition to being renewable, hydropower has the advantage of allowing rapid load-following, in that the generation rate can easily be varied within a day to match the demand for power. However, the flow fluctuations that result from load-following can be controversial, in part because they may affect downstream fish populations. At Flaming Gorge Dam, located on the Green River in northeastern Utah, concern has been raised about whether flow fluctuations caused by the dam disrupt feeding at a tailwater trout fishery, as fish move in response to flow changes and as the flow changes alter the amount or timing of the invertebrate drift that trout feed on. Western Area Power Administration (Western), which controls power production on submonthly time scales, has made several operational changes to address concerns about flow fluctuation effects on fisheries. These changes include reducing the number of daily flow peaks from two to one and operating within a restricted range of flows. These changes significantly reduce the value of the power produced at Flaming Gorge Dam and put higher load-following pressure on other power plants. Consequently, Western has great interest in understanding what benefits these restrictions provide to the fishery and whether adjusting the restrictions could provide a better tradeoff between power and non-power concerns. Directly evaluating the effects of flow fluctuations on fish populations is unfortunately difficult. Effects are expected to be relatively small, so tightly controlled experiments with large sample sizes and long study durations would be needed to evaluate them. Such experiments would be extremely expensive and would be subject to the confounding effects of uncontrollable variations in factors such as runoff and weather. Computer simulation using individual-based models (IBMs) is an alternative study approach for ecological problems that are not amenable to analysis using field studies alone. An IBM simulates how a population responds to environmental changes by representing how the population's individuals interact with their environment and each other. IBMs represent key characteristics of both individual organisms (trout, in this case) and the environment, thus allowing controlled simulation experiments to analyze the effects of changes in the key variables. For the flow fluctuation problem at Flaming Gorge Dam, the key environmental variables are flow rates and invertebrate drift concentrations, and the most important processes involve how trout adapt to changes (over space and time) in growth potential and mortality risk. This report documents simulation analyses of flow fluctuation effects on trout populations. The analyses were conducted in a highly controlled fashion: an IBM was used to predict production (survival and growth) of trout populations under a variety of scenarios that differ only in the level or type of flow fluctuation.

Railsback, S. F.; Hayse, J. W.; LaGory, K. E.; Environmental Science Division; EPRI

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Effect of Flow Pulses on Degradation Downstream of Hapcheon Dam, South Korea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the vertical and horizontal mixing of dye as the fluid slumps under gravity immediately after removal of dam gravity numerical model initialized with a finite length dammed region and periodic boundary conditions (reduced gravity = g , Coriolis parameter = f) propagating alongshore (y = 0). The potential vorticity q

Julien, Pierre Y.

11

Seismic fracture analysis of concrete gravity dams including dam-reservoir interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the seismic fracture response of concrete gravity dams is investigated with considering the effects of dam-reservoir interaction. A co-axial rotating crack model (CRCM), which includes the strain softening behavior, is selected for concrete ... Keywords: Concrete gravity dam, Dam-reservoir interaction, Non-linear analysis, Seismic fracture

Yusuf Calayir; Muhammet Karaton

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Virginia Resources Authority Act (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Virginia Resources Authority provides financing options to support community investment in a number of areas, including wastewater, flood prevention and dam safety, solid waste, water, land...

13

Evaluation of the Biological Effects of the Northwest Power Conservation Council's Mainstem Amendment on the Fisheries Upstream and Downstream of Libby Dam, Montana, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new project began in 2005 to monitor the biological and physical effects of improved operations of Hungry Horse and Libby Dams, Montana, called for by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Mainstem Amendment. This operating strategy was designed to benefit resident fish impacted by hydropower and flood control operations. Under the new operating guidelines, July through September reservoir drafts will be limited to 10 feet from full pool during the highest 80% of water supply years and 20 feet from full pool during the lowest 20% of water supply (drought) years. Limits were also established on how rapidly discharge from the dams can be increased or decreased depending on the season. The NPCC also directed the federal agencies that operate Libby and Hungry Horse Dams to implement a new flood control strategy (VARQ) and directed Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks to evaluate biological responses to this operating strategy. The Mainstem Amendment operating strategy has not been fully implemented at the Montana dams as of June 2008 but the strategy will be implemented in 2009. This report highlights the monitoring methods used to monitor the effects of the Mainstem Amendment operations on fishes, habitat, and aquatic invertebrates upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. We also present initial assessments of data and the effects of various operating strategies on physical and biological components of the systems upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Annual electrofishing surveys in the Kootenai River and selected tributaries, along with gill net surveys in the reservoir, are being used to quantify the impacts of dam operations on fish populations upstream and downstream of Libby Dam. Scales and otoliths are being used to determine the age structure and growth of focal species. Annual population estimates and tagging experiments provide estimates of survival and growth in the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries. Radio telemetry will be used to validate an existing Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) model developed for the Kootenai River and will also be used to assess the effect of changes in discharge on fish movements and habitat use downstream of Libby Dam. Passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags will be injected into rainbow, bull, and cutthroat trout throughout the mainstem Kootenai River and selected tributaries to provide information on growth, survival, and migration patterns in relation to abiotic and biotic variables. Model simulations (RIVBIO) are used to calculate the effects of dam operations on the wetted perimeter and benthic biomass in the Kootenai River below Libby Dam. Additional models (IFIM) will also be used to evaluate the impacts of dam operations on the amount of available habitat for different life stages of rainbow and bull trout in the Kootenai River.

Sylvester, Ryan; Stephens, Brian; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

14

Effect of superficial insulation on roller-compacted concrete dams in cold regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superficial insulation is often used to prevent cracking of concrete dams located in cold regions. In this study, surface temperatures with and without heat insulation during the overwintering period are calculated. Using the material properties of roller-compacted ... Keywords: Superficial crack, Superficial insulation, Temperature difference, Temperature field, Thermal stress, Three-dimensional finite element relocating mesh method

Xiao-fei Zhang; Shou-yi Li; Yan-long Li; Yao Ge; Hui Li

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Dam Safety Program (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Dam Safety Division within the Department of the Environment is responsible for administering a dam safety program to regulate the construction, operation, and maintenance of dams to prevent...

16

Dam Safety (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection's Division of Dam Safety provides for the regulation and safety of dams and reservoirs throughout the Commonwealth in order to protect the...

17

Potential effects of four Flaming Gorge Dam hydropower operational scenarios on riparian vegetation of the Green River, Utah and Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four hydropower operational scenarios at Flaming Gorge Dam were evaluated to determine their potential effects on riparian vegetation along the Green River in Utah and Colorado. Data collected in June 1992 indicated that elevation above the river had the largest influence on plant distribution. A lower riparian zone occupied the area between the approximate elevations of 800 and 4,200-cfs flows--the area within the range of hydropower operational releases. The lower zone was dominated by wetland plants such as cattail, common spikerush, coyote willow, juncus, and carex. An upper riparian zone was above the elevation of historical maximum power plant releases from the dam (4,200 cfs), and it generally supported plants adapted to mesic, nonwetland conditions. Common species in the upper zone included box elder, rabbitbrush, grasses, golden aster, and scouring rush. Multispectral aerial videography of the Green River was collected in May and June 1992 to determine the relationship between flow and the areas of water and the riparian zone. From these relationships, it was estimated that the upper zone would decrease in extent by about 5% with year-round high fluctuation, seasonally adjusted high fluctuation, and seasonally adjusted moderate fluctuation, but it would increase by about 8% under seasonally adjusted steady flow. The lower zone would increase by about 13% for both year-round and seasonally adjusted high fluctuation scenarios but would decrease by about 40% and 74% for seasonally adjusted moderate fluctuation and steady flows, respectively. These changes are considered to be relatively minor and would leave pre-dam riparian vegetation unaffected. Occasional high releases above power plant capacity would be needed for long-term maintenance of this relict vegetation.

LaGory, K.E.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Ecological Sciences Section

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Total Dissolved Gas Effects on Incubating Chum Salmon Below Bonneville Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE; Portland District), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook a project in 2006 to look further into issues of total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation in the lower Columbia River downstream of Bonneville Dam. In FY 2008, the third year of the project, PNNL conducted field monitoring and laboratory toxicity testing to both verify results from 2007 and answer some additional questions about how salmonid sac fry respond to elevated TDG in the field and the laboratory. For FY 2008, three objectives were 1) to repeat the 2006-2007 field effort to collect empirical data on TDG from the Ives Island and Multnomah Falls study sites; 2) to repeat the static laboratory toxicity tests on hatchery chum salmon fry to verify 2007 results and to expose wild chum salmon fry to incremental increases in TDG, above those of the static test, until external symptoms of gas bubble disease were clearly present; and 3) to assess physiological responses to TDG levels in wild chum salmon sac fry incubating below Bonneville Dam during spill operations. This report summarizes the tasks conducted and results obtained in pursuit of the three objectives. Chapter 1 discusses the field monitoring, Chapter 2 reports the findings of the laboratory toxicity tests, and Chapter 3 describes the field-sampling task. Each chapter contains an objective-specific introduction, description of the study site and methods, results of research, and discussion of findings. Literature cited throughout this report is listed in Chapter 4. Additional details on the monitoring methodology and results are provided in Appendices A and B included on the compact disc bound inside the back cover of the printed version of this report.

Arntzen, Evan V.; Hand, Kristine D.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Geist, David R.; Murray, Katherine J.; Dawley, Earl M.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Elston, Ralph A.; Vavrinec, John

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

19

Effects of Mitigative Measures on Productivity of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam: Determine Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from McNary Dam, 1997-1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors report on their progress from April 1997 through March 1998 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (USGS; Report C), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS; Report D), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; Report E), and Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report F). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete. Therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported. Highlights of results of the work from April 1997 through March 1998 listed.

Ward, David L. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Dams – Fishways (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

No permanent dam or obstruction may be placed in the waters of the state without providing for fish passage.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

INTERNATIONAL COMMISSION ON LARGE DAMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

earthquake. The dam was designed as a concrete gravity dam constructed using roller-compacted concrete (RCC a week. The Olivenhain Dam is the first RCC gravity dam permitted by the state of California and), is the tallest RCC dam in the North America. The Olivenhain Dam has the typical geometry for concrete gravity

Bowles, David S.

22

GEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS By: Christine T. Weber1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Finally, the fish ladder at Little Goose Dam uses pumped river water rather than a gravity flow. Of all GOOSE DAM ON UPSTREAM MOVEMENTS OF ADULT CHINOOK SALMON, ONCORHYNCHUS TSHAWYTSCHA A major environmental effects of hydroelectric dams (Figure 1) on the upstream movements of adult salmonids. Results indicated

Zornberg, Jorge G.

23

Effects of the Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the Kokanee Fishery in the Flathead River System, 1983 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to assess the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the kokanee fishery in the Flathead River system. This annual report covers the 1982-1983 field season concerning the effects of Hungry Horse operations on kokanee abundance, migration, spawning, egg incubation and fry emergence in the Flathead River system. This report also addresses the expected recovery of the mainstem kokanee population under the flow regime recommended by the Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks in 1982.

Fraley, John J.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Dam Safety Program (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Dam safety in Florida is a shared responsibility among the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), the regional water management districts, the United States Army Corps of Engineers ...

25

Saliency-Driven tactile effect authoring for real-time visuotactile feedback  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New-generation media such as the 4D film have appeared lately to deliver immersive physical experiences, yet the authoring has relied on content artists, impeding the popularization of such media. An automated approach for the authoring becomes increasingly ... Keywords: 4D film, multimedia, tactile effect, visual saliency

Myongchan Kim; Sungkil Lee; Seungmoon Choi

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Dam Safety Standards (New Jersey)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These rules set forth procedures for application to construct, repair or modify a dam and set standards for design and maintenance of dams. These rules also establish a dam inspection procedure....

27

Effects of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Kokanee Fishery in the Flathead River System, 1979-1985 Final Research Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to assess the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the kokanee fishery in the Flathead River system. Studies concerning operation of the dam on the Flathead River aquatic biota began in 1979 and continued to 1982 under Bureau of Reclamation funding. These studies resulted in flow recommendations for the aquatic biota in the main stem Flathead River, below the influence of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork. Studies concerned specifically with kokanee salmon have continued under Bonneville Power Administration funding since 1982. This completion report covers the entire study period (September 1979 to June 1985). Major results of this study were: (1) development and refinement of methods to assess hydropower impacts on spawning and incubation success of kokanee; (2) development of a model to predict kokanee year class strength from Flathead River flows; and (3) implementation of flows favorable for successful kokanee reproduction. A monitoring program has been developed which will assess the recovery of the kokanee population as it proceeds, and to recommend management strategies to maintain management goals for the kokanee fishery in the river system.

Clancy, Patrick

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Effects of hydropower operations on recreational use and nonuse values at Glen Canyon and Flaming Gorge Dams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increases in streamflows are generally positively related to the use values of angling and white-water boating, and constant flows tend to increase the use values more than fluctuating flows. In most instances, however, increases in streamflows beyond some threshold level cause the use values to decrease. Expenditures related to angling and white-water boating account for about $24 million of activity in the local economy around Glen Canyon Dam and $24.8 million in the local economy around flaming Gorge Dam. The range of operational scenarios being considered in the Western Area Power Administration`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement, when use rates are held constant, could change the combined use value of angling and white-water boating below Glen Canyon Dam, increasing it by as much as 50%, depending on prevailing hydrological conditions. Changes in the combined use value below Flaming Gorge Dam could range from a decrease of 9% to an increase of 26%. Nonuse values, such as existence and bequest values, could also make a significant contribution to the total value of each site included in this study; however, methodological and data limitations prevented estimating how each operational scenario could change nonuse values.

Carlson, J.L.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Safe Dams Act of 1972 (Tennessee) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safe Dams Act of 1972 (Tennessee) Safe Dams Act of 1972 (Tennessee) Safe Dams Act of 1972 (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Transportation Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Safe Dams Act of 1973 (SDA) gives the Commissioner of the Department of Environment and Conservation the power to issue certificates authorizing the construction, alteration, or operation of a dam. A dam is defined as any artificial barrier, together with appurtenant works, which does or may impound or divert water, and which either (1) is or will be twenty (20)

30

Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina) Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina) Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control The Dams and Reservoirs Safety Act provides for the certification and inspection of dams in South Carolina and confers regulatory authority on the Department of Health and Environmental Control. Owners of dams and reservoirs are responsible for maintaining the safety of the structures,

31

Heart . Author manuscript Effects of depressive symptoms and coronary heart disease and their  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heart . Author manuscript Page /1 11 Effects of depressive symptoms and coronary heart disease separately in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) and in populations healthy at study inception and CHD status. OBJECTIVE To examine effects of depressive symptoms and coronary heart disease

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

32

Use of aerial videography to evaluate the effects of Flaming Gorge Dam operations on natural resources of the Green River  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Peaking hydropower operations can profoundly alter natural stream flow and thereby affect the natural resources dependent on these flows. In this paper, we describe how aerial videography was used to collect environmental data and evaluate impacts of hydropower operations at Flaming Gorge Dam on natural resources of the Green River. An airborne multispectral video/radiometer remote sensing system was used to collect resource data under four different flow conditions from seven sites (each about one mile in length) located downstream from the dam. Releases from Flaming Gorge Dam during data collection ranged from approximately 800 to 4,000 cubic feet/sec (cfs), spanning most of the normal operating range for this facility. For each site a series of contiguous, non-overlapping images was prepared from the videotapes and used to quantify surface water area, backwater habitats, and areas of riparian vegetation under varying flow conditions. From this information, relationships between flow and habitat parameters were developed and used in conjunction with hydrologic modeling and ecological information to evaluate impacts of various modes of operation.

Snider, M.A.; Hayse, J.W.; Hlohowskyj, I.; LaGory, K.E.; Greaney, M.M.; Kuiper, J.A.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.A.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Dam Safety (Michigan)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule requires that anyone who desires to construct a dam that is 6 feet or more in height and impounds 5 surface acres or more at the design flood elevation, must first obtain a permit from...

34

Regulation of Dams (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The owner of a dam is required to maintain the structure in good condition, and notify the Department of Environmental Management upon the sale or transfer of ownership of the structure. The...

35

Dam Safety (North Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

North Carolina Administrative Code Title 15A, Subchapter 2K lays out further regulations for the design, approval, construction, maintenance, and inspection of dams to ensure public safety and...

36

Export Authorizations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Below is a listing of export authorizations grouped by Canada and Mexico.Export Authorizations - CanadaExport Authorizations - Mexico

37

Principal Author: Contributing Authors:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost benefit analysis of green building ever conducted. It demonstrates conclusively that sustainable building is a cost-effective investment, and its findings should encourage communities across the country to “build green.” In August 2000, Governor Davis issued Executive Order D-16-00, establishing sustainable building as a primary goal for state construction and tasking the State and Consumer Services Agency with its implementation. Our agency established the Sustainable Building Task Force, a unique partnership among more than 40 governmental agencies, whose combined building, environmental, and fiscal expertise has produced outstanding results, including funding for this report. Since its inception, the Sustainable Building Task Force has worked diligently to incorporate green building principles into California’s capital outlay process. Our many successes include: Building the first LEED Gold state owned office building in the country, the Education Headquarters Building, which is saving taxpayers $500,000 a year in energy costs alone; Including sustainable building performance standards, such as energy efficiency, in over $2 billion of state construction and renovation contracts;

Sustainable Building; Task Force; Greg Kats; Capital E; Adam Berman; Capital E; Jeff Perlman; Capital E

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Statistical evaluation of the effects of fall and winter flows on the spring condition of rainbow and brown trout in the green river downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flaming Gorge Dam, a hydroelectric facility operated by the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), is located on the Green River in Daggett County, northeastern Utah. In recent years, single peak releases each day or steady flows have been the operational pattern during the winter period. A double-peak pattern (two flow peaks each day) was implemented during the winter of 2006-2007 by Reclamation. Because there is no recent history of double-peaking at Flaming Gorge Dam, the potential effects of double-peaking operations on the body condition of trout in the dam's tailwater are not known. A study plan was developed that identified research activities to evaluate potential effects from double-peaking operations during winter months. Along with other tasks, the study plan identified the need to conduct a statistical analysis of existing data on trout condition and macroinvertebrate abundance to evaluate potential effects of hydropower operations. This report presents the results of this analysis. We analyzed historical data to (1) describe temporal patterns and relationships among flows, benthic macroinvertebrate abundance, and condition of brown trout (Salmo trutta) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the tailwaters of Flaming Gorge Dam and (2) to evaluate the degree to which flow characteristics (i.e., flow volumes and flow variability) and benthic macroinvertebrate abundance affect the condition of trout in this area. This information, together with further analyses of size-stratified trout data, may also serve as baseline data to which the effects of potential future double-peaking flows can be compared. The condition (length, weight and/or relative weight) of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) at two sites in the Green River downstream of Flaming Gorge Dam (Tailrace and Little Hole) and weight of brown trout (Salmo trutta) at the Little Hole site has been decreasing since 1990 while the abundance of brown trout has been increasing at the two sites. At the same time, flow variability in the river has decreased and the abundance of total benthic macroinvertebrates at the Tailrace site has increased. The condition of trout in spring (averaged across all sampled trout) was positively correlated with fall and winter flow variability (including within-day skewness, within-season skewness and/or change in flow between days) at both locations. No negative correlations between trout condition and any measure of flow variability were detected. The length and weight of rainbow trout at the Little Hole site were negatively correlated with increasing fall and winter flow volume. The condition of brown trout at Little Hole and the condition of brown and rainbow trout at Tailrace were not correlated with flow volume. Macroinvertebrate variables during October were either positively correlated or not correlated with measures of trout condition at the Tailrace and Little Hole sites. With the exception of a positive correlation between taxa richness of macroinvertebrates in January and the relative weight of brown trout at Tailrace, the macroinvertebrate variables during January and April were either not correlated or negatively correlated with measures of trout condition. We hypothesize that high flow variability increased drift by dislodging benthic macroinvertebrates, and that the drift, in turn, resulted in mostly lower densities of benthic macroinvertebrates, which benefited the trout by giving them more feeding opportunities. This was supported by negative correlations between benthic macroinvertebrates and flow variability. Macroinvertebrate abundance (with the exception of ephemeropterans) was also negatively correlated with flow volume. The change in trout condition from fall to spring, as measured by the ratio of spring to fall relative weight, was evaluated to determine their usefulness as a standardized index to control for the initial condition of the fish as they enter the winter period. The ratio values were less correlated with the fall condition values than the spring condition values and did not show the same re

Magnusson, A. K.; LaGory, K. E.; Hayse, J. W.; Environmental Science Division

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

39

Flood Protection and Dam Safety (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All dams in Virginia are subject to the Dam Safety Act and Dam Safety Regulations unless specifically excluded. A dam is excluded if it: (a) is less than six feet high; (b) has a maximum capacity...

40

MERLIN Analysis of Leesville Dam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three sections of American Electric Power's (AEP's) Leesville Dam were analyzed with MERLIN, EPRI's fracture mechanics program. The Leesville Dam had previously been found to be unstable under probable maximum flood (PMF) loadings when analyzed using traditional gravity methods.

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Effects of Flaming Gorge Dam hydropower operations on flow and stage in the Green River, Utah and Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the development of Flaming Gorge Reservoir release patterns and resulting downstream flows and stages for four potential hydropower operational scenarios. The release patterns were developed for three representative hydrologic years: moderate, dry, and wet. Computer models were used to estimate flows and stages in the Green River resulting from these release patterns for the moderate water year. The four hydropower operational scenarios for Flaming Gorge Dam were year-round high fluctuating flows, seasonally adjusted high fluctuating flows, seasonally adjusted moderate fluctuating flows, and seasonally adjusted steady flows. The year-round high fluctuating flow scenario assumes that the monthly total reservoir releases would be the same as historical releases. The remaining seasonally adjusted flow scenarios would comply with the 1992 Biological Opinion of the US Fish and Wildlife Service, which requires high flows in the spring and limited hourly fluctuations, especially in summer and autumn releases, to protect endangered fish. Within one year, the maximum daily river stage fluctuations resulting from hydropower operations under the seasonally adjusted high fluctuating flow scenario would be similar to the maximum daily fluctuations under the year-round high fluctuating flow scenario. However, reduced or no fluctuations would occur in some time periods under the former scenario. The maximum daily river stage fluctuations under the seasonally adjusted moderate fluctuating flow scenario would be about half of those under the seasonally adjusted high fluctuating flow scenario.

Yin, S.C.L.; Cho, H.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.; McCoy, J.J.; Palmer, S.C. [Western Area Power Administration, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Development of dam safety management system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, we can see an increasing amount of dam damage or failure due to aging, earthquakes occurrence and unusual changes in weather. For this reason, dam safety is gaining more importance than ever before in terms of disaster management at a national ... Keywords: Dam safety, Dam safety issue, Dam safety management system, Field inspection, Instrumentation, Monitoring, Safety evaluation

Jesung Jeon; Jongwook Lee; Donghoon Shin; Hangyu Park

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Potential effects of four Flaming Gorge Dam hydropower operational scenarios on the fishes of the Green River, Utah and Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aerial videography and modeling were used to evaluate the impacts of four hydropower operational scenarios at Flaming Gorge Dam, Utah, on trout and native fishes in the Green River, Utah and Colorado. The four operational scenarios studied were year-round high fluctuations, seasonally adjusted high fluctuations, seasonally adjusted moderate fluctuations, and seasonally adjusted steady flows. Impacts on trout were evaluated by examining differences among scenarios in the areas of inundated substrates that serve as spawning and feeding habitat. All scenarios would provide at least 23 acres per mile of habitat for spawning and food production; seasonally adjusted operations would provide additional areas during periods of sustained high release. Seasonally adjusted high fluctuations would increase inundated areas by 12 to 26% for a short period in winter and spring, but food production and reproduction would not be expected to increase. Seasonally adjusted moderate fluctuations and steady flows would produce similar increases in area, but the longer period of inundation could also result in increased food production and provide additional spawning sites for trout. Impacts on native fishes were assessed by examining daily changes in backwater nursery areas. Compared with year-round high fluctuations, the daily changes in backwater area would decrease by about 47, 89, and 100% under the seasonally adjusted high fluctuation, moderate fluctuation, and steady flow scenarios, respectively. Similarly, daily stage fluctuations during the nursery period would decrease by 72, 89, and 100% under the seasonally adjusted high fluctuation, moderate fluctuation, and steady flow scenarios, respectively. These reductions in daily fluctuations in backwater area and stage would improve conditions in nursery habitats and could in turn improve recruitment and overwinter survival. Introduced fish species could also benefit from the seasonally adjusted operational scenarios.

Hlohowskyj, I.; Hayse, J.W.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Help - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data in the bibliographic records for all holdings of the 10 ANL Libraries. An author query will search the fields shown below. Author Corporate Name Conference NameLocation...

45

Speculative Authorization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present Speculative Authorization (SPAN), a prediction technique that reduces authorization latency in enterprise systems. SPAN predicts requests that a system client might make in the near future, based on its past behavior. SPAN allows authorization ... Keywords: Access control, machine learning, prediction

Pranab Kini, Konstantin Beznosov

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Regulations and Permits Related to Dams (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Vermont law requires a permit, or a dam order, for the construction, alteration, or removal of dams impounding more than 500,000 cubic feet of water, including any accumulated sediments. Dam...

47

Dams, Dikes, and Other Devices; Dam Safety Program (North Dakota) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dikes, and Other Devices; Dam Safety Program (North Dakota) Dikes, and Other Devices; Dam Safety Program (North Dakota) Dams, Dikes, and Other Devices; Dam Safety Program (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting These regulations govern the permitting, construction, operation, inspection, and hazard classifications of dams, dikes, and other water

48

Effects of the Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the Kokanee Fishery in the Flathead River System, 1984 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study assessed the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the kokanee fishery in the Flathead River system. This report covers the 1983-84 field season concerning the effects of Hungry Horse operations on kokanee abundance and reproductive success in the upper Flathead River system. This report also addresses the projected recovery of the main stem kokanee run under the flow regime recommended by the Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks and implemented by the Bureau of Reclamation and Bonneville Power Administration in 1982. An estimated 58,775 kokanee reached spawning grounds in the Flathead River System in 1983. The 1983 spawning run was composed of 92% age III + fish, as compared to an average of 80% from 1972-1983. A total of 6883 kokanee redds were enumerated in the main stem Flathead River in 1983. A total of 2366 man-days of angling pressure was estimated during the 1983 kokanee lure fishery in the Flathead River system. Estimated numbers of fry emigrating from McDonald Creek, the Whitefish River and Brenneman's Slough were 13,100,000, 66,254 and 37,198, yielding egg to fry survival rates of 76%, 10.4% and 19.2%.

Fraley, John J.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Effects of Flaming Gorge Dam hydropower operations on sediment transport in the Browns Park reach of the Green River, Utah and Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three methods for comparing sediment transport were applied to four proposed hydropower operational scenarios under study for Flaming Gorge Dam on the Green River in Utah. These methods were effective discharge, equilibrium potential, and cumulative sediment load with flow exceedance plots. Sediment loads transported by the Green River in the Browns Park reach were calculated with the Engelund-Hansen equation for three historical water years and four hydropower operational scenarios. A model based on the Engelund-Hansen equation was developed using site-specific information and validated by comparing predictions for a moderate water year with measured historical values. The three methods were used to assess the impacts of hydropower operational scenarios on sediment resources. The cumulative sediment load method provided the most useful information for impact evaluation. Effective discharge was not a useful tool because of the limited number of discrete flows associated with synthetic hydrographs for the hydropower operational scenarios. The equilibrium potential method was relatively insensitive to the variations in operating conditions, rendering it comparatively ineffective for impact evaluation.

Williams, G.P.; Tomasko, D.; Cho, H.E.; Yin, S.C.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Safety of Dams and Reservoirs Act (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act regulates dams and associated reservoirs to protect health and public safety and minimize adverse consequences associated with potential dam failure. The act describes the responsibilities...

51

Impacts of Water Level Fluctuations on Kokanee Reproduction in Flathead Lake; Effects of Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dam on Reproductive Success, 1983 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Koktneesalmon (Oncorhvnchusnerka), the land-locked form of sockeye salmon, were originally introduced to Flathead Lake in 1916. My 1933, kokanee had become established in the lake and provided a popular summer trolling fishery as well as a fall snagging fishery in shoreline areas. Presently, Flathead Lake supports the second highest fishing pressure of any lake or reservoir in Montana (Montana Department of Fish and Game 1976). During 1981-82, the lake provided 168,792 man-days of fishing pressure. Ninety-two percent of the estimated 536,870 fish caught in Flathead Lake in 1981-82 were kokanee salmon. Kokanee also provided forage for bull trout seasonally and year round for lake trout. Kokanee rear to maturity in Flathead Lake, then return to various total grounds to spawn. Spawning occurred in lake outlet streams, springs, larger rivers and lake shoreline areas in suitable but often limited habitat. Shoreline spawning in Flathead Lake was first documented in the mid-1930's. Spawning kokanee were seized from shoreline areas in 1933 and 21,000 cans were processed and packed for distribution to the needy. Stefanich (1953 and 1954) later documented extensive but an unquantified amount of spawning along the shoreline as well as runs in Whitefish River and McDonald Creek in the 1950's. A creel census conducted in 1962-63 determined 11 to 13 percent of the kokanee caught annually were taken during the spawning period (Robbins 1966). During a 1981-82 creel census, less than one percent of the fishermen on Flathead Lake were snagging kokanee (Graham and Fredenberg 1982). The operation of Kerr Dam, located below Flathead Lake on the Flathead River, has altered seasonal fluctuations of Flathead Lake. Lake levels presently remain high during kokanee spawning in November and decline during the incubation and emergence periods. Groundwater plays an important role in embryo and fry survival in redds of shoreline areas exposed by lake drawdown. Stefanich (1954) and Domrose (1968) found live eggs and fry only in shoreline spawning areas wetted by groundwater seeps. Impacts of the operation of Kerr Dam on lakeshore spawning have not been quantified. Recent studies have revealed that operation of Hungry Horse Dam severely impacted successful kokanee spawning and incubation in the Flathead River above Flathead Lake (Graham et al. 1980, McMullin and Graham 1981, Fraley and Graham 1982 and Fraley and McMullin 1983). Flows from Hungry Horse Dam to enhance kokanee reproduction in the river system have been voluntarily met by the Bureau of Reclamation since 1981. In lakeshore spawning areas in other Pacific Northwest systems, spawning habitat for kokanee and sockeye salmon was characterized by seepage or groundwater flow where suitable substrate composition existed (Foerster 1968). Spawning primarily occurred in shallower depths (<6 m) where gravels were cleaned by wave action (Hassemer and Rieman 1979 and 1980, Stober et al. 1979a). Seasonal drawdown of reservoirs can adversely affect survival of incubating kokanee eggs and fry spawned in shallow shoreline areas. Jeppon (1955 and 1960) and Whitt (1957) estimated 10-75 percent kokanee egg loss in shoreline areas of Pend Oreille Lake, Idaho after regulation of the upper three meters occurred in 1952. After 20 years of operation, Bowler (1979) found Pend Oreille shoreline spawning to occur in fewer areas with generally lower numbers of adults. In studies on Priest Lake, Idaho, Bjornn (1957) attributed frozen eggs and stranded fry to winter fluctuations of the upper three meters of the lake. Eggs and fry frozen during winter drawdown accounted for a 90 percent loss to shoreline spawning kokanee in Donner Lake, California (Kimsey 1951). Stober et al. (1979a) determined irrigation drawdown of Banks Lake, Washington reduced shoreline survival during five of the seven years the system was studied. The goal of this phase of the study was to evaluate and document effects of the operation of Kerr Dam on kokanee shoreline reproduction in Flathead Lake. Specific objectives to meet this goal are: (1) Del

Decker-Hess, Janet; McMullin, Steve L.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Authorization Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Authorization Policy Authorization Policy Services Overview ECS Audio/Video Conferencing Fasterdata IPv6 Network Network Performance Tools (perfSONAR) ESnet OID Registry PGP Key Service Virtual Circuits (OSCARS) OSCARS Case Study Documentation User Manual FAQ Design Specifications Functional Specifications Notifications Publications Authorization Policy Default Attributes Message Security Clients For Developers Interfaces Links Hardware Requirements DOE Grids Service Transition Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Authorization Policy Introduction An authorization decision consists of deciding if an authenticated entity

53

Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol . Author manuscript Effects of cardiac overexpression of type 6 adenylyl cyclase affects on the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol . Author manuscript Page /1 8 Effects of cardiac overexpression isoforms in the heart. Cardiac overexpression of AC6 (AC6 Tg) has been shown to be protective in response ; pharmacology ; Heart ; drug effects ; physiopathology ; Heart Rate ; drug effects ; physiology ; Heart

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

54

JOM: Author Tools - Author Obligations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Once the Author Query Application has been completed, your article will be processed and you will receive the proofs. Open Choice In addition to the normal

55

Author Select  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Author Select Last Name First Name search Type in a name, or the first few letters of a name, in one or both of appropriate search boxes above and select "Go". An attempt will be...

56

Statutory Authority  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Statutory Authority for the Iowa State Energy Code (Pertinent Text is Bolded) 103A.7 STATE BUILDING CODE. 1. The state building code commissioner with the approval of the advisory...

57

Effects of Hydroelectric Dam Operations on the Restoration Potential of Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Spawning Habitat Final Report, October 2005 - September 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Fish and Wildlife Program directed by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council. The study evaluated the restoration potential of Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat within the impounded lower Snake River. The objective of the research was to determine if hydroelectric dam operations could be modified, within existing system constraints (e.g., minimum to normal pool levels; without partial removal of a dam structure), to increase the amount of available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the lower Snake River. Empirical and modeled physical habitat data were used to compare potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Snake River, under current and modified dam operations, with the analogous physical characteristics of an existing fall Chinook salmon spawning area in the Columbia River. The two Snake River study areas included the Ice Harbor Dam tailrace downstream to the Highway 12 bridge and the Lower Granite Dam tailrace downstream approximately 12 river kilometers. These areas represent tailwater habitat (i.e., riverine segments extending from a dam downstream to the backwater influence from the next dam downstream). We used a reference site, indicative of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in tailwater habitat, against which to compare the physical characteristics of each study site. The reference site for tailwater habitats was the section extending downstream from the Wanapum Dam tailrace on the Columbia River. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat use data, including water depth, velocity, substrate size and channelbed slope, from the Wanapum reference area were used to define spawning habitat suitability based on these variables. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat suitability of the Snake River study areas was estimated by applying the Wanapum reference reach habitat suitability criteria to measured and modeled habitat data from the Snake River study areas. Channel morphology data from the Wanapum reference reach and the Snake River study areas were evaluated to identify geomorphically suitable fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat. The results of this study indicate that a majority of the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas contain suitable fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat under existing hydrosystem operations. However, a large majority of the currently available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas is of low quality. The potential for increasing, through modifications to hydrosystem operations (i.e., minimum pool elevation of the next downstream dam), the quantity or quality of fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat appears to be limited. Estimates of the amount of potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor study area decreased as the McNary Dam forebay elevation was lowered from normal to minimum pool elevation. Estimates of the amount of potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Lower Granite study area increased as the Little Goose Dam forebay elevation was lowered from normal to minimum pool elevation; however, 97% of the available habitat was categorized within the range of lowest quality. In both the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas, water velocity appears to be more of a limiting factor than water depth for fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, with both study areas dominated by low-magnitude water velocity. The geomorphic suitability of both study areas appears to be compromised for fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, with the Ice Harbor study area lacking significant bedforms along the longitudinal thalweg profile and the Lower Granite study area lacking cross-sectional topographic diversity. To increase the quantity of available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study area, modifications to hydroelectric dam operations beyond those evaluated in this study likely would be necessary. M

Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Arntzen, Evan V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

58

Authorizes Negotiations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, 1996 , 1996 Number 9 Secretary of Energy Authorizes Negotiations for Renewal of URA Contract INSIDE 2 Walton Receives DOE Environment Award 3 Cast in Concrete 4 Spring Cleaning 6 University Close-Up: Rutgers University 11 Labwide Celebration Invitation By Donald Sena, Office of Public Affairs On March 28, Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary authorized a five-year renewal of the Universities Research Association's contract to manage Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, pending negotiation of various contrac- tual reforms that include lab-wide management performance measures. O'Leary, who allowed the contract to be noncompetitively renewed, said in a signed authorization: "...use of competitive procedures would cause unacceptable disruption in the manage- ment and operation of this major

59

Effect of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Reproductive Success of Kokanee in the Flathead System, 1987 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies of kokanee reproductive success in the Flathead system from 1981 to 1987 have assessed the losses in fish production attributable to hydroelectric operations. We estimated that the Flathead Lake shoreline spawning stock has lost at least 50,000 fish annually, since Kerr Dam was completed in 1938. The Flathead River spawning stock has lost 95,000 spawners annually because of the operations of Hungry Horse Dam. Lakeshore spawning has been adversely affected because Flathead Lake has been drafted to minimum pool during the winter when kokanee eggs are incubating in shallow shoreline redds. Egg mortality from exposure and desiccation of kokanee redds has increased since the mid 1970's. When the lake was drafted more quickly and held longer at minimum pool. Escapement surveys in the early 1950's, and a creel survey in the early 1960's have provided a baseline to which the present escapement levels can be compared, and loss estimated. Main stem Flathead River spawning has also declined since the mid 1970's when fluctuating discharge from Hungry Horse Dam during the spawning and incubation season exposed redds at the river margin and increased mortality. This decline followed an increase in main stem spawning in the late 1950's through the mid 1960's attributable to higher winter water temperature and relatively stable discharge from Hungry Horse Dam. Spawning escapement in the main stem exceeded 300,000 kokanee in the early 1970's as a result. Spawning in spring-influenced sites has comprised 35 percent of the main stem escapement from 1979 to 1986. We took that proportion of the early 1970's escapement (105,000) as the baseline against which to measure historic loss. Agricultural and suburban development has contributed less significantly to degradation of kokanee spawning habitat in the river system and on the Flathead Lake shoreline. Their influence on groundwater quality and substrate composition has limited reproductive success in few sites. Studies of the effects of hydroelectric operations on the reproductive success of kokanee in the Flathead system have been ongoing since 1980. Results of these studies have been published in a series of annual progress reports which are detailed in Appendix G. The reports summarize spawning site inventories and spawning escapement, egg and alevin mortality rates and the mechanisms by which water level fluctuations influence mortality, creel surveys, and investigation of the population dynamics of Flathead kokanee. The Region 1 offices of the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks distribute this material to the scientific community and the general public. Until recently, it was considered feasible to recover losses to the Flathead kokanee fishery by enhancing and diversifying natural reproduction. But the establishment of opossum shrimp (M. relicta) in Flathead Lake has reduced the availability of zooplankton forage in the spring and summer, and may reduce the viability of juvenile kokanee. In 1986, research was redirected to quantify this competitive interaction and to investigate artificial means of enhancing the kokanee fishery. The average density of mysid shrimp in Flathead Lake has increased to 108/m{sup 2} in 1987, and at some locations density exceeds 500/m2. Mysid grazing pressure has delayed the pulse of zooplankton production in the spring and reduced zooplankton standing crop in the summer. Cladocerans such as Daphnia thorata, the preferred food of kokanee of all ages, are the most markedly affected species. The peak density of D. thorata in the summer has declined from 4.8/liter in 1983 to O.9/liter in 1987. Growth rates of underyearling and yearling kokanee have declined, apparently as a result of the reduction in their food supply. Spawning escapement has also declined, falling from 150,000 in 1985. to 25,000 in 1986, to 600 in 1987. Fry-to-adult survival has declined from 2.5 percent to near zero. The causes of high mortality, and which age-classes are most susceptible, are not completely understood, but the observed decline in juvenile growth rate impl

Beattie, Will; Zubik, Raymond; Clancey, Patrick

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Principal Authors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Award No. DE-FC26-00NT41005. However, any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the DOE. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. With the Nation's coal-burning utilities facing the possibility of tighter controls on mercury

C. Jean Bustard

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Use, Maintenance, Removal, Inspections, and Safety of Dams (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section describes operating plans for dams with movable structures, as well as procedures for raising or lowering of impoundment levels, dam removal, and dam safety inspections.

62

Perspectives on Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework Directive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Retirement of Dams and Hydroelectric Facilities. ASCE, Newon the Allier River, a hydroelectric plant in France. Thethe dam generating hydroelectric power versus the ecological

Lawrence, Justin E; Pollak, Josh D; Richmond, Sarah F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi) Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi) Dam Safety Regulation (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Transportation Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality The purpose of the Dam Safety Regulation is to ensure that all dams constructed in the state of Mississippi are permitted and thus do not potentially harm wildlife, water supplies and property. Any person or entity proposing to construct, enlarge, repair, or alter a dam or reservoir

64

Lead author:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report contains three separate papers, each addressing selected issues concerning natural gas policy and security of gas supply in Europe. The over-arching themes are vulnerability (to supply disruptions, to supplier pricing power) and fragmentation; and measures designed to overcome them, namely interconnection and consolidation of bargaining power. The first paper contains a review of some of the economic effects of, and subsequent policy reactions to, the January 2009 cut of Russian gas supplies through the Ukraine Corridor, with a particular focus on Bulgaria and on EU policy. The second paper provides an analysis of the current state of gas relations between Ukraine and the Russian Federation, with a focus on the Ukrainian perspective and on recent political developments in that country. The third paper provides an analysis of the case for consolidating buyer power in line with the concept of an EU Gas Purchasing Agency. Keywords:

Edward Hunter Christie; Pavel K. Baev; Volodymyr Golovko

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Dam Safety (Delaware) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dam Safety (Delaware) Dam Safety (Delaware) Dam Safety (Delaware) < Back Eligibility Construction Fed. Government Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Start Date 2004 State Delaware Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control The Delaware Dam Safety Law was adopted in 2004 and provides the framework for proper design, construction, operation, maintenance, and inspection of dams in the interest of public health, safety, and welfare. The law requires licensing, inspections and preparation of emergency action plans (EAPs) for publicly owned dams with a high or significant hazard potential.

66

Power Plant Dams (Kansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Plant Dams (Kansas) Power Plant Dams (Kansas) Power Plant Dams (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Kansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Health and Environment This act states the provisions for erection and maintenance of dams. When any person, corporation or city may be desirous of erecting and maintaining a milldam or dam for generating power across any watercourse, the party so desiring to do the same may run the stream over the land of any other person by ditching or otherwise, and he, she or it may obtain the right to erect and maintain said dam and keep up and maintain the necessary ditches

67

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation; Aquatic Modeling of the Selective Withdrawal System, Hungry Horse Dam, Montana, 1991-1993 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hungry Horse Dam presently releases frigid water from the bottom of the reservoir all year long. Cold water effects insect production and fish growth downstream. Rapid temperature changes of up to 8.3 C (14 F) have been measured in the Flathead River downstream of the South Fork confluence, controlled by dam discharges. Thermal effects from Hungry Horse Dam are detectable for over 64 Km downstream to Flathead Lake. The installation of a selective withdrawal structure on each of the dam`s discharge penstocks was determined to be the most cost-effective means to provide constant, permanent temperature control without impacting power production and flexibility in dam operation. The thermal model presented herein revealed that fish growth potential in the river would increase two to five times through selective withdrawal, temperature control. Temperature control is possible over the entire range of turbine discharge capacity, with very little effect on power production. Findings indicate that angling would improve through higher catch rates and larger fish. Temperature control will solve the most serious impact to river health. However, flow fluctuations will continue to effect insect production and usable fishery habitat in the Flathead River. A natural thermal regime combined with moderated flow fluctuation would further enhance riverine food production, trout growth and recreation potential.

Marotz, Brian L.; Althen, Craig; Gustafson, Daniel

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Effect of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Reproduction Success of Kokanee in the Flathead River System, 1986 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 1985 kokanee spawning run in the Flathead system was the strongest in five years. Escapement to the Flathead River system was 147,000 fish, including 123,000 in McDonald Creek and an estimated 20,000 in the main stem. Enumeration of spawners and redds in the Flathead River was hindered by high fall flows and early freezing in November. The upstream spawning migration from Flathead Lake began in late August. Schools of kokanee were seen six miles above the lake on September 4. We counted 1,156 redds in Flathead Lake, distributed primarily along the southeastern shore. An unusually high proportion (90 percent) of lakeshore spawning occurred in the zone above minimum pool, where egg mortality is very high because of exposure from drawdown. Escapement to the Swan River was 1,350 fish. Four year old (III+) fish comprised 95 percent of the spawning run in the Flathead system. This continues a five-year trend toward dominance of the III+ year class. The age composition of spawners has varied considerably for the past 15 years. The average size of spawning fish was 365 mm, which is identical to the average size of the parent year class in 1981. One of the goals of managing Flathead kokanee is to produce mature fish 300-330 mm in length. In the main stem Flathead River, pre-emergent survival was 80 percent. Survival in McDonald Creek, unaffected by hydroelectric operations, was 83 percent. Sampling showed few hatched alevins, probably due to unusually cold winter temperatures. Egg survival at Blue Bay, a spawning area on Flathead Lake where redds are concentrated below minimum pool, varied in relation to depth and dissolved oxygen concentration in the substrate. Eggs survived 78 days at 2,880 feet where dissolved oxygen was 5.7 mg/l. Eggs survived 35 days at 2,870 feet where dissolved oxygen concentration averaged 2.9 mg/l. Low dissolved oxygen contributed to poor survival to emergence at all elevations in Blue Ray. Experiments in Skidoo Bay confirmed that survival of eggs above minimum pool depends on redds being wetted by groundwater seeps. After 40 days exposure by drawdown, eggs in groundwater seeps showed 86 percent survival, whereas outside of the groundwater seeps eggs survived less than six days. These results confirm that exposure by drawdown is the primary factor that limits kokanee reproductive success in redds above minimum pool. We surveyed the west and south shoreline of Flathead Lake to locate potential kokanee spawning habitat. We found conditions which could support incubating eggs at two sites in South Ray and two sites on the west shore of the lake. Seven other sites on the west shore were not suitable due to low groundwater discharge or low dissolved oxygen. In all these areas suitable substrate existed only within the drawdown zone. The lake should be drafted earlier in the fall, and filled earlier in the spring to improve recruitment from lakeshore spawning. We conducted creel surveys during 1985, and estimated that anglers caught 192,000 kokanee. Anglers harvested 49,200 fish during the ice fishery in Skidoo Bay, 129,000 fish during the summer fishery on the lake, and 13,800 during the fall river fishery. Estimated fishing pressure for the year exceeded 188,000 angler hours. The abundance of mysid shrimp in Flathead Lake, measured at six index stations, increased to 130/mIf in 1986. My&Is increased tenfold from 1984 to 1985, and about threefold from 1985 to 1986. Monitoring of mysid shrimp and zooplankton populations in Flathead Lake is supplementing an investigation of the growth and survival of juvenile kokanee. Kokanee and mysid shrimp feed primarily on planktonic crustaceans. This work was designed to detect a potential decline in kokanee recruitment or growth brought about by competitive interaction with mysid shrimp. Fluctuation in adult kokanee year class strength is in part attributable to the negative effects of hydroelectric dam operation on reproductive success in the main stem Flathead River and in Flathead Lake. Our results show that egg survival in the river has improved in response to sta

Beattie, Will; Clancey, Patrick

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Dam Safety Program (Florida) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Summary Dam safety in Florida is a shared responsibility among the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP), the regional water management districts, the United...

70

Destruction or Alteration of a Dam (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Permission from the Environmental Protection Commission is required prior to the removal, destruction, or alteration that results in a lower water level of any existing dam.

71

Use of an Autonomous Sensor to Evaluate the Biological Performance of the Advanced Turbine at Wanapum Dam  

SciTech Connect

Hydropower is the largest renewable energy resource in the world and the United States. However, Hydropower dams have adverse ecological impacts because migrating fish may be injured or killed when they pass through hydro turbines. In the Columbia and Snake River basins, dam operators and engineers are required to make these hydroelectric facilities more fish-friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation after fish population declines and the subsequent listing of several species of Pacific salmon in the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Grant County Public Utility District (Grant PUD) requested authorization from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that are designed to improve survival for fish passing through the turbines while improving operation efficiency and increasing power generation. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy provided co-funding to Grant PUD for aspects of performance testing that supported the application. As an additional measure to the primary evaluation measure of direct injury and mortality rates of juvenile Chinook salmon using balloon tag-recapture methodology, this study used an autonomous sensor device to provide insight into the specific hydraulic conditions or physical stresses that the fish experienced or the specific causes of the biological response. We found that the new blade shape and the corresponding reduction of turbulence in the advanced hydropower turbine were effective. The frequency of severe events based on Sensor Fish pressure and acceleration measurements showed trends similar to those of fish survival determined by balloon tag-recapture tests. In addition, the new turbine provided a better pressure and rate of change environment for fish passage. Overall, the Sensor Fish data indicated that the advanced hydro turbine design met the desired fish passage goals for Wanapum Dam.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Dauble, Dennis D.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

72

Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to ''protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries...'' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May, 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to redevelop fisheries and fisheries habitat in basin streams and lakes.

Dunnigan, James L.; Marotz, Brian L.; DeShazer, Jay (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Effect of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Reproductive Success of Kokanee in the Flathead System; Technical Addendum to the Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This addendum to the Final Report presents results of research on the zooplankton and fish communities of Flathead Lade. The intent of the Study has been to identify the impacts of hydroelectric operations at Kerr and Hungry Horse Dam on the reproductive success of kokanee an to propose mitigation for these impacts. Recent changes in the trophic ecology of the lake, have reduced the survival of kokanee. In the last three year the Study has been redirected to identify, if possible, the biological mechanisms which now limit kokanee survival, and to test methods of enhancing the kokanee fishery by artificial supplementation. These studies were necessary to the formulation of mitigation plans. The possibility of successfully rehabilitating the kokanee population, is the doubt because of change in the trophic ecology of the system. This report first presents the results of studies of the population dynamics of crustacean zooplankton, upon which planktivorous fish depend. A modest effort was directed to measuring the spawning escapement of kokanee in 1988. Because of its relevance to the study, we also report assessments of 1989 kokanee spawning escapement. Hydroacoustic assessment of the abundance of all fish species in Flathead Lake was conducted in November, 1988. Summary of the continued efforts to document the growth rates and food habits of kokanee and lake whitefish are included in this report. Revised kokanee spawning and harvest estimates, and management implications of the altered ecology of Flathead Lake comprise the final sections of this addendum. 83 refs., 20 figs., 25 tabs.

Beattie, Will; Tohtz, Joel

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

McNary Dam, Ice Harbor Dam, and Lower Monumental Dam Smolt Monitoring Program; 1996 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW) assumed responsibility for the Smolt Monitoring Program at McNary Dam on the Columbia River in 1990 and at the new juvenile collection facility at Lower Monumental Dam on the Snake River in 1993. In 1996, Smolt Monitoring Program activities also began at the new juvenile collection facility located at Ice Harbor Dam. This report summarizes the 1996 Smolt Monitoring work at all three sites. The work at Ice Harbor consisted of Gas Bubble Trauma (GBT) monitoring only. In general, the 1996 passage season at both the McNary and Lower Monumental sites can be characterized by reduced passage of juveniles through the collection systems due to elevated river flows and spill, and low (<1%) overall facility mortality rates most likely resulting from cooler water temperatures. In accordance with the National Marine Fisheries Service recommendations (NMFS, 1995) all spring migrants were bypassed at McNary Dam in 1996. Mechanical problems within the McNary collection system resulted in collection and sampling activities being delayed until April 18 at this site, while sampling and collection began on the scheduled starting date of April 1 at Lower Monumental Dam. Monitoring operations were conducted through December 14 at McNary Dam and through October 28 at Lower Monumental Dam. An ongoing transportation evaluation summer migrant marking program was conducted at McNary Dam in 1996 by the NMFS. This necessitated the sampling of 394,211 additional fish beyond the recommended sampling guidelines. All total, 509,237 and 31,219 juvenile salmonids were anesthetized and individually counted, examined for scale loss, injuries, and brands by WDFW Smolt Monitoring personnel in 1996 at McNary Dam and Lower Monumental Dam, respectively.

Hillson, Todd; Lind, Sharon; Price, William (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Multifractal scaling behavior analysis for existing dams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fractal theory was used to describe long term behavior of dam structures by means of determining (mono-) fractal exponents. Many records do not exhibit a simple monofractal scaling behavior, which can be accounted for by a single scaling exponent. ... Keywords: Dam, Long term behavior, Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis, Observation time series

Huaizhi Su, Zhiping Wen, Feng Wang, Bowen Wei, Jiang Hu

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to estimate dam passage and route specific survival rates for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts to a primary survival-detection array located 81 km downstream of the dam, evaluate a BGS located in the B2 forebay, and evaluate effects of two spill treatments. The 2010 study also provided estimates of forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and spill + B2 Corner Collector (B2CC) efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. In addition, the study estimated forebay passage survival and survival of fish traveling from the forebay entrance array, through the dam and downstream through 81 km of tailwater.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to estimate dam passage and route specific survival rates for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts to a primary survival-detection array located 81 km downstream of the dam, evaluate a BGS located in the B2 forebay, and evaluate effects of two spill treatments. The 2010 study also provided estimates of forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and spill + B2 Corner Collector (B2CC) efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. In addition, the study estimated forebay passage survival and survival of fish traveling from the forebay entrance array, through the dam and downstream through 81 km of tailwater.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A review of proposed Glen Canyon Dam interim operating criteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three sets of interim operating criteria for Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River have been proposed for the period of November 1991, to the completion of the record of decision for the Glen Canyon Dam environmental impact statement (about 1993). These criteria set specific limits on dam releases, including maximum and minimum flows, up-ramp and down-ramp rates, and maximum daily fluctuation. Under the proposed interim criteria, all of these parameters would be reduced relative to historical operating criteria to protect downstream natural resources, including sediment deposits, threatened and endangered fishes, trout, the aquatic food base, and riparian plant communities. The scientific bases of the three sets of proposed operating criteria are evaluated in the present report:(1) criteria proposed by the Research/Scientific Group, associated with the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES); (2) criteria proposed state and federal officials charged with managing downstream resources; and (3) test criteria imposed from July 1991, to November 1991. Data from Phase 1 of the GCES and other sources established that the targeted natural resources are affected by dam operations, but the specific interim criteria chosen were not supported by any existing studies. It is unlikely that irreversible changes to any of the resources would occur over the interim period if historical operating criteria remained in place. It is likely that adoption of any of the sets of proposed interim operating criteria would reduce the levels of sediment transport and erosion below Glen Canyon Dam; however, these interim criteria could result in some adverse effects, including the accumulation of debris at tributary mouths, a shift of new high-water-zone vegetation into more flood-prone areas, and further declines in vegetation in the old high water zone.

LaGory, K.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Tomasko, D.; Hayse, J.; Durham, L.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Seismic Analysis of Morrow Point Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of this study is to perform nonlinear dynamic earthquake time history analyses on Morrow Point Dam, which is located 263 km southwest of Denver, Colorado. This project poses many significant technical challenges, one of which is to model the entire Morrow Point Dam/Foundation Rock/Reservoir system which includes accurate geology topography. In addition, the computational model must be initialized to represent the existing dead loads on the structure and the stress field caused by the dead loads. To achieve the correct dead load stress field due to gravity and hydrostatic load, the computer model must account for the manner in which the dams were constructed. Construction of a dam finite element model with the correct as-built geometry of the dam structure and simply ''turning on'' gravity in the computer model will generally lead to an incorrect initial stress field in the structure. The sequence of segmented lifts typical of dam construction has a significant impact on the static stress fields induced in the dam. In addition, the dam model must also account for the interaction between the adjacent dam segments across the dam contraction joints. As a result of these challenges, it was determined that a significant amount of code development was required in order to accurately simulate the motion of the dam structure. Modifications to the existing slide surfaces are needed to allow for appropriate modeling of the shear keys across the contraction joints. Furthermore, a model for hydrodynamic interaction was also implemented into NIKE3D and DYNA3D for fluid representation in the 3D dam system finite element model. Finally, the modeling of the 3D dam system results in a very large computational model, which makes it difficult to perform a static initialization using an implicit code. Traditionally, for these large models, the model has been initialized over a long time scale using an explicit code. However, recent advancements have made it possible to run NIKE3D in ''parallel'' on relatively small parallel machines as well as on the ASCI platforms.

Noble, C R

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2001-2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2001 through March 2002 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2002 through March 2003 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam.

Ward, David L.; Kern, J. Chris; Hughes, Michele L. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Dam Safety Regulations (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Regulations (Connecticut) Safety Regulations (Connecticut) Dam Safety Regulations (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection All dams, except those owned by the U.S., are under the jurisdiction of these regulations. These dams will be classified by hazard rating, and may

83

Regional Development Authorities (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation authorizes the establishment of local development authorities in Indiana. A development authority established under this law may acquire, construct, equip, own, lease, and finance...

84

Monitoring of Juvenile Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Summer 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to evaluate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha; CH0) at John Day Dam (JDA) during summer 2010. This study was conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC) and the University of Washington (UW). The study was designed to estimate the effects of 30% and 40% spill treatment levels on single release survival rates of CH0 passing through two reaches: (1) the dam, and 40 km of tailwater, (2) the forebay, dam, and 40 km of tailwater. The study also estimated additional passage performance measures which are stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam with Emphasis on the Prototype Surface Flow Outlet, 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main purpose of the study was to evaluate the performance of Top Spill Weirs installed at two spillbays at John Day Dam and evaluate the effectiveness of these surface flow outlets at attracting juvenile salmon away from the powerhouse and reducing turbine passage. The Juvenile Salmonid Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was used to estimate survival of juvenile salmonids passing the dam and also for calculating performance metrics used to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of the dam at passing juvenile salmonids.

Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Monter, Tyrell J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Faber, Derrek M.; Durham, Robin E.; Townsend, Richard L.; Skalski, John R.; Kim, Jina; Fischer, Eric S.; Meyer, Matthew M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Perspectives on Dam Removal: York Creek Dam and the Water Framework Directive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 4. Water Framework Directive decision-making processand the Water Framework Directive LA 222 UC Berkeley May 16Dam and the Water Framework Directive Justin Lawrence, Josh

Lawrence, Justin E; Pollak, Josh D; Richmond, Sarah F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Milner Dam Wind Park | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Milner Dam Wind Park Milner Dam Wind Park Jump to: navigation, search Name Milner Dam Wind Park Facility Milner Dam Wind Park Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Exergy Developer Exergy Energy Purchaser Idaho Power Location Cassia County ID Coordinates 42.495962°, -114.021106° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.495962,"lon":-114.021106,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

88

Dams (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Dams (South Dakota) Dams (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources Dam construction in South Dakota requires a Location Notice or a Water Right Permit. A Location Notice is a form that must be filed with the County Register of Deeds, and is the only paperwork required if (a) the proposed dam will impound 25 acre feet of water or less at the primary

89

Roller-Compacted Concrete for Dams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Placing mass concrete by the roller-compacted method improves the economics of hydroelectric dam construction. Many sites previously considered uneconomical for embankment or conventional concrete construction may now prove feasible.

1986-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

90

Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

[Type text] [Type text] Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study September 2011 September 2011 Page 2 Abstract The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) collaborated to examine the interdependencies between two critical infrastructure sectors - Dams and Energy. 1 The study highlights the importance of hydroelectric power generation, with a particular emphasis on the variability of weather patterns and competing demands for water which determine the water available for hydropower production. In recent years, various regions of the Nation suffered drought, impacting stakeholders in both the Dams and Energy Sectors. Droughts have the potential to affect the operation of dams and reduce hydropower production,

91

Dams (South Dakota) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Dams (South Dakota) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being the most...

92

Bibliographies by Author - W  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Case Studies. Papers & Publications. About the Authors. About Us. Bibliographies by Author - W. Wactlar, Howard D. Hauptmann, Alexander, ...

93

Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries and fish habitat in basin streams and lakes. 'Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

94

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage Through Bonneville Dam in 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2002. The ERDC contracted with MEVATEC Corporation to provide staff ranging from scientists to technicians to help conduct the study. This study supports the Portland-District goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. In this report, we present results of two studies of juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam that we carried out in the 2002 downstream passage season April 20 through July 15, 2002. The first study of Project-wide FPE provides hourly estimates of fish passage and associated variances for all operating turbine units, spill bays, and the two sluiceway entrances at Powerhouse 1 (B1), as well as estimates of a variety of fish-passage efficiency and effectiveness measures. This was the third consecutive year of full-project hydroacoustic sampling and passage estimation. The second study was more narrowly focused on B2 turbines and had two components: (1) to sample the FGE at two modified turbine intakes and compare them with efficiencies of other B2 units that were sampled in the first study, and (2) to evaluate proportions of fish passing up into gatewell slots versus through screen gaps at a few B2 turbine intakes.

Ploskey, Gene R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Schilt, Carl R. (MEVATEC); Kim, J (Lynntech); Escher, Charles (MEVATEC Corporation); Skalski, John R.

2003-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan, 1990-2003 Progress (Annual) Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this document the authors present mitigation implementation activities to protect and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan only addresses non-operational actions (mitigation measures that do not affect dam operation) described in the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' (Mitigation Plan) submitted to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) in March 1991 and in accordance with subsequent Council action on that Mitigation Plan. Operational mitigation was deferred for consideration under the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR) process. This document represents an implementation plan considered and conditionally approved by the Council in March of 1993.

Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

1993-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

96

A preliminary evaluation of the thermal effects of the Ben Franklin Dam project on Columbia River temperatures below the Hanford Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The planned construction of the Ben Franklin project below the Hanford production reactors poses the question of determining to what extent this project will affect the Columbia River temperatures. Using the plant operations record for the year 1966, and the weather record for the same period, a series of simulation runs was made to determine the effects of the clam on the temperature regime, and the extent to which density currents could be expected to develop. This information is to be used as background for the later evaluation of the modification of the existing radionuclide discharge. The digital simulation model COL HEAT, was used. This model has been previously developed under Atomic Energy Commission sponsorship for use in the regional evaluation of the effects of the Hanford plant.

Jaske, R.T.

1967-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

CFO .:. Signature Authority Guidelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations Presentations Strategic Plan Ten Commandments Budget Office Business Systems Analysis Conference Services Controller's Office Field Operations Financial Policy & Assurance Human Resources in the OCFO Procurement & Property Office of Sponsored Projects & Industry Partnerships Training Travel Office spacer OCFO Home Send Feedback Signature Authority Guidelines LBNL Signature Authority Guidelines for Operational Transactions Signature Authorization System (SAS) Database in BRS: The Authorized Signers List can be found in the BLIS Reporting System (BRS) in the purchasing folder.You will need your LDAP username and password to access this database. Access the BLIS Reporting System (BRS) by clicking HERE. Delegation of Signature Authority Form: All requests for signature authority for Laboratory employees in the

98

Assessment of Dissolved Oxygen Mitigation at Hydropower Dams Using an Integrated Hydrodynamic/Water Quality/Fish Growth Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dissolved oxygen (DO) in rivers is a common environmental problem associated with hydropower projects. Approximately 40% of all FERC-licensed projects have requirements to monitor and/or mitigate downstream DO conditions. Most forms of mitigation for increasing DO in dam tailwaters are fairly expensive. One area of research of the Department of Energy's Hydropower Program is the development of advanced turbines that improve downstream water quality and have other environmental benefits. There is great interest in being able to predict the benefits of these modifications prior to committing to the cost of new equipment. In the case of turbine replacement or modification, there is a need for methods that allow us to accurately extrapolate the benefits derived from one or two turbines with better design to the replacement or modification of all turbines at a site. The main objective of our study was to demonstrate a modeling approach that integrates the effects of flow and water quality dynamics with fish bioenergetics to predict DO mitigation effectiveness over long river segments downstream of hydropower dams. We were particularly interested in demonstrating the incremental value of including a fish growth model as a measure of biological response. The models applied are a suite of tools (RMS4 modeling system) originally developed by the Tennessee Valley Authority for simulating hydrodynamics (ADYN model), water quality (RQUAL model), and fish growth (FISH model) as influenced by DO, temperature, and available food base. We parameterized a model for a 26-mile reach of the Caney Fork River (Tennessee) below Center Hill Dam to assess how improvements in DO at the dam discharge would affect water quality and fish growth throughout the river. We simulated different types of mitigation (i.e., at the turbine and in the reservoir forebay) and different levels of improvement. The model application successfully demonstrates how a modeling approach like this one can be used to assess whether a prescribed mitigation is likely to meet intended objectives from both a water quality and a biological resource perspective. These techniques can be used to assess the tradeoffs between hydropower operations, power generation, and environmental quality.

Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Coutant, Charles C [ORNL

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Synthesis of Juvenile Salmonid Passage Studies at The Dalles Dam, Volume II, 2001-05  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of juvenile salmonid research at The Dalles Dam is to provide data to inform decisions on strategies to improve smolt survival rates at the project. Survival improvement strategies address the three primary passage routes at The Dalles Dam -- spillway, sluiceway, and turbines – with the general intent to increase spill and sluice passage and decrease turbine passage. Since the review by Ploskey et al. (2001a) of research during 1982-2000 at The Dalles Dam, the Corps funded over $20M of research in at least 39 studies during 2001-2006. The purpose of the current review is to synthesize juvenile salmonid passage data at The Dalles Dam (TDA) collected from 2001 through 2006. The data we synthesize comes from numerous research techniques employed to address particular study objectives at The Dalles Dam. The suite of techniques includes acoustic and radio telemetry, acoustic cameras, acoustic Doppler current profilers, balloon tags, computational fluid dynamics models, drogues, fixed and mobile hydroacoustics, fyke nets, physical scale models, PIT-tags, sensor fish, sonar trackers, and underwater video. Hydraulic data involves flow patterns and water velocities. Biological data involve forebay approach paths and residence times, horizontal and diel distributions, passage efficiencies and effectiveness, fish behaviors, tailrace egress and predation rates, and route-specific and total project survival rates. Data for 2001-2006 are synthesized in this report to provide, in conjunction with Ploskey et al. (2001a), resources for engineers, biologists, and dam operators to use when making decisions about fish protection measures for juvenile salmonids at The Dalles Dam. This review covers the major fish passage research efforts during 2001-2006 and includes sections on the Environmental Setting, Forebay and Project Passage Studies, Spill Studies, Sluiceway Studies, Turbine Studies, Smolt Survival Studies, and a Discussion.

Johnson, Gary E.; Beeman, John W.; Duran, Ian; Puls, Andrew

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Making an automated monitoring system work at Tolt Dam  

SciTech Connect

A major upgrade of the dam safety program at Tolt Dam in Seattle, Washington is described. The upgrade was prompted by the age (30 years) of the dam, the addition of a hydroelectric plant, and public concern. The program is based on an automated condition monitoring and advance warning system. The design, implementation, and operating experience of the system are described.

Marilley, J.M. [Seattle Water Dept., WA (United States); Myers, B.K. [Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Seattle, WA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

WINDAM: modules to analyze overtopping of earth embankment dams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Windows™ Dam Analysis Modules (WINDAM) is a set of modular software components under development for the analysis of overtopped earth embankments. The initial modules address the routing of floods through reservoirs with dam overtopping and evaluation ... Keywords: dam design and analysis, erosion, flood control, hydraulic modelling, numerical analysis, simulation

Mitchell L. Neilsen; Darrel M. Temple; Gregory J. Hanson

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Construction of high embankment dam material flow equilibrium system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As high embankment dam engineering is often large-scale, how to achieve equilibrium of material flow is a critical factor affecting the construction progress of embankment dam engineering and an important approach to save resource and reduce construction ... Keywords: Embankment dam, Material flow equilibrium, Traffic network

Yan Zhang; Guo-Ping Xia

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Executive Summary The Report of the World Commission on Dams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in drainage applications. Also, dams often have vertical or near-vertical facing, so gravity has a differentGEOSYNTHETIC DAM LINING SYSTEMS By: Christine T. Weber1 and Jorge Zornberg, Advisor Abstract: The overall goal of this project is to contribute towards the use of geosynthetics in the design of dams

Kammen, Daniel M.

104

"Deadman Island Lock and Dam, Ohio River" The Military Engineer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a concrete gravity dam. It is important to use best estimates of loadings and properties and masonry gravity dams for all failure modes including overtopping (Douglas et al 1999). Table 4 Historic annual frequency of failure of concrete and masonry gravity dams Frequency of Failure x 10-5 Concrete

US Army Corps of Engineers

105

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 1998-1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors report on their progress from April 1998 through March 1999 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (USGS; Report C), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; Report D), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report E), and the University of Idaho (UI; Report F). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete. Therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported. Highlights of results of our work from April 1998 through March 1999 are given.

Ward, David L.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan EIS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glen Canyon LTEMP EIS Glen Canyon LTEMP EIS Glen Canyon Dam, a 1,300-MW water-storage and hydroelectric facility is located on the Colorado River upstream of the Grand Canyon. EVS is evaluating the effects of dam operations on the Colorado River. A comprehensive evaluation of Glen Canyon Dam operations and their effects on the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon is being conducted by the Department of the Interior with EVS assistance. The Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan (LTEMP) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) - the first such evaluation in over 15 years - will examine flow regimes to meet the goals of supplying water for communities, agriculture, and industry and will protect the resources of the Grand Canyon, while providing clean hydropower. The LTEMP EIS, which is expected to be completed by the end of 2013, will

107

A Theoretical Study of Cold Air Damming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of cold air damming are examined analytically with a two-layer steady state model. The upper layer is a warm and saturated cross-mountain (easterly or southeasterly onshore) flow. The lower layer is a cold mountain-parallel (...

Qin Xu

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Particle Data Group - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Edition and 2007 Web Update 6 Edition and 2007 Web Update (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors New authors of 2007 Web Update M. Antonelli, 102 H. Baer, 64 G. Bernardi, 103 M. Carena, 51 M.-C. Chen, 11 B. Dobrescu, 51 J.-F. Grivaz, 104 T. Gutsche, 105 J. Huston, 45 T. Junk, 51 C.-J. Lin, 1 H. Mahlke, 106 P. Mohr, 107 P. Nevski, 75 S. Rolli, 108 A. Romaniouk, 109 B. Seligman, 110 M. Shaevitz, 111 B. Taylor, 107 M. Titov, 56,112 G. Weiglein, 78 A. Wheeler, 69 Authors of the 2006 Review of Particle Physics W.-M. Yao et al. (Particle Data Group), J. Phys. G 33, 1 (2006) (bibtex format) Also see: PS format or PDF format. AUTHORS OF LISTINGS AND REVIEWS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors (RPP 2006)

109

Net Force on a Dam Consider a dam holding back an incompressible fluid such as water. Let us suppose that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and dams Research dealing with the interaction between a gravity cur- rent and obstacles is scare. A first catching dam heights. For the reference avalanche, the veloc- ity just behind the nose in the head% for the 2-D simulation. The reduction in front velocity due to the presence of dams was an increasing

Keesling, James

110

Evaluation of Behavioral Guidance Structure on Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at Bonneville Dam in 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an acoustic-telemetry study at Bonneville Dam in 2009 to evaluate the effects of a behavioral guidance structure (BGS) in the Bonneville Dam second powerhouse forebay on fish passage and survival through the second powerhouse (B2), the dam as a whole, and through the first powerhouse and spillway combined. The BGS was deployed to increase the survival of fish passing through B2 by increasing the percentage of outmigrating smolts entering the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC)—a surface flow outlet known to be a relatively benign route for downstream passage at this dam. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. Study results indicated that having turbine 11 in service is important for providing flow conditions that are comparable to those observed in pre-BGS years (2004 and 2005) and in 2008. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Faber, Derrek M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Author Biography Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author Biography Form. Title: ? Dr. ? Prof. ? Mr. ? Mrs. ? Ms. Gender: ? Male ? Female. Name: First. M.I.. Last. Current Status: Position: Company: Address:.

112

defense authorization advances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This year, the appropriations bill for the Department of Defense (DOD) was passed and signed into law over the summer, while the authorization bill emerged ...

113

Instructions for Authors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 7, 2013 ... Once the Author Query Application has been completed, your article will be processed and you will receive the proofs. Open Choice. In addition ...

114

Sustainable Energy Dam: research into possible improvement of dam/dike safety by application of sustainable energy on dams/dikes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A study on the use of the Afsluitdijk (or more generic, enclosure dams in general) for the generation of energy. Focus in this study in… (more)

Wondergem, D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Office of Legal Counsel U.S. Department of Justice *1 EFFECT OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR OTHER AGENCIES AND BRANCHES ON THE AUTHORITY TO  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

337, 1995 WL 917146 (O.L.C.) 337, 1995 WL 917146 (O.L.C.) Office of Legal Counsel U.S. Department of Justice *1 EFFECT OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR OTHER AGENCIES AND BRANCHES ON THE AUTHORITY TO CONTINUE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FUNCTIONS DURING THE LAPSE IN THE DEPARTMENT'S APPROPRIATIONS December 13, 1995 Where Congress has provided appropriations for the legislative branch, the Department of Justice may continue to provide testimony at hearings and perform other services related to funded functions of the legislative branch during a lapse in funding for the Department, if the participation of the Department is necessary for the hearing or other funded function to be effective. Similarly, those functions of the Department of Justice that are necessary to the effective execution of functions by an

116

Dam Control and Safety Act (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Control and Safety Act (West Virginia) Control and Safety Act (West Virginia) Dam Control and Safety Act (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Department of Environmental Protection This law grants authority to the secretary of the Department of Environmental Protection to control and exercise regulatory jurisdiction

117

Hoover Dam Bypass Project Phase II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EA-1478 DOE/EA-1478 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Western' s Hoover Dam Bypass Project Phase II (Double-Circuiting a Portion of the Hoover-Mead #5 and #7 230-kV Transmission Lines with the Henderson-Mead #1 230-kV Transmission Line, Clark County, Nevada) Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration 615 S. 43 rd Avenue Phoenix, Arizona 85009 Prepared by: Transcon Environmental 3740 East Southern Avenue, Suite 218 Mesa, Arizona 85206 (480) 807-0095 October 2003 Western Area Power Administration Hoover Dam Bypass Project Phase II page i Environmental Assessment TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................1 1.1 Background..................................................................................................................................1

118

inform author guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

inform Author Guidelines Texts for publication include feature articles, commentaries, columns, meeting reports, news stories, profiles, and letters to the editor. The typical inform feature article ranges from 1000 to 1500 words. This word cou

119

Juvenile Radio-Tag Study: Lower Granite Dam, 1985 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concept of using mass releases of juvenile radio tags represents a new and potentially powerful research tool that could be effectively applied to juvenile salmonid passage problems at dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. A system of detector antennas, strategically located, would automatically detect and record individually tagged juvenile salmonids as they pass through the spillway, powerhouse, bypass system, or tailrace areas below the dam. Accurate measurements of spill effectiveness, fish guiding efficiency (FGE), collection efficiency (CE), spillway survival, powerhouse survival, and bypass survival would be possible without handling large numbers of unmarked fish. A prototype juvenile radio-tag system was developed and tested by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) at John Day Dam and at Lower Granite Dam. This report summarizes research to: (1) evaluate the effectiveness of the prototype juvenile radio-tag system in a field situation and (2) to test the basic assumptions inherent in using the juvenile radio tag as a research tool.

Stuehrenberg, Lowell C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Women @ Energy: Kerstin Kleese van Dam | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kerstin Kleese van Dam Kerstin Kleese van Dam Women @ Energy: Kerstin Kleese van Dam March 27, 2013 - 3:41pm Addthis Kerstin Kleese van Dam is an associate division director of the Computational Science and Mathematics Division and leads the Scientific Data Management Group at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Kerstin Kleese van Dam is an associate division director of the Computational Science and Mathematics Division and leads the Scientific Data Management Group at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Check out other profiles in the Women @ Energy series and share your favorites on Pinterest. Kerstin Kleese van Dam has led the charge at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to resolve data management, analysis, and knowledge discovery challenges in extreme-scale data environments. She also directs data

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Work Authorization System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington, D.C. DOE O 412.1A Approved: 4-21-05 This directive was reviewed and certified as current and necessary by Susan J. Grant, Director, Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/Chief Financial Officer, 4-21-05. SUBJECT: WORK AUTHORIZATION SYSTEM 1. OBJECTIVES. To establish a work authorization and control process for work performed by designated site and facility management contractors, and other contractors as determined by the procurement executive, consistent with the budget execution and program evaluation requirements of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Evaluation process. 2. CANCELLATIONS. DOE O 412.1 Work Authorization System, dated 4-20-99. Cancellation of a directive does not, by itself, modify or otherwise affect any contractual

122

Effects of Mitigative Measures on Productivity of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam; Determine Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from the McNary Dam, 1994-1995 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The author reports on progress from April 1994 through March 1995 of research on white sturgeon in the lower Columbia River. The study began in July 1986 and is a cooperative effort of federal, state and tribal fisheries entities to determine the (1) the status and habitat requirements, and (2) the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the lower Columbia River. This report describes activities conducted during the third year of this contract's second phase. Information was collected, analyzed, and evaluated on sub-adult and adult life histories, population dynamics, quantity and quality of habitat, and production enhancement strategies. The report is divided into sections that evaluate success of developing and implementing a management plan for white sturgeon; evaluate growth, mortality, and contributions to fisheries of juvenile white sturgeon transplanted from areas downstream; describe the life history and population dynamics of sub-adult a nd adult white sturgeon; define habitat requirements for spawning and rearing of white sturgeon and quantify the extent of habitat available; describe reproductive and early life history characteristics of white sturgeon; and quantify physical habitat used by spawning and rearing white sturgeon in the free-flowing portion of the Columbia River.

Beiningen, Kirk T. [Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR (US)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

From Authentication to Authorization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PKIs focus on establishing a link between an entity and a key. Hence, PKIs provide a mechanism for entity identification by providing a link between an entity and a key. However, the real requirement in many systems is authorization, i.e., is a certain entity authorized to perform a specific action. For example, imagine a program for course registration at a university. Suppose a student, John Doe, wants to register for a graduate course in Computer Science. In order for a student to register for this course, he/she should be a graduate student in Computer Science or a undergraduate student with the requisite standing, e.g. a senior with GPA above 3.5. Therefore, the registration program needs to know that John Doe has the required credentials. In the PKI setting, John Doe will present a certificate (signed by a trusted certificate authority) which binds his identity to a key. This establishes that John Doe is interacting with the registration program. The program then consults a database to verify that John Doe has the required credentials. In this scenario, the PKI approach has the following disadvantages: Authorization decisions are adhoc

Somesh Jha

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Georgia Safe Dams Act of 1978 (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safe Dams Act of 1978 (Georgia) Safe Dams Act of 1978 (Georgia) Georgia Safe Dams Act of 1978 (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The purpose of the Georgia Safe Dams Act is to provide regulation,

125

Montana Dam Safety Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Dam Safety Act (Montana) Montana Dam Safety Act (Montana) Montana Dam Safety Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Retail Supplier Institutional Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 1985 State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation This Act establishes the state's interest in the construction of dams for water control and regulation and for hydropower generation purposes. It

126

Dam Design and Construction (Wisconsin) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dam Design and Construction (Wisconsin) Dam Design and Construction (Wisconsin) Dam Design and Construction (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 1985 State Wisconsin Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Department of Natural Resources These regulations apply to dams that are not owned by the U.S. government

127

Permission for Dam Construction and Operation (Iowa) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

maintain, or operate a dam on a stream for manufacturing or industrial purposes. Other powers of the Department pertaining to such construction are listed in this section...

128

THE VALUE OF THE HIGH ASWAN DAM TO THE EGYPTIAN ECONOMY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The High Aswan Dam converted a variable and uncertain flow of river water into a predictable and controllable flow. We use a computable general equilibrium model of the Egyptian economy to estimate the economic impact of the High Aswan Dam. We compare the 1997 economy as it was to the 1997 economy as it would have been for 72 historical, pre-dam water flows. The steady water flow increased transport productivity, while the seasonal shift in water supply allowed for a shift towards more valuable summer crops. These static effects are worth LE 4.9 billion. Investments in transport and agriculture increased as a consequence. Assuming that Egypt is a small open economy, this is worth another LE 1.1 billion. The risk premium on the reduced variability is estimated to be LE 1.1 billion for a modest risk aversion, and perhaps LE 4.4 billion for a high risk aversion. The total gain of LE 7.1 billion equals 2.7 % of GDP. Key words Egypt, High Aswan Dam, computable general equilibrium model, risk premium, water supply

Kenneth M. Strzepek A; Gary W. Yohe D; Richard S. J. Tol E; Mark Rosegrant B

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A topography of dams in China : impacts to agriculture, labor, and migration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Dams are often promoted as a tool to reduce poverty and spur economic development. Dam construction worldwide, and particularly in China, which has built nearly… (more)

[No author

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study, September 2011 | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study, September 2011 Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study, September 2011 Dams and Energy Sectors Interdependency Study, September 2011 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) collaborated to examine the interdependencies between two critical infrastructure sectors - Dams and Energy. The study highlights the importance of hydroelectric power generation, with a particular emphasis on the variability of weather patterns and competing demands for water which determine the water available for hydropower production. Dams-Energy Interdependency Study.pdf More Documents & Publications Hydroelectric Webinar Presentation Slides and Text Version Impacts of Long-term Drought on Power Systems in the U.S. Southwest - July 2012 Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee

131

Dam Safety and Encroachments Act (Pennsylvania) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dam Safety and Encroachments Act (Pennsylvania) Dam Safety and Encroachments Act (Pennsylvania) Dam Safety and Encroachments Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection This act sets the standards and criteria for the siting and design of dams, water obstructions and encroachments considering both existing and projected conditions. It requires operational plans to be prepared and implemented by owners and also requires monitoring, inspection and reporting of conditions affecting the safety of dams, water obstructions

132

Export Authorizations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Assurance Cybersecurity Below is a listing of export authorizations grouped by Canada and Mexico. Export Authorizations - Canada Export Authorizations - Mexico Export...

133

Electronic authoring tools  

SciTech Connect

More than a decade ago, word processing software revolutionized the way documents were prepared, and productivity was increased. But the editing and formatting capabilities of most word processors did very little to prevent errors in spelling, typing, grammar, diction, style, or organization from slipping through to the final documents. In the past few years, the number of software tools that aid the author has increased substantially. They now vary in scope from simple spelling checkers to sophisticated diction analyzers and idea processors. Moreover, writing-aid-software described in this report is now available for many types of computing systems, including personal computers, scientific workstations, and mainframes. The various pieces of software can be used in interactive or non-interactive (batch) modes.

Hurford, J.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Particle Data Group - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Edition 8 Edition C. Amsler et al. (Particle Data Group), Physics Letters B667, 1 (2008) Also see: PDF format. AUTHORS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors C. Amsler, 1 M. Doser, 2 M. Antonelli, 3 D. Asner, 4 K.S. Babu, 5 H. Baer, 6 H.R. Band, 7 R.M. Barnett, 8 J. Beringer, 8 E. Bergren, G. Bernardi, 9 W. Bertl, 10 H. Bichsel, 11 O. Biebel, 12 P. Bloch, 2 E. Blucher, 13 S. Blusk, 14 R.N. Cahn, 8 M. Carena, 15,13,16 C. Caso, 17,* A. Ceccucci, 2 D. Chakraborty, 18 M.-C. Chen, 19 R.S. Chivukula, 20 G. Cowan, 21 O. Dahl, 8 G. D'Ambrosio, 22 T. Damour, 23 A. de Gouvea, 24 T. DeGrand, 25 B. Dobrescu, 15 M. Drees, 26 A. Edwards, 27 S. Eidelman, 28 V.D. Elvira, 15 J. Erler, 29 V.V. Ezhela, 30 J.L. Feng, 19 W. Fetscher, 31 B.D. Fields, 32 B. Foster, 33 T.K. Gaisser, 34 L. Garren, 15 H.-J. Gerber, 31 G. Gerbier, 35 T. Gherghetta, 36 G.F. Giudice, 2 M. Goodman, 37 C. Grab, 31 A.V. Gritsan, 38 J.-F. Grivaz, 39 D.E. Groom, 8 M. Grünewald, 40 A. Gurtu, 41,2 T. Gutsche, 42 H.E. Haber, 43 K. Hagiwara, 44 C. Hagmann, 45 K.G. Hayes, 46 J.J. Hernández-Rey, 47,¶ K. Hikasa, 48 I. Hinchliffe, 8 A. Höcker, 2 J. Huston, 20 P. Igo-Kemenes, 49 J.D. Jackson, 8 K.F. Johnson, 6 T. Junk, 15 D. Karlen, 50 B. Kayser, 15 D. Kirkby, 19 S.R. Klein, 51 I.G. Knowles, 52 C. Kolda, 53 R.V. Kowalewski, 50 P. Kreitz, 54 B. Krusche, 55 Yu.V. Kuyanov, 30 Y. Kwon, 56 O. Lahav, 57 P. Langacker, 58 A. Liddle, 59 Z. Ligeti, 8 C.-J. Lin, 8 T.M. Liss, 60 L. Littenberg, 61 J.C. Liu, 54 K.S. Lugovsky, 30 S.B. Lugovsky, 30 H. Mahlke, 62 M.L. Mangano, 2 T. Mannel, 63 A.V. Manohar, 64 W.J. Marciano, 61 A.D. Martin, 65 A. Masoni, 66 D. Milstead, 67 R. Miquel, 68 K. Mönig, 69 H. Murayama, 70,71,8 K. Nakamura, 44 M. Narain, 72 P. Nason, 73 S. Navas, 74,¶ P. Nevski, 61 Y. Nir, 75 K.A. Olive, 76 L. Pape, 31 C. Patrignani, 17 J.A. Peacock, 52 A. Piepke, 77 G. Punzi, 78 A. Quadt, 79, S. Raby, 80 G. Raffelt, 81 B.N. Ratcliff, 54 B. Renk, 82 P. Richardson, 65 S. Roesler, 2 S. Rolli, 83 A. Romaniouk, 84 L.J. Rosenberg, 11 J.L. Rosner, 13 C.T. Sachrajda, 85 Y. Sakai, 44 S. Sarkar, 86 F. Sauli, 2 O. Schneider, 87 D. Scott, 88 B. Seligman, 89 M. Shaevitz, 90 T. Sjöstrand, 91 J.G. Smith, 25 G.F. Smoot, 8 S. Spanier, 54 H. Spieler, 8 A. Stahl, 92 T. Stanev, 34 S.L. Stone, 14 T. Sumiyoshi, 93 M. Tanabashi, 94 J. Terning, 95 M. Titov, 96 N.P. Tkachenko, 30 N.A. Törnqvist, 97 D. Tovey, 98 G.H. Trilling, 8 T.G. Trippe, 8 G. Valencia, 99 K. van Bibber, 45 M.G. Vincter, 4 P. Vogel, 100 D.R. Ward, 101 T. Watari, 102 B.R. Webber, 101 G. Weiglein, 65 J.D. Wells, 103 M. Whalley, 65 A. Wheeler, 54 C.G. Wohl, 8 L. Wolfenstein, 104 J. Womersley, 105 C.L. Woody, 61 R.L. Workman, 106 A. Yamamoto, 44 W. -M. Yao, 8 O.V. Zenin, 30 J. Zhang, 107 R.-Y. Zhu 108 P.A. Zyla 8

135

Cultural-resource survey report: Hoover Dam Powerplant Modification Project II. Associated transmission-line facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) is proposing to modify or install additional transmission facilities between the Hoover Dam hydroelectric plant and the Western Area Power Authority substation near Boulder City, Nevada. Reclamation has completed cultural resource investigations to identify historic or prehistoric resources in the project area that might be affected during construction of the transmission line. Four possible transmission corridors approximately 50 feet wide and between 9.5 and 11.5 miles long were investigated. The proposed transmission lines either parallel or replace existing transmission lines. The corridors generally have undergone significant disturbance from past transmission line construction. A Class II sampling survey covering approximately 242 acres was conducted. Access or construction roads have not been identified and surveys of these areas will have to be completed in the future. No historic or prehistoric archeological sites were encountered within the four corridor right-of-ways. It is believed that the probability for prehistoric sites is very low. Four historic period sites were recorded that are outside, but near, the proposed corridor. These sites are not individually eligible for the National Register of Historic Places, but may be associated with the construction of Hoover Dam and contribute to a historic district or multiple property resource area focusing on the dam and its construction.

Queen, R.L.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Reducing the Impacts of Hydroelectric Dams on Juvenile Anadromous Fishes: Bioengineering Evaluations Using Acoustic Imaging in the Columbia River, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dams impact the survival of juvenile anadromous fishes by obstructing migration corridors, lowering water quality, delaying migrations, and entraining fish in turbine discharge. To reduce these impacts, structural and operational modifications to dams— such as voluntary spill discharge, turbine intake guidance screens, and surface flow outlets—are instituted. Over the last six years, we have used acoustic imaging technology to evaluate the effects of these modifications on fish behavior, passage rates, entrainment zones, and fish/flow relationships at hydroelectric projects on the Columbia River. The imaging technique has evolved from studies documenting simple movement patterns to automated tracking of images to merging and analysis with concurrent hydraulic data. This chapter chronicles this evolution and shows how the information gleaned from the scientific evaluations has been applied to improve passage conditions for juvenile salmonids. We present data from Bonneville and The Dalles dams that document fish behavior and entrainment zones at sluiceway outlets (14 to 142 m3/s), fish passage rates through a gap at a turbine intake screen, and the relationship between fish swimming effort and hydraulic conditions. Dam operators and fisheries managers have applied these data to support decisions on operational and structural changes to the dams for the benefit of anadromous fish populations in the Columbia River basin.

Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hedgepeth, J.; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Nagy, William T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Weiland, Mark A.

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

137

Dams, Mills, and Electric Power (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mills, and Electric Power (Missouri) Mills, and Electric Power (Missouri) Dams, Mills, and Electric Power (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Missouri Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Missouri Department of Natural Resources The Water Resources Center of the Missouri Department of Natural Resources is responsible for implementing regulations pertaining to dam and reservoir safety. Any person or corporation may erect a dam across any watercourse, provided that: (a) the entity is chartered to construct, operate and

138

Regulation of Dams and Bridges Affecting Navigable Waters (Wisconsin) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dams and Bridges Affecting Navigable Waters Dams and Bridges Affecting Navigable Waters (Wisconsin) Regulation of Dams and Bridges Affecting Navigable Waters (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 2007 State Wisconsin Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Natural Resources Chapter 31 of the Wisconsin Statutes lays out the regulations relevant to

139

Dams have played an important role in human development throughout the world for thousands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093, PR China; 3 Department of Renewable Resources, University of Alberta than 22 000 large dams (but only 22 before 1949), China is the largest dam-building country; by way , and Zehao Shen7 The Three Gorges Dam in China is the largest dam ever built. Its impacts on the biodiversity

Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

140

Uplift Pressures, Shear Strengths, and Tensile Strengths for Stability Analysis of Concrete Gravity Dams: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using generic values in stability analyses of existing concrete dams can result in expensive and unnecessary remedial work. The information in this report will help dam owners predict dam stability under extreme loading conditions and identify the conditions that control uplift pressure distributions at study dams.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Dam breaking seiches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the dam is m, and g is gravity, the equation of motion for the dam's position can be written #12;Seiches Benjamin (1955), if the dam's edge is relatively sharp, gravity is negligible, and the outflow is similar assembly. As the dam moves up and down, and the assembly rotates, the component of gravity acting

Balmforth, Neil

142

A Conjecture Related to Sylvester's Problem Author(s ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

http://www.jstor.org. A Conjecture Related to Sylvester's Problem. Author(s): Peter Borwein and Michael Edelstein. Source: The American Mathematical Monthly, ...

143

Columbia River Salmonid Outmigration: McNary Dam Passage and Enhanced Smolt Quality, 1984 Second Year Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of the McNary Dam transportation system on emigrating fall and spring chinook smolts were evaluated using physiological indices of stress (e.g., plasma cortisol, hepatic glycogen, leucocrit, interrenal cell nuclear diameter) and performance tests (e.g., saltwater challenge, secondary stress challenge, disease resistance). Controlled experiments were conducted in a hatchery environment to characterize the fishes' physiological responses to stress, and disease resistance to allow a basis for judging the nature of the stress experienced by smolts at McNary Dam. 55 figs., 3 tabs.

Schreck, Carl B.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2004 through March 2005 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

Rien, Thomas A.; Hughes, Michele L.; Kern, J. Chris (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

White Sturgeon Mitgation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2003 through March 2004 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

Rein, Thomas A.; Hughes, Michele L.; Kern, J. Chris (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clackamas, OR)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Route-Specific Passage Proportions and Survival Rates for Fish Passing through John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report fulfills a request of the U.S. Army Engineer District, Portland, Oregon, to produce an interim report of estimates of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates for lower Columbia River dams in 2010 and 2011. The estimates are needed to update the Compass Model for the Columbia River Treaty and the new Biological Opinion before detail technical reports are published in late 2012. This report tabulates route-specific fish-passage proportions and survival rates for steelhead and Chinook salmon smolts passing through various sampled routes at John Day Dam, The Dalles Dam, and Bonneville Dam in 2010 and 2011. Results were compiled from analyses of data acquired in spring 2010 and 2011 studies that were specifically designed to estimate dam-passage and forebay-to-tailrace survival rates, travel time metrics, and spill passage efficiency, as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The study designs allowed for estimation of route-specific fish passage proportions and survival rates as well as estimation of forebay-passage survival, all of which are summarized herein.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

147

Authorization Agreements at the INEEL  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a description of the INEEL Authorization Agreement Program and a discussion of the process used to prepare and approve the 21 Authorization Agreements.

N. E. Cole

1999-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

148

Rules and Regulations for Dam Safety (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These rules and regulations seek to provide for the safety of dams to protect the public, real property, and natural resources by establishing reasonable standards and creating a public record for...

149

Libby Dam Wildlife Habitat Enhancement, 1992 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of a project that was initiated in September, 1984 to mitigate for the loss of big game winter and spring range by the Libby Dam hydroelectric facility.

Holifield, Jennifer; Komac, Ron (Kootenai National Forest, Fisher River Ranger District, Libby MT)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Microsoft Word - Appendix H - Emergency Response Plan for Dams...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

H Emergency Response Plan for the Rocky Flats Site Dams This page intentionally left blank LMSRFSS04533-3.0 Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Emergency Response Plan for the Rocky...

151

Centrifuge Modeling and Analysis of Concrete Gravity Dams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains general background information on centrifuge experimentation and linear elastic fracture mechanics pertaining to concrete gravity dam models, and explains in detail the experimental methodology and procedures developed for testing concrete gravity dam models in centrifuges. An important detail in the experimental procedure is that the models are loaded upstream with water and, at fracture, have water uplift pressure within any cracks. Finally, test results and comparisons to analytic...

1995-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

152

Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing Through Bonneville Dam, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2010. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a single-release model. This also was the last year of evaluation of effects of a behavioral guidance device installed in the Powerhouse 2 forebay. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Kim, Jin A.; Royer, Ida M.; Batten, George W.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Etherington, D. J.; Faber, Derrek M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Hennen, Matthew J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Survival and Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Passing through Bonneville Dam, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and subcontractors conducted an acoustic-telemetry study of juvenile salmonid fish passage and survival at Bonneville Dam in 2010. The study was conducted to assess the readiness of the monitoring system for official compliance studies under the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a single-release model. This also was the last year of evaluation of effects of a behavioral guidance device installed in the Powerhouse 2 forebay. The study relied on releases of live Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System tagged smolts in the Columbia River and used acoustic telemetry to evaluate the approach, passage, and survival of passing juvenile salmon. This study supports the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Kim, Jin A.; Royer, Ida M.; Batten, George W.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Etherington, D. J.; Faber, Derrek M.; Fischer, Eric S.; Fu, Tao; Hennen, Matthew J.; Mitchell, Tyler; Monter, Tyrell J.; Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Effects of Mitigative Measures on Productivity of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam; Determine Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from McNary Dam, 1995-1996 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project began in July 1986 and is a cooperative effort of federal, state, and tribal fisheries entities to determine (1) the status and habitat requirements, and (2) effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the lower Colombia and Snake rivers.

Rien, Thomas A.; Beiningen, Kirk T. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

AUTHORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an international center for soil fertility and agricultural development IFPRI Discussion Paper 01084

Balu L. Bumb; Michael E. Johnson; Porfirio A. Fuentes; Balu L. Bumb; Porfirio A. Fuentes

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

AUTHORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

agricultural research centers that receive principal funding from governments, private foundations, and international and regional organizations, most of which are members of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR).

Marika Krausova; Afua Branoah Banful

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

AUTHORS:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the fourth report commissioned by the Civil Society Institute in an effort to advance a realistic and sustainable energy policy for the U.S. electricity sector. CSI, with the expertise of Synapse Energy Economics, seeks to examine and make accessible to policy makers and the public the shortcomings of the prevailing, business-as-usual approach advanced by both political parties. We do not have the financial resources, the water and air resources or the time to waste in our national search for practical and actionable steps toward a safe and sustainable energy future. By summarizing and comparing the full costs (beyond those included in utility bills) of all the major power generation resources, we hope to highlight the costs of the “business as usual” energy path in terms of human health and the safety and integrity of our environment. The findings, thus far, are conclusive: there are no technological or economic barriers to a sustainable electric grid based primarily on efficiency, renewable and distributed resources. Political will is the sole barrier to realizing the economic, public health and environmental benefits of a sustainable energy policy. The public, as demonstrated by over 28 national and state public opinion surveys commissioned by CSI since 2004 (as well as surveys by numerous

Geoff Keith; Sarah Jackson; Alice Napoleon; Tyler Comings; Jean Ann; Ramey Foreword

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Authors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dr. Mark C. Berger is the Director of CBER and a professor of economics at the University of Kentucky. He has conducted research on the Kentucky economy for over 15 years and his research has been published in the leading journals in economics, including the American Economic Review, Journal of Political

Dr. Eric; C. Thompson; Dr. Mark; C. Berger; Steven N. Allen; Hemp In Kentucky

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to monitor movements of bull trout that were provided passage above Albeni Falls Dam, Pend Oreille River. Electrofishing and angling were used to collect bull trout below the dam. Tissue samples were collected from each bull trout and sent to the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service Abernathy Fish Technology Center Conservation Genetics Lab, Washington. The DNA extracted from tissue samples were compared to a catalog of bull trout population DNA from the Priest River drainage, Lake Pend Oreille tributaries, and the Clark Fork drainage to determine the most probable tributary of origin. A combined acoustic radio or radio tag was implanted in each fish prior to being transported and released above the dam. Bull trout relocated above the dam were able to volitionally migrate into their natal tributary, drop back downstream, or migrate upstream to the next dam. A combination of stationary radio receiving stations and tracking via aircraft, boat, and vehicle were used to monitor the movement of tagged fish to determine if the spawning tributary it selected matched the tributary assigned from the genetic analysis. Seven bull trout were captured during electrofishing surveys in 2008. Of these seven, four were tagged and relocated above the dam. Two were tagged and left below the dam as part of a study monitoring movements below the dam. One was immature and too small at the time of capture to implant a tracking tag. All four fish released above the dam passed by stationary receivers stations leading into Lake Pend Oreille and no fish dropped back below the dam. One of the radio tags was recovered in the tributary corresponding with the results of the genetic test. Another fish was located in the vicinity of its assigned tributary, which was impassable due to low water discharge at its mouth. Two fish have not been located since entering the lake. Of these fish, one was immature and not expected to enter its natal tributary in the fall of 2008. The other fish was large enough to be mature, but at the time of capture its sex was unable to be determined, indicating it may not have been mature at the time of capture. These fish are expected to enter their natal tributaries in early summer or fall of 2009.

Paluch, Mark; Scholz, Allan; McLellan, Holly [Eastern Washington University Department of Biology; Olson, Jason [Kalispel Tribe of Indians Natural Resources Department

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

160

Division of Water, Part 673: Dam Safety Regulations (New York) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Dam Safety Regulations (New York) 3: Dam Safety Regulations (New York) Division of Water, Part 673: Dam Safety Regulations (New York) < Back Eligibility Fed. Government Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State New York Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations address dam safety, define dam hazard categories and inspection procedures, and apply to any owner of a dam. Dam owners are required to maintain dams in a safe condition at all times and to comply with Department inquiries for information on the status of a given dam

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Bibliographies By Author - Mateas, Michael  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The authors conclude that "ubiquitous computing in the form of small, integrated computational appliances supporting multiple collocated users ...

162

Federal Authorities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Authorities Electricity Advisory Committee Technology Development Electricity Policy Coordination and Implementation DOE Grid Tech Team Energy Assurance Coordination and...

163

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Contractor Records Custodian Authorization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

duties. To effect the authorization, complete the following and submit the form to DOERM@hq.doe.gov. Authorizing PRO or RMFO Name (print) Signature Date Organization (Name &...

164

Four Dam Pool Power Agency FDPPA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dam Pool Power Agency FDPPA Dam Pool Power Agency FDPPA Jump to: navigation, search Name Four Dam Pool Power Agency (FDPPA) Place Anchorage, Alaska Zip 99515 Sector Hydro Product Joint action agency consisting of four hydroelectric projects that was organized by five electric cooperatives that purchase power from the facilities. Coordinates 38.264985°, -85.539014° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.264985,"lon":-85.539014,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

165

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam Sluiceway, 2005  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate fish passage at The Dalles Dam powerhouse in 2005. The goal of the study was to provide information on smolt passage that will inform decisions on long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. The study addressed one of the main programs dedicated to improving juvenile salmonid survival at The Dalles Dam: Surface Flow Bypass. The study objectives (see below) were met using a combination of hydroacoustic and hydraulic data. The study incorporated fixed-location hydroacoustic methods across the entire powerhouse, with especially intense sampling using multiple split-beam transducers at all sluiceway portals. We did not sample fish passage at the spillway in 2005. In the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish movements. The fish data were interpreted with hydraulic data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Fish passage data were collected in the framework of an “experiment” using a randomized block design (3-day treatments; two treatments) to compare two sluiceway operational configurations: Sluice 2+5 and Sluice 2+19 (six gates open for each configuration). Total project outflow was 76% of the 10-year average for spring and 71% of the 10-year average for summer. Based on these findings, we make the following recommendations: 1) The sluice should be operated 24 h/d from April until November. 2) Open six rather than three sluice gates to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. 3) Open the three gates above the western-most operating main turbine unit and the three gates at MU 8 where turbine passage rates are relatively high. 4) Operate the turbine units below open sluice gates as a standard fish operations procedure. 5) Develop hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway to tap the potential of The Dalles Dam sluiceway to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. 6) Consider the following elements for surface flow bypasses during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: Form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than ~7% of total project discharge) at both west and east ends of the dam; Create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration < 1 m/s per meter); Make water velocities at an entrance high enough (> 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, e.g., 10,000 cfs or so; Adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, i.e., test a Removable Sluiceway Weir. 7)The Dalles Dam sluiceway has potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. We recommend tapping this potential with enhancements to the sluiceway.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam Sluiceway, 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate fish passage at The Dalles Dam powerhouse in 2005. The goal of the study was to provide information on smolt passage that will inform decisions on long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. The study addressed one of the main programs dedicated to improving juvenile salmonid survival at The Dalles Dam: Surface Flow Bypass. The study objectives (see below) were met using a combination of hydroacoustic and hydraulic data. The study incorporated fixed-location hydroacoustic methods across the entire powerhouse, with especially intense sampling using multiple split-beam transducers at all sluiceway portals. We did not sample fish passage at the spillway in 2005. In the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish movements. The fish data were interpreted with hydraulic data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Fish passage data were collected in the framework of an “experiment” using a randomized block design (3-day treatments; two treatments) to compare two sluiceway operational configurations: Sluice 2+5 and Sluice 2+19 (six gates open for each configuration). Total project outflow was 76% of the 10-year average for spring and 71% of the 10-year average for summer. Based on these findings, we make the following recommendations: 1) The sluice should be operated 24 h/d from April until November. 2) Open six rather than three sluice gates to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. 3) Open the three gates above the western-most operating main turbine unit and the three gates at MU 8 where turbine passage rates are relatively high. 4) Operate the turbine units below open sluice gates as a standard fish operations procedure. 5) Develop hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway to tap the potential of The Dalles Dam sluiceway to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. 6) Consider the following elements for surface flow bypasses during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: Form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than ~7% of total project discharge) at both west and east ends of the dam; Create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, e.g., 10,000 cfs or so; Adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, i.e., test a Removable Sluiceway Weir. 7)The Dalles Dam sluiceway has potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. We recommend tapping this potential with enhancements to the sluiceway.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Ninety-Nine-Year Sediment Yield Record of the Middle Cuyahoga River Watershed Contained Within the Ohio Edison Dam Pool.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The 17.4 m tall Ohio Edison Dam was constructed in 1912 on the Cuyahoga River near the city of Akron, Ohio. The dam was installed… (more)

Mann, Kristofer Clayton

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

JOM: Author Tools - Style Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

References to books should include the italicized book title, and pages within the book: Form: Author: Book title, edition, publisher name, publisher location, date ...

169

MetTrans Author Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AUTHOR AND SUBMISSION GUIDELINES ... Of particular importance is the description of the experimental procedures involved in the experiment. It is very ...

170

Collabortive Authoring of Walden's Paths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collaborative Authoring of Walden's Paths. Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries. Lecture Notes in Computer Sciences 2012.Lecture Notes in Computer Sciences 2012

Yuanling, Dr. Li [Texas A& M University; Bogen, Paul Logasa [ORNL; Pogue, Daniel [Halliburton Energy Services; Furuta, Dr. Richard Keith [Texas A& M University; ShipmanIII, Dr. Frank Major [Texas A& M University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Mills, Dams, and Reservoirs (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Mills, Dams, and Reservoirs (Massachusetts) Mills, Dams, and Reservoirs (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Conservation and Recreation This chapter of the Massachusetts General Laws outlines procedures to

172

The Sensor Fish - Making Dams More Salmon-Friendly  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This article describes the Sensor Fish, an instrument package that travels through hydroelectric dams collecting data on the hazardous conditions that migrating salmon smolt encounter. The Sensor Fish was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory with funding from DOE and the US Army Corps of Engineers and has been used at several federal and utility-run hydroelectric projects on the Snake and Columbia Rivers of the US Pacific Northwest. The article describes the evolution of the Sensor Fish design and provides examples of its use at McNary and Ice Harbor dams.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Keilman, Geogre

2004-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Smolt Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Summer 2012  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at Bonneville Dam during summer 2012, as required by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 1 km below the dam, as well as forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency, as required in the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORIZATION STATE AGENCIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORIZATION ­ STATE AGENCIES Form RC-108 (Revised 07/2011) STATE, CT 06106 www.cslib.org/publicrecords AUTHORITY: State agencies in the Executive branch and certain or Transfer Agreement), and retain pursuant to S1-390. STATE AGENCY: DIVISION / UNIT: ADDRESS (for return

Oliver, Douglas L.

175

Proposed construction of Priest Rapids Dam in relation to Hanford Works  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the proposed construction of the Priest Rapids Dam on the Columbia River by the Atomic Energy Commission. Power generation to the Hanford Works and flood control for the surrounding area is the main goal for the construction of the dam. The summary covers the feasibility of the dam from its design, operation, benefits, security, drawbacks, etc.

Smothers, S.A.

1953-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

176

Location-based services to control roller compaction quality for rock-fill dams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is very important for rock-fill dams to carry out more accurately monitoring and remotely quality controlling in real time. Based on location based services, an integration platform, with the name of CRCQ-DAM, is proposed to control roller compaction ... Keywords: RTK, WebGIS, location-based services, rock-fill dams, roller compaction quality

Hao Wu; Qiankun Wang; Jiru Zhang; Qin Chen; Xupeng Wang

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

ANCOLD 2000 Conference on Dams 1 ADVANCES IN THE PRACTICE AND USE OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 1934, · 200-foot-high by 381-foot-long concrete arch dam, over 500 long with gravity and earth fill Montana Energy Policy Analyst SUBJECT: Briefing on the transfer of Kerr Dam The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) have been the co-licensee for Kerr Dam since 1985. This relationship has been

Bowles, David S.

178

PORTFOLIO RISK ASSESSMENT OF SA WATER'S LARGE DAMS by David S. Bowles1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dimensions [5] and high pressure and gravity die-casting [6,7]. Since the two-dimensional dam ridges. Water from the dam flows through the valley and into the sea under gravity. Immediately after-14 December 2001 Three-dimensional modelling of dam-break induced flows using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

Bowles, David S.

179

Authority and Review Chart Exhibit A R = REVIEW A = AUTHORITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Authority and Review Chart Exhibit A R = REVIEW A = AUTHORITY ¹ OFF-SCALE NOT HANDLED PER POLICY Chancellor Academic Affairs ASST PROF (LRF, In Residence, Clinical X) Appointment R R R³ R R R R R4 R A Merit/ Reappointment A A³ R A R A Merit with off-scale salary increase R R³ R R R R R A Merit with 6th Year Market os

Zhou, Yuanyuan

180

Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating for damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana FWP uses a combination of diverse techniques to collect a variety of physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered, threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities intended to restore native fishes and their habitats.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Statement of Authorized Signatory Party  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Statement of Authorized Signatory Party Statement of Authorized Signatory Party (For submitting electronic certified payroll records) This form is to serve as a letter acknowledging that I, _______________________ will serve as the authorized signatory party for (Name/Title) weekly certified payroll reports for the following contract, ___________________. (Contract #/Your Company) The following personnel will be responsible for the weekly data entry of payroll reports through the electronic certified payroll system via iSupplier Portal. Please provide personnel name, title, email address and designated role (see below for explanation): ________________ _____________ ________________ _____________ (Name) (Title) (Email address) (Role/Responsibility)

182

Enloe Dam Passage Project, Volume I, 1984 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses issues related to the provision of fish passage facilities at Enloe Dam and the introduction of anadromous salmonid fish to the upper Similkameen River basin. The species of fish being considered is a summer run of steelhead trout adapted to the upper Columbia basin. (ACR)

Fanning, M.L.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

REVIEW PLAN John Redmond Dam Reservoir, Coffee County, Kansas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................................................................................1 2. REVIEW MANAGEMENT ORGANIZATION (RMO) COORDINATION Report with Responses to HQ Comments and support for John Redmond Dam and Reservoir, Kansas. (6) CEWSL Statement (HQ Policy Compliance Review). (8) SWT-PE-P Memorandum 29 June 2009; Response to HQ Policy

US Army Corps of Engineers

184

An Analytic Model of Cold Air Damming and Its Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that the geometric shape of the cold dome in the two-layer model of cold air damming of Xu can be described approximately by a cubic polynomial and thus a set of coupled algebraic equations can be derived to quantify the scale and ...

Qin Xu; Shouting Gao

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Hydroelectric power potential, Woonsocket Falls Dam, Woonsocket, Rhode Island  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of developing a hydroelectric power plant at an existing flood control dam of the city of Woonsocket, RI was examined considering environmental, economic, technical and engineering factors. It was concluded that the City should proceed with plans to develop a hydro plant. (LCL)

Daly, J C; Dowdell, R B; Kelly, W E; Koveos, P E; Krikorian, Jr, J S; Lengyel, G; Prince, M J; Seely, S; Tromp, L; Urish, D W

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

No Van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov Discontinuity in Ads Space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that the van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity arising in the massless limit of massive gravity theories is peculiar to Minkowski space and it is not present in Anti De Sitter space, where the massless limit is smooth. More generally, the massless limit is smooth whenever the square of the graviton mass vanishes faster than the cosmological constant.

M. Porrati

2000-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

187

Danish Energy Authority Final report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Danish Energy Authority Final report Kaliningrad Regional District Heating Network 2004 - 2006 2006 #12;Kaliningrad District Heating Network Project 2004 - 2006 2 Table of content The report........................................................................................................... 7 1.4.1 District heating in the Region

188

Medical Treatment Authorization Form _____________________________________________________________________ DOB___/____/____  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Treatment Authorization Form if they are in excess of other valid and collectible insurance. 1. List any medical conditions that camp personnel): _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________ 2. List any medications currently taking

189

Delaware Solid Waste Authority (Delaware)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) runs three landfills, all of which recover methane and generate electricity with a total capacity of 24 MWs. The DSWA Solid Waste Plan includes goals,...

190

Retrofitting the Tennessee Valley Authority  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the flagship of the New Deal, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) was a triumph of regional and environmental design that has since fallen on hard times. When writer James Agee toured the region in 1935, he described ...

Zeiber, Kristen (Kristen Ann)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Juvenile Chinook Salmon through Snake River Dams and Reservoirs, 1993 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A pilot study was conducted to estimate survival of hatchery-reared yearling chinook salmon through dams and reservoirs on the Snake River. The goals of the study were to: (1) field test and evaluate the Single-Release, Modified-Single-Release, and Paired-Release Models for the estimation of survival probabilities through sections of a river and hydroelectric projects; (2) identify operational and logistical constraints to the execution of these models; and (3) determine the usefulness of the models in providing estimates of survival probabilities. Field testing indicated that the numbers of hatchery-reared yearling chinook salmon needed for accurate survival estimates could be collected at different areas with available gear and methods. For the primary evaluation, seven replicates of 830 to 1,442 hatchery-reared yearling chinook salmon were purse-seined from Lower Granite Reservoir, PIT tagged, and released near Nisqually John boat landing (River Kilometer 726). Secondary releases of PIT-tagged smolts were made at Lower Granite Dam to estimate survival of fish passing through turbines and after detection in the bypass system. Similar secondary releases were made at Little Goose Dam, but with additional releases through the spillway. Based on the success of the 1993 pilot study, the authors believe that the Single-Release and Paired-Release Models will provide accurate estimates of juvenile salmonid passage survival for individual river sections, reservoirs, and hydroelectric projects in the Columbia and Snake Rivers.

Iwamoto, Robert N.; Sandford, Benjamin P.; McIntyre, Kenneth W.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Compliance Monitoring of Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Summer 2012  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon at The Dalles Dam during summer 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion, dam passage survival is required to be greater than or equal to 0.93 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam and through the tailrace to 2 km downstream of the dam, forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required by the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Dalles Dam, Columbia River: Spillway Improvement CFD Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that were applied to The Dalles spillway for the US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District. The models have been successfully validated against physical models and prototype data, and are suitable to support biological research and operations management. The CFD models have been proven to provide reliable information in the turbulent high-velocity flow field downstream of the spillway face that is typically difficult to monitor in the prototype. In addition, CFD data provides hydraulic information throughout the solution domain that can be easily extracted from archived simulations for later use if necessary. This project is part of an ongoing program at the Portland District to improve spillway survival conditions for juvenile salmon at The Dalles. Biological data collected at The Dalles spillway have shown that for the original spillway configuration juvenile salmon passage survival is lower than desired. Therefore, the Portland District is seeking to identify operational and/or structural changes that might be implemented to improve fish passage survival. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) went through a sequence of steps to develop a CFD model of The Dalles spillway and tailrace. The first step was to identify a preferred CFD modeling package. In the case of The Dalles spillway, Flow-3D was as selected because of its ability to simulate the turbulent free-surface flows that occur downstream of each spilling bay. The second step in development of The Dalles CFD model was to assemble bathymetric datasets and structural drawings sufficient to describe the dam (powerhouse, non-overflow dam, spillway, fish ladder entrances, etc.) and tailrace. These datasets are documented in this report as are various 3-D graphical representations of The Dalles spillway and tailrace. The performance of the CFD model was then validated for several cases as the third step. The validated model was then applied to address specific SIS design questions. Specifically, the CFD models were used to evaluate flow deflectors, baffle block removal and the effects of spillwalls. The CFD models were also used to evaluate downstream differences at other locations, such as at the Highway 197 bridge piers and Oregon shore islands, due to alterations in spill pattern. CFD model results were analyzed to quantitatively compare impacts of the spillwall that has subsequently been constructed between bays 6 and 7. CFD model results provided detailed information about how the spillwall would impact downstream flow patterns that complemented results from the 1:80 scale physical model. The CFD model was also used to examine relative differences between the juvenile spill pattern used in previous years and the anticipated spill pattern that will be applied once the wall is complete. In addition, the CFD model examined velocity magnitudes over the downstream basalt shelf to investigate potential for erosion under high flow conditions (e.g., 21 kcfs/bay for bays 1 through 6) with the spillwall in place. Several appendices follow the results and discussion sections of this report. These appendices document the large number of CFD simulations that have been performed by PNNL; both spillway improvement study (SIS) related and those performed for related biological tests.

Cook, Chris B.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Smolt Passage Behavior and Flow-Net Relationship in the Forebay of John Day Dam, 1984-1985 Final Report of Research.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The migration routes of downstream migrant salmonids in the forebay of John Day Dam were defined and assessed in relation to current velocities and water turbidity and temperature. Forebay current patterns were obtained from current meters at fixed sampling stations, the distribution of outmigrants was determined from purse seine sampling, and migration routes of yearling chinook salmon and steelhead were identified by radio telemetry techniques. All species of emigrating salmonids alter their distribution across the forebay as they approach the dam. Fish abundance was positively correlated with water clarity. There was no evidence to suggest that the migration routes were in response to current patterns in the forebay. Radio telemetry studies demonstrated that a certain segment of yearling chinook salmon approaching the dam are predisposed to spill passage (Washington side of the river) by virtue of their lateral position across the forebay. A new application of radio tag methodology was assessed and found to be useful in evaluating the effectiveness of spill for bypassing outmigrant salmon. A program system and cartographic model was developed which displays for any specified hour forebay current patterns at prevailing river flows and dam operations. The system can be used at other dam sites where investigations may wish to detail forebay current patterns.

Giorgi, Albert E.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

10 Questions for a Computational Scientist: Kerstin Kleese-Van Dam |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a Computational Scientist: Kerstin Kleese-Van Dam a Computational Scientist: Kerstin Kleese-Van Dam 10 Questions for a Computational Scientist: Kerstin Kleese-Van Dam June 9, 2011 - 4:35pm Addthis Kerstin Kleese-Van Dam Kerstin Kleese-Van Dam Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Science gave me the opportunity to contribute to addressing some of society's big challenges - climate change, environmental remediation, sustainable clean energy and secure power. Kerstin Kleese-Dam, Computational Scientist Meet Kerstin Kleese-Van Dam. At Pacific Northwest National Lab, she's a master of computers and data - covering a wide span of projects from genomic sciences and climate change to nanometer-scale imaging and power grids. She recently spent some time to give us the download on her many

196

DOD Third Party Financing Authorities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 rd Party Financing Authorities Joseph Sikes, Director OSD Facilities Energy & Privatization DoD 3 rd Party Financing Authorities - Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs) - 10 years - FAR Part 41 - Up to 30 years - 10 U.S.C. § 2922a - Enhanced Use Lease (EUL) - 5 years or longer with approval - 10 U.S.C. § 2667 - Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPCs) - Up to 25 years - 42 U.S.C. 8256 / 10 U.S.C. § 2913 - Utility Energy Service Contracts (UESCs) - 10 years - 10 U.S.C. § 2913 provides for obtaining the savings and benefits of a UESC, but does not contain any authority to contract beyond the 10-year limit provided generally for utility contracts under 40 U.S.C. § 501(b)(1)(B) 10 U.S.C. § 2922a - Secretary of a Military Department may enter into contract for up to 30 years with

197

Placement of the dam for the no. 2 kambaratinskaya HPP by large-scale blasting: some observations  

SciTech Connect

Results of complex instrument observations of large-scale blasting during construction of the dam for the No. 2 Kambaratinskaya HPP on the Naryn River in the Republic of Kirgizia are analyzed. The purpose of these observations was: to determine the actual parameters of the seismic process, evaluate the effect of air and acoustic shock waves, and investigate the kinematics of the surface formed by the blast in its core region within the mass of fractured rocks.

Shuifer, M. I.; Argal, E. S. [JSC 'SPII Gidroproekt' (Russian Federation)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

ROAuth: recommendation based open authorization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many major online platforms such as Facebook, Google, and Twitter, provide an open Application Programming Interface which allows third party applications to access user resources. The Open Authorization protocol (OAuth) was introduced as a secure and ... Keywords: OAuth, collaborationnetworks, privacy, recommendations, social networks

Mohamed Shehab; Said Marouf; Christopher Hudel

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate juvenile salmon passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004 to inform decisions about long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway and spill passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. PNNL used fixed-location hydroacoustic sampling across the entire project, especially at the sluiceway and spillway, using multiple split-beam transducers at selected locations. At the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish. The fish data were interpreted and integrated with hydraulic data from a CFD model and in-field ADCP measurements. Two sluiceway operations were compared: West only (SL 1) vs. West+East (SL 1 + SL 18). Based on our findings, we concluded that The Dalles Dam sluiceway has the potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. This potential could be tapped with hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway. We recommended the following: (1) six rather than three sluice gates should be opened to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. (2) The turbine units below open sluice gates should be operated as a standard fish operations procedure. (3) In 2005, the Corps and fisheries agencies should consider operating sluice gates in one or more of the following combinations of six gates: (a) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 18-1, 18-2, 18-3 (repeat 2004 operation), (b) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, or (c) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 2-1, 2-2, 2-3. The following elements for surface flow bypasses which should be considered during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: (1) form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than {approx}7% of total project discharge), (2) create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration < 1 m/s/m), (3) make water velocities at an entrance high enough (> 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, (4) adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, and (5) consider installing a forebay wall to increase fish availability to the surface flow bypass.

Johnson, Gary E.; Hanks, Michael E.; Khan, Fenton; Cook, Chris B.; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate juvenile salmon passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004 to inform decisions about long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway and spill passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. PNNL used fixed-location hydroacoustic sampling across the entire project, especially at the sluiceway and spillway, using multiple split-beam transducers at selected locations. At the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish. The fish data were interpreted and integrated with hydraulic data from a CFD model and in-field ADCP measurements. Two sluiceway operations were compared: West only (SL 1) vs. West+East (SL 1 + SL 18). Based on our findings, we concluded that The Dalles Dam sluiceway has the potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. This potential could be tapped with hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway. We recommended the following: (1) six rather than three sluice gates should be opened to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. (2) The turbine units below open sluice gates should be operated as a standard fish operations procedure. (3) In 2005, the Corps and fisheries agencies should consider operating sluice gates in one or more of the following combinations of six gates: (a) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 18-1, 18-2, 18-3 (repeat 2004 operation), (b) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, or (c) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 2-1, 2-2, 2-3. The following elements for surface flow bypasses which should be considered during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: (1) form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than {approx}7% of total project discharge), (2) create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, (4) adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, and (5) consider installing a forebay wall to increase fish availability to the surface flow bypass.

Johnson, Gary E.; Hanks, Michael E.; Khan, Fenton; Cook, Chris B.; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Dam Construction and Maintenance (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction and Maintenance (Minnesota) Construction and Maintenance (Minnesota) Dam Construction and Maintenance (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting Dams may be constructed, improved, or repaired on private, non-navigable waters subject to certain timelines; however, previously-developed hydropower mechanisms cannot be disrupted. The State may also choose to

202

Turbocharger with sliding piston, and having vanes and leakage dams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A turbocharger having a sliding piston for regulating exhaust gas flow into the turbine wheel includes a set of first vanes mounted on a fixed first wall of the turbine nozzle and projecting axially toward an opposite second wall of the nozzle, and/or a set of second vanes mounted on the end of the piston and projecting in an opposite axial direction toward the first wall of the nozzle. For the/each set of vanes, there are leakage dams formed on the wall that is adjacent the vane tips when the piston is closed. The leakage dams are closely adjacent the vane tips and discourage exhaust gas from leaking in a generally radial direction past the vane tips as the piston just begins to open from its fully closed position.

Roberts, Quentin (Nancy, FR); Alnega, Ahmed (Thaon Les Vosges, FR)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

203

Author template for journal articles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

28E 28E Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States New Construction Market Alex B. Lekov, Victor H. Franco, Gabrielle Wong-Parodi, James E. McMahon, and Peter Chan Environmental Energy Technologies Division October 2009 This manuscript has been authored by an author at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 with the U.S. Department of Energy. The U.S. Government retains, and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges, that the U.S. Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY

204

AUTHORIZATION TO CONTINUE OPERATION OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contract Competition] Contract Competition] AUTHORIZATION TO CONTINUE OPERATION OF THE_[insert the name of the laboratory/site/facility]___ UNDER A MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACT The _[insert the name of the laboratory/site/facility]_ is currently managed and operated by _[insert the name of the contractor]_ for the Department of Energy under a Management and Operating (M&O) contract as defined in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 17.6. The current contract and the determination authorizing the M&O form of contract expire on _[insert the expiration date]_. _[In one or two sentences, briefly describe the laboratory/site/facility mission]_. A new contract is currently being procured by the DOE _[insert DOE office name]_, under Request for Proposals (RFP) number _[insert RFP number]_. The resultant

205

AUTHORIZATION TO CONTINUE OPERATION OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Non-competitive Extension] Non-competitive Extension] AUTHORIZATION TO CONTINUE OPERATION OF THE_[insert the name of the laboratory/site/facility]___ UNDER A MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACT The _[insert the name of the laboratory/site/facility]_ is currently managed and operated by _[insert the name of the contractor]_ for the Department of Energy under DOE contract _[insert contract number]._This contract is a Management and Operating (M&O) contract as defined in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 17.6. The current contract and the determination authorizing the M&O form of contract expire on _[insert the expiration date]_. A non-competitive extension is currently being pursued in accordance with FAR 6.301. [In one or two sentences, briefly describe the

206

author | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

13 13 Varnish cache server Home Groups Community Central Green Button Applications Developer Utility Rate FRED: FRee Energy Database More Public Groups Private Groups Features Groups Blog posts Content Stream Documents Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142234313 Varnish cache server author Home Developer Description: Developer community for OpenEI data, and helpful information for OpenEI wiki authors Enabling developers to use energy web services on OpenEI, REEGLE.info, Data.gov and across the web. We help developers find quality data, understand data provenance and assist with web service integration. We also help "power wiki" users develop complex Ask queries, SPARQL queries

207

Authorization Request (non-proprietary)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enclosed are change pages for Duke Cogema Stone & Webster's (DCS) request for authorization of construction of the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility. The enclosed change pages replace pages in the Construction Authorization Request as updated through Reference 1. The enclosed change pages do not contain information which is considered to be proprietary to DCS. Enclosure 1 provides twenty-five copies of the change pages, which may be disclosed to the public. Enclosure 2 provides replacement instructions. The changes are additional clarification of previously closed open items and have been discussed in subsequent telephone conversations with the NRC staff. If I can provide any additional information, please feel free to contact me at (704) 373-7820.

Duke Cogema; Stone Webster; Duke Cogema Stone; Duke Cogema Stone; Webster Mixed Oxide (moxj Fuel; Andrew Persinko Usnrc/hq; Kenneth L. Ashe; David A. Ayres

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Rock Island Dam Smolt Monitoring; 1994-1995 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Downstream migrating salmon and steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus spp.) smolts were monitored at the Rock Island Dam bypass trap from April 1 - August 31, 1954. This was the tenth consecutive year that the bypass trap was monitored. Data collected included: (1) number of fish caught by species, (2) number of adipose clipped and/or Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tagged fish caught by species, (3) daily average riverflow, (4) daily average powerhouse No. 1 and No. 2 flows and daily average spill. These data were transmitted to the Fish Passage Center, which manages the Smolt Monitoring Program throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Smolt Monitoring Program is used to manage the {open_quotes}water budget{close_quotes}, releasing upstream reservoir water storage allocated to supplement river flows to enhance survival of downstream migrating juvenile salmonids. The Rock Island Dam trapping facility collected 37,795 downstream migrating salmonids in 1994. Collected fish included 4 yearling and 4 sub-yearling chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) that had been previously PIT tagged to help determine migration rates. Additionally, 1,132 sub-yearling chinook, 4,185 yearling chinook, 6,627 steelhead, (O. mykiss) and 422 sockeye (O. nerka) with clipped adipose fins were collected. The middle 80% of the 1994 spring migration (excluding sub-yearling chinooks) passed Rock Island Dam during a 34 day period, April 25 - May 28. Passage rates of chinook and steelhead smolts released from hatcheries and the downstream migration timing of all salmonids are presented. The spring migration timing of juvenile salmonids is strongly influenced by hatchery releases above Rock Island Dam.

Truscott, Keith B.; Fielder, Paul C. (Chelan County Public Utility District No. 1, Power Operations Department, Wenatchee, WA)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Dam Removal Decisions: Science and Decision-Making  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the result of a two-year collaborative effort partially supported by EPRI and managed by the Heinz Center for Science, Economics, and the Environment. Other project supporters included FEMA, the Department of the Interior, the Army Corps of Engineers, and nongovernmental environmental organizations. The report concludes that dams continue to be extremely important to our nation's infrastructure by providing water supply, flood protection, hydroelectric power production, and recreation. How...

2002-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

210

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Fish Passage through Bonneville Dam in 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers requested that the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conduct fish-passage studies at Bonneville Dam in 2004. These studies support the Portland District's goal of maximizing fish-passage efficiency (FPE) and obtaining 95% survival for juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 2 (B2). In this report, we present results of four studies related to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam. The studies were conducted between April 15 and July 15, 2004, encompassing most of the spring and summer migrations. Studies included evaluations of (1) Project fish passage efficiency and other major passage metrics, (2) B2 fish guidance efficiency and gap loss, (3) smolt approach and fate at the B2 Corner Collector (B2CC), and (4) B2 vertical barrier screen head differential.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Schilt, Carl R.; Kim, Jina; Johnson, Peter N.; Hanks, Michael E.; Patterson, Deborah S.; Skalski, John R.; Hedgepeth, J

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

211

Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Subyearling Chinook Salmon Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Summer 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of subyearling Chinook salmon smolts at The Dalles Dam during summer 2010. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.93 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 2 km below the dam The forebay-to-tailrace survival estimate satisfies the “BRZ-to-BRZ” survival estimate called for in the Fish Accords. , as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency, as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. The estimate of dam survival for subyearling Chinook salmon at The Dalles in 2010 was 0.9404 with an associated standard error of 0.0091.

Johnson, Gary E.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, John R.

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

212

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Detroit Dam, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Detroit Dam (DET) on the North Santiam River, Oregon for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to provide data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at DET and others dams in USACE’s Willamette Valley Project. This study was conducted in response to regulatory requirements necessitated by the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. The goal of the study was to provide information of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at DET from February 2011 through February 2012. The results of the hydroacoustic study provide new and, in some cases, first-ever data on passage estimates, run timing, distributions, and relationships between fish passage and environmental variables at the dam. This information will inform management decisions on the design and development of surface passage and collection devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the North Santiam River watershed above DET. During the entire study period, an estimated total of 182,526 smolt-size fish (±4,660 fish, 95% CI) passed through turbine penstock intakes. Run timing peaked in winter and early spring months. Passage rates were highest during late fall, winter and early spring months and low during summer. Horizontal distribution for hours when both turbine units were operated simultaneously indicated Unit 2 passed almost twice as much fish as Unit 1. Diel distribution for smolt-size fish during the study period was fairly uniform, indicating fish were passing the turbines at all times of the day. A total of 5,083 smolt-size fish (± 312 fish, 95% CI) were estimated passed via the spillway when it was open between June 23 and September 27, 2011. Daily passage was low at the spillway during the June-August period, and increased somewhat in September 2011. When the spillway was operated simultaneously with the turbines, spillway efficiency (efficiency is estimated as spillway passage divided by total project passage) was 0.72 and effectiveness (fish:flow ratio—proportion fish passage at a route (e.g., spillway) divided by proportion water through that route out of the total project) was 2.69. That is, when the spillway was open, 72% of the fish passing the dam used the spillway and 28% passed into the turbine penstocks. Diel distribution for smolt-size fish at the spillway shows a distinct peak in passage between mid-morning and mid-afternoon and low passage at night. We estimated that 23,339 smolt-size fish (± 572 fish, 95% CI) passed via the Regulating Outlet (RO) when it was open from October 29 through November 12, 2011, January 2-6, and January 20 through February 3, 2012. During the October–November period, RO passage peaked at 1,086 fish on November 5, with a second peak on November 7 (1,075 fish). When the RO was operated simultaneously with the turbines, RO efficiency was 0.33 and effectiveness was 0.89. In multiple regression analyses, a relatively parsimonious model was selected that predicted the observed fish passage data well. The best model included forebay temperature at depth, forebay elevation, total discharge, hours of daylight, and the operation period. The vertical distribution of fish in the forebay near the face of the dam where the transducers sampled showed fish were generally distributed throughout the water column during all four operational periods. During the refill and full pool periods, vertical distribution was bi-modal with surface-layer and mid-water modes. Patterns for day and night distributions were variable. Fish were distributed above and below the thermocline when it was present (full pool and drawdown periods).

Khan, Fenton; Royer, Ida M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Ham, Kenneth D.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While transportation impacts are often masked by heavy growth in corridor traffic and latent travel demand, modeling enables measuring the real transportation impacts of rail projects. Rail transit is both safe and environmentally friendly. Rail systems expand mobility and reduce household investment in transportation. However, as regions implement rail systems, they must take care to consider the full range of rider impacts so that environmental justice issues do not emerge. The largest body of research relates to the economic impact of rail. These impacts are strongest in station areas, as access to rail increases property value on nearby property. The positive impact of rail on property values does not hold true for property directly adjacent to the rail line however. State Departments of Transportation have played a variety of roles in rail development, ranging from funding initial planning and operating services. TxDOT has authority to participate in rail development but no funding has been appropriated by the legislature. TxDOT could more actively participate in commuter rail projects if the agency was afforded greater flexibility in application of funds and the right to own rolling

Light; Commuter Rail; Jeffrey C. Arndt; Curtis Morgan; John H. Overman; Terry L. Clower, Ph.D.; Bernard L. Weinstein, Ph.D.; Michael Seman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LEAVE BLANK (NARA use only) LEAVE BLANK (NARA use only) JOB NUMBER To: NATIONAL ARCHIVES & RECORDS ADMINISTRATION 8601 ADELPHI ROAD, COLLEGE PARK, MD 20740-6001 Date Received 1. FROM (Agency or establishment) NOTIFICATION TO AGENCY In accordance with the provisions of 44 U.S.C 3303a, the disposition request, including amendments is approved except for items that may be marked "disposition not approved" or "withdrawn" in column 10. 2. MAJOR SUB DIVISION 3. MINOR SUBDIVISION 4. NAME OF PERSON WITH WHOM TO CONFER 5. TELEPHONE DATE ARCHIVIST OF THE UNITED STATES 6. AGENCY CERTIFICATION I hereby certify that I am authorized to act for this agency in matters pertaining to the disposition of its records and that the records proposed for disposal on the attached______page(s) are not needed now for the business of this agency or will not be

215

REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

instructions on reverse) instructions on reverse) L E A V E B L A N K JOB NO. #/-Y3Y-ff-L GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS SERVICE, WASHINGTON, DC 20408 1. f R O M (Agency orertabluhment) lepartment of Energy 2. M N O R SUBDIVISION 3. M I N O R SUBDIVISION - . ,#q/FEF 4. NAME OF P ~ R S O N WITH WHOM TO CONFER 15. TELEPHONE EXT. 1 hereby certify that I am authorized to act for this agency in matters pertaining to the disposal of the agency's records; that the records proposed for disposal in this Request of page(s) are not now needed for the business of this .agency or will not be needed after the retention periods specified; and that written concurrence from the General Accounting Office, if required under the prov~sions of Title 8 of the GAO Manual for Guidance of Federal Agenctes, is

216

The Conscious Landscape: Reinterpreting and Reinhabiting the La Colle Falls Hydro Dam.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The ruins of the La Colle Falls Hydro Dam encompass two very distinct topographies: the physical landscape of the vast Canadian Northwest, and the complex… (more)

Hurd, Jason John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Particle Data Group - 2009 Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

08 Edition and 2009 Web Update 08 Edition and 2009 Web Update (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) New authors of 2009 Web Update D. de Florian, 109 G. Dissertori, 31 D. Edwards, 27 S. Golwala, 108 M. Heffner, 45 B. Heltsley, 62 J. Holder, 34 A. Karle, 7 J. Lys, 8 G. Salam, 112 K. Scholberg, 111 M. Syphers, 15 A. Vogt, 110 W. Walkowiak, 113 C. Walter, 111 E. Weinberg, 90 L. Wiencke, 114 Authors of the 2008 Review of Particle Physics C. Amsler et al. (Particle Data Group), Physics Letters B667, 1 (2008) (Also see: PDF format) AUTHORS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) C. Amsler, 1 M. Doser, 2 M. Antonelli, 3 D. Asner, 4 K.S. Babu, 5 H. Baer, 6 H.R. Band, 7 R.M. Barnett, 8 J. Beringer, 8 E. Bergren, G. Bernardi, 9 W. Bertl, 10 H. Bichsel, 11 O. Biebel, 12 P. Bloch, 2 E. Blucher, 13 S. Blusk, 14 R.N. Cahn, 8 M. Carena, 15,13,16 C. Caso, 17,* A. Ceccucci, 2 D. Chakraborty, 18 M.-C. Chen, 19 R.S. Chivukula, 20 G. Cowan, 21 O. Dahl, 8 G. D'Ambrosio, 22 T. Damour, 23 A. de Gouvea, 24 T. DeGrand, 25 B. Dobrescu, 15 M. Drees, 26 A. Edwards, 27 S. Eidelman, 28 V.D. Elvira, 15 J. Erler, 29 V.V. Ezhela, 30 J.L. Feng, 19 W. Fetscher, 31 B.D. Fields, 32 B. Foster, 33 T.K. Gaisser, 34 L. Garren, 15 H.-J. Gerber, 31 G. Gerbier, 35 T. Gherghetta, 36 G.F. Giudice, 2 M. Goodman, 37 C. Grab, 31 A.V. Gritsan, 38 J.-F. Grivaz, 39 D.E. Groom, 8 M. Grünewald, 40 A. Gurtu, 41,2 T. Gutsche, 42 H.E. Haber, 43 K. Hagiwara, 44 C. Hagmann, 45 K.G. Hayes, 46 J.J. Hernández-Rey, 47,¶ K. Hikasa, 48 I. Hinchliffe, 8 A. Höcker, 2 J. Huston, 20 P. Igo-Kemenes, 49 J.D. Jackson, 8 K.F. Johnson, 6 T. Junk, 15 D. Karlen, 50 B. Kayser, 15 D. Kirkby, 19 S.R. Klein, 51 I.G. Knowles, 52 C. Kolda, 53 R.V. Kowalewski, 50 P. Kreitz, 54 B. Krusche, 55 Yu.V. Kuyanov, 30 Y. Kwon, 56 O. Lahav, 57 P. Langacker, 58 A. Liddle, 59 Z. Ligeti, 8 C.-J. Lin, 8 T.M. Liss, 60 L. Littenberg, 61 J.C. Liu, 54 K.S. Lugovsky, 30 S.B. Lugovsky, 30 H. Mahlke, 62 M.L. Mangano, 2 T. Mannel, 63 A.V. Manohar, 64 W.J. Marciano, 61 A.D. Martin, 65 A. Masoni, 66 D. Milstead, 67 R. Miquel, 68 K. Mönig, 69 H. Murayama, 70,71,8 K. Nakamura, 44 M. Narain, 72 P. Nason, 73 S. Navas, 74,¶ P. Nevski, 61 Y. Nir, 75 K.A. Olive, 76 L. Pape, 31 C. Patrignani, 17 J.A. Peacock, 52 A. Piepke, 77 G. Punzi, 78 A. Quadt, 79, S. Raby, 80 G. Raffelt, 81 B.N. Ratcliff, 54 B. Renk, 82 P. Richardson, 65 S. Roesler, 2 S. Rolli, 83 A. Romaniouk, 84 L.J. Rosenberg, 11 J.L. Rosner, 13 C.T. Sachrajda, 85 Y. Sakai, 44 S. Sarkar, 86 F. Sauli, 2 O. Schneider, 87 D. Scott, 88 B. Seligman, 89 M. Shaevitz, 90 T. Sjöstrand, 91 J.G. Smith, 25 G.F. Smoot, 8 S. Spanier, 54 H. Spieler, 8 A. Stahl, 92 T. Stanev, 34 S.L. Stone, 14 T. Sumiyoshi, 93 M. Tanabashi, 94 J. Terning, 95 M. Titov, 96 N.P. Tkachenko, 30 N.A. Törnqvist, 97 D. Tovey, 98 G.H. Trilling, 8 T.G. Trippe, 8 G. Valencia, 99 K. van Bibber, 45 M.G. Vincter, 4 P. Vogel, 100 D.R. Ward, 101 T. Watari, 102 B.R. Webber, 101 G. Weiglein, 65 J.D. Wells, 103 M. Whalley, 65 A. Wheeler, 54 C.G. Wohl, 8 L. Wolfenstein, 104 J. Womersley, 105 C.L. Woody, 61 R.L. Workman, 106 A. Yamamoto, 44 W. -M. Yao, 8 O.V. Zenin, 30 J. Zhang, 107 R.-Y. Zhu 108 P.A. Zyla 8

218

Optimization of Concurrent Deployments of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System and Other Hydroacoustic Equipment at John Day Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the results of the acoustic optimization study conducted at John Day Dam during January and February 2008. The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods to minimize electrical and acoustic interference from various other acoustic sampling devices. Thereby, this would allow concurrent sampling by active and passive acoustic methods during the formal evaluations of the prototype surface flow outlets at the dam during spring and summer outmigration seasons for juvenile salmonids. The objectives for the optimization study at John Day Dam were to: 1. Design and test prototypes and provide a total needs list of pipes and trolleys to deploy JSATS hydrophones on the forebay face of the powerhouse and spillway. 2. Assess the effect on mean percentage decoded of JSATS transmissions from tags arrayed in the forebay and detected on the hydrophones by comparing: turbine unit OFF vs. ON; spill bay OPEN vs. CLOSED; dual frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) both OFF vs. ON at a spill bay; and, fixed-aspect hydroacoustic system OFF vs. ON at a turbine unit and a spill bay. 3. Determine the relationship between fixed-aspect hydroacoustic transmit level and mean percentage of JSATS transmissions decoded. The general approach was to use hydrophones to listen for transmissions from JSATS tags deployed in vertical arrays in a series perpendicular to the face of the dam. We used acoustic telemetry equipment manufactured by Technologic and Sonic Concepts. In addition, we assessed old and new JSATS signal detectors and decoders and two different types of hydrophone baffling. The optimization study consisted of a suite of off/on tests. The primary response variable was mean percentage of tag transmissions decoded. We found that there was no appreciable adverse effect on mean percentage decoded for JSATS transmitters from: turbine operations; spillway operations; DIDSON/ADCP acoustic energy; and PAS hydroacoustic systems at transmit level of -12 dB, although there was a significant impact at all higher transmit levels (-11 to -6 dB). The main conclusion from this optimization study is that valid JSATS telemetry data can be collected simultaneously with a DIDSON/ADCP and a PAS hydroacoustic system at transmit level -12 dB. Multiple evaluation tools should be considered to increase the robustness and thoroughness of future fish passage evaluations at John Day and other dams.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Khan, Fenton; Kim, Jina; Lamarche, Brian L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Choi, Eric Y.; Faber, Derrek M.; Wilberding, Matthew C.; Deng, Zhiqun; Weiland, Mark A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Fischer, Eric S.; Cushing, Aaron W.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

California Enterprise Development Authority - Statewide PACE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California Enterprise Development Authority - Statewide PACE Program (California) California Enterprise Development Authority - Statewide PACE Program (California) Eligibility...

220

California Enterprise Development Authority (Figtree PACE) -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enterprise Development Authority (Figtree PACE) - Statewide PACE Program (California) California Enterprise Development Authority (Figtree PACE) - Statewide PACE Program...

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221

REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1nstrlrcrlons on reverts) 1nstrlrcrlons on reverts) ' 0 NATIONAL ARCMVES and RECORDS AD~~INISTRAT~ON (NIR) WASHINGTON, DC 20408 1. FROM (Agency or estabi~shment) Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 . '2. MAJOR SUBDIVISION fn lccordance w i l h the provirions o f 4 4 DOE~NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE U.S.C. 3 3 0 3 r the disposition r e q u c ~ t , including rmtndments, i s approvtd n c t p l 3. MINOR SUBOlVlStON lor ilemr that mky be mrrkcd 'dir wition not approved' o r withdmwn' in c&mn lo. '4. NAME O F PERSON WITH WHOM TO CONFER 5. TELEPHONE Mary Ann Wallace -301 903 4353 6. AGENCY CERTIFICATION I hereby certify that I am authorized to a d for this to th#disposit-ion of its records and that the records roposed for disposal on the P now needed for the business of this agency or wil not be needed after the concurrence f

222

REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

~nstructions on reverse) ~nstructions on reverse) G E N E R A L SERVICES A D M I N I S T R A T I O N N A T I O N A L ARCHIVES A N D RECORDS SERVICE, WASHINGTON, D C 20408 1. F R O M (Agency or ertablishment) L E A V E B L A N K JOB NO. di-%3%-fF / C D A T E R E C E I V E D flzg)~? NOTIFICATION TO AGENCY n t n f F n e r a v - Sari Francisco Operations Office . 3. M I N O R S U B D I V I S I O N b ~ s ~ ~ 5 ? % 5 2 5 Lawrence Berkel ey Laboratory 4. N A M E O F PERSON W I T H W H O M T O CONFER IS. TELEPHONE EXT. I hereby certify that I am authorized to act for this agency in matters pertaining to the disposal of the agency's records; that the records proposed for disposal in this Request of 1 page(s) are not now needed for the business of this agency or will not be needed after the retention periods specified; and that written concurrence from the General Accounting Office, if required under the provisions of Title 8 of the GAO Manual for Guidance of Federal Agencies, is

223

REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

m m - REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY (See Instructions on reverse) GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION N A T I O N A L ARCHIVES AND RECORDS SERVICE, WASHINGTON, DC 20408 1. F R O M ( A g e n c y o r e s t a b l i s h m e n t ) jepartment of Energy 2. MAJOR S U B D I V I S I O N Oak Ridse Operations Office 3. M I N O R S U B D I V I S I O N 4 . N A M E O F PERSON W I T H W H O M T O C O N F E R ( 5 . T E L E P H O N E E X T . L E A V E B L A N K - JOB N O . d/-d33P PO- ZJ - - - - p p D A T E R E C E I V E D p - NOTIFICATION TO AGENCY In accordance with the provisions of 44 U.S.C. 3303a the disposal request, including amendments, is approved except for items that may be marked "disposition not approved" or "withdrawn" in column 10. If no records are proposed for disposal, the signature of the Archivist is not required. - DATE ARCHIVIST

224

REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Instructions on reverse) Instructions on reverse) LEAVE BLANK - GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS SERVICE, WASHINGTON, DC 20408 I . F R O M (Agency or ertabluhmentJ D A T E RECEIVED NOTIF~CATION TO AGENCY Department of Energy 2. MAJ0.R S U B D I V I S I O N I 4 . N A M E O F PERSON W I T H W H O M T O CONFER 15. TELEPHONE E X T . \OATS l A R C H l V l S T O F T H E U N I T E D STATES In accordance with the provisions of 44 U.S.C. 3303 the dispoal request. including amendmentr, is approved . 3. M I N O R S U B D I V I S I O N except for items that may be marked "disposition not approved" or "withdrawn" in column 10. If no records are proposed for disposal, the signature of the Archivist is not required. I hereby certify that I am authorized to act for this agency in matters pertaining to the disposal of the agency's records;

225

Dam Safety Rules (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Rules (West Virginia) Safety Rules (West Virginia) Dam Safety Rules (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Department of Environmental Protection This establishes requirements relating to the design, placement, construction, enlargement, alteration, removal, abandonment, and repair of

226

COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS DEMONSTRATION BUS 7. Author{s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A demonstration compressed natural gas (CNG) bus has been operating on The University of Texas at Austin shuttle system since 1992. This CNG vehicle, provided by the Blue Bird Company, was an opportunity for the University to evaluate the effectiveness of a CNG bus for shuttle operations. Three basic operating comparisons were made: 1) fuel consumption, 2) tire wear, and 3) vehicle performance. The bus was equipped with a data logger, Which was downloaded regularly, for trip reports. Tire wear was monitored regularly, and performance tests were conducted at the Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Center. Overall, the data suggest that fuel costs for the CNG bus are comparable to those for University diesel buses. This is a result of the lower fuel price for natural gas. Actual natural gas fuel consumption was higher for the CNG buses than for the diesel buses. Due to weight differences, tire wear was much less on the CNG buses. Finally, after installation of a closed-loop system, the CNG bus out-performed the diesel bus on acceleration, grade climbing ability, and speed.

Cheng-ming Wu; Ron Matthews; Mark Euritt

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Survival of Subyearling Fall Chinook Salmon in the Free-flowing Snake River and Lower Snake River Reservoirs in 2003 and from McNary Dam Tailrace to John Day Dam Tailrace in the Columbia River from 1999 to 2002, 1999-2003 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report results from an ongoing study of survival and travel time of subyearling fall Chinook salmon in the Snake River during 2003 and in the Columbia River during 1999-2002. Earlier years of the study included serial releases of PIT-tagged hatchery subyearling Chinook salmon upstream from Lower Granite Dam, but these were discontinued in 2003. Instead, we estimated survival from a large number of PIT-tagged fish released upstream from Lower Granite Dam to evaluate transportation from Snake River Dams. During late May and early June 2003, 68,572 hatchery-reared subyearling fall Chinook salmon were PIT tagged at Lyons Ferry Hatchery, trucked upstream, acclimated, and released at Couse Creek and Pittsburg Landing in the free-flowing Snake River. We estimated survival for these fish from release to Lower Granite Dam tailrace. In comparison to wild subyearling fall Chinook salmon PIT tagged and released in the free-flowing Snake River, the hatchery fish we released traveled faster and had higher survival to Lower Granite Dam, likely because of their larger size at release. For fish left in the river to migrate we estimated survival from Lower Granite Dam tailrace to McNary Dam tailrace. Each year, a small proportion of fish released are not detected until the following spring. However, the number of fish released in 2003 that overwintered in the river and were detected as they migrated seaward as yearlings in 2004 was small (<1.0%) and had minimal effect on survival estimates. We evaluated a prototype floating PIT-tag detector deployed upstream from Lower Granite reservoir to collect data for use in partitioning travel time and survival between free-flowing and reservoir habitats. The floating detector performed poorly, detecting only 27 PIT tags in 340 h of operation from a targeted release of 68,572; far too few to partition travel time and survival between habitats. We collected river-run subyearling Chinook salmon (mostly wild fish from the Hanford Reach) at McNary Dam, PIT tagged them, and released them to the tailrace as part of an evaluation of transportation from McNary Dam in 2002. Estimated survival in 2002 from the tailrace of McNary Dam to the tailrace of John Day Dam was 0.746 (s.e. 0.036). For migration years 1999-2002, we found that in the reach from McNary to John Day Dam reach, travel time was shorter (migration rate was greater) and survival probabilities were greater when flow volume was greater. Survival was also correlated with water temperature: warmer water was associated with decreased survival, and there was an apparent survival threshold at about 19.3 C (above this temperature survival decreased substantially).

Muir, William D.; Axel, Gordon A.; Smith, Steven G. (National Marine Fisheries Service, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, Fish Ecology Division, Seattle, WA)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Juvenile Radio-Tag Study: Lower Granite Dam, 1985-1986 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A prototype juvenile radio-tag system was developed and tested by the National Marine Fisheries Services (NMFS) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) at John Day Dam in 1984. Results indicated that the system could provide acceptable estimates of powerhouse and spillway passage. Research in 1986 continued testing of the tag system to further define its application and limitations. Field work included releases in the forebay and tailrace under a no-spill environment and testing of new systems to improve tag detection. Laboratory tests included the response of the tag in hostile environmental conditions (spillway passage) and the effects of the radio tag on fish buoyancy compensation. This report provides results of the work along with a summarization of the combined 1985--86 field and assumption testing. 12 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

Giorgi, Albert E.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Water quality and sedimentation implications of installing a hydroelectric dam on the Río Baker in Chilean Patagonia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HidroAysen, a Chilean corporation operated by energy giant Endesa, has proposed to build two hydroelectric dams on the Rio Baker in the Aysin Region of Chilean Patagonia. The proposed dams have been met with a variety of ...

Leandro, Gianna Dee

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

NOAA's Rapid Response to the Howard A. Hanson Dam Flood Risk Management Crisis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Howard A. Hanson Dam (HHD) has brought flood protection to Washington's Green River Valley for more than 40 years and opened the way for increased valley development near Seattle. However, following a record high level of water behind the dam in ...

Allen B. White; Brad Colman; Gary M. Carter; F. Martin Ralph; Robert S. Webb; David G. Brandon; Clark W. King; Paul J. Neiman; Daniel J. Gottas; Isidora Jankov; Keith F. Brill; Yuejian Zhu; Kirby Cook; Henry E. Buehner; Harold Opitz; David W. Reynolds; Lawrence J. Schick

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Mangla Dam Raising Project (Pakistan): General Review and Socio-Spatial Impact Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mangla Dam Raising Project (Pakistan): General Review and Socio-Spatial Impact Assessment Saheeb, National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad-44000, Pakistan saheebk@ceme.nust.edu.pk Abstract. INTRODUCTION Pakistan has recently successfully completed the raising of Mangla dam, a major water works system

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

232

Van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity in topologically new massive gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity in the topologically new massive gravity (TNMG). The reduction from 2 degrees of freedom to one is interpreted as van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity appeared when going from anti-de Sitter spacetime to Minkowski spacetime in the linearized TNMG.

Yun Soo Myung

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

PREDICTION OF TOTAL DISSOLVED GAS EXCHANGE AT HYDROPOWER DAMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation in waters released at hydropower dams can cause gas bubble trauma in fisheries resulting in physical injuries and eyeball protrusion that can lead to mortality. Elevated TDG pressures in hydropower releases are generally caused by the entrainment of air in spillway releases and the subsequent exchange of atmospheric gasses into solution during passage through the stilling basin. The network of dams throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB) are managed for irrigation, hydropower production, flood control, navigation, and fish passage that frequently result in both voluntary and involuntary spillway releases. These dam operations are constrained by state and federal water quality standards for TDG saturation which balance the benefits of spillway operations designed for Endangered Species Act (ESA)-listed fisheries versus the degradation to water quality as defined by TDG saturation. In the 1970s, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), under the federal Clean Water Act (Section 303(d)), established a criterion not to exceed the TDG saturation level of 110% in order to protect freshwater and marine aquatic life. The states of Washington and Oregon have adopted special water quality standards for TDG saturation in the tailrace and forebays of hydropower facilities on the Columbia and Snake Rivers where spillway operations support fish passage objectives. The physical processes that affect TDG exchange at hydropower facilities have been studied throughout the CRB in site-specific studies and routine water quality monitoring programs. These data have been used to quantify the relationship between project operations, structural properties, and TDG exchange. These data have also been used to develop predictive models of TDG exchange to support real-time TDG management decisions. These empirically based predictive models have been developed for specific projects and account for both the fate of spillway and powerhouse flows in the tailrace channel and resultant exchange in route to the next downstream dam. Currently, there exists a need to summarize the general finding from operational and structural TDG abatement programs conducted throughout the CRB and for the development of a generalized prediction model that pools data collected at multiple projects with similar structural attributes. A generalized TDG exchange model can be tuned to specific projects and coupled with water regulation models to allow the formulation of optimal daily water regulation schedules subject to water quality constraints for TDG supersaturation. A generalized TDG exchange model can also be applied to other hydropower dams that affect TDG pressures in tailraces and can be used to develop alternative operational and structural measures to minimize TDG generation. It is proposed to develop a methodology for predicting TDG levels downstream of hydropower facilities with similar structural properties as a function of a set of variables that affect TDG exchange; such as tailwater depth, spill discharge and pattern, project head, and entrainment of powerhouse releases. TDG data from hydropower facilities located throughout the northwest region of the United States will be used to identify relationships between TDG exchange and relevant dependent variables. Data analysis and regression techniques will be used to develop predictive TDG exchange expressions for various structural categories.

Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Pasha, MD Fayzul K [ORNL; Stewart, Kevin M [ORNL; Bender, Merlynn [Bureau of Reclamation; Schneider, Michael L. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

CRFLOOD: A Numerical Model to Estimate Uplift Pressure Distribution in Cracks in Concrete Gravity Dams: Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uplift pressure forms an overturning force on dams that must be minimized so that dams can meet the required safety factors. CRFLOOD is a PC code that permits evaluation of different drain designs by selecting suitable combinations of drain diameter, spacing, and location for specific dam conditions.

1992-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

235

Estimating Overall Risk of Dam Failure: Practical Considerations in Combining Failure Probabilities ANCOLD 2003 Risk Workshop Page 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% 80% 90% 100% M N P Q R P AP ANP NP DAM: D E F G H - - - Flood Concrete Gravity Section Under drainDAM SAFETY DECISION-MAKING: COMBINING ENGINEERING ASSESSMENTS WITH RISK INFORMATION David S. Bowles breaching a dam; so drop the matter before a dispute breaks out. Proverbs 17:14 (NIV) ABSTRACT A decision

Bowles, David S.

236

Arizona Power Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Arizona Power Authority Place Arizona Utility Id 798 Utility Location Yes Ownership S NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity...

237

Definition: Adjacent Balancing Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

either directly or via a multi-party agreement or transmission tariff.1 Related Terms transmission lines, Balancing Authority, Balancing Authority Area, transmission line,...

238

Definition: Balancing Authority Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Balancing Authority maintains loadresource balance within this area.1 Related Terms transmission lines, Balancing Authority, transmission line, smart grid References ...

239

Property:Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Authority Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:Authority&oldid657258...

240

Request For Records Disposition Authority: Strategic Petroleum...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Authority: Strategic Petroleum Reserve Project Management Office Request For Records Disposition Authority: Strategic Petroleum Reserve Project Management Office Paper case files...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Adult Salmonid PIT-TAG Returns to Columbia River`s Lower Granite Dam.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of an analysis of the returns of PIT-tagged Snake River spring chinook and steelhead detected at Lower Granite Dam are summarized. Included is theoretical work on statistical power calculations for tests of return rates. The phrase return rate will be taken to mean return and detection rate. Knowledge that a fish has returned depends upon it being detected at Lower Granite Dam. Some returns are unaccounted for because they go through the navigation lock or manage to go through the adult bypass undetected. (1) Adult PIT tag recoveries to date are informative at least from a qualitative perspective. (2) The tagging levels by geographic region, rearing type, and, for chinook, life history stage have varied considerably since PIT tagging began on the Columbia River system. Early tagging studies were directed at Juvenile problems rather than adult return rates. As a result, comparisons in adult return rates between years, regions, etc., are more difficult. Global conclusions about the effect of potential treatments and/or natural factors, such as region of origin, on adult return rates are difficult to make until a more balanced. more consistent tagging study is implemented. (3) Along the same lines, tagging levels will need to be increased considerably if experiments are to be conducted to determine factors that affect return rates. E.g., approximately 46,000 fish in both the control and the treatment groups need to be PIT-tagged to detect a statistically significant difference with 80% probability. (4) Analysis of the available data suggests that life stage (parr or smolt), rearing type (hatchery or wild), and geographic location all affect the return rates for spring chinook. The data are limited, however. (5) Return rates for Snake River steelhead are roughly an order of magnitude greater than Snake River spring chinook return rates.

Newman, Ken

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Simulations of The Dalles Dam Proposed Full Length Spillwall  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling study to evaluatethe impacts of a full-length spillwall at The Dalles Dam. The full-length spillwall is being designed and evaluated as a structural means to improve tailrace egress and thus survival of juvenile fish passing through the spillway. During the course of this study, a full-length spillwall at Bays 6/7 and 8/9 were considered. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) has proposed extending the spillwall constructed in the stilling basin between spillway Bays 6 and 7 about 590 ft farther downstream. It is believed that the extension of the spillwall will improve egress conditions for downstream juvenile salmonids by moving them more rapidly into the thalweg of the river hence reducing their exposure to predators. A numerical model was created, validated, and applied the The Dalles Dam tailrace. The models were designed to assess impacts to flow, tailrace egress, navigation, and adult salmon passage of a proposed spill wall extension. The more extensive model validation undertaken in this study greatly improved our confidence in the numerical model to represent the flow conditions in The Dalles tailrace. This study used these validated CFD models to simulate the potential impacts of a spillwall extension for The Dalles Dam tailrace for two locations. We determined the following: (1)The construction of an extended wall (between Bays 6/7) will not adversely impact entering or exiting the navigation lock. Impact should be less if a wall were constructed between Bays 8/9. (2)The construction of a wall between Bays 6/7 will increase the water surface elevation between the wall and the Washington shore. Although the increased water surface elevation would be beneficial to adult upstream migrants in that it decreases velocities on the approach to the adult ladder, the increased flow depth would enhance dissolved gas production, impacting potential operations of the project because of water quality. A wall between Bays 8/9 should have a lesser impact as the confined spill would be across more bays and the relative flow constriction less. (3) The 405 kcfs case was used for the rapid assessment of flow conditions and hydraulic mechanisms that might be responsible for the unexpected erosion at the end of the shelf downstream of Bay 7.

Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

243

ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor to continue with the project, the Watts Bar Dam Project was canceled and the Exploranium radiation monitors were removed from the doors of Watts Bar Dam in early 2006. The DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office decided to proceed with a Pilot building on the ORNL work performed at the TN and SC weigh stations in the highway sector of the Trusted Corridors project and eventually expanded it to other southern states under the name of Southeastern Corridor Pilot Project (SETCP). Many of the Phase I goals were achieved however real-world test data of private watercraft and barges was never obtained.

Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Using web information for author name disambiguation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In digital libraries, ambiguous author names may occur due to the existence of multiple authors with the same name (polysemes) or different name variations for the same author (synonyms). We proposed here a new method that uses information available ... Keywords: author name disambiguation, bibliographic citation, search engine

Denilson Alves Pereira; Berthier Ribeiro-Neto; Nivio Ziviani; Alberto H.F. Laender; Marcos André Gonçalves; Anderson A. Ferreira

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Lower Granite Dam Smolt Monitoring Program, 1999 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 1999 fish collection season at Lower Granite was characterized by high spring flows and spill, low levels of debris, cool water temperatures, increased hatchery chinook numbers, and an overall decrease in numbers of smolts collected and transported. A total of 5,882,872 juvenile salmonids were collected at Lower Granite. Of these, 5,466,057 were transported to release sites below Bonneville Dam, 5,232,105 by barge and 233,952 by truck. An additional 339,398 fish were bypassed back to the river. A total of 117,609 salmonids were examined in daily samples. Nine research projects conducted by four agencies impacted a total of 440,810 smolts (7.5% of the total collected) of which 247,268 were PIT tagged and 572 were recorded as incidental mortalities.

Verhey, Peter; Morrill, Charles; Mensik, Fred

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to estimate the survival for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts during spring 2010 in a portion of the Columbia River that includes Bonneville Dam. The study estimated smolt survival from a virtual release at Bonneville Dam to a survival array 81 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. We also estimated median forebay residence time, median tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A single release design was used to estimate survival from Bonneville Dam to a primary array located 81 km downstream of Bonneville. The approach did not include a reference tailrace release. Releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam to Hood River contributed to the formation of virtual releases at a Bonneville Dam forebay entrance array and at the face of the dam. A total of 3,880 yearling Chinook salmon and 3,885 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to estimate the survival for yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts during spring 2010 in a portion of the Columbia River that includes Bonneville Dam. The study estimated smolt survival from a virtual release at Bonneville Dam to a survival array 81 km downstream of Bonneville Dam. We also estimated median forebay residence time, median tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A single release design was used to estimate survival from Bonneville Dam to a primary array located 81 km downstream of Bonneville. The approach did not include a reference tailrace release. Releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam to Hood River contributed to the formation of virtual releases at a Bonneville Dam forebay entrance array and at the face of the dam. A total of 3,880 yearling Chinook salmon and 3,885 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation, 1992-1993 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In February of 1900, over forty agency representatives and interested citizens began development of the 1991 Mitigation Plan. This effort culminated in the 1993 Implementation Plan for mitigation of fish losses attributable to the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The primary purpose of this biennial report is to inform the public of the status of ongoing mitigation activities resulting from those planning efforts. A habitat improvement project is underway to benefit bull trout in Big Creek in the North Fork drainage of the Flathead River and work is planned in Hay Creek, another North Fork tributary. Bull trout redd counts have been expanded and experimental programs involving genetic evaluation, outmigrant monitoring, and hatchery studies have been initiated, Cutthroat mitigation efforts have focused on habitat improvements in Elliott Creek and Taylor`s Outflow and improvements have been followed by imprint plants of hatchery fish and/or eyed eggs in those streams. Rogers Lake west of Kalispell and Lion Lake, near Hungry Horse, were chemically rehabilitated. Cool and warm water fish habitat has been improved in Halfmoon Lake and Echo Lake. Public education and public interest is important to the future success of mitigation activities. As part of the mitigation team`s public awareness responsibility we have worked with numerous volunteer groups, public agencies, and private landowners to stimulate interest and awareness of mitigation activities and the aquatic ecosystem. The purpose of this biennial report is to foster public awareness of, and support for, mitigation activities as we move forward in implementing the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan.

DosSantos, Joe; Vashro, Jim; Lockard, Larry

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Definition: Intermediate Balancing Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intermediate Balancing Authority Intermediate Balancing Authority Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Intermediate Balancing Authority A Balancing Authority Area that has connecting facilities in the Scheduling Path between the Sending Balancing Authority Area and Receiving Balancing Authority Area and operating agreements that establish the conditions for the use of such facilities.[1] Related Terms Balancing Authority, Balancing Authority Area, Scheduling Path, Sending Balancing Authority, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ne Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Intermediate_Balancing_Authority&oldid=502634"

250

Feasibility assessment of low-head hydroelectric development at the Peninsular Paper Company dam in Ypsilanti, Michigan. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a study into the feasibility of developing a small, low-head dam site for hydroelectric generation in southeastern Michigan are presented. Average hydraulic head at the site is 13.0 ft, mean stream flow is 498 cfs. Economic, environmental and institutional factors were considered. Seven specific hypothetical designs were examined in detail, including vertical, bulb, cross-flow and tubular turbine designs. It was determined that the production capacity of the facility had an important influence on the cost-effectiveness of the project. A detailed benefit/cost analysis was conducted to identify the optimum facility size in terms of incremental costs and benefits. From an economic standpoint, it was found that the most cost-effective design for developing the site, although profitable, would not be financially attractive to the owner compared to other investment opportunities with which the company is faced. The projected after-tax return on investment for the project, based on current costs, was projected to be from 2 to 6%, depending upon the depreciation basis used. The project would, however, have a favorable effect on the corporation's working capital. The environmental issues associated with the development of the site would be relatively minor. The most important consequence would be enhanced public safety due to structural repairs to the dam and the availability of a small, independent source of electric generation that could be called on in times of power outages or natural disaster.

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Wildlife Mitigation and Restoration for Grand Coulee Dam: Blue Creek Project, Phase 1.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a recommendation from the Spokane Tribe to the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) for partial mitigation for the extensive wildlife and wildlife habitat losses on the Spokane Indian Reservation caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. NPPC`s interim wildlife goal over the next 7 years for the Columbia hydropower system, is to protect, mitigate and enhance approximately 35% basin wide of the lost habitat units. Grand Coulee Dam had the greatest habitat losses of any Dams of the Wildlife Rule.

Merker, Christopher

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Creation of the dam for the No. 2 Kambaratinskaya HPP by large-scale blasting: analysis of planning experience and lessons learned  

SciTech Connect

Results of complex instrument observations and video taping during large-scale blasts detonated for creation of the dam at the No. 2 Kambaratinskaya HPP on the Naryn River in the Kyrgyz Republic are analyzed. Tests of the energy effectiveness of the explosives are evaluated, characteristics of LSB manifestations in seismic and air waves are revealed, and the shaping and movement of the rock mass are examined. A methodological analysis of the planning and production of the LSB is given.

Shuifer, M. I.; Argal, E. S. [JSC 'Gidrospetsproekt' (Russian Federation)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Virginia Coalfield Economic Development Authority (Virginia) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Virginia Coalfield Economic Development Authority (Virginia) Virginia Coalfield Economic Development Authority (Virginia) Virginia Coalfield Economic Development Authority (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Program Info Start Date 1990 State Virginia Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Loan Program Public Benefits Fund Provider Virginia Coalfield Economic Development Authority The Virginia Coalfield Economic Development Authority (VACEDA) was created in 1988 to encourage economic development in the western section of the state. The Authority administers incentive and financing programs designed to encourage new job creation and economic diversification, specifically in the electronic information technology, energy, education, and emerging technology sectors. VCEDA provides financial support for fixed assets,

254

Quantifying the Behavioral Response of Spawning Chum Salmon to Elevated Discharges from Bonneville Dam, Columbia River : Annual Report 2005-2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In unimpounded rivers, Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) typically spawn under relatively stable stream flows, with exceptions occurring during periodic precipitation events. In contrast, hydroelectric development has often resulted in an artificial hydrograph characterized by rapid changes in discharge and tailwater elevation that occur on a daily, or even an hourly basis, due to power generation (Cushman 1985; Moog 1993). Consequently, populations of Pacific salmon that are known to spawn in main-stem habitats below hydroelectric dams face the risks of changing habitat suitability, potential redd dewatering, and uncertain spawning success (Hamilton and Buell 1976; Chapman et al. 1986; Dauble et al. 1999; Garland et al. 2003; Connor and Pflug 2004; McMichael et al. 2005). Although the direct effects of a variable hydrograph, such as redd dewatering are apparent, specific effects on spawning behavior remain largely unexplored. Chum salmon (O. keta) that spawn below Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River are particularly vulnerable to the effects of water level fluctuations. Although chum salmon generally spawn in smaller tributaries (Johnson et al. 1997), many fish spawn in main-stem habitats below Bonneville Dam near Ives Island (Tomaro et al. 2007; Figure 1). The primary spawning area near Ives Island is shallow and sensitive to changes in water level caused by hydroelectric power generation at Bonneville Dam. In the past, fluctuating water levels have dewatered redds and changed the amount of available spawning habitat (Garland et al. 2003). To minimize these effects, fishery managers attempt to maintain a stable tailwater elevation at Bonneville Dam of 3.5 m (above mean sea level) during spawning, which ensures adequate water is provided to the primary chum salmon spawning area below the mouth of Hamilton Creek (Figure 1). Given the uncertainty of winter precipitation and water supply, this strategy has been effective at restricting spawning to a specific riverbed elevation and providing minimum spawning flows that have the greatest chance of being maintained through egg incubation and fry emergence. However, managing the lower Columbia River for a stable tailwater elevation does not provide much operational flexibility at Bonneville Dam, which has little storage capacity. When river discharges increase due to rain events, the traditional approach has been to pass excess water at night to maintain stable tailwater elevations during the daytime. The underlying assumption of this strategy, referred to as reverse load following, is that fish do not spawn at night. However, Tiffan et al. (2005) showed that this assumption is false by documenting nighttime spawning by chum salmon in the Ives Island area. Similarly, McMichael et al. (2005) reported nighttime spawning by Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) in the Columbia River, indicating that diel spawning may be a common occurrence in Pacific salmon. During the latter portion of the chum spawning period in December 2003 and 2004, discharges from Bonneville Dam increased from an average of 3,398 m3/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 3.5 m above mean sea level) during the day to over 5,664 m3/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 5.1 m) at night, with peak discharges of 7,080 m{sup 3}/s (tailwater elevation {approx} 6.1 m). This caused concern among fishery managers regarding the potential effects of these high discharges on this population of spawning chum salmon, which is listed under the Endangered Species Act (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 1999). We hypothesized that increased water velocities associated with elevated tailwaters might alter chum salmon spawning behavior if water velocities at redd locations increased beyond the range of suitability (>0.8 m/s; Salo 1991). In 2005, we investigated the movement and behavioral responses of spawning chum salmon at Ives Island to increased tailwater elevations at Bonneville Dam. We used acoustic telemetry to determine if the higher velocities associated with increased tailwater elevations caused fish to leave their re

Tiffan, Kenneth F.; Haskell, Craig A.; Kock, Tobias J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Measurements in the Tailrace at John Day Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) were used to measure water velocities in the tailrace at John Day Dam over a two-week period in February 2005. Data were collected by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Hydraulic Design Section, Portland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The objective of this project was therefore to collect field measurements of water velocities in the near-field draft tube exit zone as well as the far-field tailrace to be used for improving these models. Field data were collected during the project using five separate ADCPs. Mobile ADCP data were collected using two ADCPs mounted on two separate boats. Data were collected by either holding the boat on-station at pre-defined locations for approximately 10 minutes or in moving transect mode when the boat would move over large distances during the data collection. Results from the mobile ADCP survey indicated a complex hydrodynamic flow field in the tailrace downstream of John Day Dam. A large gyre was noted between the skeleton section of the powerhouse and non-spilling portion of the spillway. Downstream of the spillway, the spillway flow is constrained against the navigation lock guide wall, and large velocities were noted in this region. Downstream of the guide wall, velocities decreased as the spillway jet dispersed. Near the tailrace island, the flow split was measured to be approximately equal on Day 2 (25.4 kcfs spillway/123 kcfs total). However, approximately 60% of the flow passed along the south shore of the island on Day 1 (15.0 kcfs spillway/150 kcfs total). At a distance of 9000 ft downstream of the dam, flows had equalized laterally and were generally uniform over the cross section. The collection of water velocities near the draft tube exit of an operating turbine unit is not routine, and equipment capable of measuring 3D water velocities in these zones are at the forefront of hydraulic measurement technology. Although the feasibility of measuring 1D water velocity magnitudes has been previously demonstrated by the authors, the feasibility of resolving 3D water velocity vectors given the heterogeneity of the flow field was unknown before this study’s data were collected. Both the 1D and 3D data were collected by deploying three ADCPs on dual-axis rotators directly above the draft tube exit of Turbine Unit 16. These instruments collected 1D data during both the mobile reconnaissance campaign and a later one-week period with zero spillway discharge. During the zero spillway discharge period, Turbine Unit 16 was operated over a range of discharges. Approximately 12 hours of 1D velocity data were collected at low (12 kcfs), middle (16.2 kcfs), and high (19.2 kcfs) turbine discharges. The 1D dataset indicates large differences in flow patterns and RMS velocity fluctuations among the various discharge levels. Results from this project show that it is technically feasible to measure 3D water velocities directly downstream of an operating turbine unit using a narrow beam swath (i.e., 6-degree) ADCP. Data products from these 3D velocity data include a measurement of the draft tube barrel flow distribution (a.k.a., the flow split), directional changes and the general decay of velocity as flow exits the draft tube and enters the tailrace, and a relative measure of the homogeneity of the flow field.

Cook, Chris B.; Dibrani, Berhon; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Titzler, P. Scott; Dennis, Gary W.

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

256

Monitoring and Evaluation of Yearling Fall Chinook Salmon Released from Acclimation Facilities Upstream of Lower Granite Dam; 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, conducted monitoring and evaluation studies on Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Snake River stock) yearling fall chinook salmon that were acclimated and released at three Fall Chinook Acclimation Project sites upstream of Lower Granite Dam along with yearlings released on-station from Lyons Ferry Hatchery in 1998. The three fall chinook acclimation facilities are operated by the Nez Perce Tribe and located at Pittsburg Landing and Captain John Rapids on the Snake River and at Big Canyon Creek on the Clearwater River. Yearlings at the Big Canyon facility consisted of two size classes that are referred to in this report as 9.5 fish per pound (fpp) and 30 fpp. The Big Canyon 9.5 fpp were comparable to the yearlings at Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids and Lyons Ferry Hatchery. A total of 9,942 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Pittsburg Landing. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.19. Of the 9,942 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 6,836 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Granite, Little Goose, Lower Monumental and McNary). A total of 4,926 9.5 fpp and 2,532 30 fpp yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Big Canyon. PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 156.9 mm and mean condition factor of 1.13. PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings had a mean fork length of 113.1 mm and mean condition factor of 1.18. Of the 4,926 PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released, a total of 3,042 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. Of the 2,532 PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released, a total of 1,130 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 1,253 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Captain John Rapids. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 147.5 mm and mean condition factor of 1.09. Of the 1,253 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 719 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams. A total of 2,420 yearlings were PIT tagged and released at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. PIT tagged yearlings had a mean fork length of 159.0 mm and mean condition factor of 1.10. Of the 2,420 PIT tagged fish released, a total of 979 unique tags were detected at mainstem Snake and Columbia River dams (Lower Monumental and McNary). Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged fish released from Pittsburg Landing were 10.5 days to Lower Granite Dam, 21.7 days to McNary Dam and 29.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 16.4 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 18.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 25 at Lower Granite Dam, May 6 at McNary Dam and May 14 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 20 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 9.5 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 13.3 days to Lower Granite Dam, 26.0 days to McNary Dam and 30.8 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 13.0 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 15.3 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 18.3 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were April 27 at Lower Granite Dam, May 11 at McNary Dam and May 15 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 9 at Lower Granite Dam, May 24 at McNary Dam and May 25 at Bonneville Dam. Median travel times, based on all detections, of PIT tagged 30 fpp yearlings released from Big Canyon were 20.8 days to Lower Granite Dam, 37.6 days to McNary Dam and 43.5 days to Bonneville Dam. Median migration rates were 8.3 rkm/d to Lower Granite Dam, 10.6 rkm/d to McNary Dam and 12.9 rkm/d to Bonneville Dam. The median arrival dates were May 5 at Lower Granite Dam, May 23 at McNary Dam and May 28 at Bonneville Dam. The 90% passage dates were May 22 at Lower Granite Dam, May 31 at McNary Dam and June 5 at Bonneville Dam. Median arrival dates, based on all detections, of PIT tagge

Rocklage, Stephen J. (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Definition: Host Balancing Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Host Balancing Authority Host Balancing Authority Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Host Balancing Authority A Balancing Authority that confirms and implements Interchange Transactions for a Purchasing Selling Entity that operates generation or serves customers directly within the Balancing Authority's metered boundaries., The Balancing Authority within whose metered boundaries a jointly owned unit is physically located.[1] Related Terms Balancing Authority, Interchange Transaction, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An in LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. line Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Host_Balancing_Authority&oldid=502546" Categories:

258

Mobile IP Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mobile IP and Authentication, Authorization, Accounting (AAA) working groups are currently looking at defining the requirements for Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting. This document contains the requirements which would have to be supported ...

S. Glass; T. Hiller; S. Jacobs; C. Perkins

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Trust negotiation: authorization for virtual organizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trust negotiation is an authorization approach for open distributed systems, such as dynamic coalitions and other types of virtual organizations. Under the trust negotiation approach to authorization, every resource that might be shared within the coalition ...

M. Winslett; Adam J. Lee; Kenneth J. Perano

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Definition: Interchange Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

information for reliability assessment purposes.1 Related Terms Interchange, sustainability, balancing authority, smart grid References Glossary of Terms Used in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams and Works  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams and Works (Virginia) Water-Power Development, Conservation of Hydroelectric Power Dams and Works (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia State Corporation Commission It is the policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to encourage the utilization of its water resources to the greatest practicable extent, to control the waters of the Commonwealth, and also to construct or reconstruct dams in any rivers or streams within the Commonwealth for the

262

Precipitation Changes near Three Gorges Dam, China. Part I: A Spatiotemporal Validation Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 2010, the water level upstream of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) reached the designated 175-m level. The associated inundation and land use–land cover changes have important implications for water resource management, agriculture, ...

Fang Zhao; Marshall Shepherd

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Investigation of Uplift Pressures and Shear and Tensile Strengths for Concrete Gravity Dams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concrete gravity dam stability depends on the characteristics of the rock foundation, strength of the concrete-to-rock bond, concrete strength, and uplift pressure forces. This interim report describes, with examples, how to assess these factors.

1990-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

264

Update of Columbia River flow and temperature data measured at Priest Rapids Dam and Vernita Bridge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Columbia River temperatures and flow rates are collected daily at Priest Rapids Dam and Vernita Bridge. These data are necessary for assessing trends or changes in river conditions downstream of Priest Rapids Dam. In order to analyze this data, Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed a computerized data base using existing US Geological Survey flow and temperature records at Priest Rapids Dam and Vernita Bridge. Daily-averaged temperature and daily flow information on the Columbia River just downstream of Priest Rapids Dam and upstream of river mile 380 were collected and stored in a data base. A newly developed computer model, COLSTAT (Columbia River Statistical Update), used the data base to statistically analyze temperature and flow conditions by computing the frequency of occurrence and duration of selected temperatures and flow rates for the Columbia River. Information regarding the data base is presented, as well as, a description of the COLSTAT model.

Whelan, G.; Newbill, C.A.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Surface and subsurface soils at the Pond B dam: July 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pond B, 685-13G, is an inactive reactor cooling impoundment built in 1961 on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Between 1961 and 1964, Pond B received R-Reactor cooling water discharges that were contaminated with {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and plutonium. Though the pond has not been used since 1964, radionuclides from the contaminated cooling water remain in the water and in the surface sediments of the pond. The current proposal to fix and repair the Pond B dam structure includes installing a new drain system and monitoring equipment. The dam will be reinforced with additional previous material on the downstream face of the dam. The objectives of this report are to describe the sampling methodology used during the July 1998 sampling event at the downstream face of the Pond B dam and in Pond B, present the results of the sampling event, and compare, where possible, these results to related risk-based standards.

Halverson, N.V.

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

266

Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Surveys of Velocity Downstream of Albeni Falls Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Seattle District, is studying the potential to locate fish bypass systems at Albeni Falls Dam. The USACE requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to survey velocity magnitude and direction in the dam tailrace. The empirical data collected will be used to support future numerical modeling, physical modeling, and evaluation of fish bypass system alternatives. In May 2010, PNNL conducted velocity surveys of the Albeni Falls Dam using a boat-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler. The surveys were conducted over three days (May 25 through 27). During the survey period, total river discharge at the dam varied between 30.2 and 31.0 kcfs. A small amount of spill discharge, 2 kcfs, was present on two days (May 26 and 27). This report presents data plots showing measured velocity direction and magnitude averaged over the entire depth and over 5-ft depth increments from 5 to 30 ft.

Perkins, William A.; Titzler, P. Scott; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Kallio, Sara E.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

267

Association of State Dam Safety Officials (ASDSO)/EPRI Spillway Gate Workshop: January 5 & 6, 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maintaining the integrity of dams at hydroelectric projects is essential to the protection of communities, the surrounding environment, and the power and resource management infrastructure. The Spillway Gate Workshop, sponsored by the Association of State Dam Safety Officials (ASDSO) and EPRI, and with funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), focused on a critical aspect of the safety issues related to analysis, inspection, maintenance, and performance of spillway gates. The intent of...

2000-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

268

Water Velocity Measurement on an Extended-Length Submerged Bar Screen at John Day Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a study of water velocity around an extended-length submerged bar screen (ESBS) at John Day Dam. The study was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers by AScI Corporation and MEVATEC Corporation in March of 2000. This report was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. ESBS are being studied as one method for diverting juvenile migrating fish from the dam's turbine intakes into the gate well and through the juvenile fish bypass channels.

Weiland, Mark A

2001-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

269

Non-powered Dams: An untapped source of renewable electricity in the USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydropower has been a source of clean, renewable electricity in the USA for more than 100 years. Today, approximately 2500 US dams provide 78 GW of conventional and 22 GW of pumped-storage hydropower. In contrast, another approximately 80 000 dams in the USA do not include hydraulic turbine equipment and provide non-energy related services, such as flood control, water supply, navigation, and recreation.

Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; Battey, Hoyt [Department of Energy; Smith, Brennan T [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

EIS-0480: Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Two agencies of the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, are jointly preparing a Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Glen Canyon Dam and an EIS for adoption of the Plan. The Glen Canyon Dam, on the Colorado River in northern, Arizona, generates hydroelectric power that is marketed by DOE's Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency.

271

Optimization of Hydroacoustic Equipment Deployments at Lookout Point and Cougar Dams, Willamette Valley Project, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the study was to optimize performance of the fixed-location hydroacoustic systems at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) and the acoustic imaging system at Cougar Dam (CGR) by determining deployment and data acquisition methods that minimized structural, electrical, and acoustic interference. The general approach was a multi-step process from mount design to final system configuration. The optimization effort resulted in successful deployments of hydroacoustic equipment at LOP and CGR.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.

2010-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

272

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; Annual Progress Report, April 2007 - March 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2007 through March 2008 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report C), and Montana State University (MSU; Report D). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported.

Mallette, Christine [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

273

Evaluation of Steelhead Kelt Passage into the Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse Corner Collector Prior to the Juvenile Migration Seasons, 2007 and 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a steelhead kelt passage study conducted by the PNNL for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Bonneville Dam in early spring 2007 and 2008. At the Second Powerhouse, a surface flow outlet called the corner collector (B2CC) may be an effective non-turbine passage route for steelhead kelt moving downstream in early spring before the main juvenile emigration season. The goal of this project was to inform management decisions regarding B2CC operations by estimating the number of kelt using the B2CC for downstream passage at Bonneville Dam prior to the juvenile spring migration season. We performed a hydroacoustic study from March 2 to April 10, 2007 and from March 13 to April 15, 2008.

Weiland, Mark A.; Kim, Jina; Nagy, William T.; Johnson, Gary E.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Operations Authorization Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operations Authorization Assessment Plan Operations Authorization Assessment Plan Operations Authorization Assessment Plan Performance Objective: The objective of this assessment is to verify there is documentation in place which accurately describes the safety envelope for a facility, program or project. Criteria: Conditions and requirements should be established to ensure programs addressing all applicable functional areas are adequately implemented to support safe performance of the work. The extent of documentation and level of authority for agreement shall be tailored to the complexity and hazards associated with the work. Personnel shall be responsible and accountable for performance of work in accordance with the controls established. Operations-Authorization.doc More Documents & Publications

275

Georgia Environmental Finance Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Environmental Finance Authority - Residential Energy Georgia Environmental Finance Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program (Georgia) Georgia Environmental Finance Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Construction Heating Heat Pumps Water Heating Program Info State Georgia Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount Oglethorpe Power Corporation: $5,500 Electric Cities of Georgia: up to $5,000 Municipal Gas Authority of Georgia: up to $5,000 Estes Heating and Air (Statewide): $10,000 The Georgia Environmental Finance Authority (GEFA) encourages Georgians to

276

Alleghany Highlands Economic Development Authority (Virginia) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alleghany Highlands Economic Development Authority (Virginia) Alleghany Highlands Economic Development Authority (Virginia) Alleghany Highlands Economic Development Authority (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Enterprise Zone Industry Recruitment/Support Loan Program Public Benefits Fund Provider Alleghany Highlands Economic Development Corporation The Alleghany Highlands Economic Development Authority was created to encourage economic development in the Alleghany Highlands. The Authority provides financial support for the purchase of real estate, construction of

277

Text Authoring, Knowledge Acquisition and Description Logics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a principled approach to the problem of connecting a controlled document authoring system with a knowledge base. We start by describing closed-world authoring situations, in which the knowledge base is used for constraining the possible documents and orienting the user's selections. Then we move to open-world authoring situations in which, additionally, choices made during authoring are echoed back to the knowledge base. In this way the information implicitly encoded in a document becomes explicit in the knowledge base and can be re-exploited for simplifying the authoring of new documents. We show how

Marc Dymetman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Spring 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at The Dalles Dam during spring 2010. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay boat-restricted zone (BRZ) to the tailrace BRZ at The Dalles Dam, as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. A virtual/paired-release design was used to estimate dam passage survival at The Dalles Dam. The approach included releases of acoustic-tagged smolts above John Day Dam that contributed to the formation of a virtual release at the face of The Dalles Dam. A survival estimate from this release was adjusted by a paired release below The Dalles Dam. A total of 4,298 yearling Chinook salmon and 4,309 steelhead smolts were tagged and released in the investigation. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tag model number ATS-156dB, weighing 0.438 g in air, was used in this investigation. The dam passage survival results are summarized as follows: Yearling Chinook Salmon 0.9641 (SE = 0.0096) and Steelhead 0.9535 (SE = 0.0097).

Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, John R.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Excepted Service Authorities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Excepted Service Authorities Excepted Service Authorities Excepted Service Authorities Excepted Service Authorities for EJ and EK Pay Plans EJ and EK Pay plans are unique to DOE. They were established under: Section 621(d) of the DOE Organization Act (42 United States Code (U.S.C.), section 7231(d), hereafter referred to as pay plan EJ. Section 3161(a) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1995 (Pub.L. 103-337, October 5, 1994) and renewals, hereafter referred to as pay plan EK. The EJ authority is used to enhance the Department's recruitment and retention of highly qualified scientific, engineering, and professional and administrative personnel. Appointments made, and compensation fixed, under this authority may be made "without regard to the civil service laws"

280

Evaluation of Salmon Spawning Below Bonneville Dam, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since FY 2000, scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have conducted research to assess the extent of spawning by chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) in the lower mainstem Columbia River. Their work supports a larger project funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) aimed at characterizing the physical habitat used by mainstem fall Chinook and chum salmon populations. Multiple collaborators in addition to PNNL are involved in the BPA project--counterparts include the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). Data resulting from the individual tasks each agency conducts are providing a sound scientific basis for developing strategies to operate the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) in ways that will effectively protect and enhance the chum and tule fall Chinook salmon populations--both listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Fall Chinook salmon, thought to originate from Bonneville Hatchery, were first noted to be spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam by WDFW biologists in 1993. Known spawning areas include gravel beds on the Washington side of the river near Hamilton Creek and near Ives Island. Limited surveys of spawning ground were conducted in the area around Ives and Pierce islands from 1994 through 1997. Based on those surveys, it is believed that fall Chinook salmon are spawning successfully in this area. The size of this population from 1994 to 1996 was estimated at 1800 to 5200 fish. Chum salmon also have been documented spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam. Chum salmon were listed as threatened under the ESA in March 1999. At present there is a need to determine the number of fall Chinook and chum salmon spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam, the characteristics of their spawning areas, and the flows necessary to ensure their long-term survival. Ongoing discussions regarding the minimum and maximum flows will result in optimal spawning habitat usage and survival of embryos of both species. Collection of additional data as part of this project will ensure that established flow guidelines are appropriate and provide adequate protection for the species of concern. This is consistent with the high priority placed by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council Independent Scientific Advisory Board and the salmon managers on determining the importance of mainstem habitats to the production of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. Thus, there is a need to better understand the physical habitat variables used by mainstem fall Chinook and chum salmon populations and the effects of hydropower project operations on spawning and incubation. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was asked to participate in the cooperative study during FY 2000. Since then, we have focused on (1) investigating the interactions between groundwater and surface water near fall Chinook and chum salmon spawning areas; (2) providing in-season hyporheic temperature data and assisting state agencies with emergence timing estimates; (3) locating and mapping deep-water fall Chinook salmon spawning areas; and (4) providing support to the WDFW for analysis of stranding data. Work conducted during FY 2006 addressed these same efforts. This report documents the studies and tasks performed by PNNL during FY 2006. Chapter 1 provides a description of the searches conducted for deepwater redds--adjacent to Pierce and Ives islands for fall Chinook salmon and near the Interstate 205 bridge for chum salmon. The chapter also provides data on redd location, information about habitat associations, and estimates of total spawning populations. Chapter 2 documents the collection of data on riverbed and river temperatures and water surface elevations, from the onset of spawning to the end of emergence, and the provision of those data in-season to fisheries management agencies to assist with emer

Arntzen, Evan; Mueller, Robert; Murray, Christopher [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Evaluation of Salmon Spawning Below Bonneville Dam, Annual Report October 2005 - September 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since FY 2000, scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have conducted research to assess the extent of spawning by chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) in the lower mainstem Columbia River. Their work supports a larger project funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) aimed at characterizing the physical habitat used by mainstem fall Chinook and chum salmon populations. Multiple collaborators in addition to PNNL are involved in the BPA project--counterparts include the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). Data resulting from the individual tasks each agency conducts are providing a sound scientific basis for developing strategies to operate the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) in ways that will effectively protect and enhance the chum and tule fall Chinook salmon populations--both listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Fall Chinook salmon, thought to originate from Bonneville Hatchery, were first noted to be spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam by WDFW biologists in 1993. Known spawning areas include gravel beds on the Washington side of the river near Hamilton Creek and near Ives Island. Limited surveys of spawning ground were conducted in the area around Ives and Pierce islands from 1994 through 1997. Based on those surveys, it is believed that fall Chinook salmon are spawning successfully in this area. The size of this population from 1994 to 1996 was estimated at 1800 to 5200 fish. Chum salmon also have been documented spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam. Chum salmon were listed as threatened under the ESA in March 1999. At present there is a need to determine the number of fall Chinook and chum salmon spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam, the characteristics of their spawning areas, and the flows necessary to ensure their long-term survival. Ongoing discussions regarding the minimum and maximum flows will result in optimal spawning habitat usage and survival of embryos of both species. Collection of additional data as part of this project will ensure that established flow guidelines are appropriate and provide adequate protection for the species of concern. This is consistent with the high priority placed by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council Independent Scientific Advisory Board and the salmon managers on determining the importance of mainstem habitats to the production of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. Thus, there is a need to better understand the physical habitat variables used by mainstem fall Chinook and chum salmon populations and the effects of hydropower project operations on spawning and incubation. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was asked to participate in the cooperative study during FY 2000. Since then, we have focused on (1) investigating the interactions between groundwater and surface water near fall Chinook and chum salmon spawning areas; (2) providing in-season hyporheic temperature data and assisting state agencies with emergence timing estimates; (3) locating and mapping deep-water fall Chinook salmon spawning areas; and (4) providing support to the WDFW for analysis of stranding data. Work conducted during FY 2006 addressed these same efforts. This report documents the studies and tasks performed by PNNL during FY 2006. Chapter 1 provides a description of the searches conducted for deepwater redds--adjacent to Pierce and Ives islands for fall Chinook salmon and near the Interstate 205 bridge for chum salmon. The chapter also provides data on redd location, information about habitat associations, and estimates of total spawning populations. Chapter 2 documents the collection of data on riverbed and river temperatures and water surface elevations, from the onset of spawning to the end of emergence, and the provision of those data in-season to fisheries management agencies to assist with emer

Arntzen, Evan V.; Mueller, Robert P.; Murray, Christopher J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

282

Optimization of Hydroacoustic Deployments at John Day Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes short-term studies conducted in late November and early December 2001 to optimize hydroacoustic sampling techniques for John Day Dam before the 2002 fish passage efficiency (FPE) study. Knowledge gained in this study should significantly improve hydroacoustic sampling and the accuracy of estimates of fish passage at two locations that have presented problems in past studies. The spillway has been most problematic because many fish detected there were not entrained. Without correction, non-commitment of fish can result in multiple detections and overestimation of fish passage and FPE. Trash-rack-mounted, down-looking transducers for sampling unguided fish at a submerged traveling screen (STS) also have posed problems because the beam was aimed so far downstream that researchers had concerns about fish aspect and detectability. The deployments, aiming angles, and ping rates described here should eliminate all problems encountered in previous studies. This report describes hydroacoustic evaluations. The spill-bay deployment identified in this study should completely eliminate multiple detections of fish by limiting the sample volume for counting fish to the deep high-discharge volume adjacent to the gate. Results from testing of transducers deployed in a turbine intake with an STS suggest that, after testing in 2002, it may be possible to cut the number of powerhouse transducers sampling STS units by 50% or to double the spatial sampling coverage with the same number of transducers, all while improving detectability.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Cook, Christopher B.; Titzler, P. Scott; Moursund, Russell A.

2002-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

283

Operation of the Lower Granite Dam Adult Trap, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During 2008 we operated the adult salmonid trap at Lower Granite Dam from 7 March through 25 November, except during a short summer period when water temperatures were too high to safely handle fish. We collected and handled a total of 20,463 steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss and radio-tagged 34 of the hatchery steelhead. We took scale samples from 3,724 spring/summer Chinook salmon O. tshawytscha for age and genetic analysis. We collected and handled a total of 8,254 fall Chinook salmon. Of those fish, 2,520 adults and 942 jacks were transported to Lyons Ferry Hatchery on the Snake River in Washington. In addition, 961 adults and 107 jacks were transported to the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery on the Clearwater River in Idaho. The remaining 3,724 fall Chinook salmon were passed upstream. Scales samples were taken from 780 fall Chinook salmon tagged with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags and collected by the sort-by-code system.

Harmon, Jerrel R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Priest Rapids Dam flow curtailment: Incident report, January 7, 1961  

SciTech Connect

This incident report deals with mechanical damage (caused by falling rocks) to the power line supplying station power, Priest Rapids Dam lost all generating flow at 4:23 p.m., cutting discharge from 71,700 cfs to about 12,000 cfs. Within five minutes, spillway gates were opened, bringing river flow back to greater than 36,000 cfs in about 10 minutes. The flow at 181-B dropped from 72,000 cfs to a minimum of 56,000 cfs at about 5:25 p.m. Priest Rapids generators returned to service at 4:45 p.m., the indicated flow at the gauge reaching 71,700 cfs again at about 8:00 p.m. River temperatures at the gauge increased 0.5 C following the interruption, but not at 181-B. Prompt HAPO notification of the flow reduction as provided for in the agreement between the PUD and the AEC was not made on this occasion; the first notice came from the 251 Substation.

Kramer, H.A.; Corley, J.P.

1961-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

285

Determination of Fishery Losses in the Flathead System Resulting from the Construction of Hungry Horse Dam, 1986 Final Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study is part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's residential fish and wildlife plan, which is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife resources caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River basin. The major goal of this study was to provide estimates of fishery losses to the Flathead system as a result of the completion of Hungry Horse Dam and to propose mitigation alternatives for enhancing the fishery. Construction of Hungry Horse Dam had the greatest adverse impacts on cutthroat and full trout from Flathead Lake and mitigative measures should be taken to offset these losses, if biologically and economically feasible. Also, other losses to fish and wildlife have been documented in the Flathead basin due to hydroelectric facilities and their operation. Some of these research projects will not be completed until 1989, when mitigation will be recommended using a basin-wide approach. Since HHR is at the headwaters of the Columbia system, mitigative measures may also affect downstream projects. Therefore, we presented an array of possible mitigation alternatives for consideration by decision-makers, with suggestions on the ones we feel are the most cost effective. Possible mitigation measures are included.

Zubik, Raymond J.; Fraley, John

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Washington, Volume IIA, Tumwater Falls and Dryden Dam Fish Passage, 1983 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This engineering feasibility and predesign report on the Tumwater Falls and Dryden Dam Fish Passage Project provides BPA with information for planning purposes and will serve as a discussion document for interested agencies. Tumwater Falls and Dryden Dams, both on the Wenatchee River, were built in the early 1900's as diversions for hydropower, and irrigation and hydropower, respectively. The present fishway facilities at both sites are inadequate to properly pass the anadromous fish runs in the Wenatchee River. These runs include spring and summer chinook salmon, sockeye salmon, coho salmon and steelhead trout. Predesign level drawings are provided in this report that represent fishway schemes capable of adequately passing present and projected fish runs. The effects of present passage facilities on anadromous fish stocks is addressed both quantitatively and qualitatively. The quantitative treatment assesses losses of adult migrants due to the structures and places an estimated value on those fish. The dollar figure is estimated to be between $391,000 and $701,000 per year for both structures. The qualitative approach to benefits deals with the concept of stock vigor, the need for passage improvements to help ensure the health of the anadromous fish stock. 29 references, 27 figures, 5 tables.

Unknown Author

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam; 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 2000 through March 2001 on determining the effects of mitigative measures on productivity of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam, and on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia and Snake rivers upstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW; Report A), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW; Report B), U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (USGS; Report C), Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission (CRITFC; Report D), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS; Report E), and Oregon State University (OSU; Report F). This is a multi-year study with many objectives requiring more than one year to complete; therefore, findings from a given year may be part of more significant findings yet to be reported. Highlights of results of our work from April 2000 through March 2001 are listed.

Kern, J. Chris; Ward, David L.; Farr, Ruth A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Characterizing the Fish Passage Environment at The Dalles Dam Spillway: 2001-2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The spill environment at The Dalles Dam in 2001-2004 was characterized using a field-deployed autonomous sensor (the so-called Sensor Fish), computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, and Lagrangian particle tracking. The sensor fish has a self-contained capability to digitally the record pressure and triaxial accelerations it was exposed to following its release into the spillway. After recovery downstream of the tailrace, the data stored in the memory of the sensor are downloaded and stored for analysis. The spillway, stilling basin, and tailrace hydrodynamics were simulated using an unsteady, free-surface, three-dimensional CFD code that solved the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations in conjunction with a two-equation turbulence model. The results from the CFD simulations were then used in a Lagrangian particle tracking model that included the effects of mass, drag, and buoyancy in the particle equation of motion. A random walk method was used to simulate the effects of small-scale turbulence on the particle motion. Several operational and structural conditions were evaluated using the Sensor Fish, CFD, and particle tracking. Quantifying events such as strike and stilling basin retention time characterized exposure conditions in the spill environment.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Serkowski, John A.; Cook, Chris B.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Perkins, William A.

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

289

(DOE/EIS-0183-SA-05): Supplement Analysis for the Boise River Diversion Dam Powerplant Rehabilitation, 10/17/02  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 17, 2002 October 17, 2002 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KECP-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Boise River Diversion Dam Powerplant Rehabilitation, DOE/EIS-0183-SA-05 memorandum Mark A. Jones Program Analyst - PGF-6 TO : Proposed Action: Boise River Diversion Dam - Amendment to Capital Investment Sub-Agreement, Contract Number DE-MS79-94BP94618 Proposed By: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) Location: Near Boise, in Ada County, Idaho Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to fund Reclamation's rehabilitation of the powerplant at the existing Boise River Diversion Dam (Diversion Dam) to use the water resource at Diversion Dam for electrical power production. Analysis: The Diversion Dam is located about 7 miles southeast of Boise, Idaho on the Boise River, about

290

Regional Districts, Commissions, and Authorities (South Carolina) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regional Districts, Commissions, and Authorities (South Carolina) Regional Districts, Commissions, and Authorities (South Carolina) Regional Districts, Commissions, and Authorities (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Regional Districts, Commissions, and Authorities

291

Balancing Authority Related Proposals for EIA Surveys  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

for EIA Surveys EIA Stakeholder Presentation June 5, 2012 . ... smart grid technologies and demand response. Require balancing authorities to post the next day

292

Laurentian Energy Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Laurentian Energy Authority Place Minnesota Sector Biomass Product Joint venture between Hibbing and Virginia Public Utilities to develope, own and manage a...

293

Call for Book Authors and Editors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Call for Book Authors and Editors. The Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society ( TMS) and John Wiley & Sons have teamed up as publishing partners, bringing ...

294

Disposal Authorization Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and closure of the SDF, and is a requirement under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Radioactive Waste Management Manual 435.1-1. Disposal Authorization Statement More...

295

Definition: Sink Balancing Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interchange, Interchange Transaction, Balancing Authority, smart grid References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign...

296

Definition: Source Balancing Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transaction, Sending Balancing Authority, Interchange, smart grid References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign...

297

JOM: Author Tools - Types of Papers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HOME > Author Tools > Types of Papers. Types of Papers ... Explores materials usage and development throughout history. These articles must contain new ...

298

ARM - Firearm Training and Authorization List  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AlaskaFirearm Training and Authorization List NSA Related Links Facilities and Instruments Barrow Atqasuk ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the...

299

Walden's authoring tools: a usability evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Walden's Paths enables K-12 teachers to incorporate Web-based information in their curriculum. However, most information on the Web requires some tailoring or contextualization in order to adapt it for curricular purposes. An annotated list of Web resources with a common thread that binds them is called a Path. Walden's Paths' Path Server is a presentation tool for viewing Paths over the Web. It provides a means for guided exploratory learning where the students can start with pages on the path and browse the Web unhindered, with a facility to return to the path at will. Providing GUI support for authoring paths presents many issues. The changes in the Web, author skills and work practices necessitate the need for Authoring Tools that support the new paradigms. This thesis describes the development of a new generation of authoring tools for Walden's Paths. The new tools separate the process of authoring of paths from publishing of paths. Authoring involves creation of paths, while publishing involves making the authored paths accessible to the intended audience. This separation helps provide authoring support for users while they do not have access to a network connection. The PathAuthor is a network-independent, platform-independent stand-alone tool with minimal overhead. The PathPublisher is a CGI tool that can be accessed via the Web to publish paths. Usability evaluation of an application determines its efficiency, ease of use and learnability. The usability of the PathAuthor and PathPublisher was evaluated by a group of K-12 teachers. This thesis presents the results of this evaluation. The results are in three forms, observations made during the evaluation, questionnaires that were filled in by the teachers and views expressed by them during the discussion that was conducted after the evaluation. The thesis then outlines avenues for further development of the Walden's Authoring Tools.

Karadkar, Unmil Purushottam

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Re-Analysis of Hydroacoustic Fish-Passage Data from Bonneville Dam after Spill-Discharge Corrections  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Portland District asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to re-analyze four years of fixed-aspect hydroacoustic data after the District made adjustments to spill discharge estimates. In this report, we present new estimates of all major fish-passage metrics for study years 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2004, as well as estimates for 2005. This study supports the Portland District and its effort to maximize survival of juvenile salmon passing Bonneville Dam. Major passage routes through Bonneville Dam include 10 turbines and a sluiceway at Powerhouse 1 (B1), an 18-bay spillway, and eight turbines at Powerhouse 2 (B2) and a sluiceway including the B2 Corner Collector. The original reports and all associated results, discussion, and conclusions for non flow-related metrics remain valid and useful, but effectiveness measures for study years 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2004 as reported in previous reports by Ploskey et al. should be superseded with the new estimates reported here. The fish-passage metrics that changed the most were related to effectiveness. Re-analysis produced spill effectiveness estimates that ranged from 12% to 21% higher than previous estimates in spring and 16.7% to 27.5% higher in summer, but the mean spill effectiveness over all years was only slightly above 1:1 (1.17 for spring and 1.29 for summer). Conversely surface-passage effectiveness decreased in the years this metric was measured (by 10.1% in spring and 10.7% in summer of 2002 and 9.5% in spring and 10.2% in summer of 2004). The smallest changes in the re-analysis were in project fish passage efficiency (0%-1%) and spill efficiency (0.9%-3.0%).

Ploskey, Gene R.; Kim, Jina; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.

2007-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Danish Energy Authority Poland -Electricity and gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Danish Energy Authority Poland - Electricity and gas market development study and practical guidelines for using EU Funds Electricity sector analyses December 2004 #12;Danish Energy Authority Poland - Electricity and gas market development study and practical guidelines for using EU Funds Electricity sector

302

Assessment of the impacts of demand curtailments in the DAMs: issues in and proposed modifications of FERC Order No. 745.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), in its initiative to incentivize demand response resources (DRRs) to participate in the day-ahead markets (DAMs), enacted Order No.… (more)

Castillo, Isaac

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Survival Estimates for the Passage of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead through Snake River Dams and Reservoirs, 1995 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Documentation is provided for the third of a multiyear study to estimate the survival of juvenile salmonids passing through dams and reservoirs on the Snake River.

Muir, William D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Water-induced displacement in Thua Thien Hue province: the impacts of hydropower dams on livelihood of forest dependent people.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Thua Thien Hue province is one of provinces in Vietnam where a high potential for hydroelectricity has resulted in the construction of dams for energy… (more)

Yustina Artati, ..

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Coordination of Federal Authorizations for Electric Transmission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coordination of Federal Authorizations for Electric Transmission Coordination of Federal Authorizations for Electric Transmission Facilities-Interim Final Rule and Proposed Rule Coordination of Federal Authorizations for Electric Transmission Facilities-Interim Final Rule and Proposed Rule The utility operating companies of the American Electric Power System1 ("AEP") commend the Department of Energy ("DOE") for its ongoing commitment to implement the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 ("EPAct"), specifically, as addressed here, the DOE's continuing effort to establish procedures under which entities may request that DOE coordinate Federal authorizations for the siting of interstate transmission facilities. Coordination of Federal Authorizations for Electric Transmission Facilities-Interim Final Rule and Proposed Rule

306

Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville Dam; 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2003 a total of 253 adult fall chinook and 113 chum were sampled for biological data in the Ives and Pierce islands area below Bonneville Dam. Vital statistics were developed from 221 fall chinook and 109 chum samples. The peak redd count for fall chinook was 190. The peak redd count for chum was 262. Peak spawning time for fall chinook was set at approximately 24 November. Peak spawning time for chum occurred approximately 24 November. There were estimated to be a total of 1,533 fall chinook spawning below Bonneville Dam in 2003. The study area's 2003 chum population was estimated to be 688 spawning fish. Temperature unit data suggests that below Bonneville Dam 2003 brood bright stock, fall chinook emergence began on January 6, 2004 and ended 28 April 2004, with peak emergence occurring 13 April. 2003 brood juvenile chum emergence below Bonneville Dam began 22 February and continued through 15 April 2004. Peak chum emergence took place 25 March. A total of 25,433 juvenile chinook and 4,864 juvenile chum were sampled between the dates of 20 January and 28 June 2004 below Bonneville Dam. Juvenile chum migrated from the study area in the 40-55 mm fork length range. Migration of chum occurred during the months of March, April and May. Sampling results suggest fall chinook migration from rearing areas took place during the month of June 2004 when juvenile fall chinook were in the 65 to 80 mm fork length size range. Adult and juvenile sampling below Bonneville Dam provided information to assist in determining the stock of fall chinook and chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville Dam. Based on observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration, it appears that in 2003 all of the fall chinook using the area below Bonneville Dam were of a late-spawning, bright stock. Observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, GSI and DNA analysis, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration suggests chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville dam are similar to stocks of chum found in Hamilton and Hardy creek and are part of the Lower Columbia River Chum ESU.

van der Naald, Wayne; Duff, Cameron; Brooks, Robert (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Columbia River Section, John Day, OR)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Evaluation of Fall Chinook and Chum Salmon Spawning below Bonneville Dam; 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002 a total of 364 adult fall chinook and 472 chum were sampled for biological data in the Ives and Pierce islands area below Bonneville Dam. Vital statistics were developed from 290 fall chinook and 403 chum samples. The peak redd count for fall chinook was 214. The peak redd count for chum was 776. Peak spawning time for fall chinook was set at approximately 15 November. Peak spawning time for chum occurred approximately 6 December. There were estimated to be a total of 1,881 fall chinook spawning below Bonneville Dam in 2002. The study area's 2002 chum population was estimated to be 4,232 spawning fish. Temperature unit data suggests that below Bonneville Dam 2002 brood bright stock, fall chinook emergence began on February 3 2003 and ended 7 May 2003, with peak emergence occurring 20 April. 2002 brood juvenile chum emergence below Bonneville Dam began 27 January and continued through 6 April 2003. Peak chum emergence took place 1 March. A total of 10,925 juvenile chinook and 1,577 juvenile chum were sampled between the dates of 24 January and 21 July 2003 below Bonneville Dam. Juvenile chum migrated from the study area in the 40-55 mm fork length range. Migration of chum occurred during the months of March, April and May. Sampling results suggest fall chinook migration from rearing areas took place during the month of June 2003 when juvenile fall chinook were in the 65 to 80 mm fork length size range. Adult and juvenile sampling below Bonneville Dam provided information to assist in determining the stock of fall chinook and chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville Dam. Based on observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration, it appears that in 2002 and 2003 the majority of fall chinook using the area below Bonneville Dam were of a late-spawning, bright stock of fall chinook. Observed spawning times, adult age and sex composition, GSI and DNA analysis, juvenile emergence timing, juvenile migration timing and juvenile size at the time of migration suggests chum spawning and rearing below Bonneville dam are similar to stocks of chum found in Hamilton and Hardy creek and are part of the Lower Columbia River Chum ESU.

van der Naald, Wayne; Clark, Roy; Brooks, Robert (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Columbia River Section, John Day, OR)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Feasibility report on the potential hydroelectric development at Combie Dam. [3. 5 MW, 70-ft head  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of an investigation of the technical, environmental, economic and financial feasibility of installing a hydroelectric powerplant at the existing Combie Dam on the Bear River in Nevada and Placer Counties, California, are discussed. This dam is owned and operated by the Nevada Irrigation District (the District) to act as a diversion and provide some storage for District water supply. The power plant would utilize flows which presently pass over the dam's spillway. The project would involve expanding the existing four foot diameter outlet on the southern gravity portion of the dam, installing a penstock (approximately 175 feet long, 102 inches in diameter) and constructing a 3500 kilowatts (kW) power plant on the south bank of the river below the dam. The capital cost of the project, including interest during construction, would total approximately $4,500,000 in July 1980 dollars. The unit capacity cost of the project at the 1980 price level would be $1,285 per kilowatt. The energy production unit cost would be 41.4 mills per kilowatt hour in 1980, and 56.3 mills per kilowatt hour in 1984. Environmental impacts of the Combie Power Project would be minimal. The primary conclusion from this study is that the Combie Power Project is economically, environmentally and institutionally viable, at the present time if an adequate power purchase agreement can be reached. Continued escalation of energy values will make this project even more attractive. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The Influence of Large Dams on Surrounding Climate and Precipitation Patterns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Understanding the forcings exerted by large dams on local climate is key to establishing if artificial reservoirs inadvertently modify precipitation patterns in impounded river basins. Using a 30 year record of reanalysis data, the spatial gradients of atmospheric variables related to precipitation formation are identified around the reservoir shoreline for 92 large dams of North America. Our study reports that large dams influence local climate most in Mediterranean, arid and semi-arid climates, while for humid climates the influence is least. During the growing season, large dams in Mediterranean climates increase CAPE 2-3 times near the reservoir compared to the non-growing season. Clear spatial gradients of CAPE, specific humidity and surface evaporation are also observed around the fringes between the reservoir shoreline and further from these dams. Because of the increasing correlation observed between higher percentile of rain and CAPE, our findings point to the possibility of storm intensification in impounded basins of the Mediterranean and arid climates of the United States.

Degu, Ahmed M.; Hossain, Faisal; Niyogi, Dev; Pielke, Roger; Shepherd, J. M.; Voisin, Nathalie; Chronis, Themis

2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

310

Marin Energy Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Authority Energy Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Marin Energy Authority Place California Utility Id 56692 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.1330/kWh Commercial: $0.0843/kWh Industrial: $0.0862/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Marin_Energy_Authority&oldid=411038" Categories:

311

Export Authorizations - Procedures | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Export Authorizations - Procedures Export Authorizations - Procedures Export Authorizations - Procedures Part II, Section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) states that exports of electric energy should be allowed unless the proposed export would impair the sufficiency of electric power supply within the U.S. or would impede or tend to impede the coordinated use of the U.S. power supply network. Based on these guidelines, DOE will grant authorization to export electric energy if it is determined that: 1.Sufficient generating resources exist such that the exporter could sustain the export while still maintaining adequate generating resources to meet all firm supply obligations; and, 2.The export would not cause operating parameters on regional transmission systems to fall outside of established industry criteria.

312

Guam Power Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guam Power Authority Guam Power Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Guam Power Authority Place Hagatna, GU Utility Id 40428 Utility Location Yes Ownership S NERC Location GU Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] SGIC[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Guam Power Authority Smart Grid Project was awarded $16,603,507 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $33,207,014. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

313

LOTO Authorized Personnel | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) Personnel Lockout/Tagout (LOTO) Personnel Primary Authorized Employee Have the training and/or experience to exercise group and system-level judgments, and are authorized to lockout and tagout any equipment for which they have division's approval. If coordinated multiple lock and tags are applied by more than one employee, those of the "primary authorized employee" must be the first to be applied and the last to be removed. SMD - LOTO Primary Authorized Personnel Name Phone # Systems/Group Raymond Ceruti Ext. 7116 Mechanical Engineering Technical Support John Cintorino Ext. 2544 Magnet Test & Measurement Joseph D'Ambra Ext. 3764 Superconducting Materials R&D Sebastian Dimaiuta Ext. 5265 Electrical Systems Technical Support Glenn Jochen Ext. 7320 Mechanical Engineering Technical Support

314

Definition: Receiving Balancing Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Balancing Authority, smart grid References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline...

315

Definition: Sending Balancing Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Balancing Authority, smart grid References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline...

316

Definition: Balancing Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

authority area, smart grid References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline...

317

Statutory Rules and Authorities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appliance & Equipment Standards » About » Statutory Rules and Appliance & Equipment Standards » About » Statutory Rules and Authorities Statutory Rules and Authorities The United States Congress has mandated through various statutes that the Department of Energy (DOE) is to implement energy conservation standards and test procedures for residential products and commercial and industrial equipment. DOE has published regulations in the Code of Federal Regulations for more than 50 categories of appliance and equipment types. Statutory Authorities The authority to develop, revise, and implement minimum energy conservation standards for appliances and equipment was established by Congress in Part B of Title III of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), Public Law 94-163, as amended by the: National Energy Conservation Policy Act, Public Law (P.L.) 95-619;

318

Copan Public Works Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Copan Public Works Authority Copan Public Works Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Copan Public Works Authority Place Oklahoma Utility Id 4319 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service Average Rates Residential: $0.0900/kWh Commercial: $0.0859/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Copan_Public_Works_Authority&oldid=410530" Categories: EIA Utility Companies and Aliases

319

Walters Public Works Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walters Public Works Authority Walters Public Works Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Walters Public Works Authority Place Oklahoma Utility Id 20061 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rate- Single Phase Commercial Commercial Rate- Three Phase Commercial Residential Rate Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0944/kWh Commercial: $0.0927/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Walters_Public_Works_Authority&oldid=41213

320

Property:File/Author | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Author Author Jump to: navigation, search Property Name File/Author Property Type String Description Individual that created the original file. Note that this will often not be the same as the individual that uploads the file to OpenEI. Pages using the property "File/Author" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B Banglmetst 221.pdf + Donna Heimiller + BrazilTMYst 238.pdf + Donna Heimiller + C Cammetst 58.pdf + Donna Heimiller + China Chifeng 50m Wind Power.pdf + Donna Heimiller + China Enshi 50m Wind Power.pdf + Donna Heimiller + China Fuzhou 50m Wind Power.pdf + Donna Heimiller + China Guangzhou 50m Wind Power.pdf + Donna Heimiller + China Haikou 50m Wind Power.pdf + Donna Heimiller + China Hangzhou 50m Wind Power.pdf + Donna Heimiller +

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Tennessee Valley Authority (Alabama) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Authority (Alabama) Authority (Alabama) Jump to: navigation, search Name Tennessee Valley Authority Place Alabama Utility Id 18642 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Industrial: $0.0487/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Tennessee Valley Authority (Alabama). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS 2009-03 19,875 343,154 24 19,875 343,154 24

322

American Samoa Power Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Samoa Power Authority Samoa Power Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name American Samoa Power Authority Place American Samoa Utility Id 40429 Utility Location Yes Ownership S NERC Location AS Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=American_Samoa_Power_Authority&oldid=408977"

323

%QUEST FOR RECO .JS DI JSITION AUTHORITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RECO .JS DI JSITION AUTHORITY -- - - -- - , 8 - 3 - 1 -- - L-- I4nval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves (FE-47) To NATIONAL ARCHIVES & FSCORDS ADMlN',-P?TI3lJ 860 1 ADELPHI ROAD...

324

ORDS OlSPOSITlON AUTHORITY S  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AUTHORITY ( S e e Attached Pages) U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Human Radiation Experiments ( 0 I i . E Eleatronic Records (Archives and Research) I. Record Series...

325

Goltry Public Works Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Goltry Public Works Authority Goltry Public Works Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Goltry Public Works Authority Place Oklahoma Utility Id 7441 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Large Commercial Industrial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1070/kWh Commercial: $0.1420/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Goltry_Public_Works_Authority&oldid=410749

326

Property:Author | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Author Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Author Property Type String Description The author of a document, resource, reference material or tool. Pages using the property "Author" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2-D Magnetotellurics At The Geothermal Site At Soultz-Sous-Forets- Resistivity Distribution To About 3000 M Depth + Johannes Geiermann +, Eva Schill + 2.8-Ma Ash-Flow Caldera At Chegem River In The Northern Caucasus Mountains (Russia), Contemporaneous Granites, And Associated Ore Deposits + Peter W. Lipman +, O. A. Bogatikov +, A. A. Tsvetkov +, ... 2007 Annual Report + Enel + 238U Decay Series Systematics Of Young Lavas From Batur Volcano, Sunda Arc + K. H. Rubin +, G. E. Wheller +, M. O. Tanzer +, ...

327

Accountable Property Representatives and Property Pass Authorization...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IM-11 (202) 586-0194 SHARIATI, LINDA SC-41 (301) 903-7433 SHARPE, DEBORAH L. NE-21 (301) 903-4921 SHEA, JOHN ED-1 (202) 586-7898 Employee Authorized...

328

A Prehistoric Lahar-Dammed Lake And Eruption Of Mount Pinatubo Described In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prehistoric Lahar-Dammed Lake And Eruption Of Mount Pinatubo Described In Prehistoric Lahar-Dammed Lake And Eruption Of Mount Pinatubo Described In A Philippine Aborigine Legend Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Prehistoric Lahar-Dammed Lake And Eruption Of Mount Pinatubo Described In A Philippine Aborigine Legend Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The prehistoric eruptions of Mount Pinatubo have followed a cycle: centuries of repose terminated by a caldera-forming eruption with large pyroclastic flows; a post-eruption aftermath of rain-triggered lahars in surrounding drainages and dome-building that fills the caldera; and then another long quiescent period. During and after the eruptions lahars descending along volcano channels may block tributaries from watersheds

329

Fish Migration, Dams, and Loss of Ecosystem Services in the Mekong Basin  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The past decade has seen increased international recognition of the importance of the services provided by natural ecosystems. It is unclear however whether such international awareness will lead to improved environmental management in many regions. We explore this issue by examining the specific case of fish migration and dams on the Mekong river. We determine that dams on the Mekong mainstem and major tributaries will have a major impact on the basin's fisheries and the people who depend upon them for food and income. We find no evidence that current moves towards dam construction will stop, and consider two scenarios for the future of the fisheries and other ecosystems of the basin. We conclude that major investment is required in innovative technology to reduce the loss of ecosystem services, and alternative livelihood strategies to cope with the losses that do occur

Dugan, Patrick J. [WorldFish Center; Barlow, Chris [Australian Center for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR); Agostinho, Angelo A. [Fundacao University, Parana Brazil; Baran, Eric [WorldFish Center; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Chen, Daqing [Yangtze River Fisheries Research Institute, People's Republic of China; Cowx, Ian G. [Hull International Fisheries Research Institute, England; Ferguson, John W. [North West Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA; Jutagate, Tuantong [Ubon Ratchathani University, Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand; Mallen-Cooper, Martin [Fishway Consulting Service, Australia; Marmulla, Gerd [Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Rome, Italy; Nestler, John [USA Corps Engineers, Concord, MA USA; Petrere, Miquel [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, Brazil; Winemiller, Kirk O. [Texas A& M University

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Temporary Restoration of Bull Trout Passage at Albeni Falls Dam, 2008 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to provide temporary upstream passage of bull trout around Albeni Falls Dam on the Pend Oreille River, Idaho. Our specific objectives are to capture fish downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, tag them with combination acoustic and radio transmitters, release them upstream of Albeni Falls Dam, and determine if genetic information on tagged fish can be used to accurately establish where fish are located during the spawning season. In 2007, radio receiving stations were installed at several locations throughout the Pend Oreille River watershed to detect movements of adult bull trout; however, no bull trout were tagged during that year. In 2008, four bull trout were captured downstream of Albeni Falls Dam, implanted with transmitters, and released upstream of the dam at Priest River, Idaho. The most-likely natal tributaries of bull trout assigned using genetic analyses were Grouse Creek (N = 2); a tributary of the Pack River, Lightning Creek (N = 1); and Rattle Creek (N = 1), a tributary of Lightning Creek. All four bull trout migrated upstream from the release site in Priest River, Idaho, were detected at monitoring stations near Dover, Idaho, and were presumed to reside in Lake Pend Oreille from spring until fall 2008. The transmitter of one bull trout with a genetic assignment to Grouse Creek was found in Grouse Creek in October 2008; however, the fish was not found. The bull trout assigned to Rattle Creek was detected in the Clark Fork River downstream from Cabinet Gorge Dam (approximately 13 km from the mouth of Lightning Creek) in September but was not detected entering Lightning Creek. The remaining two bull trout were not detected in 2008 after detection at the Dover receiving stations. This report details the progress by work element in the 2008 statement of work, including data analyses of fish movements, and expands on the information reported in the quarterly Pisces status reports.

Bellgraph, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Libby Dam Hydro-electric Project Mitigation: Efforts for Downstream Ecosystem Restoration.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Construction of Libby Dam, a large hydropower and flood control dam occurred from 1966 to 1975 on the Kootenai River, near Libby, Montana in the Northwestern United States. Live reservoir storage is substantial, with water residence time of about 5 1/2 months (based on mean annual discharge of about 440 m{sup 3}/s). Downstream river discharge and thermal regimes and the dependent habitat conditions have been significantly altered by dam construction and operation relative to pre-dam conditions. Highly valued Kootenai River fish populations, including white sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus, burbot Lota lota and bull trout Salvelinus confluentus and their supporting ecological conditions have been deteriorating during post-dam years. Measurements of the presence of very low (ultraoligotrophic) concentrations of dissolved phosphorus in the river downstream from Libby Dam were identified as a critical limitation on primary production and overall ecosystem health. A decision was made to initiate the largest experimental river fertilization project to date in the Kootenai River at the Montana-Idaho border. Pre-treatment aquatic biomonitoring began in 2001; post-treatment monitoring began in 2005. A solar-powered nutrient addition system was custom designed and built to dose small releases of dissolved nutrients at rates from 10 to 40 L/hour, depending on river discharge, which averaged several hundred m3/s. Closely monitored experimental additions of ammonium polyphosphate solution (10-34-0) into the river occurred during the summers of 2005 through 2008. Targets for mixed in-river P concentrations were 1.5 {micro}g/L in 2005, and 3 {micro}g/L in subsequent years. Primary productivity and algal accrual rates along with invertebrate and fish community metrics and conditions were consistently measured annually, before and after experimental fertilization. Initial results from the program are very encouraging, and are reported.

Holderman, Charles

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

332

Evaluation of a Behavioral Guidance Structure at Bonneville Dam Second Powerhouse including Passage Survival of Juvenile Salmon and Steelhead using Acoustic Telemetry, 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summarizes research conducted at Bonneville Dam in 2008 to evaluate a prototype Behavioral Guidance Structure, that was deployed by the US Army Corps of Engineers in an effort to increase survival of outmigrating smolts at Bonneville Dam.

Faber, Derrek M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Hughes, James S.; McComas, Roy L.; Kim, Jina; Townsend, R. L.; Fu, Tao; Skalski, J. R.; Fischer, Eric S.

2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

333

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at Bonneville Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at The Dalles Dam, Spring 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study estimated dam passage survival at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and provided additional performance measures as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. This summary report focuses on spring run stocks, yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead.

Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

337

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at Bonneville Dam, Spring 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study was designed to estimate dam passage survival at Bonneville Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and to provide additional fish passage performance measures at that site as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

338

SUMMARY OF USSD EMERGING ISSUES WHITE PAPER ON DAM SAFETY RISK ASSESSMENT: WHAT IS IT? WHO'S USING IT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUMMARY OF USSD EMERGING ISSUES WHITE PAPER ON DAM SAFETY RISK ASSESSMENT: WHAT IS IT? WHO'S USING White Paper on Dam Safety Risk Assessment. It also includes tables that summarize strengths and references that are summarized in the White Paper, technology transfer and training needs, and research

Bowles, David S.

339

Compliance Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at The Dales Dam, Spring 2011  

SciTech Connect

The study estimated dam passage survival at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp) and provided additional performance measures as stipulated in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. This summary report focuses on spring run stocks, yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead.

Skalski, John R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Comparison of coupled and decoupled modal approaches in seismic analysis of concrete gravity dams in time domain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Different methods are available for dynamic analysis of concrete dams. Among these, modal approach is highly popular due to the efficiency of the method. This becomes more significant if the response is to be calculated for several earthquake ground ... Keywords: Concrete gravity dam, Coupled modes, Decoupled modal approach, Dynamic analysis

Ali Samii; Vahid Lotfi

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

White Sturgeon Mitigation & Restoration in the Columbia & Snake River Upstream from Bonneville Dam  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) Summary: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is proposing to fund the White Sturgeon Mitigation and Restoration in the Columbia and Snake Rivers Upstream from Bonneville Dam Project. The project proposes to continue to carry out harvest monitoring and stock status updates coordinated with fisheries management planning, annual young-of-the year recruitment indexing, research, experimental artificial propagation, and transport of white sturgeon to less densely populated areas of the river(s). Additionally, release of hatchery-reared juveniles is proposed to evaluate release

342

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents survival, behavioral, and fish passage results for tagged yearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead as part of a survival study conducted at John Day Dam during spring 2011. This study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead to assist managers in identifying dam operations for compliance testing as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. Survival estimates were based on a paired-release survival model.

Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Kim, Jin A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Wagner, Katie A.; Fischer, Eric S.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Batten, G.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Elder, T.; Etherington, D. J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Miracle, Ann L.; Mitchell, T. D.; Prather, K.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Royer, Ida; Seaburg, Adam; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

343

Acoustic Telemetry Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Survival at John Day Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report presents survival, behavioral, and fish passage results for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon smolts and juvenile steelhead tagged with JSATS acoustic micro-transmitters as part of a survival study conducted at John Day Dam during 2010. This study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead to assist managers in identifying dam operations for compliance testing as stipulated by the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System Biological Opinion and the 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords. Survival estimates were based on a single-release survival estimate model.

Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Kim, Jin A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fu, Tao; Fischer, Eric S.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Wagner, Katie A.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Miller, Benjamin L.; Miracle, Ann L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Royer, Ida M.; Khan, Fenton; Cushing, Aaron W.; Etherington, D. J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Elder, T.; Batton, George; Johnson, Gary E.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Survival and Passage of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead at The Dalles Dam, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The acoustic telemetry study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington (UW) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The purpose of the study was to estimate dam passage survival and other performance measures for yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead at The Dalles Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) and 2008 Columbia Basin Fish Accords.

Johnson, Gary E.; Skalski, J. R.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Deng, Zhiqun; Fischer, Eric S.; Hughes, James S.; Khan, Fenton; Kim, Jin A.; Townsend, Richard L.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Survival of Juvenile Chinook Salmon Passing the Bonneville Dam Spillway in 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (CENWP) funds numerous evaluations of fish passage and survival on the Columbia River. In 2007, the CENWP asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct an acoustic telemetry study to estimate the survival of juvenile Chinook salmon passing the spillway at Bonneville Dam. This report documents the study results which are intended to be used to improve the conditions juvenile anadromous fish experience when passing through the dams that the Corps operates on the river.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Hughes, James S.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Durham, Robin E.; Fischer, Eric S.; Kim, Jina; Townsend, R. L.; Skalski, J. R.; Buchanan, Rebecca A.; McComas, Roy L.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

The Evolution of Science Museums Author(s): Silvio A. Bedini  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Evolution of Science Museums Author(s): Silvio A. Bedini Reviewed work(s): Source: TechnologyScienceMuseums SILVIO A. BEDINI He whoviewsonlytheproduceofhisowncountrymaybesaid toinhabita singleworld;8 SilvioA. Bedini Ourmodernmuseumsofphysicalscienceandtechnologyhadtheir originsinanothertypeofcollection

Short, Daniel

347

Tecumseh Utility Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tecumseh Utility Authority Tecumseh Utility Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Tecumseh Utility Authority Place Oklahoma Utility Id 18524 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Bright Light Service- (Any Kind) Lighting General Commercial Service Commercial High Pressure Sodium Light Lighting Large Commercial Rate Commercial Residential Rate Residential Residential Total Electric Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1590/kWh Commercial: $0.1460/kWh References

348

Arkansas River Power Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Power Authority River Power Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Arkansas River Power Authority Place Colorado Website www.arpapower.org/ Utility Id 712 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

349

Stillwater Utilities Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stillwater Utilities Authority Stillwater Utilities Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Stillwater Utilities Authority Place Oklahoma Utility Id 18125 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png ELECTRIC RATE BLOCK BILLING SERVICE Residential ELECTRIC RATE ENERGY EFFICIENT RESIDENTIAL SERVICES Residential ELECTRIC RATE GENERAL SERVICE Commercial ELECTRIC RATE GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP RATE Commercial

350

New York Power Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Authority Power Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name New York Power Authority Place New York Utility Id 15296 Utility Location Yes Ownership S NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NY Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 1 Commercial 10 Commercial 1B Commercial 20 Commercial 21 Commercial 2B Commercial 37 Commercial

351

Jacksonville Electric Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Authority Electric Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Jacksonville Electric Authority Place Florida Utility Id 9617 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png CS Curtailable Service Rider Option A CS Curtailable Service Rider Option A Primary Service Discount CS Curtailable Service Rider Option A Transmission Service 69000-230000 Discount CS Curtailable Service Rider Option A Transmission Service 230000+ volts Discount CS Curtailable Service Rider Option B CS Curtailable Service Rider Option B 230000+ volts CS Curtailable Service Rider Option B Primary Service Discount CS Curtailable Service Rider Option B Transmission Service 69000-230000

352

Biofuel Authority Rajasthan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Authority Rajasthan Authority Rajasthan Jump to: navigation, search Name Biofuel Authority Rajasthan Place Jaipur, Rajasthan, India Zip 302005 Sector Biofuels Product Jaipur-based local body to promote biofuels. Coordinates 26.89876°, 75.79636° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.89876,"lon":75.79636,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

353

Prague Public Works Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prague Public Works Authority Prague Public Works Authority Place Oklahoma Utility Id 15311 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rate Commercial Commercial Time of Use Rate Commercial Industrial Rate Industrial Residential Rate Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0879/kWh Commercial: $0.0917/kWh Industrial: $0.0711/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Prague_Public_Works_Authority&oldid=411392

354

Tennessee Valley Authority (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tennessee Valley Authority Tennessee Valley Authority Place Kentucky Utility Id 18642 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Industrial: $0.0455/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Tennessee Valley Authority (Kentucky). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS 2009-03 68,976 1,670,768 22 68,976 1,670,768 22

355

Lower Colorado River Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Authority River Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Lower Colorado River Authority Place Texas Utility Id 11269 Utility Location Yes Ownership S NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

356

Bolivar Energy Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Authority Energy Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Bolivar Energy Authority Place Tennessee Utility Id 1936 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Power Rate, part 1- 0 TO 50 kw & Less Than 15,000 Kwh Commercial General Power Rate, part 2- Over 50 Kw To 1000 Kw or Over 15,000 Kwh Commercial General Power Rate, part 3- Over 1000 Kw Commercial Outdoor Lighting Rates 100Watt Sodium Lighting Outdoor Lighting Rates 250Watt Sodium Lighting Outdoor Lighting Rates 400Watt Metal Halide Lighting

357

Part 2: CERCLA Authority | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: CERCLA Authority 2: CERCLA Authority Part 2: CERCLA Authority Question: When is DOE response under CERCLA necessary? Answer: Response under CERCLA may be necessary when all of the following four thresholds are crossed: a hazardous substance is released or there is a substantial threat of a release into the environment, and response is necessary to protect public health, welfare, or the environment. These thresholds are established by CERCLA section 104(a) and most of the key terms are defined by CERCLA. There may be circumstances where response under CERCLA may not be necessary, including 1) for a facility licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and being decommissioned in conformance with an NRC approved decommissioning plan, 2) for a facility being decommissioned in compliance with a Resource Conservation and

358

I REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY LEAVE BL ...A (NARA use only1 JOB NUMBER TO: NATIONAL ARCHIVES & RECORDS ADMINISTRATION In accordance with the provisions of 44 U.S.C. 3303a, the Office of the Chief Information Officer disposition request, including amendments, is approved except for items that may be marked "disposition not approved" or "withdrawn" in column 10. Records Management Division N1-434-02-2 Date received 860 1 ADELPHI ROAD COLLEGE PARK, MD 20740-600 1 1. FROM (Agency or establishment) Department of Energy , ( / I 4 30 -A&&& NOTIFICATION TO AGENCY 6. AGENCY CERTIFICATION I hereby certify that I am authorized to act for this agency in matters pertaining to the disposition of its records and that the

359

Navajo Tribal Utility Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Authority Utility Authority (Redirected from Navajo Tribal Utility Association) Jump to: navigation, search Name Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Place Arizona Utility Id 13314 Utility Location Yes Ownership S NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Navajo Tribal Utility Association Smart Grid Project was awarded $4,991,750 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $10,611,849.

360

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Regulatory Authorities  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Regulatory Authorities Regulatory Authorities About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Regulatory Authorities Beginning | Regulations Today | Coordinating Agencies | Regulation of Mergers and Acquisitions Beginning of Industry Restructuring In April 1992, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued its Order 636 and transformed the interstate natural gas transportation segment of the industry forever. Under it, interstate natural gas pipeline companies were required to restructure their operations by November 1993 and split-off any non-regulated merchant (sales) functions from their regulated transportation functions. This new requirement meant that interstate natural gas pipeline companies were allowed to only transport natural gas for their customers. The restructuring process and subsequent operations have been supervised closely by FERC and have led to extensive changes throughout the interstate natural gas transportation segment which have impacted other segments of the industry as well.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Platte River Power Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Power Authority River Power Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Platte River Power Authority Place Colorado Website www.prpa.org/ Utility Id 15143 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

362

Wagoner Public Works Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wagoner Public Works Authority Wagoner Public Works Authority Place Oklahoma Utility Id 20163 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png INDUSTRIAL RATES Industrial LARGE COMMERCIAL RATES Commercial RESIDENTIAL RATES Residential SMALL COMMERCIAL RATES Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0954/kWh Commercial: $0.0873/kWh Industrial: $0.0753/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Wagoner_Public_Works_Authority&oldid=412137

363

Kissimmee Utility Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kissimmee Utility Authority Kissimmee Utility Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Kissimmee Utility Authority Place Florida Utility Id 10376 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location FRCC NERC FRCC Yes ISO Other Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png GENERAL SERVICE Commercial GENERAL SERVICE DEMAND Commercial GENERAL SERVICE LARGE DEMAND Commercial GENERAL SERVICE LARGE DEMAND TIME OF USE Commercial

364

REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY Atomic Energy Commission REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY More Documents & Publications...

365

Outfall Site and Type Selection for a New Surface Flow Outlet to Pass Juvenile Salmonids at Bonneville Dam’s Second Powerhouse, Columbia River  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A site near the downstream tip of Cascades Island with a mid-level chute outfall type was selected for the high flow (> 28.3 m3/s) outfall of the new surface flow outlet for juvenile salmonids at Bonneville Dam’s Second Powerhouse (B2). The new passage route and outfall are a result of modifications to the original ice and trash sluice chute to increase discharge capacity and improve passage conditions, including a new outfall type and site. Technical guidelines on high flow outfall location and design were established concurrently with the outfall development process. Critical design parameters for the new B2 outfall included discharge of 150 m3/s, jet entry velocities approaching 15.2 m/s, and a tailwater elevation range of 6.1 m. For outfall siting, the selection process began with identification of nine initial alternatives. Screening, evaluation, and selection stages narrowed the list to two outfall sites – “Range D” 122 m directly downstream from the existing sluice chute outfall and “Range F” 760 m downstream near the end of Cascades Island. For outfall type, the selection process was initiated with conceptualization of 13 alternatives. Following successive screening, evaluation, consolidation, and selection stages, two outfall types became finalists – “Adjustable Cantilever” and “Mid-Level Cantilever.” The four combinations of outfall site/type were evaluated in 1:30 and 1:100 scale physical hydraulic models and a Mid-Level Cantilever at the tip of Cascades Island in Range F was selected. During further engineering after our study, the cantilever was replaced with a monolith structure to reduce construction costs, resulting in a mid-level chute outfall that was installed in 2004. Post-construction evaluations indicated survival rates around 100% through the B2CC were the highest of all passage routes at Bonneville Dam. The B2CC surface flow outlet with its high flow outfall provided a major improvement to juvenile salmonid passage at Bonneville Dam.

Johnson, Gary E.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Giorgi, Albert E.; Kuhn, Karen; Lee, Randall T.; Plump, John H.; Stensby, David A.; Sweeney, Charles E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Reduced Spill at Hydropower Dams: Opportunities for More Generation and Increased Fish Population  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report indicates that reduction of managed spill at hydropower dams can speed implementation of technologies for fish protection and achieve economic goals. Spill of water over spillways is managed in the Columbia River basin to assist downstream-migrating juvenile salmon, and is generally believed to be the most similar to natural migration, benign and effective passage route; other routes include turbines, intake screens with bypasses, and surface bypasses. However, this belief may be misguided, because spill is becoming recognized as less than natural, with deep intakes below normal migration depths, and likely causing physical damages from severe shear on spillways, high turbulence in tail waters, and collisions with baffle blocks that lead to disorientation and predation. Some spillways induce mortalities comparable to turbines. Spill is expensive in lost generation, and controversial. Fish-passage research is leading to more fish-friendly turbines, screens and bypasses that are more effective and less damaging, and surface bypasses that offer passage of more fish per unit water volume than does spill (leaving more water for generation). Analyses by independent economists demonstrated that goals of increased fish survival over the long term and net gain to the economy can be obtained by selectively reducing spill and diverting some of the income from added power generation to research, development, and installation of fish-passage technologies. Such a plan would selectively reduce spill when and where least damaging to fish, increase electricity generation using the water not spilled and use innovative financing to direct monetary gains to improving fish passage.

Coutant, Charles C [ORNL; Mann, Roger [RMecon, Davis, California; Sale, Michael J [ORNL

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

PP-369 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority PP-369 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority Presidential Permit authorizing British Columbia and Power Authority to construct,...

368

Local Option - County Energy District Authority | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - County Energy District Authority Local Option - County Energy District Authority Local Option - County Energy District Authority < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Nonprofit Residential Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type PACE Financing '''''Note: The Federal Housing Financing Agency (FHFA) issued a [http://www.fhfa.gov/webfiles/15884/PACESTMT7610.pdf statement] in July 2010 concerning the senior lien status associated with most PACE programs. [http://www.dsireusa.org/documents/Incentives/OK18F.htm S.B. 102] amended the law to make PACE loans junior and inferior to other liens. Effective November 1, 2011, this law should allow local governments to adopt PACE programs that are within the acceptable parameters established by the FHFA.''''' Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property

369

Energy and Health Convening Lead Author (CLA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transparent Cost Database on OpenEI Leads: Austin Brown, Ryan McKeel The Transparent Cost Database provides and downloadable. http://en.openei.org/wiki/Transparent_Cost_Database Renewable Electricity Futures Study Authors) level. Additional states are being added. http://en.openei.org/wiki/GRR Navajo Generating Station

370

Alpaca: extensible authorization for distributed services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional Public Key Infrastructures (PKI) have not lived up to their promise because there are too many ways to define PKIs, too many cryptographic primitives to build them with, and too many administrative domains with incompatible roots of trust. ... Keywords: authorization, cryptography, logic, security, theorem-proving

Chris Lesniewski-Laas; Bryan Ford; Jacob Strauss; Robert Morris; M. Frans Kaashoek

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Learning to Author Text with textual CBR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Textual reuse is an integral part of textual case-based reasoning (TCBR) which deals with solving new problems by reusing previous similar problem-solving experiences documented as text. We investigate the role of text reuse for text authoring applications ...

Ibrahim Adeyanju; Nirmalie Wiratunga; Juan A. Recio-García; Robert Lothian

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Dworshak Dam Impacts Assessment and Fisheries Investigation: Kokanee Depth Distribution in Dworshak Reservoir and Implications Toward Minimizing Entrainment, 1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors measured the day and night depth distribution of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka kennerlyi directly upstream of Dworshak Dam from October 1993 to December 1994 using split-beam hydroacoustics. At night most kokanee (70%) were distributed in a diffuse layer about 10 m thick. The depth of the layer varied with the season and ranged from 30 to 40 m deep during winter and from 15 to 25 m deep during summer. Nighttime depth of the kokanee layer during summer roughly corresponded to a zone where water temperatures ranged from 7 C to 12 C. Daytime kokanee distribution was much different with kokanee located in dense schools. Most kokanee (70%) were found in a 5--15 m thick layer during summer. Daytime depth distribution was also shallowest during fall and deepest during winter. Dworshak Dam has structures which can be used for selective water withdrawal and can function in depth ranges that will avoid the kokanee layer. Temperature constraints limit the use of selective withdrawal during the spring, summer, and fall, but in the winter, water is nearly isothermal and the full range of selector gate depths may be utilized. From October 1993 to February 1994, selector gates were positioned to withdraw water from above the kokanee layer. The discharge pattern also changed with more water being released during May and July, and less water being released during fall and winter. A combination of these two changes is thought to have increased kokanee densities to a record high of 69 adults/ha.

Maiolie, Melo; Elam, Steve

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation : Fish Passage and Habitat Improvement in the Upper Flathead River Basin, 1991-1996 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the past 50 years, dramatic changes have occurred in the Flathead Lake and River system. Degradation of fishery resources has been evident, in part due to deterioration of aquatic habitat and introduction of non-endemic fish and invertebrate species. Habitat loss has been attributed to many factors including the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam, unsound land use practices, urban development, and other anthropogenic and natural disturbances. Fish migration has also been limited by barriers such as dams and impassible culverts. Cumulatively, these factors have contributed to declines in the distribution and abundance of native fish populations. Recovery of fish populations requires that a watershed approach be developed that incorporates long-term aquatic habitat needs and promotes sound land use practices and cooperation among natural resource management agencies. In this document, the authors (1) describe completed and ongoing habitat improvement and fish passage activities under the Hungry Horse Fisheries Mitigation Program, (2) describe recently identified projects that are in the planning stage, and (3) develop a framework for identifying prioritizing, implementing, and evaluating future fish habitat improvement and passage projects.

Knotek, W.Ladd; Deleray, Mark; Marotz, Brian L.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Protocols for implementing DOE authorized release of radioactive scrap metals  

SciTech Connect

A process to implement the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) policy for authorized release of radioactive materials from DOE facilities is provided in the Draft Handbook for Controlling Release for Reuse or Recycle of Property Containing Residual Radioactive Material, published by DOE in 1997 and distributed to DOE field offices for interim use and implementation. The authorized release of such property is intended to permit its beneficial use across the entire DOE complex. A computerized management tool--P2Pro(RSM)--has been developed to aid in carrying out the release process for radioactive metals. It contains protocols for the authorized release process and relevant information to facilitate the evaluation of scrap metals for reuse and recycle. The P2Pro(RSM) protocols provide DOE and its contractors with an effective, user-friendly tool for managing authorized release activities P2Pro(RSM) is designed to be used in the Windows{sup {trademark}} environment. The protocols incorporate a relational database coupled with a graphic-user interface to guide the user through the appropriate steps so authorized release limits can be developed. With the information provided in the database, an as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) optimization process can be easily set up and run for up to 10 alternatives for disposition of radioactive scrap metals. The results of the ALARA optimization process can be printed in a series of reports and submitted as part of the application for the authorized release of the radioactive scrap metals.

Chen, S.Y.; Arnish, J.; Kamboj, S.; Nieves, L.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Evaluation of Salmon Spawning below the Four Lowermost Columbia River Dams, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since FY 2000, scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have conducted research to assess the extent of spawning by chum (Oncorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook (O. tshawytscha) salmon in the lower mainstem Columbia River. Their work supports a larger Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) project aimed at characterizing the physical habitat used by mainstem fall Chinook and chum salmon populations. Multiple collaborators in addition to PNNL are involved in the BPA project--counterparts include the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). Data resulting from the individual tasks each agency conducts are providing a sound scientific basis for developing strategies to operate the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) in ways that will effectively protect and enhance the chum and fall Chinook salmon populations--both listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Fall Chinook salmon, thought to originate from Bonneville Hatchery, were first noted to be spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam by biologists from the WDFW in 1993. Known spawning areas include gravel beds on the Washington side of the river near Hamilton Creek and Ives Island. Limited spawning ground surveys were conducted in the area around Ives and Pierce islands during 1994 through 1997. Based on these surveys, fall Chinook salmon were believed to be spawning successfully in this area. In addition, chum salmon have been documented spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam. In FY 1999, BPA Project No. 1999-003 was initiated by the WDFW, ODFW, and the USFWS to characterize the variables associated with physical habitat used by mainstem fall Chinook and chum salmon populations and to better understand the effects of hydropower project operations on spawning and incubation. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was asked to join the study in FY 2000, during which its initial efforts were focused on (1) investigating the interactions between groundwater and surface water near fall Chinook and chum salmon spawning areas and (2) locating and mapping deepwater fall Chinook salmon spawning areas. In FY 2001, an additional task was added to provide support to the WDFW for analysis of juvenile salmon stranding data. The work PNNL has conducted since then continues to address these same three issues. The overall project is subdivided into a series of tasks, with each agency taking the lead on a task; WDFW leads the adult task, ODFW leads the juvenile task, and the USFWS leads the habitat task. All three tasks are designed to complement each other to achieve the overall project goal. Study results from PNNL's work contribute to all three tasks. This report documents the studies and tasks performed by PNNL during FY 2005. Chapter 1 provides a description of the deepwater redd searches conducted adjacent to Pierce and Ives islands and documents the search results and analysis of findings. Chapter 2 documents the collection of data on riverbed and river temperatures, from the onset of spawning to the end of emergence, and the provision of those data in-season to fisheries management agencies to assist with emergence timing estimates. Technical assistance provided to the WDFW in evaluation of stranding data is summarized in Chapter 3.

Geist, David; Currie, Andrea [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Graduate Schools Yearbook 2008 Kim Dam-Johansen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Keywords: Energy, Biofuels, Shale gas, Alternative fuels, Diesel, Fisher ­ Tropsch 1 Corresponding author. The process is based on Fischer- Tropsch technology in which the shale gas is reformed with steam, while and industry; e.g. ExxonMobil announced a $600 million program [10-12]. However, the use of Fischer-Tropsch

Mosegaard, Klaus

377

Compliance Monitoring of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, 2012  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this compliance study was to estimate dam passage survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at John Day Dam during the spring and summer outmigrations in 2012. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 for spring migrants and greater than or equal to 0.93 for summer migrants, estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal to 0.015. The study also estimated smolt passage survival from the forebay 2 km upstream of the dam to the tailrace 3 km downstream of the dam, as well as the forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, spill passage efficiency (SPE), and fish passage efficiency (FPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords (Fish Accords). A virtual/paired-release design was used to estimate dam passage survival at John Day Dam. The approach included releases of smolts, tagged with acoustic micro-transmitters, above John Day Dam that contributed to the formation of a virtual release at the face of John Day Dam. A survival estimate from this release was adjusted by a paired release below John Day Dam. A total of 3376 yearling Chinook salmon, 5726 subyearling Chinook salmon, and 3239 steelhead smolts were used in the virtual releases. Sample sizes for the below-dam paired releases (R2 and R3, respectively) were 997 and 995 for yearling Chinook salmon smolts, 986 and 983 for subyearling Chinook salmon smolts, and 1000 and 1000 for steelhead smolts. The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) tags were manufactured by Advanced Telemetry Systems. Model SS300 tags, weighing 0.304 g in air, were surgically implanted in yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon, and Model SS130 tag, weighing 0.438 g in air, were surgically implanted in juvenile steelhead for this investigation. The intent of the spring study was to estimate dam passage survival during both 30% and 40% spill conditions. The two spill conditions were to be systematically performed in alternating 2-day test intervals over the course of the spring outmigration. High flow conditions in 2012 interrupted the spill study. Dam passage survival was therefore estimated season-wide regardless of spill conditions.

Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Seaburg, Adam; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Hughes, James S.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Finite element methods for unsaturated porous solids and their application to dam engineering problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents a finite element formulation of equations proposed in a companion paper to describe the hyperelastic response of three-phase porous media. Attention is paid to the development of consistent tangents required by the Newton-Raphson procedure ... Keywords: Concrete dams, Hydro-mechanical coupling, Multiphase porous media, Rock mass permeability, Unilateral constraints

C. Callari; A. Abati

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Guidelines for Drilling and Testing Core Samples at Concrete Gravity Dams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regulatory agencies for dam safety often require stability data on concrete and foundation conditions--data obtained by testing core samples and taking various site measurements. These guidelines offer field-proven methods for compiling reliable results, with adequate documentation to support utility claims.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Grand Coulee Dam Wildlife Mitigation Program : Pygmy Rabbit Programmatic Management Plan, Douglas County, Washington.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council and the Bonneville Power Administration approved the pygmy rabbit project as partial mitigation for impacts caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The focus of this project is the protection and enhancement of shrub-steppe/pygmy rabbit habitat in northeastern Washington.

Ashley, Paul

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A Theoretical Study of Cold Air Damming with Upstream Cold Air Inflow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The previously developed two-layer model of cold air damming is extended to include upstream cold air inflow. The upper layer is an isentropic cross-mountain flow. The lower layer is a cold boundary layer flow partially blocked by a two-...

Qin Xu; Shouting Gao; Brian H. Fiedler

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Spatial variability of sea level rise due to water impoundment behind dams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Church and White, 2006]. This rate may be currently accelerating due to an increased influence of climate reservoirs (based on the work by Vorosmarty et al. [1997]), which are used in this paper's calculations. (b 1a), and added six additional post1997 dams from Chao et al. [2008] (specifically, the Three Gorges

Conrad, Clint

383

Sedimentology of Pennsylvanian sandstone from bedding-plane exposures, Laurel dam spillway, eastern Kentucky Coalfield  

SciTech Connect

Exposures of bedding planes in a coarsening-upward sequence of the Breathitt Formation at the Laurel Dam spillway in Whitley County, Kentucky, were analyzed by surveying a 250,000-ft{sup 2} area on a 10-ft grid and mapping within grids.

Greb, S.F.; Chesnut, D.R. Jr. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Critical gravity as van Dam-Veltman-Zakharov discontinuity in anti de Sitter space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider critical gravity as van Dam-Vletman-Zakharov (vDVZ) discontinuity in anti de Sitter space. For this purpose, we introduce the higher curvature gravity. This discontinuity can be confirmed by calculating the residues of relevant poles explicitly. For the non-critical gravity of $0gravity.

Yun Soo Myung

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

385

AN ESTIMATE OF MORTALITY OF CHINOOK SALMON IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER NEAR BONNEVILLE DAM DURING THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al., 1983) Offset Center of Gravity (OCOG) (Bamber, 1994) Leading edge position = Position-7 km does not provide a complete picture of the vector field of ocean currents and gravity anomalies CHINA'S POYANG LAKE (2002­2007) Long Kou Gauge Pass 163 Pass 980 #12;Satellite Altimetry Based Dam

386

Uplift Pressures in Cracks in Concrete Gravity Dams--An Experimental Study: Volume 8  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uplift pressure distribution in cracks in concrete dams is affected by a combination of several factors, such as crack properties, drain dimensions, and the type of flow in the crack. This study shows that most uplift pressure distributions can be controlled using a vertical drain system with diameters from two to four inches and spacing of about ten feet.

1992-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

387

Assessment of Natural Stream Sites for Hydroelectric Dams in the Pacific Northwest Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This pilot study presents a methodology for modeling project characteristics using a development model of a stream obstructing dam. The model is applied to all individual stream reaches in hydrologic region 17, which encompasses nearly all of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. Project site characteristics produced by the modeling technique include: capacity potential, principal dam dimensions, number of required auxiliary dams, total extent of the constructed impoundment boundary, and the surface area of the resulting reservoir. Aggregated capacity potential values for the region are presented in capacity categories including total, that at existing dams, within federal and environmentally sensitive exclusion zones, and the balance which is consider available for greenfield development within the limits of the study. Distributions of site characteristics for small hydropower sites are presented and discussed. These sites are screened to identify candidate small hydropower sites and distributions of the site characteristics of this site population are presented and discussed. Recommendations are made for upgrading the methodology and extensions to make the results more accessible and available on a larger scale.

Douglas G. Hall; Kristin L. Verdin; Randy D. Lee

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Evaluation of Salmon Spawning Below Bonneville Dam Annual Report October 2006 - September 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From 1999 through 2007, the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Bonneville Power Administration funded a project to determine the number of fall Chinook and chum salmon spawning downstream of Bonneville Dam, the characteristics of their spawning areas, and the flows necessary to ensure their long-term survival. Data were collected to ensure that established flow guidelines are appropriate and provide adequate protection for the species of concern. The projects objectives are consistent with the high priority placed by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council Independent Scientific Advisory Board and the salmon managers on determining the importance of mainstem habitats to the production of salmon in the Columbia River Basin. Because of the influence of mainstem habitat on salmon production, there is a continued need to better understand the physical habitat variables used by mainstem fall Chinook and chum salmon populations and the effects of hydropower project operations on spawning and incubation. During FY 2007, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory focused on (1) locating and mapping deep-water fall Chinook salmon and chum salmon spawning areas, (2) investigating the interaction between groundwater and surface water near fall Chinook and chum salmon spawning areas, and (3) providing in-season hyporheic temperature and water surface elevation data to assist state agencies with emergence timing and redd dewatering estimates. This report documents the studies and tasks performed by PNNL during FY 2007. Chapter 1 provides a description of the searches conducted for deepwater redds-adjacent to Pierce and Ives islands for fall Chinook salmon and near the Interstate 205 bridge for chum salmon. The chapter also provides data on redd location, information about habitat associations, and estimates of total spawning populations. Chapter 2 documents the collection of data on riverbed and river temperatures and water surface elevations, from the onset of spawning to the end of emergence, and the provision of those data in-season to fisheries management agencies to assist with emergence timing estimates and evaluations of redd dewatering.

Arntzen, Evan V.; Mueller, Robert P.; Murray, Katherine J.; Bott, Yi-Ju [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

389

Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and Accountabilities Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and Accountabilities The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for the performance of the Technology Partnership Ombudsman function at the national laboratories and facilities within the Department of Energy, and to implement the requirements of the Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000. Each national laboratory is required, and other facilities may be required, to appoint a technology partnership Ombudsman, often referred to as Technology Transfer Ombudsman, or TTO. The TTO provides a arogrammatic focal point for helping to resolve complaints and disputes in the area of technology partnerships, patents, and technology licensing at

390

Navajo Tribal Utility Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Place Arizona Utility Id 13314 Utility Location Yes Ownership S NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Navajo Tribal Utility Association Smart Grid Project was awarded $4,991,750 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $10,611,849. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png

391

Long Island Power Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long Island Power Authority Long Island Power Authority Address 333 Earle Ovington Blvd Place Uniondale, New York Zip 11553 Sector Services Product Green Power Marketer Website www.lipower.org/ Coordinates 40.720549°, -73.593524° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.720549,"lon":-73.593524,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

392

%QUEST FOR RECO .JS DI JSITION AUTHORITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

i i r rCI - - j %QUEST FOR RECO .JS DI JSITION AUTHORITY -- - - -- - , 8 / - 3 - 1 -- - L-- I4nval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves (FE-47) To NATIONAL ARCHIVES & FSCORDS ADMlN',-P?TI3lJ 860 1 ADELPHI ROAD COLLEGE PARK, MD 20740-609 1 1 FROM (Agency or establishment) U.S. Department of Energy 2. MAJOR SUBDIVISION -- Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy (FE-I) Date-received r- /+--a/ NOTIFICATION TO AGENCY In accordance with the provisions of 44 U.S.C. 3303a, the disposition request, including amendments, is approved except for items that may be marked 'disposition not approved" or "withdrawn" in column 10. 3. AGENCY CERTIFICATION V I hereby certify that I am authorized to act for this agency in matters pertaining to the disposition of its records and that the records

393

Tennessee Valley Authority (Mississippi) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mississippi) Mississippi) Jump to: navigation, search Name Tennessee Valley Authority Place Mississippi Utility Id 18642 References Energy Information Administration.[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Industrial: $0.0448/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Tennessee Valley Authority (Mississippi). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS 2009-03 14,903 268,562 8 14,903 268,562 8

394

Alaska Energy Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logo: Alaska Energy Authority Name Alaska Energy Authority Address 813 West Northern Lights Blvd Place Anchorage, Alaska Zip 99503 Website www.akenergyauthority.org Coordinates 61.1954022°, -149.898802° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":61.1954022,"lon":-149.898802,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

395

HEQUEST FOR Rt43RDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- - HEQUEST FOR Rt43RDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY (See ~nstructions on reverse) / GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS SERVICE, WASHINGTON, D C 20408 1 . F R O M (Agency orestablishment) U.S. Department of Energy 2 . MAJOR SUBDIVISION Oak Ridge Operations Office 3. M I N O R SUBDIVISION I hereby certify that I am authorized to act for this agency in matters pertaining to the disposal of the agency's records; that the records proposed for disposal in this Request of 4 page(s) are not now needed for the business of this agency or will not be needed after the retention periods specified; and that written concurrence from the General Accounting Office, if required under the provisions of Title 8 of the GAO Manual for Guidance of Federal Agencies, is

396

Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and Accountabilities Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and Accountabilities The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for the performance of the Technology Partnership Ombudsman function at the national laboratories and facilities within the Department of Energy, and to implement the requirements of the Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000. Each national laboratory is required, and other facilities may be required, to appoint a technology partnership Ombudsman, often referred to as Technology Transfer Ombudsman, or TTO. The TTO provides a arogrammatic focal point for helping to resolve complaints and disputes in the area of technology partnerships, patents, and technology licensing at

397

Tennessee Valley Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Authority Authority Place Tennessee Utility Id 18642 Utility Location Yes Ownership F NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Industrial: $0.0480/kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Tennessee Valley Authority (Tennessee). Month RES REV (THOUSAND $) RES SALES (MWH) RES CONS COM REV (THOUSAND $) COM SALES (MWH) COM CONS IND_REV (THOUSAND $) IND SALES (MWH) IND CONS OTH REV (THOUSAND $) OTH SALES (MWH) OTH CONS TOT REV (THOUSAND $) TOT SALES (MWH) TOT CONS

398

Influence of river level on temperature and hydraulic gradients in chum and fall Chinook salmon spawning areas downstream of Bonneville Dam, Columbia River  

SciTech Connect

Chum (Oncorhynchus keta) and fall Chinook (O. tshawytscha) salmon segregate spatially during spawning in the Ives Island side channel of the lower Columbia River downstream from Bonneville Dam. Previous research during one spawning season (2000) suggested that these species selected spawning habitats based on differences in hyporheic temperature and vertical hydraulic gradient (VHG) with the river. In this study, we confirmed the spatial segregation of spawning based on hyporheic characteristics over four years (2001–2004) and examined the effects of load-following operations (power generation to meet short-term electrical demand) at Bonneville Dam on hyporheic function and characteristics. We found that during the study period, hyporheic temperature and VHG in chum salmon spawning areas were highly variable during periods of load-following operation when river levels fluctuated. In contrast, hyporheic water temperature and VHG within chum spawning areas fluctuated less when river levels were not changing due to load-following operation. Variable temperature and VHG could affect chum and fall Chinook salmon spawning segregation and incubation success by altering the cues each species uses to select redd sites. Alterations in site selection would result in a breakdown in the spatial segregation of spawning between chum and fall Chinook salmon, which would expose earlier spawning fall Chinook eggs to a greater risk of dislodgement from later spawning chum salmon. Additional research will be required to fully assess the effects of load-following operations on the hyporheic environment and spawning and incubation success of chum and fall Chinook salmon downstream from Bonneville Dam.

Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Murray, Christopher J.; McGrath, Kathy; Bott, Yi-Ju; Hanrahan, Timothy P.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Survey of Potential Hanford Site Contaminants in the Upper Sediment for the Reservoirs at McNary, John Day, The Dalles, and Bonneville Dams, 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results from a multi-agency cooperative environmental surveillance study. of the study looked at sediment from the pools upstream from dams on the Columbia River that are downstream from Hanford Site operations. The radiological and chemical conditions existing in the upper-level sediment found in the pools upstream from McNary Dam, John Day Dam, The Dalles Lock and Dam, and Bonneville Dam were evaluated. This study also evaluated beach sediment where available. Water samples were collected at McNary Dam to further evaluate potential Hanford contaminants in the lower Columbia River. Samples were analyzed for radionuclides, chemicals, and physical parameters. Results from this study were compared to background values from sediment and water samples collect from the pool upstream of Priest Rapids Dam (upstream of the Hanford Site) by the Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project.

Patton, Gregory W.; Priddy, M; Yokel, Jerel W.; Delistraty, Damon A.; Stoops, Thomas M.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Authority in Online Disaster Relief Communities 1 Running Head: AUTHORITY IN ONLINE DISASTER RELIEF COMMUNITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). The magnitude of the disaster overwhelmed institutions normally responsible for providing relief--forums, bulletin boards, blogs, and personal websites--to coordinate a massive grassroots response to the disasterAuthority in Online Disaster Relief Communities 1 Running Head: AUTHORITY IN ONLINE DISASTER RELIEF

Kiesler, Sara

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Records Schedule-Alaska Power Authority  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-109 PREVIOUS EDITION NOT USABLE STANDARD FORM SF 1 15 (REV 3-91) -109 PREVIOUS EDITION NOT USABLE STANDARD FORM SF 1 15 (REV 3-91) Prescr~bed by NARA 36 CFR 1228 REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY To NATIONAL ARCIIIVES and RECORDS ADMINISTRATION (NIR) WASHINGTON, DC 20408 1 FROM (Agency or establ~shment) Department o f Energy 2 MAJOR SUBDIVISION Alaska Power Administration 3 MINOR SUBDIVISION 4 NAME OF PERSON WITH WHOM TO CONFER Carol Holmberg JOB NUMBER N1-447-97- 1 DATE RECEIVED .'I+ 46 NOTIFICATION TO AGENCY In accordance ~ 7 t h thc prov~sions of 44 U S C 3303a, the d~spos~tion request, including amendments, is approved except for items that may be marked "dlspos~tion not approved or "withdrawn" In column 10 5 TELEPHONE (907)586-7405 DATE 1 t,- -'?x 6 AGENCY CERTIFICATION I hearby certify that I am author~zed to act for thls agency in matters pertalnlng to the dlpsositi

402

Fish Passage Center; Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The year 2000 hydrosystem operations illustrated two main points: (1) that the NMFS Biological Opinion on the operations of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) fish migration measures could not be met in a slightly below average water year, and; (2) the impacts and relationships of energy deregulation and volatile wholesale energy prices on the ability of the FCRPS to provide the Biological Opinion fish migration measures. In 2000, a slightly below average water year, the flow targets were not met and, when energy ''emergencies'' were declared, salmon protection measures were reduced. The 2000 migration year was a below average runoff volume year with an actual run off volume of 61.1 MAF or 96% of average. This year illustrated the ability of the hydro system to meet the migration protection measures established by the NMFS Biological Opinion. The winter operation of storage reservoirs was based upon inaccurate runoff volume forecasts which predicted a January-July runoff volume forecast at The Dalles of 102 to 105% of average, from January through June. Reservoir flood control drafts during the winter months occurred according to these forecasts. This caused an over-draft of reservoirs that resulted in less volume of water available for fish flow augmentation in the spring and the summer. The season Biological Opinion flow targets for spring and summer migrants at Lower Granite and McNary dams were not met. Several power emergencies were declared by BPA in the summer of 2000. The first in June was caused by loss of resources (WNP2 went off-line). The second and third emergencies were declared in August as a result of power emergencies in California and in the Northwest. The unanticipated effects of energy deregulation, power market volatility and rising wholesale electricity prices, and Californian energy deregulation reduced the ability of the FCRPS to implement fish protection measures. A Spill Plan Agreement was implemented in the FCRPS. Under this plan, spill hours were increased at Lower Monumental Dam. Spill volume at The Dalles was reduced and daytime spill tests were conducted at John Day and Bonneville Dams. Although provided for fish, most spill that occurred in 2000 was either in excess of project hydraulic capacity or excess generation. This effectively reduced the actual cost of the spill program. For the most part, spill in 2000 was managed to the waiver limits for total dissolved gas levels and the NMFS action criteria for dissolved gas signs were not exceeded. Hatchery spring chinook returns comprised an estimated 81.4% of the total spring chinook adult return to Lower Granite Dam. Smolt travel time and survival were similar to past years for most Smolt Monitoring Program groups. The notable exceptions were Snake River hatchery steelhead groups and mid-Columbia hatchery sub-yearling groups from Wells and Ringold hatcheries, which had significantly lower survival than previous years. Yearling chinook travel time showed variation from past years, reflecting the atypical flow shape in 2000 which had high flows in April, declining through May.

DeHart, Michele (Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority, Fish Passage Center, Portland, OR)

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Author's personal copy Unemployment effects of climate policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

appreciation of the potential unemployment resulting from greenhouse gas emissions restrictions policies. More restrictions, the consequences of a labor subsidy, are also analyzed. Policies to limit greenhouse gas as usual,'' i.e. with no greenhouse gas policy restrictions, which is called the Reference Solution. e n v

404

REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY U. S. Atomic Energy Commision REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY More Documents &...

405

Request For Records Disposition Authority | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Authority Request For Records Disposition Authority Office of Naval Petroleum and Shale Oil Reserves Request For Records Disposition Authority More Documents & Publications...

406

Request For Records Disposition Authority | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposition Authority Request For Records Disposition Authority Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Request For Records Disposition Authority More Documents & Publications...

407

Comments of the Lower Colorado River Authority | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lower Colorado River Authority Comments of the Lower Colorado River Authority Comments of the Lower Colorado River Authority on Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Studying...

408

PP-22 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, Amendment 1967...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydro and Power Authority, Amendment 1967 PP-22 British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, Amendment 1967 Presidential permit authorizing British Columbia Hydro and Power...

409

REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY S  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

S S e e Instructions o n reverse) NATIONAL ARCHIVES and RECORDS ADMINISTRATION (NIR) WASHINGTON. DC 20408 , - - 1. FROM (Agency or establishment) Department of Energy 2. MAJOR SUBDIVISION Assistant Secretary For Fossil Energy (FE-1) I 3. MINOR SUBDIVISION Office of Naval Petroleum and Shale Oil 4 . NAME OF PERSON WITH WHOM TO CON I 1 Jerry Hinkle (FE 47) 1(202)586-43 80 I I / 6. AGENCY CERTIFICATION I NOTIFICATION TO AGENCY i I In accordance with the provisions of 44 U.S.C. 3303a the disposition request, including amendments, is ap roved except for items that may be marke! "dis osition not approved" or "withdrawn" in c o L n 10. I hereby certify that I am authorized to act for this agency in yatters pertaining to of its records and that the records roposed for disposal on the attached

410

Authorized limits for Fernald copper ingots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This development document contains data and analysis to support the approval of authorized limits for the unrestricted release of 59 t of copper ingots containing residual radioactive material from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP). The analysis presented in this document comply with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5, {open_quotes}Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment,{close_quotes} as well as the requirements of the proposed promulgation of this order as 10 CFR Part 834. The document was developed following the step-by-step process described in the Draft Handbook for Controlling Release for Reuse or Recycle Property Containing Residual Radioactive Material.

Frink, N.; Kamboj, S.; Hensley, J.; Chen, S.Y.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Transmission Grid Modernization Roadmap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In August 2010, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) adopted a corporate vision for the company to become one of the nation’s leading providers of clean low-cost energy by the year 2020. Within TVA, the Energy Delivery (ED) organization is responsible for the reliable delivery of electric power. ED’s mission is to maintain a cost-effective, reliable, safe, and compliant transmission system for TVA.Various challenges, such as increasing environmental regulation, new and ...

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

412

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam hydroacoustic system was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. Two of the seven transducers were mounted to the frame containing the strobe lights and were oriented horizontally. The remaining five transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on individual floating frames upstream of the barge, with the transducers looking vertically downward.

Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Kalispel Tribe of Indians Wildlife Mitigation and Restoration for Albeni Falls Dam: Flying Goose Ranch Phase I.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a recommendation from the Kalispel Tribe to the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) for wildlife habitat mitigation for the extensive habitat losses caused by Albeni Falls Dam on and near the Kalispel Indian Reservation.

Merker, Christopher

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Monitoring of Juvenile Yearling Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Survival and Passage at John Day Dam, Spring 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to compare dam passage survival, at two spill treatment levels, of yearling Chinook salmon and steelhead smolts at John Day Dam during spring 2010. The two treatments were 30% and 40% spill out of total project discharge. Under the 2008 Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinion (BiOp), dam passage survival should be greater than or equal to 0.96 and estimated with a standard error (SE) less than or equal 0.015. The study also estimated forebay residence time, tailrace egress time, and spill passage efficiency (SPE), as required in the Columbia Basin Fish Accords. However, by agreement among the stakeholders, this study was not an official BiOp compliance test because the long-term passage measures at John Day Dam have yet to be finalized and another year of spill-treatment testing was desired.

Weiland, Mark A.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Hughes, James S.; Woodley, Christa M.; Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

415

Chemical Imaging Infrastructure Research Team: Carina Lansing, Zoe Guillen, Kerstin Kleese-van Dam, Shaun O'Leary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Imaging Infrastructure Research Team: Carina Lansing, Zoe Guillen, Kerstin Kleese-van Dam, Shaun O'Leary Purpose Support real-time analysis of single and multi-modal chemical imaging experiments

416

An Analysis of the Impact of a Split-Front Rainband on Appalachian Cold-Air Damming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Appalachian cold-air damming (CAD) is characterized by the development of a cool, stable air mass that is advected southwestward along the eastern slopes of the Appalachian Mountains by low-level ageostrophic flow. Operational forecasters have ...

Michael J. Brennan; Gary M. Lackmann; Steven E. Koch

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

The Feasibility of Using an Ultrasonic Fish Tracking System in the Tailrace of Lower Granite Dam in 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a study conducted by PNNL in Spring 2002 at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River for the US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District. Our goal was to determine the feasibility of using ultrasonic fish tracking in the untested environment of a hydroelectric dam tailrace. If fish tracking were determined to be feasible, we would track the movement of juvenile hatchery chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), juvenile hatchery steelhead (O. mykiss), and juvenile wild steelhead (O. mykiss) and relate their movement to dam operations. The majority of fish to be tracked were released as a part of a separate study conducted by the Biological Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey (BRD), which was investigating the movement of juvenile salmon in the forebay of Lower Granite Dam in relation to Removable Spillway Weir (RSW) testing. The two studies took place consecutively from April 14 to June 7, 2002.

Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Cash, Kenneth; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2003-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

418

Survival and Passage of Yearling and Subyearling Chinook Salmon and Juvenile Steelhead at McNary Dam, 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study was designed to evaluate the passage and survival of yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon and juvenile steelhead at McNary Dam as stipulated by the 2008 Biological Opinion and Fish Accords and to assess performance measures including route-specific fish passage proportions, travel times, and survival based upon a virtual/paired-release model. This study supports the USACE’s continual effort to improve conditions for juvenile anadromous fish passing through Columbia River dams.

Hughes, James S.; Weiland, Mark A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Carpenter, Scott M.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Fischer, Eric S.; Batton, George; Carlson, Thomas J.; Cushing, Aaron W.; Deng, Zhiqun; Etherington, D. J.; Fu, Tao; Greiner, Michael J.; Ingraham, John M.; Kim, Jin A.; Li, Xi; Martinez, Jayson J.; Mitchell, T. D.; Rayamajhi, Bishes; Seaburg, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Townsend, Richard L.; Wagner, Katie A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

419

MISCELLANEOUS PAPER S71-17 EARTHQUAKE RESISTANCE OF EARTH AND ROCK-FILL DAMS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MISCELLANEOUS PAPER S71-17 MISCELLANEOUS PAPER S71-17 EARTHQUAKE RESISTANCE OF EARTH AND ROCK-FILL DAMS Report 2 ANALYSIS OF RESPONSE O F RIFLE.GAP D A M TO PROJECT RULISON UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATION bv J. E. Ahlberg, J. Fowler, L W. Heller ........ . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . - ...... *- , .... . . . - ->-w-J- * - : - . . June 1972 s~omsored by Office, Chief of Engineers, U. S. Army Conducted by U. S. A m y Engineer Waterways Experiment Station Soils and Pavements Laboratory Vicksburg, Mississippi APPROVED FOR WBLlC RELEASE: DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED L i s t o f Associated Reports Previous reports under Engineering Study 540 are: "A Comparative Summary o f Current Earth Dam Analysis Methods for Earthquake Response," issued by Office, Chief o f Engineers, a s Inclosure 1 to Engineer

420

MHK Projects/Lock and Dam No 2 Hydroelectric Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lock and Dam No 2 Hydroelectric Project Lock and Dam No 2 Hydroelectric Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.7486,"lon":-92.8048,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Forest Service Special Use Authorization | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forest Service Special Use Authorization Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Forest Service Special Use Authorization Details...

422

REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY More Documents & Publications Disposition Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY REQUEST FOR RECORDS...

423

Presidential Permits and Export Authorizations - About the Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presidential Permits and Export Authorizations - About the Program Presidential Permits and Export Authorizations - About the Program Electricity Advisory Committee Technology...

424

Status and Habitat Requirements of White Sturgeon Populations in the Columbia River Downstream from McNary Dam, 1989-1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on our progress from April 1989 through March 1990 on determining the status and habitat requirements of white sturgeon populations in the Columbia River downstream from McNary Dam. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), Washington Department of Fisheries (WDF), US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). Study objectives addressed by each agency are to describe the life history and population dynamics of subadults and adults between Bonneville and McNary dams and evaluate the need and identify potential methods for protecting, mitigating and enhancing populations downstream from McNary Dam, to describe the white sturgeon recreational fishery between Bonneville and McNary dams, describe reproductive and early life history characteristics downstream from Bonneville Dam and describe life history and population dynamics of subadults and adults downstream from Bonneville Dam, to describe reproduction and early life history characteristics, define habitat requirements for spawning and rearing and quantify extent of habitat available between Bonneville and McNary dams, and to describe reproduction and early life history characteristics, define habitat requirements for spawning and rearing and quantify extent of habitat available downstream from Bonneville Dam. Our approach is to work concurrently downstream and upstream from Bonneville Dam. Upstream from Bonneville Dam we began work in the Dalles Reservoir in 1987 and expanded efforts to Bonneville Reservoir in 1988 and John Day Reservoir in 1989. Highlights from this work is also included. 47 refs., 33 figs., 66 tabs.

Nigro, Anthony A. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Grand Coulee Dam Mitigation, 1996-1999 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) study was to determine baseline habitat units and to estimate future habitat units for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation projects on the Spokane Indian Reservation. The mitigation between BPA and the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI) is for wildlife habitat losses on account of the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the HEP survey data will assist in mitigation crediting and appropriate management of the mitigation lands.

Kieffer, B.; Singer, Kelly; Abrahamson, Twa-le

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Fish Passage Improvements at Three Mile Falls Diversion Dam, Umatilla River, Oregon, Final Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the results and conclusions from the biological assessment and outlines several alternative plans for solving fish passage problems at the dam. A recommended plan, based on consensus of the fisheries agencies and the tribes, is described, and the rationale for that decision is discussed. Data needs for final designs, a tentative construction schedule, and a discussion of operation and maintenance needs are presented.

Unknown Author

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the fourth year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

Johnson, Robert L.; Simmons, Mary Ann; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

428

Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the third year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Seismic analysis of the Par Pond Dam: Study of slope failure and liquefaction. Technical evaluation report  

SciTech Connect

Stability concerns of the Par Pond Dam, an embankment structure in the Savannah River Site complex, resulted in a comprehensive evaluation of the state of its integrity. Specifically, excessive seepage through the embankment, slope failure due to an earthquake event as well as liquefaction potential of the embankment and the foundation are addressed and the potential of failure is evaluated. Lastly, remedial benefits of the addition of a berm structure are also assessed.

Simos, N.; Reich, M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Scientific substantiation of safe operation of the Earthen Dams at the Votkinsk HPP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over a period of 15 years, coworkers of the B. E. Vedeneev Scientific-Research Institute of Hydraulic Engineering have conducted scientific accompaniment of the operation of the earthen dams at the Votkinsk HPP. During that time, basic performance characteristics associated with complex hydrogeologic and hydrochemical conditions, and the forms of their unfavorable manifestations influencing the reliability and safety of the structures were revealed, and, recommendations and measures were developed for their elimination.

Deev, A. P.; Fisenko, V. F. [Votkinsk HPP Branch of the JSC 'RusGidro,' Chaikovskii (Russian Federation); Sol'skii, S. V.; Lopatina, M. G.; Gints, A. V.; Aref'eva, A. N. [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva', Branch of JSC 'RusGidro' (Russian Federation)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

ERDC/CRRELTR-07-18 Evaluation of Dam Decommissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluating catchment-scale hydrological modeling by means of terrestrial gravity observations the effect of hydrological processes on observed terrestrial gravity residuals. In this study we apply terrestrial gravity observations (measured in one location) to constrain simple hydrological models

432

JPP 2008, 60: 943950 2008 The Authors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on epidemiological data from survivors of the Japanese atomic bombs, is estimated to be 0.05 per sievert (ICRP 2005 in this effect was sparked by earlier reports demonstrating that, following a low dose of a-particles, a larger

Brenner, David Jonathan

433

Juvenile Salmonid Pit-Tag Studies at Prosser Dam and the Chandler Canal Fish Collection Facility, Yakima River, 1991 and 1992 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1991 and 1992, the National Marine Fisheries Service completed the second and third years of a 3-year study to estimate juvenile salmonid (Oncorhynchus spp.) timing and survival characteristics related to passage through the Prosser Dam complex, including the Chandler Canal and the Chandler fish collection facility, on the Yakima River. Yearling chinook (O. tshawyacha) and coho salmon (O. kisutch) were collected at the Chandler facility, PIT tagged, and released at various locations in the Yakima River, Chandler Canal, and the Chandler facility. Individual fish were subsequently detected at PIT-tag detection monitors at the Chandler facility and/or McNary Dam on the Columbia River. Survival through various reaches, PIT-tag detection efficiency, and Chandler Canal fish entrainment proportion parameters were estimated using maximum likelihood techniques. The research objectives in 1991 and 1992 were to: (1) assess the effects of passage through the Chandler Canal and the Chandler facility on the survival of juvenile salmonids, (2) determine the entrainment rate of juvenile salmonids into the Chandler Canal as a function of river flow, and (3) determine the efficiency and reliability of the PIT-tag monitoring system at the Chandler facility. The initial 1990 research plan was expanded in 1991 and 1992 to include several more release locations and many more release days.

Ruehle, Thomas E.; Sandford, Benjamin P.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Hydroacoustic Assessment of Downstream Migrating Salmonids at the Dalles Dam in Spring and Summer, 1985 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hydroacoustic study of downstream migrating salmon and steelhead was conducted at The Dalles Dam. The primary objective was to estimate the effectiveness of the spillway and sluiceway in passing downstream migrants. The secondary goals were to provide information on the horizontal, vertical, and temporal distributions of downstream migrants. June 1, and the summer season was from July 1 to August 15, 1985. Nineteen transducers were deployed to monitor turbine, spillway, and sluiceway locations. The 10 h instantaneous spill effectiveness results showed that spill passed fish more efficiently during the summer study than during the spring study. During the period May 1-31 when the turbines, spillway, and sluiceway were all operating consistently, the sluiceway was found to be the most efficient method of passing fish on a percent flow basis. During the summer study, after the termination of spill, the sluiceway and turbines passed almost equal percentages of fish. The run timing during the spring showed steadily increasing numbers of fish until the peak of the run on May 16. Another, smaller peak occurred on May 20. Thereafter, passage gradually decreased through the end of the spring study. The spring run consisted of yearling chinook, steelhead and sockeye juvenile salmonids. During the summer study, fish passage gradually decreased, except for minor peaks near the beginning of the study. The summer migration consisted primarily of subyearling chinook juvenile salmonids.

Steig, Tracy W.; Johnson, Ward R. (BioSonics, Inc. Seattle, WA)

1986-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Total Dissolved Gas Monitoring in Chum Salmon Spawning Gravels Below Bonneville Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Portland District), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted research to determine whether total dissolved gas concentrations are elevated in chum salmon redds during spring spill operations at Bonneville Dam. The study involved monitoring the total dissolved gas levels at egg pocket depth and in the river at two chum salmon spawning locations downstream from Bonneville Dam. Dissolved atmospheric gas supersaturation generated by spill from Bonneville Dam may diminish survival of chum (Oncorhynchus keta) salmon when sac fry are still present in the gravel downstream from Bonneville Dam. However, no previous work has been conducted to determine whether total dissolved gas (TDG) levels are elevated during spring spill operations within incubation habitats. The guidance used by hydropower system managers to provide protection for pre-emergent chum salmon fry has been to limit TDG to 105% after allowing for depth compensation. A previous literature review completed in early 2006 shows that TDG levels as low as 103% have been documented to cause mortality in sac fry. Our study measured TDG in the incubation environment to evaluate whether these levels were exceeded during spring spill operations. Total dissolved gas levels were measured within chum salmon spawning areas near Ives Island and Multnomah Falls on the Columbia River. Water quality sensors screened at egg pocket depth and to the river were installed at both sites. At each location, we also measured dissolved oxygen, temperature, specific conductance, and water depth to assist with the interpretation of TDG results. Total dissolved gas was depth-compensated to determine when levels were high enough to potentially affect sac fry. This report provides detailed descriptions of the two study sites downstream of Bonneville Dam, as well as the equipment and procedures employed to monitor the TDG levels at the study sites. Results of the monitoring at both sites are then presented in both text and graphics. The findings and recommendations for further research are discussed, followed by a listing of the references cited in the report.

Arntzen, Evan V.; Geist, David R.; Panther, Jennifer L.; Dawley, Earl

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

436

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage and Distribution at Lookout Point Dam, 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at Lookout Point Dam (LOP) on the Middle Fork Willamette River. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). The goal of the study was to provide fish passage and distribution data to support decisions on long-term measures to enhance downstream passage at LOP and others dams in USACE’s Willamette Valley Project in response to the listing of Upper Willamette River Spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and Upper Willamette River steelhead (O. mykiss) as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. During the year-long study period - February 1, 2010 to January 31, 2011the objectives of the hydroacoustic evaluation of fish passage and distribution at LOP were to: 1. Estimate passage rates, run timing, horizontal distribution, and diel distribution at turbine penstock intakes for smolt-size fish. 2. Estimate passage rates, run timing and diel distribution at turbine penstock intakes for small-size fish. 3. Estimate passage rates and run timing at the regulating outlets for smolt-size fish. 4. Estimate vertical distribution of smolt-size fish in the forebay near the upstream face of the dam. The fixed-location hydroacoustic technique was used to accomplish the objectives of this study. Transducers (420 kHz) were deployed in each penstock intake, above each RO entrance, and on the dam face; a total of nine transducers (2 single-beam and 7 split-beam) were used. We summarize the findings from the hydroacoustic evaluation of juvenile salmonid passage and distribution at LOP during February 2010 through January 2011 as follows. • Fish passage rates for smolt-size fish (> ~90 mm) were highest during December-January and lowest in mid-summer through early fall. • During the entire study period, an estimated total of 142,463 fish ± 4,444 (95% confidence interval) smolt-size fish passed through turbine penstock intakes. • Diel periodicity of smolt-size fish showing crepuscular peaks was evident in fish passage into turbine penstock intakes. • Run timing for small-size fish (~65-90 mm) peaked (702 fish) on December 18. Downstream passage of small-size juvenile fish was variable, occurring on two days in the spring, eight days in the summer, and at times throughout late fall and winter. A total of 7,017 ± 690 small-size fish passed through the turbine penstock intakes during the study period. • Relatively few fish passed into the ROs when they were open in summer (2 fish/d) and winter (8 fish/d). • Fish were surface-oriented with 62-80% above 10 m deep. The highest percentage of fish (30-60%) was in the 5-10 m depth bin. We draw the following conclusions from the study. • The non-obtrusive hydroacoustic data from this study are reliable because passage estimates and patterns were similar with those observed in the direct capture data from the tailrace screw trap and were consistent with distribution patterns observed in other studies of juvenile salmonid passage at dams. • Fish passage at LOP was apparently affected but not dominated by dam operations and reservoir elevation. • The surface-oriented vertical distribution of fish we observed supports development of surface passage or collector devices. In summary, the high-resolution spatially and temporally data reported herein provide detailed estimates of vertical, horizontal, diel, daily, and seasonal passage and distributions at LOP during March 2010 through January 2011. This information is applicable to management decisions on design and development of surface passage and collections devices to help restore Chinook salmon populations in the Middle Fork Willamette River watershed above Lookout Point Dam.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the entrainment data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the third year of the strobe light study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout under field conditions. The prototype system consists of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended 15 m vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, illuminate a region directly upstream of the barge. The 2003 study period extended from June 16 through August 1. Three light treatments were used: all six lights on for 24 hours, all lights off for 24 hours, and three of six lights cycled on and off every hour for 24 hours. These three treatment conditions were assigned randomly within a 3-day block throughout the study period. Hydroacoustic technology was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The hydroacoustic system in 2003 comprised seven splitbeam transducers arrayed in front of the strobe lights, two multibeam transducers behind the lights, and a mobile splitbeam system. The seven splitbeam transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. These transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on an aluminum frame floating upstream of the barge and looked vertically downward. The multibeam transducers monitored the distribution of fish directly behind and to both sides of the lights, while the mobile splitbeam system looked at the distribution of fish within the third powerplant forebay. To augment the hydroacoustic data, additional studies were conducted. The hydrodynamic characteristics of the third powerplant forebay were measured, and acoustically tagged juvenile kokanee were released upstream of the strobe lights and tracked within the forebay and downstream of the dam. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on kokanee and rainbow trout focused on the number of fish detected in each of the areas covered by one of the downlooking transducers, the timing of fish arrivals after the status of the strobe lights changed, fish swimming effort (detected velocity minus flow velocity), and fish swimming direction. Water velocity measurements were used to determine fish swimming effort. The tracking of tagged kokanee provided data on fish movements into and out of the third powerplant forebay, including entrainment.

Simmons, M.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Synthesis of Sensor Fish Data for Assessment of Fish Passage Conditions at Turbines, Spillways, and Bypass Facilities – Phase 1: The Dalles Dam Spillway Case Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the characterization of spillway passage conditions at The Dalles Dam in 2006 and the effort to complete a comprehensive database for data sets from The Dalles Dam spillway Sensor Fish and balloon-tagged live fish experiments. Through The Dalles Dam spillway case study, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated the database as an efficient means for accessing and retrieving system-wide data for the U.S Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).

Deng, Zhiqun; Serkowski, John A.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

Light-Emitting Tag Testing in Conjunction with Testing of the Minimum Gap Runner Turbine Design at Bonneville Dam Powerhouse 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a pilot study conducted by Tom Carlson of PNNL and Mark Weiland of MEVATEC Corp to test the feasibility of using light-emitting tags to visually track objects passing through the turbine environment of a hydroelectric dam. Light sticks were released at the blade tip, mid-blade, and hub in the MGR turbine and a Kaplan turbine at Bonneville Dam and videotaped passing thru the dam to determine visibility and object trajectories.

Carlson, Thomas J

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

440

200 Area Deactivation Project Facilities Authorization Envelope Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project facilities as required by HNF-PRO-2701, Authorization Envelope and Authorization Agreement. The Authorization Agreements (AA's) do not identify the specific set of environmental safety and health requirements that are applicable to the facility. Therefore, the facility Authorization Envelopes are defined here to identify the applicable requirements. This document identifies the authorization envelopes for the 200 Area Deactivation.

DODD, E.N.

2000-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dam authority effective" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLE