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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Windows The Windows Volume Purchase RFP to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on Twitter Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on Google Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on Delicious Rank High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on Digg Find More places to share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: The Windows Volume Purchase RFP on AddThis.com... Home About FAQs Low-E Storm Windows Request for Proposal Contacts For Builders For Residential Buyers For Light Commercial Buyers For Manufacturers

2

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Events on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Events on Twitter Bookmark High...

3

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: News on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: News on Twitter Bookmark High...

4

Building Technologies Office: High Performance Windows Volume...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Technologies Office: High Performance Windows Volume Purchase to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: High Performance Windows Volume Purchase on Facebook...

5

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Builders  

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For Builders to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Builders on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Builders on...

6

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Manufacturers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Manufacturers to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Manufacturers on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For...

7

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program on Twitter Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program on Google Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program on Delicious Rank High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program on Digg Find More places to share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase:

8

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Information Resources to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources on Twitter Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources on Google Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources on Delicious Rank High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources on Digg Find More places to share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Information Resources on AddThis.com... Home About For Builders For Residential Buyers For Light Commercial Buyers For Manufacturers For Utilities Information Resources Information Resources Numerous publications will be available to help educate buyers, product

9

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to Contacts to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Contacts on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Contacts on Google Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Contacts on Delicious Rank High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Contacts on Digg Find More places to share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Contacts on AddThis.com... Home About For Builders For Residential Buyers For Light Commercial Buyers For Manufacturers For Utilities Information Resources Contacts Web site and High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program contacts are provided below. Website Contact Send us your comments, report problems, and/or ask questions about

10

Business Case Slide 7: High-Volume: Repository - Diagram  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diagram Previous Slide Next Slide Table of Contents High-Volume: Repository - Diagram Repository Tunnel Components...

11

Business Case Slide 19: High-Volume: Casks - Program Focus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Volume: Casks - Program Focus Previous Slide Next Slide Table of Contents High-Volume: Casks - Program Focus ORNL furnace for cermet development ORNL furnace for cermet development...

12

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Subscribe to Windows...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subscribe to Windows Volume Purchase Event News and Updates to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Subscribe to Windows Volume Purchase Event News and...

13

High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

14

High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting For Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature-High-Volume Lifting For Enhanced Geothermal Systems Temperature-High-Volume Lifting For Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting For Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting Project Description The proposed scope of work is divided into three Phases. Overall system requirements will be established in Phase 1, along with an evaluation of existing lifting system capability, identification of technology limitations, and a conceptual design of an overall lifting system. In developing the system components in Phase 2, component-level tests will be conducted using GE facilities. Areas of development will include high-temperature drive system materials, journal and thrust bearings, and corrosion and erosion-resistant lifting pump components. Finally, in Phase 3, the overall lab-scale lifting system will be demonstrated in a flow loop that will be constructed at GE Global Research.

15

Properties of low cost, high volume glasses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The properties of new and weathered samples of low cost, high volume glasses have been studied to determine their usefulness for solar energy applications. Glasses of varying compositions produced by float, drawn, rolled fusion, and twin ground techniques were examined. Spectral transmittance and reflectance were measured and solar weighted values calculated. Laser raytrace techniques were used to evaluate surface parallelism and bulk homogeneity. Compositional changes were examined with scanning electron microscopy, x-ray fluorescence, and Auger electron spectroscopy. These techniques were used in conjunction with ellipsometry to study the surface effects associated with weathering.

Lind, M. A.; Hartman, J. S.; Buckwalter, C. Q.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

High volume production of nanostructured materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for high volume production of nanoparticles, nanotubes, and items incorporating nanoparticles and nanotubes. Microwave, radio frequency, or infrared energy vaporizes a metal catalyst which, as it condenses, is contacted by carbon or other elements such as silicon, germanium, or boron to form agglomerates. The agglomerates may be annealed to accelerate the production of nanotubes. Magnetic or electric fields may be used to align the nanotubes during their production. The nanotubes may be separated from the production byproducts in aligned or non-aligned configurations. The agglomerates may be formed directly into tools, optionally in compositions that incorporate other materials such as abrasives, binders, carbon-carbon composites, and cermets.

Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

17

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: NewsDetail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NewsDetail to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: NewsDetail on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: NewsDetail on Twitter...

18

High-Resolution Spatial Modeling of Daily Weather Elements for a Catchment in the Oregon Cascade Mountains, United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-quality, daily meteorological data at high spatial resolution are essential for a variety of hydrologic and ecological modeling applications that support environmental risk assessments and decision making. This paper describes the ...

Christopher Daly; Jonathan W. Smith; Joseph I. Smith; Robert B. McKane

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Presentations for Past Events and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations for Past Events and Webinars to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Presentations for Past Events and Webinars on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Presentations for Past Events and Webinars on Twitter Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Presentations for Past Events and Webinars on Google Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Presentations for Past Events and Webinars on Delicious Rank High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Presentations for Past Events and Webinars on Digg Find More places to share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Presentations for Past Events and Webinars on AddThis.com... Home About For Builders For Residential Buyers For Light Commercial Buyers

20

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Light Commercial Buyers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Light For Light Commercial Buyers to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Light Commercial Buyers on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Light Commercial Buyers on Twitter Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Light Commercial Buyers on Google Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Light Commercial Buyers on Delicious Rank High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Light Commercial Buyers on Digg Find More places to share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Light Commercial Buyers on AddThis.com... Home About For Builders For Residential Buyers For Light Commercial Buyers For Manufacturers For Utilities Information Resources For Light Commercial Buyers Significant energy savings from low-E window technology are possible in the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Residential Buyers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buyers to someone by E-mail Residential Buyers to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Residential Buyers on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Residential Buyers on Twitter Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Residential Buyers on Google Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Residential Buyers on Delicious Rank High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Residential Buyers on Digg Find More places to share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Residential Buyers on AddThis.com... Home About For Builders For Residential Buyers For Light Commercial Buyers For Manufacturers For Utilities Information Resources For Residential Buyers Both home owners and buyers can take advantage of the energy savings from

22

Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase Program Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase Program, conduced by PNNL for DOE-BTP, including a summary of outcomes and lessons learned.

Parker, Graham B.; Mapes, Terry S.; Zalis, WJ

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Business Case Slide 14: High-Volume: Casks - DUCRETE (cont)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DUCRETE (cont.) Previous Slide Next Slide Table of Contents High-Volume: Casks - DUCRETE(tm) (cont.) DUCRETE Casks are Considerably Smaller and Lighter than Casks Constructed of...

24

Business Case Slide 12: High-Volume: Casks - Description  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Casks - Description Previous Slide Next Slide Table of Contents High-Volume: Casks - Description Description Use DUO2 to enhance the shielding efficiency in spent fuel casks for...

25

Business Case Slide 18: High-Volume: Casks - Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Volume: Casks - Issues Issues Low-cost manufacturing techniques for large shapes DUAGG(tm) Achieving a homogenous distribution in cement matrix Ensuring adequate strength...

26

High Volume Method of Making Low Cost, Lightweight Solar Materials  

ORNL 2010-G00644/jcn UT-B ID 201002380 High Volume Method of Making Low Cost, Lightweight Solar Materials Technology Summary A critical challenge for ...

27

High Volume Method of Making Low Cost, Lightweight Solar Materials ...  

A critical challenge for solar energy is the high cost (>$1/W) of quality solar materials. Researchers at ORNL have invented an approach for producing large volumes ...

28

Building Technologies Office: High Performance Windows Volume Purchase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase High Performance Windows Volume Purchase DOE's Building Technologies Office (BTO) is coordinating a volume purchase of high performance windows, and low-e storm windows, to expand the market of these high efficiency products. Price is the principal barrier to more widespread market commercialization. The aim of this volume purchase initiative is to work with industry and potential buyers to make highly insulated windows more affordable. Announcement EPA Most Efficient Program for window technology to launched in January 2013. Program Highlights Features Image of person signing document. Volume Purchase RFP Arrow Image of a question mark. Frequently Asked Questions Arrow Image of low-e storm window with two orange-yellow arrows hitting the window and reflecting back inside. Building Envelope and Windows R&D Program Blog Arrow

29

Business Case Slide 16: High-Volume: Casks - Basis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basis Previous Slide Next Slide Table of Contents High-Volume: Casks - Basis Basis Storage casks with high-density shielding can be directly loaded in reactor pools Eliminates a...

30

Assessment of Planning Target Volume Margins for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy of the Prostate Gland: Role of Daily Inter- and Intrafraction Motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine planning target volume margins for prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy based on inter- and intrafraction motion using four daily localization techniques: three-point skin mark alignment, volumetric imaging with bony landmark registration, volumetric imaging with implanted fiducial marker registration, and implanted electromagnetic transponders (beacons) detection. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients who underwent definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer formed the basis of this study. Each patient was implanted with three electromagnetic transponders and underwent a course of 39 treatment fractions. Daily localization was based on three-point skin mark alignment followed by transponder detection and patient repositioning. Transponder positioning was verified by volumetric imaging with cone-beam computed tomography of the pelvis. Relative motion between the prostate gland and bony anatomy was quantified by offline analyses of daily cone-beam computed tomography. Intratreatment organ motion was monitored continuously by the Calypso (registered) System for quantification of intrafraction setup error. Results: As expected, setup error (that is, inter- plus intrafraction motion, unless otherwise stated) was largest with skin mark alignment, requiring margins of 7.5 mm, 11.4 mm, and 16.3 mm, in the lateral (LR), longitudinal (SI), and vertical (AP) directions, respectively. Margin requirements accounting for intrafraction motion were smallest for transponder detection localization techniques, requiring margins of 1.4 mm (LR), 2.6 mm (SI), and 2.3 mm (AP). Bony anatomy alignment required 2.1 mm (LR), 9.4 mm (SI), and 10.5 mm (AP), whereas image-guided marker alignment required 2.8 mm (LR), 3.7 mm (SI), and 3.2 mm (AP). No marker migration was observed in the cohort. Conclusion: Clinically feasible, rapid, and reliable tools such as the electromagnetic transponder detection system for pretreatment target localization and, subsequently, intratreatment target location monitoring allow clinicians to reduce irradiated volumes and facilitate safe dose escalation, where appropriate.

Tanyi, James A., E-mail: tanyij@ohsu.ed [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); He, Tongming [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Summers, Paige A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX (United States); Mburu, Ruth G. [Department of Chemistry, Portland State University, Portland, OR (United States); Kato, Catherine M.; Rhodes, Stephen M.; Hung, Arthur Y.; Fuss, Martin [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Business Case Slide 11: High-Volume: Repository - Program Focus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Focus Previous Slide Next Slide Table of Contents High-Volume: Repository - Program Focus Program focus (ORNL) Fill and cermets are being pursued Both put DUO2 close to...

32

Business Case Slide 10: High-Volume: Repository - Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Issues Previous Slide Next Slide Table of Contents High-Volume: Repository - Issues Issues Technical basis for using DUO2 as a geochemical barrier Technical issues DUO2 alteration...

33

Business Case Slide 13: High-Volume: Casks - DUCRETE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Previous Slide Next Slide Table of Contents High-Volume: Casks - DUCRETE(tm) DUAGG Briquettes DUAGG briquettes are made by a liquid-phase-sintering process and crushed and...

34

High Volume Fly Ash Blended Cements: Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At present, the production of high-volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete involves the addition of large volumes of fly ash as a separate ingredient at a ready-mixed concrete batch plant. This necessitates additional storage silos and quality control at the job site. In order to resolve these issues, CANMET, in partnership with Electric Power Research Institute, U.S.A., undertook a major research project to develop blended cements incorporating high volumes of ASTM Class fly ash. The blended cements are made by ...

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

35

Low-Volume Wastes With High-Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: P4 Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, utilities have comanaged some or all of their low-volume wastes with their high-volume by-products in disposal facilities. This report presents the results of a field study of comanagement of coal combustion by-products at a utility-owned dry landfill in the midwestern United States. The findings from this research provide technical information for use in an ongoing study of comanagement by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

1998-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: For Utilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and mixed climates, R-5 windows on average reduce window heat loss by 40% and overall space conditioning costs by 10% relative to common ENERGY STAR windows. Promotion of high...

37

Changes in Climate at High Southern Latitudes: A Unique Daily Record at Orcadas Spanning 1903–2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climate observations at Orcadas represent the only southern high-latitude site where data span more than a century, and its daily measurements are presented for the first time in this paper. Although limited to a single station, the observed ...

Natalia Zazulie; Matilde Rusticucci; Susan Solomon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Investigation on Lightweight High-Volume Fly Ash Concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study that developed an engineering data base on HVFA lightweight concrete. The investigation also identified potential problems that might be experienced in commercializing lightweight concrete production. The study was based on the use of high volume flyash (HVFA) in the concrete process.

1997-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

39

Development of High-Volume Fly Ash Blended Cements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-volume fly ash (HVFA) blended cement can be produced either by intergrinding fly ash with portland cement clinker or by blending dry fly ash with portland cement. Production of HVFA cement using the intergrinding method may be the most cost-effective and practical of the two approaches. This report documents the results of commercial-scale production of HVFA blended cements using up to 55 percent fly ash to replace the portland cement.

2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

40

High volume tidal or current flow harnessing system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apparatus permitting the utilization of large volumes of water in the harnessing and extracting of a portion of the power generated by the rise and fall of ocean tides, ocean currents, or flowing rivers includes the provision of a dam, and a specialized single cavity chamber of limited size as compared with the water head enclosed by the dam, and an extremely high volume gating system in which all or nearly all of the water between the high and low levels on either side of the dam is cyclically gated through the single chamber from one side of the dam to the other so as to alternately provide positive air pressure and a partial vacuum within the single chamber. In one embodiment, the specialized chamber has a barrier at the bottom which divides the bottom of the chamber in half, large ports at the bottom of the chamber to permit inflow and outflow of high volumes of water, and ganged structures having a higher total area than that of corresponding ports, in which the structures form sluice gates to selectively seal off and open different sets of ports. In another embodiment, a single chamber is used without a barrier. In this embodiment, vertical sluice gates are used which may be activated automatically by pressures acting on the sluice gates as a result of ingested and expelled water.

Gorlov, A.M.

1984-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Handbook of solar energy data for south-facing surfaces in the United States. Volume II. Average hourly and total daily insolation data for 235 localities (Alaska - Montana)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Average hourly and daily total insolaion estimates are given for 235 US sites at a variety of array tilt angles. (MHR)

Smith, J.H.

1980-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Verification and validation guidelines for high integrity systems. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

High integrity systems include all protective (safety and mitigation) systems for nuclear power plants, and also systems for which comparable reliability requirements exist in other fields, such as in the process industries, in air traffic control, and in patient monitoring and other medical systems. Verification aims at determining that each stage in the software development completely and correctly implements requirements that were established in a preceding phase, while validation determines that the overall performance of a computer system completely and correctly meets system requirements. Volume I of the report reviews existing classifications for high integrity systems and for the types of errors that may be encountered, and makes recommendations for verification and validation procedures, based on assumptions about the environment in which these procedures will be conducted. The final chapter of Volume I deals with a framework for standards in this field. Volume II contains appendices dealing with specific methodologies for system classification, for dependability evaluation, and for two software tools that can automate otherwise very labor intensive verification and validation activities.

Hecht, H.; Hecht, M.; Dinsmore, G.; Hecht, S.; Tang, D. [SoHaR, Inc., Beverly Hills, CA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Methods for high volume production of nanostructured materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for high volume production of nanoparticles, nanotubes, and items incorporating nanoparticles and nanotubes. Microwave, radio frequency, or infrared energy vaporizes a metal catalyst which, as it condenses, is contacted by carbon or other elements such as silicon, germanium, or boron to form agglomerates. The agglomerates may be annealed to accelerate the production of nanotubes. Magnetic or electric fields may be used to align the nanotubes during their production. The nanotubes may be separated from the production byproducts in aligned or non-aligned configurations. The agglomerates may be formed directly into tools, optionally in compositions that incorporate other materials such as abrasives, binders, carbon-carbon composites, and cermets.

Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ludtka, Gerald M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

44

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes with High-Volume By-Products: CY Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents an investigation into the effects of comanagement of low-volume wastes with high-volume coal combustion by-products at the CY site. This is one of 14 sites investigated by EPRI to provide background information to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the 2000 Regulatory Determination on comanagement under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

45

Business Case Slide 15: High-Volume: Casks - DU/Steel Cermet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DUSteel Cermet Previous Slide Next Slide Table of Contents High-Volume: Casks - DUSteel Cermet Functions Radiation Shielding Gamma: High-Density DUO2Other Neutron Moderation...

46

Business Case Slide 6: High-Volume: Repository - Description  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Volume: Repository - Description Description of potential uses Structural component of cask (basket, wall) as a cermet Cermet: DUO2 particles embedded in steel matrix Fill material...

47

PTA proves its worth in high-volume hardfacing jobs  

SciTech Connect

Imparting wear and corrosion resistance to metal surfaces by providing a hard surface is the basis for hardfacing. The realization of the economic advantage of increased wear by providing a metal deposit on a relatively low-cost substrate has spurred the growth of hardfacing over the last half century. Plasma transferred arc (PTA) hardfacing and laser beam hardfacing are relative newcomers to this arena. Hardfacing with PTA is ideal for high-volume hardfacing where a high degree of quality, reliability and consistency is required. Significant advances in materials and equipment have helped to spur the advancement of the technology and the wider acceptance by industry. It is believed that in the future, PTA hardfacing systems will be developed that rely a great deal on microprocessors and robotics, more so than at present. These would further enhance the product quality and consistency and would enable tailor-made PTA system designs for multiple applications. The quest for new materials for PTA hardfacing that combine wear and corrosion resistance and weldability is expected to continue. Newer applications are constantly being developed as more and more medium- and small-scale operators realize the advantages that can be derived from the use of PTA hardfacing. The basic driving force for these improvements and growth is quality, reliability, productivity and significant long-term cost reduction.

Raghu, D.; Webber, R. [Deloro Stellite, Goshen, IN (United States). Stellite Coatings Div.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Test evaluates high-volume ESP application offshore Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electric submersible pump (ESP) test, although shorter than hoped for, indicated that artificial lift with ESPs had potential for replacing gas-lift operations, offshore Mexico. Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex) recently preformed this test of a high-volume (10,000 b/d) ESP in the Akal reservoir of the Cantarell field, northeast Marina Region in the Gulf of Mexico. In the Marine Region, gas lift is the main artificial lift method; however, to maintain production on gas lift, sweetened gas requirements for the Akal reservoir would have to increase by about 30 MMscfd. The ESP design was complex because the pump would have to handle 20--40% of free gas at its intake. Installed in September 1996, the ESP had to be pulled from the well in November 1997 because of an electrical short. Actual operating time was about 7 months. The paper describes test objectives, pump environment, pump design, downhole equipment, surface equipment, operating history, production history, and an analysis.

Almazo, S.G. [Pemex, Villahermosa (Mexico); Riling, G. [Cealc, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1998-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

49

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: Frequently Asked Questions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

can be cost-prohibitive, there is a large energy and cost savings potential from volume demand and supply. Is there an overview of the program? The following presentation PDF...

50

Preconcentrator with high volume chiller for high vapor pressure particle detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apparatus and method for collecting particles of both high and low vapor pressure target materials entrained in a large volume sample gas stream. Large volume active cooling provides a cold air supply which is mixed with the sample gas stream to reduce the vapor pressure of the particles. In embodiments, a chiller cools air from ambient conditions to 0-15.degree. C. with the volumetric flow rate of the cold air supply being at least equal to the volumetric flow rate of the sample gas stream. In further embodiments an adsorption media is heated in at least two stages, a first of which is below a threshold temperature at which decomposition products of the high vapor pressure particle are generated.

Linker, Kevin L

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

51

High Temperature Corrosion Research in Progress: 1997: Volume 1 (A-J), Volume 2 (K-U)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-temperature oxidation and corrosion are important life-limiting factors for several critical components in thermal power systems. Research into many aspects of the problem is taking place in laboratories worldwide. This report, a survey of work in progress, updates and extends EPRI's 1994 report TR-104124, Volumes 1 and 2.

1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

52

Aluminum Tailor-welded Blanks for High Volume Automotive ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Strength Aluminum Brazing Sheets for Condenser Fins of Automotive Heat Exchangers · High Temperature Creep Characterization of A380 Cast ...

53

Operational improvements in a factory of low volume and high mixture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis shows operational improvements for the assembly area of a semiconductor equipment manufacturer. High complexity and customization of machines and a low and fluctuating volume are typical challenges within the ...

Treis, Simon Michael Christian

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

A flexible assembly system for low volume and high diversity production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis project seeks to optimize floor layouts for semiconductor equipment assembly operations. The assembly of semiconductor equipment is characterized by low volume and high product diversity and complexity. Demand ...

Schwenke, Richard Clemens

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Proceedings of the 1984 workshop on high-energy excitations in condensed matter. Volume II  

SciTech Connect

This volume covers electronic excitations, momentum distributions, high energy photons, and a wrap-up session. Abstracts of individual items from the conference were prepared separately for the data base. (GHT)

Silver, R.N. (comp.)

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Implementation of RFID in a low volume high flexibility assembly plant : item-level tagging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The implementation of an RFID checkpoint system in a low volume high flexibility assembly plant, aimed at tracking the flow of parts within the facility, was studied. A pilot revealed the suitability of the technology to ...

Koniski, Cyril (Cyril A.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Aligning tool set metrics for operation in a Multi Technology High Mix Low Volume manufacturing environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ireland Fab Operations (IFO) is transitioning and leading the way within Intel to Multi- Technology High Mix Low Volume (MT-HMLV) manufacturing. To avoid errors in estimating metrics, specific capacity tool set metrics for ...

Naughton, Alyson B. (Alyson Bourne)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Microstructure Control of Ni Base Alloys with High Volume Fraction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

hypo-stoichiometric composition of Ni3V, formation of "multi- variant structure ... reasons; one is the high TC (1318 K) at its stoichiometric composition [1, 2], and ...

59

High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion.This document is organized into three volumes. Volumes I and II represent a tiered set of information intended for somewhat different audiences. Volume I is intended to provide an overview of waste glass corrosion, and Volume 11 is intended to provide additional experimental details on experimental factors that influence waste glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II. Volume I is intended for managers, decision makers, and modelers, the combined set of Volumes I, II, and III is intended for scientists and engineers working in the field of high-level waste.

Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Volume Tracking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Total Volumes Captured on both Enterprise & Q4000" Total Volumes Captured on both Enterprise & Q4000" ,"Daily Period",,"Containment Total" ,"Oil","Gas","Oil","Gas" "End Period","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery","Recovery" "Date and Time","Rate","Rate","Cumulative","Cumulative" "MM/DD/YY 00:00","(bo)","(mmcf)","(bbls)","(mmcf)","Comment" 40333,16.486,0,16.486,0,"Oil rate based on metered volume" 40334,6060.70543,15.666,6077.19143,15.666,"Oil rate based on metered volume" 40335,10496.19429,22.00800001,16573.38572,37.674,"Oil rate based on metered volume"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes With High-Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: LS Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power industry has historically comanaged low-volume wastes with high-volume by-products as a cost-effective means of disposal. This report documents an investigation into the effects of comanagement of low-volume wastes with high-volume coal combustion by-products at the LS site. This is one of 14 sites investigated by EPRI to provide background information to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the 2000 Regulatory Determination on comanagement under the Resource Conservation and ...

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

62

www.westfalenwind.de 1 ,,Grid integration of high volumes of Renewable Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enhancement of grid for powertransfer Power-to-Heat instead of power management (reduces ,,must-run unitswww.westfalenwind.de 1 ,,Grid integration of high volumes of Renewable Energies ­ Exceeding.westfalenwind.de 4 Grid requirements RES power generation characteristics: · high degree of fluctuating sources like

Noé, Reinhold

63

Modeling twin-screw multiphase pump performance during periods of high gas volume fraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiphase pumping is a new technology used for reducing capital investments, increasing production rates, and improving recoveries in many on-shore projects. Interest is also growing in the subsea/offshore application of this technology. Multiphase pumping adds energy to an unprocessed effluent stream acting as a combined pump and compressor, permitting the recovery of oil and gas on an economical basis. In practice, multiphase production is characterized by wide fluctuations in the gas and liquid mass flow rates. During periods of substantial gas flow, temperature becomes the critical variable determining the performance of the pump. Without the liquid phase to remove the gas compression heat, temperatures in the discharge gas stream begin to rise causing a decrease in efficiency, a high temperature shut-in of the pump, and damage to the pump. While this behavior has been observed in lab experiments and in the field, a review of literature reveals that no mechanistic model exists for predicting the performance of a twin-screw pump under high gas volume flow conditions. Also, very few data are available under high GVF conditions. Both large-scale experiments and mechanistic modeling were performed as part of this research. This thesis models the behavior of a twin-screw multiphase pump under high gas volume fraction conditions. The model of the pump is based on fundamental principles of thermodynamic and fluid mechanics. The specific experimental tasks undertaken in this work include studying the volumetric pump performance during periods of high gas volume fractions, the observation of temperature increase with time under periods of 100% gas volume fraction and studying the effect of viscosity on high GVF performance. The results indicate that the pump can be operated during periods of 100% gas volume fractions. The volumetric efficiency of the twin-screw multiphase pump during periods of high to 100% gas volume fractions can be improved by increasing the viscosity of the process stream or by injecting high viscosity fluids into the pump casing. At 94-95% gas volume fraction the system transitions from isothermal conditions. And the system moves from isothermal to adiabatic (uncooled) conditions with time. A model has been generated that predicts temperature increase with time as a function of the key parameters of pump speed, differential pressure, mass flow rate, specific heat and slip flow. This model can be used to develop novel control philosophies for operating multiphase pumps during high gas volume fractions.

Singh, Aditya

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

An Analysis of Daily Humidity Patterns at a Mountainous and Urban Site in a Tropical High-Altitude Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mixing ratio data of water vapor at different hours of the day in a high-altitude tropical plateau in Mexico are shown. The objective is to measure water vapor quantity in a mountainous zone, where no previous studies of this kind exist, and in ...

H. G. Padilla; A. C. Leyva; P. A. Mosiño

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

High-Volume Fly Ash Utilization Projects in the United States and Canada: Second Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fly ash--an increasing disposal problem for utilities operating coal-fired power plants--has considerable unrealized potential as a construction material. In a wide-ranging survey, this study documented more than 250 U.S. and Canadian construction projects employing fly ash in high volume for backfill, landfill, hydraulic fill, embankments, pavement base courses, soil amendment, subgrade stabilization, and grout.

1986-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

66

Handbook of solar energy data for south-facing surfaces in the United States. Volume III. Average hourly and total daily insolation data for 235 localities (North Carolina - Wyoming)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Average hourly and daily total insolation estimates are given for 235 US sites at a variety of array tilt angles. (MHR)

Smith, J.H.

1980-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

High-level waste borosilicate glass: A compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this document is to summarize scientific information pertinent to evaluating the extent to which high-level waste borosilicate glass corrosion and the associated radionuclide release processes are understood for the range of environmental conditions to which waste glass may be exposed in service. Alteration processes occurring within the bulk of the glass (e.g., devitrification and radiation-induced changes) are discussed insofar as they affect glass corrosion. Volume III contains a bibliography of glass corrosion studies, including studies that are not cited in Volumes I and II.

Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

High Temperature, Large Sample Volume, Constant Flow Magic Angle Spinning NMR Probe for a 11  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Temperature, Large Sample Volume, Constant Flow Magic Angle Spinning NMR Probe for a High Temperature, Large Sample Volume, Constant Flow Magic Angle Spinning NMR Probe for a 11.7 T Magnetic Field for In Situ Catalytic Reaction Characterization Project start date: April 1, 2007 EMSL Lead Investigator: Joseph Ford, EMSL High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility Co-investigators: Jian Zhi Hu, Macromolecular Structure and Dynamics, Biological Science Division, FCSD Jesse Sears and David W. Hoyt, EMSL High Field Magnetic Resonance Facility Detailed understanding of the mechanisms involved in a catalytic reaction requires identification of the nature of the active sites and the temporal evolution of reaction intermediates. Although optical methods such as UV-visible and infrared (IR) spectroscopies can be used for some types of reactions, these do not

69

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes with High-Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: FC Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities typically comanage some or all of their low-volume wastes with high-volume by-products in disposal facilities. This report presents the results of a field study of comanagement practices at an impoundment at a power plant located in the south-central United States. The findings from this research provided technical information for use in a study of comanagement practices by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

2002-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

70

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes with High-Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: HA Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Typically, utilities comanage some or all of their low-volume wastes with their high-volume by-products in disposal facilities. This report presents the results of a field study of comanagement of coal combustion by-products at a utility-owned impoundment in the midwestern United States (HA site). The findings from this research provided technical information for use in a study of comanagement practices by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

71

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes with High Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: AP Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power companies typically comanage some or all of their low-volume wastes with high-volume by-products in disposal facilities. This report presents the results of a field study of comanagement practices at an impoundment at a power plant located in the southwestern United States. The findings from this research provided technical information for use in a study of comanagement practices by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

72

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes with High-Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: MO Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents an investigation into the effects of comanagement of low-volume wastes with high-volume coal combustion by-products at the MO site. The MO site is one of 14 investigated by EPRI to provide background information to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the 2000 Regulatory Determination on comanagement under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

73

Daily Occurrence Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occurrence Reporting and Processing System Home ORPS Database Access Daily Occurrence Reports Weekly Summary of Significant Occurrences Occurrence Reporting Quality ORPS Training...

74

Reduced-volume antennas with integrated high-impedance electromagnetic surfaces.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several antennas with integrated high-impedance surfaces are presented. The high-impedance surface is implemented as a composite right/left-handed (CRLH) metamaterial fabricated from a periodic structure characterized by a substrate, filled with an array of vertical vias and capped by capacitive patches. Omnidirectional antennas placed in close proximity to the high-impedance surface radiate hemispherically with an increase in boresight far-field pattern gain of up to 10 dB and a front-to-back ratio as high as 13 dB at 2.45 GHz. Several TEM rectangular horn antennas are realized by replacing conductor walls with high-impedance surfaces. The TEM horn antennas are capable of operating below the TE{sub 1,0} cutoff frequency of a standard all-metal horn antenna, enabling a reduction in antenna volume. Above the cutoff frequency the TEM horn antennas function similarly to standard rectangular horn antennas.

Forman, Michael A.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Glass Property Data and Models for Estimating High-Level Waste Glass Volume  

SciTech Connect

This report describes recent efforts to develop glass property models that can be used to help estimate the volume of high-level waste (HLW) glass that will result from vitrification of Hanford tank waste. The compositions of acceptable and processable HLW glasses need to be optimized to minimize the waste-form volume and, hence, to save cost. A database of properties and associated compositions for simulated waste glasses was collected for developing property-composition models. This database, although not comprehensive, represents a large fraction of data on waste-glass compositions and properties that were available at the time of this report. Glass property-composition models were fit to subsets of the database for several key glass properties. These models apply to a significantly broader composition space than those previously publised. These models should be considered for interim use in calculating properties of Hanford waste glasses.

Vienna, John D.; Fluegel, Alexander; Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

76

High level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 6  

SciTech Connect

The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 6) outlines the standards and requirements for the sections on: Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Research and Development and Experimental Activities, and Nuclear Safety.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 2) presents the standards and requirements for the following sections: Quality Assurance, Training and Qualification, Emergency Planning and Preparedness, and Construction.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 4  

SciTech Connect

The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 4) presents the standards and requirements for the following sections: Radiation Protection and Operations.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID), Volume 5  

SciTech Connect

The High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms/242-A Evaporator Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is contained in multiple volumes. This document (Volume 5) outlines the standards and requirements for the Fire Protection and Packaging and Transportation sections.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Cryogenic loading of large volume presses for high-pressure experimentation and synthesis of novel materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an efficient easily implemented method for loading cryogenic fluids in a large volume press. We specifically apply this method to the high-pressure synthesis of an extended solid derived from CO using a Paris-Edinburgh cell. This method employs cryogenic cooling of Bridgman type WC anvils well insulated from other press components, condensation of the load gas within a brass annulus surrounding the gasket between the Bridgman anvils. We demonstrate the viability of the described approach by synthesizing macroscopic amounts (several milligrams) of polymeric CO-derived material, which were recovered to ambient conditions after compression of pure CO to 5 GPa or above.

Lipp, M J; Evans, W J; Yoo, C S

2005-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Use of Class C Fly Ash in High-Volume Fly Ash Concrete Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the use of fly ash in concrete is a well-established practice, the volume of high-calcium Class C ash used lags behind that of low-calcium Class F ash. Because Class C may be the only type of ash produced in some western states, this disparity can significantly limit its use potential. The literature results presented in this report represent the first phase of a longer term research effort to provide technical information supporting the increased use of Class C ash in concrete applications.

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

82

Implementation of lean processes at a high-mix low-volume aerospace manufacturing facility in France  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The theories of the Toyota Production System have been operational touchstones now for over twenty years in North America and Western Europe. In spite of this many companies, particularly those in high-mix low-volume ...

Hurd, A.-P. (Annie-Pierre), 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A High-Order Finite-Volume Algorithm for Fokker-Planck Collisions in Magnetized Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

A high-order finite volume algorithm is developed for the Fokker-Planck Operator (FPO) describing Coulomb collisions in strongly magnetized plasmas. The algorithm is based on a general fourth-order reconstruction scheme for an unstructured grid in the velocity space spanned by parallel velocity and magnetic moment. The method provides density conservation and high-order-accurate evaluation of the FPO independent of the choice of the velocity coordinates. As an example, a linearized FPO in constant-of-motion coordinates, i.e. the total energy and the magnetic moment, is developed using the present algorithm combined with a cut-cell merging procedure. Numerical tests include the Spitzer thermalization problem and the return to isotropy for distributions initialized with velocity space loss cones. Utilization of the method for a nonlinear FPO is straightforward but requires evaluation of the Rosenbluth potentials.

Xiong, Z; Cohen, R H; Rognlien, T D; Xu, X Q

2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

84

Proceedings of the 1984 workshop on high-energy excitations in condensed matter. Volume I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume covers neutron scattering inelastic instrumentation, x-ray scattering inelastic instrumentation, and magnetic excitations. (GHT)

Silver, R.N. (comp.)

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Daily Temperature Lag  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Daily Temperature Lag Daily Temperature Lag Name: Shyammayi Status: teacher Grade: K-2 Country: Mauritius Date: Summer 2011 Question: At what time of the day is the temperature hottest? At what time of the day is the temperature coldest? Replies: In general, the hottest part of the day is late afternoon. The sun has passed its peak in the sky but still heats the Earth up until very late in the afternoon. The lowest temperatures are around dawn. Earth has had all night to get rid of the day's heat by radiating it into space. After sunrise, temperatures begin to climb. This can be changed by local storms, sea breezes or mountain breezes and even monsoon winds. Hope this helps. R. W. "Bob" Avakian Instructor Arts and Sciences/CRC Oklahoma State Univ. Inst. of Technology Shyammayi

86

A high resolution finite volume method for efficient parallel simulation of casting processes on unstructured meshes  

SciTech Connect

We discuss selected aspects of a new parallel three-dimensional (3-D) computational tool for the unstructured mesh simulation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) casting processes. This tool, known as {bold Telluride}, draws upon on robust, high resolution finite volume solutions of metal alloy mass, momentum, and enthalpy conservation equations to model the filling, cooling, and solidification of LANL castings. We briefly describe the current {bold Telluride} physical models and solution methods, then detail our parallelization strategy as implemented with Fortran 90 (F90). This strategy has yielded straightforward and efficient parallelization on distributed and shared memory architectures, aided in large part by new parallel libraries {bold JTpack9O} for Krylov-subspace iterative solution methods and {bold PGSLib} for efficient gather/scatter operations. We illustrate our methodology and current capabilities with source code examples and parallel efficiency results for a LANL casting simulation.

Kothe, D.B.; Turner, J.A.; Mosso, S.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ferrell, R.C. [Cambridge Power Computer Assoc. (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

SPLIDHOM: A Method for Homogenization of Daily Temperature Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One major concern of climate change is the possible rise of temperature extreme events, in terms of occurrence and intensity. To study this phenomenon, reliable daily series are required, for instance to compute daily-based indices: high-order ...

Olivier Mestre; Christine Gruber; Clémentine Prieur; Henri Caussinus; Sylvie Jourdain

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Business Case Slide 8: High-Volume: Repository - Basis for Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Volume: Repository - Basis for Use Basis for use DUO2 in or near cask should be a geochemical barrier Establish reducing conditions Inhibit spent fuel dissolution Keep...

89

High-order nite volume WENO schemes for the shallow water equations with dry states  

SciTech Connect

The shallow water equations are used to model flows in rivers and coastal areas, and have wide applications in ocean, hydraulic engineering, and atmospheric modeling. These equations have still water steady state solutions in which the flux gradients are balanced by the source term. It is desirable to develop numerical methods which preserve exactly these steady state solutions. Another main difficulty usually arising from the simulation of dam breaks and flood waves flows is the appearance of dry areas where no water is present. If no special attention is paid, standard numerical methods may fail near dry/wet front and produce non-physical negative water height. A high-order accurate finite volume weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) scheme is proposed in this paper to address these difficulties and to provide an efficient and robust method for solving the shallow water equations. A simple, easy-to-implement positivity-preserving limiter is introduced. One- and two-dimensional numerical examples are provided to verify the positivity-preserving property, well-balanced property, high-order accuracy, and good resolution for smooth and discontinuous solutions.

Xing, Yulong [ORNL; Shu, Chi-wang [Brown University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Investigation of a Multiphase Twin-screw Pump Operating at High Gas Volume Fractions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of twin-screw pumps for moving fluids is not new technology but its application to wet gas compression (high gas volume fraction [GVF]) is still considered relatively new. There are many advantages for using twin-screw pumps for oil field applications; three of the immediate improvements include reducing hardware costs, reducing well bore pressure, and producing a pressure boost to move the product to a central collection facility. While there are many advantages to using twin-screw pumps in wet gas applications, there are some problems that have been encountered while operating at high GVFs. When operating at high GVF, over 95 percent twin-screw pumps experience a severe loss of efficiency and an increase of operating temperature. A common way to increase the efficiency while operating in the high GVF range includes adding a liquid recirculation system where a portion of liquid is stored downstream of the pump and is injected into the pump inlet. These systems lower the effective GVF of the multiphase fluid below 95 percent in order to increase the pump efficiency. The first objective is to characterize the performance of a twin-screw pump fitted with a liquid recirculation system while operating under high GVF conditions. The second objective is to investigate the transient heat rise associated with high GVF operation. While traditional twin-screw pumps can be fitted with a liquid recirculation system to allow them to operate under high GVF conditions the pumps themselves are not optimized for wet gas compression and still suffer performance penalties. The results of this investigation show that the liquid recirculation system can allow the pump to operate under high GVF but the heat added to the system reduces the systems efficiency. Without a method of removing the heat generated in the pumping process the pump will not run at its optimal efficiency. The following investigation provides recommendations for further research in area of multiphase pumping using twin-screw pumps based on the characterization and transient studies provided in this thesis.

Kroupa, Ryan Daniel

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Properties of concrete incorporating high volumes of ASTM Class F fly ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the results of research performed in developing high-volume fly ash (HVFA) concrete incorporating ASTM Type I cement and ASTM Class F fly ash from Big Brown Power Plant of TU Electric, Texas. In HVFA concrete, the proportion of fly ash was 58 percent by weight of the total cementitious materials, the water and cement content were kept low at 115 and 155 k g/M3 , respectively. A broad range of engineering properties was investigated including compressive strength, flexural strength, splitting-tensile strength, Young's modulus of elasticity, drying shrinkage, resistance to freeze-thaw cycling, pore structure and activation energy. A preliminary economic analysis was also performed on HVFA concrete. The HVFA concrete evaluated in this study had satisfactory workability and setting characteristics. It also exhibited excellent mechanical properties with satisfactory early age strength and good long-term strength development. The HVFA concrete had relatively low drying shrinkage and a very fine pore system. Excellent durability under freeze-thaw cycling was also found for the air-entrained HVFA concrete. Results from activation energy test show that strength gain of the HVFA concrete under isothermal curing conditions could be modeled appropriately using Plowman's logarithmic strength-age model. The relative strength-maturity relationship was established for the HVFA concrete containing various percentages of additional gypsum. The HVFA concrete investigated was determined to be cost effective. It was shown that about two and half dollars per cubic meter could be saved through savings on portland cement.

Li, Wei Tung

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Method for producing low-cost, high volume hydrogen from hydrocarbon sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the conversion of naturally-occurring or biomass-derived lower to higher hydrocarbon (C{sub x}H{sub y},where x may vary from 1--3 and y may vary from 4--8) to low-cost, high-volume hydrogen. In one embodiment, methane, the major component of natural gas, is reacted in a single reaction zone of a mixed-conducting ceramic membrane reactor to form hydrogen via simultaneous partial oxidation and water gas shift reactions at temperatures required for thermal excitations of the mixed-conducting membranes. The hydrogen is produced by catalytically reacting the hydrocarbon with oxygen to form synthesis gas (a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen), followed by a water gas shift (WGS) reaction with steam, wherein both reactions occur in a single reaction zone having a multi-functional catalyst or a combination of catalysts. The hydrogen is separated from other reaction products by membrane-assisted transport or by pressure-swing adsorption technique. Membrane-assisted transport may occur via proton transfer or molecular sieving mechanisms.

Bose, Arun C.; Balachandran, Uthamalinga; Kleerfisch, Mark S.; Udovich, Carl A.; Stiegel, Gary J.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Final Report - Advanced MEA's for Enhanced Operating Conditions, Amenable to High Volume Manufacture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work completed under a 3M/DOE contract directed at advancing the key fuel cell (FC) components most critical for overcoming the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance, durability & cost barriers. This contract focused on the development of advanced ion exchange membranes & electrocatalysts for PEMFCs that will enable operation under ever more demanding automotive operating conditions & the use high volume compatible processes for their manufacture. Higher performing & more durable electrocatalysts must be developed for PEMFCs to meet the power density & lifetime hours required for FC vehicles. At the same time the amount of expensive Pt catalyst must be reduced to lower the MEA costs. While these two properties are met, the catalyst must be made resistant to multiple degradation mechanisms to reach necessary operating lifetimes. In this report, we present the work focused on the development of a completely new approach to PEMFC electrocatalyts, called nanostructured thin film (NSTF) catalysts. The carbon black supports are eliminated with this new approach which eliminates the carbon corrosion issue. The thin film nature of the catalyst significantly improves its robustness against dissolution & grain growth, preserving the surface area. Also, the activity of the NSTF for oxygen reduction is improved by over 500% compared to dispersed Pt catalyts. Finally, the process for fabricating the NSTF catalysts is consistent with high volume roll-good manufacturing & extremely flexible towards the introduction of new catalyst compositions & structures. This report documents the work done to develop new multi-element NSTF catalysts with properties that exceed pure Pt, that are optimized for use with the membranes discussed below, & advance the state-of-the-art towards meeting the DOE 2010 targets for PEMFC electrocatalysts. The work completed advances the understanding of the NSTF catalyst technology, identifies new NSTF-ternary catalyst materials for higher performance, documents enhanced durability under multiple types of accelerated tests by factors of 10x to 50x over conventional catalysts, & demonstrates their performance & durability in large area MEA FC stack tests. The PEMFC ion exchange membrane is the other key functioning FC component on which work was completed. While improvements have been made to standard PFSA type membranes, they still require humidification to achieve adequate proton conductivity & so their use at elevated temperatures & drier operating conditions is limited. Membranes with increased durability & conductivity under hotter, drier conditions allow the use of FC's in many applications, particularly automotive. Towards this goal, 2 approaches were pursued in the work reported here. The first part was designed for immediate application at drier conditions & operating temperatures between 85C and 120C, focused on the development of a membrane based on a low equivalent weight (EW), perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer for good ionic conductivity at low humidification, & the use of stabilizing additives for improved oxidative stability. The ionomer used was developed at 3M & has a shorter acid containing side-chain than the Nafion™ ionomer. This ionomer also has a higher T? & higher modulus than that of a Nafion™ membrane of the same EW, allowing lower EW ionomers to be prepared with very good mechanical properties. In addition, more than 50 stabilizing additives were evaluated in ex-situ, Fenton’s tests & more than 10 of these were incorporated into membranes & evaluated in accelerated FC tests. This work led to thin (25-30 micron) cast membranes with substantially improved conductivity & durability under simulated automotive conditions, compared to membranes currently available. The 2nd body of membrane work was focused on developing & characterizing 3 approaches for making new PEM's for operation under hot (>120C) & dry (dew point with enhanced proton conductivity, polymer matrices swollen with lo

Debe, Mark K.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

94

Final Report - Advanced MEA's for Enhanced Operating Conditions, Amenable to High Volume Manufacture  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work completed under a 3M/DOE contract directed at advancing the key fuel cell (FC) components most critical for overcoming the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance, durability & cost barriers. This contract focused on the development of advanced ion exchange membranes & electrocatalysts for PEMFCs that will enable operation under ever more demanding automotive operating conditions & the use high volume compatible processes for their manufacture. Higher performing & more durable electrocatalysts must be developed for PEMFCs to meet the power density & lifetime hours required for FC vehicles. At the same time the amount of expensive Pt catalyst must be reduced to lower the MEA costs. While these two properties are met, the catalyst must be made resistant to multiple degradation mechanisms to reach necessary operating lifetimes. In this report, we present the work focused on the development of a completely new approach to PEMFC electrocatalyts, called nanostructured thin film (NSTF) catalysts. The carbon black supports are eliminated with this new approach which eliminates the carbon corrosion issue. The thin film nature of the catalyst significantly improves its robustness against dissolution & grain growth, preserving the surface area. Also, the activity of the NSTF for oxygen reduction is improved by over 500% compared to dispersed Pt catalyts. Finally, the process for fabricating the NSTF catalysts is consistent with high volume roll-good manufacturing & extremely flexible towards the introduction of new catalyst compositions & structures. This report documents the work done to develop new multi-element NSTF catalysts with properties that exceed pure Pt, that are optimized for use with the membranes discussed below, & advance the state-of-the-art towards meeting the DOE 2010 targets for PEMFC electrocatalysts. The work completed advances the understanding of the NSTF catalyst technology, identifies new NSTF-ternary catalyst materials for higher performance, documents enhanced durability under multiple types of accelerated tests by factors of 10x to 50x over conventional catalysts, & demonstrates their performance & durability in large area MEA FC stack tests. The PEMFC ion exchange membrane is the other key functioning FC component on which work was completed. While improvements have been made to standard PFSA type membranes, they still require humidification to achieve adequate proton conductivity & so their use at elevated temperatures & drier operating conditions is limited. Membranes with increased durability & conductivity under hotter, drier conditions allow the use of FC's in many applications, particularly automotive. Towards this goal, 2 approaches were pursued in the work reported here. The first part was designed for immediate application at drier conditions & operating temperatures between 85C and 120C, focused on the development of a membrane based on a low equivalent weight (EW), perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer for good ionic conductivity at low humidification, & the use of stabilizing additives for improved oxidative stability. The ionomer used was developed at 3M & has a shorter acid containing side-chain than the Nafion™ ionomer. This ionomer also has a higher T? & higher modulus than that of a Nafion™ membrane of the same EW, allowing lower EW ionomers to be prepared with very good mechanical properties. In addition, more than 50 stabilizing additives were evaluated in ex-situ, Fenton’s tests & more than 10 of these were incorporated into membranes & evaluated in accelerated FC tests. This work led to thin (25-30 micron) cast membranes with substantially improved conductivity & durability under simulated automotive conditions, compared to membranes currently available. The 2nd body of membrane work was focused on developing & characterizing 3 approaches for making new PEM's for operation under hot (>120C) & dry (dew point <80C) FC conditions: inorganic materials with enhanced proton conductivity, polymer matrices swollen with lo

Debe, Mark K.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

95

2010 Expert and Consultant Daily Wages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2010 Expert and Consultant Daily Wages. Based on the OPM Salary Table 2010-GS. ... Daily Daily. Per Diem Salary Scale Minimum Maximum. ...

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

96

High-Btu gas from peat. Feasibility study. Volume II. Executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial, technical, economic, and environmental viability of producing 80 million Standard Cubic Feet per day (SCF/day) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco assigned the work for this study to a project team consisting of the following organizations: Dravo Engineers and Constructors for the design, engineering and economic evaluation of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems; Ertec, Inc. for environmental and socioeconomic analyses; Institute of Gas Technology for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support; and Deloitte Haskins and Sells for management advisory support. This report presents the work performed by Dravo Engineers and Constructors to meet the requirements of: Task 1, peat harvesting; Task 2, peat dewatering; Task 3, peat gasification; Task 4, long lead items; and Task 9.1, economic analysis. The final report comprises three volumes, the first is the Executive Summary. This Volume II contains all of the text of the report, and Volume III includes all of the specifications, drawings, and appendices applicable to the project. Contents of Volume II are: introduction; project scope and objectives; commercial plant description; engineering specifications; design and construction schedules; capital cost estimates; operating cost estimates; financial analysis; and future areas for investigation. 15 figures, 17 tables.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

High-Btu gas from peat. Feasibility study. Volume I. Executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial, technical, economic, and environmental viability of producing 80 million Standard Cubic Feet per day (SCF/day) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco assigned the work for this study to a project team consisting of the following organizations: Dravo Engineers and Constructors for the design, engineering and economic evaluation of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems; Ertec, Inc. for environmental and socioeconomic analyses; Institute of Gas Technology for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support; and Deloitte Haskins and Sells for management advisory support. This report presents the work performed by Dravo Engineers and Constructors to meet the requirements of: Task 1, peat harvesting; Task 2, peat dewatering; Task 3, peat gasification; Task 4, long lead items; and Task 9.1, economic analysis. The final report comprises three volumes, the first of which is this Executive Summary. Subsequent volumes include Volume II which contains all of the text of the report, and Volume III which includes all of the specifications, drawings, and appendices applicable to the project. As part of this study, a scale model of the proposed gasification facility was constructed. This model was sent to Minnegasco, and photographs of the model are included at the end of this summary.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

High-Energy Aspects of Solar Flares: Overview of the Volume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this introductory chapter, we provide a brief summary of the successes and remaining challenges in understanding the solar flare phenomenon and its attendant implications for particle acceleration mechanisms in astrophysical plasmas. We also provide a brief overview of the contents of the other chapters in this volume, with particular reference to the well-observed flare of 2002 July 23

Dennis, Brian R; Hudson, Hugh S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Field Guide Updates for 2011: Volume 1 - Compressors for High-Voltage Circuit Breakers, Volume 2 - Lubrication of High-Voltage Circu it Breakers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-voltage circuit breakers (HVCBs) perform essential protection and control functions on power transmission networks. Circuit breakers have multiple components that must operate in concert in order for the breaker to perform properly. If one component, such as the air or hydraulic system, does not operate correctly, the circuit breaker may misoperate or fail, possibly resulting in equipment damage or an outageboth expensive consequences. To help utilities prevent such undesirable events, this field gu...

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

100

Theoretical and experimental analysis of a multiphase screw pump, handling gas-liquid mixtures with very high gas volume fractions  

SciTech Connect

In the investigation of the pumping behaviour of multiphase screw pumps, handling gas-liquid mixtures with very high gas volume fractions, theoretical and experimental analyses were performed. A new theoretical screw pump model was developed, which calculates the time-dependent conditions inside the several chambers of a screw pump as well as the exchange of mass and energy between these chambers. By means of the performed experimental analysis, the screw pump model was verified, especially at very high gas volume fractions from 90% to 99%. The experiments, which were conducted with the reference fluids water and air, can be divided mainly into the determination of the steady state pumping behaviour on the one hand and into the analysis of selected transient operating conditions on the other hand, whereas the visualisation of the leakage flows through the circumferential gaps was rounded off the experimental analysis. (author)

Raebiger, K. [LEISTRITZ Pumpen GmbH, Nuremberg (Germany); Faculty of Advanced Technology, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd, Wales (United Kingdom); Maksoud, T.M.A.; Ward, J. [Faculty of Advanced Technology, University of Glamorgan, Pontypridd, Wales (United Kingdom); Hausmann, G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Building Services Engineering, University of Applied Sciences, Nuremberg (Germany)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Program on Technology Innovation: Volume Reduction Methods and Waste Form Changes for High-Activity Spent Resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has initiated a series of studies to mitigate the impact of limited disposal-site access on continued light water reactor operations. A previous EPRI report, Program on Technology Innovation: Volume Reduction Methods and Waste Form Changes for High-Activity Spent Resin: A Feasibility Study (1025303), established that cation and anion resin beads could be separated for the purpose of rendering the anion resin as Class A resin waste, and ...

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

102

High integrity software for nuclear power plants: Candidate guidelines, technical basis and research needs. Main report, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work documented in this report was performed in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to examine the technical basis for candidate guidelines that could be considered in reviewing and evaluating high integrity computer e following software development and assurance activities: Requirements specification; design; coding; verification and validation, inclukding static analysis and dynamic testing; safety analysis; operation and maintenance; configuration management; quality assurance; and planning and management. Each activity (framework element) was subdivided into technical areas (framework subelements). The report describes the development of approximately 200 candidate guidelines that span the entire ran e identification, categorization and prioritization of technical basis for those candidate guidelines; and the identification, categorization and prioritization of research needs for improving the technical basis. The report has two volumes: Volume 1, Executive Summary includes an overview of the framwork and of each framework element, the complete set of candidate guidelines, the results of the assessment of the technical basis for each candidate guideline, and a discussion of research needs that support the regulatory function; this document, Volume 2, is the main report.

Seth, S.; Bail, W.; Cleaves, D.; Cohen, H.; Hybertson, D.; Schaefer, C.; Stark, G.; Ta, A.; Ulery, B. [Mitre Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

An Experimental Examination of a Progressing Cavity Pump Operating at Very High Gas Volume Fractions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The progressing cavity pump is a type of positive displacement pump that is capable of moving nearly any fluid. This type of pump transports fluids in a series of discrete cavities formed by the helical geometries of its rigid rotor and elastomeric stator. With appropriate materials for the rotor and stator, this pump can move combinations of liquids, suspended solids, and gasses equally well. Because of its versatility, the progressing cavity pump is widely used in the oil industry to transport mixtures of oil, water, and sediment; this investigation was prompted by a desire to extend the use of progressing cavity pumps to wet gas pumping applications. One of the progressing cavity pump's limitations is that the friction between the rotor and stator can generate enough heat to damage the rotor if the pump is not lubricated and cooled by the process fluid. Conventional wisdom dictates that this type of pump will overheat if it pumps only gas, with no liquid in the process fluid. If a progressing cavity pump is used to boost the output from a wet gas well, it could potentially be damaged if the well's output is too dry for an extended period of time. This project seeks to determine how a progressing cavity pump behaves when operating at gas volume fractions between 0.90 and 0.98. A progressing cavity pump manufactured by seepex, model no. BN 130-12, is tested at half and full speed using air-water mixtures with gas volume fractions of 0.90, 0.92, 0.94, 0.96, and 0.98. The pump's inlet and outlet conditions are controlled to produce suction pressures of 15, 30, and 45 psi and outlet pressures 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 psi higher than the inlet pressure. A series of thermocouples, pressure transducers, and turbine flow meters measures the pump's inlet and outlet conditions, the flow rates of water and air entering the pump, and pressures and temperatures at four positions within the pump's stator. Over all test conditions, the maximum recorded temperature of the pump stator did not exceed the maximum safe rubber temperature specified by the manufacturer. The pump’s flow rate is independent of both the fluid's gas volume fraction and the pressure difference across the pump, but it increases slightly with the pump's suction pressure. The pump's mechanical load, however, is dependent only on the pressure difference across the pump and increases linearly with that parameter. Pressure measurements within the stator demonstrated that the leakage between the pump's cavities increases with the fluids gas volume fraction, indicating that liquid inside the pump improves its sealing capability. However, those same measurements failed to detect any appreciable leakage between the two pressure taps nearest the pump's inlet. This last observation suggests that the pump could be shortened by as much as 25 percent without losing any performance in the range of tested conditions; shortening the pump should increase its efficiency by decreasing its frictional mechanical load.

Glier, Michael W.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Development of a High Volume Capable Process to Manufacture High Performance Photovoltaic Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-322  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The intent of the work is for RFMD and NREL to cooperate in the development of a commercially viable and high volume capable process to manufacture high performance photovoltaic cells, based on inverted metamorphic (IMM) GaAs technology. The successful execution of the agreement will result in the production of a PV cell using technology that is capable of conversion efficiency at par with the market at the time of release (reference 2009: 37-38%), using RFMD's production facilities. The CRADA work has been divided into three phases: (1) a foundation phase where the teams will demonstrate the manufacturing of a basic PV cell at RFMD's production facilities; (2) a technology demonstration phase where the teams will demonstrate the manufacturing of prototype PV cells using IMM technology at RFMD's production facilities, and; (3) a production readiness phase where the teams will demonstrate the capability to manufacture PV cells using IMM technology with high yields, high reliability, high reproducibility and low cost.

Geisz, J. F.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

High-temperature gas-cooled reactors: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume IV  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning medium-enriched uranium/thorium once-through fuel cycle; medium-enrichment uranium-233/thorium recycle fuel; high-enrichment uranium-235/thorium recycle (spiked) fuel cycle; high-enrichment uranium-233/thorium recycle (spiked) fuel cycle; and gas-turbine high-temperature gas-cooled reactor.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Mechanical Properties and Durability of Concrete Made with High-Volume Fly Ash Blended Cement Produced in a Cement Plant: Commercial -Scale Trial Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report documents the preliminary results of the commercial-scale production of a high-volume fly ash (HVFA) blended cement, using up to 55 percent fly ash to replace the portland cement.

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

107

Measurements and modeling of laser irradiance in the high-power third-harmonic Nova focus: Volume B, Data book. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

This document contains analysis of third-harmonic equivalent plane photographs obtained in the 2PJW{underscore}3wspot series and described in the report under the same title, Volume A. The photographs that are analyzed in this data book are summarized. A description of the analysis output is included.

Wegner, P.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems; Volume 6 Building America Best Practices Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

by by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory & Oak Ridge National Laboratory June 4, 2007 June 2007 * NREL/TP-550-41085 PNNL-16362 High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems Building America Best Practices Series Volume 6 High-Performance Home Technologies: Solar Thermal & Photovoltaic Systems Building America Best Practices Series Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, a DOE national laboratory Michael C. Baechler Theresa Gilbride, Kathi Ruiz, Heidi Steward and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a DOE national laboratory Pat M. Love June 4, 2007 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor Battelle Memorial Institute, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty,

109

A comparison of glass reaction at high and low glass surface/solution volume  

SciTech Connect

Static leach tests have been performed at glass surface area/leachant volume (SA/V) ratios of 10, 340, 2,000, and 20,000 m[sup [minus]1] to assess the effects of the SA/V on the mechanism and rate of the glass reaction. Tests were performed using actinide-doped borosilicate waste glasses [Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) 131 and SRL 202] to monitor the distribution of released radionuclides in tests at different SA/V. Solution results show the major effect of the SA/V to be dilution of reaction of products. Differences in the pH and silicic acid concentrations attained in tests at different SA/V then affect the reaction rate. Tests at low SA/V maintain leachate pH values similar to the initial leachant, while tests at higher SA/V result in higher leachate pH values being attained due to ion-exchange reactions. Transuranics released as the glass corrodes may exist in the leachate in concentrations far above their solubility limits by sorbing onto colloids, although the colloids may eventually settle out of solution. Transuranics also sorb onto the steel reaction vessel. The glass reaction progress can be characterized by three stages: (a) an initial stage where the reaction rate depends on the leachant pH, (b) an intermediate stage where the reaction slows toward a minimum rate as the leachate solution approaches saturation,'' and (c) a long-term stage where the reaction rate may be affected by the formation of secondary phases that control the solution chemistry. Tests at different SA/V cannot always be compared directly because the dominant reaction step and the observed reaction stage (initial, intermediate, or long-term) may not be the same.

Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Low Cost High Performance Generator Technology Program. Volume 4. Mission application study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of initial efforts to investigate application of selenide thermoelectric RTG's to specific missions as well as an indication of development requirements to enable satisfaction of emerging RTG performance criteria are presented. Potential mission applications in DoD such as SURVSATCOM, Advance Defense Support Program, Laser Communication Satellite, Satellite Data System, Global Positioning Satellite, Deep Space Surveillance Satellite, and Unmanned Free Swimming Submersible illustrate power requirements in the range of 500 to 1000 W. In contrast, the NASA applications require lower power ranging from 50 W for outer planetary atmospheric probes to about 200 W for spacecraft flights to Jupiter and other outer planets. The launch dates for most of these prospective missions is circa 1980, a requirement roughly compatible with selenide thermoelectric and heat source technology development. A discussion of safety criteria is included to give emphasis to the requirements for heat source design. In addition, the observation is made that the potential accident environments of all launch vehicles are similar so that a reasonable composite set of design specifications may be derived to satisfy almost all applications. Details of the LCHPG application potential is afforded by three designs: an 80 W RTG using improved selenide thermoelectric material, a 55 to 65 W LCHPG using current and improved selenide materials, and the final 500 W LCHPG as reported in Volume 2. The final results of the LCHPG design study have shown that in general, all missions can expect an LCHPG design which yields 10 percent efficiency at 3 W/lb with the current standard selenide thermoelectric materials, with growth potential to 14 percent at greater than 4 W/lb in the mid 1980's time frame.

Not Available

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Low Cost High Performance Generator Technology Program. Volume 5. Heat Pipe Topical  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress towards the development of a heat pipe for use in the Low Cost High Performance Thermoelectric Generator Program is reported for the period May 15, 1975 through June 1975. (TFD)

Not Available

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Geothermal fracture stimulation technology. Volume II. High-temperature proppant testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data were obtained from a newly built proppant tester, operated at actual geothermal temperatures. The short term test results show that most proppants are temperature sensitive, particularly at the higher closure stresses. Many materials have been tested using a standard short-term test, i.e., fracture-free sand, bauxite, and a resin-coated sand retained good permeability at the high fluid temperatures in brine over a range of closure stresses. The tests were designed to simulate normal closure stress ranges for geothermal wells which are estimated to be from 2000 to 6000 psi. Although the ultra high closure stresses in oil and gas wells need not be considered with present geothermal resources, there is a definite need for chemically inert proppants that will retain high permeability for long time periods in the high temperature formations.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Implementation of RFID in a low volume high flexibility assembly plant : process redesign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on the operational improvements in a semiconductor equipment manufacturing company (Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates). The company faces challenges of highly fluctuating demand as well as complex ...

Sun, Yulei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Implementation of RFID in a low volume high flexibility assembly plant : module component tracking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis is to help Varian Semiconductor Equipment Associates, Inc. (VSEA) to smooth the production and reduce the manufacturing cost. Without an efficient way to track on its high-value components, VSEA ...

Jia, Rui, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2007 Daily Journals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decathlon Director, Richard King, and his wife, Melissa. Richard King, Solar Decathlon organizer, keeps a daily journal during the 2007 Solar Decathlon. Solar Decathlon 2007 Daily...

116

Geostrophic Volume Transport in High Eddy-Energy Areas of the Kuroshio Extension and Gulf Stream  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three new deep hydrographic sections taken in July 1980, May 1981 and May 1982, between 29–41°N along 152°E across the high eddy-energy area of the Kuroshio Extension are used to compute the relative geostrophic transport as a function of depth. ...

Pearn P. Niiler; William J. Schmitz; Dong-Kyu Lee

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 1: Exploration of High-Penetration Renewable Electricity Futures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Mai, T.; Wiser, R.; Sandor, D.; Brinkman, G.; Heath, G.; Denholm, P.; Hostick, D.J.; Darghouth, N.; Schlosser, A.; Strzepek, K.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Phase II Trial of Radiosurgery to Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy-Defined High-Risk Tumor Volumes in Patients With Glioblastoma Multiforme  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the efficacy of a Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) boost to areas of high risk determined by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) functional imaging in addition to standard radiotherapy for patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients in this prospective Phase II trial underwent surgical resection or biopsy for a GBM followed by SRS directed toward areas of MRS-determined high biological activity within 2 cm of the postoperative enhancing surgical bed. The MRS regions were determined by identifying those voxels within the postoperative T2 magnetic resonance imaging volume that contained an elevated choline/N-acetylaspartate ratio in excess of 2:1. These voxels were marked, digitally fused with the SRS planning magnetic resonance image, targeted with an 8-mm isocenter per voxel, and treated using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group SRS dose guidelines. All patients then received conformal radiotherapy to a total dose of 60 Gy in 2-Gy daily fractions. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Results: The median survival for the entire cohort was 15.8 months. With 75% of recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Class 3 patients still alive 18 months after treatment, the median survival for RPA Class 3 has not yet been reached. The median survivals for RPA Class 4, 5, and 6 patients were 18.7, 12.5, and 3.9 months, respectively, compared with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group radiotherapy-alone historical control survivals of 11.1, 8.9, and 4.6 months. For the 16 of 35 patients who received concurrent temozolomide in addition to protocol radiotherapeutic treatment, the median survival was 20.8 months, compared with European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer historical controls of 14.6 months using radiotherapy and temozolomide. Grade 3/4 toxicities possibly attributable to treatment were 11%. Conclusions: This represents the first prospective trial using selective MRS-targeted functional SRS combined with radiotherapy for patients with GBM. This treatment is feasible, with acceptable toxicity and patient survivals higher than in historical controls. This study can form the basis for a multicenter, randomized trial.

Einstein, Douglas B., E-mail: douglas.einstein@khnetwork.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Wessels, Barry [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Bangert, Barbara [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Fu, Pingfu [Department of Biostatistics, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Nelson, A. Dennis [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Cohen, Mark [Department of Pathology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Pathology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Sagar, Stephen [Department of Neurology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Neurology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Lewin, Jonathan [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Sloan, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Zheng Yiran; Williams, Jordonna; Colussi, Valdir; Vinkler, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States); Maciunas, Robert [Department of Neurosurgery, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University Kettering, Ohio (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Review of current status of high flux heat transfer techniques. Volume I. Text + Appendix A  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this work comprised two tasks. The first was to review high heat flux technology with consideration given to heat transfer panel configuration, diagnostics techniques and coolant supply. The second task was to prepare a report describing the findings of the review, to recommend the technology offering the least uncertainty for scale-up for the MFTF-B requirement and to recommend any new or perceived requirements for R and D effort.

Bauer, W.H.; Gordon, H.S.; Lackner, H.; Mettling, J.R.; Miller, J.E.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste (Volume 1) Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain in Nevada represents the proposed solution to what has been a lengthy national effort to dispose of high-level radioactive waste, waste which must be isolated from the biosphere for tens of thousands of years. This chapter reviews the background of that national effort and includes some discussion of international work in order to provide a more complete framework for the problem of waste disposal. Other chapters provide the regional geologic setting, the geology of the Yucca Mountain site, the tectonics, and climate (past, present, and future). These last two chapters are integral to prediction of long-term waste isolation.

R.A. Levich; J.S. Stuckless

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Modular, High-Volume Fuel Cell Leak-Test Suite and Process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cell stacks are typically hand-assembled and tested. As a result the manufacturing process is labor-intensive and time-consuming. The fluid leakage in fuel cell stacks may reduce fuel cell performance, damage fuel cell stack, or even cause fire and become a safety hazard. Leak check is a critical step in the fuel cell stack manufacturing. The fuel cell industry is in need of fuel cell leak-test processes and equipment that is automatic, robust, and high throughput. The equipment should reduce fuel cell manufacturing cost.

Ru Chen; Ian Kaye

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

122

Energy Assurance Daily | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Assurance Daily Energy Assurance Daily Energy Assurance Daily Energy Assurance Daily provides a summary of public information concerning current energy issues. Published Monday through Friday to inform stakeholders of developments affecting energy systems, flows, and markets, it provides highlights of energy issues rather than a comprehensive coverage. Energy Assurance Daily covers: Major energy developments Electricity, petroleum, and natural gas industries Other relevant news Energy prices The Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration (ISER) Division cannot guarantee the accuracy of the material in the Energy Assurance Daily. Any further use is subject to the copyright restrictions of the source document. The Energy Assurance Daily has workable hypertext links to the

123

High-level waste borosilicate glass a compendium of corrosion characteristics. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current plans call for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to start up facilities for vitrification of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored in tanks at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina, in 1995; West Valley Demonstration Project, West Valley, New York, in 1996; and at the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, after the year 2000. The product from these facilities will be canistered HLW borosilicate glass, which will be stored, transported, and eventually disposed of in a geologic repository. The behavior of this glass waste product, under the range of likely service conditions, is the subject of considerable scientific and public interest. Over the past few decades, a large body of scientific information on borosilicate waste glass has been generated worldwide. The intent of this document is to consolidate information pertaining to our current understanding of waste glass corrosion behavior and radionuclide release. The objective, scope, and organization of the document are discussed in Section 1.1, and an overview of borosilicate glass corrosion is provided in Section 1.2. The history of glass as a waste form and the international experience with waste glass are summarized in Sections 1.3 and 1.4, respectively.

Cunnane, J.C. [comp.; Bates, J.K.; Bradley, C.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Maximizing Web site availability Authors: High-Volume Web Site Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: High availability is more important than ever now that your customers, suppliers, and/or employees rely on your Web site. This paper reviews availability concepts and practices that can help you achieve your availability objectives. It includes a summary of practices that pertain specifically to e-business infrastructures. © Copyright IBM Corporation 200 2 Maximizing Web Site availabilityExecutive summary What happens when your Web site is down? At the least, your site’s users become idle, your staff goes into crisis mode, and everyone’s productivity decreases. At the worst, the users are your customers and they go somewhere else to buy the product or service your company offers. Depending on how long the site is down, customer satisfaction and revenue are diminished, and the reputation of your IT organization, if not your company, is damaged. It’s not a good place to be. That’s why availability is such an important aspect of managing a successful e-business Web site. This paper reviews availability concepts, all of which are well known to IT professionals. Given the increasing complexities of managing e-business infrastructures and the increasing intolerance for any outages, the paper stresses that the basic concepts and practices of availability are more important than ever. It also reviews practices specifically related to e-business infrastructures; understanding and

unknown authors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 7.1 - High-Performance Home Technologies: Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HOT-HUMID HOT-HUMID MIXED-HUMID COLD / VERY COLD HOT-DRY / MIXED-DRY MARINE PREPARED BY Pacific Northwest National Laboratory & Oak Ridge National Laboratory August 2010 August 2010 * PNNL-17211 CLIMATE REGIONS VOLUME 7.1 R HIGH-PERFORMANCE HOME TECHNOLOGIES Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County BUILDING AMERICA BEST PRACTICES SERIES BUILDING AMERICA BEST PRACTICES SERIES VOLUME 7.1 High-Performance Home Technologies: Guide to Determining Climate Regions by County PREPARED BY Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Michael C. Baechler Jennifer Williamson, Theresa Gilbride, Pam Cole, and Marye Hefty

126

Estimation of Daily Degree-hours  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Degree-hours have many applications in fields such as agriculture, architecture, and power generation. Since daily mean temperatures are more readily available than hourly temperatures, the difference between mean daily degree-hours computed from ...

Nathaniel B. Guttman; Richard L. Lehman

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Homogenization of Daily Temperatures over Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to homogenize daily maximum and minimum temperatures over Canada is presented. The procedure is based on previously defined monthly adjustments derived from step changes identified in annual Canadian temperature series. Daily ...

Lucie A. Vincent; X. Zhang; B. R. Bonsal; W. D. Hogg

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

High-Resolution NMR Spectroscopy of Sample Volumes from 1 nL to 10 L Michael E. Lacey,, Raju Subramanian,, Dean L. Olson,,,| Andrew G. Webb,, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-Resolution NMR Spectroscopy of Sample Volumes from 1 nL to 10 µL Michael E. Lacey,,§ Raju, 1999) Contents I. Introduction 1 II. Historical Perspective 3 III. NMR Figures of Merit 3 A. Spectral Resolution 3 B. Signal-to-Noise, Sensitivity, and Limits of Detection 3 IV. Approaches To Augment NMR Probe

Andrews, Anne M.

129

Backstage at the Daily Show | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Backstage at the Daily Show Backstage at the Daily Show Backstage at the Daily Show Addthis Description Backstage footage from Secretary Chu's appearance on the Daily Show where he discuses the green room candy dish and possible lighting considerations. Speakers Secretary Steven Chu Duration 1:32 Topic Energy Efficiency Credit Energy Department Video SECRETARY STEVEN CHU: I'm in the famous green room of the Jon Stewart show. If you look around, I have all these games: Monopoly, a Rubik's Cube, Pictureka! Now if - this is to amuse myself, but in actual fact, the most famous part of this room is this. There's enough chocolate here to put you on a high that - (chuckles) - will really get you going. This is my wife, Jean. JEAN CHU: (Chuckles.) I'm - (chuckles) - edit this out! (Begin recorded segment.)

130

Petroleum Supply Annual 1998, Volume 2  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, Volume 2 8, Volume 2 Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 3.8MB . . Front Matter . Cover Page, Contacts, Preface, and Table of Contents Page PDF . . Monthly Statistics Tables . National Statistics 1 U.S. Petroleum Balance PDF TXT 2 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF TXT 3 U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Stocks PDF TXT . Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 4 PAD District I PDF TXT 5 Daily Average PAD District I PDF TXT 6 PAD District II PDF TXT 7 Daily Average PAD District II PDF TXT 8 PAD District III PDF TXT 9 Daily Average PAD District III PDF TXT 10 PAD District IV PDF TXT 11 Daily Average PAD District IV PDF TXT 12 PAD District V PDF TXT

131

1000 -1300 CALORIES DAILY 60 grams protein daily  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fat cheese stick and peeled apples slices DINNER 2 - 3 ounces chicken with ½ cup broccoli, ¼ cup meal size o Sip fluids slowly o Avoid high fat and high sugar foods o Avoid drinking fluids Meal Plan BREAKFAST ½ - 1 cup cereal, ½ banana and 4- 8 oz low fat milk SNACK: 1 light low fat yogurt

Goldman, Steven A.

132

On the use of surface interpolation techniques in generalised finite volume strategies for simulating transport in highly anisotropic porous media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A control volume technique for solving a representative diffusion equation in an orthotropic medium is considered. The approximation of the cross-diffusion flux term is of utmost important for the accuracy of the solution. A preliminary investigation ... Keywords: discretized equations, least squares, overdetermined systems, polynomial approximations

Pasdunkorale A. Jayantha; Ian W. Turner

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Measurements and modeling of laser irradiance in the high-power third-harmonic Nova focus: Volume B, Data book  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains analysis of third-harmonic equivalent plane photographs obtained in the 2PJW{underscore}3wspot series and described in the report under the same title, Volume A. The photographs that are analyzed in this data book are summarized. A description of the analysis output is included.

Wegner, P.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Energy Assurance Daily (EAD): May 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Energy Assurance Daily provides a summary of public information concerning current energy issues. Published Monday through Friday to inform stakeholders of developments affecting energy systems,...

135

Energy Assurance Daily (EAD): July 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Energy Assurance Daily provides a summary of public information concerning current energy issues. Published Monday through Friday to inform stakeholders of developments affecting energy systems,...

136

Energy Assurance Daily (EAD): January - March 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Energy Assurance Daily provides a summary of public information concerning current energy issues. Published Monday through Friday to inform stakeholders of developments affecting energy systems,...

137

Energy Assurance Daily (EAD): April 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Energy Assurance Daily provides a summary of public information concerning current energy issues. Published Monday through Friday to inform stakeholders of developments affecting energy systems,...

138

Energy Assurance Daily (EAD): June 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Energy Assurance Daily provides a summary of public information concerning current energy issues. Published Monday through Friday to inform stakeholders of developments affecting energy systems,...

139

2011 Expert and Consultant Daily Wages Based on the OPM ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. 2011 Expert and Consultant Daily Wages Based on the OPM Salary Table 2011-GS ... Daily Daily Per Diem Salary Scale Minimum Maximum ...

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

140

Global Increasing Trends in Annual Maximum Daily Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the presence of trends in annual maximum daily precipitation time series obtained from a global dataset of 8326 high-quality land-based observing stations with more than 30 years of record over the period from 1900 to 2009. ...

Seth Westra; Lisa V. Alexander; Francis W. Zwiers

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Technology of high-level nuclear waste disposal. Advances in the science and engineering of the management of high-level nuclear wastes. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The twenty papers in this volume are divided into three parts: site exploration and characterization; repository development and design; and waste package development and design. These papers represent the status of technology that existed in 1981 and 1982. Individual papers were processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Hofmann, P.L. (ed.)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Program on Technology Innovation: Volume Reduction Methods and Waste Form Changes for High-Activity Spent Resin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has initiated a series of studies to mitigate the impact of limited disposal-site access on continued light water reactor operations. Previous reports investigated two Class B/C low-level radioactive waste minimization techniques. The first was an advanced volume-reduction technique for non-metal filter waste, while the second was a compilation of advanced waste-segregation strategies that were aimed at minimizing the generation of Class B/C waste. This report...

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

143

Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 With Data for 2012 | Release Date: September 27, 2013 | Next Release Date: August 28, 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go Re-release of the Petroleum Supply Annual with data for 2011 Volume 1 - Final annual data for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. Volume 1 Tables All Tables All Tables Detailed Statistics Tables National Statistics 1 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV 2 U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF CSV Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 3 PAD District 1 PDF CSV 4 Daily Average PAD District 1 PDF CSV

144

Information needs for characterization of high-level waste repository sites in six geologic media. Volume 2. Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume II contains appendices for the following: (1) remote sensing and surface mapping techniques; (2) subsurface mapping methods for site characterization; (3) gravity technique; (4) audio-frequency magnetotelluric technique; (5) seismic refraction technique; (6) direct-current electrical resistivity method; (7) magnetic technique; (8) seismic reflection technique; (9) seismic crosshole method; (10) mechanical downhole seismic velocity survey method; (11) borehole geophysical logging techniques; (12) drilling and coring methods for precharacterization studies; (13) subsurface drilling methods for site characterization; (14) geomechanical/thermomechanical techniques for precharacterization studies; (15)geomechanical/thermal techniques for site characterization studies; (16) exploratory geochemical techniques for precharacterization studies; (17) geochemical techniques for site characterization; (18) hydrologic techniques for precharacterization studies; (19) hydrologic techniques for site characterization; and (20) seismological techniques.

NONE

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Volume Comparison  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Volume Comparison Volume Comparison Data for October 2013 | Release Date: January 7, 2014 | Complete XLS File Beginning with data for August 2010, natural gas consumption for the residential and commercial sectors was derived from the total system sendout reported by local distribution companies on Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries." The new methodology was designed to yield estimates that more closely reflect calendar month consumption patterns. Total system sendout is the sum of all volumes dispatched into the service territory during the report month, less any storage injections and deliveries to points outside the service territory. Previously, residential and commercial consumption estimates were based solely on reported sector

146

Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how hydrogen photoproduction activity in algal cultures can be improved dramatically by increasing the gas-phase to liquid-phase volume ratio of the photobioreactor. NREL, in partnership with subcontractors from the Institute of Basic Biological Problems in Pushchino, Russia, demonstrated that the hydrogen photoproduction rate in algal cultures always decreases exponentially with increasing hydrogen partial pressure above the culture. The inhibitory effect of high hydrogen concentrations in the photobioreactor gas phase on hydrogen photoproduction by algae is significant and comparable to the effect observed with some anaerobic bacteria.

Not Available

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

An inventory planning methodology based on the value of inventory in high-mix low-volume production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??xiv, 121 p. : ill. ; 30 cm HKUST Call Number: Thesis IELM 2012 Radke The transition of manufacturing systems towards high responsiveness and flexibility… (more)

Radke, Andreas Martin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 4: High-Temperature Materials PIRTs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) technique was used to identify safety-relevant/safety-significant phenomena and assess the importance and related knowledge base of high-temperature structural materials issues for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR). The major aspects of materials degradation phenomena that may give rise to regulatory safety concern for the NGNP were evaluated for major structural components and the materials comprising them, including metallic and nonmetallic materials for control rods, other reactor internals, and primary circuit components; metallic alloys for very high-temperature service for heat exchangers and turbomachinery, metallic alloys for high-temperature service for the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), other pressure vessels and components in the primary and secondary circuits; and metallic alloys for secondary heat transfer circuits and the balance of plant. These materials phenomena were primarily evaluated with regard to their potential for contributing to fission product release at the site boundary under a variety of event scenarios covering normal operation, anticipated transients, and accidents. Of all the high-temperature metallic components, the one most likely to be heavily challenged in the NGNP will be the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). Its thin, internal sections must be able to withstand the stresses associated with thermal loading and pressure drops between the primary and secondary loops under the environments and temperatures of interest. Several important materials-related phenomena related to the IHX were identified, including crack initiation and propagation; the lack of experience of primary boundary design methodology limitations for new IHX structures; and manufacturing phenomena for new designs. Specific issues were also identified for RPVs that will likely be too large for shop fabrication and transportation. Validated procedures for on-site welding, post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), and inspections will be required for the materials of construction. High-importance phenomena related to the RPV include crack initiation and subcritical crack growth; field fabrication process control; property control in heavy sections; and the maintenance of high emissivity of the RPV materials over their service lifetime to enable passive heat rejection from the reactor core. All identified phenomena related to the materials of construction for the IHX, RPV, and other components were evaluated and ranked for their potential impact on reactor safety.

Corwin, William R [ORNL; Ballinger, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Majumdar, S. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Weaver, K. D. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP, VOLUME 57, HIGH PT PHYSICS AT RHIC, DECEMBER 2-6, 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AuAu, dAu, and pp collision modes of the RHIC collider at BNL have led to the publication of exciting high p{perpendicular} particle production data. There have also been two physics runs with polarized protons, and preliminary results on the double-spin asymmetry for pion production had been presented very recently. The ontological questions behind these measurements are fascinating: Did RHIC collisions create a Quark-Gluon-Plasma phase and did they verify the Color Glass Condensate as the high energy limit of QCD? Will the Spin Crisis finally be resolved in terms of gluon polarization and what new surprises are we yet to meet for Transverse Spin? Phenomena related to sub-microscopic questions as important as these call for interpretations that are footed in solid theory. At large p{perpendicular}, perturbative concepts are legitimately expected to provide useful approaches. The corresponding hard parton dynamics are, in several ways, key to unraveling the initial or final state and collisional phase of hard scattering events in vacuum as well as in hot or cold nuclear matter. Before the advent of RHIC data, a RIKEN-BNL workshop had been held at BNL in March 1999 on ''Hard Parton Physics in High Energy Nuclear Collisions''. The 2003 workshop on ''High p{perpendicular} Physics at RHIC'' was a logical continuation of this previous workshop. It gave the opportunity to revisit the 1999 expectations in the light of what has been found in the meantime and, at the same time, to critically discuss the underlying theoretical concepts. We brought together theorists who have done seminal work on the foundations of parton phenomenology in field theory, with theorists and experimentalists who are presently working on RHIC phenomenology. The participants were both from a high-energy physics and nuclear physics background and it remains only to be said here that this chemistry worked perfectly and the workshop was a great success.

KRETZER,S.MORRISON,D.VENUGOPALAN,R.VOGELSANG,W.

2004-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

150

Seasonal Variation in Daily Temperature Ranges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abrupt spring and autumnal changes in the daily temperature range, from low winter values to higher nonwinter values, were noted in the Minneapolis-St. Paul temperature record. Since this feature was even more evident in five rural and small town ...

David L. Ruschy; Donald G. Baker; Richard H. Skaggs

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

EPRI Review of Geologic Disposal for Used Fuel and High Level Radioactive Waste: Volume IV - Lessons Learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effective termination of the Yucca Mountain program by the U.S. Administration in 2009 has further delayed the construction and operation of a permanent disposal facility for used fuel and high level radioactive waste (HLW) in the United States. In concert with this decision, the President directed the Energy Secretary to establish the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future to review and provide recommendations on options for managing used fuel and HLW. EPRI is uniquely positioned to prov...

2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

152

PVMaT Cost Reductions in the EFG High-Volume PV Manufacturing Line: Annual Report, August 1998-December 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The PVMaT 5A2 program at ASE Americas is a three-year program that addresses topics in the development of manufacturing systems, low-cost processing approaches, and flexible manufacturing methods. The three-year objectives are as follows: (1) implementation of computer-aided manufacturing systems, including Statistical Process Control, to aid in electrical and mechanical yield improvements of 10%, (2) development and implementation of ISO 9000 and ISO 14000, (3) deployment of wafer production from large-diameter (up to 1 m) EFG cylinders and wafer thicknesses down to 95 microns, (4) development of low-damage, high-yield laser-cutting methods for thin wafers, (5) cell designs for >15% cell efficiencies on 100-micron-thick EFG wafers, (6) development of Rapid Thermal Anneal processing for thin high-efficiency EFG cells, and (7) deployment of flexible manufacturing methods for diversification in wafer size and module design. In the second year of this program, the significant accomplishments in each of three tasks that cover these areas are as follows: Task 4-Manufacturing systems, Task 5-Low-cost processes, and Task 6-Flexible manufacturing.

Bathey, B.; Brown, B.; Cao, J.; Ebers, S.; Gonsiorawski, R.; Heath, B.; Kalejs, J., Mackintosh, B.; Ouellette, M.; Piwczyk, B., Rosenblum, M.; Southimath, B. (ASE Americas, Inc.)

2001-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

153

HIGH-TEMPERATURE LIQUID-METAL TECHNOLOGY REVIEW. A Bimonthly Technical Progress Review. Volume 1, No. 6  

SciTech Connect

Information is included on: sodium-heated steam generntor development; thermodynamic properties of K and Nb- Zr alloy; engineering properties of K and Cs; research on cavitation and cavitation damage in liquid metals, Hg and H/sub 2/ O, and mechanical pump impellers operating in liquid metal space power loops; sodium pumps and loops; 15 kw solar mechanical engine; sodium cold traps; reactor development; liquid metals technology of Hg, K, Na, NaK, Rb, and Cs; liquid metal heat and mass transfe r; heat rejection problems in nuclear space power plants; SPUR program; effects of high temperature Na on austenitic and ferritic steels; structural materials in LASL liquid sodium systems; LAMPRE program; twostage potassium test turbine; and application of nuclear electrical power to manned orbiting space stations. (P.C.H.)

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Development of a 2-kilowatt high-reliability wind machine. Phase I. Design and analysis. Volume II. Technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high reliability wind machine rated for 2 kW at 9 m/s has been designed to be cost-effective for remote site use. To meet or exceed environmental conditions as specified in Contract PF64410F, the resulting design defines a rugged, relatively simple wind machine. Rigorous fatigue analysis for structural components and development of redundant systems for electrical components led to an expected mean time between failures of 12.35 years. Approximately one year into the research and development program a completed design meeting contract stipulations is being submitted to the contract buyer. The design is for a horizontal axis, down-wind machine with two wooden blades spanning 5 meters diameter. Positive rotor speed control is accomplished through a centrifugally governed variable pitch stalling rotor. Design merits have been confirmed through dynamic truck testing.

Drake, W.; Clews, H.; Cordes, J.; Johnson, B.; Murphy, P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Development of a 2-kilowatt high-reliability wind machine. Phase I. Design and analysis. Volume I. Executive summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high reliability wind machine rated for 2 kW at 9 m/s has been designed to be cost-effective for remote site use. To meet or exceed environmental conditions as specified in Contract PF64410F, the resulting design defines a rugged, relatively simple wind machine. Rigorous fatigue analysis for structural components and development of redundant systems for electrical components led to an expected mean time between failures of 12.35 years. Approximately one year into the research and development program, a completed design meeting contract stipulations is being submitted to the contract buyer. The design is for a horizontal axis, down-wind machine with two wooden blades spanning 5 meters diameter. Positive rotor speed control is accomplished through a centrifugally governed variable pitch, stalling rotor. Design merits have been confirmed through dynamic truck testing.

Drake, W.; Clews, H.; Cordes, J.; Johnson, B.; Murphy, P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

HIGH-TEMPERATURE LIQUID-METAL TECHNOLOGY REVIEW. A Bimonthly Technical Progress Review. Volume 1, Number 2  

SciTech Connect

Metals ---technology of high-temperature liquid, review; Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP-2) ---coolant boiling research for; Nuclear Power Plants ---development research on thermionic, Los Alamos Molten Plutonium Reactor Experiments ---fuel element analysis; Heat Transfer Systems ---conference on liquid metal; Bearings --coating for liquid metal, performance of; Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP-8) ---component development; Sodium---heat transfer research on; Mercury --heat transfer research on; Potassium ---heat transfer research on; Nitrogen Systems ---Hg --N, flow characteristics for two-phase; Mercury Systems ---Hg --N, flow characteristics for two-phase; Nuclear Power Plants ---heat transfer rejection by space, research on; Alkali Metals ---heat transfer research on; Turbines ---development of twostage potassium; Bearings --- development of liquid-metal lubricated; Niobium Alloys ---properties for alkali metal containment, research on; Rubidium ---thermophysical properties of; Los Alamos Molten Plutonium Reactor Experiments ---design of LAMPRE-1. (D.C.W.)

Dwyer, O.E. ed.

1963-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Detection of ultra high energy neutrinos with an underwater very large volume array of acoustic sensors: A simulation study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the detection of ultra high energy (E > 1 EeV) cosmic neutrinos using acoustic sensors immersed in water. The method is based on the thermoacoustic model describing the production of microsecond bipolar acoustic pulses by neutrino-induced particle cascades. These cascades locally heat the medium which leads to rapid expansion and a short sonic pulse detectable in water with hydrophones over distances of several kilometres. This makes acoustic detection an approach complementary to todays optical Cerenkov and radio Cerenkov detectors, and could help to reduce the respective systematic uncertainties. In this work a complete simulation / reconstruction chain for a submarine acoustic neutrino telescope is developed, and the sensitivity of such a detector to a diffuse flux of ultra highenergy cosmic neutrinos is estimated.

Timo Karg

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

Improving Estimates of Heavy and Extreme Precipitation Using Daily Records from European Rain Gauges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long-term variability in heavy precipitation characteristics over Europe for the period 1950–2000 is analyzed using high-quality daily records of rain gauge measurements from the European Climate Assessment (ECA) dataset. To improve the ...

Olga Zolina; Clemens Simmer; Konstantin Belyaev; Alice Kapala; Sergey Gulev

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Statistical Evaluation of Combined Daily Gauge Observations and Rainfall Satellite Estimates over Continental South America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a comprehensive assessment of a new high-resolution, gauge–satellite-based analysis of daily precipitation over continental South America during 2004. This methodology is based on a combination of additive and multiplicative ...

Daniel A. Vila; Luis Gustavo G. de Goncalves; David L. Toll; Jose Roberto Rozante

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Volume State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22 22 Volume State State or Country From/To Receipts/ Imports From Deliveries/ Exports To Net a Alabama Florida .................................................................. 0 722,558 -722,558 Georgia................................................................. 0 1,352,308 -1,352,308 Gulf of Mexico....................................................... 123,132 0 123,132 Mississippi ............................................................ 2,758,595 0 2,758,595 Tennessee............................................................ 1,744 764,749 -763,005 Total..................................................................... 2,883,471 2,839,615 43,856

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2009 Daily Journals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Richard King next to a deck and planter boxes. Decathlete Way and the U.S. Capitol are in the background. Richard King next to a deck and planter boxes. Decathlete Way and the U.S. Capitol are in the background. Solar Decathlon Director Richard King takes a break from the competition along Decathlete Way. Solar Decathlon 2009 Daily Journals The daily journals highlighted the events of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2009. Each day, Richard King, Solar Decathlon director, covered the latest on the teams, their standings, and the events going on in the solar village. October 19, 2009 I personally believe one of the greatest discoveries in the field of energy from the 20th century is our ability to generate electricity from sunlight using photovoltaic solar cells. Read more. October 17, 2009 Solar Decathlon 2009 was intriguing and suspenseful to the very end. None

162

A simple method to downscale daily wind statistics to hourly wind data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind is the principal driver in the wind erosion models. The hourly wind speed data were generally required for precisely wind erosion modeling. In this study, a simple method to generate hourly wind speed data from daily wind statistics (daily average and maximum wind speeds together or daily average wind speed only) was established. A typical windy location with 3285 days (9 years) measured hourly wind speed data were used to validate the downscaling method. The results showed that the overall agreement between observed and simulated cumulative wind speed probability distributions appears excellent, especially for the wind speeds greater than 5 m s-1 range (erosive wind speed). The results further revealed that the values of daily average erosive wind power density (AWPD) calculated from generated wind speeds fit the counterparts computed from measured wind speeds well with high models' efficiency (Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient). So that the hourly wind speed data can be predicted from daily average and maximu...

Guo, Zhongling

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Field test of two high-pressure direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume II. Oxygen/diesel system  

SciTech Connect

A field test of an oxygen/diesel fuel, direct contact steam generator has been completed. The field test, which was a part of Project DEEP STEAM and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, involved the thermal stimulation of a well pattern in the Tar Zone of the Wilmington Oil Field. The activity was carried out in cooperation with the City of Long Beach and the Long Beach Oil Development Company. The steam generator was operated at ground level, with the steam and combustion products delivered to the reservoir through 2022 feet of calcium-silicate insulated tubing. The objectives of the test included demonstrations of safety, operational ease, reliability and lifetime; investigations of reservoir response, environmental impact, and economics; and comparison of those points with a second generator that used air rather than oxygen. The test was extensively instrumented to provide the required data. Excluding interruptions not attributable to the oxygen/diesel system, steam was injected 78% of the time. System lifetime was limited by the combustor, which required some parts replacement every 2 to 3 weeks. For the conditions of this particular test, the use of trucked-in LOX resulted in liess expense than did the production of the equivalent amount of high pressure air using on site compressors. No statistically significant production change in the eight-acre oxygen system well pattern occurred during the test, nor were any adverse effects on the reservoir character detected. Gas analyses during the field test showed very low levels of SOX (less than or equal to 1 ppM) in the generator gaseous effluent. The SOX and NOX data did not permit any conclusion to be drawn regarding reservoir scrubbing. Appreciable levels of CO (less than or equal to 5%) were measured at the generator, and in this case produced-gas analyses showed evidence of significant gas scrubbing. 64 figures, 10 tables.

Moreno, J.B.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Field test of two high-pressure, direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume I. Air/diesel system  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the Project DEEP STEAM to develop technology to more efficiently utilize steam for the recovery of heavy oil from deep reservoirs, a field test of a downhole steam generator (DSG) was performed. The DSG burned No. 2 diesel fuel in air and was a direct-contact, high pressure device which mixed the steam with the combustion products and injected the resulting mixture directly into the oil reservoir. The objectives of the test program included demonstration of long-term operation of a DSG, development of operational methods, assessment of the effects of the steam/combustion gases on the reservoir and comparison of this air/diesel DSG with an adjacent oxygen/diesel direct contact generator. Downhole operation of the air/diesel DSG was started in June 1981 and was terminated in late February 1982. During this period two units were placed downhole with the first operating for about 20 days. It was removed, the support systems were slightly modified, and the second one was operated for 106 days. During this latter interval the generator operated for 70% of the time with surface air compressor problems the primary source of the down time. Thermal contact, as evidenced by a temperature increase in the production well casing gases, and an oil production increase were measured in one of the four wells in the air/diesel pattern. Reservoir scrubbing of carbon monoxide was observed, but no conclusive data on scrubbing of SO/sub x/ and NO/sub x/ were obtained. Corrosion of the DSG combustor walls and some other parts of the downhole package were noted. Metallurgical studies have been completed and recommendations made for other materials that are expected to better withstand the downhole combustion environment. 39 figures, 8 tables.

Marshall, B.W.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Volume 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect

A major objective of the coal-fired high performance power systems (HIPPS) program is to achieve significant increases in the thermodynamic efficiency of coal use for electric power generation. Through increased efficiency, all airborne emissions can be decreased, including emissions of carbon dioxide. High Performance power systems as defined for this program are coal-fired, high efficiency systems where the combustion products from coal do not contact the gas turbine. Typically, this type of a system will involve some indirect heating of gas turbine inlet air and then topping combustion with a cleaner fuel. The topping combustion fuel can be natural gas or another relatively clean fuel. Fuel gas derived from coal is an acceptable fuel for the topping combustion. The ultimate goal for HIPPS is to, have a system that has 95 percent of its heat input from coal. Interim systems that have at least 65 percent heat input from coal are acceptable, but these systems are required to have a clear development path to a system that is 95 percent coal-fired. A three phase program has been planned for the development of HIPPS. Phase 1, reported herein, includes the development of a conceptual design for a commercial plant. Technical and economic feasibility have been analysed for this plant. Preliminary R&D on some aspects of the system were also done in Phase 1, and a Research, Development and Test plan was developed for Phase 2. Work in Phase 2 include s the testing and analysis that is required to develop the technology base for a prototype plant. This work includes pilot plant testing at a scale of around 50 MMBtu/hr heat input. The culmination of the Phase 2 effort will be a site-specific design and test plan for a prototype plant. Phase 3 is the construction and testing of this plant.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

State Volume  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Volume of Natural Gas Delivered to Processing Plants (million cubic feet) Total Liquids Extracted (thousand barrels) Extraction Loss Located Within the State Located Outside of the State Total Processed Volume (million cubic feet Estimated Heat Content (billion Btu) Alabama...................... 111,656 2,614 114,270 4,476 5,810 18,610 Alaska ......................... 2,987,364 0 2,987,364 33,346 38,453 148,444 Arkansas..................... 214,868 161 215,029 237 474 977 California..................... 240,566 0 240,566 9,798 12,169 41,037 Colorado ..................... 493,748 1,249 494,997 16,891 23,420 63,411 Florida......................... 5,900 0 5,900 1,130 1,143 4,202 Illinois.......................... 578 0 578 63 64 271 Kansas........................ 825,825 2,731 828,556 30,617 41,115 120,221 Kentucky .....................

167

Climate Reference Network Daily01 Product | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Daily01 Product Daily01 Product Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Climate Reference Network Daily01 Product Dataset Summary Description The U.S. Climate Reference Network is designed specifically to monitor national climate change with best scientific practice and adherence to the accepted principles of climate observations. USCRN daily temperature mean, maximum, and minimum, daily precipitation, daily global solar radiation, and daily average surface infrared temperature data are available in the Daily01 file set for all stations in the network. Daily mean, maximum, and minimum relative humidity are available for most stations. Tags {"Climate Reference Network",USCRN,CRN,"air temperature",temperature,precipitation,"global solar radiation"," surface temperature","surface infrared temperature","relative humidity","natural resources",water,air,"soil "}

168

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high-temperature furnace (HITAF): Volume 4. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An outgrowth of our studies of the FWDC coal-fired high performance power systems (HIPPS) concept was the development of a concept for the repowering of existing boilers. The initial analysis of this concept indicates that it will be both technically and economically viable. A unique feature of our greenfields HIPPS concept is that it integrates the operation of a pressurized pyrolyzer and a pulverized fuel-fired boiler/air heater. Once this type of operation is achieved, there are a few different applications of this core technology. Two greenfields plant options are the base case plant and a plant where ceramic air heaters are used to extend the limit of air heating in the HITAF. The greenfields designs can be used for repowering in the conventional sense which involves replacing almost everything in the plant except the steam turbine and accessories. Another option is to keep the existing boiler and add a pyrolyzer and gas turbine to the plant. The study was done on an Eastern utility plant. The owner is currently considering replacing two units with atmospheric fluidized bed boilers, but is interested in a comparison with HIPPS technology. After repowering, the emissions levels need to be 0.25 lb SO{sub x}/MMBtu and 0.15 lb NO{sub x}/MMBtu.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Managing natural gas volume analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In late 1992, Natural Gas Pipeline Co. of America and BMP Energy Systems began the joint development of a system for the automated verification and statistical correction of gas volume data captured at meter locations by flow computers. NGPL required a single system that would provide functionality for both chart processing and automated EFM data validation and correction. The pipeline company was looking for a vendor that would help develop a system to handle EFM data. The NGAS 4[trademark] system implemented at NGPL made the bridge from monthly to daily gas volume processing. The automated and rapid validation of flow data within the NGAS 4 system minimizes human intervention for validation and correction. NGPL has moved from reliance on paper chart processing to the EFM capability required in the evolving US gas market.

Parker, J. (Natural Gas Pipeline Co. of America, Lombard, IL (United States)); Treat, R. (BMP Energy Systems, Houston, TX (United States)); Bergen, H. (BMP Energy Systems, Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Nonlinear model predictive control for dosing daily anticancer agents using a novel saturating-rate cell-cycle model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC) algorithm was developed to dose the chemotherapeutic agent tamoxifen based on a novel saturating-rate, cell-cycle model (SCM). Using daily tumor measurements, the algorithm decreased tumor volume along a specified ... Keywords: Biomedical systems, Cancer, Nonlinear model, Nonlinear model predictive control, Pharmacodynamics, Pharmacokinetics

Jeffry A. Florian, Jr.; Julie L. Eiseman; Robert S. Parker

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Simulation of Daily Weather Data Using Theoretical Probability Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer simulation model was constructed to supply daily weather data to a plant disease management model for potato late blight. In the weather model Monte Carlo techniques were employed to generate daily values of precipitation, maximum ...

J. A. Bruhn; W. E. Fry; G. W. Fick

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Temperature Effects on the Winter Daily Electric Load  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here we describe the relationship between average daily temperature and winter-daily electric load, as ascertained on the largest electric district in Italy. In particular, it is shown that a sudden 6°C temperature decrease (not a rare event) ...

Paolo Bolzern; Giorgio Fronza; Giuseppe Brusasca

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Solar Decathlon 2005 Daily Event Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DAILY EVENT SCHEDULE DAILY EVENT SCHEDULE Last updated on September 30, 2005 Note: This schedule is not part of the official Rules and Regulations and is subject to change at any time. Weds, Sept 28 12:00 AM 12:30 AM 1:00 AM 1:30 AM 2:00 AM 2:30 AM 3:00 AM 3:30 AM 4:00 AM 4:30 AM 5:00 AM 5:30 AM 6:00 AM 6:30 AM 7:00 AM 7:30 AM 8:00 AM 8:30 AM 9:00 AM 9:30 AM 10:00 AM 10:30 AM 11:00 AM 11:30 AM 12:00 PM 12:30 PM 1:00 PM 1:30 PM 2:00 PM 2:30 PM 3:00 PM 3:30 PM 4:00 PM 4:30 PM 5:00 PM 5:30 PM 6:00 PM 6:30 PM 7:00 PM 7:30 PM 8:00 PM 8:30 PM 9:00 PM 9:30 PM 10:00 PM 10:30 PM 11:00 PM 11:30 PM Registration Forrestal Bldg (DOE) Cafeteria National Mall Team/Organizer meeting and Safety Orientation Thurs, Sept 29 12:00 AM 12:30 AM 1:00 AM 1:30 AM 2:00 AM 2:30 AM 3:00 AM 3:30 AM 4:00 AM 4:30 AM 5:00 AM 5:30 AM 6:00 AM 6:30 AM 7:00

174

A Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

503 * July 2012 503 * July 2012 Hydrogen photoproduction by 500 mL of sulfur/phosphorus- deprived (-S -P) algal cultures placed in PhBRs with different headspace volumes (165-925 mL). The final percentages of H 2 gas in the gas phase of the PhBRs are indicated in the figure inset; the Y-axis reports actual amounts of H 2 produced. The yield of H 2 gas in the PhBR with a historically small gas phase volume is shown as a dotted line. A Significant Increase in Hydrogen Photoproduction Rates and Yields by Wild-Type Algae is Detected at High Photobioreactor Gas Phase Volume Project: Biological Systems for Hydrogen Photoproduction Team: Maria L. Ghirardi and Michael Seibert, NREL; Sergey N. Kosourov, Khorcheska A. Batyrova, Ekaterina P. Petushkova, and Anatoly A. Tsygankov, IBBP, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

175

Background: Long-Term Daily and Monthly Climate Records from Stations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Background: Long-Term Daily and Monthly Climate Records from Stations Background: Long-Term Daily and Monthly Climate Records from Stations Across the Contiguous United States The United States Historical Climatology Network (USHCN) is a high-quality data set of daily and monthly records of basic meteorological variables from 1218 observing stations across the 48 contiguous United States. Daily data include observations of maximum and minimum temperature, precipitation amount, snowfall amount, and snow depth; monthly data consist of monthly-averaged maximum, minimum, and mean temperature and total monthly precipitation. Most of these stations are U.S. Cooperative Observing Network stations located generally in rural locations, while some are National Weather Service First-Order stations that are often located in more urbanized environments. The USHCN has been developed over the years at

176

FY 2010 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 DOE/CF-038 Volume 4 Science May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 4 DOE/CF-038 Volume 4 Science Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Science FY 2010 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language ...........................................................................................................................5 Overview...................................................................................................................................................7 Funding by Site .......................................................................................................................................21

177

FY 2012 Volume 7  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Volume 7 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Nuclear Energy D f N l W t Di l Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 7 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Volume 7 FY 2012 Congressional Budget Volume 7 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary ........................................................................................................... 3

178

High Voltage Test Apparatus for a Neutron EDM Experiment and Lower Limit on the Dielectric Strength of Liquid Helium at Large Volumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new search for a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron is underway using ultracold neutrons produced and held in a bath of superfluid helium. Attaining the target sensitivity requires maintaining an electric field of several tens of kilovolts per centimeter across the experimental cell, which is nominally 7.5 cm wide and will contain about 4 liters of superfluid. The electrical properties of liquid helium are expected to be sufficient to meet the design goals, but little is known about these properties for volumes and electrode spacings appropriate to the EDM experiment. Furthermore, direct application of the necessary voltages from an external source to the experimental test cell is impractical. An apparatus to amplify voltages in the liquid helium environment and to test the electrical properties of the liquid for large volumes and electrode spacings has been constructed. The device consists of a large-area parallel plate capacitor immersed in a 200 liter liquid helium dewar. Preliminary results show the breakdown strength of normal state liquid helium is at least 90 kV/cm at these volumes, at the helium vapor pressure corresponding to 4.38 K. These fields hold for more than 11 hours with leakage currents less than 170 pA (about 20% of the maximum tolerable in the EDM experiment). The system is also found to be robust against anticipated radiation backgrounds. Preliminary results for superfluid show that fields of at least 30 kV/cm can be sustained at the volumes required for the EDM experiment, about 60% of the design goal. These results are likely limited by the low pressure that must be maintained above the superfluid bath.

J. C. Long; P. D. Barnes; J. G. Boissevain; D. J. Clark; M. D. Cooper; J. J. Gomez; S. K. Lamoreaux; R. E. Mischke; S. I. Penttila

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

179

State Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 State Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Volume Price Pipeline (Canada) Eastport, ID..................... 830,351 3.79 802,182 4.71 759,647 2.83 R 623,652 4.72 707,885 5.30 Calais, ME ...................... 123,521 4.50 152,486 4.47 124,991 3.49 R 115,301 R 5.85 102,292 6.44 Detroit, MI ....................... 6,171 3.82 405 9.34 1,948 3.56 2,514 5.96 1,117 6.27 Marysville, MI.................. 0 -- 0 -- 74 3.95 0 -- 303 7.80 St. Clair, MI..................... 17,198 4.45 21,747 4.54 28,441 3.19 5,202 5.84 22,853 6.50 International Falls, MN .... 3,022 2.77 617 4.85 602 3.01 0 -- 0 -- Noyes, MN...................... 469,361 3.75 448,898 4.19 402,621 3.09 R 359,801 5.04 399,298 5.77 Warroad, MN .................. 4,576 3.95 5,318 4.52

180

APHRODITE: Constructing a Long-Term Daily Gridded Precipitation Dataset for Asia Based on a Dense Network of Rain Gauges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A daily gridded precipitation dataset covering a period of more than 57 yr was created by collecting and analyzing rain gauge observation data across Asia through the activities of the Asian Precipitation—Highly Resolved Observational Data Integration ...

Akiyo Yatagai; Kenji Kamiguchi; Osamu Arakawa; Atsushi Hamada; Natsuko Yasutomi; Akio Kitoh

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Use of WindSat to Extend a Microwave-Based Daily Optimum Interpolation Sea Surface Temperature Time Series  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NOAA ¼° daily optimum interpolation sea surface temperature analysis (DOISST) is available either as a 31-yr (from 1981 onward) time series based on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) observations or as a 9-yr (2002–11) time ...

Viva F. Banzon; Richard W. Reynolds

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

FY 2012 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 Volume 4 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Science Science February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-0060 Volume 4 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Science Science February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Science FY 2012 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language ...........................................................................................................................5 Overview ...................................................................................................................................................7

183

Characterizing Tumor Heterogeneity With Functional Imaging and Quantifying High-Risk Tumor Volume for Early Prediction of Treatment Outcome: Cervical Cancer as a Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Treatment response in cancer has been monitored by measuring anatomic tumor volume (ATV) at various times without considering the inherent functional tumor heterogeneity known to critically influence ultimate treatment outcome: primary tumor control and survival. This study applied dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) functional MRI to characterize tumors' heterogeneous subregions with low DCE values, at risk for treatment failure, and to quantify the functional risk volume (FRV) for personalized early prediction of treatment outcome. Methods and Materials: DCE-MRI was performed in 102 stage IB{sub 2}-IVA cervical cancer patients to assess tumor perfusion heterogeneity before and during radiation/chemotherapy. FRV represents the total volume of tumor voxels with critically low DCE signal intensity (20, >13, and >5 cm{sup 3}, respectively, significantly predicted unfavorable 6-year primary tumor control (p = 0.003, 7.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}, 2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}) and disease-specific survival (p = 1.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, 2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}, 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}, respectively). The FRVs were superior to the ATVs as early predictors of outcome, and the differentiating power of FRVs increased during treatment. Discussion: Our preliminary results suggest that functional tumor heterogeneity can be characterized by DCE-MRI to quantify FRV for predicting ultimate long-term treatment outcome. FRV is a novel functional imaging heterogeneity parameter, superior to ATV, and can be clinically translated for personalized early outcome prediction before or as early as 2-5 weeks into treatment.

Mayr, Nina A., E-mail: Nina.Mayr@osumc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Huang Zhibin [Department of Radiation Oncology and Department of Physics, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Wang, Jian Z. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Lo, Simon S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Fan, Joline M. [Department of Molecular Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Grecula, John C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Sammet, Steffen [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Department of Radiology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Sammet, Christina L. [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Jia Guang; Zhang Jun; Knopp, Michael V.; Yuh, William T.C. [Department of Radiology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Twenty-second water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Severe accident research, thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs, high-burnup fuel behavior  

SciTech Connect

This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Second Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 24-26, 1994. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Finland, France, Italy, Japan, Russia, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting.

Monteleone, S. [comp.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Proceedings of the 1992 workshops on high-energy physics with colliding beams. Volume 1, Search for new phenomena at colliding-beam facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report contains brief papers and viewgraphs on high energy topics like: supersymmetry; new gauge bosons; and new high energy colliders.

Rogers, J. [ed.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Illustrating surfaces in volume  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel framework for illustrating surfaces in a volume. Surfaces are illustrated by drawing only feature lines, such as silhouettes, valleys, ridges, and surface hatching strokes, and are embedded in volume renderings. This framework ...

Xiaoru Yuan; Baoquan Chen

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

FY 2013 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 DOE/CF-0075 Volume 5 Environmental Management Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-0075 Volume 5 Environmental Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Environmental Management Page 1 FY 2013 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary ............................................................................................................................................ 3 Appropriation Language .......................................................................................................................................................... 5

188

FY 2011 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 DOE/CF-0051 Volume 5 Environmental Management Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-0051 Volume 5 Environmental Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request Department of Energy/ Environmental Management FY 2011 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language ...........................................................................................................................5 Overview...................................................................................................................................................7

189

FY 2007 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 DOE/CF-006 Volume 5 Environmental management Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-006 Volume 5 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Environmental management Department of Energy/ Environmental Management FY 2007 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .........................................................................................................3 Overview................................................................................................................................................5 Defense Environmental Cleanup Appropriation Cleanup .................................................................107 Carlsbad

190

FY 2009 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 DOE/CF-027 Volume 4 Science February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 4 DOE/CF-027 Volume 4 Science Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Science FY 2009 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language ...........................................................................................................................5 Overview...................................................................................................................................................7 Funding by Site

191

FY 2008 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 DOE/CF-018 Volume 5 Environmental Management Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-018 Volume 5 Environmental Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Environmental Management FY 2008 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3 Strategic Overview....................................................................................................................................5 Overview...................................................................................................................................................7

192

FY 2011 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 DOE/CF-0050 Volume 4 Science Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-0050 Volume 4 Science Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request Department of Energy/ Science FY 2011 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language ...........................................................................................................................5 Overview...................................................................................................................................................7

193

FY 2012 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Volume 5 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Environmental Management February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Environmental Management FY 2011 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3

194

SEPTEMBER 2011 VOLUME 4 NUMBER 3 IJSTHZ (ISSN 1939-1404) SPECIAL ISSUE ON HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING IN EARTH OBSERVATION AND REMOTE SENSING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1939-1404) SPECIAL ISSUE ON HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING IN EARTH OBSERVATION AND REMOTE SENSING Foreword to the Special Issue on High Performance Computing in Earth Observation and Remote Sensing .................................... ................................................................ C. A. Lee, S. D. Gasster, A. Plaza, C.-I Chang, and B. Huang 508 High Performance Computing

Plaza, Antonio J.

195

On the Conditional Distribution of Daily Precipitation Amounts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Possible conditional dependence of the distribution of daily precipitation amounts on the occurrence of precipitation on the preceding day is examined. Test results based on 25 years of data at 30 stations in the conterminous United States show ...

Edwin H. Chin; John F. Miller

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Comprehensive Automated Quality Assurance of Daily Surface Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a comprehensive set of fully automated quality assurance (QA) procedures for observations of daily surface temperature, precipitation, snowfall, and snow depth. The QA procedures are being applied operationally to the Global ...

Imke Durre; Matthew J. Menne; Byron E. Gleason; Tamara G. Houston; Russell S. Vose

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Thailand Daily Rainfall and Comparison with TRMM Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily rainfall data collected from more than 100 gauges over Thailand for the period 1993–2002 are used to study the climatology and spatial and temporal characteristics of Thailand rainfall variations. Comparison of the Thailand gauge (TG) data ...

Roongroj Chokngamwong; Long S. Chiu

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Climatologically Aided Mapping of Daily Precipitation and Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurately mapped meteorological data are an essential component for hydrologic and ecological research conducted at broad scales. A simple yet effective method for mapping daily weather conditions across heterogeneous landscapes is described and ...

Richard D. Hunter; Ross K. Meentemeyer

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Realizations of Daily Weather in Forecast Seasonal Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stochastic daily weather time series models (?“weather generators”?) are parameterized consistent with both local climate and probabilistic seasonal forecasts. Both single-station weather generators, and spatial networks of coherently operating ...

D. S. Wilks

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Regional, Very Heavy Daily Precipitation in NARCCAP Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors analyze the ability of the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program's ensemble of climate models to simulate very heavy daily precipitation and its supporting processes, comparing simulations that used observation-...

Sho Kawazoe; William J. Gutowski Jr.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Regional, Very Heavy Daily Precipitation in CMIP5 Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors analyze the ability of global climate models (GCMs) from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) multimodel ensemble to simulate very heavy daily precipitation and its supporting processes, comparing them with ...

Sho Kawazoe; William J. Gutowski Jr.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Uncertainty of Daily Isolation Estimates from a Mesoscale Pyranometer Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily insulation values at the earth's surface are required for modeling of biophysical processes and solar energy engineering design. Ground-based pyranometer networks have proliferated in recent years, offering improved spatial coverage for ...

William L. Bland

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Iodine retention during evaporative volume reduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for retaining radioactive iodine in aqueous waste solutions during volume reduction is disclosed. The method applies to evaporative volume reduction processes whereby the decontaminated (evaporated) water can be returned safely to the environment. The method generally comprises isotopically diluting the waste solution with a nonradioactive iodide and maintaining the solution at a high pH during evaporation.

Godbee, H.W.; Cathers, G.I.; Blanco, R.E.

1975-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

204

High Air Volume to Low Liquid Volume Aerosol Collector Technology  

Giving animals in need a HOME. November 14, 2013. LLNL, Intel, Cray produce big data machine. ... for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration

205

FY 2013 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Volume 2 f Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional B d R Budget Request Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital F nd Working Capital Fund Safeguards and Security Crosscut Pensions February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-0072 Volume 2 f Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional B d R Budget Request Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital F nd Working Capital Fund Safeguards and Security Crosscut Pensions February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Volume 2 FY 2013 Congressional Budget Volume 2 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3

206

FY 2012 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Volume 3 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 3 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Volume 3 FY 2012 Congressional Budget Volume 3 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3

207

FY 2005 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Volume 1 February 2004 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Naval Reactors Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request DOE/ME-0032 Volume 1 February 2004 Volume 1 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Printed with soy ink on recycled paper National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

208

FY 2009 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE/CF-024 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 1 DOE/CF-024 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2009 Congressional Budget Volume 1 Table of Contents

209

FY 2010 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 DOE/CF-037 Volume 3 Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Nuclear Energy May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 3 DOE/CF-037 Volume 3 Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Nuclear Energy Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Nuclear Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Nuclear Energy Department of Energy/ Volume 3 FY 2010 Congressional Budget

210

FY 2012 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Volume 2 f Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional B d R Budget Request Other Defense Activities Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Better Building Pilot Loan Guarantee Initiative for Universities Schools and Hospitals Universities, Schools, and Hospitals Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 g y Pensions Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Volume 2 FY 2012 Congressional Budget Volume 2 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3

211

FY 2007 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chief Financial Officer Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-002 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-002 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2007 Congressional Budget

212

FY 2010 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 DOE/CF-039 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 5 DOE/CF-039 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal Department of Energy FY 2010Congressional Budget Environmental Management/ Defense Nuclear Waste/Nuclear Waste Disposal Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3

213

FY 2013 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Volume 6 Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 DOE/CF-0076 Volume 6 Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration

214

FY 2007 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 DOE/CF-005 Volume 4 Science Nuclear waste disposal Defense nuclear waste disposal Departmental administration Inspector general Working capital fund Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-005 Volume 4 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Science Nuclear waste disposal Defense nuclear waste disposal Departmental administration Inspector general Working capital fund Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents

215

FY 2013 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 DOE/CF-0074 Volume 4 Science Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-0074 Volume 4 Science Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Science Advanced Research Projects Agency- Energy Science Advanced Research Projects Agency- Energy Department of Energy/Science/ Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary ............................................................................................................................................ 3

216

FY 2008 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE/CF-014 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-014 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2008 Congressional Budget Volume 1 Table of Contents

217

FY 2006 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 4 February 2005 DOE/ME-0049 Volume 4 Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 4 February 2005 DOE/ME-0049 Volume 4 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund

218

FY 2010 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE/CF-035 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 1 DOE/CF-035 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2010 Congressional Budget Volume 1 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3

219

Precision volume measurement system.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new precision volume measurement system based on a Kansas City Plant (KCP) design was built to support the volume measurement needs of the Gas Transfer Systems (GTS) department at Sandia National Labs (SNL) in California. An engineering study was undertaken to verify or refute KCP's claims of 0.5% accuracy. The study assesses the accuracy and precision of the system. The system uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) in a temperature and computer controlled environment to ratio a known volume to an unknown volume.

Fischer, Erin E.; Shugard, Andrew D.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

FY 2013 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 DOECF-0073 Volume 3 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

LANL Volume 2_Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management Programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy April 2002 Volume II...

222

Performance assessment of the direct disposal in unsaturated tuff or spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste owned by USDOE: Volume 2, Methodology and results  

SciTech Connect

This assessment studied the performance of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a hypothetical repository in unsaturated tuff. The results of this 10-month study are intended to help guide the Office of Environment Management of the US Department of Energy (DOE) on how to prepare its wastes for eventual permanent disposal. The waste forms comprised spent fuel and high-level waste currently stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Hanford reservations. About 700 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of the waste under study is stored at INEL, including graphite spent nuclear fuel, highly enriched uranium spent fuel, low enriched uranium spent fuel, and calcined high-level waste. About 2100 MTHM of weapons production fuel, currently stored on the Hanford reservation, was also included. The behavior of the waste was analyzed by waste form and also as a group of waste forms in the hypothetical tuff repository. When the waste forms were studied together, the repository was assumed also to contain about 9200 MTHM high-level waste in borosilicate glass from three DOE sites. The addition of the borosilicate glass, which has already been proposed as a final waste form, brought the total to about 12,000 MTHM.

Rechard, R.P. [ed.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Warm Weather and the Daily Commute | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Warm Weather and the Daily Commute Warm Weather and the Daily Commute Warm Weather and the Daily Commute May 7, 2013 - 12:02pm Addthis Biking to work helps you get some exercise while reducing your carbon footprint. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/olaser Biking to work helps you get some exercise while reducing your carbon footprint. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/olaser Elizabeth Spencer Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory How can I participate? Check out options for busing or carpooling in your area or, if you live close, try walking or biking to work. You know the weather is starting to warm up when you start hearing about those "bike, bus, or walk to work" challenges. And while my local news just started drumming up publicity for theirs, I've seen these events pop up in

224

Invisible Science: Lab Breakthroughs in Our Daily Lives | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Invisible Science: Lab Breakthroughs in Our Daily Lives Invisible Science: Lab Breakthroughs in Our Daily Lives Invisible Science: Lab Breakthroughs in Our Daily Lives April 24, 2012 - 2:30pm Addthis The Lab Breakthroughs video series focuses on the array of technological advancements and discoveries that stem from research performed in the National Labs, including improvements in industrial processes, discoveries in fundamental scientific research, and innovative medicines. See the Lab Breakthroughs topic page for the most recent videos and Q&As with researchers. The Lab Breakthroughs video series focuses on the array of technological advancements and discoveries that stem from research performed in the National Labs, including improvements in industrial processes, discoveries

225

Daylighter Daily Solar Roof Light | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Daylighter Daily Solar Roof Light Daylighter Daily Solar Roof Light Jump to: navigation, search Name Daylighter Daily Solar Roof Light Address 1991 Crocker Road, Suite 600 Place Cleveland, Ohio Zip 44145 Sector Solar Product Installation; Manufacturing Phone number 440-892-3312 Website http://www.SolarLightisFree.co Coordinates 41.4648875°, -81.9506519° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4648875,"lon":-81.9506519,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

226

Initial performance assessment of the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste stored at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 2: Appendices  

SciTech Connect

This performance assessment characterized plausible treatment options conceived by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for its spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste and then modeled the performance of the resulting waste forms in two hypothetical, deep, geologic repositories: one in bedded salt and the other in granite. The results of the performance assessment are intended to help guide INEL in its study of how to prepare wastes and spent fuel for eventual permanent disposal. This assessment was part of the Waste Management Technology Development Program designed to help the US Department of Energy develop and demonstrate the capability to dispose of its nuclear waste, as mandated by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The waste forms comprised about 700 metric tons of initial heavy metal (or equivalent units) stored at the INEL: graphite spent fuel, experimental low enriched and highly enriched spent fuel, and high-level waste generated during reprocessing of some spent fuel. Five different waste treatment options were studied; in the analysis, the options and resulting waste forms were analyzed separately and in combination as five waste disposal groups. When the waste forms were studied in combination, the repository was assumed to also contain vitrified high-level waste from three DOE sites for a common basis of comparison and to simulate the impact of the INEL waste forms on a moderate-sized repository, The performance of the waste form was assessed within the context of a whole disposal system, using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes, 40 CFR 191, promulgated in 1985. Though the waste form behavior depended upon the repository type, all current and proposed waste forms provided acceptable behavior in the salt and granite repositories.

Rechard, R.P. [ed.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

LANL Volume 2_Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Emergency Management Programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy April 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY Volume II April 2002 Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results .......................................................................................................................................2 3.0 Conclusions .................................................................................................................................4

228

FY 2012 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Volume 6 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration

229

High-solids black liquor firing in pulp and paper industry kraft recovery boilers: Phase 1 -- Final report. Volume 2: Project technical results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is a multiple-phase effort to develop technologies to improve high-solids black liquor firing in pulp mill recovery boilers. The principal means to this end is to construct and operate a pilot-scale recovery furnace simulator (RFS) in which these technologies can be tested. The Phase 1 objectives are to prepare a preliminary design for the RFS, delineate a project concept for evaluating candidate technologies, establish industrial partners, and report the results. Phase 1 addressed the objectives with seven tasks: Develop a preliminary design of the RFS; estimate the detailed design and construction costs of the RFS and the balance of the project; identify interested parties in the paper industry and key suppliers; plan the Phase 2 and Phase 3 tests to characterize the RFS; evaluate the economic justification for high-solids firing deployment in the industry; evaluate high-solids black liquor property data to support the RFS design; manage the project and reporting results, which included planning the future program direction.

Southards, W.T.; Clement, J.L.; McIlroy, R.A.; Tharp, M.R.; Verrill, C.L.; Wessell, R.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

EPRI Review of Geologic Disposal for Used Fuel and High Level Radioactive Waste: Volume II--U.S. Regulations for Geologic Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. efforts to site and construct a deep geologic repository for used fuel and high level radioactive waste (HLW) proceeded sporadically over a three-decade period from the late 1950s until 1982, when the U.S. Congress enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) codifying a national approach for developing a deep geologic repository. Amendment of the NWPA in 1987 resulted in a number of dramatic changes in direction for the U.S. program, most notably the selection of Yucca Mountain as the only site of t...

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

231

EPRI Review of Geologic Disposal for Used Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste: Volume III - Review of National Repository Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effective termination of the Yucca Mountain program by the U.S. Administration in 2009 has left the U.S. program for management of used fuel and high level radioactive waste (HLW) in a state of uncertainty. In concert with this major policy reset and in response to the resulting policy vacuum, the President directed the Energy Secretary to establish the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC) "...to conduct a comprehensive review of policies for managing the back end of the nuclear f...

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

232

On an Additive Model of Daily Temperature Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guttman and Plantico reported on an additive model to describe daily temperature climates. This note reports on spectral analyses of the nonrandom residuals from the model. We concluded that quasi-periodic features are not present in the 1951–80 ...

Nathaniel B. Guttman; Marc S. Plantico

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Daily rainfall disaggregation using HYETOS model for Peninsular Malaysia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we have examined the applicability of single site disaggregation model (HYETOS) based on the Poisson cluster model to disaggregate daily rainfall to hourly data using proportional adjusting procedure. In this study, the modified Bartlett ... Keywords: disaggregation, hyetos, poisson cluster processes

Ibrahim Suliman Hanaish; Kamarulzaman Ibrahim; Abdul Aziz Jemain

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Generating Multiyear Gridded Daily Rainfall over New Zealand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Daily rainfall totals are a key input for hydrological models that are designed to simulate water and pollutant flow through both soil and waterways. Within New Zealand there are large areas and many river catchments where no long-term rainfall ...

Andrew Tait; Richard Turner

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Description: Lithium batteries are used daily in our work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with batteries from the same package or with the same expiration date. Avoid at all costs batteries that haveDescription: Lithium batteries are used daily in our work activities from flashlights, cell phones containing one SureFire 3-volt non-rechargeable 123 lithium battery and one Interstate 3-volt non

236

Variability in Daily, Zonal Mean Lower-Stratospheric Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite data from the microwave sounding unit (MSU) channel 4, when carefully merged, provide daily zonal anomalies of lower-stratosphere temperature with a level of precision between 0.01° and 0.08°C per 2.5° latitude band. Global averages of ...

John R. Christy; S. James Drouilhet Jr.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Comparison of the prediction accuracy of daily and monthly regression models for energy consumption in commercial buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The measured energy savings from retrofits in commercial buildings are generally determined as the difference between the energy consumption predicted using a baseline model and the measured energy consumption during the post retrofit period. Most baseline models are developed by regressing the daily energy consumption versus the daily average temperature (daily models) or by regressing the monthly energy consumption versus the monthly average temperature (monthly models). Since the post-retrofit weather is generally different from the weather used for model development, the prediction error of the baseline model may be different from the fitting error. Daily and monthly baseline models were developed for a midsize commercial building with (i) dual-duct CAV and VAV systems, (ii) office and university occupancy schedules, and (iii) different operating practices using the weather of a mild weather year. The prediction errors were identified as the difference between the energy use predicted by the regression models and the values simulated by a calibrated simulation program when both models use weather from a year very different from the weather year used to develop the regression model. The major results are summarized below: 1. When the AHUs operate 24 hours per day, annual energy prediction errors of daily regression models were found to be less than 1.4%. The errors of monthly regression models were found to be in the same range as the error of the daily models. 2. When the AHUs were shut down during unoccupied periods, annual prediction errors for both daily and monthly regression models were as high as 15%. However, the prediction error of daily regression models can be decreased to a range of 2% to 3% if the daily average energy consumption is regressed versus the average temperature during the operation period. Based on these findings, we suggest use of daily or monthly regression models when the AHUs are operated 24 hours per day. When shut-down is performed during unoccupied hours, daily energy consumption should be regressed versus the average ambient temperature during operating hours to develop the baseline model.

Wang, Jinrong

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Development of a high temperature solar powered water chiller, Volume 4. Phase 1 technical progress report, September 26, 1977--June 1, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of the high temperature solar powered water chiller was evaluated in a solar system. Three climatic regions were selected for the evaluation which represent significant variations in heating to cooling ratio. Typical multi-family and commercial building constructions were selected for each location, and building load files created using the TRNSYS program. Solar system components were selected on a preliminary basis and simulation models were prepared for each, including the chiller. Component cost and total system cost data were developed for economic trade-off studies. It is intended, under this contract, to evaluate various system configurations to determine which best interfaces with the solar driven Rankine unit, both from a performance and economic standpoint. Preliminary parametric studies were begun to identify the best type of system and best component sizing for a commercial building in two cities. Some prelimanry annual performance data have been obtained and related to conventional equipment performance.

English, R. A.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Initial performance assessment of the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste stored at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1, Methodology and results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This performance assessment characterized plausible treatment options conceived by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for its spent fuel and high-level radioactive waste and then modeled the performance of the resulting waste forms in two hypothetical, deep, geologic repositories: one in bedded salt and the other in granite. The results of the performance assessment are intended to help guide INEL in its study of how to prepare wastes and spent fuel for eventual permanent disposal. This assessment was part of the Waste Management Technology Development Program designed to help the US Department of Energy develop and demonstrate the capability to dispose of its nuclear waste. Although numerous caveats must be placed on the results, the general findings were as follows: Though the waste form behavior depended upon the repository type, all current and proposed waste forms provided acceptable behavior in the salt and granite repositories.

Rechard, R.P. [ed.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Site characterization plan conceptual design report for a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt, vertical emplacement mode: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Conceptual Design Report describes the conceptual design of a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt at a proposed site in Deaf Smith County, Texas. Waste receipt, processing, packing, and other surface facility operations are described. Operations in the shafts underground are described, including waste hoisting, transfer, and vertical emplacement. This report specifically addresses the vertical emplacement mode, the reference design for the repository. Waste retrieval capability is described. The report includes a description of the layout of the surface, shafts, and underground. Major equipment items are identified. The report includes plans for decommissioning and sealing of the facility. The report discusses how the repository will satisfy performance objectives. Chapters are included on basis for design, design analyses, and data requirements for completion of future design efforts. 105 figs., 52 tabs.

Not Available

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Property/composition relationships for Hanford high-level waste glasses melting at 115{degrees}C volume 1: Chapters 1-11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Composition Variation study (CVS) is being performed within the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Vitrification Technology Development (PVTD) project in support of a future high-level nuclear waste vitrification plant at the Hanford site in Washington. From 1989 to 1994, over 120 nonradioactive glasses were melted and properties measured in five statistically-designed experimental phases. Glass composition is represented by the 10 components SiO{sub 2}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}O, Li{sub 2}O, CaO, MgO, and Others (all remaining components). The properties measured include viscosity ({eta}), electrical conductivity ({epsilon}), glass transition temperature (T{sub g} ), thermal expansion of solid glass ({alpha}{sub s}) and molten glass ({alpha}{sub m}), crystallinity (quenched and canister centerline cooled glasses), liquidus temperature (T{sub L}), durability based on normalized elemental releases from the Materials Characterization Center-1 28-day dissolution test (MCC-1, r{sub mi}) and the 7-day Product Consistency Test (PCT, r{sub pi}), and solution pHs from MCC-1 and PCT. Amorphous phase separation was also evaluated. Empirical first- and second-order mixture models were fit using the CVS data to relate the various properties to glass composition. Equations for calculating the uncertainty associated with property values predicted by the models were also developed. The models were validated using both internal and external data. Other modeling approaches (e.g., non-bridging oxygen, free energy of hydration, phase-equilibria T{sub L}) were investigated for specific properties. A preliminary Qualified Composition Region was developed to identify glass compositions with high confidence of being processable in a melter and meeting waste form acceptance criteria.

Hrma, P.R.; Piepel, G.F.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

182,40183,40183,100.5,95,97,19.88,33600,42,27 182,40183,40183,100.5,95,97,19.88,33600,42,27 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40183,40184,40184,95,90,92.96,-4.04,39200,49,25 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40184,40185,40185,94,83,86.45,-6.51,33600,42,30 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40185,40186,40186,90,81.5,83.19,-3.26,47200,53,27 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40186,40189,40189,91,88.75,89.88,6.69,42400,53,30 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40189,40190,40190,71,67.75,68.95,-20.93,78400,95,30 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40190,40191,40191,61.25,58.75,59.99,-8.96,52800,64,31 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40191,40192,40192,56.25,54.75,55.33,-4.66,71200,82,32 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40192,40193,40193,53.75,53,53.36,-1.97,44000,55,25 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40193,40196,40196,55.75,54.75,55.64,2.28,21600,25,12

243

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana Rt Peak",41246,41247,41247,31.5,31.5,31.5,-1.5,1600,2,3 Indiana Rt Peak",41246,41247,41247,31.5,31.5,31.5,-1.5,1600,2,3 "Indiana Rt Peak",41247,41248,41248,34,33.5,33.75,2.25,1600,2,3 "Indiana Rt Peak",41248,41249,41249,37.25,37,37.13,3.38,8000,10,9 "Indiana Rt Peak",41249,41250,41250,34.25,33.25,33.67,-3.46,2400,3,6 "Indiana Rt Peak",41250,41253,41253,38.25,37,37.5,3.83,12800,16,13 "Indiana Rt Peak",41253,41254,41254,37.75,37.5,37.63,0.13,1600,2,4 "Indiana Rt Peak",41254,41255,41255,34,34,34,-3.63,2400,3,4 "Indiana Rt Peak",41255,41256,41256,32.25,32,32.19,-1.81,3200,4,6 "Indiana Rt Peak",41256,41257,41257,31,31,31,-1.19,1600,2,3 "Indiana Rt Peak",41257,41260,41260,33,32,32.5,1.5,1600,2,4 "Indiana Rt Peak",41260,41261,41261,33.9,33.5,33.66,1.16,3200,4,7

244

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

40911,40912,40912,35.25,34,34.38,-13.52,6400,8,9 40911,40912,40912,35.25,34,34.38,-13.52,6400,8,9 "Indiana",40912,40913,40913,31,30.45,30.73,-3.65,4800,6,7 "Indiana",40913,40914,40914,31,28.75,30.27,-0.46,20000,25,14 "Indiana",40917,40918,40918,29.05,29,29.03,-1.24,1600,2,4 "Indiana",40918,40919,40919,29.5,28.5,29.02,-0.01,5600,7,8 "Indiana",40919,40920,40920,32.25,30.75,31.59,2.57,6400,8,7 "Indiana",40920,40921,40921,35,33.25,33.92,2.33,30400,37,19 "Indiana",40921,40924,40924,29.5,29,29.25,-4.67,1600,2,4 "Indiana",40924,40925,40925,31.5,29.75,30.52,1.27,7200,9,8 "Indiana",40925,40926,40926,30.25,29.5,30,-0.52,3200,4,6 "Indiana",40926,40927,40927,33.75,32,32.61,2.61,13600,17,16 "Indiana",40927,40928,40928,33.5,32.5,33,0.39,9600,12,12

245

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

37.25,35.5,36.16,3.13,27200,25,16 37.25,35.5,36.16,3.13,27200,25,16 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",32,31,31.63,-4.53,12800,15,14 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",26.25,25.5,25.86,-5.77,7200,7,10 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",39.5,38.5,39.21,13.35,20000,24,13 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",47.75,45,46.51,7.3,27200,32,19 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",43.5,42,42.79,-3.72,39200,46,20

246

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26,25.25,25.71,-1.15,6800,16,15 26,25.25,25.71,-1.15,6800,16,15 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",24,23.25,23.63,-2.08,14400,17,14 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",23.85,22,23.36,-0.27,8800,22,16 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",21.85,19.25,20.77,-2.59,10000,25,15 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",21.75,20,21.32,0.55,9600,23,14 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",21.25,19,20.42,-0.9,7200,16,14

247

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

40.5,40.35,40.43,2.67,3200,8,3 40.5,40.35,40.43,2.67,3200,8,3 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",41,40.85,40.97,0.54,2000,2,3 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",36.25,36.25,36.25,-4.72,3200,1,2 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",39.05,39,39.02,2.77,1200,2,2 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",36.25,36.25,36.25,-2.77,3200,2,3 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",36.75,36.5,36.63,0.38,1600,4,3

248

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

258,37259,37259,31,27.5,29.51,108000,101,28 258,37259,37259,31,27.5,29.51,108000,101,28 "PJM West",37259,37260,37260,28.25,26.95,27.38,107200,96,32 "PJM West",37260,37263,37263,26.7,26.25,26.45,102400,106,29 "PJM West",37263,37264,37264,26.25,25.45,25.75,87200,81,27 "PJM West",37264,37265,37265,24.85,24.2,24.45,53600,58,27 "PJM West",37265,37266,37266,23.6,22.5,23.05,88000,87,25 "PJM West",37266,37267,37267,23.05,22.75,22.91,72000,79,24 "PJM West",37267,37270,37270,25.1,24.55,24.88,75200,82,29 "PJM West",37270,37271,37271,23.65,22.6,23.44,47200,44,22 "PJM West",37271,37272,37272,23.05,22.85,22.95,42400,47,21 "PJM West",37272,37273,37273,23.6,23.1,23.33,68000,76,27 "PJM West",37273,37274,37274,23.8,23.3,23.47,72800,73,28

249

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50.25,49,49.68,2.51,19200,46,20 50.25,49,49.68,2.51,19200,46,20 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",49.5,48.5,49.1,-0.58,18000,43,18 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",49.25,47,48.32,-0.78,27200,63,23 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",55,50.5,52.65,4.33,23200,29,20 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",47.75,46.5,47.18,-5.47,13600,34,19 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",47.75,44.75,45.82,-1.36,13600,28,18

250

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,50.33,2.26,87200,193,30 8,50.33,2.26,87200,193,30 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",45.5,48.4,-1.93,70400,154,29 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",45,46.48,-1.92,62000,146,28 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",49,51.48,5,90400,108,29 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",44.5,45.53,-5.95,38800,94,28

251

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1246,41247,41247,44.25,43.5,43.87,2.68,16400,29,14 1246,41247,41247,44.25,43.5,43.87,2.68,16400,29,14 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",41247,41248,41248,43,42,42.36,-1.51,36800,59,23 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",41248,41249,41249,40.25,39.75,40,-2.36,17200,24,11 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",41249,41250,41251,37,36.5,36.56,-3.44,31200,28,13 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",41250,41253,41253,41.25,40,40.84,4.28,12000,26,16 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",41253,41254,41254,39.5,38.5,39.08,-1.76,12400,26,15 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",41254,41255,41255,39.45,39,39.11,0.03,15600,26,13 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",41255,41256,41256,43.75,42,43.02,3.91,16000,32,20 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",41256,41257,41258,43,40.5,42.17,-0.85,38400,32,18 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",41257,41260,41260,42,41.5,41.62,-0.55,6400,10,11

252

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7,49.6,0.49,22400,56,24 7,49.6,0.49,22400,56,24 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",54,56.09,6.49,29200,73,27 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",57.5,60.07,3.98,28400,71,26 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",50,55.19,-4.88,32800,41,20 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",52.5,56.14,0.95,20800,52,22

253

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

084,39085,39085,43.25,43.25,43.25,-1.79,800,1,2 084,39085,39085,43.25,43.25,43.25,-1.79,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",39086,39087,39087,42.5,42.25,42.38,-0.87,1600,2,4 "ERCOT-South",39087,39090,39090,43.25,43.25,43.25,0.87,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",39090,39091,39091,45,45,45,1.75,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",39091,39092,39092,44.5,44.5,44.5,-0.5,800,1,2,,,," " "ERCOT-South",39099,39100,39100,62,62,62,17.5,3200,4,6 "ERCOT-South",39100,39101,39101,56.5,56,56.17,-5.83,2400,3,5 "ERCOT-South",39101,39104,39104,55,55,55,-1.17,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",39104,39105,39105,57.25,57,57.08,2.08,2400,3,4 "ERCOT-South",39105,39106,39106,59,58,58.54,1.46,4800,6,5 "ERCOT-South",39106,39107,39107,58,57.75,57.81,-0.73,3200,4,5 "ERCOT-South",39107,39108,39108,54.5,54.5,54.5,-3.31,800,1,2

254

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

720,38721,38721,69,68,68.6,1.54,74400,63,23 720,38721,38721,69,68,68.6,1.54,74400,63,23 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38721,38722,38722,74.25,69,70.77,2.17,68000,68,33 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38722,38723,38723,77.75,73.5,76.91,6.14,61600,70,35 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38723,38726,38726,74,69,70.06,-6.85,55200,57,22 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38726,38727,38727,63,61.75,62.52,-7.54,60800,72,29 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38727,38728,38728,55,51,53.51,-9.01,68800,55,30 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38728,38729,38729,50.5,49,49.37,-4.14,56000,55,25 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38729,38730,38730,50.6,49.5,50.17,0.8,54400,55,25 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38730,38733,38733,63.5,59,60.85,10.68,36800,37,23 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38733,38734,38734,65,64,64.63,3.78,12000,10,13

255

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

449,39450,39450,74,72,73,1600,2,4 449,39450,39450,74,72,73,1600,2,4 "Entergy",39450,39451,39451,64,64,64,800,1,2 "Entergy",39451,39454,39454,47.5,46.5,47,2400,3,3 "Entergy",39454,39455,39455,41.5,41,41.17,2400,3,3 "Entergy",39455,39456,39456,43,43,43,800,1,2 "Entergy",39456,39457,39457,52,49,50.33,2400,3,5 "Entergy",39457,39458,39458,49,49,49,800,1,2 "Entergy",39458,39461,39461,67,67,67,800,1,2 "Entergy",39461,39462,39462,73,73,73,800,1,2 "Entergy",39462,39463,39463,69,68,68.33,2400,3,5 "Entergy",39463,39464,39464,70,64,68,2400,3,3 "Entergy",39464,39465,39465,65,65,65,1600,2,2 "Entergy",39465,39468,39468,79,75,76.67,2400,3,5 "Entergy",39468,39469,39469,74,73,73.7,4000,5,8

256

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8720,38721,38721,51,50,50.625,3200,4,4 8720,38721,38721,51,50,50.625,3200,4,4 "Entergy",38721,38722,38722,56.5,53.5,55.3,4000,5,7 "Entergy",38722,38723,38723,60,60,60,5600,6,5 "Entergy",38723,38726,38726,59,58,58.5,1600,2,3 "Entergy",38726,38727,38727,55.5,53,54.1,4000,5,5 "Entergy",38727,38728,38728,53.5,52,53.0938,6400,8,9 "Entergy",38728,38729,38729,49,46,47.6667,9600,11,8 "Entergy",38729,38730,38730,49,47.5,48.0417,4800,6,7 "Entergy",38730,38733,38733,54.25,54.25,54.25,800,1,2 "Entergy",38733,38734,38734,53.75,53.75,53.75,800,1,2 "Entergy",38734,38735,38735,62,58,60.1,4000,5,6 "Entergy",38735,38736,38736,60,58,58.875,4800,4,5 "Entergy",38736,38737,38737,55,50,53.1944,7200,9,8

257

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

623,37624,37624,32.5,29,30.16,20800,26,20 623,37624,37624,32.5,29,30.16,20800,26,20 "Entergy",37624,37627,37627,36.75,34.75,35.54,28800,27,18 "Entergy",37627,37628,37628,38,35.5,36.31,45600,53,26 "Entergy",37628,37629,37629,35,31.25,33.69,26400,33,21 "Entergy",37629,37630,37630,33.55,32.75,33.19,22400,26,20 "Entergy",37630,37631,37631,37.75,34.5,35.51,36000,45,24 "Entergy",37631,37634,37634,43.75,38.25,41.62,36800,46,20 "Entergy",37634,37635,37635,42.5,38,40.72,17600,22,18 "Entergy",37635,37636,37636,43,42,42.61,16800,21,17 "Entergy",37636,37637,37637,43,41.25,42.02,12000,15,15 "Entergy",37637,37638,37638,50,44.15,45.85,8800,10,13 "Entergy",37638,37641,37641,41,39.25,40.1,31200,29,16 "Entergy",37641,37642,37642,41.75,38,40.09,25600,27,15

258

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

43.75,40,42.24,2.81,10000,25,19 43.75,40,42.24,2.81,10000,25,19 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",40,38.75,39.35,-2.89,12400,31,16 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",45,41.5,43.54,4.19,16000,38,20 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",44,42.25,43.09,-0.45,13600,34,19 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",41.5,40,40.64,-2.45,20000,25,16 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",42.25,41,41.35,0.71,14000,34,17

259

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6894,36895,36895,74.5,74,74.25,1600,2,3 6894,36895,36895,74.5,74,74.25,1600,2,3 "NEPOOL",36899,36900,36900,83,81,82,1600,2,3 "NEPOOL",36900,36901,36901,89,88,88.67,2400,3,3 "NEPOOL",36901,36902,36902,77.5,73,75.25,1600,2,3 "NEPOOL",36902,36903,36903,75.75,75.75,75.75,800,1,2 "NEPOOL",36903,36906,36906,75,74,74.5,2400,3,3 "NEPOOL",36906,36907,36907,80,76.5,77.75,3200,4,3 "NEPOOL",36907,36908,36908,79.5,76,78.38,3200,4,4 "NEPOOL",36908,36909,36909,75.5,74.5,75,3200,3,4 "NEPOOL",36909,36910,36910,71.75,70.75,71.25,1600,2,3 "NEPOOL",36910,36913,36913,74.75,74,74.4,4000,5,3 "NEPOOL",36914,36915,36915,67.5,66.5,67,2400,3,3 "NEPOOL",36915,36916,36916,67,65.75,66.33,2400,3,2 "NEPOOL",36916,36917,36917,65,61.25,63.38,3200,4,3

260

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,47,48.2,3.37,9600,24,17 1,47,48.2,3.37,9600,24,17 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",56,53,55.36,7.17,9600,24,17 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",58.2,55,57.22,1.85,9200,23,17 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",52.25,49,50.04,-7.18,8400,21,19 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",45,43.5,44.24,-5.8,26400,28,22 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",52.5,50,51.46,7.22,7600,19,15

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

48,45.75,46.49,-0.96,30000,63,25 48,45.75,46.49,-0.96,30000,63,25 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",47.5,45,46.75,0.26,31600,79,22 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",51,45,45.83,-0.92,40000,50,24 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",51.25,47.75,48.43,2.6,26000,51,22 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",52.75,49.25,50.5,2.07,27200,68,23 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",52.5,51.5,52.02,1.52,46400,55,20

262

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

62,66.21,-0.74,44400,109,30 62,66.21,-0.74,44400,109,30 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",60,64.12,-2.09,45200,113,30 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",59,60.9,-3.22,99200,123,29 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",62,63.2,2.3,50400,114,31 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",61.75,62.98,-0.22,48800,122,31

263

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

43.25,42,42.63,4.13,1600,2,4 43.25,42,42.63,4.13,1600,2,4 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",42.65,42.65,42.65,0.02,800,1,2 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",45.25,44,44.86,2.21,5600,7,8 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",46.5,45.75,46.08,1.22,2400,3,6 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",45,45,45,-1.08,4000,4,4 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",44.75,44.75,44.75,-0.25,1600,2,4

264

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

355,38356,38356,56.85,56.25,56.7,6400,7,7 355,38356,38356,56.85,56.25,56.7,6400,7,7 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38356,38357,38357,55.25,55,55.0833,2400,3,3 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38357,38358,38358,59,59,59,800,1,2 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38358,38359,38359,57.5,57,57.25,2400,3,5 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38359,38362,38362,55.5,55.5,55.5,3200,4,6 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38362,38363,38363,58.75,58,58.575,9600,11,10 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38363,38364,38364,57.75,57.5,57.625,1600,2,4 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38364,38365,38365,55.75,55.25,55.4688,12800,15,11 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38365,38366,38366,58.5,58.25,58.4583,4800,5,6 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38366,38369,38369,92,85,88.7143,5600,7,8 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38369,38370,38370,97.5,97,97.1667,2400,3,5

265

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

22.6,23.25,-1.53,6400,14,16 22.6,23.25,-1.53,6400,14,16 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",18.25,18.97,-4.28,6400,8,9 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",18,19.32,0.35,5600,14,10 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",17,17.24,-2.08,7200,12,10 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",18,18.61,1.38,7200,17,17

266

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

988,37991,37991,38.5,38,38.29,10400,13,11 988,37991,37991,38.5,38,38.29,10400,13,11 "Entergy",37991,37992,37992,56,50.5,51.79,15200,19,13 "Entergy",37992,37993,37993,60,56,58.95,12000,15,9 "Entergy",37993,37994,37994,55,51,52.44,16800,21,14 "Entergy",37994,37995,37995,43,40.5,41.28,7200,9,9 "Entergy",37995,37998,37998,45,39,40.86,5600,7,8 "Entergy",37998,37999,37999,39.5,38,38.42,8000,10,7 "Entergy",37999,38000,38000,39,36,37.48,10400,12,9 "Entergy",38000,38001,38001,40.25,38,38.66,14400,17,10 "Entergy",38001,38002,38002,39,36.25,36.98,10400,12,9 "Entergy",38002,38005,38005,39,37,37.44,13600,12,9 "Entergy",38005,38006,38006,55,48,52.64,5600,7,10 "Entergy",38006,38007,38007,54,47,50.58,12000,15,11

267

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

65.25,63,64.48,0.53,9600,12,15 65.25,63,64.48,0.53,9600,12,15 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",59,57,57.68,-6.8,20000,23,13 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",58,57,57.45,-0.23,8800,9,9 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",57,55.75,56.53,-0.92,8000,10,12 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",57.5,56,56.46,-0.07,10400,13,10 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",59.25,56.75,58.09,1.63,20000,25,17

268

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7988,37991,37991,62,62,62,800,1,2 7988,37991,37991,62,62,62,800,1,2 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",37991,37992,37992,70,69,69.5,1600,2,2 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",37992,37993,37993,75.25,72,73.81,3200,4,6 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",37993,37994,37994,81,76,78.3,8000,10,11 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",37994,37995,37995,85.75,81.5,84.24,12800,16,12 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",37998,37999,37999,77,72.5,74.12,6400,8,9 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",37999,38000,38000,120,92,104.81,16800,21,11 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38000,38001,38001,375,270,311.75,6400,8,8 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38001,38002,38002,175,170,171,4000,5,5 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38005,38006,38006,90,84,86.78,7200,9,7 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38006,38007,38007,94,81.5,87.42,10400,13,13 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",38007,38008,38008,76,72,74.69,6400,8,8

269

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

31.9,30.75,31.02,,14000,34,10 31.9,30.75,31.02,,14000,34,10 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",28.85,28,28.3,-2.72,52000,59,13 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",31.5,31,31.22,2.92,20000,41,13 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",34.25,33.4,33.8,2.58,22000,47,13 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",30,29.75,29.9,-3.9,52800,54,16 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",28.25,27.85,27.95,-1.95,48000,57,11

270

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

59.05,59,59.03,2.03,1600,2,3 59.05,59,59.03,2.03,1600,2,3 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",63,63,63,3.97,800,1,2 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",62.5,60,61,-2,2400,3,6 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",63.75,63,63.32,2.32,5600,7,8 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",56,55,55.5,-7.82,3200,4,5 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",55.5,55.5,55.5,0,800,1,2

271

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

815,39818,39818,58.5,55.25,56.28,5.13,40000,45,27 815,39818,39818,58.5,55.25,56.28,5.13,40000,45,27 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39818,39819,39819,60.25,57.75,58.92,2.64,109600,119,41 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39819,39820,39820,58,55,56.66,-2.26,49600,60,29 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39820,39821,39821,55.55,55,55.21,-1.45,48000,56,34 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39821,39822,39822,63,60.75,61.9,6.69,38400,46,28 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39822,39825,39825,69,66,67.63,5.73,62400,74,37 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39825,39826,39826,66.5,61,64.03,-3.6,91200,107,40 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39826,39827,39827,85.5,80,82.91,18.88,103200,124,50 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39827,39828,39828,100,88,93.22,10.31,110400,135,51 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39828,39829,39829,110,93,98.58,5.36,77600,93,37

272

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

988,37991,37991,43.25,36,38.11,35200,40,16 988,37991,37991,43.25,36,38.11,35200,40,16 "PJM West",37991,37992,37992,53.5,50,51.99,33600,41,24 "PJM West",37992,37993,37993,70,66.25,67.48,34400,40,25 "PJM West",37993,37994,37994,62,59.65,60.58,36000,41,19 "PJM West",37994,37995,37995,56.75,53,54.66,32800,39,23 "PJM West",37995,37998,37998,53.75,51.25,52.44,40000,47,25 "PJM West",37998,37999,37999,54,52.55,53.14,37600,47,24 "PJM West",37999,38000,38000,65.25,61.5,63.18,30400,37,20 "PJM West",38000,38001,38001,88,77,82.58,50400,57,28 "PJM West",38001,38002,38002,90,77,80.76,31200,37,20 "PJM West",38002,38005,38005,53.25,52.75,53.03,30400,38,18 "PJM West",38005,38006,38006,70,67,68.64,36000,45,24

273

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

150,150,,400,1,2 150,150,,400,1,2 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",180,180,30,2400,3,4 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",310,310,130,400,1,2 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",350,350,40,400,1,2 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",165,165,-185,800,1,2

274

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1246,41247,41247,27.5,27.5,27.5,0.17,800,1,2 1246,41247,41247,27.5,27.5,27.5,0.17,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",41247,41248,41248,28.5,28.5,28.5,1,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",41248,41249,41249,30,30,30,1.5,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",41250,41253,41253,30,29,29.5,-0.5,1600,2,3 "Entergy Peak",41253,41254,41254,30,29.75,29.88,0.38,1600,2,2 "Entergy Peak",41254,41255,41255,29.75,29.75,29.75,-0.13,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",41269,41270,41270,32,32,32,2.25,1600,2,2 "Entergy Peak",41355,41358,41358,38.5,38.5,38.5,6.5,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",41367,41368,41368,35,35,35,-3.5,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",41425,41428,41428,37,37,37,2,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",41436,41437,41437,42,42,42,5,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",41446,41449,41449,41,41,41,-1,800,1,2

275

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

32.5,33.04,-3.33,15200,19,19 32.5,33.04,-3.33,15200,19,19 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",37,37.32,4.28,7600,19,18 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",35,35.46,-1.86,9600,24,22 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",37,38.66,3.2,14800,36,27 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",39.75,40.34,1.69,9200,23,22

276

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0911,40912,40912,27,26.5,26.83,-2.17,8800,11,6 0911,40912,40912,27,26.5,26.83,-2.17,8800,11,6 "ERCOT Houston",40912,40913,40913,28.3,28,28.18,1.35,4800,6,7 "ERCOT Houston",40913,40914,40914,26.35,26.2,26.29,-1.89,3200,4,6 "ERCOT Houston",40914,40917,40917,27.25,27,27.13,0.84,8000,10,5 "ERCOT Houston",40917,40918,40918,27.75,27.5,27.58,0.45,2400,3,3 "ERCOT Houston",40918,40919,40919,27.5,27.5,27.5,-0.08,1600,2,2 "ERCOT Houston",40919,40920,40920,31.5,31,31.33,3.83,2400,3,4 "ERCOT Houston",40920,40921,40921,31,30.25,30.5,-0.83,2400,2,4 "ERCOT Houston",40925,40926,40926,26,25.75,25.96,-4.54,5600,7,4 "ERCOT Houston",40926,40927,40927,23.75,23.75,23.75,-2.21,2400,3,5 "ERCOT Houston",40928,40931,40931,22.15,22.15,22.15,-1.6,800,1,2

277

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

258,37259,37259,26,22.95,24.08,51200,64,19 258,37259,37259,26,22.95,24.08,51200,64,19 "Entergy",37259,37260,37260,28.25,24.5,26.09,38400,47,17 "Entergy",37260,37263,37263,22.5,17,20.72,34400,43,16 "Entergy",37263,37264,37264,25,19,20.17,19200,24,15 "Entergy",37264,37265,37265,20,19,19.55,44000,54,19 "Entergy",37265,37266,37266,23,18.75,19.31,50400,62,18 "Entergy",37266,37267,37267,19,15,18.21,45600,56,18 "Entergy",37267,37270,37270,18.85,17.4,18.21,65600,81,17 "Entergy",37270,37271,37271,21.75,18.2,19.01,24800,28,18 "Entergy",37271,37272,37272,22.35,18.95,20.98,31200,38,16 "Entergy",37272,37273,37273,22,19,21.2,49600,62,22 "Entergy",37273,37274,37274,22.5,19.5,20.93,46400,55,20 "Entergy",37274,37277,37277,19.75,18.75,19.26,36000,45,18

278

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",39904,39905,39905,30.85,30,30.44,"na",69200,129,16 SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",39904,39905,39905,30.85,30,30.44,"na",69200,129,16 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",39905,39906,39907,28.7,27.5,28.03,-2.41,119200,103,17 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",39906,39909,39909,31.5,30.25,30.5,2.47,43200,89,17 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",39909,39910,39910,33.3,32.45,32.83,2.33,40800,80,20 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",39910,39911,39912,29,28,28.69,-4.14,116000,117,22 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",39911,39913,39914,27.25,26.55,26.88,-1.81,96800,110,21 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",39912,39916,39916,28.5,27.5,28.01,1.13,58000,119,19 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",39916,39917,39917,26.65,25,26.27,-1.74,26400,51,17 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",39917,39918,39918,28.25,27.7,27.97,1.7,55600,101,20

279

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

43,39.05,41.9,4.15,5600,7,8 43,39.05,41.9,4.15,5600,7,8 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",40.5,38.5,39.53,-2.37,3200,4,7 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",39.25,38.25,38.9,-0.63,13600,17,15 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",41.5,39,40,1.1,10400,13,11 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",39,37.75,38.3,-1.7,12000,14,15 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",44.5,43,43.4,5.1,4000,5,5

280

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

62.5,65.15,3.64,62800,150,34 62.5,65.15,3.64,62800,150,34 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",54.25,61.54,-3.61,153600,172,34 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",60.5,62.02,0.48,81200,188,36 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",61.75,62.73,0.71,69600,168,34 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",62.75,63.47,0.74,74400,170,34

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,45.5,-0.2,22800,57,25 1,45.5,-0.2,22800,57,25 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",43.5,45.44,-0.06,96000,198,32 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",42.25,43.27,-2.17,89600,210,33 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",39,42.7,-0.57,118400,261,35 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",42.5,43.86,1.16,169600,196,33

282

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

40182,40183,40183,60.5,60.5,60.5,7.5,800,1,2 40182,40183,40183,60.5,60.5,60.5,7.5,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40183,40184,40184,62.25,62.25,62.25,1.75,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40189,40190,40190,63.5,60.75,62.42,0.17,2400,3,3 "Entergy Peak",40190,40191,40191,46,45,45.5,-16.92,1600,2,2 "Entergy Peak",40196,40197,40197,40,40,40,-5.5,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40197,40198,40198,40,40,40,0,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40198,40199,40199,38,38,38,-2,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40199,40200,40200,38,38,38,0,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40204,40205,40205,47,47,47,9,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40205,40206,40206,45,45,45,-2,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40206,40207,40207,48,48,48,3,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40210,40211,40211,43,43,43,-5,800,1,2

283

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

449,39450,39450,131,114,125.81,37.67,95200,116,49 449,39450,39450,131,114,125.81,37.67,95200,116,49 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39450,39451,39451,106,99,102.43,-23.38,78400,96,39 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39451,39454,39454,54,52.5,53.44,-48.99,65600,74,34 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39454,39455,39455,45,41,42.69,-10.75,87200,98,48 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39455,39456,39456,47.5,45,46.31,3.62,47200,57,36 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39456,39457,39457,59.5,54.25,57.53,11.22,35200,44,34 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39457,39458,39458,51,46.25,48.3,-9.23,72800,88,51 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39458,39461,39461,76.5,70,74.88,26.58,103200,121,42 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39461,39462,39462,80,75.5,77.94,3.06,109600,127,40 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",39462,39463,39463,72,68,70.47,-7.47,78400,95,35

284

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

911,40912,40912,56,52,53.84,-11.87,161600,191,55 911,40912,40912,56,52,53.84,-11.87,161600,191,55 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40912,40913,40913,39,38,38.7,-15.14,45600,54,30 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40913,40914,40914,33.25,33,33.05,-5.65,42400,53,33 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40914,40917,40917,37.25,36.5,36.8,3.75,43200,51,34 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40917,40918,40918,36,35.25,35.53,-1.27,48000,57,31 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40918,40919,40919,35,34.2,34.6,-0.93,32000,40,28 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40919,40920,40920,35.5,35,35.14,0.54,43200,48,27 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40920,40921,40921,40.75,38.6,39.44,4.3,108000,111,39 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40921,40924,40924,43.5,41.6,42.69,3.25,61600,74,39 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40924,40925,40925,35.25,34.5,34.68,-8.01,36000,44,23

285

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Da LMP Peak",41246,41247,41247,48,45.75,47.16,-7.85,40000,48,21 Da LMP Peak",41246,41247,41247,48,45.75,47.16,-7.85,40000,48,21 "Nepool MH Da LMP Peak",41247,41248,41248,58.5,55,57.81,10.65,26400,32,21 "Nepool MH Da LMP Peak",41248,41249,41249,79.75,75,76.49,18.68,32800,39,18 "Nepool MH Da LMP Peak",41249,41250,41250,65,50.5,51.47,-25.02,35200,42,23 "Nepool MH Da LMP Peak",41250,41253,41253,47,45.5,46.48,-4.99,12800,16,14 "Nepool MH Da LMP Peak",41253,41254,41254,50,46,47.3,0.82,38400,44,22 "Nepool MH Da LMP Peak",41254,41255,41255,70,57,59.54,12.24,39200,49,19 "Nepool MH Da LMP Peak",41255,41256,41256,50,48.25,48.97,-10.57,53600,59,29 "Nepool MH Da LMP Peak",41256,41257,41257,39.25,38.5,38.98,-9.99,11200,14,10 "Nepool MH Da LMP Peak",41257,41260,41260,45,45,45,6.02,3200,4,6

286

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

82,75,79.66,6.43,30400,38,26 82,75,79.66,6.43,30400,38,26 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",62,58,60.11,-19.55,24000,30,22 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",45.05,43.75,44.81,-15.3,24000,28,17 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",38,36,36.89,-7.92,35200,39,17 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",44,41.5,42.84,5.95,32000,39,23 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",48,44,46.44,3.6,22400,28,20

287

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

46,48.6,-4.22,46000,115,33 46,48.6,-4.22,46000,115,33 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",46.5,49.21,0.61,51600,120,30 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",45.75,46.71,-2.5,123200,150,36 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",46.5,49.35,2.64,63600,151,36 "Mid Columbia Peak","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",47.3,49.44,0.09,65600,163,34

288

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

39815,39818,39818,42,39,41,4.5,2400,3,4 39815,39818,39818,42,39,41,4.5,2400,3,4 "Entergy Peak",39818,39819,39819,44.5,44.5,44.5,3.5,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",39819,39820,39820,44.5,44,44.25,-0.25,1600,2,4 "Entergy Peak",39820,39821,39821,46,45,45.5,1.25,2400,3,6 "Entergy Peak",39821,39822,39822,45,45,45,-0.5,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",39822,39825,39825,45,40,42.5,-2.5,1600,2,3 "Entergy Peak",39825,39826,39826,48,48,48,5.5,1600,2,3 "Entergy Peak",39827,39828,39828,55,53,54,6,1600,2,4 "Entergy Peak",39828,39829,39829,56,53,54.33,0.33,2400,3,5 "Entergy Peak",39832,39833,39833,42.5,42.5,42.5,-11.83,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",39833,39834,39834,43,42,42.5,0,1600,2,4 "Entergy Peak",39836,39839,39839,40,38,39,-3.5,1600,2,3

289

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1246,41247,41247,30,30,30,-2.63,1600,2,2 1246,41247,41247,30,30,30,-2.63,1600,2,2 "ERCOT Houston",41250,41253,41253,33,33,33,3,800,1,2 "ERCOT Houston",41260,41261,41261,27,26.9,26.98,-6.02,4000,5,4 "ERCOT Houston",41263,41264,41264,28.5,28.25,28.33,1.35,2400,3,4 "ERCOT Houston",41270,41271,41271,26.5,26.5,26.5,-1.83,800,1,2 "ERCOT Houston",41288,41289,41289,34.25,34,34.13,7.63,1600,2,3 "ERCOT Houston",41289,41290,41290,33.85,33.75,33.78,-0.35,2400,3,4 "ERCOT Houston",41338,41339,41339,34.75,34.25,34.58,0.8,2400,3,3 "ERCOT Houston",41372,41373,41373,42.75,42.75,42.75,8.17,800,1,2 "ERCOT Houston",41381,41382,41382,35.55,35.55,35.55,-7.2,800,1,2 "ERCOT Houston",41386,41387,41387,37.5,37.5,37.5,1.95,800,1,2

290

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

60.75,57.5,59.33,7.47,34400,42,23 60.75,57.5,59.33,7.47,34400,42,23 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",58.5,55,56.62,-2.71,36800,45,25 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",65,62.25,63.61,6.99,76000,86,34 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",66.5,60,63.84,0.23,43200,52,26 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",58.5,55,57.1,-6.74,36000,41,21 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",48,44,46.02,-11.08,33600,42,27

291

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

546,40547,40547,37,37,37,0,800,1,2 546,40547,40547,37,37,37,0,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40547,40548,40548,36,36,36,-1,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40548,40549,40549,33.75,33.75,33.75,-2.25,1600,2,2 "Entergy Peak",40550,40553,40553,42,42,42,8.25,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40555,40556,40556,52.75,49,50.88,8.88,1600,2,3 "Entergy Peak",40562,40563,40563,38.5,38,38.1,-12.78,4000,5,4 "Entergy Peak",40563,40564,40564,39,39,39,0.9,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40567,40568,40568,39,39,39,0,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40568,40569,40569,38,38,38,-1,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40571,40574,40574,36,36,36,-2,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40574,40575,40575,39.5,39.5,39.5,3.5,800,1,2 "Entergy Peak",40575,40576,40576,37,36.5,36.75,-2.75,1600,2,2

292

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

DA LMP",40911,40912,40912,92,84.75,87.16,-14.07,46400,56,29 DA LMP",40911,40912,40912,92,84.75,87.16,-14.07,46400,56,29 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40912,40913,40913,49,46,47.55,-39.61,78400,77,24 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40913,40914,40914,39.75,39.25,39.57,-7.98,12000,15,10 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40914,40917,40917,39,38,38.39,-1.18,8800,11,9 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40917,40918,40918,38.25,38,38.14,-0.25,8000,9,11 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40918,40919,40919,41.5,39.9,40.88,2.74,70400,83,25 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40919,40920,40920,37.25,36.75,36.83,-4.05,20000,23,16 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40920,40921,40921,44,43.5,43.73,6.9,11200,11,12 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40921,40924,40924,67,65.5,66.35,22.62,16800,21,15 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40924,40925,40925,50.75,50,50.24,-16.11,11200,14,12

293

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6893,36894,36894,65.5,64.5,65,1600,2,2 6893,36894,36894,65.5,64.5,65,1600,2,2 "PJM West",36894,36895,36895,63,59.5,61.25,3200,4,2 "PJM West",36895,36896,36896,60,58.5,59.12,4800,6,4 "PJM West",36899,36900,36900,59.5,59.5,59.5,800,1,2 "PJM West",36900,36901,36901,58,55.5,56.61,5600,7,6 "PJM West",36901,36902,36902,50.5,49,49.75,3200,4,4 "PJM West",36902,36903,36903,47,46,46.33,4800,6,3 "PJM West",36903,36906,36906,45.5,45,45.12,3200,4,6 "PJM West",36906,36907,36907,46,42,44.21,5600,7,6 "PJM West",36907,36908,36908,42.5,42,42.4,4000,4,7 "PJM West",36908,36909,36909,41,39,39.56,7200,7,6 "PJM West",36909,36910,36910,39.5,39,39.25,2400,3,5 "PJM West",36910,36913,36913,51,50,50.43,5600,5,6

294

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6893,36894,36894,83,83,83,800,1,2 6893,36894,36894,83,83,83,800,1,2 "Entergy",36894,36895,36895,93,93,93,800,1,2 "Entergy",36895,36896,36896,83,78.5,80.83,7200,9,4 "Entergy",36896,36899,36899,78,67,74.25,3200,4,5 "Entergy",36899,36900,36900,57,54,55.5,1600,2,4 "Entergy",36900,36901,36901,53,53,53,1600,1,2 "Entergy",36902,36903,36903,67.5,65,66.5,4000,5,3 "Entergy",36903,36906,36906,52.5,48,50.25,1600,2,3 "Entergy",36907,36908,36908,52,45,48.86,8800,11,4 "Entergy",36908,36909,36909,56,51,51.95,16800,21,6 "Entergy",36909,36910,36910,50,48.5,49.33,24000,30,7 "Entergy",36910,36913,36913,56.5,54,55.25,11200,13,7 "Entergy",36913,36914,36914,63,57,58.38,6400,8,3 "Entergy",36914,36915,36915,61.5,42,55.75,15200,19,9

295

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

449,39450,39450,180,158,161.65,26400,33,22 449,39450,39450,180,158,161.65,26400,33,22 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39450,39451,39451,123,108,114.27,36800,46,28 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39451,39454,39454,77,75.5,76.31,21600,26,17 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39454,39455,39455,68.25,66,67.1,41600,51,26 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39455,39456,39456,69.5,68,68.71,21600,27,18 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39456,39457,39457,81,74,75.75,30400,35,17 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39457,39458,39458,75,69.75,71.18,24800,31,19 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39458,39461,39461,80.5,77,79.38,17600,19,17 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39461,39462,39462,102,95,98.76,52000,64,24 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39462,39463,39463,90.5,87.5,88.59,34400,43,25 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39463,39464,39464,85,83.5,84.21,20800,26,14

296

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

815,39818,39818,43,42.5,42.75,5.17,1600,2,4 815,39818,39818,43,42.5,42.75,5.17,1600,2,4 "ERCOT-South",39818,39819,39819,40,39.5,39.88,-2.87,3200,4,3," " "ERCOT-South",39819,39820,39820,39,38,38.73,-1.15,8800,9,9 "ERCOT-South",39820,39821,39821,41.5,39,39.82,1.09,8800,11,9 "ERCOT-South",39821,39822,39822,38.75,37.5,38.03,-1.79,6400,8,10 "ERCOT-South",39822,39825,39825,43.5,43.5,43.5,5.47,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",39825,39826,39826,55,50.5,52.95,9.45,8800,11,12,,," " "ERCOT-South",39826,39827,39827,45.5,43.5,44.44,-8.51,14400,18,18 "ERCOT-South",39827,39828,39828,45,44.25,44.68,0.24,12000,14,12 "ERCOT-South",39828,39829,39829,44,42.75,43.18,-1.5,8000,10,10 "ERCOT-South",39833,39834,39834,33,32.5,32.75,-10.43,9600,12,8

297

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

54.5,53.4,53.98,5.44,3200,4,7 54.5,53.4,53.98,5.44,3200,4,7 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",49,47.25,48.27,-5.71,8000,10,12 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",56,53.5,54.75,6.48,4800,6,10 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",97,87,89.96,35.21,20800,18,16 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",56.25,51,53.71,-36.25,16800,19,15 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",46.75,46,46.33,-7.38,17600,22,17

298

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nepool MH Da Lmp ",39815,39818,39818,65.55,65,65.44,-5.89,12000,15,9 Nepool MH Da Lmp ",39815,39818,39818,65.55,65,65.44,-5.89,12000,15,9 "Nepool MH Da Lmp",39818,39819,39819,67,65,66.22,0.78,39200,46,22 "Nepool MH Da Lmp ",39819,39820,39820,65,63.25,63.83,-2.39,20000,24,18 "Nepool MH Da Lmp ",39820,39821,39821,67.5,65.75,66.47,2.64,28000,33,16 "Nepool MH Da Lmp ",39821,39822,39822,78.5,76,77.31,10.84,21600,27,16 "Nepool MH Da Lmp ",39822,39825,39825,100,90,94.19,16.88,28800,35,19 "Nepool MH Da Lmp ",39825,39826,39826,81,72.75,74.76,-19.43,36000,44,24 "Nepool MH Da Lmp ",39826,39827,39827,101,98,99.83,25.07,16000,20,18 "Nepool MH Da Lmp",39827,39828,39828,130,117,120.32,20.49,40000,50,27 "Nepool MH Da Lmp ",39828,39829,39829,120,106,109.76,-10.56,72800,91,35

299

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SP 15",39449,39450,39450,74.6,69.25,73.56,97200,234,36 SP 15",39449,39450,39450,74.6,69.25,73.56,97200,234,36 "SP 15",39450,39451,39452,70,63,68.49,291200,275,37 "SP 15",39451,39454,39454,75,68,69.2,140000,326,39 "SP 15",39454,39455,39455,73.25,69,71.52,144800,329,37 "SP 15",39455,39456,39456,72.25,70.25,71.32,198000,425,35 "SP 15",39456,39457,39457,73.75,70.75,72.79,157600,351,37 "SP 15",39457,39458,39459,70.25,67.25,68.46,226400,268,33 "SP 15",39458,39461,39461,75,73.25,73.77,184000,366,38 "SP 15",39461,39462,39462,78.25,75,75.77,110800,235,34 "SP 15",39462,39463,39464,88,77.5,79.42,323200,351,36 "SP 15",39463,39465,39466,79,74.25,77.52,259200,302,36 "SP 15",39464,39468,39468,84.45,77,82.35,126400,287,36

300

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

54.55,54.05,54.37,1.9,8800,20,11 54.55,54.05,54.37,1.9,8800,20,11 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",53.25,52.75,53.09,-1.28,35200,64,16 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",52,51.25,51.51,-1.58,13600,28,17 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",56.5,53.25,54.08,2.57,65600,71,17 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",51.15,50.8,51.01,-3.07,27600,53,19 "NP15","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",50.75,50,50.18,-0.83,23200,39,11

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

084,39085,39085,62,55,55.98,10400,13,10 084,39085,39085,62,55,55.98,10400,13,10 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39085,39086,39086,54.75,52.75,53.53,30400,38,20 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39086,39087,39087,56,55,55.35,24800,31,19 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39087,39090,39090,58,56.5,57.08,8000,10,12 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39090,39091,39091,58.75,57.25,57.86,34400,41,19 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39091,39092,39092,60.5,59,59.8,20800,25,19 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39092,39093,39093,65,63.5,64.04,13600,16,15 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39093,39094,39094,61.25,59.75,60.82,15200,19,14 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39094,39097,39097,62,59,60.95,16800,21,16 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39097,39098,39098,69.25,67,68.25,22400,28,15 "NEPOOL MH DA LMP",39098,39099,39099,89,84.5,86.33,34400,43,26

302

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

53.5,48,50.93,,13600,17,11 53.5,48,50.93,,13600,17,11 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",57.5,52.75,55,4.07,31200,39,15 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",51.5,49.5,50.38,-4.62,3200,4,4 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",52,49.5,51.25,0.87,19200,24,12 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",46.75,45.25,45.8,-5.45,21600,27,14 "Indiana","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",43,39.5,41.3,-4.5,10400,13,8

303

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1246,41247,41247,28.5,26.5,27.76,-0.16,63200,141,25 1246,41247,41247,28.5,26.5,27.76,-0.16,63200,141,25 "Mid Columbia Peak",41247,41248,41248,28.5,27,27.86,0.1,79200,187,26 "Mid Columbia Peak",41248,41249,41249,28,23.5,27.02,-0.84,76000,170,25 "Mid Columbia Peak",41249,41250,41251,23.25,21.25,22.44,-4.58,159200,191,23 "Mid Columbia Peak",41250,41253,41253,25.25,21.25,23.45,1.01,74800,176,25 "Mid Columbia Peak",41253,41254,41254,23.75,20.75,22.51,-0.94,92800,209,26 "Mid Columbia Peak",41254,41255,41255,24.5,23,23.84,1.33,100800,222,27 "Mid Columbia Peak",41255,41256,41256,28,25.5,26.88,3.04,80800,182,26 "Mid Columbia Peak",41256,41257,41258,27.75,26.5,27.13,0.25,152000,171,25 "Mid Columbia Peak",41257,41260,41260,25.75,23.25,24.43,-2.7,76000,180,25

304

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38.75,37.25,37.95,-2.02,13600,17,14 38.75,37.25,37.95,-2.02,13600,17,14 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",43.5,40,42.39,4.44,10000,25,20 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",39.5,37.75,38.26,-4.13,9200,23,15 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",40.25,37.25,38.46,0.2,7600,19,14 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",41,38,38.93,0.47,9200,23,15 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",38.25,36.5,37.29,-1.64,13600,17,17

305

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

623,37624,37624,37.45,33.75,35.69,28800,36,19 623,37624,37624,37.45,33.75,35.69,28800,36,19 "PJM West",37624,37627,37627,48,47,47.58,28800,32,20 "PJM West",37627,37628,37628,50.5,48,49.53,33600,42,19 "PJM West",37628,37629,37629,47,44.25,45.39,35200,44,20 "PJM West",37629,37630,37630,39,37,37.73,27200,33,19 "PJM West",37630,37631,37631,43.5,41.75,42.44,25600,27,17 "PJM West",37631,37634,37634,64,56.5,58.31,20800,26,19 "PJM West",37634,37635,37635,56,54.8,55.52,19200,24,19 "PJM West",37635,37636,37636,56.5,54.9,55.51,28000,33,19 "PJM West",37636,37637,37637,53,50.25,51.89,32000,40,22 "PJM West",37637,37638,37638,54,52,52.63,30400,38,23 "PJM West",37638,37641,37641,48.25,47,47.48,26400,33,17

306

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

258,37259,37259,33.75,32.5,33.23,10400,13,12 258,37259,37259,33.75,32.5,33.23,10400,13,12 "NEPOOL",37259,37260,37260,36.25,35,35.98,24800,31,18 "NEPOOL",37260,37263,37263,34,33.25,33.66,8800,11,12 "NEPOOL",37263,37264,37264,34,33.5,33.67,10400,13,11 "NEPOOL",37264,37265,37265,32.6,31,32.04,9600,11,13 "NEPOOL",37265,37266,37266,29.5,28.7,29.1,10400,13,11 "NEPOOL",37266,37267,37267,29.25,28.25,28.75,12000,15,12 "NEPOOL",37267,37270,37270,31,30,30.24,16800,17,13 "NEPOOL",37270,37271,37271,30.5,29.75,30.09,30400,36,15 "NEPOOL",37271,37272,37272,29.5,28.65,28.98,23200,28,15 "NEPOOL",37272,37273,37273,30.4,29.8,30.02,32800,39,16 "NEPOOL",37273,37274,37274,30,29.1,29.37,11200,14,15 "NEPOOL",37274,37277,37277,30,29.25,29.72,6400,8,9

307

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

182,40183,40183,89,82.75,86.08,20.49,214400,242,55 182,40183,40183,89,82.75,86.08,20.49,214400,242,55 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40183,40184,40184,80.65,74.5,77.16,-8.92,270400,295,56 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40184,40185,40185,80.5,77.5,78.92,1.76,93600,111,47 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40185,40186,40186,86,78.25,80.64,1.72,278400,316,62 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40186,40189,40189,82.75,72,80.64,0,81600,98,36 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40189,40190,40190,73,65.75,67.86,-12.78,178400,205,50 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40190,40191,40191,55.25,53,53.89,-13.97,162400,180,50 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40191,40192,40192,49.75,48,48.84,-5.05,97600,109,45 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40192,40193,40193,46.25,43.5,44.65,-4.19,99200,117,46 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40193,40196,40196,46,44.95,45.38,0.73,59200,71,35

308

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8721,38722,38722,57.5,57.5,57.5,-22.5,800,1,2 8721,38722,38722,57.5,57.5,57.5,-22.5,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",38748,38749,38749,57,57,57,-0.5,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",38751,38754,38754,59,59,59,2,1600,2,3 "ERCOT-South",38786,38789,38789,48,48,48,-11,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",38803,38804,38804,52.5,50.5,51.06,3.06,6400,8,7 "ERCOT-South",38804,38805,38805,54.75,54.75,54.75,3.69,3200,2,3 "ERCOT-South",38805,38806,38806,55.25,53.5,54.21,-0.54,4800,6,5 "ERCOT-South",38806,38807,38807,58,58,58,3.79,800,1,2,,,,," " "ERCOT-South",38810,38811,38811,60,60,60,2,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",38811,38812,38812,64,64,64,4,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",38812,38813,38813,63,62.5,62.63,-1.37,3200,4,6 "ERCOT-South",38813,38814,38814,62,62,62,-0.63,800,1,2

309

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

546,40547,40547,51,47.5,48.71,-0.32,96800,116,39 546,40547,40547,51,47.5,48.71,-0.32,96800,116,39 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40547,40548,40548,49.25,47.45,48.14,-0.57,64000,67,40 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40548,40549,40549,53.5,51.5,52.27,4.13,55200,66,37 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40549,40550,40550,60.5,57,58.43,6.16,80000,93,39 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40550,40553,40553,63.5,57,60.43,2,105600,124,41 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40553,40554,40554,69.5,64.25,66.98,6.55,128800,145,44 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40554,40555,40555,72.25,62,67.54,0.56,158400,194,51 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40555,40556,40556,84,75,80.13,12.59,92800,116,46 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40556,40557,40557,89.5,80.5,84.09,3.96,108800,133,42 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",40557,40560,40560,57.55,55,56.11,-27.98,88800,105,40

310

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

40182,40183,40183,52.5,51.5,51.85,0.9,67600,116,25 40182,40183,40183,52.5,51.5,51.85,0.9,67600,116,25 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",40183,40184,40184,51.75,50.5,51.01,-0.84,61600,115,25 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",40184,40185,40185,53,50.5,51.39,0.38,59600,115,24 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",40185,40186,40187,58.5,55,56.79,5.4,394400,381,29 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",40186,40189,40189,51.25,50.75,51,-5.79,59200,116,26 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",40189,40190,40190,50.25,49,49.8,-1.2,53600,102,25 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",40190,40191,40192,51.5,50.75,51.12,1.32,59200,61,19 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",40191,40193,40194,49,48.25,48.35,-2.77,77600,71,20 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",40192,40196,40196,50.5,50,50.3,1.95,38800,71,18 "SP-15 Gen DA LMP Peak",40193,40197,40197,51.35,50,50.93,0.63,66800,84,19

311

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

084,39085,39085,43,43,43,4800,6,6 084,39085,39085,43,43,43,4800,6,6 "Entergy",39085,39086,39086,40,34,38.3,4000,5,6 "Entergy",39086,39087,39087,38,37,37.5,1600,2,2 "Entergy",39087,39090,39090,41,41,41,800,1,2 "Entergy",39090,39091,39091,49,46,48.14,5600,6,6 "Entergy",39091,39092,39092,48,48,48,2400,3,4 "Entergy",39092,39093,39093,49,47,48,1600,2,3 "Entergy",39093,39094,39094,45,44,44.5,1600,2,4 "Entergy",39094,39097,39097,51,47,49.33,2400,3,5 "Entergy",39097,39098,39098,58.5,53.5,56.06,6400,8,8 "Entergy",39098,39099,39099,62,56,58.97,7200,9,9 "Entergy",39099,39100,39100,54.5,53,53.6,4000,5,5 "Entergy",39100,39101,39101,50.75,50,50.15,4000,5,9 "Entergy",39101,39104,39104,55,53,54,2400,3,3

312

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Companies"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

546,40547,40547,55.25,54,54.67,7.01,27200,29,18 546,40547,40547,55.25,54,54.67,7.01,27200,29,18 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40547,40548,40548,50,48.75,49.39,-5.28,14400,16,14 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40548,40549,40549,54.25,53,53.44,4.05,24800,31,23 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40549,40550,40550,55.5,53.25,54.05,0.61,84800,80,24 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40550,40553,40553,65.5,64.75,65.01,10.96,21600,25,18 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40553,40554,40554,71,68.5,69.33,4.32,15200,18,17 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40554,40555,40555,79,72,77.51,8.18,68800,85,29 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40555,40556,40556,100.5,88,94.96,17.45,40000,49,23 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40556,40557,40557,92.25,87,87.7,-7.26,25600,31,23 "Nepool MH DA LMP",40557,40560,40560,66,63.5,65.03,-22.67,28000,30,17

313

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

355,38356,38356,41,39,40.13,6.73,12000,14,13 355,38356,38356,41,39,40.13,6.73,12000,14,13 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38356,38357,38357,41,40,40.57,0.44,13600,15,15 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38357,38358,38358,44,42,43.23,2.66,30400,35,16 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38358,38359,38359,46.25,44,45.07,1.84,17600,22,12 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38359,38362,38362,39.5,38.75,39.17,-5.9,9600,12,11 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38362,38363,38363,45,41.5,43.31,4.14,26400,32,17 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38363,38364,38364,44,41.25,41.8,-1.51,16000,19,15 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38364,38365,38365,39.5,38.5,39.1,-2.7,10400,13,13 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38365,38366,38366,51.5,47,48.26,9.16,57600,58,17 "PJM Wh Real Time Peak",38366,38369,38369,65,63,63.48,15.22,23200,21,14

314

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

34.5,34.5,34.5,3.21,1600,2,3 34.5,34.5,34.5,3.21,1600,2,3 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",35.75,35.5,35.58,1.08,2400,3,4 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",36.5,36,36.25,0.67,4000,5,7 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",36.25,36,36.13,-0.12,3200,4,4 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",44,43.5,43.75,7.62,3200,4,6 "ERCOT Houston","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",44.25,43.75,44.04,0.29,5600,7,8

315

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0911,40912,40912,27,26.5,26.63,-2.76,6400,8,6 0911,40912,40912,27,26.5,26.63,-2.76,6400,8,6 "ERCOT-South",40912,40913,40913,28,27.25,27.72,1.09,8000,9,7 "ERCOT-South",40913,40914,40914,25.75,25.75,25.75,-1.97,2400,3,4 "ERCOT-South",40914,40917,40917,27,27,27,1.25,1600,2,4 "ERCOT-South",40919,40920,40920,31,31,31,4,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",40920,40921,40921,30.25,30.25,30.25,-0.75,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",40925,40926,40926,25.5,25.5,25.5,-4.75,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",40926,40927,40927,23.25,23.25,23.25,-2.25,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",40931,40932,40932,24.5,24.5,24.5,1.25,800,1,2 "ERCOT-South",40932,40933,40933,26,25.75,25.96,1.46,4800,6,4 "ERCOT-South",40933,40934,40934,28,27,27.5,1.54,1600,2,4 "ERCOT-South",40934,40935,40935,29,28.75,28.88,1.38,1600,2,4

316

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

68.5,66,67.29,5.05,28400,71,21 68.5,66,67.29,5.05,28400,71,21 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",65,62.5,63.85,-3.44,27200,66,25 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",65.25,61.75,63.39,-0.46,80800,99,26 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",65.75,63.5,64.58,1.19,49200,107,25 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",65.75,64,64.98,0.4,32400,81,24 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",65.25,62.25,63.26,-1.72,78400,96,25

317

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

65.75,63,64.97,4.97,29600,55,25 65.75,63,64.97,4.97,29600,55,25 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",62.25,59,61.4,-3.57,106400,109,24 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",63,59.25,60.22,-1.18,45600,102,26 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",63.5,61.75,62.26,2.04,40400,86,26 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",64.2,62,62.52,0.26,38400,75,25 "Palo Verde","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel",66.45,62,63.19,0.67,45200,87,27

318

"Price Hub","Trade Date","Delivery Start Date","Delivery End Date","High Price $/MWh","Low Price $/MWh","Wtd Avg Price $/MWh","Change","Daily Volume MWh","Number of Trades","Number of Counterparties"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PJM-West Real Time Peak",41276,41277,41277,44,41.75,42.64,-6.4,60000,72,34 PJM-West Real Time Peak",41276,41277,41277,44,41.75,42.64,-6.4,60000,72,34 "PJM-West Real Time Peak",41277,41278,41278,37,36,36.53,-6.11,19200,23,23 "PJM-West Real Time Peak",41278,41281,41281,36.5,36,36.17,-0.36,41600,48,32 "PJM-West Real Time Peak",41281,41282,41282,33.05,32.5,32.61,-3.56,20800,26,18 "PJM-West Real Time Peak",41282,41283,41283,33.75,32.5,32.91,0.3,37600,43,30 "PJM-West Real Time Peak",41283,41284,41284,31,30.25,30.64,-2.27,26400,31,26 "PJM-West Real Time Peak",41284,41285,41285,29.9,29.25,29.66,-0.98,38400,26,23 "PJM-West Real Time Peak",41285,41288,41288,32.5,31.5,32.14,2.48,40000,50,28 "PJM-West Real Time Peak",41288,41289,41289,37.5,34.5,36.5,4.36,64800,74,35

319

FY 2010 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 DOE/CF-040 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 6 DOE/CF-040 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy/

320

FY 2008 Volume 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 DOE/CF-017 Volume 4 Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-017 Volume 4 Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

FY 2005 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2004 Volume 6 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request DOE/ME-0037 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration

322

FY 2009 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 DOE/CF-026 Volume 3 Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 3 DOE/CF-026 Volume 3 Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management

323

FY 2007 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 DOE/CF-004 Volume 3 Energy supply and Conservation Energy efficiency and renewable energy Electricity delivery and energy reliability Nuclear energy Environment, safety and health Legacy management Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 3 DOE/CF-004 Volume 3 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy supply and Conservation Energy efficiency and renewable energy Electricity delivery and energy reliability Nuclear energy Environment, safety and health Legacy management Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Environment, Safety and Health Legacy Management Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability

324

FY 2007 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 DOE/CF-007 Volume 6 Power marketing administrations Southeastern power administration Southwestern power administration Western power administration Bonneville power administration Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 DOE/CF-007 Volume 6 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Power marketing administrations Southeastern power administration Southwestern power administration Western power administration Bonneville power administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy/

325

FY 2011 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DOE/CF-0048 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Domestic Utility Fee Pensions Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-0048 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Domestic Utility Fee Pensions Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional

326

FY 2006 Volume 7  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 February 2005 DOE/ME-0052 Volume 7 Interior & Related Agencies Fossil Energy Research & Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Energy Conservation Economic Regulation Strategic Petroleum Reserve Energy Information Administration Clean Coal Technology Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 7 February 2005 DOE/ME-0052 Volume 7 Interior & Related Agencies Fossil Energy Research & Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Energy Conservation Economic Regulation Strategic Petroleum Reserve Energy Information Administration Clean Coal Technology Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Fossil Energy Research and Development

327

FY 2013 Volume I  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE/CF-0071 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-0071 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration Page 1 FY 2013 Congressional Budget

328

FY 2006 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 February 2005 DOE/ME-0050 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Environmental Services Non-Defense Site Acceleration Completion Non-Defense Environmental Services Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 5 February 2005 DOE/ME-0050 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Environmental Services Non-Defense Site Acceleration Completion Non-Defense Environmental Services Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Environmental Services Non-Defense Site Acceleration Completion

329

FY 2009 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DOE/CF-025 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 2 DOE/CF-025 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration

330

FY 2005 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Volume 3 February 2004 Volume 3 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Energy Supply Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution Electric Transmission and Distribution Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Environment, Safety & Health Environment, Safety & Health Future Liabilities Future Liabilities Legacy Management Legacy Management Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request DOE/ME-0034 Volume 3 Energy Supply Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution

331

FY 2007 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DOE/CF-003 Volume 2 Other defense activities Security & Safety Performance assurance Environment, safety & health Legacy management Nuclear energy Defense related administrative support Hearings and appeals Safeguards & security crosscut Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-003 Volume 2 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other defense activities Security & Safety Performance assurance Environment, safety & health Legacy management Nuclear energy Defense related administrative support Hearings and appeals Safeguards & security crosscut Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Department of Energy/

332

FY 2006 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 February 2005 DOE/ME-0047 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Security & Performance Assurance Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense Related Administrative Support Office of Hearings & Appeals Safeguards & Security Crosscut Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 2 February 2005 DOE/ME-0047 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Security & Performance Assurance Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense Related Administrative Support Office of Hearings & Appeals Safeguards & Security Crosscut Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut

333

FY 2011 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 DOE/CF-0047 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-0047 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2011 Congressional Budget

334

FY 2006 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 February 2005 DOE/ME-0051 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 6 February 2005 DOE/ME-0051 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration

335

FY 2009 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 DOE/CF-029 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 6 DOE/CF-029 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration

336

FY 2008 Volume 6  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 DOE/CF-019 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 DOE/CF-019 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy/

337

FY 2010 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DOE/CF-036 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 2 DOE/CF-036 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program

338

Unsteady flow volumes  

SciTech Connect

Flow volumes are extended for use in unsteady (time-dependent) flows. The resulting unsteady flow volumes are the 3 dimensional analog of streamlines. There are few examples where methods other than particle tracing have been used to visualize time varying flows. Since particle paths can become convoluted in time there are additional considerations to be made when extending any visualization technique to unsteady flows. We will present some solutions to the problems which occur in subdivision, rendering, and system design. We will apply the unsteady flow volumes to a variety of field types including moving multi-zoned curvilinear grids.

Becker, B.G.; Lane, D.A.; Max, N.L.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Architecture and Daily Life: The Revitalization of a French Neighborhood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glass Covered Court. Places/Volume 2, Number perimeter housing blockglass-covered entry to the pedestrian street, which recalls the sky-lit courtyards of the familistère housing block

Schuman, Tony

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

PVMaT Cost Reductions in the EFG High Volume PV Manufacturing Line: Final Subcontract Report, 5 August 1998 -- 4 February 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the three major task areas: manufacturing systems development, low-cost processing technology, and flexible manufacturing methods. In Manufacturing Systems, we have worked on implementing and utilizing SPC on a larger scale by developing support systems for computer-aided data bases and equipment and process-tracking methodology; developing and implementing new diagnostic techniques; reducing acid use and waste products by introducing a new dry-etch process; and formalizing documentation and training procedures for manufacturing processes (ISO 9000) and for waste product and safety management (ISO 14000) to assist in handling the larger manufacturing organization. Low-Cost Processes, we report on progress in demonstrating low-damage, high-throughput laser technology; studies on Rapid Thermal Processing approaches to improving cell efficiency; evaluating new thin-wafer technology using EFG cylinders; and developing a large EFG octagon and laser-cutting technology for producing 12.5 cm x 12.5 cm wafers. For Flexible Manufacturing, we completed introduction of manufacturing data bases for wafer and cell manufacturing; process modifications to accommodate manufacture of 10 cm x 15 cm wafers; and module field-performance studies and defect tracking to be used to improve manufacturing processes, new encapsulant qualification and introduction into manufacturing, and progress in developing designs for low-cost modules.

Kalejs, J.; Bathey, B.; Brown, B.; Cao, J.; Doedderlein, J.; Ebers, S.; Gonsiorawski, R.; Heath, B.; Kardauskas, M.; Mackintosh, B.; Ouellette, M.; Piwczyk, B.; Rosenblum, M.; Southimath, B.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Progress in evaluation of radionuclide geochemical information developed by DOE high-level nuclear waste repository site projects: report for January-March 1985. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geochemical information relevant to the retention of radionuclides by the Hanford Site (in basalt) and the Yucca Mountain site (in tuff), candidate high-level nuclear waste geologic repositories being developed by US Department of Energy (DOE) projects, is being evaluated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Our evaluation of the sorption of technetium by basalt/groundwater systems was essentially completed this quarter and the results summarized; we conclude that the experimental methodology and results reported by the DOE for the Hanford Site have not conclusively established that significant retardation of technetium migration may be provided by phases present in the basalts of the Hanford Site. We have shown that sodium boltwoodite is the saturating uranium solid phase in two basalt/groundwater systems. Because thermodynamic data are not available for sodium boltwoodite, calculated solubilities for uranium are erroneous in these systems. Results of radionuclide solubility/speciation calculations, published by the DOE for the Yucca Mountain site, were evaluated this quarter under our geochemical modeling task. We express concerns relative to the inherent limitations of such calculations. Samples of Yucca Mountain tuff and J-13 well water were received for use in our planned radionuclide sorption/solubility experiments. These Yucca Mountain materials will be used to evaluate radionuclide sorption and apparent concentration limit values published by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project. 40 refs., 5 figs., 16 tabs.

Kelmers, A.D.; Seeley, F.G.; Arnold, W.D.; Blencoe, J.G.; Meyer, R.E.; Jacobs, G.K.; Whatley, S.K.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Quantitative Determination of Twin Volume Fraction in TWIP Steels ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By using a newly developed low-accelerating-voltage high-resolution EBSD technique, the nanotwin volume fraction can be quantitatively determined, leading ...

343

NISTIR 7628 Volume 2, Guidelines for Smart Grid Cyber ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Volume 1 – Smart Grid Cyber Security Strategy, Architecture, and High-Level ... Appendix F – Logical Architecture and Interfaces of the Smart Grid ...

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

FY 2008 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DOE/CF-015 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Health, Safety and Security Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense-Related Administrative Support Hearings and Appeals Safeguards and Security Crosscut Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-015 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Health, Safety and Security Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense-Related Administrative Support Hearings and Appeals Safeguards and Security Crosscut Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Other Defense Activities Safeguards and Security Crosscut Department of Energy/ Other Defense Activities FY 2008 Congressional Budget Volume 2 Table of Contents Page

345

FY 2006 Volume 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 1 February 2005 DOE/ME-0046 Volume 1 Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 1 February 2005 DOE/ME-0046 Volume 1 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration FY 2006 Congressional Budget

346

FY 2006 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Supply Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution Nuclear Energy Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 3 February 2005 DOE/ME-0048 Volume 3 Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution Nuclear Energy Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 3 February 2005 DOE/ME-0048 Volume 3 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution Nuclear Energy Environment, Safety and Health Legacy Management Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

347

Guidelines Volume II  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

II II Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 Part 4: Transportation Sector Part 5: Forestry Sector Part 6: Agricultural Sector Transportation Sector-Page 4.iii Contents of Volume II This volume, the second of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program, discuss in general how to analyze emissions and emission reduction/carbon sequestration projects, and

348

Guidelines Volume I  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

I I Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 Part 1: Electricity Supply Sector Part 2: Residential and Commercial Buildings Sector Part 3: Industrial Sector Electricity Supply Sector-Page 1.iii Contents of Volume I This volume, the first of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program,

349

2001volume1.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Passenger Volumes Passenger Volumes Eng Passenger Luggage Passenger Luggage Passenger Luggage Displ Volume Volume Volume Volume Volume Volume (liters) (2 dr) (ft 3 ) (2 dr) (ft 3 ) (4 dr) (ft 3 ) (4 dr) (ft 3 ) Hbk (ft 3 ) Hbk (ft 3 ) Acura 3.2cl 3.2 90 14 0 0 0 0 Acura 3.2tl 3.2 0 0 96 14 0 0 Acura 3.5rl 3.5 0 0 96 15 0 0 Acura Integra 1.8 0 0 83 12 77 13 Audi A4 1.8 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi A4 Avant Quattro 1.8 0 0 89 31 0 0 Audi A4 Quattro 1.8 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi A6 2.8 0 0 98 15 0 0 Audi A6 Avant Quattro 2.8 0 0 99 36 0 0 Audi A6 Quattro 2.7 0 0 98 15 0 0 Audi A8 L 4.2 0 0 104 18 0 0 Audi A8 Quattro 4.2 0 0 100 18 0 0 Audi S4 2.7 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi S4 Avant 2.7 0 0 89 31 0 0 Audi S8 Quattro 4.2 0 0 100 18 0 0 Audi TT Coupe 1.8 0 0 0 0 65 14 Audi TT Coupe Quattro 1.8 0 0 0 0 65 11 BMW 325ci 2.5 84 9 0 0 0 0 BMW 325ci Convertible 2.5 74 9 0 0 0 0 BMW 325i 2.5 0 0 91 11 0 0 BMW 325i Sport Wagon 2.5 0 0 91 26 0 0 BMW 325xi 2.5 0 0 91 11 0 0 BMW 325xi Sport Wagon 2.5

350

Establishment of the feasibility of a process capable of low cost, high volume production of silane, SiH/sub 4/. Low cost silicon solar array project, Task I. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1976--December 31, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the study of a process for the low cost, high volume production of silane (SiH/sub 4/) via redistribution of chlorohydrosilanes, the longevity and nature of the amine functional ion exchange resin catalyst was investigated. A modest decline in catalyst activity appears to be the result of loss of amine function during the initiallizing period. Long term activity remains quite high. In preparation for additional studies, deuterium labeled trichlorosilane is being prepared. The nominally 5 kg/day silane-from-dichlorosilane mini-plant has been constructed, leak tested and conditioned for start up. Approval for operation from a Pre-start Up Safety Review Team has been received in conjunction with an approved flameless method for venting silane. Laboratory studies of the hydrogenation of silicon tetrachloride co-product of the silane process are continuing along with the design of a mini-plant scale unit capable of pressurized operation. Preliminary design of a maxi-plant to integrate the entire process is also underway.

Breneman, W.C.; Mui, J.Y.P.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Total Maximum Daily Load Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) The overall goal of the Clean Water Act is to "restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the NationÂ’s waters." In 1999, EPA proposed changes to Section 303(d), to establish Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for watersheds that do not meet this goal. The TMDL is the highest amount of a given pollutant that is permissible in that body of water over a given period of time. TMDLs include both waste load allocation (WLA) for point sources and load allocations for non-point sources. In Appalachia, acid mine drainage (AMD) is the single most damaging non-point source. There is also particular concern of the atmospheric deposition of airborne sulfur, nitrogen, and mercury compounds. States are currently in the process of developing comprehensive lists of impaired waters and establishing TMDLs for those waters. EPA has recently proposed a final rule that will require states to develop TMDLs and implement plans for improving water quality within the next 10 years. Under the new rule, TMDL credits could be traded within a watershed.

352

Cointegration of the Daily Electric Power System Load and the Weather  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper examines the cointegration of the daily electric power system load and the weather by a field intelligent system. The daily load has been modelled by dynamic regressions. A "Daily Artificial Dispather" thermal intelligent system has been costructed. Time and energy tests have been obtained for this intelligent system. The improvement in the daily load forecast, achieved by this intelligent system, has been obtained. The predicted daily electricity price has been found.

Stefanov, Stefan Z

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Arnold Schwarzenegger HIGH-VOLUME MANUFACTURING FOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercialization can deliver the promise of photovoltaic energy to California and its electricity consumer. It can's energy supply, environment and social welfare. Key Words: Electrosynthesis, CuInSe2, photovoltaic, electroplating, non-energy benefits. #12;2 Executive Summary 1. Introduction Affordable photovoltaic (PV

354

Forecast Technical Document Volume Increment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast Technical Document Volume Increment Forecasts A document describing how volume increment is handled in the 2011 Production Forecast. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Volume increment forecasts Background A volume increment forecast is a fundamental output of the forecast

355

FY 2008 Volume 3  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 DOE/CF-016 Volume 3 Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 3 DOE/CF-016 Volume 3 Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Department of Energy/ Energy Supply and Conservation FY 2008 Congressional Budget

356

FY 2010 Volume 7  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 DOE/CF-041 Volume 7 Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 7 DOE/CF-041 Volume 7 Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas

357

FY 2009 Volume 7  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 DOE/CF-030 Volume 7 Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 7 DOE/CF-030 Volume 7 Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas

358

FY 2007 Volume 7  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 DOE/CF-008 Volume 7 Fossil energy and other Fossil energy research and development Naval petroleum & oil shale reserves Elk hills school lands fund Strategic petroleum reserve Clean coal technology Energy information administration Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 7 DOE/CF-008 Volume 7 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Fossil energy and other Fossil energy research and development Naval petroleum & oil shale reserves Elk hills school lands fund Strategic petroleum reserve Clean coal technology Energy information administration Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Strategic Petroleum Reserve Clean Coal Technology

359

FY 2008 Volume 7  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 DOE/CF-020 Volume 7 Fossil Energy and Other Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Strategic Petroleum Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas Energy Information Administration Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 7 DOE/CF-020 Volume 7 Fossil Energy and Other Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Strategic Petroleum Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas Energy Information Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves

360

volume.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Passenger Luggage Passenger Luggage Passenger Luggage Passenger Luggage Volume Volume Volume Volume Volume Volume (2 dr) (ft 3 ) (2 dr) (ft 3 ) (4 dr) (ft 3 ) (4 dr) (ft 3 ) Hbk (ft 3 ) Hbk (ft 3 ) Acura 3.2tl 0 0 96 14 0 0 Acura 3.5rl 0 0 96 15 0 0 Acura Integra 0 0 83 12 77 13 Aston Martin DB-7 Vantage Coupe 72 6 0 0 0 0 Aston Martin DB-7 Vantage Volante 72 6 0 0 0 0 Audi A4 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi A4 Avant 0 0 89 31 0 0 Audi A4 Avant Quattro 0 0 89 31 0 0 Audi A4 Quattro 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi A6 0 0 98 15 0 0 Audi A6 Avant Quattro 0 0 99 36 0 0 Audi A6 Quattro 0 0 98 15 0 0 Audi A8 Quattro 0 0 100 18 0 0 Audi S4 0 0 88 14 0 0 Audi TT Coupe 0 0 0 0 65 14 Audi TT Coupe Quattro 0 0 0 0 65 11 BMW 323ci 84 9 0 0 0 0 BMW 323i 0 0 91 11 0 0 BMW 323i Convertible 0 0 74 9 0 0 BMW 323i Touring 0 0 91 26 0 0 BMW 328ci 84 9 0 0 0 0 BMW 328i 0 0 91 11 0 0 BMW 528i 0 0 93 11 0 0 BMW 528i Sport Wagon 0 0 96 33 0 0 BMW 540i 0 0 93 11 0 0 BMW 540i Sport Wagon 0 0 96 33 0 0 BMW 740i, 740i Sport

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

FY 2005 Volume 7  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Volume 7 Interior & Related Agencies Interior & Related Agencies Fossil Energy Research & Development Fossil Energy Research & Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Elk Hills School Lands Fund Energy Conservation Energy Conservation Economic Regulation Economic Regulation Strategic Petroleum Reserve Strategic Petroleum Reserve Energy Information Administration Energy Information Administration Clean Coal Technology Clean Coal Technology February 2004 Volume 7 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request Interior & Related Agencies Interior & Related Agencies

362

FY 2005 Volume 5  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Volume 5 Environmental Management Environmental Management Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Environmental Services Defense Environmental Services Non Non - - Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Site Acceleration Completion Non Non - - Defense Environmental Services Defense Environmental Services Uranium Enrichment Decontamination Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund and Decommissioning Fund February 2004 Volume 5 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request Environmental Management Environmental Management Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Site Acceleration Completion

363

FY 2005 Volume 2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Volume 2 February 2004 Volume 2 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Other Defense Activities Other Defense Activities Energy Security and Assurance Energy Security and Assurance Security Security Independent Oversight & Performance Assurance Independent Oversight & Performance Assurance Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Environment, Safety & Health Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy Defense Related Administrative Support Defense Related Administrative Support Office of Hearings & Appeals Office of Hearings & Appeals Future Liabilities Future Liabilities Safeguards & Security Crosscut Safeguards & Security Crosscut Department of Energy

364

Feasibility of low-cost, high-volume production of silane and pyrolysis of silane to semiconductor-grade silicon. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1978. Low cost silicon solar array project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the silane production program is to determine the feasibility and practicality of high-volume, low-cost production of silane (SiH/sub 4/) as an intermediate for obtaining solar-grade silicon metal. The process is based on the synthesis of SiH/sub 4/ by the catalytic disproportionation of chlorosilanes resulting from the reaction of hydrogen, metallurgical silicon, and silicon tetrachloride. The goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of a silane production cost of under $4.00/kg at a production rate of 1000 MT/year. The objective of the silicon production program is to establish the feasibility and cost of manufacturing semiconductor grade polycrystalline silicon through the pyrolysis of silane. The silane-to-silicon conversion is to be investigated in a fluid bed reactor and in a free space reactor. The process design program is to provide JPL with engineering and economic parameters for an experimental unit sized for 25 metric tons of silicon per year and a product-cost estimate for silicon produced on a scale of 100 metric tons per year. The purpose of the capacitive fluid-bed heating program is to explore the feasibility of using electrical capacitive heating to control the fluidized silicon-bed temperature during the heterogeneous decomposition of silane. In addition, a theoretical fluid-bed silicon deposition model was developed for use in the design of a fluid-bed pyrolysis scheme. Progress is reported in each of these areas. (WHK)

Breneman, W.C.; Farrier, E.G.; Morihara, H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Viability Assessment Volume 4  

SciTech Connect

Volume 4 provides the DOE plan and cost estimate for the remaining work necessary to proceed from completing this VA to submitting an LA to NRC. This work includes preparing an EIS and evaluating the suitability of the site. Both items are necessary components of the documentation required to support a decision in 2001 by the Secretary of Energy on whether or not to recommend that the President approve the site for development as a repository. If the President recommends the site to Congress and the site designation becomes effective, then DOE will submit the LA to NRC in 2002 for authorization to construct the repository. The work described in Volume 4 constitutes the last step in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site and the design and evaluation of the performance of a repository system in the geologic setting of this site. The plans in this volume for the next 4 years' work are based on the results of the previous 15 years' work, as reported in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 of this VA. Volume 1 summarizes what DOE has learned to date about the Yucca Mountain site. Volume 2 describes the current, reference repository design, several design options that might enhance the performance of the reference design, and several alternative designs that represent substantial departures from the reference design. Volume 2 also summarizes the results of tests of candidate materials for waste packages and for support of the tunnels into which waste would be emplaced. Volume 3 provides the results of the latest performance assessments undertaken to evaluate the performance of the design in the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain. The results described in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 provide the basis for identifying and prioritizing the work described in this volume. DOE believes that the planned work, together with the results of previous work, will be sufficient to support a site suitability evaluation for site recommendation and, if the site is recommended and designated, a defensible LA. Volume 4 is divided into seven sections. Section 2 presents a rationale and summary for the technical work to be done to develop the preclosure and postclosure safety cases that will support the compliance evaluations required for the evaluation of site suitability and for licensing. Section 2 also describes other necessary technical work, including that needed to support design decisions and development of the necessary design information. Section 3 presents a more detailed description of the technical work required to address the issues identified in Section 2. Section 3 also describes activities that will continue after submittal of the site recommendation and the LA. Examples include the drift scale heater test in the Exploratory Studies Facility (Section 3.1.4.3) and long-term waste package corrosion testing (Section 3.2.2.9). Section 4 discusses the statutory and regulatory framework for site recommendation and submittal of an LA, and describes the activities and documentation that must be completed to achieve these milestones, including the development of an EIS. Section 5 describes the numerous activities required to support program milestones, including support for completing the testing program, continuing tests as part of the performance confirmation program, and managing information and records to support regulatory and legal review. Sections 6 and 7 provide cost and schedule information for the activities planned.

DOE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Addition of Bevacizumab to Standard Radiation Therapy and Daily Temozolomide Is Associated With Minimal Toxicity in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the safety of the addition of bevacizumab to standard radiation therapy and daily temozolomide for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods and Materials: A total of 125 patients with newly diagnosed GBM were enrolled in the study, and received standard radiation therapy and daily temozolomide. All patients underwent a craniotomy and were at least 2 weeks postoperative. Radiation therapy was administered in 1.8-Gy fractions, with the clinical target volume for the primary course treated to a dose of 45 to 50.4 Gy, followed by a boost of 9 to 14.4 Gy, to a total dose of 59.4 Gy. Patients received temozolomide at 75 mg/m{sup 2} daily throughout the course of radiation therapy. Bevacizumab was given at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 14 days, beginning a minimum of 4 weeks postoperatively. Results: Of the 125 patients, 120 (96%) completed the protocol-specified radiation therapy. Five patients had to stop the protocol therapy, 2 patients with pulmonary emboli, and 1 patient each with a Grade 2 central nervous system hemorrhage, Grade 4 pancytopenia, and wound dehiscence requiring surgical intervention. All 5 patients ultimately finished the radiation therapy. After radiation therapy, 3 patients had progressive disease, 2 had severe fatigue and decreased performance status, 1 patient had a colonic perforation, and 1 had a rectal fissure; these 7 patients therefore did not proceed with the protocol-specified adjuvant temozolomide, bevacizumab, and irinotecan. However, 113 patients (90%) were able to continue on study. Conclusions: The addition of bevacizumab to standard radiation therapy and daily temozolomide was found to be associated with minimal toxicity in patients newly diagnosed with GBM.

Vredenburgh, James J., E-mail: vrede001@mc.duke.edu [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Desjardins, Annick [Department of Neurology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kirkpatrick, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Reardon, David A. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Peters, Katherine B. [Department of Neurology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Herndon, James E.; Marcello, Jennifer [Department of Cancer Center Biostatistics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Bailey, Leighann; Threatt, Stevie; Sampson, John; Friedman, Allan [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Friedman, Henry S. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Volume Refinement Fairing Isosurfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose an interpolating refinement method for two- and three-dimensional scalar fields defined on hexahedral grids. Iterative fairing of the underlying contours (isosurfaces) provides the function values of new grid points. Our method can be considered ... Keywords: adaptive mesh refinement, isosurfaces, subdivision, variational modeling, volume fairing

Martin Bertram

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Variability in daily, zonal mean lower-stratospheric temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite data from the microwave sounding unit (MSU) channel 4, when carefully merged, provide daily zonal anomalies of lower-stratosphere temperature with a level of precision between 0.01[degrees] and 0.08[degrees]C per 2.5[degrees] latitude band. Global averages of these daily zonal anomalies reveal the prominent warming events due to volcanic aerosol in 1982 (El Chichon) and 1991 (Mt. Pinatubo), which are on the order of 1[degrees]C. The quasibiennel oscillation (QBO) may be extracted from these zonal data by applying a spatial filter between 15[degrees]N and 15[degrees]S latitude, which resembles the meridional curvature. Previously published relationships between the QBO and the north polar stratospheric temperatures during northern winter are examined but were not found to be reproduced in the MSU4 data. Sudden stratospheric warmings in the north polar region are represented in the MSU4 data for latitudes poleward of 70[degrees]N. In the Southern Hemisphere, there appears to be a moderate relationship between total ozone concentration and MSU4 temperatures, though it has been less apparent in 1991 and 1992. In terms of empirical modes of variability revealed significant power in the 15-20 day period band.

Christy, J.R. (Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States)); Drouilhet, S.J. Jr. (Moorhead State Univ., MN (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 3 of 3  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 2 of 3  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

Beck Colleen M.,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Off-Site Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs: Assessing Potential Environmental Liabilities through an Examination of Proposed Nuclear Projects,High Explosive Experiments, and High Explosive Construction Activities Volume 1 of 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the results of nearly six years (2002-2008) of historical research and field studies concerned with evaluating potential environmental liabilities associated with U.S. Atomic Energy Commission projects from the Plowshare and Vela Uniform Programs. The Plowshare Program's primary purpose was to develop peaceful uses for nuclear explosives. The Vela Uniform Program focused on improving the capability of detecting, monitoring and identifying underground nuclear detonations. As a result of the Project Chariot site restoration efforts in the early 1990s, there were concerns that there might be other project locations with potential environmental liabilities. The Desert Research Institute conducted archival research to identify projects, an analysis of project field activities, and completed field studies at locations where substantial fieldwork had been undertaken for the projects. Although the Plowshare and Vela Uniform nuclear projects are well known, the projects that are included in this research are relatively unknown. They are proposed nuclear projects that were not executed, proposed and executed high explosive experiments, and proposed and executed high explosive construction activities off the Nevada Test Site. The research identified 170 Plowshare and Vela Uniform off-site projects and many of these had little or no field activity associated with them. However, there were 27 projects that merited further investigation and field studies were conducted at 15 locations.

Beck Colleen M,Edwards Susan R.,King Maureen L.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Statistical Tests for Comparison of Daily Variability in Observed and Simulated Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests for differences in daily variability based on the jackknife are presented. These tests properly account for the effect of autocorrelation in the data and are reasonably robust against departures from normality. Three measures for the daily ...

T. Adri Buishand; Jules J. Beersma

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

An Overview of the Global Historical Climatology Network-Daily Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A database is described that has been designed to fulfill the need for daily climate data over global land areas. The dataset, known as Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN)-Daily, was developed for a wide variety of potential applications, ...

Matthew J. Menne; Imke Durre; Russell S. Vose; Byron E. Gleason; Tamara G. Houston

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Evaluation of ASCAT-Based Daily Gridded Winds in the Tropical Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of daily gridded Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT; DASCAT) blended winds is examined in the tropical Indian Ocean using 3-day running mean gridded Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT; QSCAT) winds and in situ daily winds from the Research ...

S. Sivareddy; M. Ravichandran; M. S. Girishkumar

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Local-Scale Variability of Daily Solar Radiation—San Diego County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial variability of daily solar radiation values over a region of several hundred square kilometers was examined. Coefficients of variability were obtained as the standard deviations of between-station daily radiation difference divided by ...

Edward Aguado

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Trends in Daily Solar Radiation and Precipitation Coefficients of Variation since 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the possibility of changes in daily scale solar radiation and precipitation variability. Coefficients of variation (CVs) were computed for the daily downward surface solar radiation product from the International Satellite ...

David Medvigy; Claudie Beaulieu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Validation in an Arid Area of an Algorithm for the Estimation of Daily Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Thornton–Running algorithm to estimate daily global radiation was tested at a site in a coastal desert of the eastern Mediterranean. In this algorithm three factors are multiplied in order to compute the daily global radiation: the total ...

P. R. Berliner; K. Droppelmann

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Observational Evidence for Reduction of Daily Maximum Temperature by Croplands in the Midwest United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate model simulations have shown that conversion of natural forest vegetation to croplands in the United States cooled climate. The cooling was greater for daily maximum temperature than for daily minimum temperature, resulting in a reduced ...

Gordon B. Bonan

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top Hat and Choke Line oil recovery systems - XLS Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top...

380

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top Hat and Choke Line oil recovery systems - ODS format Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Seasonal Predictability of Daily Rainfall Characteristics in Central Northern Chile for Dry-Land Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal predictability of daily winter rainfall characteristics relevant to dry-land management was investigated in the Coquimbo region of central northern Chile, with focus on the seasonal rainfall total, daily rainfall frequency, and mean ...

Koen Verbist; Andrew W. Robertson; Wim M. Cornelis; Donald Gabriels

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A Method to Estimate Missing Daily Maximum and Minimum Temperature Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to estimate missing daily maximum and minimum temperatures is presented. Temperature estimates are based on departures from daily temperature normals at the three closest stations with similar observation times. Although applied to ...

Arthur T. DeGaetano; Keith L. Eggleston; Warren W. Knapp

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Trends in Total Precipitation and Frequency of Daily Precipitation Extremes over China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on a newly developed daily precipitation dataset of 740 stations in China and more robust trend detection techniques, trends in annual and seasonal total precipitation and in extreme daily precipitation, defined as those larger than its ...

Panmao Zhai; Xuebin Zhang; Hui Wan; Xiaohua Pan

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Feasibility of low-cost, high-volume production of silane and pyrolysis of silane to semiconductor-grade silicon. Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the silane production program is to determine the feasibility and practicality of high-volume, low-cost production of silane (SiH/sub 4/) as an intermediate for obtaining solar-grade silicon metal. The process is based on the synthesis of SiH/sub 4/ by the catalytic disproportionation of chlorosilanes resulting from the reaction of hydrogen, metallurgical silicon, and silicon tetrachloride. The goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of a silane production cost of under $4.00/kg at a production rate of 1000 MT/year. The objective of the silicon production program is to establish the viability and economic feasibility of manufacturing semiconductor-grade polycrystalline silicon through the pyrolysis of silane. The silane-to-silicon conversion is to be investigated in a fluid bed reactor and a free space reactor. The purpose of the process design program is to provide JPL with engineering and economic parameters for an experimental facility capable of producing 25 metric tons of silicon per year by the pyrolysis of silane gas. An ancillary purpose is to estimate the cost of silicon produced by the same process on a scale of 1000 metric tons per year. The capacitive fluid-bed heating program is exploring the feasibility of utilizing electrical capacitive heating to control the fluidized silicon bed temperature during the heterogeneous decomposition of silane. In addition, a theoretical fluid-bed silicon deposition model is being developed to be used in a design of a fluid-bed pyrolysis process scheme. Research progress is described in detail. (WHK)

Breneman, W.C.; Farrier, E.G.; Morihara, H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Feasibility of low-cost, high-volume production of silane and pyrolysis of silane to semiconductor-grade silicon. Low cost silicon solar array project. Quarterly progress report for July--September 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project is divided into four tasks: silane production, silicon production, process design, and fluid-bed pyrolysis R and D. The purpose of the silane production task is to determine the feasibility and practicality of high-volume, low-cost production of silane (SiH/sub 4/) as an intermediate for obtaining solar-grade silicon metal. The process is based on the synthesis of SiH/sub 4/ by the catalytic disproportionation of chlorosilanes resulting from the reaction of hydrogen, metallurgical silicon, and silicon tetrachloride. The goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of a silane production cost of under $4.00/kg at a production rate of 1000 MT/year. The objective of the silicon production task is to establish the feasibility and cost of manufacturing semi-conductor grade polycrystalline silicon through the pyrolysis of silane (SiH/sub 4/). The silane-to-silicon conversion is to be investigated in a fluid bed reactor and in a free-space reactor. The process design task is to provide JPL with engineering and economic parameters for an experimental unit sized for 25 metric tons of silicon per year and a product-cost estimate for silicon produced on a scale of 1000 metric tons per year. The purpose of fluid-bed pyrolysis task is to explore the feasibility of using electrical capacitive heating to control the fluidized silicon-bed temperature during the heterogeneous decomposition of silane and to further explore the behavior of a fluid bed. These basic studies will form part of the information necessary to assess technical feasibility of the fluid-bed pyrolysis of silane. Status of these tasks are reported. (WHK)

Breneman, W.C.; Farrier, E.G.; Morihara, H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Viability Assessment Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume describes the major design features of the Monitored Geologic Repository. This document is not intended to provide an exhaustive, detailed description of the repository design. Rather, this document summarizes the major systems and primary elements of the design that are radiologically significant, and references the specific technical documents and design analyses wherein the details can be found. Not all portions of the design are at the same level of completeness. Highest priority has been given to assigning resources to advance the design of the Monitored Geologic Repository features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation and for which there is no NRC licensing precedent. Those features that are important to radiological safety and/or waste isolation, but for which there is an NRC precedent, receive second priority. Systems and features that have no impact on radiological safety or waste isolation receive the lowest priority. This prioritization process, referred to as binning, is discussed in more detail in Section 2.3. Not every subject discussed in this volume is given equal treatment with regard to the level of detail provided. For example, less detail is provided for the surface facility design than for the subsurface and waste package designs. This different level of detail is intentional. Greater detail is provided for those functions, structures, systems, and components that play key roles with regard to protecting radiological health and safety and that are not common to existing nuclear facilities already licensed by NRC. A number of radiological subjects are not addressed in the VA, (e.g., environmental qualification of equipment). Environmental qualification of equipment and other radiological safety considerations will be addressed in the LA. Non-radiological safety considerations such as silica dust control and other occupational safety considerations are considered equally important but are not addressed in th is volume of the VA (see Volume 1, Section 2.2.1.2, subsection on Health Related Mineral Issues).

DOE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Form EIA-930 HOURLY AND DAILY BALANCING AUTHORITY OPERATIONS REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

930 930 HOURLY AND DAILY BALANCING AUTHORITY OPERATIONS REPORT INSTRUCTIONS Due Date: mm/dd/yyyy Approved: OMB No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 10/31/2016 Burden: 0.19 hours Page 1 Draft for Discussion only PURPOSE Form EIA-930 requires Internet posting of hourly balancing authority operating data. The posted data are used to monitor the current status and trends of the electric power industry, and to support enhancement of electric system operations. REQUIRED RESPONDENTS For the contiguous United States: all entities that are listed in NERC's Compliance Registry as a balancing authority must post balancing authority operating information required by this survey. Other than the Midwest ISO (MISO), registered balancing authorities that are parties

388

A method to estimate the effect of deformable image registration uncertainties on daily dose mapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To develop a statistical sampling procedure for spatially-correlated uncertainties in deformable image registration and then use it to demonstrate their effect on daily dose mapping. Methods: Sequential daily CT studies are acquired to map anatomical variations prior to fractionated external beam radiotherapy. The CTs are deformably registered to the planning CT to obtain displacement vector fields (DVFs). The DVFs are used to accumulate the dose delivered each day onto the planning CT. Each DVF has spatially-correlated uncertainties associated with it. Principal components analysis (PCA) is applied to measured DVF error maps to produce decorrelated principal component modes of the errors. The modes are sampled independently and reconstructed to produce synthetic registration error maps. The synthetic error maps are convolved with dose mapped via deformable registration to model the resulting uncertainty in the dose mapping. The results are compared to the dose mapping uncertainty that would result from uncorrelated DVF errors that vary randomly from voxel to voxel. Results: The error sampling method is shown to produce synthetic DVF error maps that are statistically indistinguishable from the observed error maps. Spatially-correlated DVF uncertainties modeled by our procedure produce patterns of dose mapping error that are different from that due to randomly distributed uncertainties. Conclusions: Deformable image registration uncertainties have complex spatial distributions. The authors have developed and tested a method to decorrelate the spatial uncertainties and make statistical samples of highly correlated error maps. The sample error maps can be used to investigate the effect of DVF uncertainties on daily dose mapping via deformable image registration. An initial demonstration of this methodology shows that dose mapping uncertainties can be sensitive to spatial patterns in the DVF uncertainties.

Murphy, Martin J.; Salguero, Francisco J.; Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Staub, David; Vaman, Constantin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond Virginia 23298 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume contains extensive data for the following chapters: (1) solid breeder tritium recovery, (2) solid breeder blanket designs, (3) alternate blanket concept screening, and (4) safety analysis. The following appendices are also included: (1) blanket design guidelines, (2) power conversion systems, (3) helium-cooled, vanadium alloy structure blanket design, (4) high wall loading study, and (5) molten salt safety studies. (MOW)

Not Available

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book complements Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 1. Lipid Oxidation Pathways, Volume 2 Health acid analysis aocs april articles chloropropanediol contaminants detergents dietary fats division divisions esters fats fatty food foods glycidol Health h

391

high  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Summary Our short-term outlook for a wide array of energy prices has been adjusted upward as international and domestic energy supply conditions have tightened. We think that crude oil prices are as likely as not to end the year $2 to $3 per barrel higher than our previous projections. Thus, we think that the probability of West Texas Intermediate costing an average of $30 per barrel or more at midwinter is about 50 percent. On their current track, heating oil prices are likely to be about 30 percent above year-ago levels in the fourth quarter. Prices for Q1 2001 seem more likely now to match or exceed the high level seen in Q1 2000. Tight oil markets this year and an inherent propensity for high gas utilization in incremental power supply have resulted in rising North American natural gas

392

The correlation of 27 day period solar activity and daily maximum temperature in continental Australia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the first observation of a 27 day period component in daily maximum temperature recorded at widely spaced locations in Australia. The 27 day component, extracted by band pass filtering, is correlated with the variation of daily solar radio flux during years close to solar minimum. We demonstrate that the correlation is related to the emergence of regions of solar activity on the Sun separated, temporally, from the emergence of other active regions. In this situation, which occurs only near solar minimum, the observed 27 day variation of temperature can be in phase or out of phase with the 27 day variation of solar activity. During solar maximum correlation of temperature and solar activity is much less defined. The amplitude of the 27 day temperature response to solar activity is large, at times as high as 6 degrees C, and much larger than the well documented temperature response to the 11 year cycle of solar activity. We demonstrate that the 27 day temperature response is localised to the Australia...

Edmonds, Ian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Illustrative Context-Preserving Exploration of Volume Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In volume rendering, it is very difficult to simultaneously visualize interior and exterior structures while preserving clear shape cues. Highly transparent transfer functions produce cluttered images with many overlapping structures, while clipping ... Keywords: Illustrative visualization, focus+context techniques, volume rendering.

Stefan Bruckner; Soren Grimm; Armin Kanitsar; M. Eduard Groller

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Environmental report 1995. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Volume 2 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) annual Environmental Report 1995. This volume is intended to support summary data from Volume 1 and is essentially a detailed data report that provides additional data points, where applicable. Some summary data are also included in Volume 2, and more detailed accounts are given of sample collection and analytical methods. Volume 2 includes information in eight chapters on monitoring of air, air effluent, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation, as well as three chapters on ground water protection, compliance self-monitoring and quality assurance.

Harrach, R.J.; Failor, R.A.; Gallegos, G.M. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

ATF2 Proposal Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For achieving the high luminosity required at the International Linear Collider (ILC), it is critical to focus the beams to nanometer size with the ILC Beam Delivery System (BDS), and to maintain the beam collision with a nanometer-scale stability. To establish the technologies associated with this ultra-high precision beam handling, it has been proposed to implement an ILC-like final focus optics in an extension of the existing extraction beamline of ATF at KEK. The ATF is considered to be the best platform for this exercise, since it provides an adequate ultra-low emittance electron beam in a manner dedicated to the development of ILC. The two major goals for this facility, called ATF2, are: (A) Achievement of a 37 nm beam size, and (B) control of beam position down to 2 nm level. The scientific justification for the ATF2 project and its technical design have been described in Volume 1 of the ATF2 Proposal [1]. We present here Volume 2 of the ATF2 Proposal, in which we present specifics of the construction plans and the group organization to execute the research programs at ATF2. The sections in this report have been authored by relevant ATF2 subgroups within the International ATF Collaboration. The time line of the project is described in Section 2. Section 3 discuss the structure of the international collaboration. Sections 4 and 5 discuss budget considerations, which are presented as well as the design and construction tasks to be shared by the international collaboration at ATF2. Concluding remarks have been contributed by Dr. Ewan Paterson, Chair of the International Collaboration Board of the ATF collaboration.

Grishanov, B.I.; Logachev, P.; Podgorny, F.; Telnov, V.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Jones, J.; Kalinin, A.; /Daresbury; Napoly, O.; Payet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Braun, H.H.; Schulte, D.; Zimmermann, F.; /CERN; Appleby, R.; Barlow, R.; Bailey, I.; Jenner, L.; Jones, R.; Kourevlev, G.; /Cockcroft Inst.; Elsen, E.; Vogel, V.; Walker, N.; /DESY /Fermilab /Hiroshima U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Oxford U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /KEK, Tsukuba /Kyoto U., Inst. Chem. Res. /Orsay, LAL /Valencia U. /Annecy, LAPP /LBL, Berkeley /LLNL, Livermore /University Coll. London /Chiba, Natl. Inst. Rad. Sci. /North Carolina A-T State U. /Oregon U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Queen Mary, U. of London /SLAC /Tokyo U.

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

396

high  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Highlights International Oil Markets Prices. We have raised our world oil price projection by about $2 per barrel for this month because of assumed greater compliance by OPEC to targeted cuts, especially for the second quarter of 2000 (Figure 1). The expected decline in world petroleum inventories continues (Figure 2), and, given the generally stiff resolve of OPEC members to maintain production cuts, any sign of a turnaround in stocks may be postponed until later this year than previously assumed (Q3 instead of Q2). Our current estimate for the average import cost this past January is now $25 per barrel, a nearly $15-per-barrel increase from January 1999. Crude oil prices are expected to remain at relatively high levels for the first half of 2000, but

397

High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting For Enhanced Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3 GE Aviation Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA-0000075 DOE Funding Level (total award amount) 2,399,990.00 Awardee Cost Share 599,997.00 Total Project Cost...

398

PVMaT cost reductions in the EFG high volume PV manufacturing line: Annual report, 5 August 1998--4 August 1999[PhotoVoltaic Manufacturing Technology, Edge-defined Film-fed Growth  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work performed by ASE Americas researchers during the first year of this Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology 5A2 program. Significant accomplishments in each of three task are as follows. Task 1--Manufacturing Systems: Researchers completed key node analysis, started statistical process control (SPC) charting, carried out design-of-experiment (DoE) matrices on the cell line to optimize efficiencies, performed a capacity and bottleneck study, prepared a baseline chemical waste analysis report, and completed writing of more than 50% of documentation and statistical sections of ISO 9000 procedures. A highlight of this task is that cell efficiencies in manufacturing were increased by 0.4%--0.5% absolute, to an average in excess of 14.2%, with the help of DoE and SPC methods. Task 2--Low-Cost Processes: Researchers designed, constructed, and tested a 50-cm-diameter, edge-defined, film-fed growth (EFG) cylinder crystal growth system to successfully produce thin cylinders up to 1.2 meters in length; completed a model for heat transfer; successfully deployed new nozzle designs and used them with a laser wafer-cutting system with the potential to decrease cutting labor costs by 75% and capital costs by 2X; achieved laser-cutting speeds of up to 8X and evaluation of this system is proceeding in production; identified laser-cutting conditions that reduce damage for both Q-switched Nd:YAG and copper-vapor lasers with the help of a breakthrough in fundamental understanding of cutting with these short-pulse-length lasers; and found that bulk EFG material lifetimes are optimized when co-firing of silicon nitride and aluminum is carried out with rapid thermal processing (RTP). Task 3--Flexible Manufacturing: Researchers improved large-volume manufacturing of 10-cm {times} 15-cm EFG wafers by developing laser-cutting fixtures, adapting carriers and fabricating adjustable racks for etching and rinsing facilities, and installing a high-speed data collection net work; initiated fracture studies to develop methods to reduce wafer breakage; and started a module field studies program to collect data on field failures to help identify potential manufacturing problems. New encapsulants, which cure at room temperature, are being tested to improve flexibility and provide higher yields for thin wafers in lamination.

Bathey, B.; Brown, B.; Cao, J.; Ebers, S.; Gonsiorawski, R.; Heath, B.; Kalejs, J.; Kardauskas, M.; Mackintosh, B.; Ouellette, M.; Piwczyk, B.; Rosenblum, M.; Southimath, B.

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

399

Feasibility of compressed air energy storage to store wind on monthly and daily basis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The storage volumes are often limited in terms of availability. Since volume is expensive, optimizing its use is very important to make reasonable net earnings.… (more)

Riaz, Muhammad Ali

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Dependence of Extreme Daily Maximum Temperatures on Antecedent Soil Moisture in the Contiguous United States during Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents an analysis of the dependence of summertime daily maximum temperature on antecedent soil moisture using daily surface observations from a selection of stations in the contiguous United States and daily time series of soil ...

Imke Durre; John M. Wallace; Dennis P. Lettenmaier

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Twisted mass finite volume effects  

SciTech Connect

We calculate finite-volume effects on the pion masses and decay constant in twisted mass lattice QCD at finite lattice spacing. We show that the lighter neutral pion in twisted mass lattice QCD gives rise to finite-volume effects that are exponentially enhanced when compared to those arising from the heavier charged pions. We demonstrate that the recent two flavor twisted mass lattice data can be better fitted when twisted mass effects in finite-volume corrections are taken into account.

Colangelo, Gilberto; Wenger, Urs; Wu, Jackson M. S. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Journal of Research Volume 43  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Volume dilatometry, p. 145 Bekkedahl, Norman http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/jres ... nozzles with hydrocarbons and with air, p. 449 Shafer, MR; Bovey, HL ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

403

Definition: Volume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

contained within a specified three-dimensional space.1 View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Volume is the quantity of three-dimensional space enclosed by some closed boundary,...

404

Daily intake of antioxidants in relation to survival among adult patients diagnosed with malignant glioma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

II patients, moderate intake of water-soluble folate wasfor tertiles of daily intake of water-soluble antioxidants4: Associations between intake of water-soluble antioxidants

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Daily canopy photosynthesis model through temporal and spatial scaling for remote sensing applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimating daily net photosynthesis. Ecol. Model. 58, 209 –Canopy reflectance, photosynthesis, and transpira- tion.model of forest photosynthesis compared with measurements by

Chen, J.M; Liu, J; Cihlar, J; Goulden, M.L

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Daily Journal -California's Largest Legal News Provider High speed rail project squeezes by in key  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Aghaian of McKenna Long & Aldridge LLP Environmental Hydraulic fracking: we can decide now While hydraulic fracking in an environmentally responsible way. States are a major source of regulation of the fracking, and site restoration. State laws on fracking vary widely. Some states, including California, do not even

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

407

ICFA instrumentation bulletin, Volume 15, Fall 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bulletin reports on research and progress in the field of instrumentation with emphasis in the field of high-energy physics. This volume contains the following four papers: (1) Streamers in MSGC's and Other Gaseous Detectors; (2) Soft X-Ray Production in Spark Discharges in Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Air, Argon, and Xenon Gases; (3) Beam Tests of the CLEO III LiF-TEA Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector; and (4) Electron Multiplication and Secondary Scintillation in Liquid Xenon: New Prospects.

Va'vra, J. [ed.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

NBS Bulletin Volume 9  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Energy Losses in some condensers used in high-frequency circuits, p. 73 Austin, LW http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/bulletin.208. ...

2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

409

A hierarchical fracture model for the iterative multiscale finite volume method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An iterative multiscale finite volume (i-MSFV) method is devised for the simulation of multiphase flow in fractured porous media in the context of a hierarchical fracture modeling framework. Motivated by the small pressure change inside highly conductive ... Keywords: Fractured porous media, Hierarchical fractured modeling, Iterative multiscale finite volume, Iterative multiscale methods, Multiscale finite volume, Multiscale fracture modeling, Multiscale methods

Hadi Hajibeygi; Dimitris Karvounis; Patrick Jenny

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Daily Microwave-Derived Surface Temperature over Canada/Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The land surface temperature variation over northern high latitudes in response to the increase in greenhouse gases is challenging because of the lack of meteorological stations. A new method to derive the surface temperature from satellite ...

A. Mialon; A. Royer; M. Fily; G. Picard

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Taking China's Temperature: Daily Range, Warming Trends, and Regional Variations, 1955–2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In analyzing daily climate data from 305 weather stations in China for the period from 1955 to 2000, the authors found that surface air temperatures are increasing with an accelerating trend after 1990. They also found that the daily maximum (T...

Binhui Liu; Ming Xu; Mark Henderson; Ye Qi; Yiqing Li

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Ecological Modelling 143 (2001) 227243 A globally applicable model of daily solar irradiance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. At Luquillo, Puerto Rico, the daily atmospheric transmittance for solar radiation was approximately equal incoming radiation. This sensi- tivity depends upon the local partitioning of solar energy that varies, nearly linear relationship between ~ and daily average relative humidity (rhave) at Luquillo, Puerto Rico

Hunt Jr., E. Raymond

413

Daily Precipitation Forecasting in Dakar Using the NCEP–NCAR Reanalyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to predict the daily rain amount at Dakar at 1–5-day lead times, 65 thermodynamical and dynamical indices are computed at each grid point for the area 15°S–30°N, 30°W–30°E. The data used are NCEP–NCAR reanalyses and daily rainfall ...

Abdoulaye Deme; Alain Viltard; Pierre de Félice

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Southeastern United States Daily Temperature Ranges Associated with the El Niño–Southern Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The daily temperature range (DTR), daily maximum minus minimum temperature, at 290 Southeast United States stations is examined with respect to the warm and cold phases of the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) for the period of 1948–2009. A ...

Daniel M. Gilford; Shawn R. Smith; Melissa L. Griffin; Anthony Arguez

415

Today in Energy - Daily Prices - Prices - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 20, 2013Daily Prices December 20, 2013Daily Prices Daily wholesale and retail prices for various energy products are shown below, including spot prices and select futures prices at national or regional levels. Prices are updated each weekday (excluding federal holidays), typically between 7:30 and 8:30 a.m. This page is meant to provide a snapshot of selected daily prices only. Prices are republished by EIA with permission as follows: Wholesale Spot Petroleum Prices from Thomson Reuters, Retail Petroleum Prices from AAA Fuel Gauge Report, Prompt-Month Energy Futures from CME Group, and Select Spot Prices from SNL Energy. Daily Prices Wholesale Spot Petroleum Prices, 12/19/13 Close Product Area Price Percent Change* Crude Oil ($/barrel) WTI 98.40 +0.8 Brent 110.78 +1.1 Louisiana Light 108.27 +4.9

416

Principal Investigators: Long-Term Daily and Monthly Climate Records from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principal Investigators: Long-Term Daily and Monthly Climate Records from Principal Investigators: Long-Term Daily and Monthly Climate Records from Stations Across the Contiguous United States M.J. Menne, C.N. Williams, Jr., and R.S. Vose National Climatic Data Center National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration CDIAC and the USHCN PIs encourage users to make this site their main source for obtaining USHCN data, where you can take advantage of data plotting, and, for daily data, user-friendly station-specific downloading. This site will update both daily and monthly data near the beginning of each year, so as to include data through December of the previous year. However, if you need real-time data updates, you should visit the NCDC website. For NCDC-updated daily data please use the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) website where you will find a directory of USHCN stations.

417

FY 1996 solid waste integrated life-cycle forecast volume summary - Volume 1 and Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid waste forecast volumes to be generated or received ;at Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Solid Waste program over the life cycle of the site are described in this report. Previous forecast summary reports have covered only a 30-year period; however, the life-cycle approach was adopted for this FY 1996 report to ensure consistency with waste volumes reported in the 1996 Multi-Year Program Plans (MYPP). The volume data were collected on a life-cycle basis from onsite and offsite waste generators who currently ship or plan to ship solid waste to the Solid Waste program. The volumes described in detail are low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic-mixed (TRU(M)) waste. The volumes reported in this document represent the external volume of the containers selected to ship the waste. Summary level information pertaining to low-level waste (LLW) is described in Appendix B. Hazardous waste volumes are also provided in Appendices E and F but are not described in detail since they will be managed by a commercial facility. Emphasis is placed on LLMW and TRU(M) waste because it will require processing and storage at Hanford Solid Waste`s Central Waste Complex (CORK) prior to final disposal. The LLW will generally be sent directly to disposal. The total baselines volume of LLMW and TRU(M) waste forecast to be received by the Solid Waste program (until 2070) is approximately 100,900 cubic meters. This total waste volume is composed of the following waste categories: 077,080 cubic meters of LLMW; 23,180 cubic meters of TRU(M); 640 cubic meters of greater-than-class III LLMW. This total is about 40% of the total volume reported last year (FY 1995).

Valero, O.J.

1996-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

418

Waste disposal options report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

Volume 2 contains the following topical sections: estimates of feed and waste volumes, compositions, and properties; evaluation of radionuclide inventory for Zr calcine; evaluation of radionuclide inventory for Al calcine; determination of k{sub eff} for high level waste canisters in various configurations; review of ceramic silicone foam for radioactive waste disposal; epoxides for low-level radioactive waste disposal; evaluation of several neutralization cases in processing calcine and sodium-bearing waste; background information for EFEs, dose rates, watts/canister, and PE-curies; waste disposal options assumptions; update of radiation field definition and thermal generation rates for calcine process packages of various geometries-HKP-26-97; and standard criteria of candidate repositories and environmental regulations for the treatment and disposal of ICPP radioactive mixed wastes.

Russell, N.E.; McDonald, T.G.; Banaee, J.; Barnes, C.M.; Fish, L.W.; Losinski, S.J.; Peterson, H.K.; Sterbentz, J.W.; Wenzel, D.R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Squeeze: numerical-precision-optimized volume rendering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses how to squeeze volume rendering into as few bits per operation as possible while still retaining excellent image quality. For each of the typical volume rendering pipeline stages in texture map volume rendering, ray casting and splatting ...

Ingmar Bitter; Neophytos Neophytou; Klaus Mueller; Arie E. Kaufman

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Ductile Fracture Handbook: Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three-volume Ductile Fracture Handbook provides the structural analyst with computational methods for evaluating the integrity of flawed structures that are fabricated from ductile materials or have loads that may produce significant plasticity, specifically easy-to-use fracture mechanics solutions for a wide range of problems dealing with cylinders subjected to several types of elastic-plastic loading. Volume 2 presents new solutions and significant expansion of previous solutions, typically in the ...

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Ductile Fracture Handbook: Volume 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three-volume Ductile Fracture Handbook provides the structural analyst with computational methods for evaluating the integrity of flawed structures that are fabricated from ductile materials or have loads that may produce significant plasticity, specifically easy-to-use fracture mechanics solutions for a wide range of problems dealing with cylinders subjected to several types of elastic-plastic loading. Volume 3 presents solutions for axial part-throughwall cracks, cracks in elbows, tees, and nozzles...

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

VOLUME I: TEXT AND APPENDICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enclosed is the Final Reclamation Plan for American Nuclear Corporations's (ANC's) Tailings Pond #2, which also includes preliminary reclamation design for Pond #1. The final reclamation plan incorporates NRC staff comments on the preliminary plan submitted in November, 1995. Two volumes are included; the first contains the body of the report and the appendices. The second volume contains 31 large drawings. Please call me or Bob Medlock if you have any questions. Best regards, SHEPHERD MILLER, INC.

Shepherd Miller; Mr. Mark Moxley; Kent Bruxvoort P. E; Ken Hooks Nrc; Rick Chancellor Deq; Jim Voeller Avi; Bill Salisbury; For Tailings Pond

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Reducing Open Cell Landfill Methane Emissions with a Bioactive Alternative Daily  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane and carbon dioxide are formed in landfills as wastes degrade. Molecule-for-molecule, methane is about 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the earth's atmosphere, and thus, it is the methane emissions from landfills that are scrutinized. For example, if emissions composed of 60% methane and 40% carbon dioxide were changed to a mix that was 40% methane and 60% carbon dioxide, a 30% reduction in the landfill's global warming potential would result. A 10% methane, 90% carbon dioxide ratio will result in a 75% reduction in global warming potential compared to the baseline. Gas collection from a closed landfill can reduce emissions, and it is sometimes combined with a biocover, an engineered system where methane oxidizing bacteria living in a medium such as compost, convert landfill methane to carbon dioxide and water. Although methane oxidizing bacteria merely convert one greenhouse gas (methane) to another (carbon dioxide), this conversion can offer significant reductions in the overall greenhouse gas contribution, or global warming potential, associated with the landfill. What has not been addressed to date is the fact that methane can also escape from a landfill when the active cell is being filled with waste. Federal regulations require that newly deposited solid waste to be covered daily with a 6 in layer of soil or an alternative daily cover (ADC), such as a canvas tarp. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of immobilizing methane oxidizing bacteria into a tarp-like matrix that could be used for alternative daily cover at open landfill cells to prevent methane emissions. A unique method of isolating methanotrophs from landfill cover soil was used to create a liquid culture of mixed methanotrophs. A variety of prospective immobilization techniques were used to affix the bacteria in a tarp-like matrix. Both gel encapsulation of methanotrophs and gels with liquid cores containing methanotrophs were readily made but prone to rapid desiccation. Bacterial adsorption onto foam padding, natural sponge, and geotextile was successful. The most important factor for success appeared to be water holding capacity. Prototype biotarps made with geotextiles plus adsorbed methane oxidizing bacteria were tested for their responses to temperature, intermittent starvation, and washing (to simulate rainfall). The prototypes were mesophilic, and methane oxidation activity remained strong after one cycle of starvation but then declined with repeated cycles. Many of the cells detached with vigorous washing, but at least 30% appeared resistant to sloughing. While laboratory landfill simulations showed that four-layer composite biotarps made with two different types of geotextile could remove up to 50% of influent methane introduced at a flux rate of 22 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, field experiments did not yield high activity levels. Tests revealed that there were high hour-to-hour flux variations in the field, which, together with frequent rainfall events, confounded the field testing. Overall, the findings suggest that a methanotroph embedded biotarp appears to be a feasible strategy to mitigate methane emission from landfill cells, although the performance of field-tested biotarps was not robust here. Tarps will likely be best suited for spring and summer use, although the methane oxidizer population may be able to shift and adapt to lower temperatures. The starvation cycling of the tarp may require the capacity for intermittent reinoculation of the cells, although it is also possible that a subpopulation will adapt to the cycling and become dominant. Rainfall is not expected to be a major factor, because a baseline biofilm will be present to repopulate the tarp. If strong performance can be achieved and documented, the biotarp concept could be extended to include interception of other compounds beyond methane, such as volatile aromatic hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents.

Helene Hilger; James Oliver; Jean Bogner; David Jones

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

424

NTS Volume 2 - Clean Edit.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Secretary of Energy October 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE VOLUME II October 2002 i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT...

425

WIPP Volume II - EM - Final.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Secretary of Energy August 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT Volume II August 2002 i INDEPENDENT...

426

Predicting Rectal and Bladder Overdose During the Course of Prostate Radiotherapy Using Dose-Volume Data From Initial Treatment Fractions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate whether information from the initial fractions can determine which patients are likely to consistently exceed their planning dose-volume constraints during the course of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated with helical tomotherapy to a dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were recontoured on their daily megavoltage computed tomography scans and the dose was recalculated. The bladder and rectal volumes (in mL) receiving {>=}100% and {>=}70% of the prescribed dose in each fraction and in the original plans were recorded. A fraction for which the difference between planned and delivered was more than 2 mL was considered a volume failure. Similarly if the difference in the planned and delivered maximum dose (D{sub max}) was {>=}1% for the rectum and bladder, the fraction was considered a dose failure. Each patient's first 3 to 5 fractions were analyzed to determine if they correctly identified those patients who would consistently fail (i.e., {>=}20% of fractions) during the course of their radiotherapy. Results: Six parameters were studied; the rectal volume (RV) and bladder volumes (BV) (in mL) received {>=}100% and {>=}70% of the prescribed dose and maximum dose to 2 mL of the rectum and bladder. This was given by RV{sub 100}, RV{sub 70}, BV{sub 100}, BV{sub 70}, RD{sub max}, and BD{sub max}, respectively. When more than 1 of the first 3 fractions exceed the planning constraint as defined, it accurately predicts consistent failures through the course of the treatment. This method is able to correctly identify the consistent failures about 80% (RV{sub 70}, BV{sub 100}, and RV{sub 100}), 90% (BV{sub 70}), and 100% (RD{sub max} and BD{sub max}) of the times. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of a method accurately identifying patients who are likely to consistently exceed the planning constraints during the course of their treatment, using information from the first 3 to 5 fractions.

Murthy, Vedang, E-mail: vmurthy@actrec.gov.in [Department of Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics, Tata Memorial Hospital and Advanced Centre for Treatment, Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai (India)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics, Tata Memorial Hospital and Advanced Centre for Treatment, Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai (India); Shukla, Pragya; Adurkar, Pranjal; Master, Zubin; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore [Department of Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics, Tata Memorial Hospital and Advanced Centre for Treatment, Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai (India)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics, Tata Memorial Hospital and Advanced Centre for Treatment, Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai (India)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Hypertools in image and volume visualization  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes our experience in image and volume visualization at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. After an introduction on visualization issues, we present a new software approach to the analysis and visualization of images and volumes. The efficiency of the visualization process is improved by letting the user combine small and reusable applications by the means of a machine-independent interpreted language such as Tcl/Tk. These hypertools can communicate with each other over a network, which has a direct impact on the design of graphical interfaces. We first describe the implementation of a flexible gray-scale image widget that can handle large data sets, provides complete control of the color palette and allows for manual and semi-interactive segmentation. This visualization tool can be embedded in a data-flow image processing environment to assess the quality of acquisition, preprocessing and filtering of raw data. This approach combines the simplicity of visual programming with the power of a high-level interpreted language. We show how hypertools can be used in surface and volume rendering and how they increase the interaction efficiency by performing complex or tedious tasks automatically. One biomedical application is presented.

Bossart, P.L.

1996-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

428

Temporal Disaggregation of Daily Temperature and Precipitation Grid Data for Norway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a simple approach for the temporal disaggregation from daily to 3-hourly observed gridded temperature and precipitation (1 × 1 km2) on the national scale. The intended use of the disaggregated 3-hourly data is to recalibrate ...

Klaus Vormoor; Thomas Skaugen

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Analysis of the Impact of Snow on Daily Weather Variability in Mountainous Regions Using MM5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of snow on daily weather variability, as well as the mechanisms of snowmelt over the Sierra Nevada, California–Nevada, mountainous region, were studied using the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for ...

Jiming Jin; Norman L. Miller

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Use of a Principal Components Analysis for the Generation of Daily Time Series  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new approach for generating daily time series is considered in response to the weather-derivatives market. This approach consists of performing a principal components analysis to create independent variables, the values of which are then ...

Christine Dreveton; Yann Guillou

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Get Daily Energy Analysis Delivered to Your Website | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Get Daily Energy Analysis Delivered to Your Website Get Daily Energy Analysis Delivered to Your Website Get Daily Energy Analysis Delivered to Your Website August 8, 2011 - 3:39pm Addthis Get Daily Energy Analysis Delivered to Your Website Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Go to EIA's outreach page for Today in Energy widgets, badges and banners. Now everyone can feature the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Today in Energy content on their website and favorite social networking sites. Today in Energy, the agency's education product published every weekday, highlights current energy issues, topics, and data trends in short articles written in plain language. EIA has banners and widgets in different colors and sizes to fit many different websites.

432

A Harmonic Approach for Calculating Daily Temperature Normals Constrained by Homogenized Monthly Temperature Normals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NOAA released the new 1981–2010 climate normals in July 2011. These included monthly and daily normals of minimum and maximum temperature. Monthly normals were computed from monthly temperature values that were corrected for biases (i.e., ...

Anthony Arguez; Scott Applequist

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Frequency Distribution of Daily ITCZ Patterns over the Western–Central Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study attempts to explore a comprehensive and compact approach for delineating the multiscale and multivariate characteristics of the ITCZ over the western–central Pacific based on daily satellite observations of precipitation, SSTs, and ...

Baode Chen; Xin Lin; Julio T. Bacmeister

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

A Hybrid Orographic plus Statistical Model for Downscaling Daily Precipitation in Northern California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid (physical–statistical) scheme is developed to resolve the finescale distribution of daily precipitation over complex terrain. The scheme generates precipitation by combining information from the upper-air conditions and from sparsely ...

Ganesh R. Pandey; Daniel R. Cayan; Michael D. Dettinger; Konstantine P. Georgakakos

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

EIA - Daily Report 9/14/05 - Hurricane Katrina's Impact on U...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

gas production was shut in, equivalent to 35.18 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico natural gas production (which had been 10 billion cubic feet per day). EIA released its monthly...

436

Modulation of Daily Precipitation over Southwest Asia by the Madden–Julian Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of daily observations shows that wintertime (November–April) precipitation over Southwest Asia is modulated by Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) activity in the eastern Indian Ocean, with strength comparable to the interannual variability. ...

Mathew Barlow; Matthew Wheeler; Bradfield Lyon; Heidi Cullen

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Impact of Daily Arctic Sea Ice Variability in CAM3.0 during Fall and Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate projections suggest that an ice-free summer Arctic Ocean is possible within several decades and with this comes the prospect of increased ship traffic and safety concerns. The daily sea ice concentration tendency in five Coupled Model ...

Dyre O. Dammann; Uma S. Bhatt; Peter L. Langen; Jeremy R. Krieger; Xiangdong Zhang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Downscaling and Projection of Winter Extreme Daily Precipitation over North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale atmospheric variables have been statistically downscaled to derive winter (December–March) maximum daily precipitation at stations over North America using the generalized extreme value distribution (GEV). Here, the leading principal ...

Jiafeng Wang; Xuebin Zhang

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Observed Trends in Indices of Daily Temperature Extremes in South America 1960–2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A workshop on enhancing climate change indices in South America was held in Maceió, Brazil, in August 2004. Scientists from eight southern countries brought daily climatological data from their region for a meticulous assessment of data quality ...

L. A. Vincent; T. C. Peterson; V. R. Barros; M. B. Marino; M. Rusticucci; G. Carrasco; E. Ramirez; L. M. Alves; T. Ambrizzi; M. A. Berlato; A. M. Grimm; J. A. Marengo; L. Molion; D. F. Moncunill; E. Rebello; Y. M. T. Anunciação; J. Quintana; J. L. Santos; J. Baez; G. Coronel; J. Garcia; I. Trebejo; M. Bidegain; M. R. Haylock; D. Karoly

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Grid History: A Geostationary Satellite Technique for Estimating Daily Rainfall in the Tropics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique is described for estimating daily rainfall by means of visible and infrared geostationary satellite imagery. It is designed for the tropics and warm-season midlatitudes. Because it operates on a grid of points and measures time ...

David W. Martin; Michael R. Howland

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Comparison of Daily Averaged Reflection, Transmission, and Absorption for Selected Radiative Flux Transfer Approximations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares accuracy for the daily averaged reflection, transmission, and absorption of solar flux derived from the delta-four-stream approximation and a few selected two-stream approximations. In the chosen variety of two-stream ...

Xun Zhu; Albert Arking

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Cakewalking into representation : Gabriele Münter's America travels (1898-1900) and art of dailiness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study explores the fashioning of Gabriele Münter as a German modernist with a focus on the eclipse of her struggles in coming to representation, the rich complexity of her processes, and the importance of dailiness ...

Bible, Ann Vollmann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Developing hourly weather data for locations having only daily weather data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology was developed to modify an hourly TMY weather tape to be representative of a location for which only average daily weather parameters were avilable. Typical hourly and daily variations in solar flux, and other parameters, were needed to properly exercise a computer model to predict the transient performance of a solar controlled greenhouse being designed for Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The starting point was a TMY tape for Yuma, Arizona, since the design temperatures for summer and winter are nearly identical for Yuma and Riyadh. After comparing six of the most important weather variables, the hourly values on the Yuma tape were individually adjusted to give the same overall daily average conditions as existed in the long-term Riyadh data. Finally, a statistical analysis was used to confirm quantitatively that the daily variations between the long term average values for Riyadh and the modified TMY weather tape for Yuma matched satisfactorily.

Talbert, S.G.; Herold, K.E.; Jakob, F.E.; Lundstrom, D.K.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Satellite solar insolation-based daily evapotranspiration estimation in Puerto Rico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique is presented in which satellite solar insolation estimates are used to predict daily reference evapotranspiration (ETo) using the Penman-Monteith (PM), Preistly-Taylor (PT) and Hargreaves-Samini (HS) methods for Puerto Rico. For ...

Eric W. Harmsen; John Mecikalski; Melvin J. Cardona-Soto; Alejandra Rojas Gonzalez; Ramön Vasquez

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Understanding the Characteristics of Daily Precipitation over the United States Using the North American Regional Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the seasonal characteristics of daily precipitation over the United States using the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR). To help understand the physical mechanisms that contribute to changes in the characteristics of ...

Emily J. Becker; Ernesto Hugo Berbery; R. Wayne Higgins

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Generalized Linear Models for Site-Specific Density Forecasting of U.K. Daily Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site-specific probability density rainfall forecasts are needed to price insurance premiums, contracts, and other financial products based on precipitation. The spatiotemporal correlations in U.K. daily rainfall amounts over the Thames Valley are ...

Max A. Little; Patrick E. McSharry; James W. Taylor

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Intercomparison of Daily Precipitation Statistics over the United States in Observations and in NCEP Reanalysis Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison of the statistics of daily precipitation over the conterminous United States is carried out using gridded station data and three generations of reanalysis products in use at the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). ...

R. W. Higgins; V. E. Kousky; V. B. S. Silva; E. Becker; P. Xie

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

XLS Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top Hat and Choke Line oil recovery systems - XLS Updated through 12:00 AM on July 16, 2010. 52Item84Recovery...

449

Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ODS format Combined Total Amount of Oil and Gas Recovered Daily from the Top Hat and Choke Line oil recovery systems - ODS format Updated through 12:00 AM on July 16, 2010....

450

Australian Experimental Model Output Statistics Forecasts of Daily Maximum and Minimum Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Model output statistics (MOS) forecasts of daily temperature maxima and minima are developed for seven Australian cities. The developmental data and method of derivation of the MOS equations are described and the equations briefly compared to ...

F. Woodcock

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Systematic Biases in Manual Observations of Daily Maximum and Minimum Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors demonstrate that manual observations of daily maximum and minimum temperature are strongly biased toward temperatures ending in certain digits. The nature and severity of these biases are quantified using standard statistical methods. ...

Jon M. Nese

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Sensitivity of Local Daily Temperature Change Estimates to the Selection of Downscaling Models and Predictors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of statistical downscaling models are applied to the Canadian Climate Centre general circulation model (CCCM) outputs to provide climate change estimates for local daily surface temperature at a network of 39 stations in central and ...

Radan Huth

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

A Detailed Evaluation of GPCP 1° Daily Rainfall Estimates over the Mississippi River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study provides an intensive evaluation of the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) 1° daily (1DD) rainfall products over the Mississippi River basin, which covers 435 1° latitude × 1° longitude grids for the period of January 1997–...

Mekonnen Gebremichael; Witold F. Krajewski; Mark L. Morrissey; George J. Huffman; Robert F. Adler

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Rainfall Intensity, the Weibull Distribution, and Estimation of Daily Surface Runoff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for estimating absorption and runoff at a point on the basis of total daily precipitation and the absorption capacity of the soil is proposed. The method is based on a statistical characterization of the variation of precipitation ...

Daniel S. Wilks

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Estimates of Tropical Analysis Differences in Daily Values Produced by Two Operational Centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to asses the uncertainty of daily synoptic analyses for the atmospheric state, the intercomparison of three First GARP Global Experiment (FGGE) level IIIb datasets is conducted. The original analyses and reanalyses produced by the ...

Akira Kasahara; Arthur P. Mizzi

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Automation: A Step toward Improving the Quality of Daily Temperature Data Produced by Climate Observing Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research documented in this manuscript demonstrates that undeniable differences exist between values of daily temperature recorded by the National Weather Service Cooperative Observer Program network and data recorded by the Oklahoma Mesonet. ...

Christopher A. Fiebrich; Kenneth C. Crawford

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Determination of Semivariogram Models to Krige Hourly and Daily Solar Irradiance in Western Nebraska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, linear and spherical semivariogram models were determined for use in kriging hourly and daily solar irradiation for every season of the year. The data used to generate the models were from 18 weather stations in western Nebraska. ...

G. G. Merino; D. Jones; D. E. Stooksbury; K. G. Hubbard

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Influence of Daily Rainfall Characteristics on Regional Summertime Precipitation over the Southwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The regional variability in the summertime precipitation over the southwestern United States is studied using stochastic chain-dependent models generated from 70 yr of station-based daily precipitation observations. To begin, the spatiotemporal ...

Bruce T. Anderson; Jingyun Wang; Suchi Gopal; Guido Salvucci

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

The Influence of Large-Scale Climate Variability on Winter Maximum Daily Precipitation over North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generalized extreme value (GEV) distribution is fitted to winter season daily maximum precipitation over North America, with indices representing El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO), and the North ...

Xuebin Zhang; Jiafeng Wang; Francis W. Zwiers; Pavel Ya Groisman

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

An analysis of the potential for shifting electric power demand within daily load requirement  

SciTech Connect

This report analyzes the potential for shifting the electric power demand within the daily load requirements for large industrial and commercial customers of the Philadelphia Electric Company. This shifting of electric power demand would tend to flatten the daily load curve of electricity demand, benefitting both the power industry and the consumer. Data on estimated summer load curves of large commercial and industrial customers are analyzed for load flattening potential. Cost savings to the customers are determined. (GRA)

Lamb, P.G.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "daily volumes high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Daily radiation model for use in the simulation of passive solar buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A model is presented to characterize solar radiation with just three input parameters for each day. This compressed daily radiation data may be used in place of hourly data in simulations of passive solar buildings. This method is tested with the SUNCAT passive simulation. Global horizontal and direct normal radiation data are input using the compressed daily form instead of by hour. Simulation results are found to be comparable to results based on hourly radiation data.

Sillman, S.; Wortman, D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly, Volume 2, Number 1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 * May 2012 1 * May 2012 Message from the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Stockpile Stewardship, Chris Deeney Defense Programs Stockpile Stewardship in Action Volume 2, Number 1 Inside this Issue 2 LANL and ANL Complete Groundbreaking Shock Experiments at the Advanced Photon Source 3 Characterization of Activity-Size-Distribution of Nuclear Fallout 5 Modeling Mix in High-Energy-Density Plasma 6 Quality Input for Microscopic Fission Theory 8 Fiber Reinforced Composites Under Pressure: A Case Study in Non-hydrostatic Behavior in the Diamond Anvil Cell 8 Emission of Shocked Inhomogeneous Materials 9 2012 NNSA Stewardship Science Academic

463

ISABELLE. Volume 4. Detector R and D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Workshop participants were asked to assess the current status of detector R and D in terms of the specific needs for ISABELLE experiments: the demands of high particle rates, extremely selective triggers on complex and rare events, and the economics of large detector systems. The detailed results of working groups convened to consider specific areas of detector development are presented. The key points of this assessment, as regards the continuing R and D program for ISABELLE are summarized here. Twenty-six items from the volume were prepared separately for the data base, along with five items previously prepared. (GHT)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Forecast Technical Document Growing Stock Volume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecast Technical Document Growing Stock Volume Forecasts A document describing how growing stock (`standing') volume is handled in the 2011 Production Forecast. Tom Jenkins Robert Matthews Ewan Mackie Lesley Halsall #12;PF2011 ­ Growing stock volume forecasts Background A forecast of standing volume (or

465

Estimating the Time Dependence of Air Temperature Using Daily Maxima and Minima: A Comparison of Three Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many models in a variety of disciplines require air temperature throughout the day as an input, yet often the only data available are daily extrema. Several methods for estimating the diurnal change in temperature from daily extrema have been ...

J. M. Baker; D. C. Reicosky; D. G. Baker

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

A Novel Method for the Homogenization of Daily Temperature Series and Its Relevance for Climate Change Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrumental daily series of temperature are often affected by inhomogeneities. Several methods are available for their correction at monthly and annual scales, whereas few exist for daily data. Here, an improved version of the higher-order ...

Andrea Toreti; Franz G. Kuglitsch; Elena Xoplaki; Jürg Luterbacher; Heinz Wanner

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Spatial Interpolation of Daily Maximum and Minimum Air Temperature Based on Meteorological Model Analyses and Independent Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hourly meteorological forecast model initializations are used to guide the spatial interpolation of daily cooperative network station data in the northeastern United States. The hourly model data are transformed to daily maximum and minimum ...

Arthur T. DeGaetano; Brian N. Belcher

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

A Southeastern South American Daily Gridded Dataset of Observed Surface Minimum and Maximum Temperature for 1961–2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents a southeastern South American gridded dataset of daily minimum and maximum surface temperatures for 1961–2000. The data used for the gridding are observed daily data from meteorological stations in Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, and ...

Bárbara Tencer; Matilde Rusticucci; Phil Jones; David Lister

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Power Plant Electrical Reference Series, Volumes 1-16: Volume 1: Electric Generators; Volume 2: Power Transformers; Volume 3: Auxili ary System Planning; Volume 4: Wire and Cable; Volume 5: Grounding and Lightning Protection; Volume 6: Motors; Volume 7..  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive and practical guide to electric power apparatus and electrical phenomena provides an up-to-date source book for power plant managers, engineers, and operating personnel. Aiding in the recognition and prevention of potential problems, the 16-volume guide can help utilities save staff time and reduce operating expenses.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Thrusts in High Performance Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in HPC 1 Thrusts in High Performance Computing Science at Scale Petaflops to Exaflops Science through Volume Thousands to Millions of Simulations Science in Data Petabytes to...

471

The potential of different artificial neural network (ANN) techniques in daily global solar radiation modeling based on meteorological data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of present study is to predict daily global solar radiation (GSR) on a horizontal surface, based on meteorological variables, using different artificial neural network (ANN) techniques. Daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours, evaporation, and wind speed values between 2002 and 2006 for Dezful city in Iran (32 16'N, 48 25'E), are used in this study. In order to consider the effect of each meteorological variable on daily GSR prediction, six following combinations of input variables are considered: (I)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature and relative humidity as inputs and daily GSR as output. (II)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature and sunshine hours as inputs and daily GSR as output. (III)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity and sunshine hours as inputs and daily GSR as output. (IV)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours and evaporation as inputs and daily GSR as output. (V)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours and wind speed as inputs and daily GSR as output. (VI)Day of the year, daily mean air temperature, relative humidity, sunshine hours, evaporation and wind speed as inputs and daily GSR as output. Multi-layer perceptron (MLP) and radial basis function (RBF) neural networks are applied for daily GSR modeling based on six proposed combinations. The measured data between 2002 and 2005 are used to train the neural networks while the data for 214 days from 2006 are used as testing data. The comparison of obtained results from ANNs and different conventional GSR prediction (CGSRP) models shows very good improvements (i.e. the predicted values of best ANN model (MLP-V) has a mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) about 5.21% versus 10.02% for best CGSRP model (CGSRP 5)). (author)

Behrang, M.A.; Assareh, E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Young Researchers Club, Islamic Azad University, Dezful Branch (Iran); Ghanbarzadeh, A.; Noghrehabadi, A.R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Shahid Chamran University, Ahvaz (Iran)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 2 contains papers from the following sessions: Safeguards-Related Problems; Neutronics and Criticality; Operations and Systems Experience II; Plutonium Systems; Intermediate Storage in Casks; Operations and Systems Planning; Institutional Issues; Structural and Thermal Evaluation I; Poster Session B; Extended Testing I; Structural and Thermal Evaluation II; Extended Testing II; and Emergency Preparedness and Response. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 1 contains papers from the following sessions: Plenary Session; Regulations, Licensing and Standards; LMFBR Systems Concepts; Risk/Safety Assessment I; Systems and Package Design; US Institutional Issues; Risk/Safety Assessment II; Leakage, Leak Rate and Seals; Poster Session A; Operations and Systems Experience I; Manufacturing Processes and Materials; and Quality Assurance and Maintenance. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

Huebner, H.W. (ed.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Guide to Microsoft Volume Licensing June 2013 i  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guide to Microsoft Volume Licensing June 2013 i Guide to Microsoft Volume Licensing #12;Guide to Microsoft Volume Licensing June 2013 ii Table of Contents Chapter 1: Introduction to Microsoft Volume................................................................................................................................................................ 1 Keys to Understanding Microsoft Volume Licensing

Narasayya, Vivek

475

Advanced Thermionic Technology Program: summary report. Volume 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress made by the Advanced Thermionic Technology Program during the past several years. This program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, has had as its goal adapting thermionic devices to generate electricity in a terrestrial (i.e., combustion) environment. The technology has previously been developed for astronautical applications. The report is organized in four volumes, each focused as much as possible on the needs of a particular audience. Volume 1 contains Part A, the Executive Summary. This Executive Summary describes the accomplishments of the Program in brief, but assumes the reader's familiarity with the thermionic process and the technical issues associated with the Program. For this reason, Volume 1 also contains Part B, a minimally technical overview of the Advanced Thermionic Technology Program. Volume 2 (Part C) concentrates on the progress made in developing and fabricating the ''current generation'' of chemical vapor deposited hot shell thermionic converters and is addressed to those primarily concerned with today's capabilities in terrestrial thermionic technology. Volume 3 (Part D) contains the results of systems studies of primary interest to those involved in identifying and evaluating applications for thermionics. Volume 4 (Part E) is a highly technical discussion of the attempts made by the program to push the state-of-the-art beyond the current generation of converters and is directed toward potential researchers engaged in this same task. These technical discussions are complemented with Appendices where appropriate.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II  

SciTech Connect

Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2005'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2005. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab'', ''the Laboratory'', ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory'', and ''LBNL''.) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains an overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. This year's Volume I text body is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters. The report's structure has been reorganized this year, and it now includes a chapter devoted to environmental management system topics. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The ''Site Environmental Report'' is distributed by releasing it on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are also reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements, because the non-SI system is referenced by several current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. Two tables are provided at the end of the Glossary to help readers: the first defines the prefixes used with SI units of measurement, and the second provides conversions to non-SI units.

Ruggieri, Michael

2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

477