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1

Clean Cities: Dallas-Fort Worth Clean Cities coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Dallas-Fort Worth Clean Cities Coalition Dallas-Fort Worth Clean Cities Coalition The Dallas-Fort Worth Clean Cities coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Dallas-Fort Worth Clean Cities coalition Contact Information Pamela Burns 817-704-2510 pburns@nctcog.org Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Pamela Burns Photo of Pamela Burns Pamela Burns has been a co-coordinator of the Dallas-Ft. Worth Clean Cities coalition since 2007. She is also a communications coordinator with the North Central Texas Council of Governments, the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) for the Dallas-Ft. Worth (DFW) area. The MPO serves the region by developing transportation plans and programs that address the transportation needs of the rapidly growing metropolitan area. Burns works

2

Continuous Commissioning« of the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The DFW International Airport is one of the largest and busiest airports in the world. Located in North Texas, squarely between the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, the DFW Airport not only serves a huge population in the North Texas area for domestic flights but also is a major airport for international flights. The Energy and Transportation Management (ETM) Department, at the Airport, is responsible for reducing energy within their facilities, and they are very aggressive in energy management. In recent years they have renovated or replaced much of the equipment in their central utilities plant and added a huge 90,000 ton-hr (316.5 MWh) chilled water thermal storage system. The electric bills, for the accounts managed by ETM, was $29 million (Ç20 million) in 2007. Although the ETM staff had initiated many energy efficiency measures, they felt that the energy consuming systems could be optimized to realize additional energy and cost savings. The Energy Systems Laboratory was hired to apply the Continuous Commissioning« (CC«) process at the airport. Five projects have been identified to date including: 1. An energy audit and assessment of Terminal B and a lighting demonstration pilot project. 2. CC of the Consolidated Rent-A-Car Center. 3. CC of the Airport Administration Building. 4. CC of the new International Terminal D (on-going). 5. CC of the Utilities Plant, Energy Plaza (on-going). This paper will focus on the completed projects: the Consolidated Rent-A-Car Center, the Airport Administration Building, and the major on-going projects, CC of Terminal D and Energy Plaza.

Yazdani, B.; Schroeder, F.; Kramer, L.; Baltazar, J. C.; Turner, W. D.; Wei, G.; Deng, S.; Henson, R.; Dennis, J. R.; T., R.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Dallas-Fort Worth, TX Clean Taxi Replacement Incentive  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The North Central Texas Council of Governments has partnered with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the City of Dallas to develop the North Texas Green & Go Clean Taxi Partnership as...

4

NOx, SOx and CO2 Emissions Reduction from Continuous Commissioning« (CC«) Measures at the Rent-A-Car Facility in the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station, Texas A&M University System was contracted to fulfill a Continuous Commissioning« (CC«)project on the Rent-a-Car facility (RAC) of the Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport (DFWIA) in which energy savings are directly related to an emission reduction that can be credited. The purpose of this study is to estimate the creditable emissions reductions from energy efficiency CC« measures in the RAC of DFWIA.

Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

5

Fresnel/photovoltaic concentrator application experiment for the Dallas-Fort Worth airport. Phase 1: system design, final technical report, 1 June 1978-28 February 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Phase I Final Report summarizes the analytical, experimental, design, and specification efforts for the first nine months of the Dallas/Fort Worth Airport Fresnel/Photovoltaic Concentrator Application Experiment. The overall objective of the complete three-phase program is to develop and demonstrate a unique photovoltaic concentrator total energy system which, when mass-produced, will provide electrical and thermal energy at costs competitive with conventional energy sources. Toward this objective, the Phase I - System Design contract has been completed, resulting in a final system design, analytical definition of system performance and economics, and a successfully tested prototype collector which fully verified performance predictions. The proposed system will utilize 245 m/sup 2/ of E-Systems linear Fresnel photovoltaic collectors to provide 25 kW/sub e/ (AC) of power and 140 kW/sub t/ of heat to the Central Utility Facility of Dallas/Fort Worth Airport. The electric power will be used to meet a continuous lighting load, while the thermal energy will be used to preheat boiler feedwater. Peak system efficiencies will be 10.2% electric (insolation to net AC output) and 56% thermal (insolation to net heat delivered). Annual efficiencies will be 8.4% electric and 49% thermal. Production system economics are attractive in the near term: 7 cents/kWh electricity and $7/MMBtu heat (1975 $) could be achieved by 1981 with limited production. With higher production, these costs could be halved by 1990.

O'Neill, M.J.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

City of Fort Worth - Executive Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

program eligibility Advocate for and develop commercial PACE program Support On program 1 INTRODUCTION Fort Worth is a rapidly growing city of over 700,000 people. The City's...

7

Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library September 30, 2010 - 4:07pm Addthis Lindsay Gsell Fort Worth's Central Library is seeing tremendous energy savings by cutting down consumption. Using an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant from the Recovery Act, the city was able to have the building retrofitted and install a building management system. The system allows library staff to control the indoor climate of the library from one location to reduce operating costs of the facility. Addthis Related Articles Captured data from the monitoring system at the public library shows that energy usage was highest at 10:30a.m., a time when a number of patrons in the library would be using computers and lighting. | Photo courtesy of Texas Institute for Sustainable Technology Research

8

Fort Worth, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Worth, Texas: Energy Resources Worth, Texas: Energy Resources (Redirected from Fort Worth, TX) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.725409┬░, -97.3208496┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.725409,"lon":-97.3208496,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

9

Geochemical controls on production in the Barnett Shale, Fort Worth Basin.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Newark East field (Barnett Shale) in the Fort Worth Basin, Texas currently has the largest daily production of any gas field in Texas. Majorů (more)

Klentzman, Jana L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Barnett shale rising star in Fort Worth basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mississippian-age Barnett shale of the Fort Worth basin, North Texas, has emerged as a new and active natural gas play. Natural gas production from the Barnett shale at Newark East field in Denton and Wise counties, Texas, has reached 80 MMcfd from more than 300 wells. However, very little publicly available information exists on resource potential and actual well performance. The US Geological Survey 1995 National Assessment of US Oil and Gas Resources categorized the Mississippian Barnett shale play (play number 4503) as an unconventional gas play but did not quantitatively assess this resource. This article, which expands upon a recent USGS open-file resource assessment report, provides an updated look at the Barnett shale and sets forth a new quantitative assessment for the play.

Kuuskraa, V.A.; Koperna, G. [Advanced Resources International Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Schmoker, J.W.; Quinn, J.C. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1998-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

11

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Dallas Airport Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels on AddThis.com... Sept. 5, 2009 Dallas Airport Operates With Alternative Fuels F ind out how Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport uses alternative fuels

12

Phyllosilicate orientation demonstrates early timing of compactional stabilization in calcite-cemented concretions in the Barnett Shale (Late Mississippian), Fort Worth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-cemented concretions in the Barnett Shale (Late Mississippian), Fort Worth Basin, Texas (U.S.A) Ruarri J. Day-Stirrat a in revised form 8 April 2008 Accepted 16 April 2008 Keywords: Barnett Shale Goniometry Concretions Fabric Calcite-cemented zones in the prolific gas-producing Barnett Shale (Ft. Worth Basin, Texas) preserve very

13

A Comparative Study of the Mississippian Barnett Shale, Fort Worth Basin, and Devonian Marcellus Shale, Appalachian Basin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Comparative Study of the A Comparative Study of the Mississippian Barnett Shale, Fort Worth Basin, and Devonian Marcellus Shale, Appalachian Basin DOE/NETL-2011/1478 Cover. Top left: The Barnett Shale exposed on the Llano uplift near San Saba, Texas. Top right: The Marcellus Shale exposed in the Valley and Ridge Province near Keyser, West Virginia. Photographs by Kathy R. Bruner, U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Bottom: Horizontal Marcellus Shale well in Greene County, Pennsylvania producing gas at 10 million cubic feet per day at about 3,000 pounds per square inch. Photograph by Tom Mroz, USDOE, NETL, February 2010. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The authors greatly thank Daniel J. Soeder (U.S. Department of Energy) who kindly reviewed the manuscript. His criticisms,

14

Fort Worth Case Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

importance of natural gas to Texas, historically one of the world's great producers of oil and gas. The Energy Information Administration's Annual Energy Outlook 2011 projects...

15

Secondary natural gas recovery: Targeted applications for infield reserve growth in midcontinent reservoirs, Boonsville Field, Fort Worth Basin, Texas. Topical report, May 1993--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to define undrained or incompletely drained reservoir compartments controlled primarily by depositional heterogeneity in a low-accommodation, cratonic Midcontinent depositional setting, and, afterwards, to develop and transfer to producers strategies for infield reserve growth of natural gas. Integrated geologic, geophysical, reservoir engineering, and petrophysical evaluations are described in complex difficult-to-characterize fluvial and deltaic reservoirs in Boonsville (Bend Conglomerate Gas) field, a large, mature gas field located in the Fort Worth Basin of North Texas. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate approaches to overcoming the reservoir complexity, targeting the gas resource, and doing so using state-of-the-art technologies being applied by a large cross section of Midcontinent operators.

Hardage, B.A.; Carr, D.L.; Finley, R.J.; Tyler, N.; Lancaster, D.E.; Elphick, R.Y.; Ballard, J.R.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Executive Summary of Fort Worth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

endeavor, we encourage the following strategies: * Have major player involved in R&D with other companies and share the fruits * Seek more industry partner to overcome the...

17

Fort Worth Regional Science Fair Winners Directory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Is The Best Storage For Petroelum Oil II AdvisorSchool Division: Project: Third Place: Randy J. Orona 01248

Chiao, Jung-Chih

18

Dallas Cowboys Practice Facility 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The report, "Final Report on the Collapse of the Dallas Cowboys Indoor Practice Facility, May 2, 2009 (NIST IR 7661)," summarizes the study and its ...

2013-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

19

Dallas, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dallas, Texas: Energy Resources (Redirected from Dallas, TX) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.802955, -96.769923 Loading map......

20

Environmental Conditions Associated with the Dallas Microburst Storm Determined from Satellite Soundings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermodynamic structure of the troposphere in the vicinity of the microburst storm at Dallas-Ft. Worth Airport (DFW), Texas on 2 August 1985 is described. The analysis was based principally on a set of vertical soundings from the Visible and ...

Gary Ellrod

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Dallas, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dallas, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.802955, -96.769923 Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemap...

22

City of Dallas - Green Energy Purchasing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dallas - Green Energy Purchasing City of Dallas - Green Energy Purchasing Eligibility Local Government Savings For Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Information Texas...

23

City of Dallas - Green Buildling Ordinance (Texas) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agencies You are here Home Savings City of Dallas - Green Buildling Ordinance (Texas) City of Dallas - Green Buildling Ordinance (Texas) Eligibility Commercial Residential...

24

City of Dallas - Green Building Expedited Plan Review | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings City of Dallas - Green Building Expedited Plan Review City of Dallas - Green Building Expedited Plan Review...

25

Fort Worth, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

25409┬░, -97.3208496┬░ 25409┬░, -97.3208496┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.725409,"lon":-97.3208496,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

26

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Police Department Reduces Vehicle  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Dallas Police Dallas Police Department Reduces Vehicle Idling to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Police Department Reduces Vehicle Idling on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Police Department Reduces Vehicle Idling on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Police Department Reduces Vehicle Idling on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Police Department Reduces Vehicle Idling on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Police Department Reduces Vehicle Idling on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Dallas Police Department Reduces Vehicle Idling on AddThis.com... Nov. 27, 2009 Dallas Police Department Reduces Vehicle Idling L earn how the Dallas Police Department reduces its fleet's idling.

27

Comments on ôTemperature and Violent Crime in Dallas, Texas: Relationships and Implications of Climate Changeö  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Dallas Police Dept, Texas: Crime rate per 100,000and Violent Crime in Dallas, Texas: Relationships andand Violent Crime in Dallas, Texas: Relationships and

Williams, Matt N.; Hill, Stephen R.; Spicer, John

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Dallas: Building a Greener City | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dallas: Building a Greener City Dallas: Building a Greener City Dallas: Building a Greener City August 28, 2013 - 2:10pm Addthis Thanks to the Energy Department's Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program, the city of Dallas has improved the efficiency of more than 200 city-owned buildings, saving $1 million a year in energy costs. | Photo courtesy of the City of Dallas. Thanks to the Energy Department's Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program, the city of Dallas has improved the efficiency of more than 200 city-owned buildings, saving $1 million a year in energy costs. | Photo courtesy of the City of Dallas. Christina Stowers Communications Specialist in the Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program What are the key facts? Dallas used grant money from the Energy Efficiency and Conservation

29

Dallas: Building a Greener City | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dallas: Building a Greener City Dallas: Building a Greener City Dallas: Building a Greener City August 28, 2013 - 2:10pm Addthis Thanks to the Energy Department's Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program, the city of Dallas has improved the efficiency of more than 200 city-owned buildings, saving $1 million a year in energy costs. | Photo courtesy of the City of Dallas. Thanks to the Energy Department's Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program, the city of Dallas has improved the efficiency of more than 200 city-owned buildings, saving $1 million a year in energy costs. | Photo courtesy of the City of Dallas. Christina Stowers Communications Specialist in the Office of Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program What are the key facts? Dallas used grant money from the Energy Efficiency and Conservation

30

Mitigation of light rail transit construction on jurisdictional areas in the White Rock Creek floodplain, Dallas, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and consulting in Dallas, Texas. In this capacity, Ms.WHITE ROCK CREEK FLOODPLAIN, DALLAS, TEXAS Emily Schieffer (Boulevard, Suite 510, Dallas, Texas 75207, Phone: 214-741-

Schieffer, Emily; Smiley, Jerry

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Hydraulic Fracturing and Water Use in Dallas, Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Dallas, Texas is located in North Texas and sits above the eastern portion of the Barnett Shale natural gas formation. Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, wasů (more)

Yates, Sarah

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

City of Dallas - Green Buildling Ordinance (Texas) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Cooling Design & Remodeling Insulation Program Information Texas Program Type Building Energy Code In April 2008, Dallas passed a Green Building Ordinance, which requires all...

33

City of Dallas- Green Building Expedited Plan Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Dallas Green Building Program establishes expedited permitting for green buildings. During Phase 1 of the program (October 1, 2009 - September 30, 2011), applicants must provide a checklist...

34

City of Dallas - Green Buildling Ordinance (Texas) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial Code Phase 1: New buildings less than 50,000 square feet must meet minimum energy consumption required by the Dallas Energy Conservation Code; Must utilize Energy...

35

Temperature and Violent Crime in Dallas, Texas: Relationships and Implications of Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Violent Crime in Dallas, Texas Gamble and Hess 29. McCullaghand Violent Crime in Dallas, Texas: Relationships andviolent crime in Dallas, Texas from 1993ľ1999. Methods: We

Gamble, Janet L; Hess, Jeremy J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Operational testing highlights of Fort St. Vrain  

SciTech Connect

The Fort St. Vrain program has progressed through construction, preoperational testing, fuel loading, initial criticality, and operational testing at power levels up to 2 percent related power. To date, all tests necessary before the rise to full power have been completed, and the rise-to- power program is expected to be resumed again in late 1975. Major plant systems, including the prestressed concrete reactor vessel and circulators, have demonstrated adequate performance. Extensive tests on the reactor core at zero power and up to 2 percent power have demonstrated the accuracy in the design predictions of such core characteristics as critical rod position, control system worths, neutron flux distributions, and temperature coefficients. Gaseous fission product release measurements to date have confirmed the extensive analytical estimates. 6 references (auth)

Cadwell, J.J.; McEachern, D.W.; Read, J.W.; Simon, W.A.; Walker, R.F.

1975-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

37

Presented by the UT Dallas Career Center UT Dallas Fall Career Expo Employer Profile September 19, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineer Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Software Engineering Full-time Job, Internship/Co- op: Summer CPT, OPT Ambit Energy ambitenergy.com Software Developer, Business CoordinatorPresented by the UT Dallas Career Center UT Dallas Fall Career Expo Employer Profile September 19

O'Toole, Alice J.

38

Revised History of Fort Watauga.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The history of the Revolutionary War Fort Watauga located in present day Elizabethton, TN has yet to be completed. The critique of several Tennessee historiansů (more)

Compton, Brian Patrick

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Fort Calhoun  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fort Calhoun" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License Expiration Date"...

40

City of Dallas- Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 2003 the Dallas City Council passed a resolution requiring that all new municipal buildings larger than 10,000 square feet be constructed to meet LEED Silver Certification standards. In 2006...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

City of Dallas - Green Energy Purchasing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Dallas finalized purchase contracts for more than 333 million kilowatt-hours (kWh) of green electricity for city facilities during 2008. The city has elected to continue...

42

Gamble and Hess Reply to Williams et al regarding Temperature and Violent Crime in Dallas, Texas: Relationships and Implications of Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Dallas Police Dept, Texas: Crime rate per 100,000and Violent Crime in Dallas, Texas: Relationships andand Violent Crime in Dallas, Texas: Relationships and

Gamble, Janet L; Hess, Jeremy J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Fort Fairfield Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Fort Fairfield Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Fairfield Biomass Facility Facility...

44

Fort Carson Wind Resource Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and economic potential of a wind turbine project on a ridge in the southeastern portion of the Fort Carson Army base.

Robichaud, R.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Urban Heat Island of the North-Central Texas Region and its Relation to the 2011 Severe Texas Drought  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hourly surface temperature differences between Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan and rural sites have been used to calculate the urban heat island from 2001 to 2011. The heat island peaked after sunset, and was particularly strong during the drought ...

A. M. E. Winguth; B. Kelp

46

Total Lightning Signatures of Thunderstorm Intensity over North Texas. Part II: Mesoscale Convective Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total lightning data from the Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR II) research network in addition to cloud-to-ground flash data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and data from the DallasľFort Worth, Texas, Weather ...

Scott M. Steiger; Richard E. Orville; Lawrence D. Carey

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

The University of Texas at Dallas Erik Jonsson School c C. D. Cantrell (06/1997)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Dallas Erik Jonsson School PhoTEC c C. D. Cantrell (06/1997) FRESNEL analytical solution Numerical solution #12;The University of Texas at Dallas Erik Jonsson School PhoTEC c C) one Cartesian component of E #12;The University of Texas at Dallas Erik Jonsson School PhoTEC c C. D

Hart, Gus

48

Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center 17360 Coit Road, Dallas, TX 75252  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Center 17360 Coit Road, Dallas, TX 75252 Fall Integrated Pest Management Seminar Melody Lee Texas Department of Agriculture -- Dallas Dr. Dotty Woodson Texas AgriLife Extension Service--Dallas Dr. Young-Ki Jo Texas AgriLife Extension Service -- College Station Dr. James Mc

Wilkins, Neal

49

Sevin Rosen Funds (Texas - Dallas) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dallas) Dallas) Jump to: navigation, search Name Sevin Rosen Funds (Texas - Dallas) Address 13455 Noel Road, Suite 1670 Place Dallas, Texas Zip 75240 Region Texas Area Product Venture capital fund focusing on seed and early-stage technology Year founded 1981 Phone number (972) 702-1100 Website http://www.srfunds.com/ Coordinates 32.931102┬░, -96.81825┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.931102,"lon":-96.81825,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

50

WEFTEC 2006, Dallas, Texas FULL SCALE EVALUATION OF THE UPFLOTM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WEFTEC 2006, Dallas, Texas FULL SCALE EVALUATION OF THE UPFLOTM FILTER - A CATCHBASIN INSERT *** Hydro International, Portland, ME 04102, USA **** StormTrain, LLC. Ann Arbor MI USA ABSTRACT Stormwater of problem contaminants or heavy equipment. The control of runoff from relatively small critical source areas

Pitt, Robert E.

51

TheUniversityofTexasatDallas CallierCenterforCommunicationDisorders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.Date:_________/____________Securitycode/3numbersonback:_____________________ Space is limited. Register today! To register, send completed utdallas.edu/calliercenter Hear the Roar of the Rainforest The 17th Annual Crystal Charity Ball Cochlear to and from camp (Mon. - Thurs., leaving from Callier Dallas) The Friday Family Celebration Space is limited

O'Toole, Alice J.

52

FORT UNION DEEP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) is currently the hottest area of energy development in the Rocky Mountain area. The Powder River Basin (PRB) is the largest CBM area in Wyoming and has attracted the majority of the attention because of its high permeability and relatively shallow depth. Other Wyoming coal regions are also being targeted for development, but most of these areas have lower permeability and deeper coal seams. This project consists of the development of a CBM stimulation system for deep coal resources and involves three work areas: (1) Well Placement, (2) Well Stimulation, and (3) Production Monitoring and Evaluation. The focus of this project is the Washakie Basin. Timberline Energy, Inc., the cosponsor, has a project area in southern Carbon County, Wyoming, and northern Moffat County, Colorado. The target coal is found near the top of the lower Fort Union formation. The well for this project, Evans No.1, was drilled to a depth of 2,700 ft. Three coal seams were encountered with sandstone and some interbedded shale between seams. Well logs indicated that the coal seams and the sandstone contained gas. For the testing, the upper seam at 2,000 ft was selected. The well, drilled and completed for this project, produced very little water and only occasional burps of methane. To enhance the well, a mild severity fracture was conducted to fracture the coal seam and not the adjacent sandstone. Fracturing data indicated a fracture half-length of 34 ft, a coal permeability of 0.2226 md, and permeability of 15.3 md. Following fracturing, the gas production rate stabilized at 10 Mscf/day within water production of 18 bpd. The Western Research Institute (WRI) CBM model was used to design a 14-day stimulation cycle followed by a 30-day production period. A maximum injection pressure of 1,200 psig to remain well below the fracture pressure was selected. Model predictions were 20 Mscf/day of air injection for 14 days, a one-day shut-in, then flowback. The predicted flowback was a four-fold increase over the prestimulation rate with production essentially returning to prestimulation rates after 30 days. The physical stimulation was conducted over a 14-day period. Problems with the stimulation injection resulted in a coal bed fire that was quickly quenched when production was resumed. The poststimulation, stabilized production was three to four times the prestimulation rate. The methane content was approximately 45% after one day and increased to 65% at the end of 30 days. The gas production rate was still two and one-half times the prestimulation rate at the end of the 30-day test period. The field results were a good match to the numerical simulator predictions. The physical stimulation did increase the production, but did not produce a commercial rate.

Lyle A. Johnson Jr.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

FORT UNION DEEP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) is currently the hottest area of energy development in the Rocky Mountain area. The Powder River Basin (PRB) is the largest CBM area in Wyoming and has attracted the majority of the attention because of its high permeability and relatively shallow depth. Other Wyoming coal regions are also being targeted for development, but most of these areas have lower permeability and deeper coal seams. This project consists of the development of a CBM stimulation system for deep coal resources and involves three work areas: (1) Well Placement, (2) Well Stimulation, and (3) Production Monitoring and Evaluation. The focus of this project is the Washakie Basin. Timberline Energy, Inc., the cosponsor, has a project area in southern Carbon County, Wyoming, and northern Moffat County, Colorado. The target coal is found near the top of the lower Fort Union formation. The well for this project, Evans No.1, was drilled to a depth of 2,700 ft. Three coal seams were encountered with sandstone and some interbedded shale between seams. Well logs indicated that the coal seams and the sandstone contained gas. For the testing, the upper seam at 2,000 ft was selected. The well, drilled and completed for this project, produced very little water and only occasional burps of methane. To enhance the well, a mild severity fracture was conducted to fracture the coal seam and not the adjacent sandstone. Fracturing data indicated a fracture half-length of 34 ft, a coal permeability of 0.2226 md, and permeability of 15.3 md. Following fracturing, the gas production rate stabilized at 10 Mscf/day within water production of 18 bpd. The Western Research Institute (WRI) CBM model was used to design a 14-day stimulation cycle followed by a 30-day production period. A maximum injection pressure of 1,200 psig to remain well below the fracture pressure was selected. Model predictions were 20 Mscf/day of air injection for 14 days, a one-day shut-in, then flowback. The predicted flowback was a four-fold increase over the prestimulation rate with production essentially returning to prestimulation rates after 30 days. The physical stimulation was conducted over a 14-day period. Problems with the stimulation injection resulted in a coal bed fire that was quickly quenched when production was resumed. The poststimulation, stabilized production was three to four times the prestimulation rate. The methane content was approximately 45% after one day and increased to 65% at the end of 30 days. The gas production rate was still two and one-half times the prestimulation rate at the end of the 30-day test period. The field results were a good match to the numerical simulator predictions. The physical stimulation did increase the production, but did not produce a commercial rate.

Lyle A. Johnson Jr.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Propane Fuel Buses for Dallas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel and Propane Biodiesel and Propane Fuel Buses for Dallas County Schools to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Propane Fuel Buses for Dallas County Schools on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Propane Fuel Buses for Dallas County Schools on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Propane Fuel Buses for Dallas County Schools on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Propane Fuel Buses for Dallas County Schools on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Propane Fuel Buses for Dallas County Schools on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Propane Fuel Buses for Dallas County Schools on AddThis.com... Oct. 2, 2009

55

Fort Sill Tribal Energy Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Fort Sill Apache Tribe of Oklahoma has concluded an energy project funded through the ôFirst Steps Toward Developing Renewable Energy & Energy Efficiencyö program provided by the Department of Energy. The intent of the project was to include the establishment of a tribal Energy Office, an energy audit of tribal facilities, and a Strategic Energy Plan.

Shamieka Ross

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

56

International Truck & Bus Meeting & Exhibition, Fort Worth, TX, November 2003. 2003-01-3369  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System Development for an Advanced-Technology Medium-Duty Hybrid Electric Truck Chan-Chiao Lin, Huei Peng for a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV). The hybrid electric truck that employs this control system features a "Direct Hybrid" powertrain system [1], which integrates an advanced diesel engine, an electric traction

Peng, Huei

57

Dallas County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dallas County, Texas: Energy Resources Dallas County, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.8024682┬░, -96.8350999┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.8024682,"lon":-96.8350999,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

58

Town of Dallas, North Carolina (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dallas Town of Dallas Town of Place North Carolina Utility Id 4739 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png GENERAL SERVICE COMMERCIAL - Rate D Industrial INDUSTRIAL RATE E Industrial RESIDENTIAL Rate A Residential RESIDENTIAL WITH ELECTRIC WATER HEATER Rate B Residential Residential Total Electric Rate C Residential SECURITY LIGHTS - TYPE 1 Lighting SECURITY LIGHTS - TYPE 2 Lighting SECURITY LIGHTS - TYPE 3 Lighting Average Rates Residential: $0.1010/kWh

59

Residential photovoltaic worth : a summary assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two critical perspectives have been addressed by the analyses of residential photovoltaic worth. For the researcher and designer have been established allowable costs. For the homeowner and institutional decision-makers ...

Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Energy Savings Report For Dallas County, July 2000 ľ June 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents the energy and dollar savings for the period July 2000 - June 2001 for 12 Dallas County facilities that have been retrofit by Enershop. The savings for this period total $745,046, which represent 73.2% of the audit estimated savings. The electric demand savings are $261,517 and the electric usage savings are $483,529. The savings have improved somewhat from the previous report that included the billing periods for April - June 2000. The savings for the earlier period were 62.6% of the audit estimated savings compared with 73.2% for the current period.

Claridge, D. E.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Zhu, Y.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A Competition Worth Winning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Competition Worth Winning A Competition Worth Winning A Competition Worth Winning August 31, 2011 - 11:59am Addthis U.S. solar cell (PV) and module manufacturing market share. | Sources: PV News and Navigating Consulting. U.S. solar cell (PV) and module manufacturing market share. | Sources: PV News and Navigating Consulting. Dan Leistikow Dan Leistikow Former Director, Office of Public Affairs Since 2009, the Department of Energy's Loan Program has supported a robust, diverse portfolio of more than 40 projects that are investing in pioneering companies as we work to regain American leadership in the global race for clean energy jobs. These projects include the world's largest wind farm, several of the world's largest solar generation facilities, one of the country's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol plants,

62

A Competition Worth Winning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Competition Worth Winning A Competition Worth Winning A Competition Worth Winning August 31, 2011 - 11:59am Addthis U.S. solar cell (PV) and module manufacturing market share. | Sources: PV News and Navigating Consulting. U.S. solar cell (PV) and module manufacturing market share. | Sources: PV News and Navigating Consulting. Dan Leistikow Dan Leistikow Former Director, Office of Public Affairs Since 2009, the Department of Energy's Loan Program has supported a robust, diverse portfolio of more than 40 projects that are investing in pioneering companies as we work to regain American leadership in the global race for clean energy jobs. These projects include the world's largest wind farm, several of the world's largest solar generation facilities, one of the country's first commercial-scale cellulosic ethanol plants,

63

Fort Drum integrated resource assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk's primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 2, the Baseline Detail.

Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Di Massa, F.V.; Elliott, D.B.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

The University of Texas at Dallas Erik Jonsson School c C. D. Cantrell (11/1999)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Dallas Erik Jonsson School PhoTEC c C. D. Cantrell (11/1999) STIMULATED STATE EXCITED ELECTRONIC STATES #12;The University of Texas at Dallas Erik Jonsson School PhoTEC c C. D as E) Nonlinear polarization: PNL = N q q=0 qE (different frequency) #12;The University of Texas

La Rosa, Andres H.

65

Alternative Fuel Transit Buses: DART's (Dallas Area Rapid Transit) LNG Bus Fleet Final Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1998, Dallas Area Rapid Transit, a public transit agency in Dallas, Texas, began operating a large fleet of heavy-duty buses powered by liquefied natural gas. As part of a $16 million commitment to alternative fuels, DART operates 139 LNG buses serviced by two new LNG fueling stations.

Chandler, K. [Battelle (US); Norton, P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (US); Clark, N.

2000-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

66

The University of Texas at Dallas Advanced Network Research Labs 1 Generalized Burst Assembly and Scheduling Techniques for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The University of Texas at Dallas Advanced Network Research Labs 1 Generalized Burst Assembly Jason P. Jue, and Biao Chen Advanced Network Research Labs The University of Texas at Dallas, USA #12;The University of Texas at Dallas Advanced Network Research Labs 2 Outline ┬Ě Optical Burst Switching

Vokkarane, Vinod M.

67

Fort Pierce Utilities Authority - Solar Water Heating Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fort Pierce Utilities Authority - Solar Water Heating Rebate (Florida) Fort Pierce Utilities Authority - Solar Water Heating Rebate (Florida) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings...

68

NREL: Department of Defense Energy Programs - Fort Carson  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fort Carson NREL is helping Fort Carson, Colorado, meet its net zero energy, water, and waste by 2020 goal by conducting technology demonstrations and providing support for...

69

Geothermometry At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP)...

70

Thermochronometry At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermochronometry At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Thermochronometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated...

71

U.S. Army Fort Carson Photovoltaics Project Lease  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Document describes the project lease issued for the Fort Carson photovoltaic (PV) power purchase agreement (PPA).

72

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Fort Bliss Geothermal Area (Redirected from Fort Bliss Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (22) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Texas Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

73

Water Reclamation and Reuse at Fort Carson  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fort Carson has built a successful and Fort Carson has built a successful and award-winning water conservation program through a series of initiatives that avoid using potable water. The program involves an innovative approach to utilizing alter- native sources of water, water reclamation, and recycling. Fort Carson is located near Colorado Springs, Colorado, and together with the Pi├▒on Canyon Maneuver Site, occupies 373,000 acres. The army base has more than 9 million square feet of facility space-buildings that serve the army base-and an additional 4 million square feet of private family housing. Fort Carson serves as a training facility for the U.S. Army Special Forces, an infantry division, and Army Reserves. The base hosts more than 45,000 military personnel annu- ally. Approximately 20,000 civilians and military personnel

74

Water Reclamation and Reuse at Fort Carson  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Army's Fort Carson has built a successful and Army's Fort Carson has built a successful and award-winning water conservation program through a series of initiatives that avoid using potable water. The program involves an innovative approach to utilizing alter- native sources of water, water reclamation, and recycling. Fort Carson is located near Colorado Springs, Colorado, and together with the Pi├▒on Canyon Maneuver Site, occupies 373,000 acres. The army base has more than 9 million square feet of facility space-buildings that serve the army base-and an additional 4 million square feet of private family housing. Fort Carson serves as a training facility for the U.S. Army Special Forces, an infantry division, and Army Reserves. The base hosts more than 45,000 military personnel annu- ally. Approximately 20,000 civilians and military personnel

75

Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) follow-on renewable energy (RE) assessment of Fort Hood. Fort Hood receives many solicitations from renewable energy vendors who are interested in doing projects on site. Based on specific requests from Fort Hood staff so they can better understand these proposals, and the results of PNNL's 2008 RE assessment of Fort Hood, the following resources were examined in this assessment: (1) Municipal solid waste (MSW) for waste-to-energy (WTE); (2) Wind; (3) Landfill gas; (4) Solar photovoltaics (PV); and (5) Shale gas. This report also examines the regulatory issues, development options, and environmental impacts for the promising RE resources, and includes a review of the RE market in Texas.

Solana, Amy E.; Warwick, William M.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Parker, Kyle R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Manning, Anathea

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

76

Fort Hood solar energy project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the period April 1975 to March 1978, the American Technological University (ATU) of Killeen, Texas, was awarded several follow-on contracts by the Division of Solar Energy (DSE), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA), which subsequently became the Division of Solar Technology (DST), Department of Energy (DOE). The contracts were to design a solar total energy system for use at Fort Hood, Texas. A review encompassing the period of the project from January 1975 to March 1978, was conducted by the Office of Inspector General (IG), DOE. The review examined both the management of the project by ATU and ERDA personnel and the award and administration by ERDA of the contracts to ATU for support of the project. The IG review found that: (1) there was a lack of continuity in the management of the project by both ATU and ERDA; (2) ERDA failed to maintain control of the project and failed to issue specific project direction to ATU; (3) ERDA failed to follow existing procurement regulations for the review and acceptance of unsolicited proposals from ATU; (4) the ERDA Headquarters program Manager and the Contract Administrator for the conceptual design phase of the project had failed to ensure that all the tasks which had been funded were performed by ATU; and (5) the decision by the Director, ERDA/DSE, to award successive contracts to ATU was questionable in view of ATU's performance on the project.

Not Available

1980-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

Comments on ôTemperature and Violent Crime in Dallas, Texas: Relationships and Implications of Climate Changeö  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EG. Global warming and U.S. crime rates: An appli- cation of6. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime reported by DallasPolice Dept, Texas: Crime rate per 100,000 population,

Williams, Matt N.; Hill, Stephen R.; Spicer, John

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (22) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Texas Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

79

Limited energy studies, Fort Rucker, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of building and operating a liquified petroleum gas (LPG) storage facility at Fort Rucker. The primary heating fuel at Fort Rucker is natural gas; it is used in central steam plants and in central forced-air furnaces for family housing. Natural gas is purchased from the Southeast Alabama Gas District at there lowest rate. However, Fort Rucker also pays a natural gas demand charge based on the amount of natural gas used during curtailment. During a curtailment period, the natural gas demand is intended to be reduced as much as possible by switching the central steam plants to oil; but the family housing area continues to use nature gas. storage system would provide the capability of injecting a mixture of air and propane into the natural as distribution system during curtailment to reduce natural gas demand. This would result in lower gas bills throughout the year.

NONE

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8617,"lon":-120.1592,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Cove Fort Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Geothermal Area Cove Fort Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Cove Fort Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (30) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.6,"lon":-112.55,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

82

Fort Totten Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Totten Wind Farm Totten Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Totten Wind Farm Facility Fort Totten Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Spirit Lake Sioux Energy Purchaser Spirit Lake Sioux Location Fort Totten ND Coordinates 47.9817┬░, -99.0029┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.9817,"lon":-99.0029,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

83

Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Sill, Oklahoma  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Sill, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Sill took place on June 10, 2010.

Boyd, Brian K.; Hand, James R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Nesse, Ronald J.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

Lamb customer satisfaction in two Texas cities - - Dallas and Houston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An in-home lamb study evaluated consumer ratings from users of lamb (at least once per month) as influenced by cut (blade chop, rib chop, loin chop, and leg steak), demographics, preparation method, and degree of doneness. Consumers in Dallas and Houston (n = 51) evaluated each cut for overall like (OLIKE), tenderness (TEND), juiciness (JUIC), flavor intensity (IFLAV), and flavor desirability (DFLAV) using 10- point scales (10 = extreme like, extremely tender, extremely juicy, extremely intense, and extremely desirable; 1 = extreme dislike, extremely tough, extremely dry, extremely bland, and extremely undesirable). Income had a slight effect on consumer OLIKE ratings (P = 0.047). Consumers earning more than $50,000 rated lamb lower than those earning $40-50,000. Differences (P 0.10). A preparation method effect existed for TEND in the blade chop (P < 0.05). Consumers rated grilling higher than other methods. A preparation method x degree of doneness interaction existed for OLIKE (P = 0.019) and TEND (P = 0.014) ratings of leg steaks. Cuts prepared by grilling x medium or higher were rated lower than those prepared by other methods x medium or higher. Preparation method was related to IFLAV (P < 0.05). Leg steaks that were grilled had lower IFLAV ratings than steaks prepared with other methods. TEND and DFLAV were important and contributed to overall like (r = 0.84 and r = 0.83, respectively). IFLAV had a lower correlation (r = 0.32) with OLIKE, which suggests that it did not influence consumer ratings of lamb. Rib and loin cuts were rated higher than shoulder and leg cuts and are subject to less variation from dependent factors of palatability, including preparation method and degree of doneness. Leg steaks were influenced more by tenderness than flavor desirability, which suggests that tenderness may be a more important factor in tougher cuts.

Maddock, Travis David

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area (Redirected from Fort Bidwell Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fort Bidwell Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8617,"lon":-120.1592,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

86

Cove Fort Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Geothermal Area Cove Fort Geothermal Area (Redirected from Cove Fort Geothermal Area - Vapor) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Cove Fort Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (30) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.6,"lon":-112.55,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

87

Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), Fort Bliss headquarters building, lighting retrofit, Fort Bliss, El Paso, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to analyze the use of high efficiency fluorescent lighting with energy efficient lamps and electronic ballast for the Headquarters Building (Bldg. number 2) at Fort Bliss.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Lake Worth Utilities - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake Worth Utilities - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Lake Worth Utilities - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Program Lake Worth Utilities - Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $450 Rebates must not exceed purchase price Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $450 per system Provider City of Lake Worth Utilities The City of Lake Worth Utilities (CLWU), in conjunction with Florida Municipal Power Agency, offers rebates to customers who purchase and install a solar water heating system for residential use. A rebate of $450 per system is available to eligible applicants. Eligible equipment must be located on customer premises within the CLWU service territory, and must

89

Fort Payne Improvement Auth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Auth Auth Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Payne Improvement Auth Place Alabama Utility Id 6612 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Business Commercial Commercial Commercial Industrial Industrial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0894/kWh Commercial: $0.0907/kWh Industrial: $0.0810/kWh References ÔćĹ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Fort_Payne_Improvement_Auth&oldid=41071

90

Fort Loudoun Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Loudoun Electric Coop Fort Loudoun Electric Coop Place Tennessee Utility Id 6608 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Power Rate-Schedule GSA 1 Commercial General Power Rate-Schedule GSA 2 Commercial General Power Rate-Schedule GSA 3 Commercial OUTDOOR LIGHTING RATE ( 150 Watt Metal Halide) Lighting OUTDOOR LIGHTING RATE ( 250 Watt HPS) Lighting OUTDOOR LIGHTING RATE ( 400 Watt HPS) Lighting OUTDOOR LIGHTING RATE ( 400 Watt Metal Halide) Lighting OUTDOOR LIGHTING RATE( 100 Watt HPS) Lighting

91

Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Hood based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 DoD Renewables Assessment. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings, as directed by IMCOM.

Chvala, William D.; Warwick, William M.; Dixon, Douglas R.; Solana, Amy E.; Weimar, Mark R.; States, Jennifer C.; Reilly, Raymond W.

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

Lake Worth Utilities - Energy Conservation Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lake Worth Utilities - Energy Conservation Rebate Program Lake Worth Utilities - Energy Conservation Rebate Program Lake Worth Utilities - Energy Conservation Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Limit one of each type of equipment per customer account Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Energy Savings Kit: Free AC/Heat Pump: $250 Clothes Washer: $100 Dishwasher: $75 Freezer: $100 Refrigerator: $100 Programmable Thermostat: $25 Room AC: $100 Insulation Upgrade: up to $300 Commercial Commercial Lighting: up to $1,000 Insulation Upgrade: up to $1,000

93

Potential Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Savings at Schools in the Ft. Worth Independent School District  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As part of the Texas LoanSTAR program, 44 schools in the Fort Worth Independent School District (FWISD) had lighting retrofits performed on there in late 1991. The Energy Systems Laboratory of Texas A&M University is monitoring hourly energy use at two of these 44 schools, Sims Elementary School and Dunbar Middle School. Data analyses at the Energy Systems Laboratory on the monitored data along with utility billing data from 102 other schools in the FWISD, have shown major O&M savings potential in these schools of over one-fourth of the total electricity consumption and gas consumption, which could amount to $ 1,658,000/yr. This report describes the analysis procedure and highlights the O&M energy savings potential in each of the 104 schools.

Liu, M.; Reddy, T. A.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Dallas, Texas July 27, 2010 First Last Organization Email  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Watershed Coordinator Roundtable Dallas, Texas July 27, 2010 First Last Organization Email Texas Water Resources Institute glbryant@ag.tamu.edu Ruben Camacho EPA SRF Camacho.Ruben@epamail.epa.gov Jody Carton Trinity Basin Conservation Foundation jcarton@trinitybasin.org Pamela Casebolt Texas State

95

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Fort St Vrain - 011  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Fort St Vrain - 011 Fort St Vrain - 011 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Fort St Vrain (011) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The Fort St. Vrain Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation is located in Weld County, Colorado. In 1965, the U.S. Atomic Energy (a predecessor agency to DOE) agreed to provide permanent storage for a large portion of the Fort St. Vrain┬┐s spent nuclear fuel. Originally, Fort St. Vrain was a nuclear power generating facility that operated from 1976 to 1989. In 1989, the nuclear power plant was decommissioned and the plant was converted to a natural gas power plant.

96

Multispectral Imaging At Cove Fort Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area (Laney, 2005) Cove Fort Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Cove Fort Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geology and Geophysics of Geothermal Systems, Gregory Nash, 2005. Vegetalspectral analysis at Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, Utah was tested as a method of detecting hidden faults in exploration efforts. This effort proved to be successful and resulted in the Following published paper: Nash, G. D., J. N. Moore, and T. Sperry, 2003. "Vegetal-spectral anomaly detection at the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale thermal anomaly, Utah, USA: implications for use in geothermal exploration." Geothermics, v. 32, p.

97

City of Fort Collins Comment on Information Collection Extension, October  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Fort Collins Comment on Information Collection Extension, City of Fort Collins Comment on Information Collection Extension, October 2011 City of Fort Collins Comment on Information Collection Extension, October 2011 The City of Fort Collins provided comments to the Department of Energy's notice of intent to seek approval of an extension of Information Collection 1910-5149 for Recovery Act Smart Grid Investment Grant reporting for four years, which was published in the Federal Register August 10, 2011, Vol. 76, No. 154, page 49460. Fort Collins finds the current collection period burdensome and recommends quarterly reporting. View information on Recovery Act Smart Grid Investment Grants. View the Federal Register Notice. City of Fort Collins FRN Information Collection comments.pdf More Documents & Publications

98

Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature...

99

Fort Collins Utilities - Residential and Small Commercial Appliance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RefrigeratorFreezer Recycling: 35, plus free pick-up Fort Collins Utilities offers a number of appliance and recycling rebates to residential and small commercial customers....

100

NETL: News Release - Federal Environmental Laboratory at Fort...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Laboratory at Fort Meade to be Powered by Revolutionary Fuel Cell Power Plant Richardson, Browner Announce Government "Showcase" Project WASHINGTON, DC - The...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details...

102

Geographic Information System At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Nash...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown Notes An example, shown in Figure 1, shows results from the classification of big sagebrush (Artimesia tridentata) spectra, acquired over the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale,...

103

Fort Loramie, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County, Ohio. It falls under Ohio's 4th congressional district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Fort Loramie, Ohio LP Hoying, LLC References US Census Bureau...

104

U.S. Army Fort Carson Photovoltaics Project Lease  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with Fort Carson's hazardous waste. g. If it is determined by the Environmental Baseline Survey andlor NEPA process that there is the potential for hazardous waste, fuel, and...

105

Town of Fort Supply, Oklahoma (Utility Company) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supply, Oklahoma (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Town of Fort Supply Place Oklahoma Utility Id 6618 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP...

106

Pressure Temperature Log At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Pressure Temperature Log At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

107

Fort Thompson, South Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Fort Thompson, South Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia...

108

Changing the state of fairness : redeveloping Fair Park as a catalyst for the revitalization of South Dallas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis studies Fair Park, a 277 acre public park located in Dallas, Texas. Fair Park represents prevalent planning challenges - the repurposing of sites that have outlived their initial uses and the reintegration of ...

Di Mambro, Giuliana Siena

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Petrologic and petrophysical evaluation of the Dallas Center Structure, Iowa, for compressed air energy storage in the Mount Simon Sandstone.  

SciTech Connect

The Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency selected a geologic structure at Dallas Center, Iowa, for evaluation of subsurface compressed air energy storage. The site was rejected due to lower-than-expected and heterogeneous permeability of the target reservoir, lower-than-desired porosity, and small reservoir volume. In an initial feasibility study, permeability and porosity distributions of flow units for the nearby Redfield gas storage field were applied as analogue values for numerical modeling of the Dallas Center Structure. These reservoir data, coupled with an optimistic reservoir volume, produced favorable results. However, it was determined that the Dallas Center Structure cannot be simplified to four zones of high, uniform permeabilities. Updated modeling using field and core data for the site provided unfavorable results for air fill-up. This report presents Sandia National Laboratories' petrologic and petrophysical analysis of the Dallas Center Structure that aids in understanding why the site was not suitable for gas storage.

Heath, Jason E.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Test Access Mechanism for Core Based SystemonChip The Univ. of Texas at Dallas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Test Access Mechanism for Core Based System┬şon┬şChip M. Nourani The Univ. of Texas at Dallas Dept of TAM for SoC's. The basic goal is to develop a global design for test methodology and tool for testing as their interactions to one another. More specifically, it al┬ş lows at┬şspeed testing and multi┬şcore interaction during

Nourani, Mehrdad

111

School of Social Work Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1586  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environment and graduating social work practitioners who excel in their professional lives. Students-time; or taking your courses in Thornton, Colorado Springs, Fort Collins or on-line, the School of Social WorkSchool of Social Work Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1586 Phone (970) 491-6612 Fax (970) 491

Stephens, Graeme L.

112

January 6, 2004 ORNL/TM-2003/286 Retrofit Best Practices Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Bakersfield, CA. Chicago, IL. Atlanta, GA. Washington, DC Fort Worth, TX. Minneapolis, MN Miami, FL. air Phoenix and Bakersfield Dallas and Miami Boulder, Chicago, and Minneapolis Seattle, Atlanta, Washington DC a house "work"? 1 Inspecting your house 2 Moisture 4 Walls 4 Windows 4 Step 2: Your Options 5 Replacement

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

113

Radiometrics At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Radiometrics At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Radiometrics At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Radiometrics At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Radiometrics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Radiometrics_At_Fort_Bliss_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=402615" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 1863747441

114

Spontaneous Potential At Fort Bidwell Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spontaneous Potential At Fort Bidwell Area (Laney, 2005) Spontaneous Potential At Fort Bidwell Area (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Spontaneous Potential Well Log At Fort Bidwell Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bidwell Area Exploration Technique Spontaneous Potential Well Log Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Magnetotelluric Imaging, G. Michael Hoversten. The project title derived from its inception. The project however moved from the application of MT on Kilauea in 2003 to the use of combined SP and conductivity mapping (MT) in 2004. The beginning of 2004 saw the completions of the Kilauea MT experiment by the acquisition of an additional 45 MT stations on Kilauea. We therefore decided to use the funds available to work at the Fort Bidwell

115

City of Lake Worth, Florida (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Worth, Florida (Utility Company) Worth, Florida (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Lake Worth Place Florida Utility Id 10620 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location FRCC NERC FRCC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Schedule GS-S: Regular General Service Commercial Schedule GS-S: Regular General Service, Time of Use Commercial Schedule GSD-S: Regular General Service-Demand Industrial Schedule GSD-S: Regular General Service-Demand, Time of Use Commercial Schedule L-P: Private Area Lighting, 1,000 Watt (55,000 Lumen), Mercury

116

Flow Test At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

117

2-M Probe At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-M Probe At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: 2-M Probe At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

118

Density Log at Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Density Log at Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Density Log at Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

119

Fort Pierce Utilities Auth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilities Auth Utilities Auth Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Pierce Utilities Auth Place Florida Utility Id 6616 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location FRCC NERC FRCC Yes ISO Other Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Demand Commercial Commercial General Service High Load Factor Industrial General Service Large Demand Industrial Non-Demand Commercial Single Phase Commercial Non-Demand Commercial Three Phase Commercial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1440/kWh

120

Fort Valley Utility Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Comm Utility Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Valley Utility Comm Place Georgia Utility Id 6617 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COMMERCIAL: #20 Commercial INDUSTRIAL LARGE POWER: #26/28 Industrial INSTITUTIONAL: #14 Commercial Industrial Small Power Industrial RESIDENTIAL: #10 Residential SMALL COMMERCIAL: #22 Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0787/kWh Commercial: $0.1030/kWh Industrial: $0.0772/kWh References

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Master environmental plan for Fort Devens, Massachusetts  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory has prepared a master environmental plan (MEP) for Fort Devens, Massachusetts, for the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency. The MEP is an assessment based on environmental laws and regulations of both the federal government and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The MEP assess the physical and environmental status of 58 potential hazardous waste sites, including 54 study areas (SAs) that pose a potential for releasing contamination into the environment and 4 areas of concern (AOCs) that are known to have substantial contamination. For each SA or AOC, this MEP describes the known history and environment, identifies additional data needs, and proposes possible response actions. Most recommended response actions consist of environmental sampling and monitoring and other characterization studies. 74 refs., 63 figs., 50 tabs.

Biang, C.A.; Peters, R.W.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Vickrey Prices and Shortest Paths: What is an Edge Worth?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We solve a shortest path problem that is motivated by recent interest in pricing networks or other computational resources. Informally, how much is an edge in a network worth to a user who wants to send data between two nodes along a shortest path? If ...

J. Hershberger; S. Suri

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

FROM WASTE TO WORTH: THE ROLE OF WASTE DIVERSION IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FROM WASTE TO WORTH: THE ROLE OF WASTE DIVERSION IN THE GREEN ECONOMY Submission to the Ministry of the Environment Regarding the Minister's Report on the Waste Diversion Act 2002 Review Submitted by: Submitted to of the Environment 10 Rambert Crescent Integrated Environmental Policy Division Toronto, Ontario M6S 1E6 Waste

Columbia University

124

Targeting Net Zero Energy at Fort Carson: Assessment and Recommendations  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army's Fort Carson installation was selected to serve as a prototype for net zero energy assessment and planning. NREL performed the comprehensive assessment to appraise the potential of Fort Carson to achieve net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and electric vehicle integration. This report summarizes the results of the assessment and provides energy recommendations. This study is part of a larger cross-laboratory effort that also includes an assessment of renewable opportunities at seven other DoD Front Range installations, a microgrid design for Fort Carson critical loads and an assessment of regulatory and market-based barriers to a regional secure smart grid.

Anderson, K.; Markel, T.; Simpson, M.; Leahey, J.; Rockenbaugh, C.; Lisell, L.; Burman, K.; Singer, M.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Microsoft Word - JAS-Fort Nelson.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fort Nelson Demonstration Test Fort Nelson Demonstration Test 1 FACT SHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP DEMONSTRATION TEST Partnership Name Plains CO 2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership - Phase III Contacts: DOE/NETL Project Mgr. Name Organization E-Mail Darin Damiani, U.S. Department of Energy, Darin.Damiani@netl.doe.gov Principal Investigator Edward Steadman Field Test Information: Field Test Name Fort Nelson Demonstration Test Test Location British Columbia, Canada Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons Approximately 1.2 million tons of CO 2 per year Source Fort Nelson natural gas-processing plant Spectra Energy Natural Resources Canada Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) British Columbia Ministry of Energy, Mines, and Petroleum Resources

126

City of Fort Collins, Colorado (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Collins, Colorado (Utility Company) Collins, Colorado (Utility Company) (Redirected from City of Fort Collins Utilities) Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Collins City of Place Fort Collins, Colorado Utility Id 6604 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. City of Fort Collins Utilities Smart Grid Project was awarded $18,101,263 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $36,202,527. Utility Rate Schedules

127

Update On Geothermal Exploration At Fort Bidwell, Surprise Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exploration At Fort Bidwell, Surprise Valley Geothermal Exploration At Fort Bidwell, Surprise Valley California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Update On Geothermal Exploration At Fort Bidwell, Surprise Valley California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fourth exploration well within Fort Bidwell Indian Community (FBIC) lands has been successfully drilled to a total depth of 4,670 feet. Mud return temperatures and cuttings analysis are consistent with the hydrothermal model on which the well location was based. Wireline surveys have encountered an obstruction just below the casing shoe, and further evaluation of this well and resource awaits clean-out and testing activities. Author(s): Joe LaFleur, Anna Carter, Karen Moore, Ben Barker, Paul

128

Fort Collins Utilities - Residential and Small Commercial Appliance Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Small Commercial Appliance and Small Commercial Appliance Rebate Program Fort Collins Utilities - Residential and Small Commercial Appliance Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Program Info Funding Source Fort Collins Utilities and the Governor's Energy Office State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes washer: $50 Dishwasher: $25 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $35, plus free pick-up Fort Collins Utilities offers a number of appliance and recycling rebates to residential and small commercial customers. The appliance rebate program offers a $50 rebate for Energy Star rated clothes washers and $25 for Energy Star dishwashers. Applications for equipment rebates are available on the Fort Collins web site as well as at select local manufacturers and

129

Fort Pierce Utilities Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fort Pierce Utilities Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency Fort Pierce Utilities Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Fort Pierce Utilities Authority - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Maximum Rebate Insulation: $300 Room A/C Units: 2 per household All other equipment: 1 per customer account Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Room A/C Unit: $150 Insulation: $0.40/sq ft (NEW); $0.125/sq ft (ADDED) Central A/C System/Heat Pumps: $50 - $2,100; varies by size and efficiency Programmable Thermostat: $25 Clothes Washer: $50 Refrigerator: $50 Provider Fort Pierce Utilities Authority

130

Fort Collins Utilities - Residential On-Bill Financing Program Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fort Collins Utilities - Residential On-Bill Financing Program Fort Collins Utilities - Residential On-Bill Financing Program Program (Colorado) Fort Collins Utilities - Residential On-Bill Financing Program Program (Colorado) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating & Cooling Heating Heat Pumps Water Heating Solar Maximum Rebate $15,000 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount $1,000 - $15,000 Fort Collins offers its residential customers low-interest loans that may be used to finance a variety of projects including adding insulation, replacing a furnace, upgrading water and space heating systems, and

131

Federal Energy Management Program: Case Study - Fort Knox Strikes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

resource Send a link to Federal Energy Management Program: Case Study - Fort Knox Strikes Energy-Savings Gold in Partnership with Utility to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy...

132

Microsoft Word - JAS-Fort Nelson.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Test Name Fort Nelson Demonstration Test Test Location British Columbia, Canada Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons Approximately 1.2 million tons of CO 2 per year Source...

133

Four years of operations and results with FORTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FORTE (Fast Onboard Recording of Transient Events) satellite was launched on 29 August 1997 and has been in continuous operation since that time. FORTE was placed in a nearly circular, 825-km-altitude, 70 degrees inclination orbit by a Pegasus rocket funded by Air Force Space Test Program. The Department of Energy funded the FORTE satellite, which was designed and built at Los Alamos. FORTE's successful launch and engineered robustness were a result of several years of dedicated work by the joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Sandia National Laboratory project team, led through mission definition, payload and satellite development, and launch by Dr. Stephen Knox. The project is now led by Dr. Abram Jacobson. FORTE carries a suite of instruments, an optical system and a rf system, for the study of lightning and anthropogenic signals. As a result of this effort, new understandings of lightning events have emerged as well as a more complete understanding of the relationship between optical and rf lightning events. This paper will provide an overview of the FORTE satellite and will discuss the on orbit performance of the subsystems.

Klingner, P. L. (Phillip L.); Carlson, L. D. (Leslie D.); Dingler, R. D. (Robert D.); Esch-Mosher, D. M. (Diana M.); Jacobson, A. R.; Roussel-Dupre, D. (Diane)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

FOUR YEARS OF OPERATIONS AND RESULTS WITH FORTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FORTE (Fast Onboard Recording of Transient Events) satellite was launched on 29 August 1997 and has been in continuous operation since that time. FORTE was placed in a nearly circular, 825-km-altitude, 70 degrees inclination orbit by a Pegasus rocket funded by Air Force Space Test Program. The Department of Energy funded the FORTE satellite, which was designed and built at Los Alamos. FORTE's successful launch and engineered robustness were a result of several years of dedicated work by the joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Sandia National Laboratory project team, led through mission definition, payload and satellite development, and launch by Dr. Stephen Knox. The project is now led by Dr. Abram Jacobson. FORTE carries a suite of instruments, an optical system and a rf system, for the study of lightning and anthropogenic signals. As a result of this effort, new understandings of lightning events have emerged as well as a more complete understanding of the relationship between optical and rf lightning events. This paper will provide an overview of the FORTE satellite and will discuss the on orbit performance of the subsystems.

D. ROUSSEL-DUPRE; P. KLINGNER; L. CARLSON; ET AL

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Lake Worth Corridor, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Worth Corridor, Florida: Energy Resources Worth Corridor, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 26.6184015┬░, -80.1011539┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.6184015,"lon":-80.1011539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

136

Evaluation of the Dallas Thompson Riverscreen Site on the Touchet River.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Riverscreen irrigation pumps are a relatively new design in which the pump intake floats on the river surface, pulling water in only from the bottom side and surrounded by a self-cleaning screen. The Walla Walla County Conservation District recently started replacing old pump screens with the Riverscreen and was interested in whether the screens are protective of juvenile salmonids. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated approach velocities and operations at the Riverscreen installation on the Dallas Thompson property, approximately 3 mi. north of Touchet, Washington and 300 ft north of Hofer Dam, on June 18, 2007. Evaluation of this site consisted of underwater videography and water velocity measurements. The Dallas Thompson Riverscreen was pumping approximately 930 gpm during our evaluation, which is close to the maximum pumping rate for this model. Underwater videography showed only slow movement of water-borne particulates toward the pump intake, and the screen material was clean. All water velocity measurements were taken below the pump intake opening and between 3 to 6 in. from the screen face. All approach velocities (flow toward the screen and pump) were below National Marine Fisheries Service draft guidelines for juvenile fish screens.

Chamness, Mickie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

137

Thunderstorm and Lightning Studies using the FORTE Optical Lightning System (FORTE/OLS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary observations of simultaneous RF and optical emissions from lightning as seen by the FORTE spacecraft are presented. RF/optical pairs of waveforms are routinely collected both as individual lightning events and as sequences of events associated with cloud-to-ground (CG) and intra-cloud (IC) flashes. CG pulses can be distinguished from IC pulses based on the properties of the RF and optical waveforms, but mostly based on the associated RF spectrograms. The RF spectrograms are very similar to previous ground-based VHF observations of lightning and show signatures associated with return strokes, stepped and dart leaders, and attachment processes,. RF emissions are observed to precede the arrival of optical emissions at the satellite by a mean value of 280 microseconds. The dual phenomenology nature of these observations are discussed in terms of their ability to contribute to a satellite-based lightning monitoring mission.

Argo, P.; Franz, R.; Green, J.; Guillen, J.L.; Jacobson, A.R.; Kirkland, M.; Knox, S.; Spalding, R.; Suszcynsky, D.M.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

City of Fort Collins, Colorado (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Collins City of Place Fort Collins, Colorado Utility Id 6604 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. City of Fort Collins Utilities Smart Grid Project was awarded $18,101,263 Recovery Act Funding with a total project value of $36,202,527. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png GENERAL SERVICE Single Phase 200 AMP Service Commercial

139

Central Energy System Modernization at Fort Jackson, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of technology options was conducted for the central energy systems at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. There were two objectives in conducting this study. From a broader viewpoint, the Army would like to develop a systematic approach to management of its central energy systems and selected Fort Jackson for this ''pilot'' study for a prospective Central Energy System Modernization Program. From a site-specific perspective, the objective was to identify the lowest life-cycle cost energy supply option(s) at Fort Jackson for buildings currently served by central boilers and chillers. This study was co-funded by the Army's Southeast Region and the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program.

Brown, Daryl R.; Chvala, William D.; Dirks, James A.

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

140

Case Study Walnut Hill United Methodist Church - Dallas, Texas, Chiller Replacement Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In March of 1992 Walnut Hill United Methodist Church in Dallas, Tx. decided that their existing thermal storage and electric reciprocating chiller system were both in need of replacement. After analyzing several options, they chose to install 150 tons of gas-fired double-effect absorption chillers. This case study will show the original HVAC operation cost analysis and compare it to the present day operation costs and it will describe how unexpected changes occurred that caused the initial analysis to be questioned. Finally, this case study will show how today's operational costs are lower than originally projected. This presentation is not about the reasons the church chose this particular system, but about the analysis itself and its accuracy.

Phillips, J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Intern experience at Dallas Power and Light Company: an internship report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A survey of the author's internship experience with the Dallas Power & Light Company during the period January, 1979 through January, 1980 is presented. During this one year internship, the author worked as an engineer in the Executive Department. The intent of this report is to demonstrate that this experience fulfills the requirements for the Doctor of Engineering internship. The author's activities during this period can be categorized into two major areas. First, technically oriented, in which he developed a model to project future electrical demands based on land usage, and a computer program that implements this model. Secondly, a selection of non-technical business oriented areas were investigated. The tasks in these areas offered him the opportunity to be exposed to the organization and operation of an investor owned public utility company and to gain experience in a non-academic business environment.

Fischer, Roger Lewis, 1945-

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Campbell, Tennessee/Kentucky  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Campbell, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Campbell took place on June 10, 2010.

Hand, James R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Kora, Angela R.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Nesse, Ronald J.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Drum, New York  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Drum, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the U.S. Army Installation Management Command (IMCOM) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Drum took place on May 4 and 5, 2010.

Brown, Scott A.; Orrell, Alice C.; Solana, Amy E.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Hand, James R.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rowley, Steven; Nesse, Ronald J.

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

144

The Relationship between Land Use and Temperature Change in Dallas County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examines the relationship between land use and temperature change in Dallas County, TX. The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between temperature and land use and to identify the primary factors contributing to the formation of urban heat islands based on different categories of land use. Specifically, this research analyzes the elements that contribute to the urban heat island effect in Dallas County using temperature data provided by remote sensing imagery and parcel-based land use data using Geographic Information System (GIS) technique and a correlation analysis method, which was employed to analyze the relationship between temperature and land use. The results of this study showed that every land use category has different temperature averages and those patterns were observed similarly in both 2000 and 2005. Parking, airport, commercial, industrial, and residential areas have relatively high temperatures. In contrast, water, undeveloped area and parks showed relatively low temperatures. Another major finding was ratio of land use composition affected the temperature of census tracts. Correlation analyses of land use and temperature in 2000 and 2005 indicate that various types of land use categories have significant relationships with temperature. Among them commercial, industrial, residential, parking, and infrastructure, are positively associated with temperature, while undeveloped, parks, water, and dedicated areas are negatively associated with temperature. Areas with a high ratio of commercial use showed the highest and undeveloped areas showed the lowest relationship. Furthermore, through the analysis of the relationship between land use and temperature change for five years (2000-2005), this study finds that temperature change depends on the ratio of each land use category change. The results of this study can help local planning and policy decisions which are related to urban land use planning concerning temperature change such as zoning, environmental regulations and open space preservation.

Kim, Hee Ju

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Poudre High School From Fort Collins , Colorado Wins U.S. Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Poudre High School From Fort Collins , Colorado Wins U.S. Department of Energy National Science Bowl Poudre High School From Fort Collins , Colorado Wins U.S. Department of...

146

Hybrid nuclear reactor grey rod to obtain required reactivity worth  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hybrid nuclear reactor grey rods are described, wherein geometric combinations of relatively weak neutron absorber materials such as stainless steel, zirconium or INCONEL, and relatively strong neutron absorber materials, such as hafnium, silver-indium cadmium and boron carbide, are used to obtain the reactivity worths required to reach zero boron change load follow. One embodiment includes a grey rod which has combinations of weak and strong neutron absorber pellets in a stainless steel cladding. The respective pellets can be of differing heights. A second embodiment includes a grey rod with a relatively thick stainless steel cladding receiving relatively strong neutron absorber pellets only. A third embodiment includes annular relatively weak netron absorber pellets with a smaller diameter pellet of relatively strong absorber material contained within the aperture of each relatively weak absorber pellet. The fourth embodiment includes pellets made of a homogeneous alloy of hafnium and a relatively weak absorber material, with the percentage of hafnium chosen to obtain the desired reactivity worth.

Miller, John V. (Munhall, PA); Carlson, William R. (Scott Township, Allegheny County, PA); Yarbrough, Michael B. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Energy survey of Army Laundry Facilities, Fort Jackson, South Carolina; executive summary  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of energy conservation opportunities at the Fort Jackson Laundry Facility. This study was conducted under Contract Number DACA21-85-C-0587 entitled `Energy Survey of Army Laundry Facilities, Fort Bragg, North Carolina and Fort Jackson, South Carolina.` The Fort Jackson portion of this study was initiated on March 26, 1986 by letter from Jerry T. Hines, Lieutenant Colonel, Corps of Engineers.

1985-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

FINISHED CORRECTIONS for the reprint of Barton H. Barbour, Fort Union and the Upper Missouri Fur Trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blackfeet torched Fort Piegan in 1832, and the Company built a new post, Fort McKenzie, a few miles away

Barrash, Warren

149

Fort Irwin Integrated Resource Assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at Fort Irwin, a US Army Forces Command facility near Barstow, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Integrated Resource Assessment. The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Irwin. This is part of a model program that PNL has designed to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This program (1) identifies and evaluates all cost-effective energy projects; (2) develops a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, and capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) targets 100% of the financing required to implement energy efficiency projects. PNL applied this model program to Fort Irwin. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, propane gas, and vehicle fuel use for a typical operating year. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at Fort Irwin by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that accounts for all energy use among buildings, utilities, and applicable losses.

Richman, E.E.; Keller, J.M.; Dittmer, A.L.; Hadley, D.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Fort Union Regional Task Forces, proceedings. Volume II  

SciTech Connect

North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, and Wyoming created seven task forces to study the interstate effects of the Fort Union Coal Formation which underlies parts of each of these states. Volume 2 discusses the following: (1) social and economic impact; (2) taxation of energy resources; and (3) water quality and quality problems. (Portions of this document are not fully legible)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Fort Union Regional Task Forces, proceedings. Volume I  

SciTech Connect

North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, and Wyoming created seven task forces to study the interstate effects of the Fort Union Coal Formation which underlies parts of each of these states. Volume 1 covers: (1) air quality; (2) common data element and information exchange; (3) energy development, regulation, and plant siting; and (4) reclamation and land use. (Portions of this document are not fully legible)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Gamble and Hess Reply to Williams et al regarding Temperature and Violent Crime in Dallas, Texas: Relationships and Implications of Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EG. Global warming and U.S. crime rates: An appli- cation of6. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime reported by DallasPolice Dept, Texas: Crime rate per 100,000 population,

Gamble, Janet L; Hess, Jeremy J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

To be presented at the 2007 ASHRAE Winter Meeting, January 27-31, 2007, Dallas, TX. Measured energy performance a US-China demonstration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-60978 To be presented at the 2007 ASHRAE Winter Meeting, January 27-31, 2007, Dallas, TX efficient than ASHRAE 90.1- 1999. The utility data from the first year's operation match well the analysis

154

LANL awards Recovery Act contract worth up to $100 million  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL Awards Recovery Act contract LANL Awards Recovery Act contract LANL awards Recovery Act contract worth up to $100 million TerranearPMC, LLC will haul demolition debris and soils from LANL's Recovery Act cleanup projects for disposal in licensed facilities. March 10, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

155

Application of CC« at a Corporate Headquarters Facility in Dallas, TX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A corporate headquarters complex located in Dallas, TX consists of four buildings served by a central utility plant. The Continuous Commissioning« (CC«) process was applied to one building with approximately 688,000 square feet of primarily of data floor space. This building was identified as a candidate for the CC process because it consumed 58% of the 132 million kWh of electricity used by the complex in 2010 and had recently received several HVAC upgrades. CC is an ongoing process for existing buildings and central plant facilities to resolve operating problems, improve comfort, optimize energy use, and identify retrofits based on current building usage rather than original design intent [1]. The data floor optimization process consisted of three components: traditional commissioning activities, CC measure implementation, and low cost retrofits. Various M&V strategies were also utilized to quantify the resulting energy savings in a building whose energy use is dominated by data equipment load. Using six months of pre- and post- implementation HVAC equipment electrical service meter trend data, a savings of 948,700 kWh was achieved. When these savings are extrapolated to twelve months, this project is expected to reduce the 2010 HVAC electricity usage by 25% ($133,000). Once the central plant savings are included, the overall savings of this project is approximately $146,000/year.

Meline, K.; Kimla, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

City of Fort Morgan, Colorado (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Morgan Fort Morgan Place Colorado Utility Id 6610 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COMMERCIAL AREA LIGHTING (FLAT RATE) Lighting HIGHWAY FOG LIGHTING (FLAT RATE) Lighting INDUSTRIAL TRANSMISSION LEVEL Industrial INTERRUPTIBLE LOAD MANAGEMENT SERVICE Industrial IRRIGATION Commercial LARGE COMMERCIAL Commercial MUNICIPAL Commercial RESIDENTIAL DEMAND METERED Residential RESIDENTIAL GENERAL Residential RESIDENTIAL LIGHTING (FLAT RATE) Lighting SMALL COMMERCIAL DEMAND METERED Commercial

157

MHK Projects/Fort Adams | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Adams Fort Adams < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.0533,"lon":-91.5651,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

158

Cedar Fort, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort, Utah: Energy Resources Fort, Utah: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.3271707┬░, -112.1043852┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3271707,"lon":-112.1043852,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

159

U.S. Army Fort Carson Environmental Document  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINDING OF SUITABILITY TO LEASE FINDING OF SUITABILITY TO LEASE 3 Phases Energy Services Land Lease Us Army Installation Management Command Headquarters, United States Army Garrison, Fort Carson 1.0 PURPOSE The purpose of this Finding of Suitability to Lease (FOSL) is to document the environmental suitability of property at Fort Carson, Colorado, for leasing and construction of a 2 Megawatt (2 MW) solar photovoltaic (PV) plant consistent with Department of Defense (DOD) and Army policy. In addition, the FOSL identifies use restrictions as specified in the attached Environmental Protection Provisions necessary to protect human health or the environment and to prevent interference with existing and planned environmental restoration activities. 2.0 PROPERTY DESCRIPTIONS The property to be leased consists of approximately 18.1518 acres of land located inside a

160

Boralex Fort Fairfield Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Boralex Fort Fairfield Biomass Facility Facility Boralex Fort Fairfield Sector Biomass Location Aroostook County, Maine Coordinates 46.819941┬░, -68.4766064┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.819941,"lon":-68.4766064,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Fort Boise Veteran's Hospital Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating Location Boise, Idaho Coordinates 43.6135002┬░, -116.2034505┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

162

U.S. Army Fort Carson Environmental Document  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FINDING OF SUITABILITY TO LEASE FINDING OF SUITABILITY TO LEASE 3 Phases Energy Services Land Lease Us Army Installation Management Command Headquarters, United States Army Garrison, Fort Carson 1.0 PURPOSE The purpose of this Finding of Suitability to Lease (FOSL) is to document the environmental suitability of property at Fort Carson, Colorado, for leasing and construction of a 2 Megawatt (2 MW) solar photovoltaic (PV) plant consistent with Department of Defense (DOD) and Army policy. In addition, the FOSL identifies use restrictions as specified in the attached Environmental Protection Provisions necessary to protect human health or the environment and to prevent interference with existing and planned environmental restoration activities. 2.0 PROPERTY DESCRIPTIONS The property to be leased consists of approximately 18.1518 acres of land located inside a

163

Fort Belknap Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Belknap Electric Coop Inc Belknap Electric Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Fort Belknap Electric Coop Inc Place Texas Utility Id 6611 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.1090/kWh Commercial: $0.1090/kWh Industrial: $0.0807/kWh References ÔćĹ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Fort_Belknap_Electric_Coop_Inc&oldid=410715

164

City of Fort Meade, Florida (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Meade, Florida (Utility Company) Meade, Florida (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Fort Meade Place Florida Utility Id 6609 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location FRCC Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial, Demand Commercial Commercial, Non-Demand Commercial Residential, Inside City Residential Residential, Outside City Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1550/kWh Commercial: $0.1570/kWh Industrial: $0.1540/kWh References ÔćĹ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Fort_Meade,_Florida_(Utility_Company)&oldid=409610

165

Force-limited vibration tests aplied to the FORTE` satellite  

SciTech Connect

A force limited random vibration test was conducted on a small satellite called FORTE{prime}. This type of vibration test reduces the over testing that can occur in a conventional vibration test. Two vibration specifications were used in the test: The conventional base acceleration specification, and an interface force specification. The vibration level of the shaker was controlled such that neither the table acceleration nor the force transmitted to the test item exceeded its specification. The effect of limiting the shake table vibration to the force specification was to reduce (or ``notch``) the shaker acceleration near some of the satellite`s resonance frequencies. This paper describes the force limited test conducted for the FORTE{prime} satellite. The satellite and its dynamic properties are discussed, and the concepts of force limiting theory are summarized. The hardware and setup of the test are then described, and the results of the force limited vibration test are discussed.

Stevens, R.R.; Butler, T.A.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Geothermal heat pumps at Fort Polk: Early results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At Fort Polk, LA an entire city (4,003 military family housing units) is being converted to geothermal heat pumps (GHP) under a performance contract. At the same time other efficiency measures such as compact fluorescent lights (CFLs), low-flow water outlets, and attic insulation are being installed. If these contracts and this technology are to be used widely in US Department of Defense (DoD) facilities and other public buildings, better data from actual projects is the key. Being the first GHP project of this type and size, Fort Polk proved to be very challenging for all concerned. To get from RFP to start of construction took several years. This hard work by others created a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to address many of the due diligence issues that delayed the Fort Polk project. So that future projects can move faster, an evaluation has been undertaken to address the following barriers: absence of a documented large-scale demonstration of GHP energy, demand, and maintenance savings (a barrier to acceptance by federal customers, performance contractors, and investors); newness of large-scale facility capital renewal procurements at federal facilities under energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) or traditional appropriations (lack of case studies); and variability in current GHP design tools (increases risks and costs for federal customers, performance contractors, investors and designers). This paper presents early energy and demand savings results based on data collection through January 1996.

Hughes, P.J.; Shonder, J.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Development of Baseline Monthly Utility Models for Fort Hood, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Fort Hood Army base in central Texas has more than 5,200 buildings and can be considered as typical of large Department of Defense Army bases in the continental United States. The annual utility bill of the base exceeds $25 million. Baseline monthly models for electricity use, electricity demand, gas use, and water use for the three cantonment areas of Fort Hood have been developed. Such models can be used as screening tools for detecting changes in future utility bills and also to track/evaluate the extent to which Presidential Executive Order 12902, mandating 30% decrease in energy utility bills from 1985 to 2005, is being met. In this analysis, 1990 has been selected as the baseline year to illustrate the predictive capability of the models. Since ascertaining the uncertainty of our predictions is very important for meaningful evaluations, we have also presented the relevant equations for computing the 95% prediction intervals of the regression models and illustrated their use with measured data over the period of 1989-1993. This study also evaluated two different types of energy modeling software- the Princeton Scorekeeping method (PRISM) and EModel- in order to ascertain which is more appropriate for baseline modeling of large Army installations such as Fort Hood. It was found that the EModel software, which has more flexibility to handle different types of linear single variate change point models, gave more accurate modeling results.

Reddy, T. A.; Saman, N. F.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.; Chalifoux, A.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Development of Baseline Monthly Utility Models for Fort Hood, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Fort Hood Army base in central Texas has more than 5,200 buildings and can be considered as typical of large Department of Defense Army bases in the continental United States. The annual utility bill of the base exceeds $25 million. Baseline monthly models for electricity use, electricity demand, gas use, and water use for the three cantonment areas of Fort Hood have been developed. Such models can be used as screening tools for detecting changes in future utility bills and also to track/evaluate the extent to which Presidential Executive Order 12902, mandating 30% decrease in energy utility bills from 1985 to 2005, is being met. In this analysis, 1990 has been selected as the baseline year to illustrate the predictive capability of the models. Since ascertaining the uncertainty of our predictions is very important for meaningful evaluations, we have also presented the relevant equations for computing the 95% prediction intervals of the regression models and illustrated their use with measured data over the period 1989 - 1993. This study also evaluated two different types of energy modeling software- the Princeton Scorekeeping method (PRISM) and EModel- in order to ascertain which is more appropriate for baseline modeling of large Army installations such as Fort Hood. It was found that the EModel software, which has more flexibility to handle different types of linear single variate change point models, gave more accurate modeling results.

Reddy, T. A.; Saman, N. F.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.; Chalifoux, A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location.

170

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattlerl, D. A. Sanchez (2002) Geothermal

171

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattlerl, D. A. Sanchez (2002) Geothermal

172

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Redirected from Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location.

173

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattlerl, D. A. Sanchez (2002) Geothermal

174

An evaluation of the Fort Polk energy savings performance contract  

SciTech Connect

The US Army, in cooperation with an energy services company (ESCO), used private capital to retrofit 4,003 family housing units on the Fort Polk, Louisiana, military base with geothermal heat pumps (GHPs). The project was performed under an energy savings performance contract (ESPC) that provides for the Army and the ESCO to share the cost savings realized through the energy retrofit over the 20-year life of the contract. Under the terms of the contract, the ESCO is responsible for maintaining the GHPs and provides ongoing measurement and verification (M and V) to assure cost and energy savings to the Army. An independent evaluation conducted by the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Laboratory indicates that the GHP systems in combination with other energy retrofit measures have reduced annual whole-community electrical consumption by 33%, and natural gas consumption by 100%. These energy savings correspond to an estimated reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions of 22,400 tons per year. Peak electrical demand has been reduced by 43%. The electrical energy and demand savings correspond to an improvement in the whole-community annual electric load factor from 0.52 to 0.62. As a result of the project, Fort Polk saves about $450,000 annually and benefits from complete renewal of the major energy consuming systems in family housing and maintenance of those systems for 20 years. Given the magnitude of the project, the cost and energy savings achieved, and the lessons learned during its design and implementation, the Fort Polk ESPC can provide a model for other housing-related energy savings performance contracts in both the public and private sectors.

Hughes, P.J.; Shonder, J.A.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

The debate on the value of graduate education today WHAT'S IT WORTH?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physicist Ph.D. student Imre Bartos works to make his field accessible to others 8 A Cosmopolitan Degree A Cosmopolitan Degree 16 A Teller of Tales 20 Social Media and the Job Search 22 What's It Worth? 32 Alumni

Champagne, Frances A.

176

The Information Needed to Evaluate the Worth of Uncertain Information, Predictions and Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the worth of uncertain information one must obtain three types of evaluative information: 1) statistical measures of the uncertainty of the information and of its likely occurrence; 2) the decision rule (how the information is used) ...

Donald R. Davis; Soronadi Nnaji

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Thermal Gradient Holes At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

178

U.S. Army Fort Knox: Using the Earth for Space Heating and Cooling (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

FEMP case study overview of the geothermal/ground source heat pump project at the U.S. Army Fort Knox Disney Barracks.

Not Available

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Core Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Core Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core...

180

U.S. Army Fort Knox: Using the Earth for Space Heating and Cooling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact sheet covers the FEMP case study overview of the geothermal/ground source heat pump project at the U.S. Army Fort Knox Disney barracks.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Dynamic computer simulation of the Fort St. Vrain steam turbines  

SciTech Connect

A computer simulation is described for the dynamic response of the Fort St. Vrain nuclear reactor regenerative intermediate- and low-pressure steam turbines. The fundamental computer-modeling assumptions for the turbines and feedwater heaters are developed. A turbine heat balance specifying steam and feedwater conditions at a given generator load and the volumes of the feedwater heaters are all that are necessary as descriptive input parameters. Actual plant data for a generator load reduction from 100 to 50% power (which occurred as part of a plant transient on November 9, 1981) are compared with computer-generated predictions, with reasonably good agreement.

Conklin, J.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Targeting Net Zero Energy at Fort Carson: Assessment and Recommendations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Targeting Net Zero Targeting Net Zero Energy at Fort Carson: Assessment and Recommendations Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program By National Renewable Energy Laboratory Kate Anderson, Tony Markel, Mike Simpson, John Leahey, Caleb Rockenbaugh, Lars Lisell, Kari Burman, and Mark Singer October 2011 ii NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

183

Wind Monitoring Report for Fort Wainwright's Donnelly Training Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using the wind data collected at a location in Fort Wainwrightĺs Donnelly Training Area (DTA) near the Cold Regions Test Center (CRTC) test track, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) estimated the gross and net energy productions that proposed turbine models would have produced exposed to the wind resource measured at the meteorological tower (met tower) location during the year of measurement. Calculations are based on the proposed turbine modelsĺ standard atmospheric conditions power curves, the annual average wind speeds, wind shear estimates, and standard industry assumptions.

Orrell, Alice C.; Dixon, Douglas R.

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

184

Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 3: Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Stewart. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the FORSCOM Fort Stewart facility located approximately 25 miles southwest of Savannah, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 11 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, along with a table detailing information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO. The tables also present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings to investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Sullivan, G.P.; Keller, J.M.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Larson, L.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Geology of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) is located on the northwestern margin of the Marysvale volcanic field in southwestern Utah. The geology of the KGRA is dominated by lava flows and ash-flow tuffs of late Oligocene to mid-Miocene age that were deposited on faulted sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic to Mesozoic age. The geothermal system of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA is structurally controlled by normal faults. High-angle faults control fluid flow within the geothermal reservoir, while the gravitational glide blocks provide an impermeable cap for the geothermal system in the central part of the field. Surficial activity occurring to the north and south of the glide blocks is characterized by the evolution of hydrogen sulfide and deposition of native sulphur. Intense acid alteration of the aluvium, resulting from downward migration of sulphuric acid, has left porous siliceous residues that retain many of the original sedimentary structures. Detailed logs of Union Oil Company drill holes Forminco No. 1, Utah State 42-7, and Utah State 31-33 are included.

Moore, J.N.; Samberg, S.M.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Solar Energy Development Assistance for Fort Hunter Liggett  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provided assistance to Fort Hunter Liggett to determine the opportunities for solar energy development on the site. Increasing use of renewable energy is mandated by several executive orders and legislation. Fort Hunter Liggett has many attributes that enhance its suitability for renewable energy development. First, the site is located south of San Francisco in a remote portion of the costal foothills. Brush and forest fires are frequent and often result in power outages, which subsequently impacts the siteĺs training mission. In addition, the siteĺs blended electric rate during fiscal year (FY) 2010 was high at 12 ó/kWh. Lastly, the solar resource is moderately high; the site receives nearly 5.7 kWh/m2/day on a south facing, latitude-tilted surface. In light of these factors, the site is a clear candidate for a solar photovoltaic array. Prior to Pacific Northwest National Laboratoryĺs (PNNL) involvement, the site secured funding for a 1 megawatt (MW) photovoltaic (PV) array that will also provide shading for site vehicles. To best implement this project, PNNL conducted a site visit and was tasked with providing the site technical guidance and support regarding module selection, array siting, and other ancillary issues.

Russo, Bryan J.; Hoffman, Michael G.; Chvala, William D.

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

187

Fort Drum integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program`s (FEMP) mission to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Drum. This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company (Niagara Mohawk). It will (1) identify and evaluate all electric and fossil fuel cost-effective energy projects; (2) develop a schedule at each installation for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have Niagara Mohawk procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the FORSCOM Fort Drum facility located near Watertown, New York. It is a companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 2, the Baseline Detail.

Dixon, D.R.; Armstrong, P.R.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Di Massa, F.V.; Elliott, D.B.; Keller, J.M.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.; Sullivan, G.P.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Strategic Energy Management Plan For Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico  

SciTech Connect

This document reports findings and recommendations as a result of a design assistance project with Fort Buchanan with the goals of developing a Strategic Energy Management Plan for the Site. A strategy has been developed with three major elements in mind: 1) development of a strong foundation from which to build, 2) understanding technologies that are available, and 3) exploring financing options to fund the implementation of improvements. The objective of this report is to outline a strategy that can be used by Fort Buchanan to further establish an effective energy management program. Once a strategy is accepted, the next step is to take action. Some of the strategies defined in this Plan may be implemented directly. Other strategies may require the development of a more sophisticated tactical, or operational, plan to detail a roadmap that will lead to successful realization of the goal. Similarly, some strategies are not single events. Rather, some strategies will require continuous efforts to maintain diligence or to change the culture of the Base occupants and their efforts to conserve energy resources.

Parker, Steven A.; Hunt, W. D.

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Thermal design of the fast-on-orbit recording of transient events (FORTE) satellite  

SciTech Connect

Analytical tools were used to design a thermal control system for the FORTE satellite. An overall spacecraft thermal model was developed to provide boundary temperatures for detailed thermal models of the FORTE instruments. The thermal design will be presented and thermal model results discussed.

Akau, R.L.; Behr, V.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whitaker, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Controlled Source Audio MT At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Controlled Source Audio MT At Cove Fort Area (Combs 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Controlled Source Audio MT Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes "SP, dipole-dipole resistivity, CSAMT; sufficient electrical data are available. Reservoir model?" References Jim Combs (1 January 2006) Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Controlled_Source_Audio_MT_At_Cove_Fort_Area_-_Liquid_(Combs_2006)&oldid=598122"

191

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Combs 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes "SP, dipole-dipole resistivity, CSAMT; sufficient electrical data are available. Reservoir model?" References Jim Combs (1 January 2006) Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Direct-Current_Resistivity_At_Cove_Fort_Area_-_Liquid_(Combs_2006)&oldid=598123

192

EA-1922: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, 2: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska EA-1922: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska SUMMARY DOE (lead agency), Denali Commission (cooperating agency) and USDA Rural Utilities Services (cooperating agency) are proposing to provide funding to support the final design and construction of a biomass combined heat and power plant and associated district heating system to the Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments and the Gwitchyaa Zhee Corporation. The proposed biomass district heating system would be located in Fort Yukon Alaska. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 6, 2013 EA-1922: Finding of No Significant Impact Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska

193

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ground_Gravity_Survey_At_Cove_Fort_Area_(Warpinski,_Et_Al.,_2004)&oldid=598130" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities

194

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Direct-Current_Resistivity_Survey_At_Cove_Fort_Area_-_Vapor_(Warpinski,_Et_Al.,_2004)&oldid=598134"

195

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Warpinski, Et Al., Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Direct-Current_Resistivity_At_Cove_Fort_Area_-_Liquid_(Warpinski,_Et_Al.,_2004)&oldid=598125" Categories: Exploration Activities

196

Ground Magnetics At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ground_Magnetics_At_Cove_Fort_Area_(Warpinski,_Et_Al.,_2004)&oldid=598118" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages

197

EA-1922: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, 2: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska EA-1922: Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska SUMMARY DOE (lead agency), Denali Commission (cooperating agency) and USDA Rural Utilities Services (cooperating agency) are proposing to provide funding to support the final design and construction of a biomass combined heat and power plant and associated district heating system to the Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments and the Gwitchyaa Zhee Corporation. The proposed biomass district heating system would be located in Fort Yukon Alaska. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 6, 2013 EA-1922: Finding of No Significant Impact Combined Power and Biomass Heating System, Fort Yukon, Alaska

198

City of Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings City of Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Colorado Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider The City of Fort Collins The City Council of Fort Collins passed a resolution in September 2006, establishing green building goals for new city-owned buildings of 5,000 square feet or more. New buildings must be designed and constructed to

199

Fort Collins Utilities - Home Efficiency Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Efficiency Program Home Efficiency Program Fort Collins Utilities - Home Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: See Program Website Air Sealing: $200 - $500 Conditioned Crawl Space Insulation: $0.30/sq ft. - $0.75/sq ft. Cold Crawl Space: $0.30/sq ft. - $0.45/sq ft. Basement Wall Insulation:$0.50/sq ft. - $1.00/sq ft., Cantilever Floor Insulation: $0.50/sq ft. - $0.75/sq ft. Frame Floor Insulation Over Garage: $0.50/sq ft. - $0.75/sq ft.

200

United States Army; Fort Gordon, Georgia, Range Control Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DRAFT DRAFT Joint Standard Operating Procedures (JSOP) For Military Training at the Savannah River Site August 2011 U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office, Savannah River Site And U.S. Department Of The Army, Fort Gordon, Georgia DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 2 Chapter 1 General, 1.1 Purpose, page 8 1.2 Scope, page 8 1.3 Explanation of abbreviation and terms, page 8 1.4 Applicability, page 8 1.5 Deviations and Amendments, page 8 Chapter 2 Responsibilities 2.1 DOE-Savannah River Point of Contact (DOE-SR POC), page 10 2.2 DOE-Assistant Manager for Integration and Planning (AMIP), page 10 2.3 SRNS Interface Management Office, page 10 2.4 Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization, and Security (DPTMS), Page 10

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fort Collins Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial and Industrial Energy Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Fort Collins Utilities - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Insulation Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Building Tune Up: $50,000 Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Roof Top A/C: $100 - $150, plus $5 for each 0.1 SEER or IEER above minimum requirement Variable Frequency Drives: $85 - $120/HP Packaged Terminal A/C: $50, plus $5 for each 0.1 EER above minimum

202

U.S. Army Fort Carson Photovoltaics Project Lease  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DACA45-1-07-6037 DACA45-1-07-6037 DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY LEASE FORT CARSON MILITARY INSTALLATION EL PAS0 COUNTY, COLORADO THIS LEASE, made on behalf of the United States, between the SECRETARY OF THE ARMY, hereinafter referred to as the Secretary, and Carson Solar I, LLC., a limited liability company organized and existing under and by virtue of the laws of the State of Delaware, with its principal office at 31 897 Del Obispo, Suite 220, San Juan Capistrano, CA 92675, hereinafter referred to as the Lessee. WITNESSETH: The Secretary, by the authority of Title 10, United States Code, Section 2667, and for the consideration hereinafter set forth, hereby leases to the Lessee the property over, across, in and upon lands of the United States, identified in Exhibits "A" and "B," attached hereto and made a

203

Analysis of natural gas supply strategies at Fort Drum  

SciTech Connect

This analysis investigates strategies for Fort Drum to acquire a reliable natural gas supply while reducing its gas supply costs. The purpose of this study is to recommend an optimal supply mix based on the life-cycle costs of each strategy analyzed. In particular, this study is intended to provide initial guidance as to whether or not the building and operating of a propane-air mixing station is a feasible alternative to the current gas acquisition strategy. The analysis proceeded by defining the components of supply (gas purchase, gas transport, supplemental fuel supply); identifying alternative options for each supply component; constructing gas supply strategies from different combinations of the options available for each supply component and calculating the life-cycle costs of each supply strategy under a set of different scenarios reflecting the uncertainty of future events.

Stucky, D.J.; Shankle, S.A.; Anderson, D.M.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

System specification for Fort Hood Solar Cogeneration Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The characteristics and design and environmental requirements are specified for a solar cogeneration facility at the Fort Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas. Characteristics of the system and major elements are described, and applicable standards, codes, laws and regulations are listed. Performance requirements for the total system and for each individual subsystem are presented. Survival requirements are given for various environmental extremes, with consideration given to lightning protection and effects of direct or adjacent lightning strikes. Air quality control standards are briefly mentioned. The facility operates in two principal modes: energy collection and energy utilization. The plant is capable of operating in either mode independently or in both modes simultaneously. The system is also operational in transitional and standby/inactive modes. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Preliminary assessment of Fort Hood solar cogeneration plant performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analysis has been performed to enable a preliminary assessment of the performance that can be expected of a solar thermal cogeneration system designed to serve a selected group of buildings at Fort Hood, Texas. A central receiver system utilizing a molten salts mixture as the receiver coolant, heat transfer fluid, and storage medium is assumed. The system is to supply a large share of the space heating, air conditioning, domestic hot water, and electricity needs of a 20-building Troop Housing Complex. Principal energy loads are graphed and tabulated, and the principal electric parasitic loads are tabulated and the methodology by which they are estimated is reviewed. The plant model and the performance calculations are discussed. Annual energy displacement results are given. (LEW)

Ator, J.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Fort Hood solar cogeneration facility conceptual design study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study is done on the application of a tower-focus solar cogeneration facility at the US Fort Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas. Solar-heated molten salt is to provide the steam for electricity and for room heating, room cooling, and domestic hot water. The proposed solar cogeneration system is expected to save the equivalent of approximately 10,500 barrels of fuel oil per year and to involve low development risks. The site and existing plant are described, including the climate and plant performance. The selection of the site-specific configuration is discussed, including: candidate system configurations; technology assessments, including risk assessments of system development, receiver fluids, and receiver configurations; system sizing; and the results of trade studies leading to the selection of the preferred system configuration. (LEW)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

LMR design concepts for transuranic management in low sodium void worth cores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fuel cycle processing techniques and hard neuron spectrum of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metal fuel cycle have favorable characteristics for the management of transuranics; and the wide range of breeding characteristics available in metal fuelled cores provides for flexibility in transuranic management strategy. Previous studies indicate that most design options which decrease the breeding ratio also show a decrease in sodium void worth; therefore, low void worths are achievable in transuranic burning (low breeding ratio) core designs. This paper describes numerous trade studies assessing various design options for a low void worth transuranic burner core. A flat annular core design appears to be a promising concept; the high leakage geometry yields a low breeding ratio and small sodium void worth. To allow flexibility in breeding characteristics, alternate design options which achieve fissile self-sufficiency are also evaluated. A self-sufficient core design which is interchangeable with the burner core and maintains a low sodium void worth is developed. 13 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Hill, R.N.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Evaluation of differential shim rod worth measurements in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reasonable agreement between calculated and measured differential shim rod worths in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) has been achieved by taking into account the combined effects of negative reactivity contributions from changing fuel-moderator temperatures and of delayed photoneutrons. A method has been developed for extracting the asymptotic period from the shape of the initial portion of the measured time-dependent neutron flux profile following a positive reactivity insertion. In this region of the curve temperature-related reactivity feedback effects are negligibly small. Results obtained by applying this technique to differential shim rod worth measurements made in a wide variety of ORR cores are presented.

Bretscher, M.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Liquid (Combs 2006) - Liquid (Combs 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Combs 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes "SP, dipole-dipole resistivity, CSAMT; sufficient electrical data are available. Reservoir model?" References Jim Combs (1 January 2006) Historical Exploration And Drilling Data From Geothermal Prospects And Power Generation Projects In The Western United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Direct-Current_Resistivity_Survey_At_Cove_Fort_Area_-_Liquid_(Combs_2006)&oldid=598127"

210

Geographic Information System At Cove Fort Area (Nash, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nash, Et Al., 2002) Nash, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Cove Fort Area (Nash, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes An example, shown in Figure 1, shows results from the classification of big sagebrush (Artimesia tridentata) spectra, acquired over the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, Utah thermal anomaly, in relation to geology References Gregory D. Nash, Christopher Kesler, Michael C. Adam (2002) Geographic Information Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers Data Analysis, And Enhanced Data Distribution, Visualization, And

211

Geographic Information System At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Nash, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nash, Et Al., Nash, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Cove Fort Area (Nash, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes An example, shown in Figure 1, shows results from the classification of big sagebrush (Artimesia tridentata) spectra, acquired over the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, Utah thermal anomaly, in relation to geology References Gregory D. Nash, Christopher Kesler, Michael C. Adam (2002) Geographic Information Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers Data Analysis, And Enhanced Data Distribution, Visualization, And Management

212

Fuel selection study for Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Volume 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Fuel Selection Study for Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri were: (1) to evaluate specified sources of heating energy - electric or fuel oil, and the necessary associated conversion work for meeting the heating requirements of selected buildings at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri; and (2) to determine the impact on energy usage and cost savings which would result from increasing insulation levels in the building under review. The buildings considered in this study included 2,862 family housing units, 5 Bachelor Officers' Quarters, an Enlisted Women's Barracks, the Medical Detachment Building, and the Heating Plant supporting the main Fort laundry.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Fuel selection study for Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the Fuel Selection Study for Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri were: (1) to evaluate specified sources of heating energy - electric or fuel oil, and the necessary associated conversion work for meeting the heating requirements of selected buildings at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri; and (2) to determine the impact on energy usage and cost savings which would result from increasing insulation levels in the building under review. The buildings considered in this study included 2,862 family housing units, 5 Bachelor Officers' Quarters, an Enlisted Women's Barracks, the Medical Detachment Building, and the Heating Plant supporting the main Fort laundry.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barnett Shale of the Southern Fort Worth Basin The Barnett Shale of the Southern Fort Worth Basin; Comparison of Depositional Setting, Lithofacies, and Mineralogy with Equivalent...

215

Effect of radial power distribution on MITR-II fuel element and control blade worth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This summary has been prepared to document and discuss several effects on fuel element and control blade reactivity worths that occur due to changes in the radial power distribution of the 5-MW(t) Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR-II). These results were obtained from reactor physics measurements and core power distribution calculations made during the past decade.

Bernard, J.A.; Kwok, K.S.; Lanning, D.D.; Clark, L.L. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Resistivity Log At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon ┬╗ Resistivity Log At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Resistivity_Log_At_Fort_Bliss_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=689878" Categories: Exploration Activities

217

Ground Magnetics At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattlerl, D. A. Sanchez (2002) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Project

218

Berkeley Lab Facilitates 18.6-megawatt PV facility at Army's Fort  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Berkeley Lab Facilitates 18.6-megawatt PV facility at Army's Fort Berkeley Lab Facilitates 18.6-megawatt PV facility at Army's Fort Detrick, Maryland December 2013 The Army, on Friday November 29, announced a notice of intent to award a contract to build an 18.6-megawatt solar photovoltaic (PV) facility at Fort Detrick, in Frederick, Maryland. This action will help the service meet its goal of deploying one gigawatt of renewable energy by 2025. The selected contractor is Framingham, Mass.-based Ameresco. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), through its Environmental Energy Technologies Division, provided essential technical services, over a span of two years, to make this project happen. Supported by the Federal Energy Management Program, Berkeley Lab renewable power expert Gerald Robinson provided the Army, Fort Detrick staff, its Energy

219

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have collected various geophysical data around the geothermal field, including heat flow, gravity, MT, seismic surface wave phase and group velocity maps, seismic body wave travel time data and full seismic waveforms. All of these geophysical data sets have different strengths on characterizing subsurface structures and properties. Combining these data through a coordinated analysis and, when possible, by joint inversion

220

Slim Holes At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Slim Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes When the U. S. Army was in the planning stages for a geothermal exploration program at Ft. Bliss, they approached the Geothermal Research Department for input on the structure of this progrm, this consultation led to a Work-for-Others (WFO) contract from the Army to Sandia for assistance on the exploratory holes. That assistance included consultation and dmection of drilling operations, numerous temperature logs during and after drilling, and project documentation. This report comprises a summary of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Gamma Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gamma Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Gamma Log Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three principal types of data were obtained from this drilling project: core samples of the lithology penetrated by the holes, records of drilling behavior (such as water level in the hole, changes in rate of penetration etc.), and multiple temperature logs (both during and after drilling) in each well. A suite of geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron, sonic, and resistivity) was also run after completion of drilling. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr.,

222

Static Temperature Survey At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three principal types of data were obtained from this drilling project: core samples of the lithology penetrated by the holes, records of drilling behavior (such as water level in the hole, changes in rate of penetration etc.), and multiple temperature logs (both during and after drilling) in each well. A suite of geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron, sonic, and resistivity) was also run after completion of drilling.

223

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Modeling-Computer Simulations At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have collected various geophysical data around the geothermal field, including heat flow, gravity, MT, seismic surface wave phase and group velocity maps, seismic body wave travel time data and full seismic waveforms. All of these geophysical data sets have different strengths on characterizing subsurface structures and properties. Combining these data through a coordinated analysis and, when possible, by joint inversion

224

2010 DOE National Science Bowl┬« Photos - Spanish Fort Middle School |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Spanish Fort Middle School Spanish Fort Middle School National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl Winners Past National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl Logos High School Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov 2010 National Science Bowl Photos 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Spanish Fort Middle School Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Spanish Fort Middle School team, from Spanish Court, AL, explores the

225

Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 2002) Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. Drilling of the test well was completed in the fall of 2001 and results are currently being evaluated. The total depth of the well is 598 m with a

226

Poudre High School From Fort Collins , Colorado Wins U.S. Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Poudre High School From Fort Collins , Colorado Wins U.S. Poudre High School From Fort Collins , Colorado Wins U.S. Department of Energy National Science Bowl® Poudre High School From Fort Collins , Colorado Wins U.S. Department of Energy National Science Bowl® April 30, 2007 - 12:45pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Poudre High School from Fort Collins, Colorado won the 2007 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Science Bowl® for high school students today at the National 4-H Youth Conference Center. Poudre High School beat State College Area High School from State College, Pennsylvania in the national championship match. Teams representing 64 high schools from across the United States competed in the National Finals. Members of the winning team include Patrick Chaffey, Sam Elder, Winston Gao, Sam Sun, Logan Wright and coach Jack Lundt. The team won a science

227

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Reactor Site - Fort Belvoir - VA 0-02  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Site - Fort Belvoir - VA Reactor Site - Fort Belvoir - VA 0-02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: REACTOR SITE - FORT BELVOIR (VA.0-02 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Fort Belvoir , Virginia VA.0-02-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 VA.0-02-1 Site Operations: No evidence of AEC involvement with reactor operations. AEC conducted health and safety inspections of this site. Probably a licensed operation. VA.0-02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Referred to DOD VA.0-02-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Reactor fuel Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Reactor Fuel Radiological Survey(s): Health and safety inspections VA.0-02-1 Site Status: Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to DOD VA.0-02-1

228

Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattlerl, D. A. Sanchez (2002) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Project

229

Magnetotellurics At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotellurics At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Magnetotellurics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have collected various geophysical data around the geothermal field, including heat flow, gravity, MT, seismic surface wave phase and group velocity maps, seismic body wave travel time data and full seismic waveforms. All of these geophysical data sets have different strengths on characterizing subsurface structures and properties. Combining these data through a coordinated analysis and, when possible, by joint inversion

230

Ground Magnetics At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattlerl, D. A. Sanchez (2002) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Project

231

Fort Collins, Colorado on Track to Net Zero | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fort Collins, Colorado on Track to Net Zero Fort Collins, Colorado on Track to Net Zero Fort Collins, Colorado on Track to Net Zero November 18, 2010 - 2:23pm Addthis Ian Hamos What does this mean for me? Using electricity during "peak periods" requires more fuel and creates more emissions to produce the same amount as energy as non-peak periods. By integrating demand-side resources, distributed and renewable power sources, and smart grid technologies, Fort Collins is creating a net Zero Energy District (ZED) -- potentially creating hundreds of permanent jobs and setting an example for cities nationwide. Just like traffic has peaks at rush hour, electricity demand rises and falls at particular times of day. During electricity's peak periods, power plants turn on gas-fired turbines and other supplemental energy

232

A SUMMARY OF COAL IN THE FORT UNION FORMATION (TERTIARY), BIGHORN BASIN,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter SB A SUMMARY OF COAL IN THE FORT UNION FORMATION (TERTIARY), BIGHORN BASIN, WYOMING assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U...........................................................................................................................SB-1 Coal Production History

233

An Unusual Summertime Downslope Wind Event in Fort Collins, Colorado, on 3 July 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An unseasonal, severe downslope windstorm along the eastern foothills of the Colorado Rocky Mountains is described. The storm, which occurred on 3 July 1993, produced wind guts in Fort Collins, Colorado, over 40 m s?1 and resulted in extensive ...

William R. Cotton; John F. Weaver; Brian A. Beitler

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume I. Executive summary. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of the history, design, performance, supporting activities, and management plans for the Solar Total Energy System for the troop housing complex at Fort Hood, Texas, is presented. (WHK)

None

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Reassembling the rolling bridge : an art gallery at Fort Point Channel, Boston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spanning the Fort Point Channel for nearly a century, Boston's Rolling Bridge is a familiar landmark to many railway commuters and residents of the city. Its robust steel assembly, characterized by three anthropomorphic ...

Lim, Winston E

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Habitat Restoration/Enhancement Fort Hall Reservation : 2008 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Habitat enhancement, protection and monitoring were the focus of the Resident Fisheries Program during 2008. Enhancement and protection included sloping, fencing and planting wetlands plugs at sites on Spring Creek (Head-waters). Many previously constructed instream structures (rock barbs and wing dams) were repaired throughout the Fort Hall Indian Reservation (Reservation). Physical sampling during 2008 included sediment and depth measurements (SADMS) in Spring Creek at the Car Removal site. SADMS, used to track changes in channel morphology and specifically track movements of silt through Bottoms stream systems were completed for 5 strata on Spring Creek. Water temperature and chemistry were monitored monthly on Spring Creek, Clear Creek, Diggie Creek, and Portneuf (Jimmy Drinks) and Blackfoot rivers. Fish population densities and biomass were sampled in five reservation streams which included nine sites. Sampling protocols were identical to methods used in past years. Numbers of fish in Spring Creek series remained relatively low, however, there was an increase of biomass overall since 1993. Salmonid fry densities were monitored near Broncho Bridge and were similar to 2006, and 2007, however, as in years past, high densities of macrophytes make it very difficult to see fry in addition to lack of field technicians. Mean catch rate by anglers on Bottoms streams stayed the same as 2007 at 1.5/hr. Numbers of fish larger than 18-inches caught by anglers increased from 2007 at .20 to .26/hr.

Osborne, Hunter [Shoshone Bannock Tribes

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

237

Fort Stewart integrated resource assessment. Volume 1, Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), has developed a model program that provides a systematic approach to evaluating energy opportunities that (1) identifies the building groups and end uses that use the most energy (not just have the greatest energy-use intensity), and (2) evaluates the numerous options for retrofit or installation of new technology that will result in the selection of the most cost-effective technologies. In essence, this model program provides the federal energy manager with a roadmap to significantly reduce energy use in a planned, rational, cost-effective fashion that is not biased by the constraints of the typical funding sources available to federal sites. The results from this assessment process can easily be turned into a five- to ten-year energy management plan that identifies where to start and how to proceed in order to reach the mandated energy consumption targets. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the US Army US Forces Command (FORSCOM) Fort Stewart facility located approximately 25 miles southwest of Savannah, Georgia. It is a companion report to Volume 2, Baseline Detail, and Volume 3, Resource Assessment.

Larson, L.L.; Keller, J.M.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Fort St. Vrain Decommissioning: Final Site Radiation Survey: Summary Report and Lessons Learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the final step in the decommissioning process at Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCo) Fort St. Vrain nuclear power plant. The final site radiation survey documents that all nuclear facility surfaces meet the established release limits for unrestricted use. The survey formed the legal basis for the termination of the Fort St. Vrain nuclear license, which occurred in August 1997. The lessons learned in this process will be valuable to other utilities with permanently shutdown p...

1998-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

239

Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) Assessment Report for Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the findings of the Facility Energy Decision System (FEDS) assessment at Fort Buchanan, Puerto Rico, by a team of PNNL engineers under contract to the Installation Management Agency (IMA) Southeast Region Office (SERO). Funding support was also provided by the Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program. The purpose of the assessment was to determine how energy is consumed at Fort Buchanan, identify the most cost-effective energy retrofit measures, and calculate the potential energy and cost savings.

Chvala, William D.; Solana, Amy E.; Dixon, Douglas R.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Measured Cooling Performance of Two-story Homes in Dallas, Texas; Insulated Concrete Form Versus Frame Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four occupied homes near Dallas, Texas were monitored to compare heating and cooling energy use. Two homes were built with typical wood frame construction, the other two with insulated concrete form (ICF) construction. Remote data loggers collected average hourly indoor and outdoor temperature, relative humidity, furnace runtime fraction, total building electrical energy and HVAC energy use. The loggers recorded data from November 1999 through August 2000. Results show that insulated concrete form construction can reduce cooling energy use 17 to 19% in two-story homes in the north Texas climate. Two adjustments to the measured data were made to compensate for differences between the homes: (1) cooling energy use was normalized to remove the impact of miscellaneous energy use that introduces heat into the home (e.g. lights & appliances), and (2) duct leakage differences simulated in a DOE2-based software reduced the measured savings for ICF construction by 4%. Other differences noted between the homes that were not quantified included occupant impacts, exterior wall color (or absorptance) and an attic radiant barrier absent in one of the homes.

Chasar, D.; Moyer, N.; Rudd, A. F.; Parker, D.; Chandra, S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

How to estimate worth of minor value oil, gas producing properties at public auction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the divestiture of minor value working and royalty interests (worth less than $20,000) in producing oil and gas properties through the transaction medium of no-minimum, English open outcry public auctions. Specifically, the paper seeks to answer the question, What can the seller expect to receive for his minor value properties at a public auction, knowing only how he values those properties to himself To answer this question, a mathematical model that predicts the seller's expected present worth (EPW) as a function of the seller's Securities and Exchange Commission-case book value (X{sub s}), and the winning bid value (X{sub B}) is derived from classical auction theory.

Randall, B.L. (Unit Corp., Tulsa, OK (US))

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

Reactivity worth measurements at the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researches that aim to improve the performance of neutron transport codes and quality of nuclear cross section databases are very important to increase the accuracy of simulations and the quality of the analysis and prediction of phenomena in the nuclear field. In this context, relevant experimental data such as reactivity worth measurements are needed. The objective of this work was to perform a series of experiments of reactivity worth measurements, using a digital reactivity meter developed at IPEN. The experiments employed small metallic and ceramic samples inserted in the central region of the core of the experimental IPEN/MB-01 reactor. The theoretical analysis was performed by the MCNP-5 reactor physics code, developed and maintained by Los Alamos National Laboratory, and the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library.

Pinto, Leticia Negrao; Santos, Adimir dos [Nuclear Engineering Center, Nuclear and Energy Research Institute- IPEN/CNEN-SP (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

243

Water Reclamation and Reuse at Fort Carson: Best Management Practice Case Study #14 - Alternate Water Sources (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practice #14 Case Study: Overview of the water reclamation and reuse program at the U.S. Army's Fort Carson.

Not Available

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Olivella Grooved Rectangle Beads from a Middle Holocene Site in the Fort Rock Valley, Northern Great Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lake Fort Rock and other local sources. The primary culturalRock Valley currently receives no water from a perennial source.

Jenkins, Dennis L; Erlandson, Jon M

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Savings Report for the Fort Hood Army Base  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents electricity consumption and electric demand savings analysis for the Thermal Plant, buildings located in the 87000 block, III Corp building and other buildings that were determined to be part of the ESPC project at Ft. Hood, a total of 21 sites. The savings analysis for the Thermal Plant is not completed due to lack of post-retrofit data and will be included in the report upon receiving more data from Fort Hood. The data used for savings calculations were collected through the synergistic loggers installed at the Thermal Plant and III Corp building and portable loggers attached to Watt-hour meters in selected buildings. For each site, the hourly data collected for the pre- and post periods are converted to daily usage and then modeled with ASHRAEĺs IMT change-point linear models. The electricity consumption savings is then calculated for the months post-retrofit data are available. The weather-independent analysis, which utilizes 24-hour profiles that were developed using ASHRAEĺs 1093-RP diversity factor procedures, combined with ASHRAEĺs IMT change-point linear models, are used to evaluate demand savings. In Section 1 of the report, savings summaries for the sites measured and all the sites are given. In summary, the total measured savings of 1,034,473 kWh for the measured period corresponds to 60.7% of the audit-estimated electricity savings. The total of the measured demand savings of 1,220 kW for the measured period corresponds to 37.2% of the audit-estimated savings. Both measured electricity and demand savings fall short of expectations. The projected annual savings, which include the projected annual measured savings for the sites measured and the stipulated annual savings for the sites not measured, to match the JCI estimates for all the 57 sites, is also presented in Section 1. 78.2% of the audit-estimated electricity savings and 72.0% of the audit-estimated demand savings could be achieved assuming that the sites not measured were achieving 100% of the audit-estimated savings. The detailed savings summary and the plots showing the savings analysis for each site are presented in Sections 2 to 22. An Appendix is also provided that includes the list of data files in the accompanying CDROM with this report.

Song, S.; Liu, Z.; Cho, S.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Haberl, J. S.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Habitat Restoration/Enhancement Fort Hall Reservation : 2001 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Habitat enhancement, protection and monitoring were the focus of the Resident Fisheries Program during 2001. Enhancement and protection included sloping, fencing and planting willows at sites on Diggie Creek, Clear Creek and Spring Creek. In addition, many previously constructed instream structures (rock barbs and wing dams) were repaired throughout the Fort Hall Indian Reservation (Reservation). In 2001, exclosure fences were erected on Diggie Creek (250 m barbed wire; (70 m jack), Wood Creek (500 m jack), Clear Creek (20 m jack), Ross Fork Creek (200 m jack), West Fork Creek (200 m jack)) and the Portneuf River (1 km barbed wire; 100 m jack). Jack and rail exclosure fences that had deteriorated over the past ten years were repaired at numerous areas throughout the Reservation. Physical sampling during 2001 included sediment and depth surveys (SADMS) in Big Jimmy Creek and Diggie Creek. SADMS, used to track changes in channel morphology and specifically track movements of silt through Bottoms stream systems were completed for eight and nine strata in the Big Jimmy and Diggie Creek, respectively. Baseline SADM data was collected in Diggie Creek to monitor the effects of bank sloping and revegetation on channel morphology and sediment levels through time. Water temperature was monitored (hourly) in Spring Creek, Clear Creek, Ross Fork Creek and Big Jimmy Creek. Biotic sampling included invertebrate sampling in the 200 and 300 series of Clear Creek. Fish population densities and biomass were sampled in Clear Creek 200 and 300 series. Sampling protocols were identical to methods used in past years. Numbers of fish in Clear Creek 300 series remained similar to 2000 while numbers of fish in Clear Creek 200 series dropped to near pre project levels. Salmonid fry densities were monitored near Broncho Bridge and were significantly higher than 2000. A mark-recapture study was initiated in spring 2001 to estimate numbers of spawning adults using the Head End of Spring Creek Mean catch rate by anglers on Bottoms streams increased from 0.55 in 2000 to 0.77 fish per hour in 2001. Numbers of fish 18 inches caught by anglers decreased from 0.41 in 2000 to 0.19 in 2001.

Moser, David C.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) storage facility study Fort Gordon, Georgia. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Fort Gordon currently purchases natural gas from Atlanta Gas Light Company under a rate schedule for Large Commercial Interruptible Service. This offers a very favorable rate for `interruptible` gas service, however, Fort Gordon must maintain a base level of `firm gas`, purchased at a significantly higher cost, to assure adequate natural gas supplies during periods of curtailment to support family housing requirements and other single fuel users. It is desirable to provide a standby fuel source to meet the needs of family housing and other single fuel users and eliminate the extra costs for the firm gas commitment to Atlanta Gas Light Company. Therefore, a propane-air standby fuel system is proposed to be installed at Fort Gordon.

NONE

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Reflection Survey At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey At Cove Fort Area (Toksoz, Et Al, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes We have collected various geophysical data around the geothermal field, including heat flow, gravity, MT, seismic surface wave phase and group velocity maps, seismic body wave travel time data and full seismic waveforms. All of these geophysical data sets have different strengths on characterizing subsurface structures and properties. Combining these data through a coordinated analysis and, when possible, by joint inversion provides a detailed model of the Cove Fort geothermal region.

249

Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon ┬╗ Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects

250

City of Fort Collins Utilities Smart Grid Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Collins Utilities Smart Grid Project Collins Utilities Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead City of Fort Collins Utilities Country United States Headquarters Location Fort Collins, Colorado Recovery Act Funding $18,101,263.00 Total Project Value $36,202,527.00 Coverage Area Coverage Map: City of Fort Collins Utilities Smart Grid Project Coordinates 40.5852602┬░, -105.084423┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

251

Core Holes At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon ┬╗ Core Holes At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Holes At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Core Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Drilling for the four holes followed the same general pattern: 1) set a conductor casing to a depth of 30-50', 2) drill - 6" hole through mostly sand/clay sedentary formations to 500-600', 3) set 4-1/2" surface casing at that depth 4) core HQ (3.89" dia.) mostly through limestone/dolornite or

252

Resistivity Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon ┬╗ Resistivity Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Single-Well and Cross-Well Resistivity Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three principal types of data were obtained from this drilling project: core samples of the lithology penetrated by the holes, records of drilling behavior (such as water level in the hole, changes in rate of penetration

253

Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al., 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2) 2) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The project at Cove Fort/Sulphurdale in Utah, T26S R6/7W, is concerned with locating and drilling a 900-meter well to explore the western extension of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location. Drilling of the test well was completed in the fall of 2001 and results are currently being evaluated. The total depth of the well is 598 m with a non-equilibrated maximum temperature probably in the range of 157degrees C and a very complicated geologic structure.

254

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Warpinski, Et Al., (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove Fort Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Direct-Current_Resistivity_Survey_At_Cove_Fort_Area_(Warpinski,_Et_Al.,_2004)&oldid=598126" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here

255

Wind resource assessment and wind energy system cost analysis: Fort Huachuca, Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this joint DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) project is to determine whether wind turbines can reduce costs by providing power to US military facilities in high wind areas. In support of this objective, one year of data on the wind resources at several Fort Huachuca sites was collected. The wind resource data were analyzed and used as input to an economic study for a wind energy installation at Fort Huachuca. The results of this wind energy feasibility study are presented in the report.

Olsen, T.L. [Tim Olsen Consulting, Denver, CO (United States); McKenna, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter GS FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

257

FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PS FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS By R of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

258

Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1586 Phone (970) 491-6612  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

practitioners who excel in their professional lives. Students frequently come to the classroom with work Springs, Fort Collins or on-line, the School of Social Work welcomes you to our learning community. ALL College of Health and Human Sciences School of Social Work http://www.ssw.chhs.colostate.edu Master

Stephens, Graeme L.

259

Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1586 Phone (970) 491-6612  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environment and graduating social work practitioners who excel in their professional lives. Students-time; or taking your courses in Thornton, Colorado Springs, Fort Collins or on-line, the School of Social Work College of Health and Human Sciences School of Social Work http://www.ssw.chhs.colostate.edu Master

Stephens, Graeme L.

260

Energy study of Laundry Facilities, Fort Knox, Kentucky: Executive summary (revised). Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

This document is the Executive Summary of the Energy Survey of Laundry Facilities at Fort Knox, Kentucky. The purpose of this document is to briefly outline the existing and historical energy situation, summarize the methodology and results of the Energy Study, and present the specific energy conservation projects developed through the Energy Study.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Conceptual design report for the mechanical disassembly of Fort St. Vrain fuel elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual design study was prepared that: (1) reviewed the operations necessary to perform the mechanical disassembly of Fort St. Vrain fuel elements; (2) contained a description and survey of equipment capable of performing the necessary functions; and (3) performed a tradeoff study for determining the preferred concepts and equipment specifications. A preferred system was recommended and engineering specifications for this system were developed.

Lord, D.L. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wadsworth, D.C.; Sekot, J.P.; Skinner, K.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

FORT UNION COAL IN THE WILLISTON BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA: A SYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter WS FORT UNION COAL IN THE WILLISTON BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA: A SYNTHESIS By R.M. Flores and C coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

263

Two Floods in Fort Collins, Colorado: Learning from a Natural Disaster  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A flash flood in Fort Collins, Colorado, on 28 July 1997 resulted in 5 deaths, 62 injuries, and more than $250 million in property damage. Following the 1997 flood, a great many changes were made in the city's preparedness infrastructure. On 30 ...

John F. Weaver; Eve Gruntfest; Glenn M. Levy

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume III. Engineering drawings. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Engineering drawings are presented for the Solar Total Energy System at Fort Hood, Texas. Drawings are given for the solar collector subsystem, power conversion subsystem, instrumentation and control subsystem, thermal storage subsystem, site preparation, thermal storage area piping and equipment layout, heating/cooling and domestic hot water subsystem, STES building and facility, and electrical distribution. (WHK)

None,

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Fission product behavior in the Peach Bottom and Fort St. Vrain HTGRs  

SciTech Connect

Actual operating data from Peach Bottom and Fort St. Vrain were compared with code predictions to assess the validity of the methods used to predict the behavior of fission products in the primary coolant circuit. For both reactors the measured circuit activities were significantly below design values, and the observations generally verify the codes used for large HTGR design.

Hanson, D.L.; Baldwin, N.L.; Strong, D.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Fort Lewis natural gas and fuel oil energy baseline and efficiency resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to lead the improvement of energy efficiency and fuel flexibility within the federal sector. Through the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), FEMP is developing a fuel-neutral approach for identifying, evaluating, and acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at federal installations; this procedure is entitled the Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. Through a cooperative program between FEMP and the Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) for providing technical assistance to FORSCOM installations, PNL has been working with the Fort Lewis Army installation to develop the FEDS procedure. The natural gas and fuel oil assessment contained in this report was preceded with an assessment of electric energy usage that was used to implement a cofunded program between Fort Lewis and Tacoma Public Utilities to improve the efficiency of the Fort`s electric-energy-using systems. This report extends the assessment procedure to the systems using natural gas and fuel oil to provide a baseline of consumption and an estimate of the energy-efficiency potential that exists for these two fuel types at Fort Lewis. The baseline is essential to segment the end uses that are targets for broad-based efficiency improvement programs. The estimated fossil-fuel efficiency resources are estimates of the available quantities of conservation for natural gas, fuel oils {number_sign}2 and {number_sign}6, and fuel-switching opportunities by level of cost-effectiveness. The intent of the baseline and efficiency resource estimates is to identify the major efficiency resource opportunities and not to identify all possible opportunities; however, areas of additional opportunity are noted to encourage further effort.

Brodrick, J.R. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Daellenbach, K.K.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Secrest, T.J.; Shankle, S.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Dallas Regional Conference Agenda  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Lisa Muller, Assistant Superintendent, Curriculum and School Improvement. ... Melanie Taylor, Associate Superintendent of Curriculum and Instruction. ...

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

268

3DVAR and Cloud Analysis with WSR-88D Level-II Data for the Prediction of the Fort Worth, Texas, Tornadic Thunderstorms. Part I: Cloud Analysis and Its Impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this two-part paper, the impact of level-II Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) reflectivity and radial velocity data on the prediction of a cluster of tornadic thunderstorms in the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) ...

Ming Hu; Ming Xue; Keith Brewster

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

3DVAR and Cloud Analysis with WSR-88D Level-II Data for the Prediction of the Fort Worth, Texas, Tornadic Thunderstorms. Part II: Impact of Radial Velocity Analysis via 3DVAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this two-part paper, the impact of level-II Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) radar reflectivity and radial velocity data on the prediction of a cluster of tornadic thunderstorms in the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS)...

Ming Hu; Ming Xue; Jidong Gao; Keith Brewster

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Lincoln-Fort Rice, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lincoln-Fort Rice, North Dakota: Energy Resources Lincoln-Fort Rice, North Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.7374001┬░, -100.7514845┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.7374001,"lon":-100.7514845,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

271

Neutron Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Neutron Log At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Neutron Log Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three principal types of data were obtained from this drilling project: core samples of the lithology penetrated by the holes, records of drilling behavior (such as water level in the hole, changes in rate of penetration etc.), and multiple temperature logs (both during and after drilling) in each well. A suite of geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron, sonic, and resistivity) was also run after completion of drilling. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr.,

272

them. A French military officer noted in 1750 that Indians living near Fort Figu  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

them. A French military officer noted in 1750 that Indians living near Fort Figure 11. Petroleum Production and Consumption them. A French military officer noted in 1750 that Indians living near Fort Figure 11. Petroleum Production and Consumption Duquesne (now the site of Pittsburgh) set fire to an oil-slicked creek as part of a religious ceremony. As settlement by Europeans proceeded, oil' was discovered in many places in northwestern Pennsylvania and western New York-to tile frequent dismay of the well-owners, who were drilling for salt brine./ >' Cons umption/ In the mid-1800s expanding uses for oil extracted from coal and shale began to hint at the value of rock oil and encouraged the search for readily accessible A Production supplies. This impetus launched the modem petroleum age, which began on a t 10 - Sunday afternoon in August 1859 at Oil Creek, near Titusville in northwestern-\

273

Core Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9) 9) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Core Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three principal types of data were obtained from this drilling project: core samples of the lithology penetrated by the holes, records of drilling behavior (such as water level in the hole, changes in rate of penetration etc.), and multiple temperature logs (both during and after drilling) in each well. A suite of geophysical logs (gamma ray, neutron, sonic, and resistivity) was also run tier completion of drilling. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr.,

274

Thermal Gradient Holes At Fort Bidwell Area (Lafleur, Et Al., 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bidwell Area (Lafleur, Et Al., 2010) Bidwell Area (Lafleur, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Fort Bidwell Area (Lafleur, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bidwell Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "Four wells have been successfully drilled into this resource since the early 1980s using a combination of funds provided by the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the United State Department of Energy (USDOE). The first three wells, FB-1, -2 and -3 have been discussed in a previous paper (Barker et al., 2005). The current status of the FBIC project to evaluate the potential geothermal resource under the reservation is that a deep

275

Reinhabiting the Fort Point Channel : a proposal for transforming and extending the warehouse district in South Boston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this design investigation is the warehouse fabric of the Fort Point Channel and its potentials as a model for further development This extensive configuration of warehouses and access roads is the product of ...

Dale, John Randall

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Energy efficiency campaign for residential housing at the Fort Lewis army installation  

SciTech Connect

In FY1999, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted an energy efficiency campaign for residential housing at the Fort Lewis Army Installation near Tacoma, Washington. Preliminary weather-corrected calculations show energy savings of 10{percent} from FY98 for energy use in family housing. This exceeded the project's goal of 3{percent}. The work was funded by the U.S. DOEs Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The project adapted FEMP's national ``You Have the Power Campaign'' at the local level, tailoring it to the military culture. The applied research project was designed to demonstrate the feasibility of tailored, research-based strategies to promote energy conservation in military family housing. In contrast to many energy efficiency efforts, the campaign focused entirely on actions residents could take in their own homes, as opposed to technology or housing upgrades. Behavioral change was targeted because residents do not pay their own utility bills; thus other motivations must drive personal energy conservation. This campaign augments ongoing energy savings from housing upgrades carried out by Fort Lewis. The campaign ran from September 1998 through August 1999. The campaign strategy was developed based on findings from previous research and on input from residents and officials at Fort Lewis. Energy use, corrected to account for weather differences, was compared with the previous year's use. Survey responses from 377 of Fort Lewis residents of occupied housing showed that the campaign was moderately effective in promoting behavior change. Of those who were aware of the campaign, almost all said they were now doing one or more energy-efficient things that they had not done before. Most people were motivated by the desire to do the right thing and to set a good example for their children. They were less motivated by other factors.

AH McMakin; RE Lundgren; EL Malone

2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

277

Methodology for the evaluation of a 4000-home geothermal heat pump retrofit at Fort Polk, Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Army and a private energy service company are developing a comprehensive energy efficiency project to upgrade the family housing at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The project includes converting the space conditioning systems of more than 4,000 housing units to geothermal (or ground-source) heat pumps (GHPs). This interim report describes the methodology of the evaluation associated with this project, including the field monitoring that has been conducted at the base.

Hughes, P.J.; Shonder, J.A.; White, D.L.; Huang, H.L.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Population size and contaminant exposure of bats using caves on Fort Hood Military Base  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal cave usage patterns were determined in an effort to understand the ecology of a bat colony at Shell Mountain Bat Cave in Fort Hood, Texas. Exit counts were conducted one night each month for 13 consecutive months to estimate the population and determine seasonal patterns. This cave was used as a maternity roost by a colony of cave myotis (myotis velifer) from March through October. Total colony size varies from month to month, becoming zero when bats leave during the winter. Old guano from two abandoned caves, Egypt and Tippet, on Fort Hood, and new guano from Shell Mountain was analyzed. Organochlorine residues showed higher levels of total chlordanes, endrin, dieldrin, mirex, p,p'-DDE, and o,p'-DDT in Egypt and Tippet caves; organophosphates showed higher amounts in the Shell Mountain guano. Organophosphates have never before been found in bat guano, and so what effects, if any, these amounts may indicate on the health of the colony are unknown. Some metals were also found in higher amounts in guano from Egypt and Tippet caves. Residue concentrations of organochlorines and metals in guano and carcasses collected from the three caves are low and probably of no concern. Comparisons among spring and fall guano smaples from Shell Mountain suggest that HCB, total chlordanes, dieldrin, endrin, endosulfan II, p,p'-DDE, and o,p'-DDT are accumulated while the bats are at Fort Hood. Lindane appears to be the only chemical that increases while the bats are at Fort Hood. Organochlorines found in carcasses tended to show smallest amounts in a lactating female and largest amounts in nursing juveniles.

Land, Tarisha Ann

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Fort Lewis natural gas and fuel oil energy baseline and efficiency resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is to lead the improvement of energy efficiency and fuel flexibility within the federal sector. Through the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), FEMP is developing a fuel-neutral approach for identifying, evaluating, and acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at federal installations; this procedure is entitled the Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) system. Through a cooperative program between FEMP and the Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) for providing technical assistance to FORSCOM installations, PNL has been working with the Fort Lewis Army installation to develop the FEDS procedure. The natural gas and fuel oil assessment contained in this report was preceded with an assessment of electric energy usage that was used to implement a cofunded program between Fort Lewis and Tacoma Public Utilities to improve the efficiency of the Fort's electric-energy-using systems. This report extends the assessment procedure to the systems using natural gas and fuel oil to provide a baseline of consumption and an estimate of the energy-efficiency potential that exists for these two fuel types at Fort Lewis. The baseline is essential to segment the end uses that are targets for broad-based efficiency improvement programs. The estimated fossil-fuel efficiency resources are estimates of the available quantities of conservation for natural gas, fuel oils [number sign]2 and [number sign]6, and fuel-switching opportunities by level of cost-effectiveness. The intent of the baseline and efficiency resource estimates is to identify the major efficiency resource opportunities and not to identify all possible opportunities; however, areas of additional opportunity are noted to encourage further effort.

Brodrick, J.R. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)); Daellenbach, K.K.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Secrest, T.J.; Shankle, S.A. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) process at Fort Drum, New York  

SciTech Connect

The federal energy manager has been directed by the Comprehensive Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) to reduce energy consumption by 20% from 1985 levels, by the year 2000. However, the tools and funding to capture this resource in a cost-effective manner have not been provided. In an effort to assist federal agencies in meeting EPAct requirements, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked by the US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) to identify, evaluate, and acquire all cost-effective energy projects at selected federal facilities. PNL has developed and applied the Federal Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) methodology at the Fort Drum FORSCOM facility near Watertown, New York. The FEDS methodology is a systematic approach to evaluating energy opportunities that result in a roadmap to significantly reduce energy use in a planned, rational, cost justified fashion over a 5 to 10 year period. At Fort Drum, the net present value (NPV) of the installed cost of all cost-effective energy resource opportunities (EROS) is over $16 million (1992 $). The NPV of the savings associated with this investment is nearly $47 million (1992 $), for an overall NPV of approximately $31 million. By implementing all the cost-effective EROS, Fort Drum will reduce annual energy use by over 230,000 MBtu, or 15%. Annual energy expenditures will decrease by over $2.4 million, or a 20% reduction.

Dixon, D.R.; Daellenbach, K.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rowley, S.E. [Directorate of Engineering & Housing, Ft. Drum, NY (United States); Gillespie, A.H. [Army Forces Command, Ft. McPherson, GA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Energy saving potential of residential HVAC options at Fort Irwin, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated heating and cooling system options for existing family housing at Fort Irwin, California. The purpose of this work was to quantify the energy conservation potential of alternative system types and to identify the most cost-effective technology available. The conventional residential heating/cooling systems at Fort Irwin are separate propane forced-air furnaces and central air conditioners. The options examined included air- and ground-source heat pumps, a natural gas furnace with central air conditioning, and a natural-gas-fired heat pump. The most cost-effective technology applicable to Fort Irwin was found to be the high-efficiency ground-source heat pumps. If all conventional units were replaced immediately, the net energy savings would be 76,660 MBtu (80.9 TJ) per year and a reduction in electrical demand of approximately 15,000 kW-month. The initial investment for implementing this technology would be approximately $7.1 million, with a savings-to-investment ratio of 1.74.

Hadley, D.L.; Stucky, D.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Geothermal reservoir assessment: Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Unit. Final report, September 1977-July 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three exploratory geothermal wells were drilled in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal resource area in southwestern Utah to obtain new subsurface data for inclusion in the US DOE's geothermal reservoir assessment program. Existing data from prior investigations which included the drilling of an earlier exploratory well at the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale area was also provided. Two of the wells were abandoned before reaching target depth because of severe lost circulation and hole sloughing problems. The two completed holes reached depths of 5221 ft. and 7735 ft., respectively, and a maximum reservoir temperature of 353/sup 0/F at 7320 ft. was measured. The deepest well flow was tested at the rate of 47,000 lbs/h with a wellhead temperature of 200/sup 0/F and pressure of 3 psig. Based upon current economics, the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal resource is considered to be sub-commercial for the generation of electrical power. A synopsis is given of the exploratory drilling activities and results containing summary drilling, testing, geologic and geochemical information from four exploratory geothermal wells.

Ash, D.L.; Dondanville, R.F.; Gulati, M.S.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Land Cover Differences in Soil Carbon and Nitrogen at Fort Benning, Georgia  

SciTech Connect

Land cover characterization might help land managers assess the impacts of management practices and land cover change on attributes linked to the maintenance and/or recovery of soil quality. However, connections between land cover and measures of soil quality are not well established. The objective of this limited investigation was to examine differences in soil carbon and nitrogen among various land cover types at Fort Benning, Georgia. Forty-one sampling sites were classified into five major land cover types: deciduous forest, mixed forest, evergreen forest or plantation, transitional herbaceous vegetation, and barren land. Key measures of soil quality (including mineral soil density, nitrogen availability, soil carbon and nitrogen stocks, as well as properties and chemistry of the O-horizon) were significantly different among the five land covers. In general, barren land had the poorest soil quality. Barren land, created through disturbance by tracked vehicles and/or erosion, had significantly greater soil density and a substantial loss of carbon and nitrogen relative to soils at less disturbed sites. We estimate that recovery of soil carbon under barren land at Fort Benning to current day levels under transitional vegetation or forests would require about 60 years following reestablishment of vegetation. Maps of soil carbon and nitrogen were produced for Fort Benning based on a 1999 land cover map and field measurements of soil carbon and nitrogen stocks under different land cover categories.

Garten Jr., C.T.

2004-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fort Hood solar total energy project. Technical support and systems integration. First semiannual report, May 1-October 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress on the design of a Solar Total Energy System which will supply a significant portion of the energy requirements of a troop housing complex at Fort Hood, Texas, is described. Selection and sizing of the distributed collector field are discussed, and parabolic trough collector technology is reviewed. Energy load measurements and insolation models for the Fort Hood site are described. Technical project support efforts are reviewed. (WHK)

None,

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Geothermal heat pump energy savings performance contract at Fort Polk, LA: Lessons learned  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At Fort Polk, LA the space conditioning systems of 4,003 military family housing units have been converted to geothermal heat pumps (GHP) under an energy savings performance contract (ESPC). At the same time, other efficiency measures, such as compact fluorescent lights (CFLs), low-flow shower heads, and attic insulation, were installed. An independent evaluation of the Fort Polk ESPC was carried out. Findings indicate that the project has resulted in a 25.6 million kWh savings in electrical energy use, or 32.4% of the pre-retrofit electrical consumption in family housing, for a typical meteorological year. Peak electrical demand has also been reduced by 6,541 kW, which is 39.6% of the pre-retrofit peak demand. Natural gas savings are about 260,000 therms per year. In addition, the ESPC has allowed the Army to effectively cap its future expenditures for family housing HVAC maintenance at about 77% of its previous costs. Given these successful results, the Fort Polk ESPC can provide a model for other ESPCs in both the public and the private sectors. The purpose of this paper is to outline the method by which the ESPC was engineered and implemented, both from the standpoint of the facility owner (the US Army) and the energy services company (ESCO) which is carrying out the contract. The lessons learned from this experience should be useful to other owners, ESCOs and investors in the implementation of future ESPCs. It should be noted that the energy savings presented in this document are the apparent energy savings observed in the monitored data, and are not to be confused with the contracted energy savings used as the basis for payments. To determine the contracted energy savings, the apparent energy savings may require adjustments for such things as changes in indoor temperature performance criteria, additions of ceiling fans, and other factors.

Shonder, J.A.; Hughes, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Gordon, R. [Applied Energy Management Techniques, Corvallis, OR (United States); Giffin, T. [SAIC/The Fleming Group, East Syracuse, NY (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

ASSESSMENT OF HYDROCARBON SEEPAGE DETECTION METHODS ON THE FORT PECK RESERVATION, NORTHEAST MONTANA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface exploration techniques have been employed in separate study areas on the Fort Peck Reservation in northeastern Montana. Anomalies associated with hydrocarbon seepage are documented in all three areas and a variety of surface exploration techniques can be compared. In a small area with established production, Head Gas and Thermal Desorption methods best match production; other methods also map depletion. In a moderate-size area that has prospects defined by 3D seismic data, Head Gas along with Microbial, Iodine, and Eh soil anomalies are all associated with the best hydrocarbon prospect. In a large area that contains many curvilinear patterns observed on Landsat images, that could represent micro-seepage chimneys, results are inconclusive. Reconnaissance mapping using Magnetic Susceptibility has identified a potential prospect; subsequent Soil Gas and Head Gas surveys suggest hydrocarbon potential. In the final year of this project the principle contractor, the Fort Peck Tribes, completed a second survey in the Wicape 3D Seismic Prospect Area (also known as Area 6 in Phase I of the project) and sampled several Landsat image features contained in the Smoke Creek Aeromag Anomaly Area (also known as Area 1 in Phase II of the project). Methods determined to be most useful in Phases I and II, were employed in this final Phase III of the study. The Southwest Wicape seismic anomaly was only partially confirmed. The abundant curvilinears proposed to be possible hydrocarbon micro-seepage chimneys in the Smoke Creek Area were not conclusively verified as such. Insufficient sampling of background data precludes affirmative identification of these mostly topographic Landsat features as gas induced soil and vegetation anomalies. However relatively higher light gas concentrations were found associated with some of the curvilinears. Based on the findings of this work the Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation intend to utilize surface hydrocarbon exploration techniques for future identification and confirmation of oil and gas prospects.

Lawrence M. Monson

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

287

Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-353 Boralex Fort Fairfield LP & Boralex Ashland LP: Federal Register Notice Vol 74 No 151  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Application from Boralex Fort Fairfield LP & Boralex Ashland LP to export electric energy to Canada. Federal Register Notice Vol 74 No 151

288

The Role of Occupant Behavior in Achieving Net Zero Energy: A Demonstration Project at Fort Carson  

SciTech Connect

This study, sponsored by the U.S. General Services Administrationĺs Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings, aimed to understand the potential for institutional and behavioral change to enhance the performance of buildings, through a demonstration project with the Department of Defense in five green buildings on the Fort Carson, Colorado, Army base. To approach this study, the research team identified specific occupant behaviors that had the potential to save energy in each building, defined strategies that might effectively support behavior change, and implemented a coordinated set of actions during a three-month intervention.

Judd, Kathleen S.; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Zalesny, Mary D.; Fernandez, Nicholas

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

Geothermal Direct Use Feasibility Study on the Fort Bidwell Indian Reservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fort Bidwell Indian Reservation (FBIR) is rich in renewable energy resources. Development of its geothermal resources has the potential to profoundly affect the energy and economic future of the FBIC. Geothermal energy can contribute to making the reservation energy self-sufficient and, potentially, an energy exporter. The feasibility study assessed the feasibility of installing a geothermal district heating system to provide low-cost, efficient heating of existing and planned residences, community buildings and water, using an existing geothermal well, FB-3.

Dale Merrick

2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

290

Fort Devens: Cold Climate, Energy-Efficient, Market-Rate Townhomes  

SciTech Connect

In 2009, Mass Development issued an RFQ and subsequent RFP for teams to develop moderately priced high-efficiency homes on two sites within the Devens Regional Enterprise Zone. MassDevelopment, a Massachusetts agency that owns the Devens site (formerly Fort Devens Army Base, in Harvard, Massachusetts), set a goal of producing a replicable example of current and innovative sustainable building practices with a near-zero energy potential. Metric Development, as primary developer and construction manager, formed one of the successful teams that included CARB and Cambridge Seven Architects (C7A).

Zoeller, W.; Slattery, M.; Grab, J.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Primary coolant chemistry of the Peach Bottom and Fort St. Vrain high-temperature gas-cooled reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical impurities in the primary coolants of the Peach Bottom and Fort St. Vrain reactors are discussed. The impurity mixtures in the two plants were quite different because the sources of the impurities were different. In the Peach Bottom reactor, the impurities were dominated by H/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/, which are decomposition products of oil. In the Fort St. Vrain reactor, there were high levels of CO, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/O. Although oil ingress at Peach Bottom created carbon deposits on virtually all surfaces, its effect on reactor operation was negligible. Slow outgassing of water from the thermal insulation at Fort St. Vrain caused delays in reactor startup. The overall graphite oxidation in both plants was negligible.

Burnette, R.D.; Baldwin, N.L.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Fort Irwin integrated resource assessment. Volume 3: Sitewide Energy Project identification for buildings and facilities  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has tasked the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), supported by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Fort Irwin. This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the FORSCOM Fort Irwin facility located near Barstow, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 16 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, along with a table detailing information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present valve (NPV) and savings-to-investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Keller, J.M.; Dittmer, A.L.; Elliott, D.B.; McMordie, K.L.; Richman, E.E.; Stucky, D.J.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Hadley, D.L.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Modeling soil quality thresholds to ecosystem recovery at Fort Benning, GA, USA  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research was to use a simple model of soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics to predict nutrient thresholds to ecosystem recovery on degraded soils at Fort Benning, Georgia, in the southeastern USA. Artillery, wheeled, and tracked vehicle training at military installations can produce soil disturbance and potentially create barren, degraded soils. Ecosystem reclamation is an important component of natural resource management at military installations. Four factors were important to the development of thresholds to recovery of aboveground biomass on degraded soils: (1) initial amounts of aboveground biomass, (2) initial soil C stocks (i.e., soil quality), (3) relative recovery rates of biomass, and (4) soil sand content. Forests and old fields on soils with varying sand content had different predicted thresholds for ecosystem recovery. Soil C stocks at barren sites on Fort Benning were generally below predicted thresholds to 100% recovery of desired future ecosystem conditions defined on the basis of aboveground biomass. Predicted thresholds to ecosystem recovery were less on soils with more than 70% sand content. The lower thresholds for old field and forest recovery on more sandy soils were apparently due to higher relative rates of net soil N mineralization. Calculations with the model indicated that a combination of desired future conditions, initial levels of soil quality (defined by soil C stocks), and the rate of biomass accumulation determine the predicted success of ecosystem recovery on disturbed soils.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Effect of military training on indicators of soil quality at Fort Benning, Georgia  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of soil disturbance on several key indicators of soil quality at Fort Benning, Georgia. Military activities at Fort Benning that result in soil disturbance include infantry, artillery, wheeled, and tracked vehicle training. Soil samples were collected along a disturbance gradient that included: (1) reference sites, (2) light military use, (3) moderate military use, (4) heavy military use, and (5) remediated sites. With the exception of surface soil bulk density, measured soil properties at reference and light use sites were similar. Relative to reference sites, greater surface soil bulk density, lower soil carbon concentrations, and less carbon and nitrogen in particulate organic matter (POM) were found at moderate use, heavy use, and remediated sites. Studies along a pine forest chronosequence indicated that carbon stocks in POM gradually increased with stand age. An analysis of soil C:N ratios, as well as soil carbon concentrations and stocks, indicated a recovery of soil quality at moderate military use and remediated sites relative to heavy military use sites. Measurements of soil carbon and nitrogen are ecological indicators that can be used by military land managers to identify changes in soil from training activities and to rank training areas on the basis of soil quality.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Seeing Savings from an ESPC Project in Fort Polk's Utility Bills  

SciTech Connect

Federal agencies have implemented many energy efficiency projects over the years with direct funding or alternative financing vehicles such as energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs). While it is generally accepted that these projects save energy and costs, the savings are usually not obvious in the utility bills. This is true for many valid technical reasons, even when savings are verified in other ways to the highest degree of certainty. However, any perceived deficiency in the evidence for savings is problematic when auditors or other observers evaluate the outcome of energy projects and the achievements of energy management programs. This report discusses under what circumstances energy savings should or should not be evident in utility bills. In the special case of a large ESPC project at the Army's Fort Polk, the analysis of utility bills carried out by the authors does unequivocally confirm and quantify savings. The data requirements and methods for arriving at definitive answers through utility bill analysis are demonstrated in our discussion of the Fort Polk project. The following paragraphs address why the government generally should not expect to see savings from ESPC projects in their utility bills. We also review lessons learned and best practices for measurement and verification (M&V) that can assure best value for the government and are more practical, straightforward, and cost-effective than utility bill analysis.

Shonder, J.A.

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

296

Fort Huachuca Water Awareness Program: Best Management Practice Case Study #2: Information and Education Programs (Revised), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Army Fort Huachuca contracted the University of Army Fort Huachuca contracted the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension to provide comprehensive water and energy conservation awareness programs under its Water Wise and Energy Smart (WWES) program. Ongoing since 1998, this program provides outreach, education, and services to approximately 14,000 Fort Huachuca military and civilian employees and their families. Fort Huachuca is home of the U.S. Army Intelligence Center, Network Enterprise Technology Command/9th Army Signal Command, Joint Interoperability Test Command, and the Electronic Proving Ground. The military base encompasses approximately 78,000 acres and just over eight million square feet of real property. Fort Huachuca is located at the base of the Huachuca Moun- tains and adjacent to the City of Sierra Vista near Tucson,

297

Fort Huachuca Water Awareness Program: Best Management Practice Case Study #2: Information and Education Programs (Revised), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Army Fort Huachuca contracted the University of Army Fort Huachuca contracted the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension to provide comprehensive water and energy conservation awareness programs under its Water Wise and Energy Smart (WWES) program. Ongoing since 1998, this program provides outreach, education, and services to approximately 14,000 Fort Huachuca military and civilian employees and their families. Fort Huachuca is home of the U.S. Army Intelligence Center, Network Enterprise Technology Command/9th Army Signal Command, Joint Interoperability Test Command, and the Electronic Proving Ground. The military base encompasses approximately 78,000 acres and just over eight million square feet of real property. Fort Huachuca is located at the base of the Huachuca Moun- tains and adjacent to the City of Sierra Vista near Tucson,

298

Contour Ripping and Composted Dairy Manure for Erosion Control on Fort Hood Military Installation, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Training activities on the Fort Hood Military Installation have imposed serious impacts to its grass-dominated landscape. Six decades of tracked vehicle impacts have caused soil compaction and vegetation reduction which has lead to severe surface erosion. This investigation examined two conservation practices directed at improving and creating sustainable training conditions on Fort Hood training lands, contour ripping and the application of composted dairy manure. The application of composted dairy manure may increase vegetation, while contour ripping may decrease discharge, both of which will lead to a decrease in erosion. Three small 0.30 ha watersheds were established on Fort Hood in January 2005. Each watershed had 0.46 m berms installed on all four sides with a 0.305 m H-flume and was equipped with automated storm sampling equipment. Soil samples were collected prior to any treatments, and twice after compost applications. Discharge and precipitation was collected continuously on each watershed. Stormwater samples were collected during storm events and analyzed for water quality parameters. Water quality samples, discharge and precipitation records were collected between January 2005 and July 2007. Three composted dairy manure application rates at 0, 28 and 57 m3 ha-1 were applied on watersheds C0, C1 and C2, respectively; watersheds were evaluated for effects on NO3 and soluble reactive phosphates (SRP) concentrations and loadings in storm events and on stormwater discharge. Twenty two months after the initial compost application, the two previously composted watersheds (C1 and C2) were treated with contour ripping and C2 received a second compost application. The compost application caused the spikes in NO3 and SRP concentrations and loads immediately after application. Both NO3 and SRP concentrations decreased as the number of days from application increased. Compost application did not appear to have an effect on the discharge from watersheds. Contour ripping had a significant effect on stormwater discharge. Contour ripping decreased discharge by 74 and 80% on C1 and C2, respectively when compared to the untreated control (C0).

Prcin, Lisa J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

An Analysis of the Residential Energy Savings from the Implementation of the 2001 IECC and 2006 NAECA Appliance Standards in the State of Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents results of an analysis of the annual electricity and natural gas savings from implementation of the 2001 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) specifications with updated 2006 specifications for mechanical systems to new single-family residential construction, using a code traceable DOE-2 simulation for two locations in Texas. In this analysis a sensitivity analysis was performed which included the impact of changing the Seasonal Energy Efficiency Ratio (SEER) and Heating Seasonal Performance Factor (HSPF) values in code-compliant construction (i.e., SEER 13, HSPF 7.7) as required by National Appliance Energy Conservation Act (NAECA, 2006). The results show that the annual energy consumption for a typical single-family residence decreased by 18.8% when comparing a pre-code house with natural gas heating, where the SEER for the air-conditioner was increased from 10 to 13, to a code-compliant house incorporating the 2006 NAECA standards in Houston , and by 16.0% for a similar house in Dallas/Fort Worth area. In a house employing a heat pump as a source of heating, where the SEER for the air-conditioner was increased from 10 to 13 and the HSPF was increased from 6.6 to 7.7, the annual energy consumption decreased by 18.2% for a house in Houston and by 16.6% for a similar house in Dallas/Fort Worth.

Mukhopadhyay, J.; Liu, Z.; Malhotra, M.; Haberl, J.; Gilman, D.; Montgomery, C.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fort Lewis, Yakima Firing Center, and Vancouver Barracks/Camp Bonneville basewide energy use plan; executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This Executive Summary presents an overview of a series of studies, mostly energy related, of Fort Lewis, Yakima Firing Center, Vancouver Barracks, and Camp Bonneville. Collectively, the work is known as the Basewide Energy Use Plan and is a part of the Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP).

Smiley, D.P.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Quality site seasonal report, Fort Devens Launderette, SFBP (Solar in Federal Buildings Program) 1751, December 1984 through June 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The active solar Domestic Hot Water (DHW) system at the Fort Devens Launderette was designed and constructed as part of the Solar in Federal Buildings Program (SFBP). This retrofitted system was one of eight systems selected for quality monitoring. The purpose of this monitoring effort was to document the performance of quality state-of-the-art solar systems in large federal buildings. The launderette is part of the Post Exchange complex at the Fort Devens Army Post in Fort Devens, Massachusetts. The solar system preheats hot water for the coin operated laundry which has an estimated 25,000 customers per year. There are 108 collector panels comprising the 2563-square foot collector array. Collected solar energy is stored in a 3800-gallon tank. Propylene glycol is used to protect the solar array from freezing. Two immersed heat exchangers provide heat transfer from the propylene glycol to directly heat the DHW supply water in the storage tank. Auxiliary energy is supplied by gas and oil boilers. This solar system can be considered one of a kind and as such is a prototype. The lessons learned from building and operating this system should be used to correct design deficiencies and improve the performance of future solar systems for this application. Highlights of the system performance at the Fort Devens Launderette solar system during the December 1984 through June 1985 monitoring period are presented in this report.

Logee, T.L.

1987-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Fort Campbell, Kentucky A Forester position is available with the Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands. This position is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Forest Management Plan. ┬Ě Integrate military training support with habitat management, sustainable timber ┬Ě Experience in the design and execution of forest inventories ┬Ě Experience in forest inventory data analysis for Environmental Management of Military Lands. This position is located at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. ORGANIZATION

304

Integrated Assessment Plan Template and Operational Demonstration for SPIDERS Phase 2: Fort Carson  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the Integrated Assessment Plan (IAP) for the Phase 2 Operational Demonstration (OD) of the Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability (SPIDERS) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) project. SPIDERS will be conducted over a three year period with Phase 2 being conducted at Fort Carson, Colorado. This document includes the Operational Demonstration Execution Plan (ODEP) and the Operational Assessment Execution Plan (OAEP), as approved by the Operational Manager (OM) and the Integrated Management Team (IMT). The ODEP describes the process by which the OD is conducted and the OAEP describes the process by which the data collected from the OD is processed. The execution of the OD, in accordance with the ODEP and the subsequent execution of the OAEP, will generate the necessary data for the Quick Look Report (QLR) and the Utility Assessment Report (UAR). These reports will assess the ability of the SPIDERS JCTD to meet the four critical requirements listed in the Implementation Directive (ID).

Barr, Jonathan L.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Hadley, Mark D.; Kreyling, Sean J.; Schneider, Kevin P.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Preliminary assessment report for Fort Jacob F. Wolters, Installation 48555, Mineral Wells, Texas. Installation Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Texas Army National Guard (TXARNG) property near Mineral Wells, Texas. Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a basis for establishing corrective actions in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining site activities, quantities of hazardous substances present, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. This PA satisfies, for the Fort Wolters property, the requirement of the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program.

Dennis, C.B.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Assessment of Hydrocarbon Seepage on Fort Peck Reservation, Northeast Montana: A Comparison of Surface Exploration Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface exploration techniques have been employed in separate study areas on the Fort Peck Reservation in northeastern Montana. Anomalies associated with hydrocarbon seepage are documented in all three areas and a variety of surface exploration techniques can be compared. In a small area with established production, head gas and thermal desorption methods best match production; other methods also mapped depletion. In a moderate-size area that has prospects defined by 3D seismic data, head gas along with microbial, iodine, and Eh soil anomalies are all associated with the best hydrocarbon prospect. In a large area that contains many curvilinear patterns observed on Landsat images, results are preliminary. Reconnaissance mapping of magnetic susceptibility has identified a potential prospect; subsequent soil gas and head gas surveys suggest hydrocarbon potential.

Monson, Lawrence M.

2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

307

Multielement geochemistry of three geothermal wells, Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal area, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multielement geochemical analysis of drill cuttings from three geothermal wells, Utah State 42-7, Utah State 31-33 and Forminco No. 1, in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA, Utah, demonstrates that the distributions of different elements are the result of different chemical processes operating throughout the geologic history of the area. Statistical analysis of geochemical-data distributions confirm the presence of several distinct element associations. Of the 36 elements determined on the samples, 12 (V, Mo, Cd, Ag, Au, Sb, Bi, U, Te, Sn, B and Th) were present in concentrations at or below detection levels. Of the remaining 24 elements, only 3 (Ni, Co and Zr) are lognormally distributed. Distributions for the remaining elements are of aggregate populations which represent background, mineralization or other processes.

Christensen, O.D.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

The evaluation of a 4000-home geothermal heat pump retrofit at Fort Polk, Louisiana: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an independent evaluation of an energy retrofit of 4,003 family housing units at Fort Polk, Louisiana, under an energy savings performance contract (ESPC). Replacement of the heating, cooling, and water heating systems in these housing units with geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) anchored the retrofit; low-flow shower heads and compact fluorescent lighting were also installed, as well as attic insulation where needed. Statistically valid findings indicate that the project will save 25.8 million kWh, or 32.5% of the pre-retrofit whole-community electrical consumption, and 100% of the whole-community natural gas previously used for space conditioning and water heating (260,000 therms) in a typical meteorological year. At the end-use level, the GHPs were found to save about 42% of the pre-retrofit electrical consumption for heating, cooling, and water heating in housing units that were all-electric in the pre-retrofit period. This report also demonstrates an improved method of predicting energy savings. Using an engineering model calibrated to pre-retrofit energy use data collected in the field, the method predicted actual energy savings on one of the electric feeders at Fort Polk with a very high degree of accuracy. The accuracy of this model was in turn dependent on data-calibrated models of the geothermal heat pump and ground heat exchanger that are described in this report. In addition this report documents the status of vertical borehole ground heat exchanger (BHEx) design methods at the time this project was designed, and demonstrates methods of using data collected from operating GHP systems to benchmark BHEx design methods against a detailed engineering model calibrated to date. The authors also discuss the ESPC`s structure and implementation and how the experience gained here can contribute to the success of future ESPCs.

Hughes, P.J.; Shonder, J.A.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Building America Efficient Solutions for Existing Homes Case Study: Habitat for Humanity of Palm Beach County, Lake Worth, Florida  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Description Project Description Habitat for Humanity of Palm Beach County, working with Building America researchers from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Florida Solar Energy Center, upgraded this previously unoccupied 1996 home in Lake Worth, Florida to achieve an estimated 39% improvement in energy efficiency. The 1,573-ft 2 slab-on-grade, single- family home received extensive energy upgrades during its conversion to affordable and efficient housing for low-income families. By replacing the home's water heater, using compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), reducing air infiltration, adding more ceiling insulation, and installing a central air conditioner, the home's annual energy bills are

310

Effects of Heavy, Tracked-Vehicle Disturbance on Forest Soil Properties at Fort Benning, Georgia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe the effects of heavy, tracked-vehicle disturbance on various measures of soil quality in training compartment K-11 at Fort Benning, Georgia. Predisturbance soil sampling in April and October of 2002 indicated statistically significant differences in soil properties between upland and riparian sites. Soil density was less at riparian sites, but riparian soils had significantly greater C and N concentrations and stocks than upland soils. Most of the C stock in riparian soils was associated with mineral-associated organic matter (i.e., the silt + clay fraction physically separated from whole mineral soil). Topographic differences in soil N availability were highly dependent on the time of sampling. Riparian soils had higher concentrations of extractable inorganic N than upland soils and also exhibited significantly greater soil N availability during the spring sampling. The disturbance experiment was performed in May 2003 by driving a D7 bulldozer through the mixed pine/hardwood forest. Post-disturbance sampling was limited to upland sites because training with heavy, tracked vehicles at Fort Benning is generally confined to upland soils. Soil sampling approximately one month after the experiment indicated that effects of the bulldozer were limited primarily to the forest floor (O-horizon) and the surface (0-10 cm) mineral soil. O-horizon dry mass and C stocks were significantly reduced, relative to undisturbed sites, and there was an indication of reduced mineral soil C stocks in the disturbance zone. Differences in the surface (0-10 cm) mineral soil also indicated a significant increase in soil density as a result of disturbance by the bulldozer. Although there was some tendency for greater soil N availability in disturbed soils, the changes were not significantly different from undisturbed controls. It is expected that repeated soil disturbance over time, which will normally occur in a military training area, would simply intensify the changes in soil properties that were measured following a one-time soil disturbance at the K-11 training compartment. The experiment was also useful for identifying soil measurements that are particularly sensitive to disturbance and therefore can be used successfully as indicators of a change in soil properties as a result of heavy, tracked-vehicle traffic at Fort Benning. Measurements related to total O-horizon mass and C concentrations or stocks exhibited changes that ranged from {approx}25 to 75% following the one-time disturbance. Changes in surface (0-10 cm) mineral soil density or measures of surface soil C and N following the disturbance were less remarkable and ranged from {approx}15 to 45% (relative to undisturbed controls). Soil N availability (measured as initial extractable soil N or N production in laboratory incubations) was the least sensitive and the least useful indicator for detecting a change in soil quality. Collectively, the results suggest that the best indicators of a change in soil quality will be found at the soil surface because there were no statistically significant effects of bulldozer disturbance at soil depths below 10 cm.

Garten, C.T.,JR.

2004-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

311

Modeling Soil Quality Thresholds to Ecosystem Recovery at Fort Benning, Georgia, USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to use a simple model of soil C and N dynamics to predict nutrient thresholds to ecosystem recovery on degraded soils at Fort Benning, Georgia, in the southeastern USA. The model calculates aboveground and belowground biomass, soil C inputs and dynamics, soil N stocks and availability, and plant N requirements. A threshold is crossed when predicted soil N supplies fall short of predicted N required to sustain biomass accrual at a specified recovery rate. Four factors were important to development of thresholds to recovery: (1) initial amounts of aboveground biomass, (2) initial soil C stocks (i.e., soil quality), (3) relative recovery rates of biomass, and (4) soil sand content. Thresholds to ecosystem recovery predicted by the model should not be interpreted independent of a specified recovery rate. Initial soil C stocks influenced the predicted patterns of recovery by both old field and forest ecosystems. Forests and old fields on soils with varying sand content had different predicted thresholds to recovery. Soil C stocks at barren sites on Fort Benning generally lie below predicted thresholds to 100% recovery of desired future ecosystem conditions defined on the basis of aboveground biomass (18000 versus 360 g m{sup -2} for forests and old fields, respectively). Calculations with the model indicated that reestablishment of vegetation on barren sites to a level below the desired future condition is possible at recovery rates used in the model, but the time to 100% recovery of desired future conditions, without crossing a nutrient threshold, is prolonged by a reduced rate of forest growth. Predicted thresholds to ecosystem recovery were less on soils with more than 70% sand content. The lower thresholds for old field and forest recovery on more sandy soils are apparently due to higher relative rates of net soil N mineralization in more sandy soils. Calculations with the model indicate that a combination of desired future conditions, initial levels of soil quality (defined by soil C stocks), and the rate of biomass accumulation determines the predicted success of ecosystem recovery on disturbed soils.

Garten Jr., C.T.

2004-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

312

Development of a Monitoring and Verification (M&V) Plan and Baseline for the Fort Hood ESPC Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fort Hood has selected an Energy Services Performance Contract (ESPC) contractor to help achieve its energy reduction goals as mandated by Executive Order. This ESPC is expected to be a $3.8 million, 20 year contract, which includes five primary types of Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs) in 56 buildings, and includes boiler insulation, control system upgrades, vending machine controls, cooling tower variable frequency drives (VFDs), and lighting retrofits. The plan of action for the ESPC includes cost effective M&V, using IPMVP Options B and C for the first two years after the retrofits are installed, and Option A combined with annual performance verification for the remainder of the contract. This paper discusses the development the Measurement and Verification (M&V) Plan for the Fort Hood Energy Services Performance Contract, and includes results of the baseline calculations (Haberl et al. 2002, 2003b).

Haberl, J. S.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Lynn, B.; Underwood, D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

DOE/EA-1354; Environmental Assessment for the Fort Collins 115kV Transmission Line Upgrade Project (12/2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Fort Collins 115-kV Transmission Line Upgrade Project, Fort Collins, Colorado. AGENCY: Western Area Power Administration, DOE ACTION: Finding of no significant impact SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE), Western Area Power Administration (Western) is the lead federal agency for a proposed project to upgrade the electric transmission system in the Fort Collins, Colorado area. Platte River Power Authority (Platte River) is proposing to add additional generation at its Rawhide Power Plant, to rebuild and upgrade segments of Western's existing Flatiron-Poudre and Poudre-Richard's Lake 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines, and to install additional 230 kV transmission to Platte River's existing electrical system. Western prepared an environmental assessment (EA) titled "Fort Collins 115kV Transmission

314

Fort Hood solar total energy project: technical support and systems integration. Third semiannual report, May 1, 1979-October 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work on the Fort Hood STES which was planned by DOE as a Large Scale Experiment for the Solar Total Energy Program is described. The history of the design evolution and management of the project which began in 1973 is summarized. The project was discontinued by DOE in December 1979. Supporting studies underway at the time are reported including: (1) reassessment of energy loads, (2) revised system concept, (3) plant sizing calculations, and (4) insolation variation measurement planning. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Study of well logs from Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Union Oil Company drilled four geothermal test wells in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA between 1975 and 1979. A fairly complete suite of well logs were recorded for the three deeper holes, and these data are presented as composite well log plots in this report. The composite well log plots have facilitated the interpretation of limestone, dolomite, sandstone, quartz-monzonite, serpentine, and volcanic lithologies and the identification of numerous fractures. This has been especially helpful because of the extensive lost circulaton zones and poor cuttings recovery. Intraformational flow was identified by a fluid migration-temperature tracer log at depth in CFSU 31-33. Well log crossplots were computed to assist in lithologic identification and the determination of physical properties for specific depth intervals in a given hole. The presence of hydrous minerals sometimes results in neutron porosity somewhat higher than the true nonfracture porosity, which is generally less than 4%. Permeability is clearly controlled by fractures. A maximum well temperature of 178.9/sup 0/C, low flow rates and low probable percent flash indicate these wells are subeconomic for electric generation at present. The well log study has substantially improved our understanding of the reservoir as presently drilled.

Glenn, W.E.; Ross, H.P.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Energy survey of Army Laundry Facilities, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This Final Report details Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs) for the Laundry and Boiler Plant at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The ECOs noted in the table on the next page were evaluated for individual energy savings and are recommended for implementation. The energy savings and implementation costs for each measure are summarized on the following page in order of decreasing savings-to-investment (SIR) ratio. ECIP life cycle cost analyses were performed on all ECOs as a preliminary step, though all of the measures will fall into other funding categories. Because of the high internal heat gain produced in the Laundry, coupled with the fact that the laundry is not air conditioned, building envelope measures do not produce any energy savings. The most viable ECOs are related to the Boiler Plant (Boiler Replacement), recovering energy wasted in the wash water (Rinse Water Reuse) or utilizing Low Temperature Wash Water, and Changing the Hours of Laundry Operation. Additional operation and maintenance items are listed that can be addressed by the Directorate of Engineering and Housing (DEH) or the Laundry contractor, Integrity Management International, Inc., to generate quick energy savings. There are also several items included that will not produce energy savings but will improve the comfort level of the Laundry. These items should be given consideration as a method of improving productivity and/or employee morale. All ECOs evaluated by the project team are described in detail with engineering calculations for each following in Appendix 2.

1985-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Fort Saint Vrain HTGR (Th/U carbide) Fuel Characteristics for Disposal Criticality Analysis  

SciTech Connect

DOE-owned spent nuclear fuels encompass many fuel types. In an effort to facilitate criticality analysis for these various fuel types, they were categorized into eight characteristic fuel groups with emphasis on fuel matrix composition. Out of each fuel group, a representative fuel type was chosen for analysis as a bounding case within that fuel group. Generally, burnup data, fissile enrichments and total fuel mass govern the selection of the representative or candidate fuel within that group. For the HTGR group, the Fort Saint Vrain (FSV) reactor fuel has been chosen for the evaluation of viability for waste co-disposal. The FSV reactor was operated by Public Service of Colorado as a licensed power reactor. The FSV fuel employs a U/Th carbide matrix in individually pyrolytic carbon-coated particles. These individual particles are in turn coated with silicon carbide (SiC) and contained within fuel compacts, that are in turn embedded in graphite blocks that comprised the structural core of the reactor.

Taylor, Larry Lorin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Characterization plan for Fort St. Vrain and Peach Bottom graphite fuels  

SciTech Connect

Part of Fort St. Vrain (FSV) and most of the Peach Bottom (PB) reactor spent fuels are currently stored at INEL and may remain in storage for many years before disposal. Three disposal pathways have been proposed: intact disposal, fuels partially disassembled and the high-level waste fraction conditioned prior to disposal, and fuels completed disassembled and conditioned prior to disposal. Many options exist within each of these pathways. PNL evaluated the literature and other reference to develop a fuels characterization plan for these fuels. This plan provides guidance for the characteristics of the fuel which will be needed to pursue any of the storage or disposal pathways. It also provides a suggested fuels monitoring program for the current storage facilities. This report recommends a minimum of 7 fuel elements be characterized: PB Core 1 fuel: one Type II nonfailed element, one Type II failed element, and one Type III nonfailed element; PB Core 2 fuel: two Type II nonfailed fuel elements; and FSV fuel: at least two fuel blocks from regions of high temperature and fluence and long in-reactor performance (preferably at reactor end-of- life). Selection of PB fuel elements should focus on these between radial core position 8 and 14 and on compacts between compact numbers 10 and 20. Selection of FSV fuel elements should focus on these from Fuel Zones II and III, located in Core Layers 6, 7, and possibly 8.

Maarschman, S.C.; Berting, F.M.; Clemmer, R.G.; Gilbert, E.R.; Guenther, R.J.; Morgan, W.C.; Sliva, P.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the effects of oil-price shocks on the U.S economy combining narrative and quantitative approaches. After examining daily oil-related events since 1984, we classify them into various event types. We then develop measures of exogenous shocks that avoid endogeneity and predictability concerns. Estimation results indicate that oil-price shocks have had substantial and statistically significant effects during the last 25 years. In contrast, traditional VAR approaches imply much weaker and insignificant effects for the same period. This discrepancy stems from the inability of VARs to separate exogenous oil-supply shocks from endogenous oil-price fluctuations driven by changes in oil demand.

Tao Wu; Michele Cavallo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA, a geologic and geophysical case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geological, geochemical and geophysical data are presented for one of the major geothermal systems in the western United States. Regional data indicate major tectonic structures which are still active and provide the conduits for the geothermal system. Detailed geologic mapping has defined major glide blocks of Tertiary volcanics which moved down from the Tushar Mountains and locally act as a leaky cap to portions of the presently known geothermal system. Mapping and geochemical studies indicate three periods of mineralization have affected the area, two of which are unrelated to the present geothermal activity. The geologic relationships demonstrate that the major structures have been opened repeatedly since the Tertiary. Gravity and magnetic data are useful in defining major structures beneath alluvium and basalt cover, and indicate the importance of the Cove Fort-Beaver graben and the Cove Creek fault in localizing the geothermal reservoir. These structures and a high level of microearthquake activity also suggest other target areas within the larger thermal anomaly. Electrical resistivity surveys and thermal gradient holes both contribute to the delineation of the known reservoir. Deep exploration wells which test the reservoir recorded maximum temperatures of 178 C and almost isothermal behavior beginning at 700 to 1000 m and continuing to a depth of 1800 m. Costly drilling, high corrosion rates and low reservoir pressure coupled with the relatively low reservoir temperatures have led to the conclusion that the reservoir is not economic for electric power production at present. Plans are underway to utilize the moderate-temperature fluids for agribusiness, and exploration continues for a deep high-temperature reservoir.

Ross, Howard P.; Moore, Joseph N.; Christensen, Odin D.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Limited site investigation of Landfills 1 and 4, Fort Lewis, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The information presented in this report was collected during limited site investigation activities conducted in the vicinity of Landfills 1 and 4 at Fort Lewis. The purpose of this work was to provide a means of detecting and evaluating the impacts of these inactive landfills on ground-water quality and adjacent lands. This effort included the design and construction of ground-water monitoring systems for compliance with applicable federal and state regulations governing Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-type landfills. Ground-water samples were collected from both existing (1981 and 1984) wells and the newly installed (1988) wells. The analytical results from the water samples indicate that the ground water in and around Landfill 1 contains limited contamination. Contaminants may include volatile organic compounds and nitrate. The primary concern in the area around Landfill 1 was the determination that ground water from two wells may contain cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethylene above drinking water standards. Nitrate levels in the downgradient wells were greater than those in upgradient wells and exceeded drinking water standards in some of the less-representative samples. Analyses of ground-water samples from wells in and around Landfill 4 indicate several contaminants may be present. These include volatile organic compounds (principally cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethylene), coliform, oil and grease, and perhaps some metals (iron and magnesium). The primary concern in the area around Landfill 4 was the determination that ground water from five wells contained cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and 1,1,1-trichloroethylene above drinking water standards. The source of contaminants beneath either landfill cannot yet be identified. Insufficient data exist to disprove or confirm either landfill as possible contributors. 19 refs., 32 figs., 17 tabs.

Last, G.V.; Eddy, P.A.; Airhart, S.P.; Olsen, K.R.; Raymond, J.R.; Dahl, D.R.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Energy end-use metering in two modular office buildings at Fort Irwin, California  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the application of the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) at Fort Irwin for the period 21 December 1989 to 27 January 1992. The purpose of the test was to monitor electrical demands in Buildings 567 and 571 by end use and to monitor the response of the HVAC systems to internal and external loads. Results of two years of monitoring are summarized below. The observed energy-use intensities (EUIs) were 13.7 kWh/ft{sup 2}-yr for Building 567 and 10.4 kWh/ft{sup 2}-yr for Building 571. The corresponding numbers for HVAC energy were 5.9 and 5.3 kWh/ft{sup 2}-yr. Lighting used about 35%, primary HVAC 40% (heating 8%, cooling 32%), supply fans 3% and other equipment (mostly plug loads) about 20% of the total. Over 10% of the primary HVAC energy used in Building 567 was the result of simultaneous heating and cooling. Six energy conservation measures were evaluated: (1) delamping and retrofit of T-12 fluorescent fixtures with T-8 systems; (2) installation of two-speed fans with operation at the lower speed (67% of rated airflow) during occupied periods whenever a unit is not heating or cooling; (3) retrofit of heat pump compressors with two-speed compressors; (4) installation of controls that eliminate non-productive simultaneous heating and cooling and provide improved night and weekend setback; (5) coating the existing black roof material with a white reflective material; and (6) adding an economizer system to provide outside air cooling. The estimated energy savings as a percent of whole-building energy use are: Lighting HVAC Savings -- 26%; Two-Speed Fans -- 2%; Two-Speed Compressors -- 11%; Improved HVAC Controls -- 5%; White Roof Coating -- 5%; Economizer Cooling -- 5 %. The total energy savings that can be achieved through the measures is 49%.

Armstrong, P.R.; Keller, J.M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Effective May 1, 2013, UT System rolled out the use of Concur for online booking of business travel. The University of Texas at Dallas faculty and staff can utilize one simple tool to book their flights, car rentals, and hotel stays.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The University of Texas at Dallas faculty and staff can utilize one simple tool to book their flights, car rentals, and hotel stays. Advantages of Booking through Concur: Ease of booking all travel necessities Personal Credit Card (for hotels or non-direct bill car rentals) #12;#12;Travel Arrangers and Assistants

O'Toole, Alice J.

324

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance U.S. Army Project 181 Implementation Challenges in Deployment of an Energy Security Microgrid for Army Reserve Facilities located on the Former Fort Devens Army Base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This documents reports on a request for technical assistance from Fort Devens to analyze procurement of energy from nearby renewable generating resources.

Warwick, William M.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

U.S. Army Fort Knox: Using the Earth for Space Heating and Cooling, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Program Management Program (FEMP) facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. Located near Louisville, Kentucky, Fort Knox is home to the U.S. Army's Armor Center, Armor School, Recruiting Command, and numerous other facilities. The post has a daytime population of more than 30,000 people and more than 3,000 family housing units. In total, Fort Knox encompasses 11 million square feet of conditioned space across more than 109,000 acres. A military post of this size consumes a significant amount of energy. Fort Knox is acutely aware of the need for sustainability to ensure continuous operations and meet Federal energy goals and requirements.

326

U.S. Army Fort Knox: Using the Earth for Space Heating and Cooling, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Program Management Program (FEMP) facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. Located near Louisville, Kentucky, Fort Knox is home to the U.S. Army's Armor Center, Armor School, Recruiting Command, and numerous other facilities. The post has a daytime population of more than 30,000 people and more than 3,000 family housing units. In total, Fort Knox encompasses 11 million square feet of conditioned space across more than 109,000 acres. A military post of this size consumes a significant amount of energy. Fort Knox is acutely aware of the need for sustainability to ensure continuous operations and meet Federal energy goals and requirements.

327

Preliminary assessment report for National Guard Training Center, Georgia Army National Guard, Fort Stewart, Georgia. Installation restoration program  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the preliminary assessment (PA) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory at the Georgia Army National Guard (GAARNG) facility near Hinesville, Georgia, known as the National Guard Training Center (NGTC). Preliminary assessments of federal facilities are being conducted to compile the information necessary for completing preremedial activities and to provide a priority basis for completing corrective actions (where necessary) in response to releases of hazardous substances. The principal objective of the PA is to characterize the site accurately and determine the need for further action by examining previous site activities, types and quantities of hazardous substances utilized, and potential pathways by which contamination could affect public health and the environment. The scope of this assessment is limited to the facilities and past activities contained within the NGTC. Preliminary assessment site score sheet information is also provided for the NGTC. However, this assessment report is intended to be read in conjunction with a previous IRP assessment of Fort Stewart completed in 1992 (USATHAMA 1992) and to provide comprehensive information on the NGTC area for incorporation with information contained in that previous assessment for the entirety of Fort Stewart.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Performance and economic evaluation of the seahorse natural gas hot water heater conversion at Fort Stewart. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States with consumption of nearly 1.5 quads/year of energy (10{sup 15} quad = 1015 Btu) and cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the Federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP) seeks to evaluate new energy -- saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is one of four DOE laboratories that participate in the New Technologies Demonstration Program, providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied under that program. This report provides the results of a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP with funding support from the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of 4 candidate energy-saving technology-a water heater conversion system to convert electrically powered water heaters to natural gas fuel. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Stewart, a US Army base in Georgia, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were Gas Fired Products, developers of the technology; the Public Service Company of North Carolina; Atlanta Gas Light Company; the Army Corps of Engineers; Fort Stewart; and Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

Winiarski, D.W.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Performance and economic evaluation of the seahorse natural gas hot water heater conversion at Fort Stewart. Interim report, 1994 Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is one of four DOE laboratories that participate in the New Technologies Demonstration Program, providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied under that program. This interim report provides the results of a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP and the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of a candidate energy-saving technology-a hot water heater conversion system to convert electrically heated hot water tanks to natural gas fuel. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Stewart, a US Army base in Georgia, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were Gas Fired Products, developers of the technology; the Public Service Company of North Carolina; Atlanta Gas Light Company; the Army Corps of Engineers; Fort Stewart; and Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

Winiarski, D.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 282 Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Gordon, Georgia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides an overview of renewable resource potential at Fort Gordon, based primarily upon analysis of secondary data sources supplemented with limited on-site evaluations. This effort focuses on grid-connected generation of electricity from renewable energy sources and also on ground source heat pumps for heating and cooling buildings. The effort was funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) as follow-on to the 2005 Department of Defense (DoD) Renewables Assessment. The site visit to Fort Gordon took place on March 9, 2010.

Boyd, Brian K.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Hand, James R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Nesse, Ronald J.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume II. Preliminary design. Part 2. System performance and supporting studies. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary design developed for the Solar Total Energy System to be installed at Fort Hood, Texas, is presented. System performance analysis and evaluation are described. Feedback of completed performance analyses on current system design and operating philosophy is discussed. The basic computer simulation techniques and assumptions are described and the resulting energy displacement analysis is presented. Supporting technical studies are presented. These include health and safety and reliability assessments; solar collector component evaluation; weather analysis; and a review of selected trade studies which address significant design alternatives. Additional supporting studies which are generally specific to the installation site are reported. These include solar availability analysis; energy load measurements; environmental impact assessment; life cycle cost and economic analysis; heat transfer fluid testing; meteorological/solar station planning; and information dissemination. (WHK)

None,

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Gravity survey of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and the north Mineral Mountains area, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the summers of 1975 and 1976, a gravity survey was conducted in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and north Mineral Mountains area, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah. The survey consisted of 671 gravity stations covering an area of about 1300 km{sup 2}, and included two orthogonal gravity profiles traversing the area. The gravity data are presented as a terrain-corrected Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a contour interval of 1 mgal and as an isometric three-dimensional gravity anomaly surface. Selected anomaly separation techniques were applied to the hand-digitized gravity data (at 1-km intervals on the Universal Transverse Mercator grid) in both the frequency and space domains, including Fourier decomposition, second vertical derivative, strike-filter, and polynomial fitting analysis, respectively.

Brumbaugh, W.D.; Cook, K.L.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

North Central Texas Council of Governments┬É North Central Texas Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Investments initiative is one of 25 Area of Interest 4 Selections  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CLEAN CITIES RECOVERY ACT AWARDS CLEAN CITIES RECOVERY ACT AWARDS FOR ALTERNATIVE AND ADVANCED VEHICLES North Central Texas Council of Governments' North Central Texas Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology. The project will deploy refueling stations and alternative fuel vehicles in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. The project includes a portfolio of different technologies and fuels, including B20 (three stations), ethanol E85 (three stations), compressed natural gas (three stations and 97 vehicles), electricity (four recharging sites and 34 vehicles), and 251 hybrid electric vehicles. In addition to the city fleets, high mileage and high visibility fleets are included, such as Coca-Cola, Sysco, Frito Lay, school districts, and taxis. DOE estimates that this project will help displace approximately 1.3 million gallons of petroleum annually.

334

Before the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consumers and Consumers and the Smart Grid: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy ) ) ) ) ) ) NBP RFI: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy COMMENTS OF ONCOR ELECTRIC DELIVERY COMPANY LLC Oncor Electric Delivery Company LLC (Oncor) is a regulated electric transmission and distribution utility that serves the north-central, eastern and western parts of Texas, including the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth. Oncor operates the largest electric transmission and distribution system in Texas, delivering power to over 3 million homes and businesses and operating approximately 117,000 miles of distribution and transmission lines in Texas. Oncor operates in a unique market in which only competitive Retail Electric Providers (REPs) who are not utilities sell electricity to end-

335

NBP RFI: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy- Comments of Oncor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NBP RFI: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy- Comments of NBP RFI: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy- Comments of Oncor Electric Deliverty Company LLC NBP RFI: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy- Comments of Oncor Electric Deliverty Company LLC Oncor Electric Delivery Company LLC (Oncor) is a regulated electric transmission and distribution utility that serves the north-central, eastern and western parts of Texas, including the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth. Oncor operates the largest electric transmission and distribution system in Texas, delivering power to over 3 million homes and businesses and operating approximately 117,000 miles of distribution and transmission lines in Texas. Oncor operates in a unique market in which only competitive Retail Electric Providers (REPs) who are not utilities sell electricity to

336

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Meeting 2 Meeting 2011 Meeting 2010 Meeting 2009 Meeting 2008 Meeting 2007 Meeting 2006 Meeting 2013 Hydropower Meeting The 2013 Regional Hydropower Council and Meeting were hosted by the Fort Worth District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Dallas, Texas. Click the links below to view materials from the council and meeting. The Tulsa District will host the 2014 Regional Hydropower Council and Meeting, tentatively scheduled for June 17-19, 2014, in Tulsa, Oklahoma. June 11-12, 2013, Council Skip Navigation Links 2013 Hydropower Council Agenda FY 2014 Proposed Project Packet FY 2015 Preliminary Project Packet Little Rock District MCCs and Switchgear Replacement Project June 12-13, 2013, Meeting Skip Navigation Links 2012 Hydropower Meeting Agenda Denison Powerhouse Major Rehabilitation

337

NBP RFI: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy- Comments of Oncor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use, and Privacy- Comments of Use, and Privacy- Comments of Oncor Electric Deliverty Company LLC NBP RFI: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy- Comments of Oncor Electric Deliverty Company LLC Oncor Electric Delivery Company LLC (Oncor) is a regulated electric transmission and distribution utility that serves the north-central, eastern and western parts of Texas, including the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth. Oncor operates the largest electric transmission and distribution system in Texas, delivering power to over 3 million homes and businesses and operating approximately 117,000 miles of distribution and transmission lines in Texas. Oncor operates in a unique market in which only competitive Retail Electric Providers (REPs) who are not utilities sell electricity to end-use consumers, and the transmission and distribution utilities (who are

338

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Texas Incentives and Laws Texas Incentives and Laws The following is a list of expired, repealed, and archived incentives, laws, regulations, funding opportunities, or other initiatives related to alternative fuels and vehicles, advanced technologies, or air quality. Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Incentive - ECOtality Expired: 03/11/2013 Through the EV Project, ECOtality offers EVSE at no cost to individuals in the Dallas, Fort Worth, and Houston metropolitan areas. To be eligible for free home charging stations, individuals living within the specified areas must purchase a qualified plug-in electric vehicle (PEV). Individuals purchasing an eligible PEV should apply at the dealership at the time of vehicle purchase. The EV Project incentive program will also cover most, if

339

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Conference 1 Conference 2010 Conference 2009 Conference 2008 Conference 2007 Conference 2006 Conference 2012 Hydropower Conference The 2012 Regional Hydropower Council and Conference was hosted by the Vicksburg District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Hot Springs, Arkansas. Click the links below to view materials from the council and conference. The Fort Worth District will host the 2013 Regional Hydropower Council and Conference, tentatively scheduled for June 11-13, 2013, in Dallas, Texas. June 12-13, 2012, Council Skip Navigation Links 2012 Hydropower Council Agenda FY 2013 Proposed Project Packet FY 2014 Preliminary Project Packet June 13-14, 2012, Conference Skip Navigation Links 2012 Hydropower Conference Agenda Cost Estimating for Hydro Project Planning Entergy Hydro Operations (Lake Catherine & Lake Hamilton)

340

EAD - March 20, 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 20, 2012 1 March 20, 2012 1 ENERGY ASSURANCE DAILY Tuesday Evening, March 20, 2012 Electricity Storms Cut Power to 92,600 Utility Customers in Texas March 19-20 Strong storms with heavy rain moved through Texas overnight Monday, cutting power to thousands of utility customers throughout the state. Most outages occurred around Houston, where CenterPoint reported about 44,900 customers without power Tuesday morning. CPS Energy reported more than 19,000 customers in the San Antonio area without power Tuesday. Oncor had nearly 10,700 customers without electricity from Dallas-Fort Worth to South Texas. Austin Energy had nearly 7,800 customers without power. Pedernales Electric Co-op reported 2,700 of its customers were without power. Entergy Texas reported 4,300 customers without power, and AEP Texas and AEP

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341

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Meeting 1 Meeting 2010 Meeting 2009 Meeting 2008 Meeting 2007 Meeting 2006 Meeting 2012 Hydropower Meeting The 2012 Regional Hydropower Council and Meeting were hosted by the Vicksburg District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Hot Springs, Arkansas. Click the links below to view materials from the council and meeting. The Fort Worth District will host the 2013 Regional Hydropower Council and Meeting, tentatively scheduled for June 11-13, 2013, in Dallas, Texas. June 12-13, 2012, Council Skip Navigation Links 2012 Hydropower Council Agenda FY 2013 Proposed Project Packet FY 2014 Preliminary Project Packet June 13-14, 2012, Meeting Skip Navigation Links 2012 Hydropower Meeting Agenda Cost Estimating for Hydro Project Planning Entergy Hydro Operations (Lake Catherine & Lake Hamilton)

342

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - NETL CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DESIGNATION FORM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

548 548 North Central Texas Council of Govt EE DE-EE0002548 PMC PVT Division 2010 Neil Kirschner 12/1/09 - 11/31/13 Various - see below North Central Texas Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Investments CX for administrative work to be performed at North Central Texas Council of Governments' office location(s). The EQ identifies Dallas, Irving, Denton, Mansfield, Fort Worth, and Southlake, TX. paper only - no construction NMK Signature.jpg Digitally signed by Neil Kirschner DN: cn=Neil Kirschner, o=US DOE / NETL, ou, email=Neil.Kirschner@netl.doe.gov, c=US Reason: I attest to the accuracy and integrity of this document Date: 2009.11.24 11:55:04 -05'00' 11 24 2009 john ganz Digitally signed by john ganz DN: cn=john ganz, o=NETL- DOE, ou=140 OPFC, email=john.ganz@netl.doe.gov, c=US

343

A Comparative Analysis of Residential Energy Use for 2009 IECC Code Compliance and 2001 IECC Compliance with 2006 NAECA Appliance Standards for Selected Climate Zones in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents results of a comparative analysis of the electricity and natural gas savings from the implementation of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) when compared with the 2001 IECC1 specifications with 2006 NAECA for a new single-family residential construction. The analysis uses a DOE-2 simulation for five locations in Texas (Houston, Brownsville, Dallas/Fort Worth, El Paso and Amarillo). The analysis shows that a code ľ compliant house built to the specifications of the 2009 IECC uses 10% ľ 16% less site energy annually than a house meeting the specifications of the 2001 IECC, for an air-conditioned house with a natural gas furnace. The results also show that an air conditioned 2009 code - compliant house with a heat pump uses 10% - 14% less site energy annually.

Mukhopadhyay, J.; Baltazar, J. C.; Liu, Z.; Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Fort Collins Utilities - Fort Collins Utilities - Residential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eligible Technologies Building Insulation, Clothes Washers, Doors, DuctAir sealing, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Furnaces, Heat pumps, Water Heaters, Windows,...

345

Field Demonstration of a High-Efficiency Packaged Rooftop Air Conditioning Unit at Fort Gordon, Augusta, GA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a larger program targeting the market transformation of packaged rooftop air conditioning, five high-efficiency rooftop air conditioning products were selected in 2002 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the Unitary Air Conditioner (UAC) Technology Procurement (http://www.pnl.gov/uac). In February 2003, Fort Gordon in Augusta, Georgia was chosen as the demonstration site. With the goal of validating the field performance and operation of one of the awarded products, a 10-ton high-efficiency packaged rooftop unit (RTU) manufactured by Global Energy Group (GEG) was installed at Fort Gordon in October 2003. Following equipment installation, power metering, air- and refrigerant-side instrumentation was installed on the GEG RTU and a 4-year old typical-efficiency 20-ton RTU manufactured by AAON . The GEG and AAON units were instrumented identically and operated May through July, 2005, to observe performance under a range of conditions. Based on the data collected as part of this demonstration, the GEG equipment performed at least 8% better in stage-1 (single compressor running) cooling and at least 16% better in stage-2 (both compressors running) than the baseline AAON equipment. Performance comparisons are based on what we call application EER normalized to equivalent specific fan power. The full-load, specific-fan-power-normalized application EERs at ARI design conditions were 10.48 Btu/Wh for the GEG and 9.00 Btu/Wh for the baseline machine. With a cost premium of nearly 50%, and slightly higher maintenance costs, the life-cycle cost analysis shows that the GEG technology pays for itself--a positive net-present value (NPV)--only in climates and buildings with long cooling seasons. Manufacture of this equipment on a larger scale can be expected to reduce costs to the point where it is more broadly cost-effective. The assumed 10-ton baseline and new-technology unit costs are $3824.00 and $5525.00 respectively. If the new technology cost is assumed to drop as sales increase to $4674.50 for a 10-ton unit (i.e. the original cost difference is halved), the life-cycle costs improve. A grid of first cost, annual maintenance cost and electricity price is enumerated and the results presented in the report show the sensitivity of life cycle cost to these three financial parameters in each of eight different climates.

Armstrong, Peter R.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Parker, Graham B.

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

346

Facilities management: the development of a model for building condition assessment surveys conducted at Fort Riley, Kansas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to document the research and design of a condition assessment system for buildings by utilizing case study methods for the facilities located at Fort Riley, Kansas, an Army military installation. The design of the assessment or auditing system incorporates the following procedures: (1) identification of building components, (2) identification of building sub-components, (3) utilization of decision-tree logic diagrams to manage the information, and (4) production of inspection condition criteria and scoring for each sub-component (by visual inspection techniques) . The system was used by multiple inspectors to assess the buildings at Fort Riley. The inspectors received training in the system scoring and methodology. To verify the system's accuracy, ten percent (10%) of the buildings were re-inspected by the developers of the system (quality control) . The analysis of the system included a random sample of 20 buildings from the data collected. The data were analyzed for accuracy and consistency on the component and sub-component recognition and the inspection condition score (as compared to the quality control results) The actual inspection time was monitored to record the inspection efficiency. Statistical testing was conducted which did the following: (1) analyzed the data pair means for any significant differences, and (2) analyzed the strength of the pair relationships. From the data analysis the following was found: (1) the components and sub-components were recognized accurately and consistently, (2) the actual scores seemed to be accurate and consistent (after conducting the statistical test (T-Test) some of the means did indicate that there were some significant differences, while others indicated there were no significant differences) , (3) the data indicated that there was correlation between the data pairs. Also, it was found that this system provides reasonable inspection time and cost restraints. The building assessments are incorporated into an information system that assists the user in establishing priorities. The cost factors for each sub-component are based on building models that relate the quantities of the different sub-components to the actual floor area of the buildings. From these building models conceptual estimates can be generated and used as a tool to budget, justify, and anticipate maintenance and repair costs.

Riblett, Carl Olin

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

DOE/EA-1354; Environmental Assessment for the Fort Collins 115kV Transmission Line Upgrade Project (12/2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE FORT COLLINS 115kV TRANSMISSION LINE UPGRADE PROJECT Prepared for: Platte River Power Authority and U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration DOE/EA 1354 September 2001 i TABLE OF CONTENTS SUMMARY ............................................................................................................... S-1 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...............................................................................................1-1 1.1 DESCRIPTION OF PROPOSED PROJECT .................................................................. 1-1 1.3 PURPOSE OF ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT....................................................

348

Fort St. Vrain Decommissioning: Public Relations and Human Resources Issues: Personnel Plans and Communications During Decommissioni ng of Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details aspects of the personnel plan instrumental in the successful decommissioning of Fort St. Vrain nuclear power plant. It includes discussion of the personnel retention program, actions taken to mitigate harassment and intimidation issues, and the communications plan. The report also discusses some decommissioning pitfalls encountered, signs of trouble brewing, and ways to mitigate personnel problems before they become serious issues. Project managers designed the document to be generic ...

1998-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

349

Fort Devens: Cold Climate Market-Rate Townhomes Targeting HERS Index of 40, Harvard, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Achieving aggressive energy efficiency targets requires tight coordination and clear communication among owners, designers, builders, and subcontractors. For this townhome project, MassDevelopment, the quasi-governmental agency owner, selected Metric Development of Boston, teaming with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) and Cambridge Seven Architects, to build very high performing market-rate homes. Fort Devens is part of a decommissioned army base in working-class Harvard, Massachusetts, approximately one hour northwest of Boston. The team proposed 12 net zero energy-ready townhomes, meaning that the application of renewable energy systems would result in annual net zero energy use in the homes. The homes were also designed to achieve a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Index Score of 41 before adding renewables. For this project, CARB drew on its experience working with Rural Development Inc. on a series of affordable townhomes in northern Massachusetts. The team carefully planned the site to maximize solar access, daylighting, and efficient building forms. The basic strategy was to design a very efficient thermal enclosure while minimizing incremental cost increases compared with standard construction. Using BEopt modeling software, the team established the requirements of the enclosure and investigated multiple assembly options. They settled on double-wall construction with dense-pack cellulose fill. High performance vinyl windows (U-0.24, solar heat gain coefficient [SHGC]-0.22), a vented R-59 attic, and exceptional air sealing completed the package.

Metzger, C.; Zoeller, W.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Technical and regulatory review of the Rover nuclear fuel process for use on Fort St. Vrain fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of an analysis for processing and final disposal of Fort St. Vrain (FSV) irradiated fuel in Rover-type equipment or technologies. This analysis includes an evaluation of the current Rover equipment status and the applicability of this technology in processing FSV fuel. The analyses are based on the physical characteristics of the FSV fuel and processing capabilities of the Rover equipment. Alternate FSV fuel disposal options are also considered including fuel-rod removal from the block, disposal of the empty block, or disposal of the entire fuel-containing block. The results of these analyses document that the current Rover hardware is not operable for any purpose, and any effort to restart this hardware will require extensive modifications and re-evaluation. However, various aspects of the Rover technology, such as the successful fluid-bed burner design, can be applied with modification to FSV fuel processing. The current regulatory climate and technical knowledge are not adequately defined to allow a complete analysis and conclusion with respect to the disposal of intact fuel blocks with or without the fuel rods removed. The primary unknowns include the various aspects of fuel-rod removal from the block, concentration of radionuclides remaining in the graphite block after rod removal, and acceptability of carbon in the form of graphite in a high level waste repository.

Hertzler, T. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Multielement geochemical exploration data for the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area, Beaver and Millard counties, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multielement geochemical exploration data have been acquired for the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). This was accomplished by analysis of both whole rock and +3.3 specific gravity concentrate samples from cuttings composites collected from shallow rotary drill holes. Areal distributions are reported for arsenic, mercury, lead and zinc. These are elements indicated by previous studies to be broadly zoned around thermal centers in geothermal systems and thus to be useful for selecting and prioritizing drilling targets. Results from this work suggest that reservoir temperature and/or reservoir to surface permeability, and thus possibly overall potential for a geothermal resource, increase northward beneath the approximately 18 square mile area containing shallow drill holes, possibly to beyond the northern limits of the area. The data provide a basis for development of three principal target models for the geothermal system but do not permit prioritization of these models. It is recommended that geochemical, geological, and temperature gradient surveys be expanded northward from the present survey area to more fully define the area which appears to have the best resource potential and to aid prioritization of the target models.

Bamford, R.W.; Christensen, O.D.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Geothermal investment analysis with site-specific applications to Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analysis and modeling of investment behavior in the development of hydrothermal electric power facilities are reported. This investment behavior reflects a degree of sensitivity to public policy alternatives concerning taxation and regulation of the resource and its related energy conversion facilities. The objective of the current research is to provide a realistic and theoretically sound means for estimating the impacts of such public policy alternatives. A stochastic simulation model was developed which offers an efficient means for site-specific investment analysis of private sector firms and investors. The results of the first year of work are discussed including the identification, analysis, quantification and modeling of: a decision tree reflecting the sequence of procedures, timing and stochastic elements of hydrothermal resource development projects; investment requirements, expenses and revenues incurred in the exploration, development and utilization of hydrothermal resources for electric power generation; and multiattribute investment decision criteria of the several types of firms in the geothermal industry. An application of the investment model to specific resource sites in the state of Utah is also described. Site specific data for the Known Geothermal Resource Areas of Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale are given together with hypothesized generation capacity growth rates.

Cassel, T.A.V.; Edelstein, R.H.; Blair, P.D.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume II. Preliminary design. Part 1. System criteria and design description. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume documents the preliminary design developed for the Solar Total Energy System to be installed at Fort Hood, Texas. Current system, subsystem, and component designs are described and additional studies which support selection among significant design alternatives are presented. Overall system requirements which form the system design basis are presented. These include program objectives; performance and output load requirements; industrial, statutory, and regulatory standards; and site interface requirements. Material in this section will continue to be issued separately in the Systems Requirements Document and maintained current through revision throughout future phases of the project. Overall system design and detailed subsystem design descriptions are provided. Consideration of operation and maintenance is reflected in discussion of each subsystem design as well as in an integrated overall discussion. Included are the solar collector subsystem; the thermal storage subsystem, the power conversion sybsystem (including electrical generation and distribution); the heating/cooling and domestic hot water subsystems; overall instrumentation and control; and the STES building and physical plant. The design of several subsystems has progressed beyond the preliminary stage; descriptions for such subsystems are therefore provided in more detail than others to provide complete documentation of the work performed. In some cases, preliminary design parameters require specific verificaton in the definitive design phase and are identified in the text. Subsystem descriptions will continue to be issued and revised separately to maintain accuracy during future phases of the project. (WHK)

None,

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

ATU/Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Military Large-Scale Experiment (LSE-1): system design and support activities. Final report, November 23, 1976-November 30, 1977  

SciTech Connect

The ATU/Fort Hood Solar Total Energy System will include a concentrating solar collector field of several acres. During periods of direct insolation, a heat-transfer fluid will be circulated through the collector field and thus heated to 500 to 600/sup 0/F. Some of the fluid will be circulated through a steam generator to drive a turbine-generator set; additional fluid will be stored in insulated tanks for use when solar energy is not available. The electrical output will satisfy a portion of the electrical load at Fort Hood's 87,000 Troop Housing Complex. Heat extracted from the turbine exhaust in the form of hot water will be used for space heating, absorption air conditioning, and domestic water heating at the 87,000 Complex. Storage tanks for the hot water are also included. The systems analysis and program support activities include studies of solar availability and energy requirements at Fort Hood, investigation of interfacing LSE-1 with existing energy systems at the 87,000 Complex, and preliminary studies of environmental, health, and safety considerations. An extensive survey of available concentrating solar collectors and modifications to a computerized system simulation model for LSE-1 use are also reported. Important program support activities are military liaison and information dissemination. The engineering test program reported involved completion of the Solar Engineering Test Module (SETM) and extensive performance testing of a single module of the linear-focusing collector.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Microsoft PowerPoint - WhitneyRehab10 .ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P P t ' N T L B hi Presenter's Name: Terry L. Bachim Duty Location: Fort Worth District Operations Division Maintenance Section Maintenance Section Date of Presentation: 9 June 2010 US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG ® FORT WORTH DISTRICT Major Rehabilitation j Whitney Powerhouse Removal of rotor for Unit # 1 BUILDING STRONG ® FORT WORTH DISTRICT Major Rehabilitation j Whitney Powerhouse Removal of Thrust Bridge and Generator Shaft for Unit # 1 BUILDING STRONG ® FORT WORTH DISTRICT Major Rehabilitation j Whitney Powerhouse Removal of Head Cover for Unit # 1 BUILDING STRONG ® FORT WORTH DISTRICT Major Rehabilitation j Whitney Powerhouse Old Turbine Runner and Turbine Shaft for Unit # 1 BUILDING STRONG ® FORT WORTH DISTRICT Major Rehabilitation j Whitney Powerhouse *FY 2009 Customer Funding

356

Predicted Effects of Prescribed Burning and Timber Management on Forest Recovery and Sustainability at Fort Benning, Georgia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to use a simple compartment model of soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics to predict forest recovery on degraded soils and forest sustainability, following recovery, under different regimes of prescribed fire and timber management. This report describes the model and a model-based analysis of the effect of prescribed burning and forest thinning or clearcutting on stand recovery and sustainability at Fort Benning, GA. I developed the model using Stella{reg_sign} Research Software (High Performance Systems, Inc., Hanover, NH) and parameterized the model using data from field studies at Fort Benning, literature sources, and parameter fitting. The model included (1) a tree biomass submodel that predicted aboveground and belowground tree biomass, (2) a litter production submodel that predicted the dynamics of herbaceous aboveground and belowground biomass, (3) a soil C and N submodel that predicted soil C and N stocks (to a 30 cm soil depth) and net soil N mineralization, and (4) an excess N submodel that calculated the difference between predicted plant N demands and soil N supplies. There was a modeled feedback from potential excess N (PEN) to tree growth such that forest growth was limited under conditions of N deficiency. Two experiments were performed for the model-based analysis. In the first experiment, forest recovery from barren soils was predicted for 100 years with or without prescribed burning and with or without timber management by thinning or clearcutting. In the second experiment, simulations began with 100 years of predicted forest growth in the absence of fire or harvesting, and sustainability was predicted for a further 100 years either with or without prescribed burning and with or without forest management. Four performance variables (aboveground tree biomass, soil C stocks, soil N stocks, and PEN) were used to evaluate the predicted effects of timber harvesting and prescribed burning on forest recovery and sustainability. Predictions of forest recovery and sustainability were directly affected by how prescribed fire affected PEN. Prescribed fire impacted soil N supplies by lowering predicted soil C and N stocks which reduced the soil N pool that contributed to the predicted annual flux of net soil N mineralization. On soils with inherently high N availability, increasing the fire frequency in combination with stand thinning or clearcutting had little effect on predictions of forest recovery and sustainability. However, experiments with the model indicated that combined effects of stand thinning (or clearcutting) and frequent prescribed burning could have adverse effects on forest recovery and sustainability when N availability was just at the point of limiting forest growth. Model predictions indicated that prescribed burning with a 3-year return interval would decrease soil C and N stocks but not adversely affect forest recovery from barren soils or sustainability following ecosystem recovery. On soils with inherently low N availability, prescribed burning with a 2-year return interval depressed predicted soil C and N stocks to the point where soil N deficiencies prevented forest recovery as well as forest sustainability following recovery.

Garten, C.T.,JR.

2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

357

Trials and Tribulations of Ancient Starch Research: An Investigation of Contamination and Earth Ovens at Fort Hood, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historically, earth ovens have been used to provide direct evidence of ancient plant use through the recovery of charred macrobotanical remains and indirectly by means of experimental archaeology and the ethnographic record. Experiments suggest that direct evidence of ancient starch-rich plant use can be obtained through the recovery of starch granules deposited on fire-cracked-rock (FCR) during cooking episodes even in regions where macrobotanical remains are scarcely preserved. Starch contamination, however, can enter into the archaeological record providing ôbackground noise.ö Therefore, this study analyzes the results of the Paluxy Sand Geophyte Project to determine if archaeological starch (starch that is both cultural and ancient in origin) can be differentiated from contamination using FCR recovered from heating elements in well-preserved earth ovens at Fort Hood, Texas. FCR, non-cultural rock control samples (RCS), and air control samples (ACS) were processed and analyzed from 27 earth ovens at 6 sites. Contamination control measures were used, including the use of a clean bench, powder-free latex gloves, washing samples prior to processing, spot sampling, and comparisons between starch granule assemblages recovered from FCR and control samples. Laboratory and field equipment were processed and analyzed for contamination. Only one feature (Feature 4 from 41CV984) yielded starch granules that are unambiguously archaeological in origin, rather than the result of contamination, whereas starch assemblages from the other sites could be archaeological or contamination in origin. Small sample sizes, differential preservation, and/or the cooking of non-starch-rich plants could account for the lack of differences between FCR and RCS samples. Finally, maize (Zea mays) starch granules were recovered from all sample types suggesting that maize starch, most likely from ôpowder-freeö gloves and air-fall is a significant source of starch contamination.

Laurence, Andrew

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Identifying Oil Exploration Leads using Intergrated Remote Sensing and Seismic Data Analysis, Lake Sakakawea, Fort Berthold Indian Reservation, Willistion Basin  

SciTech Connect

The Fort Berthold Indian Reservation, inhabited by the Arikara, Mandan and Hidatsa Tribes (now united to form the Three Affiliated Tribes) covers a total area of 1530 mi{sup 2} (980,000 acres). The Reservation is located approximately 15 miles east of the depocenter of the Williston basin, and to the southeast of a major structural feature and petroleum producing province, the Nesson anticline. Several published studies document the widespread existence of mature source rocks, favorable reservoir/caprock combinations, and production throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas indicating high potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources. This technical assessment was performed to better define the oil exploration opportunity, and stimulate exploration and development activities for the benefit of the Tribes. The need for this assessment is underscored by the fact that, despite its considerable potential, there is currently no meaningful production on the Reservation, and only 2% of it is currently leased. Of particular interest (and the focus of this study) is the area under the Lake Sakakawea (formed as result of the Garrison Dam). This 'reservoir taking' area, which has never been drilled, encompasses an area of 150,000 acres, and represents the largest contiguous acreage block under control of the Tribes. Furthermore, these lands are Tribal (non-allotted), hence leasing requirements are relatively simple. The opportunity for exploration success insofar as identifying potential leads under the lake is high. According to the Bureau of Land Management, there have been 591 tests for oil and gas on or immediately adjacent to the Reservation, resulting in a total of 392 producing wells and 179 plugged and abandoned wells, for a success ratio of 69%. Based on statistical probability alone, the opportunity for success is high.

Scott R. Reeves; Randal L. Billingsley

2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

359

Visual Identity Training Branding Concepts and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

occurred during the past 6 years, for example: - Basel, Switzerland, 2006, Enhanced geothermal system (M 3.4) - Dallas-Ft. Worth airport area, 2008-09, Waste water disposal from...

360

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #290: October 20, 2003 Top...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beach, Fla. 57 14 Seattle-Everett, Wash. 56 15 Atlanta 55 16 Houston 55 17 San Bernardino-Riverside, Calif 55 18 Detroit 54 19 Minneapolis-St. Paul 53 20 Dallas-Ft. Worth, Tex. 51...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Sunluz | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Sunluz Place Fort Worth, Texas Product Texas-based PV module manufacturing joint venture between Coaire and and an undisclosed South Korean majority owner. References...

362

Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Electric Technology, Technology Solutions for Wind Integration in ERCOT, Houston, Texas September 30, 2010 Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library The library is seeing...

363

Geothermal Space Heating Applications for the Fort Peck Indian Reservation in the Vicinity of Poplar, Montana. Phase I Report, August 20, 1979--December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This engineering and economic study is concerned with the question of using the natural heat of the earth, or geothermal energy, as an alternative to other energy sources such as oil and natural gas which are increasing in cost. This document represents a quarterly progress report on the effort directed to determine the availability of geothermal energy within the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Montana (Figure 1), and the feasibility of beneficial use of this resource including engineering, economic and environmental considerations. The project is being carried out by the Tribal Research office, Assinboine and Sioux Tribes, Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Poplar, Montana under a contract to the United States Department of Energy. PRC TOUPS, the major subcontractor, is responsible for engineering and economic studies and the Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) is providing support in the areas of environment and finance, the results of which will appear in the Final Report. The existence of potentially valuable geothermal resource within the Fort Peck Indian Reservation was first detected from an analysis of temperatures encountered in oil wells drilled in the area. This data, produced by the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, pointed to a possible moderate to high temperature source near the town of Poplar, Montana, which is the location of the Tribal Headquarters for the Fort Peck Reservation. During the first phase of this project, additional data was collected to better characterize the nature of this geothermal resource and to analyze means of gaining access to it. As a result of this investigation, it has been learned that not only is there a potential geothermal resource in the region but that the producing oil wells north of the town of Poplar bring to the surface nearly 20,000 barrels a day (589 gal/min) of geothermal fluid in a temperature range of 185-200 F. Following oil separation, these fluids are disposed of by pumping into a deep groundwater aquifer. While beneficial uses may be found for these geothermal fluids, even higher temperatures (in excess of 260 F) may be found directly beneath the town of Poplar and the new residential development which is being planned in the area. This project is primarily concerned with the use of geothermal energy for space heating and domestic hot water for the town of Poplar (Figure 2 and Photograph 1) and a new residential development of 250 homes which is planned for an area approximately 4 miles east of Poplar along U.S. Route 2 (Figure 2 and Photograph 2). A number of alternative engineering design approaches have been evaluated, and the cost of these systems has been compared to existing and expected heating costs.

Spencer, Glenn J.; Cohen, M. Jane

1980-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

364

Libby Havre Fort Benton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Columbus Anaconda Whitefish Red Lodge Lewistown Harlowton Big Sandy Wolf Point Plentywood Miles City

Maxwell, Bruce D.

365

DALLAS JULY / AUGUST 2007 TECHNOLOGY CALENDAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

topics. Visitors are warmly welcomed Microsoft Building I, 7000 State Hwy 161, Irving Map Arnold://www.bakerbotts.com/file_upload/JulyAugust1.htm #12;6:30 Chamber Technology Business Council Grid Computing 5956 Sherry Lane, 17th Floor. The transmission and receipt of information contained in the document do not form or constitute an attorney

Chiao, Jung-Chih

366

Fort Devens: Cold Climate Market-Rate Townhomes Targeting HERS Index of 40, Harvard, Massachusetts (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Efficient Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fort Devens: Cold Climate Fort Devens: Cold Climate Market-Rate Townhomes Targeting HERS Index of 40 Harvard, Massachusetts PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Devens Sustainable Housing Location: Harvard, MA Partners: Metric Construction www.metriccorp.com Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings www.carb-swa.com Size: 1,300 ft 2 plus basement Price: approx. $250,000 Year Completed: 2012 Climate Zone: Cold PERFORMANCE DATA HERS Index: 39 (before renewables) Projected Annual Energy Savings: $580 Incremental Cost of Energy Efficiency Measures: $7,804 Incremental Annual Mortgage increase: $503 Achieving aggressive energy efficiency targets requires tight coordination and clear communication among owners, designers, builders, and subcontrac-

367

Decision Document for the Storm Water Outfalls/Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant, Pesticide Rinse Area, Old Fire Fighting Training Pit, Illicit PCB Dump Site, and the Battery Acid Pit Fort Lewis, Washington  

SciTech Connect

PNNL conducted independent site evaluations for four sites at Fort Lewis, Washington, to determine their suitability for closure on behalf of the installation. These sites were recommended for "No Further Action" by previous invesitgators and included the Storm Water Outfalls/Industrial Waste Water Treatment Plant (IWTP), the Pesticide Rinse Area, the Old Fire Fighting Training Pit, and the Illicit PCB Dump Site.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Liikala, Terry L.; Strenge, Dennis L.; Taira, Randal Y.

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

368

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Fort Devens Sudbury Training Annex, source control operable unit, Middlesex County, MA, September 29, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Record of Decision (ROD) document presents the selected source control (SC) remedial action at areas of contamination (AOCs) A7 and A9 at the Fort Devens Sudbury Training Annex (Annex), Middlesex County, Massachusetts. The major components of the selected remedy for AOCs A7 and A9 include: Excavation and off-site treatment and disposal of laboratory waste at AOC A7; Excavation of contaminated soil from AOC A9 and consolidation at AOC A7; Consolidation of contaminated soil and solid waste at AOC A7 to within the limits of the landfill cap; Construction of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Subtitle C landfill cap at AOC A7; Environmental monitoring and operation and maintenance (O&M) at AOC A7; Institutional controls at AOC A7 to limit future site use and to restrict site access; and Five-year reviews at AOC A7.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Gravity survey of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and the North Mineral Mountains area, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah. Technical report: Volume 77-4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the summers of 1975 and 1976, a gravity survey was conducted in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and north Mineral Mountains area, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah. The survey consisted of 671 gravity stations covering an area of about 1300 km/sup 2/, and included two orthogonal gravity profiles traversing the area. The gravity data are presented as a terrain-corrected Bouguer gravity anomaly map with a contour interval of 1 mgal and as an isometric three-dimensional gravity anomaly surface. Selected anomaly separation techniques were applied to the hand-digitized gravity data (at 1-km intervals on the Universal Transverse Mercator grid) in both the frequency and space domains, including Fourier decomposition, second vertical derivative, strike-filter, and polynomial fitting analysis, respectively.

Brumbaugh, W.D.; Cook, K.L.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

All that is worth remembering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the December of my Senior year, my old piano teacher died. Old not in the sense of age, because he was really quite young (in general, but specifically to die), but in the sense that I took lessons from him when I was ...

Young, Jessica Olivia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA and vicinity, Millard and Beaver Counties, Utah. Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed gravity survey (comprising 231 stations over about 900 km/sup 2/) was made in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource area (KGRA) and vicinity, Millard and Beaver counties, Utah to assist in the appraisal of the potential of this area as a geothermal resource. The survey reinforced the results and information obtained in the previous regional gravity surveys comprising 522 stations. The gravity data from about 700 stations were reduced and compiled as a terrain-corrected (out to 20 km) Bouguer gravity anomaly map with 1-mgal contour interval. In August 1975, an aeromagnetic survey was flown over part of the survey area at a constant barometric elevation of 12,000 ft (3660 m). These aeromagnetic data are used to supplement the interpretation of the gravity data. The aeromagnetic field intensity residual anomaly map and the second-order polynomial residual aeromagnetic map (obtained by removing a second-order polynomial surface) are presented with a 20-gamma contour interval. Two north-south profiles and one east-west profile were selected for magnetic interpretative modeling. The two north-south profiles were also stacked and averaged over 6-km-wide strips and modeled. The occurrences of hydrothermal alteration, hot spring deposits, and flowing hot springs coincide with inferred fault zones. No evidence of extensive alteration can be interpreted from the magnetic data.

Cook, K.L.; Serpa, L.F.; Pe, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Water conservation study (water and energy) Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP) FY94s Fort Knox, Kentucky. Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Systems Corp surveyed and completed water and energy analyses for 650 representative buildings at Fort Knox, categorized as unaccompanied personnel housing, community facilities, administrative facilities, maintenance facilities, training facilities, family housing, post laundry, hospital, heating plants, cooling towers, water treatment plants and water distribution systems. The water and energy conservation opportunities (ECOs) evaluated are listed in Table 1.1. Cost estimates were prepared using Means Data for Windows Spreadsheets, Version 2.Oa. Life cycle cost analyses were performed using the Life Cycle Cost in Design (LCCID) computer program. Project descriptions and DDl39l forms were prepared for four Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) projects. The total of the four projects that were developed represent $893K in annual savings and a total discounted savings of $13.4M in the twenty year life of the projects. The simple paybacks average 5.6 years and the savings to investment (SIR) for the four ECIP projects average 2.8. In addition, three Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) projects were developed. FEMP Project 1 is the replacement of all of the steam traps in the post laundry with a payback of 0.5 years and an SIR of 40. FEMP Project 2 is heating distribution system manhole repairs with a 3.4 year payback and an SIR of 5.5. FEMP Project 3 is the installation of wells to provide irrigation water for Lindsey and Anderson Greens with a 5.1 year payback and an SIR of 2.9.

1994-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

373

Eigenvalue sensitivity studies for the Fort St. Vrain high temperature gas-cooled reactor to account for fabrication and modeling uncertainties  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainties in the composition and fabrication of fuel compacts for the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) high temperature gas reactor have been studied by performing eigenvalue sensitivity studies that represent the key uncertainties for the FSV neutronic analysis. The uncertainties for the TRISO fuel kernels were addressed by developing a suite of models for an 'average' FSV fuel compact that models the fuel as (1) a mixture of two different TRISO fuel particles representing fissile and fertile kernels, (2) a mixture of four different TRISO fuel particles representing small and large fissile kernels and small and large fertile kernels and (3) a stochastic mixture of the four types of fuel particles where every kernel has its diameter sampled from a continuous probability density function. All of the discrete diameter and continuous diameter fuel models were constrained to have the same fuel loadings and packing fractions. For the non-stochastic discrete diameter cases, the MCNP compact model arranged the TRISO fuel particles on a hexagonal honeycomb lattice. This lattice-based fuel compact was compared to a stochastic compact where the locations (and kernel diameters for the continuous diameter cases) of the fuel particles were randomly sampled. Partial core configurations were modeled by stacking compacts into fuel columns containing graphite. The differences in eigenvalues between the lattice-based and stochastic models were small but the runtime of the lattice-based fuel model was roughly 20 times shorter than with the stochastic-based fuel model. (authors)

Pavlou, A. T.; Betzler, B. R.; Burke, T. P.; Lee, J. C.; Martin, W. R.; Pappo, W. N.; Sunny, E. E. [Univ. of Michigan, Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

"2. Craig","Coal","Tri-State G & T Assn, Inc",1304 "3. Fort St Vrain","Gas","Public Service Co of Colorado",969  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado" Colorado" "1. Comanche","Coal","Public Service Co of Colorado",1426 "2. Craig","Coal","Tri-State G & T Assn, Inc",1304 "3. Fort St Vrain","Gas","Public Service Co of Colorado",969 "4. Cherokee","Coal","Public Service Co of Colorado",717 "5. Rawhide","Coal","Platte River Power Authority",666 "6. Rocky Mountain Energy Center","Gas","Rocky Mountain Energy Ctr LLC",601 "7. Pawnee","Coal","Public Service Co of Colorado",505 "8. Front Range Power Project","Gas","Colorado Springs City of",462 "9. Hayden","Coal","Public Service Co of Colorado",446

375

Fort Peck Reservations Wind Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research area adds to the understanding of the area investigated by installing two 50kW Wind Turbines in a distributed generation project to save money by reducing the annual bill from the local utility. These turbines have been producing power and reducing the kWh consumed at the Tribal Headquarters Building for approximately 11 months. The Turbines are almost one year old and the Tribe is conducting regular maintenance checks and inspections to keep the Turbines in good working order. These Turbines are the impetus for the development of an Energy Department to serve as the focal point for wind development on the Reservation and to provide management for the business side of wind energy, (i.e. green tag sales, O & M contracts, and Power Purchase Agreements).

Walter White Tail Feather

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Fort Benning Indianhead Townhome Renovations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NAHB Research Center partnered with production builder Winchester/Camberley Homes to build a DOE Building America New Construction Test House (NCTH). This single family, detached house, located in the mixed-humid climate zone of Silver Spring, MD, was completed in June 2011. The primary goal for this house was to improve energy efficiency by 30% over the Building America B10 benchmark by developing and implementing an optimized energy solutions package design that could be cost effectively and reliably constructed on a production basis using quality management practices. The intent of this report is to outline the features of this house, discuss the implementation of the energy efficient design, and report on short-term testing results. During the interactive design process of this project, numerous iterations of the framing, air sealing, insulation, and space conditioning systems were evaluated for energy performance, cost, and practical implementation. The final design featured numerous advanced framing techniques, high levels of insulation, and the HVAC system entirely within conditioned space. Short-term testing confirmed a very tight thermal envelope and efficient and effective heating and cooling. In addition, relevant heating, cooling, humidity, energy, and wall cavity moisture data will be collected and presented in a future long-term report.

Stephenson, R.; Roberts, S.; Butler, T.; Kim, E.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Light-stable-isotope studies of spring and thermal waters from the Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort/Sulphurdale Thermal areas and of clay minerals from the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The isotopic compositions of hydrogen and oxygen have been determined for spring waters and thermal fluids from the Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale thermal areas, for clay mineral separates from shallow alteration of the acid-sulfate type in the Roosevelt Hot Springs area, and for spring and well waters from the Goshen Valley area of central Utah. The water analyses in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area confirm the origin of the thermal fluids from meteoric water in the Mineral Range. The water analyses in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale thermal area restrict recharge areas for this system to the upper elevations of the Pavant and/or Tushar Ranges. The low /sup 18/O shift observed in these thermal fluids (+0.7 permil) implies either high water/rock ratios or incomplete isotope exchange or both, and further suggests minimal interaction between the thermal fluid and marble country rock in the system. Hydrogen and oxygen-isotope data for clay mineral separates from shallow alteration zones in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal system suggest that the fluids responsible for the shallow acid-sulfate alteration were in part derived from condensed steam produced by boiling of the deep reservoir fluid. The isotope evidence supports the chemical model proposed by Parry et al. (1980) for origin of the acid-sulfate alteration at Roosevelt Hot Springs. The isotope analyses of spring and well waters from the Goshen Valley area indicate only a general correlation of isotope composition, salinity and chemical temperatures.

Bowman, J.R.; Rohrs, D.T.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Technical Report Documentation Page 1. Report No. SWUTC/11/476660-00075-1 2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No. 4. Title and Subtitle Megaregion Freight Movements: A Case Study of the Texas Triangle 7. Author(s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. population growth is predicted to substantially increase over the next 40 years, particularly in areas with large regional economies forecasted to contain over two-thirds of the national economic activity. In Texas, population growth from 2000 to 2040 is predicted to increase around 72 % and produce a diverse population of some 36 million. This will comprise 12 % rural and 88 % urban, much of it in the 26 metropolitan areas. These population and economic estimates stimulated the exploration of appropriate planning strategies to address the needs of serving such growth, including a macro approach encapsulated in the term megaregions. Although some planners are skeptical about whether this concept enhances traditional planning, it does merit examination in the freight transportation sector, which tends to get less emphasis in community and regional planning. Texas has at least one megaregion, and the largestŚThe Texas Triangle, comprising Dallas/Fort Worth-San Antonio-HoustonŚgenerates over 60 % of the gross state product. The project will consider the Texas Triangle with an emphasis on maintaining efficient future freight movement and will offer multimodal solutions to moving freight to, between, and within the

Dan Seedah; Robert Harrison

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Prepared for: REGION C WATER PLANNING GROUP Prepared by:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This model water conservation plan was prepared by Freese and Nichols, Alan Plummer Associates, and Chiang, Patel, and Yerby for the Region C Water Planning Group. It is intended as a template for manufacturers within Region C as they develop their own water conservation plans. Manufacturers should customize the details to match their unique situation. The model plan was prepared pursuant to Texas Commission on Environmental Quality rules. The rules do not require a drought contingency plan for manufacturers. The other Region C model water conservation plans (for municipal, steam electric power, and irrigation users) include example text for a fictional water user that can be edited to match a real-life situation. However, there are a large number of manufacturers in Region C with widely varying processes and water uses, and it is difficult to generate example text that is applicable to most manufacturers. This template provides a plan structure and instructions for the type of content that belongs in each section. The water conservation plans for the City of Fort Worth 1, the City of Dallas 2, New Mexico Office of the State Engineer (Guide for Commercial, Institutional, and Industrial Users) 3 were used

Brian K. Mcdonald; Alan Plummer Associates; Thomas C. Gooch; Stephanie W. Griffin; Alan Plummer Associates

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North Central Texas Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Investments Installation of E85 refueling infrastructure for the City of Fort Worth. This CX form is for 1 of 11...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Establishment Success of native Versus Non-Native Herbaceous Seed Mixes on a Revegetated Roadside in Central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a B.A. in Philosophy from Texas A&M as well as a Masters inCurly mesquitegrass in Texas and northern Mexico. WrightiaFlora of North Central Texas. BRIT, Fort Worth, Texas.

Tinsley, M. Jeannine; Simmons, Mark T.; Windhager, Steve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The art of ambiguity : (experiencing the Kimbell Art Museum)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, Texas, designed and executed between 1966 and 1972 by the architect Louis I. Kahn. This study responds to a series of design related questions raised in the author's ...

Sledge, David C. (David Christopher), 1968-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

An Investigation of Regional Variations of Barnett Shale Reservoir Properties, and Resulting Variability of Hydrocarbon Composition and Well Performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In 2007, the Barnett Shale in the Fort Worth basin of Texas produced 1.1 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) gas and ranked second in U.S gasů (more)

Tian, Yao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Microsoft Word - Hydropower Council Agenda 2008.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

p.m. Welcome Fort Worth District 1:05 p.m. Introductions All 1:15 p.m. FY 09 COE Appropriations Southwestern COE Districts 1:30 p.m. Presentation of Proposed FY 09 COE...

385

Microsoft PowerPoint - WhitneyRehab12  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STRONG FORT WORTH DISTRICT Major Rehabilitation j Whitney Powerhouse *FY 2007 Appropriations 3,269,716 pp p *Award of Base Contract *FY 2008 Appropriations 4,283,383 *Option...

386

Characteristics of potential repository wastes: Volume 4, Appendix 4A, Nuclear reactors at educational institutions of the United States; Appendix 4B, Data sheets for nuclear reactors at educational institutions; Appendix 4C, Supplemental data for Fort St. Vrain spent fuel; Appendix 4D, Supplemental data for Peach Bottom 1 spent fuel; Appendix 4E, Supplemental data for Fast Flux Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 4 contains the following appendices: nuclear reactors at educational institutions in the United States; data sheets for nuclear reactors at educational institutions in the United States(operational reactors and shut-down reactors); supplemental data for Fort St. Vrain spent fuel; supplemental data for Peach Bottom 1 spent fuel; and supplemental data for Fast Flux Test Facility.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Lake Dallas, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

875┬░, -97.0255641┬░ 875┬░, -97.0255641┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.1192875,"lon":-97.0255641,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

388

Dallas County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

┬░, -93.0175712┬░ ┬░, -93.0175712┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.6853001,"lon":-93.0175712,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

389

Dallas County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3┬░, -92.6983868┬░ 3┬░, -92.6983868┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.0346533,"lon":-92.6983868,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

390

Dallas County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3.9878427┬░ 3.9878427┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6120022,"lon":-93.9878427,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

391

Dallas County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8┬░, -87.1422895┬░ 8┬░, -87.1422895┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.2332138,"lon":-87.1422895,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

392

City of Dallas - Green Energy Purchasing (Texas) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

purchasing program through 2013. The purchase amounts to roughly 40% of total expected electricity consumption by municipal facilities for the year and will be supplied...

393

Collapse of the Dallas Cowboys Indoor Practice Facility, May ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... frame are representative of the building response. ? Conducted analyses to calculate demand-capacity ratios ... Survey of wind damage to trees on ...

394

SMU, Dept of Electrical Engineering Dallas, Texas 75275  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on surfing habits Hijacks Web searches and IE settings Tricks user by claiming to delete porn Bundled

Chen, Thomas M.

395

DALLAS, TEXAS Localized Patterns in Homogeneous Networks of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

); P. Ka┬? stanek, J. Kosek, D. ┬? Snita, I. Schreiber, and M. Marek, Physica (Amsterdam) 84D, 79 (1995); H. ┬? Sev┬? cikov├í, J. Kosek, and M. Marek, J. Phys. Chem. 100, 1666 (1996); M. G├│mez┬şGesteira et al

Moore, Peter K.

396

Worth, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

897548┬░, -87.7972754┬░ 897548┬░, -87.7972754┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6897548,"lon":-87.7972754,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

397

Well-Being, Authority, and Worth.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Theories of well-being give an account of what it is for persons to fare well or to live prudentially valuable lives. I divide the theoreticalů (more)

Hebert, Michel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Future contingencies and photovoltaic system worth  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The value of dispersed photovoltaic systems connected to the utility grid has been calculated using the General Electric Optimized Generation Planning program. The 1986 to 2001 time period was used for this study. Photovoltaic systems were dynamically integrated, up to 5% total capacity, into 9 NERC based regions under a range of future fuel and economic contingencies. Value was determined by the change in revenue requirements due to the photovoltaic additions. Displacement of high cost fuel was paramount to value, while capacity displacement was highly variable and dependent upon regional fuel mix.

Jones, G. J.; Thomas, M. G.; Bonk, G. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Updated 01 12 Samuel G. Worth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or modified forces, (3) research and development ("R&D"), (4) intelligence, (5) counter-intelligence only one offensive and one defensive weapon system. R&D, intelligence, and counterintelligence were "desirability") to each weapon system; the intel rules assign a value to each intelligence/counterintelligence 6

400

Total lightning observations of severe convection over North Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Five severe convective cells over North Texas from three separate dates were examined to determine what three dimensional, or ôtotalö lightning data can add to the understanding of a convective cellĺs intensity, propagation, and severe weather potential. Total lightning data were obtained from Vaisala Inc.ĺs Dallas/Fort Worth (D/FW) Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR) network. Radar data from two Weather Surveillance Radar ľ 1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) sites were used for position data and information regarding the intensity and kinematic properties of each cell. Total lightning products used by the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Fort Worth, Texas were compared to total lightning flash rate; a quantity that has been shown to be correlated to changes in cell intensity inferred from other sources, such as radar and satellite data. These products, specifically flash extent density (FED) were also compared to CG flash rate and radar derived measures from the WSR-88D sites. The results of this work show that FED and total flash rate are well correlated, with an average Pearson correlation value of 0.73, indicating that previous total flash rate results may also apply to FED. Lightning hooks, holes, and notches in FED displays indicated likely updraft regions, while appendages were observed to develop prior to deviant motion with two supercells. These results, combined with a greater update frequency provided a useful complement to radar data in the warning decision process. FED jumps were observed prior to several severe weather reports, indicating that total lightning activity may be related to updraft strength as found in past studies. However, FED jumps were sometimes observed without any associated severe event. More work is clearly needed to define what FED changes are of most importance in the short-term prediction of storm severity. The usefulness of the total lightning data on these dates was dependant upon LDAR network status and distance of the cell from the network center. The results of this study suggest that combining total flash rate trends with visual displays of FED provides the greatest added benefit to forecasters in maintaining situational awareness during warning operations.

McKinney, Christopher Michael

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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401

Evaluation and combined geophysical interpretations of NURE and related geoscience data in the Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidido, and Emory Peak quadrangles, Texas. Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report (two volumes) is the culmination of a two-year study of the six Trans-Pecos Texas quadrangles (Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidio, and Emory Park) surveyed as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Volume I contains a discussion of the aeromagnetic, gravity and geochemical data, their processing, and their analysis. The geologic history and setting of the Trans-Pecos are discussed along with the uranium potential of the region. Uranium anomalies and occurrences characteristic of numerous different NURE classes are present in the study area, and information is presented on 33 drill holes into these targets. Volume II is a folio of maps reduced to a scale of 1:500,000. Geologic maps for each of the six quadrangles are included and the geophysical maps have been prepared to be overlays for the goelogic maps. In addition to the geologic maps, residual aeromagnetic anomaly, complete Bouguer gravity anomaly, flight line index, gravity station index, and anomaly interpretative maps were prepared for each quadrangle. A large suite of digitally processed maps of gravity and aeromagnetic data were prepared and are included in Volume II.

Keller, G.R.; Hinze, W.J.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Goodell, P.C.; Roy, R.F.; Pingitore, N.E.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Development of a Residential Code-compliant Web-based Energy Efficiency Calculator for Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 2001, Texas has been proactive in initiating clean air and energy efficiency-in buildings policies. The Texas Emissions Reduction Plan legislation of 2001 mandated statewide adoption of energy codes; created a 5% annual energy savings goal for public facilities in affected counties through 2007, and provided approximately $150 million in cash incentives for clean diesel emissions grants and energy research. Texas, as part of the TERP, also proposed calculating creditable Nitrogen Oxides emissions reduction credits for energy efficiency and renewable energy through the State Implementation Plan under the Federal Clean Air Act. Residential energy codes create more energy-efficient homes and thus reduce emissions from savings in electricity generation and the burning of on-site natural gas. Since 2001, Texas energy code programs have partially transformed the housing market in Dallas/Fort Worth and Houston with 30,000 Energy Star homes (approximately 27%) in 2006, which have reduced emissions from building energy efficient homes, and created new manufacturing jobs for energy-efficient equipment and windows. However, several obstacles remain to realizing a total market transformation: the market value of energy efficiency is not uniformly assigned, and there is a lack of consumer awareness to achieve market transformation. Therefore, certain old construction practices remain entrenched. To overcome some of these obstacles, the International Code Compliance Calculator (IC3) was created. The objectives of IC3 are to: 1) increase the number of homes built in Texas with a target energy performance better than the 2000/2001 IECC baseline1; 2) increase the number of builders and building officials familiar with high performance home building options, technologies and quality assurance requirements; 3) increase the number of builders constructing and marketing high performance homes; and 4) quantify NOx emissions reduction from the energy efficiency measures recorded and verified for each house constructed with IC3. This paper presents information on the design and operation of the IC3 system.

Cordes, J.; O'Neal, S.; Marshall, K.; Montgomery, C.; Stackhouse, R.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Liu, Z.; McKelvey, K.; Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Gilman, D.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Former Fort Ord Army Base Site in Marina, California. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Former Fort Ord Army Base (FOAB) site in Marina, California, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

Stoltenberg, B.; Konz, C.; Mosey, G.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Cove Fort Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Project Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 38.6075┬░, -112.57472222222┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.6075,"lon":-112.57472222222,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

405

Fort Peck Reservation Assessment of Hydrocarbon Seepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following work was performed: (1) Identified three test areas for Phase I, (2) Selected nine surface exploration methods for comparison, (3) contracted six geochemical companies for laboratory analysis and interpretation, (4) sub-contracted one surface geochemical method for field collection and analysis, (5) Acquired free data for one surface exploration method, (6) Collected samples from 27 sites in Area 7 and 210 sites in Area 6, and (7) Began the database creation, comparison, mapping, and interpretation of all data from the two sampled areas.

Monson, Lawrence M.

2001-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

406

Microsoft PowerPoint - WhitneyRehab12  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

T T L B hi Terry L. Bachim Chief, Maintenance Section Fort Worth District O ti Di i i Operations Division 13June 2012 US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG ® FORT WORTH DISTRICT Major Rehabilitation j Whitney Powerhouse Installation of upper bridge for Unit #1 BUILDING STRONG ® FORT WORTH DISTRICT Major Rehabilitation j Whitney Powerhouse *FY 2007 Appropriations $3,269,716 pp p *Award of Base Contract *FY 2008 Appropriations $4,283,383 *Option Period #1 *FY 2009 Customer Funding $6 336 000 *FY 2009 Customer Funding $6,336,000 *Option Period #2, Mods, S&A, & EDC *FY2010 Customer Funding $6,545,000 *Option Period #3, Mods, S&A, & EDC *FY2011 Customer Funding $5,560,000 *Option Period #4, Mods, S&A, & EDC *FY2012 Funding Requirement $2,500,000 *Unfunded Modifications for

407

New Buses Transport Students and Savings in Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buses Transport Students and Savings in Texas Buses Transport Students and Savings in Texas New Buses Transport Students and Savings in Texas July 29, 2010 - 6:27pm Addthis Students look underneath one of Fort Worth Independent School District's new hybrid diesel buses. | Photo courtesy of FWISD Students look underneath one of Fort Worth Independent School District's new hybrid diesel buses. | Photo courtesy of FWISD Lindsay Gsell This fall, when students in Texas' Fort Worth Independent School District (FWISD) board school buses, some of them will be riding on the district's new hybrid electric diesel vehicles. Thanks to Recovery Act funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program, the district was able to purchase 25 buses-enough to transport 1,800 students to school while saving the district 12,000 gallons

408

Texasĺ Senate Bill 5 Legislation for Reducing Pollution in Non-Attainment and Affected Areas: Procedures for Measuring Electricity Savings from the Adoption of the International Energy Conservation Code (IRC/IECC 2001) in New Residences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four areas in Texas have been designated by the EPA as non-attainment areas because ozone levels exceed the NAAQS maximum allowable limits, Beaumont-Port Arthur, El Paso, Dallas-Ft. Worth, and Houston-Galveston-Brazoria. These areas face severe sanctions if attainment is not reached by 2007. Four additional areas in the state are also approaching national ozone limits (i.e., affected areas), including: Austin, Corpus Christi, San Antonio, and the Longview-Tyler-Marshall area.

Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Turner, W. D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Process Optimization Assessments at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri and Fort Carson, Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL) and Energy Technology Services International, Inc. (ETSI) have developed a process optimization methodology and supporting tools to conduct comprehensive facility and process energy and emi

Lin, M.; Vavrin, J.; Smith, W.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Worth County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40.4730605┬░, -94.315422┬░ 40.4730605┬░, -94.315422┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4730605,"lon":-94.315422,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

411

Worth County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

580686┬░, -93.3388917┬░ 580686┬░, -93.3388917┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.3580686,"lon":-93.3388917,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

412

Lake Worth, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida: Energy Resources Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 26.6159015┬░, -80.056986┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.6159015,"lon":-80.056986,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

413

UTA professors bring in more than $1 million worth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The original idea came from alumnus Maham Rahimi, who is now a medical student at Texas Tech University, she

Chiao, Jung-Chih

414

Worth County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

┬░, -83.8897057┬░ ┬░, -83.8897057┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.5282489,"lon":-83.8897057,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

415

Considering GPGPU for HPC centers: is it worth the effort?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In contrast to just a few years ago, the answer to the question "What system should we buy next to best assist our users" has become a lot more complicated for the operators of an HPC center today. In addition to multicore architectures, powerful accelerator ...

Hans Hacker; Carsten Trinitis; Josef Weidendorfer; Matthias Brehm

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Peer-assessment in group projects: is it worth it?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The incorporation of group projects into university computing courses is wide spread. However, there is evidence that students undertaking such projects express concern about the way in which marks awarded for outcomes produced by the group collaboratively ...

Geoffrey J. Kennedy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

"Are You Getting Your Money's Worth?" CC ONSUMERONSUMER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pumps. We also test the quality of; gasoline, diesel fuel, motor oil, and brake fluid you didn't get. ┬Ě When buying gasoline, look at the pump reading before the start of fuel delivery. The reading should be cleared and the pump set at zero be- fore you dispense fuel. ┬Ě Check your receipts

418

December 2012 A Question Worth Billions: Why Isn't  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

," scientists exploring new technologies such as hydroponics in space, biofuels, and plant-based medicines. #12, including logo, installation shots, rights-free images, and sample press release Range of wholesale products-based products and land-use techniques--such as biofuels, organic farming, and soy-based plastics and inks

Noble, James S.

419

Residential photovoltaic worth : an assessment of retrofit vs. new construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper characterizes the basic differences between photovoltaic retrofit and new construction applications. It quantifies the tradeoffs forced by rooftop area constraints, special array mounting costs, maintenance ...

Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Competition in Electricity Supply: will "1998" be worth it?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. It began in 1990 when the largest 5,000 customers with a maximum demand in excess of 1 MW were allowed with a maximum demand of between 100 kW and 1 MW. The 23 million domestic and small business consumers

California at Berkeley. University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Copy of Lake Worth Utilities - Energy Conservation Rebate Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Website http:www.coj.netDepartmentsEnvironmental+and+ComplianceOffice+of+SustainabilitySustainable+Building+Program.htm Date added to DSIRE 2010-11-05 Last DSIRE Review...

422

S&TR | September 2005: Dust That's Worth Keeping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

spectral feature. Limitations in the energy and spatial resolution achievable with electron microscopes and ion microprobes-the two main instruments used to study samples of...

423

PTA proves its worth in high-volume hardfacing jobs  

SciTech Connect

Imparting wear and corrosion resistance to metal surfaces by providing a hard surface is the basis for hardfacing. The realization of the economic advantage of increased wear by providing a metal deposit on a relatively low-cost substrate has spurred the growth of hardfacing over the last half century. Plasma transferred arc (PTA) hardfacing and laser beam hardfacing are relative newcomers to this arena. Hardfacing with PTA is ideal for high-volume hardfacing where a high degree of quality, reliability and consistency is required. Significant advances in materials and equipment have helped to spur the advancement of the technology and the wider acceptance by industry. It is believed that in the future, PTA hardfacing systems will be developed that rely a great deal on microprocessors and robotics, more so than at present. These would further enhance the product quality and consistency and would enable tailor-made PTA system designs for multiple applications. The quest for new materials for PTA hardfacing that combine wear and corrosion resistance and weldability is expected to continue. Newer applications are constantly being developed as more and more medium- and small-scale operators realize the advantages that can be derived from the use of PTA hardfacing. The basic driving force for these improvements and growth is quality, reliability, productivity and significant long-term cost reduction.

Raghu, D.; Webber, R. [Deloro Stellite, Goshen, IN (United States). Stellite Coatings Div.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Luciano Floridi Research Fellow del Wolson College e Lecturer in Logic and Epistemology presso il St.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a nostra insaputa, mentre i crimini variano dalla pornografia elettronica ai virus, dalla riproduzione

Floridi, Luciano

425

Furnace Black Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Furnace Black Characterization Sid Richardson Carbon Co Fort Worth, TX Dr. Michel Gerspacher #12 of Crystallographic Studies #12;005F7 Methodologies #12;005F8 Summary ┬Ě For all furnace carbon black 12├? Surface Unorganized Carbon Identified #12;005F11 SRCC's Model #12;005F12 Carbon Black Surface Activity

426

Potential Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Savings at the Dunbar Middle and Sims Elementary Schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study of the potential cost savings which may be achieved by improving operational and maintenance (O&M) practices at Dunbar Middle School and Sims Elementary School in the Fort Worth Independent School District. This report discusses the methodology used to identify the O&M measures and summarizes the potential savings of these measures.

Liu, M.; Houcek, J. K.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Fractures in the Barnett Shale in the Delaware Basin Natural Fractures in the Barnett Shale in the Delaware Basin Natural Fractures in the Barnett Shale in the Delaware Basin, Pecos Co. West Texas: comparison with the Barnett Shale in the Fort Worth Basin Authors: Julia F. W. Gale Venue: West Texas Geological Society Symposium, in Midland, Texas September 10-12, 2008. http://www.wtgs.org [external site] Abstract: This study describes the several sets of natural fractures in a Barnett Shale core from Pecos County, including partly open fractures, fractures associated with chert layers and early, deformed fractures. These are compared with fractures previously described in the Barnett Shale in the Fort Worth Basin. The basic fracture attributes are discussed in terms of their implications for hydraulic fracture treatments. The steep, narrow, calcite-sealed fractures that are present in many Barnett cores in the Fort Worth Basin are important because of their likely tendency to reactivate during hydraulic fracture treatments. Larger open fractures are possibly present, clustered on the order of several hundred feet apart. In the core studied from the Delaware Basin there is evidence that a greater number of narrower fractures may be open. Thus, their importance for completions may be rather different than those in the Fort Worth Basin

428

US Army Corps of Engineers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mine in Freestone, Leon, and Limestone Counties, Texas by Texas Westmoreland Coal Company. APPLICANT 96┬░ 12' 36" W. The Jewett Mine began extracting lignite (coal) in 1985. The project areaUS Army Corps of Engineers Fort Worth District Public Notice Applicant: Texas Westmoreland Coal

US Army Corps of Engineers

429

TEXAS CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY/DATAR MANUALii This manual was developed as part of NIDA Grant DA06162,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY/DATAR MANUALii This manual was developed as part of NIDA Grant DA06162 system, or redistributed for any commercial purpose without the express written permission of Texas Christian University. Institute of Behavioral Research Texas Christian University P.O. Box 298740 Fort Worth

Cooper, Brenton G.

430

Spring 2008 www.engr.colostate.edu/me Volume 10, Number 2 New Faculty Join Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This experience is serving him wellinhisMEprogram.Heisawork- study student in our Manufacturing Instructional was drafted to be the Manufacturing Director for the 2008 Formula SAE Race Car project. He works with the team/4-6 SAE Aero Design West Fort Worth, Texas 4/18-20 ASME Human Powered Vehicle Challenge Reno, Nevada 5

431

Microsoft Word - Hydropower Conference Agenda 2008.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Embassy Suites Hotel Fort Worth, Texas June 11 - 12, 2008 Wednesday, June 11 1:00 p.m. Welcome FWD 1:15 p.m. Introductory Remarks FWD SWPA Ted Coombes, SPRA 1:45 p.m. Tulsa...

432

The University of Texas at Dallas Office of Human Resources Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: $ _______________ Benefit Information: Previously eligible for ORP: _____ No ____ Yes 8.5% ____ Yes 6.00 % ORP Eligibility

O'Toole, Alice J.

433

Temperature and Violent Crime in Dallas, Texas: Relationships and Implications of Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

weather and aggressive crime in Cleveland, Ohio. Weather,temperature and violent crime. J Appl Soc Psychol. 15.Climatological conditions and crime: the forecast is. . . ?

Gamble, Janet L; Hess, Jeremy J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Solar energy facility at North Hampton Recreation Center, Dallas, Texas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The solar energy system is installed in a single story (two heights), 16,000 sq ft building enclosing a gymnasium, locker area, and health care clinic surrounded by a recreational area and athletic field. The solar energy system is designed to provide 80 percent of the annual space heating, 48 percent of the annual space cooling, and 90 percent of the domestic hot water requirements. The solar energy system includes a 238 single glazed flat plate, 3650 sq ft area collector subsystem, a 6000 gallon hot water storage subsystem, a domestic hot water preheat subsystem, an absorption chiller subsystem with a 2000 gallon tank chilled water storage subsystem. The auxiliary back up system is a gas-fired boiler and a conventional 100 gallon natural gas water heater provides any additional energy to satisfy hot water load requirements. A summary of project information, project chronology, project costs, the five modes of system operation, description of the Site Data Acquisition System, system performance summary, experience recommendations, system operational verification, drawings and major component manufacturers information are provided.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

The University of Texas at Dallas Callier Center for Communication Disorders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and billing record. Non Callier Center providers may have different policies or notices regarding their use to authorized federal officials for intelligence, counterintelligence, and other national security activities

O'Toole, Alice J.

436

Comments on ôTemperature and Violent Crime in Dallas, Texas: Relationships and Implications of Climate Changeö  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. Regional Climate Projections. In: Solomon S, Qin D,of regional climate projections for central North America. 5

Williams, Matt N.; Hill, Stephen R.; Spicer, John

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Federal Reserve Bank of DallasTime-Varying Oil Price Volatility and Macroeconomic Aggregates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We illustrate the theoretical relation among output, consumption, investment, and oil price volatility in a real business cycle model. The model incorporates demand for oil by a firm, as an intermediate input, and by a household, used in conjunction with a durable good. We estimate a stochastic volatility process for the real price of oil over the period 1986-2011 and utilize the estimated process in a non-linear approximation of the model. For realistic calibrations, an increase in oil price volatility produces a temporary decrease in durable spending, while precautionary savings motives lead investment and real GDP to rise. Irreversible capital and durable investment decisions do not overturn this result.

Michael Plante; Michael Plante; Nora Traum; We Thank Ron Alquist; Sebnem Kalemli-ozcan; Junghoon Lee; James Murray

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Exploring the feasibility of developing partnerships between Hispanic-serving organizations and the 4-H clubs in the state of Texas, in both urban and rural communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this study was to explore the phics. feasibility of developing partnerships between Hispanic-serving organizations and the 4-H club in both rural and urban areas in the state of Texas. The study also identified existing and non-existing Hispanic-serving organizations in the state of Texas, current relationships between Hispanic-service organizations and the 4-H program in the state of Texas, and benefits that can arise between these partnerships. The study was conducted during late spring and early summer, 1998. The target sample for this study was three hundred forty Hispanic-serving organizations in the state of Texas. There were eight Hispanic-serving organization directories that were used as the sampling frame for the study. The instrument used consisted of fifteen questions to determine familiarity of 4-H clubs, programs that focus on youth, youth and volunteer training, and current and potential collaboration between the 4-H program and Hispanic-serving organizations. The questionnaire also included two open-ended questions regarding benefits and alternative practices. l . The majority of the surveys came from urban areas where there were more Hispanic serving organizations to cater to the needs of the Hispanic population. The areas were Austin, Brownsville, Dallas, El Paso, Fort Worth, Houston, and San Antonio. 2. 75 percent of all organizations that responded to the survey were involved in service to youth in some form or fashion. The Hispanic-serving organizations that responded to the survey did not dedicate sufficient time (determined by the researcher) to the four main components of the 4-H program (leadership, youth training programs, public speaking, and community service). 4. Hispanic-serving organizations showed some familiarity with the 4-H program. However, 4-H is still seen as a club for the youth that live on a farm or rich. 5. Less than eve percent of Hispanic-serving organizations were currently working with the local 4-H program in their communities. Organizations are unsure as to what 4-H can provide to their community. 6. More than 50 percent of the Hispanic-serving organizations that responded to the survey were interested in developing a partnership with the 4-H club.

Rodriguez, Reyes Isaac

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Heat Transfer Performance and Piping Strategy Study for Chilled Water Systems at Low Cooling Loads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temperature differential of chilled water is an important factor used for evaluating the performance of a chilled water system. A low delta-T may increase the pumping energy consumption and increase the chiller energy consumption. The system studied in this thesis is the chilled water system at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW Airport). This system has the problem of low delta-T under low cooling loads. When the chilled water flow is much lower than the design conditions at low cooling loads, it may lead to the laminar flow of the chilled water in the cooling coils. The main objective of this thesis is to explain the heat transfer performance of the cooling coils under low cooling loads. The water side and air side heat transfer coefficients at different water and air flow rates are calculated. The coefficients are used to analyze the heat transfer performance of the cooling coils at conditions ranging from very low loads to design conditions. The effectiveness-number of transfer units (NTU) method is utilized to analyze the cooling coil performance under different flow conditions, which also helps to obtain the cooling coil chilled water temperature differential under full load and partial load conditions. When the water flow rate drops to 1ft/s, laminar flow occurs; this further decreases the heat transfer rate on the water side. However, the cooling coil effectiveness increases with the drop of water flow rate, which compensates for the influence of the heat transfer performance under laminar flow conditions. Consequently, the delta-T in the cooling coil decreases in the transitional flow regime but increases in the laminar flow regime. Results of this thesis show that the laminar flow for the chilled water at low flow rate is not the main cause of the low delta-T syndrome in the chilled water system. Possible causes for the piping strategy of the low delta-T syndrome existing in the chilled water system under low flow conditions are studied in this thesis: (1) use of two way control valves; and (2) improper tertiary pump piping strategy.

Li, Nanxi 1986-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Thunderstorm lightning and radar characteristics: insights on electrification and severe weather forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total lightning mapping, along with radar and NLDN cloud-to-ground lightning data, can be used to diagnose the severity of a storm. Analysis of the 13 October 2001 supercell event (Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas), some supercells of which were tornadic, shows that LDAR II lightning source heights (quartile, median, and 95th percentile heights) increased as the storms intensified. Most of the total lightning occurred where reflectivity cores extended upwards and within regions of reflectivity gradient rather than in reflectivity cores. A total lightning hole was associated with an intense, nontornadic supercell on 6 April 2003. This feature was nonexistent from all supercells analyzed during the 13 October case. During tornadogenesis, the radar and LDAR II data indicated updraft weakening. The height of the 30 dBZ radar top began to descend approximately 10 minutes (2 volume scans) before tornado touchdown in one storm. Total lightning and CG flash rates decreased by up to a factor of 5 to a minimum during an F2 tornado touchdown associated with this storm. LDAR II source heights all showed descent by 2-4 km during a 25 minute period prior to and during this tornado touchdown. This drastic trend of decreasing source heights was observed in two tornadic storms prior to and during tornado touchdown, but did not occur in non-tornadic supercells, suggesting that these parameters can be useful to forecasters. These observations agree with tornadogenesis theory that an updraft weakens and the mesocyclone can become divided (composed of both updraft and downdraft) when a storm becomes tornadic. LDAR II source density contours were comma-shaped in association with severe wind events within mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) on 13 October 2001 and 27 May 2002. This signature is similar to the radar reflectivity bow echo. Consistent relationships between severe weather, radar and lightning storm characteristics (i.e., lightning heights) were not found for cells within MCSs as was the case for supercells. Cell interactions within MCSs are believed to weaken these relationships as reflectivity and lightning from nearby storms contaminate the cells of interest. It is also more difficult to clearly define a cell within an MCS.

Steiger, Scott Michael

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

Fort Carson, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colorado: Energy Resources Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.7374943┬░, -104.7888615┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.7374943,"lon":-104.7888615,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

442

Fort Hunt, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hunt, Virginia: Energy Resources Hunt, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.7328926┬░, -77.0580327┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.7328926,"lon":-77.0580327,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

443

City of Fort Pierre, South Dakota (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pierre Pierre Place South Dakota Utility Id 6615 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large Commercial Commercial Residential Rate Residential Security Lighting Lighting Small Commercial (Single Phase) Rate Commercial Small Commercial (Three Phase) Rate Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.1120/kWh Commercial: $0.0609/kWh References ÔćĹ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from

444

Fort McKinley, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ohio: Energy Resources Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.7975578┬░, -84.253554┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7975578,"lon":-84.253554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

445

Renewable Energy Development on Fort Mojave Reservation Feasiblity Study  

SciTech Connect

The Ft. Mojave tribe, whose reservation is located along the Colorado River in the states of Arizona, California, and Nevada near the point where all three states meet, has a need for increased energy supplies. This need is a direct result of the aggressive and successful economic development projects undertaken by the tribe in the last decade. While it is possible to contract for additional energy supplies from fossil fuel sources it was the desire of the tribal power company, AHA MACAV Power Service (AMPS) to investigate the feasibility and desirability of producing power from renewable sources as an alternative to increased purchase of fossil fuel generated power and as a possible enterprise to export green power. Renewable energy generated on the reservation would serve to reduce the energy dependence of the tribal enterprises on off reservation sources of energy and if produced in excess of reservation needs, add a new enterprise to the current mix of economic activities on the reservation. Renewable energy development would also demonstrate the tribeĺs support for improving environmental quality, sustainability, and energy independence both on the reservation and for the larger community.

Russell Gum, ERCC analytics LLC

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

446

Fort Yukon, Chalkyitsik, & Venetie Biomass Boiler Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments (CATG) is a consortium of ten Gwich'in and Koyukon Athabascan tribes settled in 10 remote villages and are linked by the Yukon River System. The CATG mission is to maintain the Yukon Flats region as Indian Country by asserting traditional rights and taking responsibility for developing tribal technical capacity to manage the land and resources. It is the intent of CATG to explore and develop all opportunities for a renewable and self-sufficient energy program for each of the villages. CATG envisions utilization of forest resources both for construction and energy as one of the best long-term strategies for integrating the economic goals for the region as well as supporting the cultural and social issues. The intent for this feasibility project is to focus specifically on biomass utilization for heat, first, and for future electrical generation within the region, second. An initial determination has already been made regarding the importance of wood energy as a primary source of renewable energy to displace diesel fuel in the Yukon Flats region. A desktop study of other potential renewable resources was conducted in 2006.

Greg Koontz, ME William A. Wall, PhD

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

Fort Defiance, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Defiance, Arizona: Energy Resources Defiance, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.7444602┬░, -109.0764828┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.7444602,"lon":-109.0764828,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

448

MHK Projects/Fort Ross North | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

< MHK Projects < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.4,"lon":-123.9,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

449

Fort Lee, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Jersey: Energy Resources New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.8509333┬░, -73.9701381┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8509333,"lon":-73.9701381,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

450

Fort Snelling, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Snelling, Minnesota: Energy Resources Snelling, Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 44.8755939┬░, -93.2131232┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.8755939,"lon":-93.2131232,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

451

Fort Bliss, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bliss, Texas: Energy Resources Bliss, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.80755┬░, -106.421663┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.80755,"lon":-106.421663,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

452

Fort Collins, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Collins, Colorado: Energy Resources Collins, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.5852602┬░, -105.084423┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5852602,"lon":-105.084423,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

453

Fort Ripley, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

777┬░, -94.3602807┬░ 777┬░, -94.3602807┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.1660777,"lon":-94.3602807,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

454

Fort Meade, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1┬░, -76.741969┬░ 1┬░, -76.741969┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1081,"lon":-76.741969,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

455

MHK Projects/Fort Ross South | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South South < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.3103,"lon":-123.845,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

456

Fort Lauderdale, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lauderdale, Florida: Energy Resources Lauderdale, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 26.1223084┬░, -80.1433786┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.1223084,"lon":-80.1433786,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

457

Fort Rucker, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rucker, Alabama: Energy Resources Rucker, Alabama: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.343401┬░, -85.715143┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.343401,"lon":-85.715143,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

458

Fort Salonga, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salonga, New York: Energy Resources Salonga, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.9125979┬░, -73.3009489┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9125979,"lon":-73.3009489,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

459

Fort Devens, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Devens, Massachusetts: Energy Resources Devens, Massachusetts: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.536062┬░, -71.617668┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.536062,"lon":-71.617668,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

460

Fort Defiance, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Defiance, Arizona: Energy Resources Defiance, Arizona: Energy Resources (Redirected from Ft. Defiance, Arizona) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.7444602┬░, -109.0764828┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.7444602,"lon":-109.0764828,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dallas fort worth" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Fort Washington, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.13845┬░, -75.191799┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.13845,"lon":-75.191799,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

462

Fort Knox, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Knox, Kentucky: Energy Resources Knox, Kentucky: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.890736┬░, -85.963174┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.890736,"lon":-85.963174,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

463

Fort Lupton, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lupton, Colorado: Energy Resources Lupton, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.0847055┬░, -104.8130275┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.0847055,"lon":-104.8130275,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

464

Fort Bend County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bend County, Texas: Energy Resources Bend County, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 29.5692614┬░, -95.8142885┬░ Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.5692614,"lon":-95.8142885,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

465

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area - Vapor ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location....

466

Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal area. The geophysical exploration consisted of resistivity, ground magnetic, and microgravity surveys that were made to site the well in an optimum location....

467

A Comparative Study of the Mississippian Barnett Shale, Fort...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R. Bruner and Richard Smosna (URS Corporation) 1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1.1 Purpose Many exploration and production programs are based on analogy with known successful plays. For...

468

City of Fort Lauderdale - Smart Watts Rebate Program (Florida...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Insulation, Central Air conditioners, Doors, Furnaces, Water Heaters, Windows, Photovoltaics, Solar Water Heat, Tankless Water Heaters Active Incentive No...

469

Tracer testing at Soultz-sous-Forts (France) using naphthalene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: ┬Ě EPS1 fully cored exploration ┬Ě GPK-1 preliminary injection tests ┬Ě GPK-3 injection well ┬Ě GPK-2 and future GPK-4 production wells 3.6 km continuous logs: Caliper, Spectral GR, UBI (5100m) #12;EHDRA-2 (July 2000) > Water injection ┬Ě 26,800 m3 of fresh water and 1,000 m3 of heavy brine > Tracer

470

Renewable Energy Development on Fort Mojave Reservation Feasiblity Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

quality, sustainability, and energy independence both on the reservation and for the larger community.

Russell Gum, ERCC analytics LLC

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

471

ARC Thrift Store** 106 East Foothills PKWY, Fort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unused items you are helping make the world a better place to live. Recycling helps to limit the amount, televisions, VCRs, etc. Phone: 226-1101 Verizon Wireless Hopeline - Dona- tions to the Hope line project the house neces- sities and couches (only at the ** loca- tions) Items should be clean and in working

472

Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal...

473

Thermal Gradient Holes At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal...

474

Ground Magnetics At Cove Fort Area - Vapor (Warpinski, Et Al...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Update to Warpinski, et al., 2002 References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal...

475

HISTORY OF THE FORT LEWIS INCINERATOR: LESSONS LEARNED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.g., SO2, NOx, mercury), non- condensible gases (e.g., Ar, N2, O2), and water. For retrofits, the CO2 per kWh reduces the cost of CCS. 2 #12;At a coal-fired power plant, CO2 is a component of the flue gas. The total pressure of the flue gas is 1 atm and the CO2 concentration is typically 10-15%. The process

Columbia University

476

FORT HALL INDIAN RESERVATION PHONE (2OB) 478-3700  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Springs Hatchery Facility and Satellite Facilities, BpA project No. 200g-906-00 Dear Mr. Grover: The shoshone/summer Chinook that are essential for recovery of the Snake River spring/summer Chinook ESU. Because