National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for d-3 ement cd-4

  1. DEPARTlIiIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AG EMENT CENTER NEPA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    lAUIl) u.s. DEPARTlIiIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AG EMENT CENTER NEPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:Ocean Engineering and Energy Systems Intemational, Inc. (OCEES) Page lof3 STATE: ...

  2. DOE CD-4 Review of the MINERvA Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE CD-4 Review of the MINERvA Project Main INjector ExpeRiment v-A May 12, 2010 | Overview | CD-4 Documentation| Other Documents| Overview of Charge and Experiment MINERvA Overview (2.2 MB pdf) Review Agenda (all times EDT) (pdf) Review Charge (pdf) Review Presentation by MINERvA Project (DRAFT until the week of May 12) (docdb page) Required CD-4 Documentation CD-4 Document Checklist (pdf) Technical Requirements Completion Document (pdf) Quality Assurance Plan (pdf) Safety Documentation Hazard

  3. C-340 Complex D&D Final Lessons Learned (Post CD-4), Environmental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C-340 Complex D&D Final Lessons Learned (Post CD-4), Environmental Management Cleanup, Sep 2011 C-340 Complex D&D Final Lessons Learned (Post CD-4), Environmental Management ...

  4. Small-Molecule CD4-Mimics: Structure-Based Optimization of HIV-1 Entry

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Inhibition (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Small-Molecule CD4-Mimics: Structure-Based Optimization of HIV-1 Entry Inhibition Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Small-Molecule CD4-Mimics: Structure-Based Optimization of HIV-1 Entry Inhibition Authors: Melillo, Bruno ; Liang, Shuaiyi ; Park, Jongwoo ; Schön, Arne ; Courter, Joel R. ; LaLonde, Judith M. ; Wendler, Daniel J. ; Princiotto, Amy M. ; Seaman, Michael S. ; Freire, Ernesto ;

  5. Strain-Specific V3 and CD4 Binding Site Autologous HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Select Neutralization-Resistant Viruses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moody, M.  Anthony; Gao, Feng; Gurley, Thaddeus  C.; Amos, Joshua  D.; Kumar, Amit; Hora, Bhavna; Marshall, Dawn  J.; Whitesides, John  F.; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; et al

    2015-09-09

    The third variable (V3) loop and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the viral envelope are frequently targeted by neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in HIV-1-infected individuals. In chronic infection, virus escape mutants repopulate the plasma and V3 and CD4bs nAbs emerge that can neutralize heterologous tier 1 easy-to-neutralize, but not tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 isolates. However, neutralization sensitivity of autologous plasma viruses to this type of nAb response has not been studied. We describe the development and evolution in vivo of antibodies distinguished by their target specificity for V3and CD4bs epitopes on autologous tier 2 viruses but not on heterologous tiermore » 2 viruses. A surprisingly high fraction of autologous circulating viruses was sensitive to these antibodies. These findings demonstrate a role for V3 and CD4bs antibodies in constraining the native envelope trimer in vivo to a neutralization-resistant phenotype, explaining why HIV-1 transmission generally occurs by tier 2 neutralization-resistant viruses.« less

  6. Strain-Specific V3 and CD4 Binding Site Autologous HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Select Neutralization-Resistant Viruses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moody, M.  Anthony; Gao, Feng; Gurley, Thaddeus  C.; Amos, Joshua  D.; Kumar, Amit; Hora, Bhavna; Marshall, Dawn  J.; Whitesides, John  F.; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey  E.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Lu, Xiaozhi; Bonsignori, Mattia; Finzi, Andrés; Vandergrift, Nathan  A.; Alam, S.  Munir; Ferrari, Guido; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia  D.; Kamanga, Gift; Cohen, Myron  S.; Sam, Noel  E.; Kapiga, Saidi; Gray, Elin S.; Tumba, Nancy  L.; Morris, Lynn; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Gorny, Miroslaw  K.; Mascola, John  R.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George  M.; Sodroski, Joseph  G.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Montefiori, David C.; Hraber, Peter T.; Korber, Bette T.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-09-09

    The third variable (V3) loop and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the viral envelope are frequently targeted by neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in HIV-1-infected individuals. In chronic infection, virus escape mutants repopulate the plasma and V3 and CD4bs nAbs emerge that can neutralize heterologous tier 1 easy-to-neutralize, but not tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 isolates. However, neutralization sensitivity of autologous plasma viruses to this type of nAb response has not been studied. We describe the development and evolution in vivo of antibodies distinguished by their target specificity for V3and CD4bs epitopes on autologous tier 2 viruses but not on heterologous tier 2 viruses. A surprisingly high fraction of autologous circulating viruses was sensitive to these antibodies. These findings demonstrate a role for V3 and CD4bs antibodies in constraining the native envelope trimer in vivo to a neutralization-resistant phenotype, explaining why HIV-1 transmission generally occurs by tier 2 neutralization-resistant viruses.

  7. Automated D/3 to Visio Analog Diagrams

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-08-10

    ADVAD1 reads an ASCII file containing the D/3 DCS MDL input for analog points for a D/3 continuous database. It uses the information in the files to create a series of Visio files representing the structure of each analog chain, one drawing per Visio file. The actual drawing function is performed by Visio (requires Visio version 4.5+). The user can configure the program to select which fields in the database are shown on the diagrammore » and how the information is to be presented. This gives a visual representation of the structure of the analog chains, showing selected fields in a consistent manner. Updating documentation can be done easily and the automated approach eliminates human error in the cadding process. The program can also create the drawings far faster than a human operator is capable, able to create approximately 270 typical diagrams in about 8 minutes on a Pentium II 400 MHz PC. The program allows for multiple option sets to be saved to provide different settings (i.e., different fields, different field presentations, and /or different diagram layouts) for various scenarios or facilities on one workstation. Option sets may be exported from the Windows registry to allow duplication of settings on another workstation.« less

  8. Id1 expression promotes peripheral CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation and survival upon TCR activation without co-stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chen; Jin, Rong; Wang, Hong-Cheng; Tang, Hui; Liu, Yuan-Feng; Qian, Xiao-Ping; Sun, Xiu-Yuan; Ge, Qing; Sun, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yu

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Id1 expression enables naïve T cell proliferation without anti-CD28 co-stimulation. •Id1 expression facilitates T cells survival when stimulated with anti-CD3. •Elevation of IL-2 production by Id1 contributes increased proliferation and survival. •Id1 potentiates NF-κB activation by anti-CD3 stimulation. -- Abstract: Although the role of E proteins in the thymocyte development is well documented, much less is known about their function in peripheral T cells. Here we demonstrated that CD4 promoter-driven transgenic expression of Id1, a naturally occurring dominant-negative inhibitor of E proteins, can substitute for the co-stimulatory signal delivered by CD28 to facilitate the proliferation and survival of naïve CD4{sup +} cells upon anti-CD3 stimulation. We next discovered that IL-2 production and NF-κB activity after anti-CD3 stimulation were significantly elevated in Id1-expressing cells, which may be, at least in part, responsible for the augmentation of their proliferation and survival. Taken together, results from this study suggest an important role of E and Id proteins in peripheral T cell activation. The ability of Id proteins to by-pass co-stimulatory signals to enable T cell activation has significant implications in regulating T cell immunity.

  9. Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response and represses transplanted H22 hepatic ascitic tumor cell growth: Involvement of NF-?B signaling activation in CD4 + T cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Tianming; Wang, Chaoyuan; Su, Hanwen; Xiang, Meixian

    2013-06-15

    Gastrodia elata Blume (G. elata) is a famous restorative food in East Asia. It can be used as an auxiliary reagent in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treatment. Previous studies unveiled that G. elata exhibited immunomodulatory activities. To explore the active ingredients contributing to its immunomodulatory activities, gastrodin, vanillin, and parishin B were purified from G. elata and their anti-HCC effects were assessed in vivo. Among these compounds, only gastrodin was capable of repressing transplanted H22 ascitic hepatic tumor cell growth in vivo with low toxicity. Further investigations were designed to explore the effects of gastrodin on the immune system of tumor-bearing mice and potential molecular mechanisms underlying these effects. Our data showed that gastrodin ameliorated tumor cell transplantation-induced activation of endogenous pro-apoptotic pathway in CD4 + T cells and abnormalities in serum cytokine profiles in host animals. These events enhanced cytotoxic activities of natural killer and CD8 + T cells against H22 hepatic cancer cells. Gastrodin administration specifically upregulated mRNA levels of several nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) responsive genes in CD4 + T cells but not in CD8 + T cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that gastrodin increased the association of NF-?B p65 subunit to the promoter regions of IL-2 and Bcl-2 encoding genes in CD4 + T cells. Our investigations demonstrated that gastrodin is the main active ingredient contributing to the anticancer immunomodulatory properties of G. elata. Promoting NF-?B-mediated gene transcription in CD4 + T cells is implicated in its immunomodulatory activity. - Highlights: Gastrodin stimulates anticancer immune response. Gastrodin represses tumor transplantation-induced CD4 + T cell apoptosis. Gastrodin activates NF-?B activity in CD4 + T cells.

  10. Conceptual Design RM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Conceptual Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Concep Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan ptual De view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) sign e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of

  11. Decommissioning Plan RM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Decommissioning Plan Review Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 C OFFICE OF D C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Decomm Rev Critical Decisi CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan missioning view Module ion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) g Plan e plicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Oper ration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of

  12. Interactive initialization of 2D/3D rigid registration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Ren Hui; Gler, zgr; Krkloglu, Mustafa; Lovejoy, John; Yaniv, Ziv

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Registration is one of the key technical components in an image-guided navigation system. A large number of 2D/3D registration algorithms have been previously proposed, but have not been able to transition into clinical practice. The authors identify the primary reason for the lack of adoption with the prerequisite for a sufficiently accurate initial transformation, mean target registration error of about 10 mm or less. In this paper, the authors present two interactive initialization approaches that provide the desired accuracy for x-ray/MR and x-ray/CT registration in the operating room setting. Methods: The authors have developed two interactive registration methods based on visual alignment of a preoperative image, MR, or CT to intraoperative x-rays. In the first approach, the operator uses a gesture based interface to align a volume rendering of the preoperative image to multiple x-rays. The second approach uses a tracked tool available as part of a navigation system. Preoperatively, a virtual replica of the tool is positioned next to the anatomical structures visible in the volumetric data. Intraoperatively, the physical tool is positioned in a similar manner and subsequently used to align a volume rendering to the x-ray images using an augmented reality (AR) approach. Both methods were assessed using three publicly available reference data sets for 2D/3D registration evaluation. Results: In the authors' experiments, the authors show that for x-ray/MR registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mean target registration error (mTRE) of 9.3 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 146.3 73.0 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 7.2 3.2 mm with interaction times of 44 32 s. For x-ray/CT registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mTRE of 7.4 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 132.1 66.4 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 8.3 5.0 mm with interaction times of 58 52 s. Conclusions: Based on the authors' evaluation, the authors conclude that the registration approaches are sufficiently accurate for initializing 2D/3D registration in the OR setting, both when a tracking system is not in use (gesture based approach), and when a tracking system is already in use (AR based approach)

  13. The role of intrahepatic CD3 +/CD4 −/CD8 − double negative T (DN T) cells in enhanced acetaminophen toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Getachew, Yonas; Cusimano, Frank A.; James, Laura P.; Thiele, Dwain L.

    2014-10-15

    The role of the immune system, specifically NK, NKT and CD3 cells, in acetaminophen (APAP) induced liver injury remains inconsistently defined. In the present study, wild type (C57BL/6J) mice and granzyme B deficient (GrB −/−) mice were treated with acetaminophen to assess the role of the immune system in acute liver injury. Doses of acetaminophen that induced sub lethal liver injury in wild type mice unexpectedly produced fatal hepatotoxicity in granzyme B deficient (GrB −/−) mice. Analysis revealed that GrB −/− mice had an increased population of intrahepatic CD3 (+), CD4 (−), and CD8 (−) lymphocytes expressing the CD69 activation marker and Fas ligand. Depletion of these cells in the GrB −/− and wild type mice made them less susceptible to APAP injury, while depletion of NK1.1 (+) cells or both CD4 (+) and CD8 (+) T cells failed to provide the same hepatoprotection. Transfer of the GrB −/− IHLs further exacerbated liver injury and increased mortality in wild type mice but not in LRP/LPR mice, lacking fas expression. Conclusions: Acetaminophen toxicity is enhanced by the presence of activated, FasL expressing intrahepatic CD3 (+), CD4 (−), CD8 (−), NK1.1 (−) T cells. Depletion of these cells from GrB −/− mice and wild type mice greatly reduces mortality and improves the course of liver injury recovery. - Highlights: • Intrahepatic lymphocytes (IHLs) from GrB −/− mice harbor activated DNT cells. • IHLs from GrB −/− mice exhibit enhanced Fas ligand expression. • Acetaminophen toxicity is enhanced by activated, FasL expressing DNT cells.

  14. 2D/3D registration algorithm for lung brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zvonarev, P. S.; Farrell, T. J.; Hunter, R.; Wierzbicki, M.; Hayward, J. E.; Sur, R. K.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: A 2D/3D registration algorithm is proposed for registering orthogonal x-ray images with a diagnostic CT volume for high dose rate (HDR) lung brachytherapy. Methods: The algorithm utilizes a rigid registration model based on a pixel/voxel intensity matching approach. To achieve accurate registration, a robust similarity measure combining normalized mutual information, image gradient, and intensity difference was developed. The algorithm was validated using a simple body and anthropomorphic phantoms. Transfer catheters were placed inside the phantoms to simulate the unique image features observed during treatment. The algorithm sensitivity to various degrees of initial misregistration and to the presence of foreign objects, such as ECG leads, was evaluated. Results: The mean registration error was 2.2 and 1.9 mm for the simple body and anthropomorphic phantoms, respectively. The error was comparable to the interoperator catheter digitization error of 1.6 mm. Preliminary analysis of data acquired from four patients indicated a mean registration error of 4.2 mm. Conclusions: Results obtained using the proposed algorithm are clinically acceptable especially considering the complications normally encountered when imaging during lung HDR brachytherapy.

  15. A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of ... A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of ...

  16. Elliptic and Triangular Flow in Event-by-Event D=3+1 Viscous Hydrodynamics

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Elliptic and Triangular Flow in Event-by-Event D=3+1 Viscous Hydrodynamics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Elliptic and Triangular Flow in Event-by-Event D=3+1 Viscous Hydrodynamics We present results for the elliptic and triangular flow coefficients v{sub 2} and v{sub 3} in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s)=200 AGeV using event-by-event D=3+1 viscous hydrodynamic simulations. We study the effect of initial state fluctuations and finite

  17. Enhanced pairing of quantum critical metals near d = 3 + 1 (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Enhanced pairing of quantum critical metals near d = 3 + 1 Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on July 19, 2016 Title: Enhanced pairing of quantum critical metals near d = 3 + 1 Authors: Fitzpatrick, A. Liam ; Kachru, Shamit ; Kaplan, Jared ; Raghu, S. ; Torroba, Gonzalo ; Wang, Huajia Publication Date: 2015-07-20 OSTI Identifier: 1196449 Grant/Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal

  18. He I D3 OBSERVATIONS OF THE 1984 MAY 22 M6.3 SOLAR FLARE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Chang; Xu Yan; Deng Na; Lee, Jeongwoo; Zhang Jifeng; Wang Haimin; Prasad Choudhary, Debi

    2013-09-01

    The He I D3 line has a unique response to a flare impact on the low solar atmosphere and can be a powerful diagnostic tool for energy transport processes. Using images obtained from the recently digitized films of the Big Bear Solar Observatory, we report D3 observations of the M6.3 flare on 1984 May 22, which occurred in an active region with a circular magnetic polarity inversion line (PIL). The impulsive phase of the flare starts with a main elongated source that darkens in D3, inside of which bright emission kernels appear at the time of the initial small peak in hard X-rays (HXRs). These flare cores subsequently evolve into a sharp emission strand lying within the dark halo; this evolution occurs at the same time as the main peak in HXRs, reversing the overall source contrast from -5% to 5%. The radiated energy in D3 during the main peak is estimated to be about 10{sup 30} erg, which is comparable to that carried by nonthermal electrons above 20 keV. Afterward, the flare proceeds along the circular PIL in the counterclockwise direction to form a dark circular ribbon in D3, which apparently mirrors the bright ribbons in H{alpha} and He I 10830 A. All of these ribbons last for over one hour in the late gradual phase. We suggest that the present event resembles the so-called black-light flare that was proposed based on continuum images, and that D3 darkening and brightening features herein may be due to thermal conduction heating and the direct precipitation of high-energy electrons, respectively.

  19. 2D?3D polycatenated and 3D?3D interpenetrated metalorganic frameworks constructed from thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylate and rigid bis(imidazole) ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erer, Hakan; Ye?ilel, Okan Zafer; Ar?c?, Mrsel; Keskin, Seda; Bykgngr, Orhan

    2014-02-15

    Hydrothermal reactions of rigid 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)benzene (dib) and 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)-2,5-dimethylbenzene (dimb) with deprotonated thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}tdc) in the presence of Zn(II) and Cd(II) salts in H{sub 2}O produced three new metalorganic frameworks, namely, [Zn(-tdc)(H{sub 2}O)(-dib)]{sub n} (1), [Cd(-tdc)(H{sub 2}O)(-dib)]{sub n} (2), and ([Cd{sub 2}({sub 3}-tdc){sub 2}(-dimb){sub 2}](H{sub 2}O)){sub n}(3). These MOFs were characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, elemental, thermal (TG, DTA, DTG and DSC), and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. Isomorphous complexes 1 and 2 reveal polycatenated 2D+2D?3D framework based on an undulated (4,4)-sql layer. Complex 3 exhibits a new 4-fold interpenetrating 3D framework with the point symbol of 6{sup 6}. Molecular simulations were used to assess the potentials of the complexes for H{sub 2} storage application. Moreover, these coordination polymers exhibit blue fluorescent emission bands in the solid state at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: In this study, hydrothermal reactions of rigid 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)benzene (dib) and 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-yl)-2,5-dimethylbenzene (dimb) with deprotonated thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid (H{sub 2}tdc) in the presence of Zn(II) and Cd(II) salts in H{sub 2}O produced three new metalorganic frameworks. Isomorphous complexes 1 and 2 reveal polycatenated 2D+2D?3D framework based on an undulated (4,4)-sql layer. Complex 3 exhibits a new 4-fold interpenetrating 3D framework with the point symbol of 6{sup 6}. Molecular simulations were used to assess the potentials of the complexes for H{sub 2} storage application. These coordination polymers exhibit blue fluorescent emission bands in the solid state at room temperature. Display Omitted - Highlights: Complexes 1 and 2 display polycatenated 2D+2D?3D framework. Complex 3 exhibits a new 4-fold interpenetrating 3D framework. Complex 1 adsorbs the highest amount of H{sub 2} at 100 bar and 298 K. Complexes display blue fluorescent emission bands.

  20. Evaluation of static pressure drops and PM10 and TSP emissions for modified 1D-3D cyclones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, G.A.; Baker, R.V.; Hughs, S.E.

    1999-12-01

    Five modifications of a standard 1D3D cyclone were tested and compared against the standard 1D3D design in the areas of particulate emissions and static pressure drop across the cyclone. The modifications to the 1D3D design included a 2D2D inlet, a 2D2D air outlet, a D/3 trash exit, an expansion chamber with a D/3 trash exit, and a tapered air outlet duct. The 1D3D modifications that exhibited a significant improvement in reducing both PM10 and total suspended particulate (TSP) emissions were the designs with the 2D2D inlet and air exhaust combined with either the conical D/3 tail cone or the expansion chamber. In reference to the standard 1D3D cyclone, the average reduction in PM10 emissions was 24 to 29% with a 29 to 35% reduction observed in TSP emissions. The modifications with the tapered air outlets did not show any significant improvements in controlling PM10 emissions. However, the modification with the tapered air outlet/expansion chamber combination exhibited statistical significance in reducing TSP emissions by 18% compared to the 1D3D cyclone. All modifications tested exhibited lower static pressure drops than the standard 1D3D.

  1. supplemental_lists_1d-2d-3c_06-24-2011.xls | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    lists_1d-2d-3c_06-24-2011.xls supplemental_lists_1d-2d-3c_06-24-2011.xls Office spreadsheet icon supplemental_lists_1d-2d-3c_06-24-2011.xls More Documents & Publications hud_list-2_07-01-11.xls hud_list-2_07-01-11.xls updated_supplemental_lists_1g-2g-3f_10-6-2011

  2. Data:12a45141-7972-4ec8-a2dc-37fedc8133d3 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ec8-a2dc-37fedc8133d3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  3. Project Transition/Closeout (CD-4)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-09-24

    This Guide is written for the federal project director ensuring that processes progress smoothly and that projects meet asset management goals and financial closure requirements of DOE.

  4. Uptake of donor lymphocytes treated with 8-methoxypsoralen and ultraviolet A light by recipient dendritic cells induces CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells and down-regulates cardiac allograft rejection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, De-Hua; Dou, Li-Ping; Wei, Yu-Xiang; Du, Guo-Sheng; Zou, Yi-Ping; Song, Ji-Yong; Zhu, Zhi-Dong; Cai, Ming; Qian, Ye-Yong; Shi, Bing-Yi

    2010-05-14

    Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is an effective immunomodulatory therapy and has been demonstrated to be beneficial for graft-vs-host disease and solid-organ allograft rejection. ECP involves reinfusion of a patient's autologous peripheral blood leukocytes treated ex vivo with 8-methoxypsoralen and UVA light radiation (PUVA). Previous studies focused only on ECP treatment of recipient immune cells. Our study is the first to extend the target of ECP treatment to donor immune cells. The results of in vitro co-culture experiments demonstrate uptake of donor PUVA-treated splenic lymphocytes (PUVA-SPs) by recipient immature dendritic cells (DCs). Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SPs does not stimulate phenotype maturation of recipient DCs. In the same co-culture system, donor PUVA-SPs enhanced production of interleukin-10 and interferon-{gamma} by recipient DCs and impaired the subsequent capability of recipient DCs to stimulate recipient naive T cells. Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SP (PUVA-SP DCs) by recipient DCs shifted T-cell responses in favor of T helper 2 cells. Infusion of PUVA-SP DCs inhibited cardiac allograft rejection in an antigen-specific manner and induced CD4{sup +}CD25{sup high}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells. In conclusion, PUVA-SP DCs simultaneously deliver the donor antigen and the regulatory signal to the transplant recipient, and thus can be used to develop a novel DC vaccine for negative immune regulation and immune tolerance induction.

  5. Study of plasma meniscus formation and beam halo in negative ion source using the 3D3VPIC model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishioka, S.; Goto, I.; Hatayama, A.; Miyamoto, K.; Fukano, A.

    2015-04-08

    In this paper, the effect of the electron confinement time on the plasma meniscus and the fraction of the beam halo is investigated by 3D3V-PIC (three dimension in real space and three dimension in velocity space) (Particle in Cell) simulation in the extraction region of negative ion source. The electron confinement time depends on the characteristic time of electron escape along the magnetic field as well as the characteristic time of diffusion across the magnetic field. Our 3D3V-PIC results support the previous result by 2D3V-PIC results i.e., it is confirmed that the penetration of the plasma meniscus becomes deep into the source plasma region when the effective confinement time is short.

  6. Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-D-3, 1608-D Effluent Pumping Station, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2005-033

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Carlson

    2006-05-09

    Decommissioning and demolition of the 132-D-3 site, 1608-D Effluent Pumping Station was performed in 1986. Decommissioning included removal of equipment, water, and sludge for disposal as radioactive waste. The at- and below-grade structure was demolished to at least 1 m below grade and the resulting rubble buried in situ. The area was backfilled to grade with at least 1 m of clean fill and contoured to the surrounding terrain. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling.

  7. u.s. DEPARThIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EMENT CENTER NFPA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Inc. (BGI) would utilize DOE and cost share funds to (1) combine airborne full tensor gravity (FTG) and the z-axis tipper electromagnetic (ZTEM) deep penetrating, low frequency,...

  8. u.s. DEPARIUENI OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AG EMENT CENTER NEPA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    available data to predict the most likely locations for high fracture density and hot fluids. The identified locations would be used to site and drill two full-size production...

  9. DOE CD-4 Review of the MINERvA Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessment Document (with signatures) (pdf) Integrated Safety Management Document (pdf) Burn Test Results (pdf) Project Execution Plan (22207 Version with signatures) (pdf) Other...

  10. Exotic magnetism on the quasi-FCC lattices of the d3 double perovskites La2NaB'O6 (B' = Ru, Os)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aczel, Adam A; Baker, Peter J.; Bugaris, Dan; Yeon, Jeongho; Zur Loye, Hans-Conrad; Guidi, T.; Adroja, D. T.

    2014-01-01

    We find evidence for long-range and short-range ($\\zeta$~$=$~70~\\AA~at 4~K) incommensurate magnetic order on the quasi-face-centered-cubic (FCC) lattices of the monoclinic double perovskites La$_2$NaRuO$_6$ and La$_2$NaOsO$_6$ respectively. Incommensurate magnetic order on the FCC lattice has not been predicted by mean field theory, but may arise via a delicate balance of inequivalent nearest neighbour and next nearest neighbour exchange interactions. In the Ru system with long-range order, inelastic neutron scattering also reveals a spin gap $\\Delta$~$\\sim$~2.75~meV. Magnetic anisotropy is generally minimized in the more familiar octahedrally-coordinated $3d^3$ systems, so the large gap observed for La$_2$NaRuO$_6$ may result from the significantly enhanced value of spin-orbit coupling in this $4d^3$ material.

  11. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. J. Rodovsky

    2006-12-06

    This report presents the final hazard categorization (FHC) for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, and 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site.

  12. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. J. Rodovsky

    2007-04-12

    This report presents the final hazard categorization (FHC) for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, and 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site.

  13. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2 and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. L. Vialetti

    2008-05-20

    This report presents the final hazard categorization for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, and 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site.

  14. Final Hazard Categorization for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.D. Ludowise

    2009-06-17

    This report presents the final hazard categorization for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site. A material at risk calculation was performed that determined the radiological inventory for each burial ground to be Hazard Category 3.

  15. Final Hazard Categorization and Auditable Safety Analysis for the Remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, 118-D-3, 118-H-1, 118-H-2 and 118-H-3 Solid Waste Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. J. Rodovsky

    2006-03-01

    This report presents the initial hazard categorization, final hazard categorization and auditable safety analysis for the remediation of the 118-D-1, 118-D-2, and 118-D-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-D/DR Area of the Hanford Site and the 118-H-1, 118-H-2, and 118-H-3 Burial Grounds located within the 100-H Area of the Hanford Site.

  16. D3 website database | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon vssp_19_keller.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Vehicle Benchmarking of HEVs and PHEVs Argonne Facilitation of PHEV Standard Testing Procedure (SAE J1711) AVTA: 2012 Toyota Prius PHEV Downloadable Dynamometer Database Reports

  17. Small-Molecule CD4-Mimics: Structure-Based Optimization of HIV...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    S. ; Freire, Ernesto ; Sodroski, Joseph ; Madani, Navid ; Hendrickson, Wayne A. ; Smith, III, Amos B. 1 ; DFCI) 2 ; UPENN) 2 ; JHU) 2 ; Bryn Mawr) 2 ; Harvard-Med) ...

  18. Materials Data on Ca9Cd4Bi9 (SG:55) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Cd4SiSe6 (SG:9) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Cd4SiS6 (SG:9) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Cd4GeSe6 (SG:9) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Sr9Cd4Bi9 (SG:55) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-03-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. CEBAFatAGlance_11x17_d3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  4. Alarm Management System for the D/3 Distributed Control System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-03-19

    As industrial processes continue to grow in size and complexity, the Distrubuted Control Systems that automate and monitor these processes expand in a like manner. This increase in control system complexity has resulted in ever increasing numbers of alarms presented to the operator. The challenge for today's control system designer is to find innovative ways to present alarm information to the operator such that despite the large number of alarms, the operator is able tomore » quickly assess the status of the plant and immediately respond to the most critical alarms in a timely manner. This software package, designed and developed for the Savannah River Site Replacement High Level Waste Evaporator/Waste Removal Distributed Control System installed on the H-Area Tank Farm, provides an alarm system which utilizes the annunciator (SKID) panel as a means of statusing the plant and providing single keystroke access to the display on which an alarm resides.« less

  5. A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy | Department of Energy A "Ferris Bueller Style" Look at Small Business Contracting at the Department of Energy A "Ferris Bueller Style" Look at Small Business Contracting at the Department of Energy November 30, 2010 - 4:14pm Addthis Bill Valdez Bill Valdez Director of Workforce Management What does this mean for me? There are several program opportunities for small businesses within the Department of Energy. Some of the things on offer this year

  6. E~ S*D3 Weldon Spring Site Environmental Repon lor Calendar...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    The site consists of two main areas, the former Weldon Spring Chemical Plant and Raffmate Pits area and the Weldon Spring Quarry. The chemical plant and raffmate pits area and the ...

  7. A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geophysical and wellbore data for the area, and these data will be complemented with modern, state-of-the-art reflection seismic data. Three-component geophones will record...

  8. C:\\DOCUME~1\\d3k776\\LOCALS~1\\TEM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Climate at Schools in the Tropical Western Pacific (continued on page 3) Education Climate Update ARM News from the ARM Program for students and teachers about climate change ...

  9. Study of negative hydrogen ion beam optics using the 3D3V PIC model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyamoto, K.; Nishioka, S.; Goto, I.; Hatayama, A.; Hanada, M.; Kojima, A.

    2015-04-08

    The mechanism of negative ion extraction under real conditions with the complex magnetic field is studied by using the 3D PIC simulation code. The extraction region of the negative ion source for the negative ion based neutral beam injection system in fusion reactors is modelled. It is shown that the E x B drift of electrons is caused by the magnetic filter and the electron suppression magnetic field, and the resultant asymmetry of the plasma meniscus. Furthermore, it is indicated that that the asymmetry of the plasma meniscus results in the asymmetry of negative ion beam profile including the beam halo. It could be demonstrated theoretically that the E x B drift is not significantly weakened by the elastic collisions of the electrons with neutral particles.

  10. Elliptic and Triangular Flow in Event-by-Event D=3+1 Viscous...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OSTI Identifier: 21532263 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 106; Journal Issue: 4; Other Information: DOI: ...

  11. ch_6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 6.0 Sta Sta tutes tutes , , Regula Regula tions tions , , Consulta Consulta tions tions , , and Other and Other Requir Requir ements ements 6-1 DOE/EIS-0287 This chapter discusses the consultations and coordination the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has had with various agen- cies during the preparation of this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). This chapter also analyzes the complex regulatory issues that arise when consider- ing the various alternatives discussed pre- viously. When

  12. Spontaneous breaking of scale invariance in a D = 3 U(N ) model with Chern-Simons gauge fields

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bardeen, William A.; Moshe, Moshe

    2014-06-18

    We study spontaneous breaking of scale invariance in the large N limit of three dimensional U(N )κ Chern-Simons theories coupled to a scalar field in the fundamental representation. When a λ6 ( ؆ · Ø)3 self interaction term is added to the action we find a massive phase at a certain critical value for a combination of the λ(6) and ’t Hooft’s λ = N/κ couplings. This model attracted recent attention since at finite κ it contains a singlet sector which is conjectured to be dual to Vasiliev’s higher spin gravity on AdS4. Our paper concentrates on the massive phasemore » of the 3d boundary theory. We discuss the advantage of introducing masses in the boundary theory through spontaneous breaking of scale invariance.« less

  13. Instabilities of an anisotropically expanding non-Abelian plasma: 1D+3V discretized hard-loop simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebhan, Anton; Attems, Maximilian; Strickland, Michael

    2008-08-15

    Non-Abelian plasma instabilities play a crucial role in the nonequilibrium dynamics of a weakly coupled quark-gluon plasma, and they importantly modify the standard perturbative bottom-up thermalization scenario in heavy-ion collisions. Using the auxiliary-field formulation of the hard-loop effective theory, we study numerically the real-time evolution of instabilities in an anisotropic collisionless Yang-Mills plasma undergoing longitudinal free-streaming expansion. In this first real-time lattice simulation we consider the most unstable modes, long-wavelength coherent color fields that are constant in transverse directions and which therefore are effectively 1+1 dimensional in space-time, except for the auxiliary fields which also depend on discretized momentum rapidity and transverse velocity components. We reproduce the semianalytical results obtained previously for the Abelian regime, and we determine the nonlinear effects which occur when the instabilities have grown such that non-Abelian interactions become important.

  14. Magnetic order and electronic structure of 5d3 double perovskite Sr2ScOsO6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calder, Stuart A; Morrow, Ryan; Taylor, Alice E; Lumsden, Mark D; Woodward, Patrick; Christianson, Andrew D; Singh, David J

    2015-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility, crystal and magnetic structures, and electronic structure of double perovskite Sr2ScOsO6 are reported. Using both neutron and x-ray powder diffraction we find that the crystal structure is monoclinic P21/n from 3.5 to 300 K. Magnetization measurements indicate an antiferromagnetic transition at TN=92 K, one of the highest transition temperatures of any double perovskite hosting only one magnetic ion. Type I antiferromagnetic order is determined by neutron powder diffraction, with an Os moment of only 1.6(1) muB, close to half the spin-only value for a crystal field split 5d electron state with t2g^3 ground state. Density functional calculations show that this reduction is largely the result of strong Os-O hybridization, with spin-orbit coupling responsible for only a ~0.1 muB reduction in the moment.

  15. Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectroscopy Confirms the Prediction that D-3h Carbontrioxide (CO3) Has a Singlet Ground State

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hrovat, David; Hou, Gao-Lei; Chen, Bo; Wang, Xue B.; Borden, Weston

    2015-11-13

    The CO3 radical anion (CO3•–) has been formed by electrospraying carbonate dianion (CO32–) into the gas phase. The negative ion photoelectron (NIPE) spectrum of CO3•– shows that, unlike trimethylenemethane [C(CH2)3], carbontrioxide (CO3) has a singlet ground state. From the NIPE spectrum, the electron affinity of CO3 was determined to be EA = 4.06 ± 0.03 eV, and the singlet-triplet energy difference was found to be ΔEST = - 17.8 ± 0.9 kcal/mol. B3LYP, CCSD(T), and CASPT2 calculations all find that the two lowest triplet states of CO3 are very close in energy, a prediction that is confirmed by the relativemore » intensities of the bands in the NIPE spectrum of CO3•–. The 560 cm-1 vibrational progression, seen in the low energy region of the triplet band, enables the identification of the lowest, Jahn-Teller-distorted, triplet state as 3A1, in which both unpaired electrons reside in σ MOs, rather than 3A2, in which one unpaired electron occupies the b2 σ MO, and the other occupies the b1 π MO.« less

  16. The massive fermion phase for the U(N) Chern-Simons gauge theory in D=3 at large N

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardeen, William A.

    2014-10-07

    We explore the phase structure of fermions in the U(N) Chern-Simons Gauge theory in three dimensions using the large N limit where N is the number of colors and the fermions are taken to be in the fundamental representation of the U(N) gauge group. In the large N limit, the theory retains its classical conformal behavior and considerable attention has been paid to possible AdS/CFT dualities of the theory in the conformal phase. In this paper we present a solution for the massive phase of the fermion theory that is exact to the leading order of t Hoofts large N expansion. We present evidence for the spontaneous breaking of the exact scale symmetry and analyze the properties of the dilaton that appears as the Goldstone boson of scale symmetry breaking.

  17. The massive fermion phase for the U(N) Chern-Simons gauge theory in D=3 at large N

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bardeen, William A.

    2014-10-07

    We explore the phase structure of fermions in the U(N) Chern-Simons Gauge theory in three dimensions using the large N limit where N is the number of colors and the fermions are taken to be in the fundamental representation of the U(N) gauge group. In the large N limit, the theory retains its classical conformal behavior and considerable attention has been paid to possible AdS/CFT dualities of the theory in the conformal phase. In this paper we present a solution for the massive phase of the fermion theory that is exact to the leading order of ‘t Hooft’s large Nmore » expansion. We present evidence for the spontaneous breaking of the exact scale symmetry and analyze the properties of the dilaton that appears as the Goldstone boson of scale symmetry breaking.« less

  18. Construction Readiness RM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Construction Readiness Review Module March 2010 CD- [This Rev Readiness -0 view Module w s Review (CRR OFFICE O CD-1 was used to dev R). This Review OF ENVIRO Standard R Construc Rev Critical D CD-2 M velop the Revie w Module cont ONMENTA Review Pla ction Rea view Modul Decision (CD C March 2010 ew Plan for Sal tains the lesson Review.] AL MANAG an (SRP) adiness le D) Applicabili D-3 lt Waste Proce ns learned from GEMENT ity CD-4 ssing Facility ( m the SWPF Co Post Ope (SWPF) Const onstruction

  19. Section IV.D.3 for DOE 2013 Annual Report: Novel Phosphazene-based Compounds to Enhance Safety and Stability of Cell Chemistries for High Voltage Applications (INL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin L. Gering; Mason K. Harrup; Eric J. Dufek; Sergiy V. Sazhin; Harry W. Rollins; David K. Jamison; Fred F. Stewart; John Burba

    2013-09-01

    Electrolytes play a central role in performance and aging in most electrochemical systems. As automotive and grid applications place a higher reliance on electrochemical stored energy, it becomes more urgent to have electrolyte components that enable optimal battery performance while promoting battery safety and longevity. Safety remains a foremost concern for widespread utilization of Li-ion technology in electric-drive vehicles, especially as the focus turns to higher voltage systems (5V). This work capitalizes on the long established INL expertise regarding phosphazene chemistry, aimed at battery-viable compounds for electrolytes and electrodes that are highly tolerant to abusive conditions. This report showcases our 2013 work for the DOE applied battery research (ABR) program, wherein testing results are summarized for INL electrolytes and alternative anode materials.

  20. Data:94d06976-03c6-46f7-a433-abc5f4968d3a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information...

  1. Negative Ion Photoelectron Spectroscopy Confirms the Prediction that D-3h Carbontrioxide (CO3) Has a Singlet Ground State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrovat, David; Hou, Gao-Lei; Chen, Bo; Wang, Xue B.; Borden, Weston

    2015-11-13

    The CO3 radical anion (CO3•–) has been formed by electrospraying carbonate dianion (CO32–) into the gas phase. The negative ion photoelectron (NIPE) spectrum of CO3•– shows that, unlike trimethylenemethane [C(CH2)3], carbontrioxide (CO3) has a singlet ground state. From the NIPE spectrum, the electron affinity of CO3 was determined to be EA = 4.06 ± 0.03 eV, and the singlet-triplet energy difference was found to be ΔEST = - 17.8 ± 0.9 kcal/mol. B3LYP, CCSD(T), and CASPT2 calculations all find that the two lowest triplet states of CO3 are very close in energy, a prediction that is confirmed by the relative intensities of the bands in the NIPE spectrum of CO3•–. The 560 cm-1 vibrational progression, seen in the low energy region of the triplet band, enables the identification of the lowest, Jahn-Teller-distorted, triplet state as 3A1, in which both unpaired electrons reside in σ MOs, rather than 3A2, in which one unpaired electron occupies the b2 σ MO, and the other occupies the b1 π MO.

  2. Microsoft Word - Policy Flash 2010-81 Attachment 2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Acquisiti ---- Contra See Acqu ion Guide - ------ actor Leg uisition Gui ------ ------ gal Mana ide Chapter ------ ----- agement r 70-31 C, " ----- ------ Require Contractor ------ ---Chapt ements Legal Man ------ ter 31.3 (Sep nagement Re ------ ptember 2010 equirement -- 0) ts."

  3. Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... - w Z C c w z orB w m 1 a a < a W I < J( z l APPENDIX A HERBICIDE BACKGROUND STATEMENTS T ... a t ement s conc e r n i ng the chem i c a l and phy s i c a l p r op e rt i e s , e f f ...

  4. Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug 2011 Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug 2011 PDF icon 000521 & ...

  5. DATE: TO: FROM:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    52 May 17,2010 Procurement Directors Office of Procurement and Assistance Policy, MA-61 Office of Procurement and Assistance Management SUBJECT: Acquisition Letters Remaining In Effect SUMMARY: Acquisition Letter (AL) 2010-07 has been issued. It lists ALs currently in effect and the discontinued ALs along with the reason why the AL is no longer in effect. This flash may be viewed at http://mana~ement.energ;y.~ov/policy p;uidance/policy flashes.htm. Questions concerning this policy flash

  6. Example BCP Template | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ExampleBCPTemplate02-14-12.docx More Documents & Publications Critical Decision 2 (CD-2) Approval Template Critical Decision 4 (CD-4) Approval Template External Independent...

  7. Pathways for Implementing REDD+: Experiences from Carbon Markets...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Centre Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Finance, Implementation Resource Type: Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.acp-cd4cdm.orgmedia237951...

  8. Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8{sup +} T cells

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8{sup +} T cells modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ectopic expression of anti-HIV-1 shRNAs protects CD8{sup +} T cells modified with CD4ζ CAR from HIV-1 infection and alleviates impairment of cell proliferation

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? Small-Molecule CD4-Mimics: Structure-Based Optimization of HIV-1 Entry Inhibition Melillo, Bruno ; Liang, Shuaiyi ...

  10. Project Status | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    June 04, 2012 Finished Advanced Technology R&D Projects CD Status* CD Date Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) .pdf file (37KB) CD-4 January 17, 2013 Finished Accelerator ...

  11. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Performance Metrics and Targets 10. Projects Completed Below TPC: By the end of FY11, for all capital asset line item projects that are completed at CD-4, 50% are completed ...

  12. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contract Specialist series is "1102." 10. Projects Completed Below TPC: By the end of FY11, for all capital asset line item projects that are completed at CD-4, 50% are completed ...

  13. Contract/Project Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    series will be certified. 80% 85% 10. Projects Completed Below TPC: By the end of FY11, for all capital asset line item projects that are completed at CD-4, 50% are completed ...

  14. Lessons Learned | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Within 90 days of Critical Decision (CD-4) approval-- Lessons learned from project execution and facility start-up All PMLLs submitted to OAPM are filed in PARS II under their ...

  15. Construction Readiness RM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The authorization to proceed with construction of a new facility is given at the CD-3 phase of the project management cycle, after completion of the final design. Between CD-3 and CD-4 stages of...

  16. Project Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Management Project Management CD-0 Approval of Mission Need CD-1 Approval of Alternative CD-4 Approval of Project Completion CD-3 Approval to Start Construction CD-2 Approval of Performance Baseline Financial Closeout Complete CD-0 CD-1 CD-4 CD-3 CD-2 INITIATION DEFINITION EXECUTION CLOSEOUT Project Directors are responsible for the planning, programming, budgeting and acquisition of capital assets. One of the principal outcomes in exercising this responsibility is the delivery of

  17. Services | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services Services CD-0 Approval of Mission Need CD-1 Approval of Alternative CD-4 Approval of Project Completion CD-3 Approval to Start Construction CD-2 Approval of Performance Baseline Financial Closeout Complete CD-0 CD-1 CD-4 CD-3 CD-2 INITIATION DEFINITION EXECUTION CLOSEOUT Resource Center The ultimate objective of DOE's Project Management System is to deliver capital asset projects within the original performance baseline, on schedule, within budget, and fully capable of meeting mission

  18. Fermilab Map Legend

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Area - C-4 Proton Assembly - C-4 PS2 - D-3 PS3 - C-4 PS4, PE3 - C-4 PS5 - C-4 PSI, PSO - D-3 PW2 - D-3 PW3 - D-3 PW4 - D-3 PW6 - C-4 R Ramsey Auditorium - E-2 Roads & Grounds...

  19. Intrathymic radioresistant stem cells follow an IL-2/IL-2R pathway during thymic regeneration after sublethal irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuniga-Pfluecker, J.C.K.; Kruisbeek, A.M. )

    1990-05-15

    Sublethally irradiated mice undergo thymic regeneration which follows a phenotypic pattern of events similar to that observed during normal fetal development. Thymic regeneration after irradiation is the product of a limited pool of intrathymic radioresistant stem cells undergoing simultaneous differentiation. We show that in this model of T cell development, thymic regeneration follows a pathway in which the IL-2R is transiently expressed on CD4-/CD8- cells. IL-2R expression occurred during the exponential growth period of thymic regeneration, and IL-2R blocking prevented this explosive growth. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the IL-2R blockade affected primarily the development of the immature CD3-/CD4-/CD8- (triple negative) cells and their ability to generate CD3+/CD4+/CD8+ or CD3+/CD4+/CD8- and CD3+/CD4-/CD8+ thymocytes. Thus, our findings demonstrate that blocking of the IL-2R resulted in an arrest in proliferation and differentiation by intrathymic radioresistant stem cells, indicating that the IL-2/IL-2R pathway is necessary for the expansion of immature triple negative T cells.

  20. Standard Review Plan Preparation for Facility Operations Strengthening Line Management Oversight and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Standard Review Plan Preparation for Facility Operations Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring of Nuclear Facilities August 2013 2 OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT Standard Review Plan (SRP) Preparation for Facility Operations Applicability CD-0 CD-1 CD-2 CD-3 CD-4 Operation Post Operation August 2013 3 Table of Contents Objective ......................................................................................................................................... 4

  1. Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring of Nuclear Facilities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 -- Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review Overview and Management Oversight February 2015 i Standard Review Plan Volume 1 Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review Overview and Management Oversight Facility Life Cycle Applicability CD-1 CD-2 CD-3 CD-4 Operations and Transitions Decommissioning & Environmental Restoration February 2015 ii Table of Contents Acronyms ................................................................................................................................... iii

  2. Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring of Nuclear Facilities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring of Nuclear Facilities Standard Review Plan Volume 2 -- Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review During Design February 2015 i Standard Review Plan Volume 2 Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review during Design Facility Life Cycle Applicability CD-1 CD-2 CD-3 CD-4 Operations and Transitions Decommissioning & Environmental Restoration February 2015 ii Table of Contents Acronyms

  3. Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring of Nuclear Facilities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Volume 3 - Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review During Facility Operations and Transitions February 2015 i Standard Review Plan Volume 3 Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review during Facility Operations and Transitions Facility Life Cycle Applicability CD-1 CD-2 CD-3 CD-4 Operations and Transitions Decommissioning & Environmental Restoration February 2015 ii Table of Contents Acronyms

  4. Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring of Nuclear Facilities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5 - Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review of TSRs, USQs and SERs February 2015 i Standard Review Plan Volume 5 Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review of TSRs, USQs and SERs Facility Life Cycle Applicability CD-1 CD-2 CD-3 CD-4 Operations and Transitions Decommissioning & Environmental Restoration February 2015 ii Table of Contents Acronyms ................................................................................................................................... iii Introduction

  5. Pb exposure attenuates hypersensitivity in vivo by increasing regulatory T cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Liang; Zhao, Fang; Shen, Xuefeng; Ouyang, Weiming; Liu, Xinqin; Xu, Yan; Yu, Tao; Jin, Boquan; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2012-12-01

    Pb is a common environmental pollutant affecting various organs. Exposure of the immune system to Pb leads to immunosuppression or immunodysregulation. Although previous studies showed that Pb exposure can modulate the function of helper T cells, Pb immunotoxicity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Pb exposure on T cell development, and the underlying mechanism of Pb-induced suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response in vivo. SpragueDawley rats were exposed to 300 ppm Pb-acetate solution via the drinking water for six weeks, and we found that Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in the blood by 4.2-fold (p < 0.05) as compared to those in the control rats. In Pb-exposed rats, the amount of thymic CD4{sup +}CD8{sup ?} and peripheral CD4{sup +} T cells was significantly reduced, whereas, CD8{sup +} population was not affected. In contrast to conventional CD4{sup +} T cells, Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) were increased in both the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs of Pb-exposed rats. In line with the increase of Tregs, the DTH response of Pb-exposed rats was markedly suppressed. Depletion of Tregs reversed the suppression of DTH response by Pb-exposed CD4{sup +} T cells in an adoptive transfer model, suggesting a critical role of the increased Tregs in suppressing the DTH response. Collectively, this study revealed that Pb-exposure may upregulate Tregs, thereby leading to immunosuppression. -- Highlights: ? Pb exposure impaired CD4{sup +} thymic T cell development. ? Peripheral T lymphocytes were reduced following Pb exposure. ? Pb exposure increases thymic and peripheral Treg cells in rats. ? Tregs played a critical role in Pb-exposure-induced immune suppression.

  6. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... to D3-brane probes placed at the tip of the cascading warped deformed conifold ... to D3-brane probes placed at the tip of the cascading warped deformed conifold ...

  7. Method to Exhaust Fusion-Product Tritons and Alpha Particles Rapidly from

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D-3He Fueled FRC Fusion Reactors | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Exhaust Fusion-Product Tritons and Alpha Particles Rapidly from D-3He Fueled FRC Fusion Reactors A method is described how to reduce neutron production from small D-3He burning FRC fusion reactors, thereby reducing the shielding required and allowing safer operation and less maintenance. No.: M-898

  8. Technology and Engineering Development Facility | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology and Engineering Development Facility Technology & Engineering Development Facility September 25, 2013 A week ago, the Office of Project Assessment held a review of the TEDF (Technology and Engineering Development Facility). It was a CD-4(B) review. Formally called "Ready for Operations," this review and its successful completion is broadly recognized as marking the end of the project; just a few items on a punch list and the dedication (on Oct. 16) are left to do.

  9. Safeguards and Security and Cyber Security RM | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Safeguards and Security and Cyber Security RM Safeguards and Security and Cyber Security RM The SSCS RM is a tool that assists the DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the technical sufficiency of the project SSCS activities at CD-0 through CD-4. PDF icon Safeguards and Security and Cyber Security RM More Documents & Publications Safeguards and Security Program, acronyms and abbereviations - DOE M 470.4-7 Safeguards and Security Glossary - DOE M 470.4-7 References, Canceled -7

  10. Seismic Design Expectations Report | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Seismic Design Expectations Report Seismic Design Expectations Report The Seismic Design Expectations Report (SDER) is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the technical sufficiency of the project seismic design activities prior to Critical Decision (CD) approvals at CD-0, CD-1, CD-2, CD-3 and CD-4. PDF icon Seismic Design Expectations Report More Documents & Publications Natural Phenomena Hazards DOE-STD 1020-2012 & DOE Handbook DOE-STD-1020-2012 DOE

  11. Preparation for Facility Operations RM | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Preparation for Facility Operations RM Preparation for Facility Operations RM The objective of this Standard Review Plan (SRP) on Preparation for Facility Operations is to provide consistency guidance to evaluate the effectiveness of the final project closure of major construction projects for transition from Critical Decision-4 (CD-4) to facility operations. PDF icon Preparation for Facility Operations RM More Documents & Publications Code of Record Standard Review Plan (SRP) Standard

  12. Readiness Review RM | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Readiness Review RM Readiness Review RM This module assists DOE Federal line management in their efforts to bring a project or facility into a condition where it is sufficiently prepared to start or resume operations prior to CD-4 approval. It is intended to be used after some, but not all, of the Standard Review Plan Commissioning Module activities are performed and before the Transition to Operations Module activities begin. PDF icon Readiness Review RM More Documents & Publications

  13. Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring of Nuclear Facilities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Strengthening Line Management Oversight and Federal Monitoring of Nuclear Facilities Standard Review Plan Volume 4 - Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review During Facility Decommissioning and Environmental Restoration February 2015 i Standard Review Plan Volume 4 Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review during Facility Decommissioning and Environmental Restoration Facility Life Cycle Applicability CD-1 CD-2 CD-3 CD-4 Operations and Transitions Decommissioning & Environmental Restoration February

  14. Charter

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Version Sep 2011 DOE EVMS GOLD CARD PERFORMANCE BASELINE COMPONENTS (Performance Baseline must clearly document scope/KPPs, TPC and CD-4 date) AUW= Authorized Unpriced Work (contractually approved, but not yet negotiated) CA = Control Account (includes AUW) = WPs + PPs CBB = Contract Budget Base = PMB + MR CP = Contract Price = CBB + profit/fee MR = Management Reserve is held by contractor (Contingency is held by DOE) PB = Performance Baseline (TPC) = CP + Contingency + DOE ODC PMB = Performance

  15. Curcumin blocks interleukin (IL)-2 signaling in T-lymphocytes by inhibiting IL-2 synthesis, CD25 expression, and IL-2 receptor signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forward, Nicholas A.; Conrad, David M.; Power Coombs, Melanie R.; Doucette, Carolyn D.; Furlong, Suzanne J.; Lin, Tong-Jun; Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia ; Hoskin, David W.

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Curcumin inhibits CD4{sup +} T-lymphocyte proliferation. {yields} Curcumin inhibits interleukin-2 (IL-2) synthesis and CD25 expression by CD4{sup +} T-lymphocytes. {yields} Curcumin interferes with IL-2 receptor signaling by inhibiting JAK3 and STAT5 phosphorylation. {yields} IL-2-dependent regulatory T-lymphocyte function and Foxp3 expression is downregulated by curcumin. -- Abstract: Curcumin (diferulomethane) is the principal curcuminoid in the spice tumeric and a potent inhibitor of activation-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation; however, the molecular basis of this immunosuppressive effect has not been well studied. Here we show that micromolar concentrations of curcumin inhibited DNA synthesis by mouse CD4{sup +} T-lymphocytes, as well as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and CD25 ({alpha} chain of the high affinity IL-2 receptor) expression in response to antibody-mediated cross-linking of CD3 and CD28. Curcumin acted downstream of protein kinase C activation and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release to inhibit I{kappa}B phosphorylation, which is required for nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF{kappa}B. In addition, IL-2-dependent DNA synthesis by mouse CTLL-2 cells, but not constitutive CD25 expression, was impaired in the presence of curcumin, which demonstrated an inhibitory effect on IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling. IL-2-induced phosphorylation of STAT5A and JAK3, but not JAK1, was diminished in the presence of curcumin, indicating inhibition of critical proximal events in IL-2R signaling. In line with the inhibitory action of curcumin on IL-2R signaling, pretreatment of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T-cells with curcumin downregulated suppressor function, as well as forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) expression. We conclude that curcumin inhibits IL-2 signaling by reducing available IL-2 and high affinity IL-2R, as well as interfering with IL-2R signaling.

  16. Chicago

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Chart of communications requirements Chart of communications requirements Chart of communications requirements for BGE PDF icon Chart of communications requirements More Documents & Publications BGE Communications Requirements Lower Colorado River Authority Lower Colorado River Authority

    Version Sep 2011 DOE EVMS GOLD CARD PERFORMANCE BASELINE COMPONENTS (Performance Baseline must clearly document scope/KPPs, TPC and CD-4 date) AUW= Authorized Unpriced Work (contractually approved, but

  17. Structural analysis of a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody R53 targeting an epitope in HIV-1 gp120 C4 region critical for receptor and co-receptor binding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Ruimin; Chen, Yuxin; Vaine, Michael; Hu, Guangnan; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Kong, Xiang -Peng

    2015-07-15

    The fourth conserved region (C4) in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 is a structural element that is important for its function, as it binds to both the receptor CD4 and the co-receptor CCR5/CXCR4. It has long been known that this region is highly immunogenic and that it harbors B-cell as well as T-cell epitopes. It is the target of a number of antibodies in animal studies, which are called CD4-blockers. However, the mechanism by which the virus shields itself from such antibody responses is not known. Here, we determined the crystal structure of R53 in complex with its epitope peptide using a novel anti-C4 rabbit monoclonal antibody R53. Our data show that although the epitope of R53 covers a highly conserved sequence 433AMYAPPI439, it is not available in the gp120 trimer and in the CD4-bound conformation. Our results suggest a masking mechanism to explain how HIV-1 protects this critical region from the human immune system.

  18. Structural analysis of a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody R53 targeting an epitope in HIV-1 gp120 C4 region critical for receptor and co-receptor binding

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pan, Ruimin; Chen, Yuxin; Vaine, Michael; Hu, Guangnan; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Kong, Xiang -Peng

    2015-07-15

    The fourth conserved region (C4) in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 is a structural element that is important for its function, as it binds to both the receptor CD4 and the co-receptor CCR5/CXCR4. It has long been known that this region is highly immunogenic and that it harbors B-cell as well as T-cell epitopes. It is the target of a number of antibodies in animal studies, which are called CD4-blockers. However, the mechanism by which the virus shields itself from such antibody responses is not known. Here, we determined the crystal structure of R53 in complex with its epitopemore » peptide using a novel anti-C4 rabbit monoclonal antibody R53. Our data show that although the epitope of R53 covers a highly conserved sequence 433AMYAPPI439, it is not available in the gp120 trimer and in the CD4-bound conformation. Our results suggest a masking mechanism to explain how HIV-1 protects this critical region from the human immune system.« less

  19. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

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    Saxena, Avadh (15) Khare, Avinash (4) Lin, Shi-Zeng (4) Batista, Cristian D. (3) Cooper, Fred (2) Deffner, Sebastian (2) Kevrekidis, Panayotis G. (2) Reichhardt, Charles (2)...

  20. Synthesis and structure of a 2D → 3D framework with coexistence...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of hydrogen bonds and polythreading character Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Synthesis and structure of a 2D 3D framework with coexistence of hydrogen bonds ...

  1. Modcopter: Prompt, Precise Aerial Sample Collection Using Unmanned...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Modcopter: Prompt, Precise Aerial Sample Collection Using Unmanned Systems Authors: Curtis, Aaron 1 ; Elliott, James 2 ; Ronquest, Michael 3 ; Mascarenas, David D. 3 ...

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

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    Malczynski, Leonard A. (3) Peters, Michael D. (3) Conrad, Stephen Hamilton (2) ... Jean ; Cai, Ximing ; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton ; Constantine, Paul ; Dalbey, Keith R. ; ...

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Taylor, Mark A. (4) Malczynski, Leonard A. (3) Peters, Michael D. (3) Conrad, Stephen Hamilton (2) Constantine, Paul (2) Lowry, Thomas Stephen (2) Reinert, Rhonda K. (2) ...

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Ghosh, Agnidipta (3) Lima, Christopher D. (3) Shuman, Stewart (3) Sanchez, Ana M. (1) ... Ana M. ; Lima, Christopher D. ; Shuman, Stewart ; SKI) August 2015 Structural Insights to ...

  5. Detecting regular sound changes in linguistics as events of concerted...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    other evolving group. less Authors: Hruschka, Daniel J. 1 ; Branford, Simon 2 ; Smith, Eric D. 3 ; Wilkins, Jon 4 ; Meade, Andrew 2 ; Pagel, Mark 5 ; Bhattacharya,...

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    Filter Results Filter by Author Hidaka, Yoshimasa (4) Pisarski, Robert D. (3) Dumitru, ... Shu ; Paquet, Jean-Franois ; Pisarski, Robert D. ; Satow, Daisuke ; Skokov, Vladimir V. ...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Guo, Yun (3) Hidaka, Yoshimasa (3) Pisarski, Robert D. (3) Altes, Christiaan P. Korthals ... ; Korthals Altes, Chris P. ; Pisarski, Robert D. Full Text Available November 2012 , ...

  8. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

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    Filter Results Filter by Author Lin, Shu (5) Pisarski, Robert D. (3) Skokov, Vladimir V. ... Collisional energy loss above the critical temperature in QCD Lin, Shu ; Pisarski, Robert ...

  9. Argonne_map

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    ROADS & PARKING BUILDINGS 603 1 2 3 4 5 A B C D E F G 360 - E4 361 - E4 362 - E3 363 - E4 366 - E4 369 - E4 370 - E4 371 - E4 376 - E4 399 - E4 600 Area 600 - E3 617 - E3 800 Area 891 - B2 900 Area 950 - G3 951 - G2 952 - G2 953 - G2 East Area 046 - F2 091 - G3 100 Area 108 - E2 145 - F2 146 - F2 200 Area 200 - C2 201 - D2 202 - D2 203 - D2 204 - E2 205 - D2, D3 300 Area 302 - D3 306 - D4 308 - D3 309 - D3 206 - C2 208 - C2 211 - C2 212 - D2 213 - D2 214 - D3 216 - D2 314 - D4 315 - D4 316 -

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    Proposals and Design Reports Proposals and Design Reports Proposal (1/2/04) Proposal Addendum (29/3/04) Physics Case and Detector Technology Report (12/04) Technical Design Report (7/06) Reviews DOE CD-4 DOE 2008 DOE CD-3b CD-3b Readiness DOE CD-1/2/3a CD-2/3a Readiness CD-1 Readiness PAC Report (4/05) Approvals FNAL PAC Approval: April 15, 2004 DOE Critical Decision 1,2,3a (Performance Baseline, Construction Start) Approval: March 30, 2007 DOE Critical Decision 4 (Project Completion) Approval:

  11. approved_list

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    11OCT99 Exp # Spokesperson Title Days 789-2 Clark Exotic Shapes in 106Cd 4 806-2 Kondev Probing the Interplay Between Intrinsic and Collective Motion at the Extremes of Spin, Spin Projection and Seniority 5 821X Hofman In-Beam Test of LEPPEX Fission Chamber and Detectors 3 822 Kwok Patterning of Columnar Defects: Fabrication of Vortex Ratchet System for Manipulating Trapped Flux in High Temperature Superconductors 2 823 Svensson Lifetimes in the (Super)-Deformed (f7/2)4 Intruder Band in the N =

  12. Enclosure - FY 2015 Q4 Metrics Report 2015-11-02.xlsx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fourth Quarter Overall Root Cause Analysis (RCA)/Corrective Action Plan (CAP) Performance Metrics No. Contract/Project Management Performance Metrics FY 2015 Target Comment No. 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 Capital Asset Project Success: Complete 90% of capital asset projects at original scope and within 110% of CD-2 TPC. 90% FY13-FY15: 40 completions through 4th Qtr. CD-4: Critical Decision-4, Approve Start of Operations/Project Completion. FY13-FY15: 4 completions through 4th Qtr. Based on 3-year rolling

  13. Prenatal cadmium exposure produces persistent changes to thymus and spleen cell phenotypic repertoire as well as the acquired immune response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holskov, Ida; Elliott, Meenal; Hanson, Miranda L.; Schafer, Rosana [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Barnett, John B., E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, West Virginia University School of Medicine, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a common environmental contaminant. Adult exposure to Cd alters the immune system, however, there are limited studies on the effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose of CdCl{sub 2} (10 ppm) and the effects on the immune system of the offspring were assessed at 20 weeks of age. Prenatal Cd exposure caused an increase in the percent of CD4{sup ?}CD8{sup ?}CD44{sup +}CD25{sup ?} (DN1) thymocytes in both sexes and a decrease in the percent of CD4{sup ?}CD8{sup ?}CD44{sup ?}CD25{sup +} (DN3) thymocytes in females. Females had an increase in the percent of splenic CD4{sup +} T cells, CD8{sup +} T cells, and CD45R/B220{sup +} B cells and a decrease in the percent of NK cells and granulocytes (Gr-1{sup +}). Males had an increase in the percent of splenic CD4{sup +} T cells and CD45R/B220{sup +} B cells and a decrease in the percent of CD8{sup +} T cells, NK cells, and granulocytes. The percentage of neutrophils and myeloid-derived suppressor cells were reduced in both sexes. The percent of splenic nTreg cells was decreased in all Cd-exposed offspring. Cd-exposed offspring were immunized with a streptococcal vaccine and the antibody response was determined. PC-specific serum antibody titers were decreased in Cd exposed female offspring but increased in the males. PspA-specific serum IgG titers were increased in both females and males compared to control animals. Females had a decrease in PspA-specific serum IgM antibody titers. Females and males had a decrease in the number of splenic anti-PspA antibody-secreting cells when standardized to the number of B cells. These findings demonstrate that very low levels of Cd exposure during gestation can result in long term sex-specific alterations on the immune system of the offspring. -- Highlights: ? Prenatal exposure to cadmium alters the immune system of 20 week old offspring. ? The percentage of DN1 and DN3 thymocytes was changed. ? Males and females had changed percentages of numerous splenic cell populations. ? The antibody response of a streptococcal vaccine showed numerous changes.

  14. Office of Civil Rights NA-1.2 VIDEO LIBRARY Item Title

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Communicate with Confidence w/ Pamela Jett-Aal 1 CD 1 71 min 2003 Sound Solutions Learn Library-Rockhurst University Continuing Ed. Press 2 Communicate with Confidence w/ Pamela Jett-Aal 1 CD 2 50 min 2003 Sound Solutions Learn Library-Rockhurst University Continuing Ed. Press 3 Communicate with Confidence w/ Pamela Jett-Aal 1 CD 3 45 min 2003 Sound Solutions Learn Library-Rockhurst University Continuing Ed. Press 4 Communicate with Confidence w/ Pamela Jett-Aal 1 CD 4 62 min 2003 Sound

  15. reda(1)-99.PDF

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    ARM Science Team Meeting Proceedings, San Antonio, Texas, March 22-26, 1999 2 ( ) 4 c 4 d 3 4 c 2 1 0 sky T T * * K T * * K V * K K W - - + + (1) where W sky ...

  16. kzu7205.tmp

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    3068 Direct Fast-Neutron Detection D.C. Stromswold A.J. Peurrung R.R. Hansen P.L. Reeder ... for Neutrons and Gamma Rays from 23%d3e . ...... 4.4 Gamma-Rays Appearing ...

  17. Ethanol Ventures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ethanol Ventures Place: London, England, United Kingdom Zip: W1D 3SQ Product: Company aims to deliver at least 378 million litres a year of bioethanol from two Facilities in...

  18. Seismic Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    impedance boundary7 References (Majer, n.d.) "3-D Seismic Methods For Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment- Summary" 2.0 2.1 2.2 (Dobrin and Savit, 1988)...

  19. EERE's Fiscal Year 2005 Budget in Brief

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY 2005 Budget-in-Brief U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy www.eere.energy.gov TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Introduction .......................................................................................................................1 Biomass & Biorefinery Systems R&D ...............................................................................3 Building Technologies

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    Brunger, Axel T. (4) Zwart, Peter H. (4) Baker, David (3) Cohn, Judith D. (3) Echols, Nathaniel (3) Kim, Chang-Yub (3) Save Results Save this search to My Library Excel (limit ...

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    Das, Tanmoy (4) Gao, Yi (4) Ren, Jie (4) Si, Qimiao (4) Tai, Yuan-Yen (4) Ahmed, Towfiq (3) Bauer, Eric D. (3) Dai, Jianhui (3) Durakiewicz, Tomasz (3) Janoschek, Marc (3) Zhu, ...

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    Filter by Author Park, Tuson (7) Bauer, Eric D (4) Ronning, Filip (4) Thompson, Joe D (4) Ronning, F. (3) Thompson, J. D. (3) Bauer, E. D. (2) Lu, Xin (2) Chen, G F (1) Chen, Y. (1) ...

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    Werkema, Evan (4) Walter, Marc D. (3) Werkema, Evan L. (3) Yahia, Ahmed (3) Barros, Noemi (2) Bauer, Eric D. (2) Hu, Yung-Jin (2) Kazhdan, Daniel (2) Zi, Guofu (2) gory (2) Alary, ...

  4. NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULEMAKING ON THE INTEGRATED INTERAGENCY PRE...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The workshop will be held via webinar and conference call. Please register at: 1) Webinar link: https:iser.webex.comiseronstageg.php?MTIDedfa1833d3ad5014f2b91124860aeecc1 2) ...

  5. The microscopic structure of charge density waves in underdoped...

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    Authors: E. M. Forgan ; Huecker, M. 1 ; Blackburn, E. 2 ; Holmes, A. T. 2 ; Briffa, A. K. R. 2 ; Chang, J. 2 ; Bouchenoire, L. 3 ; Brown, S. D. 3 ; Liang, Ruixing 4 ...

  6. Microsoft Word - S0130700_Mar 2008Rev June 2008.doc

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    of Energy LTSP for the Falls City, Texas, Disposal Site March 2008 Doc. No. S0130700 Page D-3 LTSP for the Falls City, Texas, Disposal Site U.S. Department of Energy Doc. ...

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/3-OR-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    potential, geologic and geophysical test data, and other information of a factual nature. See OAR 141-075-0525. 3-OR-d.3 - Notice of bidding The Oregon Department of State...

  8. Microsoft Word - M131 SF30 Word _6_19_08_ LD final3 draft.doc

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    K D (M131) 4152001 & (4) Standard 1 COR 712001 with 1.6 WTP Risk Assessment Std. 1(d)(3) K D (M131) updates as required 1 (M033) Standard 1 COR Last Tuesday...

  9. Interlanguage Programming

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    &letter1, &numint1, &numint2, &numfloat1, &numdoub1, &numshor1, &myid, 1); printf(" Hello from proc %d of %d; data values: %s %c %d %d %3.1f %.0f %dn", myid, numprocs,...

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    KANG,H. (3) Wang, D. (3) Wang, X. (3) Zhu, P. F. (3) Boswell, R.W. (2) Chen, Y. (2) Choi, Seonho (2) Ge, Y (2) Germaschewski, K (2) Germaschewski, K. (2) Save Results Save this ...

  11. Three-dimensional simulation of H-mode plasmas with localized...

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    Authors: Lore, J. D. 1 ; Reinke, M. L. 2 ; Brunner, D. 3 ; LaBombard, B. 3 ; Lipschultz, B. 2 Search SciTech Connect for author "Lipschultz, B." Search SciTech Connect ...

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    ... Cuny, Gregory D. (3) Moody, D. Branch (3) Abdul-Hay, Samer O. (2) Arida, Ahmad R. (2) Boom, W. Henry (2) Cantley, Lewis C. (2) Choi, Sungwoon (2) Chopra, Rajiv (2) Choudhry, ...

  13. Validating (d,pγ) as a surrogate for neutron capture (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Lister, C. J. 11 ; Manning, B. 1 ; O'Donnell, John M. 4 ; Peters, W. A. 12 ; Ross, T. J. 8 ; Scielzo, N. D. 3 ; Seweryniak, D. 7 ; Zhu, S. 7 less + Show ...

  14. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

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    Keasling, Jay D. (3) Adams, Paul D. (1) Akbar Ali, Mohamad (1) Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge (1) ... ; Scheer, Adam M. ; Savee, John D. ; Akbar Ali, Mohamad ; Lee, Taek Soon ; Simmons, Blake ...

  15. U

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 SPONSORED BY DOE AND NRC PREPARED BY NAC INTERNATIONAL Updated RIS Directories Recently the NMMSS NRC, DOE and International Reporting Identification Symbol Directories were updated and dispatched on CD's to persons on the distribution list. The directories, D-2, D-3 and D-15 are issued at least annually. The D-2 is the DOE facilities directory and the D-3 is the NRC licensee facilities directory. The D-15 is the International facilities directory. The next issue is scheduled for the

  16. Method to Increase 3He Supply for Use in Small Clean Fusion Reactors |

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    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Increase 3He Supply for Use in Small Clean Fusion Reactors A method is described how to fuel many small D-3He burning FRC fusion reactors by building a remote D-D burning reactor twin (for each D-3He burning reactor) to breed 3He. Both reactors would employ our novel fusion ash exhaust technique. No.: M-897

  17. Sodium meta-arsenite prevents the development of autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y.S.; Kim, D.; Lee, E.K.; Kim, S.; Choi, C.S.; Jun, H.S.

    2015-04-15

    Sodium meta-arsenite (SA) is an orally available arsenic compound. We investigated the effects of SA on the development of autoimmune type 1 diabetes. Female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice were orally intubated with SA (5 mg/kg/day) from 8 weeks of age for 8 weeks. The cumulative incidence of diabetes was monitored until 30 weeks of age, islet histology was examined, and lymphocytes including T cells, B cells, CD4+ IFN-γ+ cells, CD8+ IFN-γ+ cells, CD4+ IL-4+ cells, and regulatory T cells were analyzed. We also investigated the diabetogenic ability of splenocytes using an adoptive transfer model and the effect of SA on the proliferation, activation, and expression of glucose transporter 1 (Glut1) in splenocytes treated with SA in vitro and splenocytes isolated from SA-treated mice. SA treatment decreased the incidence of diabetes and delayed disease onset. SA treatment reduced the infiltration of immunocytes in islets, and splenocytes from SA-treated mice showed a reduced ability to transfer diabetes. The number of total splenocytes and T cells and both the number and the proportion of CD4+ IFN-γ+ and CD8+ IFN-γ+ T cells in the spleen were significantly reduced in SA-treated NOD mice compared with controls. The number, but not the proportion, of regulatory T cells was decreased in SA-treated NOD mice. Treatment with SA either in vitro or in vivo inhibited proliferation of splenocytes. In addition, the expression of Glut1 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 was decreased by SA treatment. These results suggest that SA reduces proliferation and activation of T cells, thus preventing autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. - Highlights: • SA prevents the development of diabetes and delays the age of onset in NOD mice. • SA decreases the number but not the proportion of T lymphocytes in NOD mice. • SA reduces IFN-γ-producing T lymphocytes in NOD mice. • SA reduces proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. • SA reduces the expression of glucose transporter 1 (Glut1) in splenocytes.

  18. 12 GeV! | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GeV! 12 GeV! December 21, 2015 Our upgrade project is called the 12 GeV CEBAF Upgrade Project. At the time CD-4A was achieved, we demonstrated 2.2 GeV per pass. This was 12 GeV! Well, not quite. In fact with more than one pass, we limited ourselves to a little more than 6 GeV with three passes, and to 10.5 GeV with 5.5 passes. It was not felt to be prudent to demand 12 GeV out of the machine immediately after turn on. Operations in the spring of 2015 at high energy, ~10.5 GeV, came to a

  19. To: J. Chipman Frm: John P. Howe In Her Visit to Graseelli Laboratories, Cleveland, Ohio, August 30, 1943

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ij& 3-l v-y m Consisting of % pages containing 0 figures copy No.&of 12 copies. Series A' . September 9, 1943 To: J. Chipman Frm: John P. Howe In Her Visit to Graseelli Laboratories, Cleveland, Ohio, August 30, 1943 This meeting was the usual biweekly review of the coating work dono at the Grascrelli Laboratories. LOT DIP - reported by 3. R. bl&er 1 ' 2 / r; 4 I-I 3 -4 cn 14 CD 4 E L> -4 v) 4 -+ CT :2 z -J L3 t 4 F=o Q) A Cl ri z + 2 k fi ii lr= e.2 v i $ & k 0 2 5 c w s .G 0

  20. Structural Analysis of a Highly Glycosylated and Unliganded gp120-Based Antigen Using Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L Wang; Y Qin; S Ilchenko; J Bohon; W Shi; M Cho; K Takamoto; M Chance

    2011-12-31

    Structural characterization of the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 is very important for providing an understanding of the protein's immunogenicity and its binding to cell receptors. So far, the crystallographic structure of gp120 with an intact V3 loop (in the absence of a CD4 coreceptor or antibody) has not been determined. The third variable region (V3) of the gp120 is immunodominant and contains glycosylation signatures that are essential for coreceptor binding and entry of the virus into T-cells. In this study, we characterized the structure of the outer domain of gp120 with an intact V3 loop (gp120-OD8) purified from Drosophila S2 cells utilizing mass spectrometry-based approaches. We mapped the glycosylation sites and calculated the glycosylation occupancy of gp120-OD8; 11 sites from 15 glycosylation motifs were determined as having high-mannose or hybrid glycosylation structures. The specific glycan moieties of nine glycosylation sites from eight unique glycopeptides were determined by a combination of ECD and CID MS approaches. Hydroxyl radical-mediated protein footprinting coupled with mass spectrometry analysis was employed to provide detailed information about protein structure of gp120-OD8 by directly identifying accessible and hydroxyl radical-reactive side chain residues. Comparison of gp120-OD8 experimental footprinting data with a homology model derived from the ligated CD4-gp120-OD8 crystal structure revealed a flexible V3 loop structure in which the V3 tip may provide contacts with the rest of the protein while residues in the V3 base remain solvent accessible. In addition, the data illustrate interactions between specific sugar moieties and amino acid side chains potentially important to the gp120-OD8 structure.

  1. Effects of Respiratory Motion on Passively Scattered Proton Therapy Versus Intensity Modulated Photon Therapy for Stage III Lung Cancer: Are Proton Plans More Sensitive to Breathing Motion?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matney, Jason; Park, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Bluett, Jaques [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chen, Yi Pei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Wei; Court, Laurence E. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Li, Heng [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe, E-mail: rmohan@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To quantify and compare the effects of respiratory motion on paired passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and intensity modulated photon therapy (IMRT) plans; and to establish the relationship between the magnitude of tumor motion and the respiratory-induced dose difference for both modalities. Methods and Materials: In a randomized clinical trial comparing PSPT and IMRT, radiation therapy plans have been designed according to common planning protocols. Four-dimensional (4D) dose was computed for PSPT and IMRT plans for a patient cohort with respiratory motion ranging from 3 to 17 mm. Image registration and dose accumulation were performed using grayscale-based deformable image registration algorithms. The dosevolume histogram (DVH) differences (4D-3D [3D = 3-dimensional]) were compared for PSPT and IMRT. Changes in 4D-3D dose were correlated to the magnitude of tumor respiratory motion. Results: The average 4D-3D dose to 95% of the internal target volume was close to zero, with 19 of 20 patients within 1% of prescribed dose for both modalities. The mean 4D-3D between the 2 modalities was not statistically significant (P<.05) for all dosevolume histogram indices (mean SD) except the lung V5 (PSPT: +1.1% 0.9%; IMRT: +0.4% 1.2%) and maximum cord dose (PSPT: +1.5 2.9 Gy; IMRT: 0.0 0.2 Gy). Changes in 4D-3D dose were correlated to tumor motion for only 2 indices: dose to 95% planning target volume, and heterogeneity index. Conclusions: With our current margin formalisms, target coverage was maintained in the presence of respiratory motion up to 17 mm for both PSPT and IMRT. Only 2 of 11 4D-3D indices (lung V5 and spinal cord maximum) were statistically distinguishable between PSPT and IMRT, contrary to the notion that proton therapy will be more susceptible to respiratory motion. Because of the lack of strong correlations with 4D-3D dose differences in PSPT and IMRT, the extent of tumor motion was not an adequate predictor of potential dosimetric error caused by breathing motion.

  2. Experimental Design of Hydrokinetic Resource Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    419 Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual September 2011 Prepared by Vincent S. Neary, Ph.D., P.E. 1 Budi Gunawan, Ph.D. 1 Marshall C. Richmond, Ph.D. P.E. 2 Vibhav Durgesh, Ph.D. 2 Brian Polagye, Ph.D. 3 Jim Thomson, Ph.D. 3 Marian Muste, Ph.D. 4 Arnie Fontaine, Ph.D. 5 1 Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 3 Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, University of Washington 4

  3. Closure certification report for the Bear Creek burial grounds B area and walk-in pits at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    On July 5, 1993, the revised RCRA Closure Plan for the Bear Creek Burial Grounds B Area and Walk-In Pits at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, DOE/OR/01-1100&D3 and Y/ER-53&D3, was approved by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The closure activities described in that closure plan have been performed. The purpose of this document is to summarize the closure activities for B Area and Walk-In Pits (WIPs), including placement of the Kerr Hollow Quarry debris at the WIPs.

  4. Energy Literacy Social Studies Guides

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    much energy do I need? Energy Literacy Essential Principle 6: The amount of energy used by human society depends on many factors. C3 Framework for Social Studies Focus Indicators D1: Identify the disciplinary concepts and ideas associated with a supporting question that are open to interpretation. (D1.3.3-5) D2: Compare the benefits and costs of individual choices. (D2.Eco.1.3-5) D3: Use evidence to develop claims in response to compelling questions. (D3.4.3-5) D4: Present a summary of arguments

  5. First Observations of Nonhydrodynamic Mix at the Fuel-Shell Interface in Shock-Driven Inertial Confinement Implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Amendt, P.; Delettrez, J.; Bellei, C.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; et al

    2014-04-01

    A strong nonhydrodynamic mechanism generating atomic fuel-shell mix has been observed in strongly shocked inertial confinement fusion implosions of thin deuterated-plastic shells filled with 3He gas. These implosions were found to produce D3He-proton shock yields comparable to implosions of identical shells filled with a hydroequivalent 50:50 D3He gas mixture. Standard hydrodynamic mixing cannot explain this observation, as hydrodynamic modeling including mix predicts a yield an order of magnitude lower than was observed. Instead, these results can be attributed to ion diffusive mix at the fuel-shell interface.

  6. Gauge theories on hyperbolic spaces and dual wormhole instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchel, Alex

    2004-09-15

    We study supergravity duals of strongly coupled four-dimensional gauge theories formulated on compact quotients of hyperbolic spaces. The resulting background geometries are represented by Euclidean wormholes, which complicate establishing the precise gauge theory/string theory correspondence dictionary. These backgrounds suffer from the nonperturbative instabilities arising from the D3D3-bar pair-production in the background four-form potential. We discuss conditions for suppressing this Schwingerlike instability. We find that Euclidean wormholes arising in this construction develop a naked singularity before they can be stabilized.

  7. QACINA

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-09-19

    QACINA is an extensible multiphysics code that includes finite-element based solvers for 2D/3D time-dependent heat conduction, 2D time-dependent advection-diffusion, 2D time-dependent incompressible flow, 2D Lagrangian hydrodynamics. In addition, 2D/3D unstructured-grid finite-volume solvers are being developed for solving time-dependent advection-diffusion and the compressible Euler equations. QACINA uses a toolkit model for development and provides lightweight, high-performance and reusable code modules for agile development.

  8. NOT SPEC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anti d3.t .pt(dIOlendtd O .. , m:S1 acI-A;. ".VII;;>I cI "'" "",eru:men1 p"o, 1(> Ifl(I nour an< I3;Ite ..ed '" 1M...

  9. A=5Li (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    n)4He is very close. See also (KU55B, BO57G, BR57E). Above Ed 3.71 MeV, deuteron breakup (reaction (b)) is observed (HE55D). 4. 3He(d, d)3He Eb 16.555 Differential cross...

  10. A=6Li (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p)6Li Qm -4.004 See (CH58D). 3. 4He(d, )6Li Qm 1.471 An upper limit for capture radiation at Ed 1.055 MeV (2.18-MeV state) is 0.1 mb (SI54). A search for resonant...

  11. PART I - THE SCHEDULE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D Contract No. DE-AC06-09RL14728 D-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 PACKAGING ................................................................................................................ D-1 D.2 MARKING .................................................................................................................... D-1 D.3 SECURITY REQUIREMENTS ...................................................................................... D-1 Mission

  12. PART I - THE SCHEDULE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D Contract No. DE-AC27-08RV14800 D-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 PACKAGING ................................................................................................................ D-1 D.2 MARKING .................................................................................................................... D-1 D.3 SECURITY REQUIREMENTS ...................................................................................... D-1 Tank

  13. Shell model description of band structure in 48Cr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vargas, Carlos E.; Velazquez, Victor M.

    2007-02-12

    The band structure for normal and abnormal parity bands in 48Cr are described using the m-scheme shell model. In addition to full fp-shell, two particles in the 1d3/2 orbital are allowed in order to describe intruder states. The interaction includes fp-, sd- and mixed matrix elements.

  14. ESnet Visualization Widgets

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-07-01

    The ESnet Visualization widgets are various data visualization widgets for use in web browsers to aid in the visualization of computer networks. In particular the widgets are targetted at displaying timeseries and topology data. They were developed for use in the MyESnet portal but are general enough to be used other places. The widgets are built using the d3.js library.

  15. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The technical sub- programs of the FCT Program are as follows: 3.1 Hydrogen Production 3.2 Hydrogen Delivery 3.3 Hydrogen Storage 3.4 Fuel Cells 3.5 Manufacturing R&D 3.6 ...

  16. MEMORANDUfl J: FILE DATE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    J: FILE DATE r so ---w------m FROM: 9. 34oyc -w---v----- SUBJECT: D3 Bo;s CL&;C J mL-;+J; - Rcc cap 049 'A :j: &336;s L-.fh w-f L-1 ALE"nirTE ---...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2 and vsub 3 in Au+Au collisions at radical(s)200 AGeV using event-by-event D3+1 ... Its main components are a time-evolution model for the soft background, PYTHIA 8.1, and ...

  18. Delegations - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Delegations Current By Functional Area By Position Designations Assignments Rescinded by Website Administrator More filters Less filters Issue Date Start date End date Filters applied Δ Hide filters ∇ Show filters (0) [X] Remove all 0688d3e2dfe30db61965fdd7ec98f24d

  19. The Standards Forum, September 2001

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C"40()"%?D(3'6%*+"%5@EF% G% 5*3163'6%?0*2(1% H% ,-.%I"0"2J"%3*2(134% .1J2'(1)"1*34%.K0"44"10"%?3'6% &('%@"*+(6%,"J"4(L"6%*+'(8+%*+"% ,"L3'*)"1*M%N2(*3%,("% ...

  20. Couplings between Chern-Simons gravities and 2p-branes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miskovic, Olivera; Zanelli, Jorge

    2009-08-15

    The interaction between Chern-Simons (CS) theories and localized external sources (2p-branes) is analyzed. This interaction generalizes the minimal coupling between a point charge (0-brane) and a gauge connection. The external currents that define the 2p branes are covariantly constant (D-2p-1)-forms coupled to (2p-1) CS forms. The general expression for the sources--charged with respect to the corresponding gauge algebra--is presented, focusing on two special cases: 0-branes and (D-3)-branes. In any dimension, 0-branes are constructed as topological defects produced by a surface deficit of (D-2)-sphere in anti-de Sitter space, and they are not constant curvature spaces for D>3. They correspond to dimensionally continued black holes with negative mass. On the other hand, in the case of CS (super) gravities, the (D-3)-branes are naked conical singularities (topological defects) obtained by identification of points with a Killing vector. In 2+1 dimensions, extremal spinning branes of this type are Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield states. Stable (D-3)-branes are shown to exist also in higher dimensions, as well. Classical field equations are also discussed, and in the presence of sources there is a large number of inequivalent and disconnected sectors in solution space.

  1. Un~ted States Environmental Monltorlng EPA/600/4-86/022 Env~ronmental...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    comp i 1 ed by R. F. Grossman, S. C. Black, R. E. Dye, D. D. Smith, D. 3 . Thom6, A. A . ... CONF-730915. B184 Black, S. C. and D. D. Smith, 1984, "Nevada Test S i t e Experimental ...

  2. CX-001422: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource: Soda lake, Churchill County, NevadaCX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9Date: 03/29/2010Location(s): Soda Lake, NevadaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  3. Science Headlines

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    -0500 12B69234-E106-461C-B008-1A4F342D3F6Dhttp:1.usa.gov20feQ3S A Respiratory Virus Provides Clues to Possible Treatments Purdue University researchers, working at the...

  4. News

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    glaciers. 12B69234-E106-461C-B008-1A4F342D3F6Dhttp:1.usa.gov20feQ3S A Respiratory Virus Provides Clues to Possible Treatments Purdue University researchers, working at the...

  5. N O T I C E

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... B3) where Q R e 2 4 g D 3 p 8 ( p - p 8 ; 3 4 and Re pv,D (B20) (B21) J? g is gas viscosity. Note that C d Re 2 is independent of velocity. Therefore to find v tf first calculate ...

  6. Identification of full-length transmitted/founder viruses and their progeny in primary HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korber, Bette; Hraber, Peter; Giorgi, Elena; Bhattacharya, T

    2009-01-01

    Identification of transmitted/founder virus genomes and their progeny by is a novel strategy for probing the molecular basis of HIV-1 transmission and for evaluating the genetic imprint of viral and host factors that act to constrain or facilitate virus replication. Here, we show in a cohort of twelve acutely infected subjects (9 clade B; 3 clade C), that complete genomic sequences of transmitted/founder viruses could be inferred using single genome amplification of plasma viral RNA, direct amplicon sequencing, and a model of random virus evolution. This allowed for the precise identification, chemical synthesis, molecular cloning, and biological analysis of those viruses actually responsible for productive clinical infection and for a comprehensive mapping of sequential viral genomes and proteomes for mutations that are necessary or incidental to the establishment of HIV-1 persistence. Transmitted/founder viruses were CD4 and CCR5 tropic, replicated preferentially in activated primary T-Iymphocytes but not monocyte-derived macrophages, and were effectively shielded from most heterologous or broadly neutralizing antibodies. By 3 months of infection, the evolving viral quasispecies in three subjects showed mutational fixation at only 2-5 discreet genomic loci. By 6-12 months, mutational fixation was evident at 18-27 genomic loci. Some, but not all, of these mutations were attributable to virus escape from cytotoxic Tlymphocytes or neutralizing antibodies, suggesting that other viral or host factors may influence early HIV -1 fitness.

  7. Transgenic Mouse Model of Chronic Beryllium Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Terry

    2009-05-26

    Animal models provide powerful tools for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new treatment paradigms. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships is severely limited by a general inability to develop a sufficient chronic beryllium disease animal model. Discovery of the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - DPB1Glu69 genetic susceptibility component of chronic beryllium disease permitted the addition of this human beryllium antigen presentation molecule to an animal genome which may permit development of a better animal model for chronic beryllium disease. Using FVB/N inbred mice, Drs. Rubin and Zhu, successfully produced three strains of HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 transgenic mice. Each mouse strain contains a haplotype of the HLA-DPB1 Glu 69 gene that confers a different magnitude of odds ratio (OR) of risk for chronic beryllium disease: HLA-DPB1*0401 (OR = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (OR = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (OR = 240). In addition, Drs. Rubin and Zhu developed transgenic mice with the human CD4 gene to permit better transmission of signals between T cells and antigen presenting cells. This project has maintained the colonies of these transgenic mice and tested the functionality of the human transgenes.

  8. Modeling the effects of vorinostat in vivo reveals both transient and delayed HIV transcriptional activation and minimal killing of latently infected cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2015-10-23

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recent clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Lastly, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.

  9. Primary Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer in the Setting of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Emily A.; Guiou, Michael; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Lau, Derick H.; Stuart, Kerri; Vaughan, Andrew; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Chen, Allen M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze outcomes after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer among a cohort of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods and Materials: The medical records of 12 patients with serologic evidence of HIV who subsequently underwent radiation therapy to a median dose of 68 Gy (range, 64-72 Gy) for newly diagnosed squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were reviewed. Six patients (50%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy was used in 6 cases (50%). All patients had a Karnofsky performance status of 80 or 90. Nine patients (75%) were receiving antiretroviral therapies at the time of treatment, and the median CD4 count was 460 (range, 266-800). Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group / European Organization for the Treatment of Cancer toxicity criteria. Results: The 3-year estimates of overall survival and local-regional control were 78% and 92%, respectively. Acute Grade 3+ toxicity occurred in 7 patients (58%), the most common being confluent mucositis (5 patients) and moist skin desquamation (4 patients). Two patients experienced greater than 10% weight loss, and none experienced more than 15% weight loss from baseline. Five patients (42%) experienced treatment breaks in excess of 10 cumulative days, although none required hospitalization. There were no treatment-related fatalities. Conclusions: Radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer seems to be relatively well tolerated among appropriately selected patients with HIV. The observed rates of toxicity were comparable to historical controls without HIV.

  10. Synergistic activity profile of griffithsin in combination with tenofovir, maraviroc and enfuvirtide against HIV-1 clade C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferir, Geoffrey; Palmer, Kenneth E.; Schols, Dominique

    2011-09-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT) is possibly the most potent anti-HIV peptide found in natural sources. Due to its potent and broad-spectrum antiviral activity and unique safety profile it has great potential as topical microbicide component. Here, we evaluated various combinations of GRFT against HIV-1 clade B and clade C isolates in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and in CD4{sup +} MT-4 cells. In all combinations tested, GRFT showed synergistic activity profile with tenofovir, maraviroc and enfuvirtide based on the median effect principle with combination indices (CI) varying between 0.34 and 0.79 at the calculated EC{sub 95} level. Furthermore, the different glycosylation patterns on the viral envelope of clade B and clade C gp120 had no observable effect on the synergistic interactions. Overall, we can conclude that the evaluated two-drug combination increases their antiviral potency and supports further clinical investigations in pre-exposure prophylaxis for GRFT combinations in the context of HIV-1 clade C infection.

  11. Modeling the effects of vorinostat in vivo reveals both transient and delayed HIV transcriptional activation and minimal killing of latently infected cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ke, Ruian; Lewin, Sharon R.; Elliott, Julian H.; Perelson, Alan S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2015-10-23

    Recent efforts to cure human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection have focused on developing latency reversing agents as a first step to eradicate the latent reservoir. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat, has been shown to activate HIV RNA transcription in CD4+ T-cells and alter host cell gene transcription in HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. In order to understand how latently infected cells respond dynamically to vorinostat treatment and determine the impact of vorinostat on reservoir size in vivo, we have constructed viral dynamic models of latency that incorporate vorinostat treatment. We fitted these models to data collected from a recentmore » clinical trial in which vorinostat was administered daily for 14 days to HIV-infected individuals on suppressive ART. The results show that HIV transcription is increased transiently during the first few hours or days of treatment and that there is a delay before a sustained increase of HIV transcription, whose duration varies among study participants and may depend on the long term impact of vorinostat on host gene expression. Parameter estimation suggests that in latently infected cells, HIV transcription induced by vorinostat occurs at lower levels than in productively infected cells. Lastly, the estimated loss rate of transcriptionally induced cells remains close to baseline in most study participants, suggesting vorinostat treatment does not induce latently infected cell killing and thus reduce the latent reservoir in vivo.« less

  12. Chronic beryllium disease: Diagnosis and management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossman, M.D.

    1996-10-01

    Chronic beryllium disease is predominantly a pulmonary granulomatosis that was originally described in 1946. Symptoms usually include dyspnea and cough. Fever, anorexia, and weight loss are common. Skin lesions are the most common extrathoracic manifestation. Granulomatous hepatitis, hypercalcemia, and kidney stones can also occur. Radiographic and physiologic abnormalities are similar to those in sarcoidosis. While traditionally the pathologic changes included granulomas and cellular interstitial changes, the hallmark of the disease today is the well-formed granuloma. Immunologic studies have demonstrated a cell-mediated response to beryllium that is due to an accumulation of CD4{sup +} T cells at the site of disease activity. Diagnosis depends on the demonstration of pathologic changes (i.e., granuloma) and evidence that the granuloma was caused by a hypersensitivity to beryllium (i.e., positive lung proliferative response to beryllium). Using these criteria, the diagnosis of chronic beryllium disease can now be made before the onset of clinical symptoms. Whether, with early diagnosis, the natural course of this condition will be the same as when it was traditionally diagnosed is not known. Currently, corticosteroids are used to treat patients with significant symptoms or evidence of progressive disease. 21 refs.

  13. Biomarkers of Radiosensitivity in A-Bomb Survivors Pregnant at the Time of Bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miles, Edward F.; Tatsukawa, Yoshimi; Funamoto, Sachiyo; Kamada, Naoko; Nakashima, Eiji; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Seed, Thomas; Kusonoki, Yoichiro; Nakachi, Kei; Fujiwara, Saeko; et al

    2011-01-01

    Purpose . There is evidence in the literature of increased maternal radiosensitivity during pregnancy. Materials and Methods . We tested this hypothesis using information from the atomic-bomb survivor cohort, that is, the Adult Health Study database at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, which contains data from a cohort of women who were pregnant at the time of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Previous evaluation has demonstrated long-term radiation dose-response effects. Results/Conclusions . Data on approximately 250 women were available to assess dose-response rates for serum cholesterol, white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and serum hemoglobin, and onmore » approximately 85 women for stable chromosome aberrations, glycophorin A locus mutations, and naïve CD4 T-cell counts. Although there is no statistically significant evidence of increased radiosensitivity in pregnant women, the increased slope of the linear trend line in the third trimester with respect to stable chromosome aberrations is suggestive of an increased radiosensitivity.« less

  14. Combined Treatment Effects of Radiation and Immunotherapy: Studies in an Autochthonous Prostate Cancer Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wada, Satoshi; Harris, Timothy J.; Tryggestad, Erik; Yoshimura, Kiyoshi; Zeng, Jing; Yen, Hung-Rong; Getnet, Derese; Grosso, Joseph F.; Bruno, Tullia C.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To optimize the combination of ionizing radiation and cellular immunotherapy using a preclinical autochthonous model of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Transgenic mice expressing a model antigen under a prostate-specific promoter were treated using a platform that integrates cone-beam CT imaging with 3-dimensional conformal therapy. Using this technology we investigated the immunologic and therapeutic effects of combining ionizing radiation with granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor-secreting cellular immunotherapy for prostate cancer in mice bearing autochthonous prostate tumors. Results: The combination of ionizing radiation and immunotherapy resulted in a significant decrease in pathologic tumor grade and gross tumor bulk that was not evident with either single-modality therapy. Furthermore, combinatorial therapy resulted in improved overall survival in a preventive metastasis model and in the setting of established micrometastases. Mechanistically, combined therapy resulted in an increase of the ratio of effector-to-regulatory T cells for both CD4 and CD8 tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Conclusions: Our preclinical model establishes a potential role for the use of combined radiation-immunotherapy in locally advanced prostate cancer, which warrants further exploration in a clinical setting.

  15. Effects of polychlorinated biphenyls and nutritional restriction on barbituate-induced sleeping times and selected blood characteristics in raccoons (Procyon lotor)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montz, W.E.; Card, W.C.; Kirkpatrick, R.L.

    1982-05-01

    Hepatic microsomal enzyme activity was induced in wild-trapped raccoons (Procyon lotor) and selected blood characteristics were measured in an effort to detect responses due to PCB ingestion, nutritional restriction, and their interactions. Barbiturate-induced sleeping times were used as an index of hepatic microsomal activity because they have been used reliably by other workers. Blood characteristics examined in the study were nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), cholesterol, and three ketone bodies (D-(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, and acetone). Results show a reduction in sleeping times, elevated NEFA and D-(-)-3-hydroxybutyrate concentrations, and lower cholesterol concentrations in PCB-treated groups. A highly significant interaction between PCB treatment and nutritional restriction was observed in acetoacetate concentrations. (JMT)

  16. Triviality of the BCS-BEC crossover in extended dimensions: Implications for the ground state energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nussinov, Zohar [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63160-4899 (United States); Nussinov, Shmuel [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2006-11-15

    Cold atom traps and certain neutron star layers may contain fermions with separation much larger than the range of pairwise potentials yet much shorter than the scattering length. Such systems can display universal characteristics independent of the details of the short range interactions. Our main result is that for space dimensions D smaller than two and larger than four a specific extension of this problem is amenable to exact results. In particular, the energy per particle at the BCS-BEC crossover point is equal to the energy of the free fermion system in all D{<=}2 whereas this energy is rigorously nonpositive (and potentially vanishing) in all D{>=}4. We discuss the D=3 case. A particular unjustified recipe suggests {xi}=1/2 in D=3.

  17. U

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    OCTOBER 2004 SPONSORED BY DOE AND NRC PREPARED BY NAC INTERNATIONAL Updating Of Reporting Identification Symbol Information Please review and update, as necessary, your facility's information in the appropriate Report Identification Symbol (RIS) Directory. The RIS Directory for the Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors is the D-2. The RIS Directory for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and NRC licensees is the D-3. In addition, please review and update, as necessary, the

  18. Modcopter: Prompt, Precise Aerial Sample Collection Using Unmanned Systems

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Modcopter: Prompt, Precise Aerial Sample Collection Using Unmanned Systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modcopter: Prompt, Precise Aerial Sample Collection Using Unmanned Systems Authors: Curtis, Aaron [1] ; Elliott, James [2] ; Ronquest, Michael [3] ; Mascarenas, David D. [3] ; Kendrick, David T. [3] ; Lakis, Rollin E. [3] + Show Author Affiliations NM Tech NC State Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2013-06-25 OSTI

  19. hud_list-2_07-01-11.xls | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2_07-01-11.xls hud_list-2_07-01-11.xls Office spreadsheet icon hud_list-2_07-01-11.xls More Documents & Publications hud_list-2_07-01-11.xls supplemental_lists_1d-2d-3c_06-24-2011.xls updated_supplemental_lists_1j-2j-3i_12-22-2011.xlsx

  20. Measurement of the 3s1/2-3p3/2 resonance line of sodiumlike Eu52+

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Trbert, E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Hell, N.; Brown, G. V.

    2015-08-20

    We have measured the 3s1/2-3p3/2 transition in sodiumlike Eu52+ situated at 41.232 with an uncertainty of 73 ppm. Our measurement extends previous high-precision measurements into the 561/2-3p3/2 and 3p1/2-3d3/2 transitions in the neighboring magnesiumlike, aluminumlike, and siliconlike europium ions.

  1. A Delicate Universe: Compactification Obstacles to D-brane Inflation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect A Delicate Universe: Compactification Obstacles to D-brane Inflation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Delicate Universe: Compactification Obstacles to D-brane Inflation We investigate whether explicit models of warped D-brane inflation are possible in string compactifications. To this end, we study the potential for D3-brane motion in a warped conifold that includes holomorphically embedded D7-branes involved in moduli stabilization. The

  2. A Hierarchical Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations (Journal Article)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Journal Article: A Hierarchical Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Hierarchical Evaluation of Regional Climate Simulations Authors: Leung, Ruby [1] ; Ringler, Todd [2] ; Collins, William D [3] ; Taylor, Mark [4] ; Ashfaq, Moetasim [5] + Show Author Affiliations Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

  3. Higher derivative couplings in theories with sixteen supersymmetries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Ying -Hsuan; Shao, Shu -Heng; Yin, Xi; Wang, Yifan

    2015-12-15

    We give simple arguments for new non-renormalization theorems on higher derivative couplings of gauge theories to supergravity, with sixteen supersymmetries, by considerations of brane-bulk superamplitudes. This leads to some exact results on the effective coupling of D3-branes in type IIB string theory. As a result, we also derive exact results on higher dimensional operators in the torus compactification of the six dimensional (0, 2) superconformal theory.

  4. Microsoft Word - NT0005682R21

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10.8 374 1080 D3 0.1 5.9 0.3667 0.0209 6.3 8440 7.34 -212 11.1 312 900 D4 <0.03 3.9 0.2189 0.0186 6.2 8420 7.18 212 11.3 280 1020 nd- not determined Cd bdl (0.000025 mgL), Se...

  5. The Orosomucoid 1 protein is involved in the vitamin D – mediated macrophage de-activation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gemelli, Claudia; Martello, Andrea; Montanari, Monica; Zanocco Marani, Tommaso; Salsi, Valentina; Zappavigna, Vincenzo; Parenti, Sandra; Vignudelli, Tatiana; Selmi, Tommaso; Ferrari, Sergio; Grande, Alexis

    2013-12-10

    Orosomucoid 1 (ORM1), also named Alpha 1 acid glycoprotein A (AGP-A), is an abundant plasma protein characterized by anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties. The present study was designed to identify a possible correlation between ORM1 and Vitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), a hormone exerting a widespread effect on cell proliferation, differentiation and regulation of the immune system. In particular, the data described here indicated that ORM1 is a 1,25(OH)2D3 primary response gene, characterized by the presence of a VDRE element inside the 1 kb sequence of its proximal promoter region. This finding was demonstrated with gene expression studies, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and luciferase transactivation experiments and confirmed by VDR full length and dominant negative over-expression. In addition, several experiments carried out in human normal monocytes demonstrated that the 1,25(OH)2D3 – VDR – ORM1 pathway plays a functional role inside the macrophage de-activation process and that ORM1 may be considered as a signaling molecule involved in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling. - Highlights: • ORM1 is a Vitamin D primary response gene. • VD and its receptor VDR are involved in the de-activation process mediated by human resident macrophages. • The signaling pathway VD-VDR-ORM1 plays an important role in the control of macrophage de-activation process. • ORM1 may be defined as a signaling molecule implicated in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling.

  6. Quadrennial Technology Review Acronyms

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    71 Acronyms $/km dollars per kilometer $/kWh dollars per kilowatt-hour $/MJ dollars per megajoule $/MMBtu dollars per million British thermal units 3D 3-dimensional AC alternating current ACCEL Accelerating Competitiveness through Computational Excellence Program ACTT Advanced Computing Tech Team AM additive manufacturing AEO Annual Energy Outlook (of the EIA) AEP annual energy production AER all-electric range AERI atmospheric emitted radiance interferometers AHT absorption heat transformer Al

  7. GO 2009 Annual NEPA Planning Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Golden Field Office 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 February 3, 2009 MEMORANDUM FOR ERIC FYGI ACTING GENERAL COUNSEL FROM: CHRISTINE A. PHOEBE /J) ~d 3~~ -- DEPUTY MANAGER UU~<./- Attached is the 2009 Annual National Environmental Policy Act Planning Summary for the Golden Field Office (GO). GO currently is conducting four environmental assessments (EA). GO plans to initiate at least two additional EAs in 2009 and up to two environmental impact statements during 2009. The

  8. A Small, Clean, Stable Fusion Power Plant ---- Inventor Samuel A. Cohen |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Small, Clean, Stable Fusion Power Plant ---- Inventor Samuel A. Cohen This invention discloses improvements in magnetic fusion reactor design and operational modes that reduce stability and radioactivity problems by use of a kinetic-regime high-beta device that burns aneutronic fuels, particularly D-3He. The small, clean stable fusion power plant, based on the Field Reverse Configuration, operates in the 5-megawatt range and would have applications in distributed

  9. Processes for producing polyhydroxybutyrate and related polyhydroxyalkanoates in the plastids of higher plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somerville, Christopher R.; Nawrath, Christiane; Poirier, Yves

    1997-03-11

    The present invention relates to a process for producing poly-D-(-)-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB) and related polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) in the plastids of plants. The production of PHB is accomplished by genetically transforming plants with modified genes from microorganisms. The genes encode the enzymes required to synthesize PHB from acetyl-CoA or related metabolites and are fused with additional plant sequences for targeting the enzymes to the plastid.

  10. Processes for producing polyhydroxybutyrate and related polyhydroxyalkanoates in the plastids of higher plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somerville, C.R.; Nawrath, C.; Poirier, Y.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention relates to a process for producing poly-D-(-)-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB) and related polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) in the plastids of plants. The production of PHB is accomplished by genetically transforming plants with modified genes from microorganisms. The genes encode the enzymes required to synthesize PHB from acetyl-CoA or related metabolites and are fused with additional plant sequences for targeting the enzymes to the plastid. 37 figs.

  11. Method to Reduce Neutron Production in Small Clean Fusion Reactors Inventor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    --- Samuel A. Cohen | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Method to Reduce Neutron Production in Small Clean Fusion Reactors Inventor --- Samuel A. Cohen This invention describes a method to reduce neutron production of D-3He-fueled, steady state, small FRC fusion reactors using periodic, co-streaming, energetic ion beams generated by RF. Use of this method will lessen damage to and activation of reactor components and, in doing so, can advance the development of fusion reactors for electrical

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - 05_ARM 2007 Meeting.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactions From ARM Measurements to Global Modeling Catherine Chuang, Steve Chin, Shaocheng Xie, James Kelly, and James Boyle Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore Objectives Examine the influence of aerosol compositions on droplet formation and review different cloud nucleation parameterizations.- Micro Scale Investigate impacts of aerosols and autoconversion schemes on cloud properties over SGP with 2-D/3-D cloud resolving models. - Cloud Scale Explore the sensitivity of

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - DongHuang_ARMposter2009.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cloud water distribution from an air-borne scanning microwave radiometer: Wakasa Bay field experiment results Dong Huang, Albin Gasiewski, and Warren Wiscombe 1. A mobile cloud tomography setup has some advantages over a fixed one. The tomographic method involves scanning clouds from a multiplicity of directions and locations, and inverting the resulting radiometric measurements to obtain 2D/3D cloud water distributions. A fixed ground-based setup will needed more than four microwave radiometers

  14. DOE Hydropower Program Annual Report for FY 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sale, M. J.; Cada, G. F.; Dauble, D. D.; Rinehart, B. N.; Sommers, G. L.; Flynn, J. V.; Brookshier, P. A.

    2001-04-17

    This report describes the activities of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydropower Program during Fiscal Year 2000 (October 1, 1999, to September 30, 2000). Background, current activities, and future plans are presented in the following sections for all components of the Program. Program focus for FY 2000 was on (1) advanced turbine development, (2) basic and applied R&D, (3) environmental mitigation, (4) low head/low power hydropower technology, and (5) technology transfer.

  15. EFG IO?-90)

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .?GE = 1325 d +3-891 EFG IO?-90) ' United States Government *memorandum DATE: FEB 6 1991 . . I ;' 1 , q' *_* Departrnkt of Energy --. -* r- i .,. 1 .' ;I "--' I ,_ % I : [ -- ,: -.. ! j i 1: \ REPLY TO ATTN OF: EM-421 SUBJECT: Authority Determination-- Former Beryllium Production Facility in Luckey, ' Ohio TO: The File The attached review documents the basis for determining whether DOE has authority for taking remedial action at the former beryllium production facility in Luckey, Ohio,

  16. CX-004109: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Phase 2 - A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones over a Known Geothermal Resource: Soda Lake, Churchill County, NevadaCX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.7Date: 09/29/2010Location(s): Soda Lake, NevadaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  17. CX-006567: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act: A 3D-3C Reflection Seismic Survey and Data Integration to Identify the Seismic Response of Fractures and Permeable Zones Over a Known Geothermal Resource: Soda Lake, Churchill County, NevadaCX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1, B3.7Date: 08/24/2011Location(s): Churchill County, NevadaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  18. ARM poster 2007 Chuang

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactions from ARM Measurements to Global Modeling Catherine Chuang, Steve Chin, Shaocheng Xie, James Kelly, and James Boyle Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA The Issues  Examine the influence of aerosol compositions on droplet formation and review different cloud nucleation parameterizations.  Investigate impacts of aerosols and autoconversion schemes on cloud properties over SGP with 2-D/3-D cloud resolving models.  Explore the sensitivity of aerosol/cloud

  19. NMMSS Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NMMSS Reports U.S. Department of Energy / U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Nuclear Materials Management & Safeguards System NMMSS Reports DOE D-23 DOE Contractors Rev Jan 2012 DOE Manual 474.2 NMMSS User Guide - Coming Soon! NRC D-24 DOE NRC Licensees Rev Jan 2012 NUREG/BR-0007, Rev. 6 NUREG/BR-0006, Rev. 7 The electronic version of the D-2, D-3, and D-15 RIS directories are available upon request.

  20. NMMSS News jan 2013.cdr

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Crosswalk to SAMS D-2/D-3 Updates Training Courses NMMSS Germantown Operations NMMSS Team Members NMMSS Due Dates 2013 NMMSS Calendar NMMSS Mailing Addresses January 2013 NMMSS 2012 Meeting Presentations and Photographs A new link has been added to the NMMSS homepage "NMMSS 2012 Meeting Presentations and Photographs." From here you may open and down load the presentations from the 2012 users training meeting as well as photographs. Homepage link:

  1. Benchmarking density functional theory predictions of framework structures and properties in a chemically diverse test set of metal-organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazarian, Dalar; Ganesh, P.; Sholl, David S.

    2015-09-30

    We compiled a test set of chemically and topologically diverse Metal–Organic Frameworks (MOFs) with high accuracy experimentally derived crystallographic structure data. The test set was used to benchmark the performance of Density Functional Theory (DFT) functionals (M06L, PBE, PW91, PBE-D2, PBE-D3, and vdW-DF2) for predicting lattice parameters, unit cell volume, bonded parameters and pore descriptors. On average PBE-D2, PBE-D3, and vdW-DF2 predict more accurate structures, but all functionals predicted pore diameters within 0.5 Å of the experimental diameter for every MOF in the test set. The test set was also used to assess the variance in performance of DFT functionals for elastic properties and atomic partial charges. The DFT predicted elastic properties such as minimum shear modulus and Young's modulus can differ by an average of 3 and 9 GPa for rigid MOFs such as those in the test set. Moreover, we calculated the partial charges by vdW-DF2 deviate the most from other functionals while there is no significant difference between the partial charges calculated by M06L, PBE, PW91, PBE-D2 and PBE-D3 for the MOFs in the test set. We find that while there are differences in the magnitude of the properties predicted by the various functionals, these discrepancies are small compared to the accuracy necessary for most practical applications.

  2. A Maximally Supersymmetric Kondo Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Sarah; Kachru, Shamit; Torroba, Gonzalo; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We study the maximally supersymmetric Kondo model obtained by adding a fermionic impurity to N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. While the original Kondo problem describes a defect interacting with a free Fermi liquid of itinerant electrons, here the ambient theory is an interacting CFT, and this introduces qualitatively new features into the system. The model arises in string theory by considering the intersection of a stack of M D5-branes with a stack of N D3-branes, at a point in the D3 worldvolume. We analyze the theory holographically, and propose a dictionary between the Kondo problem and antisymmetric Wilson loops in N = 4 SYM. We perform an explicit calculation of the D5 fluctuations in the D3 geometry and determine the spectrum of defect operators. This establishes the stability of the Kondo fixed point together with its basic thermodynamic properties. Known supergravity solutions for Wilson loops allow us to go beyond the probe approximation: the D5s disappear and are replaced by three-form flux piercing a new topologically non-trivial S3 in the corrected geometry. This describes the Kondo model in terms of a geometric transition. A dual matrix model reflects the basic properties of the corrected gravity solution in its eigenvalue distribution.

  3. CAHE Technology Help Desk

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dr. Russell Hardy, Director CEMRC Ambient Air Sampler Locations New Mexico State University New Mexico State University Sampling Site Sample Period Am241 Bq/Sample Pu239+240 Bq/Sample Pu238 Bq/Sample On Site #106 109 Yards NW of WIPP Exh. Shaft 2/11/14 - 2/18/14 1.300 0.115 0.004 2/18/14 - 2/25/14 0.020 0.004 0.004 2/25/14 - 3/4/14 0.007 3/4/14 - 3/11/14 n/d n/d n/d 3/11/14 - 3/21/14 0.013 n/d n/d 3/21/14 - 3/29/14 0.0005 n/d n/d 3/29/14 - 4/4/14 0.0005 n/d n/d Near Field #107 0.6 Miles NW of

  4. Dual Panal Planar Portal

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-12-01

    The D3P system is designed to provide a very fast imaging system in order to search for weapons on persons in an airport environment. The complete vision of the D3P system is to have two array systems facing each other. Version 2.3 of the software is designed to control and process data from a single panel. A second panel is expected to be added at a future date and the software will be modified atmore » that time to integrate the images from two panels at one time. The D3P software can be segmented into three specific tasks. The first task is data acquisition and scanner control. At the operator's request, this task commands the scanner to move and the radar transceiver-array to send data to the computer system in a known and well-ordered manner. The array is moved over the complete aperture in 1 to 2 seconds. At the completion of the array movement the second software task reconstructs the high-resolution image from the radar data utilizing the integrated DSP board. The third task displays the result to the computer screen for user review and analysis.« less

  5. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E.; Haliburton, Genevieve E.; Ye, Chun J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; et al

    2015-07-27

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9more » RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ~40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ~20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.« less

  6. The effects of deoxynivalenol on gene expression in the murine thymus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kol, Sandra W.M. van; Hendriksen, Peter J.M.; Loveren, Henk van; Peijnenburg, Ad

    2011-02-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a mycotoxin produced by several Fusarium species and is often detected in grains. Because of its high abundance, there has been a large interest in the effects of DON in animals and humans. DON is known to be immunosuppressive at high concentrations and immunostimulatory at low concentrations. The present study aimed to acquire insight into the modes of action of DON. For this, C57Bl6 mice were orally exposed to 5, 10, or 25 mg/kg bw DON for 3, 6, or 24 h and thymuses were subjected to genome-wide expression microarray analysis. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) demonstrated that DON downregulated genes involved in proliferation, mitochondria, protein synthesis, and ribosomal proteins. Furthermore, GSEA showed a selective downregulation of genes highly expressed at the early precursor thymocytes stage. This indicates that early precursor thymocytes, particularly at the double-positive CD4+CD8+ stage, are more vulnerable to DON than very early or late precursor thymocytes. There was a large overlap of genes upregulated by DON with genes previously reported to be either upregulated during T cell activation or upregulated during negative selection of thymocytes that recognize 'self-antigens'. This indicates that DON induces cellular events that also occur after activation of the T cell receptor, for example, release of calcium from the endoplasmatic reticulum. This T cell activation in the thymus then evokes negative selection and depletion of thymocytes, which provides a plausible explanation for the high sensitivity of the thymus for DON exposure. The expression patterns of four genes indicative for some of the processes that were affected after DON treatment were confirmed using real-time PCR. Immunocytological experiments with primary mouse thymocytes demonstrated the translocation of NFAT from the cytoplasm into the nucleus upon exposure top DON, thus providing further evidence for the involvement of T cell activation.

  7. Molecular basis of the structural stability of a Top7-based scaffold at extreme pH and temperature conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soares, Thereza A.; Boschek, Curt B.; Apiyo, David O.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Straatsma, TP

    2010-07-01

    The development of stable scaffolds that can tolerate environmental extremes has an immense potential for applications in industry and defense. Recently, we have engineered an eight-residue loop into the de novo designed Top7 protein, which specifically binds the glycoprotein CD4. The robust properties of the Top7, coupled with the ease in production, make it a robust scaffold to design novel functionalities for use under extreme environmental conditions. In the present work, a series of explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations are reported which investigates the effect of mutations and extreme conditions of temperature and pH on the structure, stability, and dynamics of the native and engineered Top7. These simulations indicate that i. The structural dynamics of the engineered and native Top7 in solution are equivalent under corresponding conditions of pH and temperature. Ensemble-averaged structures of the native and engineered Top7 maintain the overall tertiary structure pattern, albeit with loss of helical content when at low pH and high-temperature conditions. Mutations of residues E43A, D46A, E67A, E69A, EA81A along the ?-helices of the engineered Top7 did not lead to significant changes in the native fold under pH 2 and 400 K, suggesting that the helices can accommodate varying sequences. iii. The anti-parallel ?-sheet is the structural core responsible for the stability of the native and engineered Top7 and is well maintained under extreme pH and temperature conditions. These findings indicate that the insertion of an eight-residue loop into the structure of Top7 does not adversely affect the global fold or the structural stability of the Top7 scaffold.

  8. Generation of knock-in primary human T cells using Cas9 ribonucleoproteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumann, Kathrin; Lin, Steven; Boyer, Eric; Simeonov, Dimitre R.; Subramaniam, Meena; Gate, Rachel E.; Haliburton, Genevieve E.; Ye, Chun J.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Marson, Alexander

    2015-07-27

    T-cell genome engineering holds great promise for cell-based therapies for cancer, HIV, primary immune deficiencies, and autoimmune diseases, but genetic manipulation of human T cells has been challenging. Improved tools are needed to efficiently “knock out” genes and “knock in” targeted genome modifications to modulate T-cell function and correct disease-associated mutations. CRISPR/Cas9 technology is facilitating genome engineering in many cell types, but in human T cells its efficiency has been limited and it has not yet proven useful for targeted nucleotide replacements. Here we report efficient genome engineering in human CD4+ T cells using Cas9:single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins (Cas9 RNPs). Cas9 RNPs allowed ablation of CXCR4, a coreceptor for HIV entry. Cas9 RNP electroporation caused up to ~40% of cells to lose high-level cell-surface expression of CXCR4, and edited cells could be enriched by sorting based on low CXCR4 expression. Importantly, Cas9 RNPs paired with homology-directed repair template oligonucleotides generated a high frequency of targeted genome modifications in primary T cells. Targeted nucleotide replacement was achieved in CXCR4 and PD-1 (PDCD1), a regulator of T-cell exhaustion that is a validated target for tumor immunotherapy. Deep sequencing of a target site confirmed that Cas9 RNPs generated knock-in genome modifications with up to ~20% efficiency, which accounted for up to approximately one-third of total editing events. These results establish Cas9 RNP technology for diverse experimental and therapeutic genome engineering applications in primary human T cells.

  9. ZFAT plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its T cell receptor-mediated response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doi, Keiko; Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka; Central Research Institute of Life Sciences for the Next Generation of Women Scientists, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka ; Fujimoto, Takahiro; Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka ; Okamura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoko; Mototani, Yasumasa; Goto, Motohito; Ota, Takeharu; Matsuzaki, Hiroshi; Kuroki, Masahide; Tsunoda, Toshiyuki; Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka ; Sasazuki, Takehiko; Shirasawa, Senji; Central Research Institute for Advanced Molecular Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated Cd4-Cre-mediated T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat-deficiency leads to reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Impaired T cell receptor-mediated response in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased expression of IL-7R{alpha}, IL-2R{alpha} and IL-2 in Zfat-deficient peripheral T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zfat plays critical roles in peripheral T cell homeostasis. -- Abstract: ZFAT, originally identified as a candidate susceptibility gene for autoimmune thyroid disease, has been reported to be involved in apoptosis, development and primitive hematopoiesis. Zfat is highly expressed in T- and B-cells in the lymphoid tissues, however, its physiological function in the immune system remains totally unknown. Here, we generated the T cell-specific Zfat-deficient mice and demonstrated that Zfat-deficiency leads to a remarkable reduction in the number of the peripheral T cells. Intriguingly, a reduced expression of IL-7R{alpha} and the impaired responsiveness to IL-7 for the survival were observed in the Zfat-deficient T cells. Furthermore, a severe defect in proliferation and increased apoptosis in the Zfat-deficient T cells following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation was observed with a reduced IL-2R{alpha} expression as well as a reduced IL-2 production. Thus, our findings reveal that Zfat is a critical regulator in peripheral T cell homeostasis and its TCR-mediated response.

  10. Inhibition of human peripheral blood lymphocyte function by protoporphyrin and longwave ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrett, K.E.; Yen, A.; Montisano, D.; Gigli, I.; Bigby, T.D.

    1994-10-01

    Modulation of immunologic effector cells by exogenous photoactive substances has been advanced as an underlying mechanism for the efficacy of various photochemotherapeutic regimens. It is also possible that endogenous photosensitizers, such as protoporphyrin, could similarly modify the function of immune cell types. The authors examined the effects of protoporphyrin plus longwave UV light on the ability of human PBL to proliferate in response to mitogens. Noncytotoxic dosages of protoporphyrin plus UV light suppressed PHA-stimulated proliferation of both PBMC and enriched T cells. CD8{sup +} cells were more sensitive to this inhibitory effect than CD4{sup +} cells. The inhibitory effect was also observed when proliferation was induced by the combination of a phorbol ester and ionomycin. Inhibition of PBMC proliferation was associated with inhibition of IL-2 secretion but proliferation was not restored with exogenous IL-2. Instead, the effect of protoporphyrin plus UV light may be on IL-2R. Cells treated with protoporphyrin and UV light did not display the increase in CD25 and {beta}-chain of the IL-2R induced by PHA in control cells. In contrast to the effects of protoporphyrin and UV light on IL-2 and IL-2R {alpha}-chain protein expression, the accumulation of mRNA for these proteins induced by PHA was unaffected. None of the effects of protoporphyrin plus UV light on lymphocytes were observed in control experiments where cells were treated with either protoporphyrin or UV light alone. They conclude that biologically relevant dosages of protoporphyrin and UV light modify the function of circulating lymphocytes. 26 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Benchmarking density functional theory predictions of framework structures and properties in a chemically diverse test set of metal-organic frameworks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nazarian, Dalar; Ganesh, P.; Sholl, David S.

    2015-09-30

    We compiled a test set of chemically and topologically diverse Metal–Organic Frameworks (MOFs) with high accuracy experimentally derived crystallographic structure data. The test set was used to benchmark the performance of Density Functional Theory (DFT) functionals (M06L, PBE, PW91, PBE-D2, PBE-D3, and vdW-DF2) for predicting lattice parameters, unit cell volume, bonded parameters and pore descriptors. On average PBE-D2, PBE-D3, and vdW-DF2 predict more accurate structures, but all functionals predicted pore diameters within 0.5 Å of the experimental diameter for every MOF in the test set. The test set was also used to assess the variance in performance of DFT functionalsmore » for elastic properties and atomic partial charges. The DFT predicted elastic properties such as minimum shear modulus and Young's modulus can differ by an average of 3 and 9 GPa for rigid MOFs such as those in the test set. Moreover, we calculated the partial charges by vdW-DF2 deviate the most from other functionals while there is no significant difference between the partial charges calculated by M06L, PBE, PW91, PBE-D2 and PBE-D3 for the MOFs in the test set. We find that while there are differences in the magnitude of the properties predicted by the various functionals, these discrepancies are small compared to the accuracy necessary for most practical applications.« less

  12. The effect of shock dynamics on compressibility of ignition-scale National Ignition Facility implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Hicks, D. G.; Dewald, E. L.; Robey, H. F.; Rygg, J. R.; Meezan, N. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; et al

    2014-11-03

    The effects of shock dynamics on compressibility of indirect-drive ignition-scale surrogate implosions, CH shells filled with D3He gas, have been studied using charged-particle spectroscopy. Spectral measurements of D3He protons produced at the shock-bang time probe the shock dynamics and in-flight characteristics of an implosion. The proton shock yield is found to vary by over an order of magnitude. A simple model relates the observed yield to incipient hot-spot adiabat, suggesting that implosions with rapid radiation-power increase during the main drive pulse may have a 2x higher hot-spot adiabat, potentially reducing compressibility. A self-consistent 1-D implosion model was used to infermore » the areal density (pR) and the shell center-of-mass radius (Rcm) from the downshift of the shock-produced D3He protons. The observed pR at shock-bang time is substantially higher for implosions, where the laser drive is on until near the compression bang time ('short-coast'), while longer-coasting implosions have lower pR. This corresponds to a much larger temporal difference between the shock- and compression-bang time in the long-coast implosions (~800 ps) than in the short-coast (~400 ps); this will be verified with a future direct bang-time diagnostic. This model-inferred differential bang time contradicts radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, which predict constant 700–800 ps differential independent of coasting time. This result is potentially explained by uncertainties in modeling late-time ablation drive on the capsule. In an ignition experiment, an earlier shock-bang time resulting in an earlier onset of shell deceleration, potentially reducing compression and, thus, fuel pR.« less

  13. Topological evolution and photoluminescent properties of a series of divalent zinc-based metalorganic frameworks tuned via ancillary ligating spacers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lian, Xiao-Min; Zhao, Wen; Zhao, Xiao-Li

    2013-04-15

    The combination of divalent zinc ions, 4-(4-carboxybenzamido)benzoic acid and exo-bidendate bipyridine ligands gave rise to a series of new MOFs: [ZnL(bipy)]DMFH{sub 2}O (1), [ZnL(bpe)]1.5H{sub 2}O (2), [ZnL(bpa)]4H{sub 2}O (3) and [ZnL(bpp)]1.75H{sub 2}O (4) (MOF=metal-organic framework, bipy=4,4?-bipyridine, bpe=trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethylene, bpa=1,2-bis(4-pyridinyl)ethane, bpp=1,3-bis(4-pyridinyl)propane, H{sub 2}L=4,4?-(carbonylimino)dibenzoic acid). Fine tune over the topology of the MOFs was achieved via systematically varying the geometric length of the second ligating bipyridine ligands. Single-crystal X-ray analysis reveals that complex 1 has a triply interpenetrated three-dimensional (3D) framework with elongated primitive cubic topology, whereas isostructural complexes 2 and 3 each possesses a 6-fold interpenetrated diamondiod 3D framework. Further expansion of the length of the bipyridine ligand to bpp leads to the formation of 4, which features an interesting entangled architecture of 2D?3D parallel polycatenation. In addition, the thermogravimetric analyses and solid-state photoluminescent properties of the selected complexes are investigated. - Graphical abstract: The incorporation of exo-bidendate bipyridine spacers into the ZnH{sub 2}L system has yielded a series of new MOFs exhibiting topological evolution from 3-fold interpenetration to 6-fold interpenetration and 2D?3D parallel polycatenation. Highlights: ? The effect of the pyridyl-based spacers on the formation of MOFs was explored. ? Fine tune over the topology of the MOFs was achieved. ? An interesting structure of 2D?3D parallel polycatenation is reported.

  14. Measurement of the 3s1/2-3p3/2 resonance line of sodiumlike Eu52+

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Träbert, E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Hell, N.; Brown, G. V.

    2015-08-20

    We have measured the 3s1/2-3p3/2 transition in sodiumlike Eu52+ situated at 41.232 Å with an uncertainty of 73 ppm. Our measurement extends previous high-precision measurements into the 56< Z< 78 range of atomic numbers. We also present measurements of 3s1/2-3p3/2 and 3p1/2-3d3/2 transitions in the neighboring magnesiumlike, aluminumlike, and siliconlike europium ions.

  15. Microsoft Word - Agenda for IIP NOPR Public Workshop_3-22-2016

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Agenda For Integrated Interagency Pre-Application (IIP) Process Notice of Proposed Rulemaking Public Workshop March 22, 2016 1:00 PM Eastern Time Workshop Facilitator: Josh Smith Workshop Presenters: Meghan Conklin, Julie Smith, and Lynn Alexander Webinar Address: https://iser.webex.com/iser/onstage/g.php?MTID=edfa1833d3ad5014f2b91124860aeecc1 Phone Number (if not joining webinar): (650) 479-3208, access code 660 032 881 I. Introduction II. Background of Integrated Interagency Pre-Application

  16. Federal Acquisition Circular (FAC) 2005-72

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached for your information is a list of Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) amendments, published in the December 31, 2014 Federal Register at 78 FR 80368. This FAC issued 4 final rules. Please note that the final rule on Service Contracts Reporting Requirements is applicable to solicitations issued and contracts awarded on or after January 30, 2014. Contracting officers will modify existing indefinite-delivery contracts, on a bilateral basis in accordance with FAR 1.108(d)(3), within six months of the effective date of the final rule, if the remaining period of performance extends beyond October 1, 2013, and $2.5 million or more remains to be obligated.

  17. P

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    t UCI-1OP19 -9 c ... P r e s e n t e d at Moscow Discussion Meeting on Neutrino Physics September 9, 1968 Neutrino Experiments a t Reactors* F. Reines a n d H . S. C u r r University of California, Irvine T. L. Jenkins and J. H. Munsee** C a s e Western Reserve University Cleveland, Ohio V ' A description is given of the re program using a l a r g e fission reactor. reaction Fe + d + p t n t ve, the reaction ve t d 3 n t n t et has now been detected, and an effort is underway to observe the

  18. app_d

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS Document 1, Darryl D. Siemer, Idaho Falls, ID Page 1 of 18 Document 1, Darryl D. Siemer, Idaho Falls, ID Page 2 of 18 - New Information - DOE/EIS-0287 D-2 Appendix D Document 1, Darryl D. Siemer, Idaho Falls, ID Page 3 of 18 Document 1, Darryl D. Siemer, Idaho Falls, ID Page 4 of 18 - New Information - D-3 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS Document 1, Darryl D. Siemer, Idaho Falls, ID Page 5 of 18 Document 1, Darryl D. Siemer, Idaho Falls, ID Page 6 of 18 -

  19. Surface characterizatin of palladium-alumina sorbents for high-temperature capture of mercury and arsenic from fuel gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltrus, J.P.; Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.; Stanko, D.; Hamilton, H.; Rowsell, L.; Poulston, S.; Smith, A.; Chu, W.

    2010-01-01

    Coal gasification with subsequent cleanup of the resulting fuel gas is a way to reduce the impact of mercury and arsenic in the environment during power generation and on downstream catalytic processes in chemical production, The interactions of mercury and arsenic with PdlAl2D3 model thin film sorbents and PdlAh03 powders have been studied to determine the relative affinities of palladium for mercury and arsenic, and how they are affected by temperature and the presence of hydrogen sulfide in the fuel gas. The implications of the results on strategies for capturing the toxic metals using a sorbent bed are discussed.

  20. Ti3CrCu4: A possible 2-D ferromagnetic spin fluctuating system (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Ti3CrCu4: A possible 2-D ferromagnetic spin fluctuating system Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ti3CrCu4: A possible 2-D ferromagnetic spin fluctuating system Authors: Dhar, S. K. [1] ; Provino, A. [2] ; Manfrinetti, P. [2] ; Kulkarni, R. [1] ; Goyal, Neeraj [1] ; Paudyal, D. [3] + Show Author Affiliations Department of Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, T.I.F.R., Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba,

  1. L)HM+H)/&D)$&'()$#&*+,%-./%&

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "$%&'()$#&*+,%-./%&!&0(1,.2,&+#&!%$3.-+4& 5676&8)".,9&8:;89&:"<",#&=9&>?@@& * &A+/#+-.B./<&C%,"-#,&D$)3&'()$#&*+,%-./%&!&EFG%$.3%/#,& * &A(%)$%H2+-&I/#%$G$%#+H)/,&)D&EF.,H/<&J+#+& * &!"#"$%&0$)G),%K&EFG%$.3%/#,&+#&!%$3.-+4& !"#$%&'()*+,-*)$ ..$/-)0*102-)$ 3,45)$,+&$2-$6&7$ 8,'&9$$

  2. Special Report: IG-0777

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Special Report Loan Guarantees for Innovative Energy Technologies DOE/IG-0777 September 2007 Department of Energy vvast~lngton, U L L U 3 d 3 S e p t e m b e r 1 9 , 2007 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Inspector General SUBSEC'T: INFORMATION: Special Repol-t on "Loan Guarantees for Iilnovative Energy 'Technologies" BACKGROUND 'Title XVlI of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 authorized the Departinent of Energy to provide loan guarantees for projects that "avoid, reduce, or

  3. IVASI I-

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    IVASI I- /& 1 -i /' / . /' A 1:' *' , tui POR-I RAI)IOI,OGICAI, sLlRvt:Y 01: 1' IlE SIblO?!DS s,w c STEEL Co!4'~Is'l R. W . Leggctt , J . Burden, bl. T. Ryan, D. L. Anderson, B. S. Ellis, and D. 3. Christian W o rk performed Health Physics Divisidn OAK RIDGE NATIOI\TAL LABOR4TORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee FEBRUARY 1977 for U. S. ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPblENT ADFIINISTRATION as part of The Radiological Surveys of Former Manhattan Engineering District/ Atomic Energy Commission Sites By .cc.ptmc.

  4. Energy Literacy Social Studies Guides

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Where does our food come from? Energy Literacy Essential Principle 3: Biological processes depend on energy flow through the Earth system. C3 Framework for Social Studies Focus Indicators D1: Identify facts and concepts associated with a supporting question. (D1.3.K-2) D2: Use maps, graphs, photographs, and other representations to describe places and the relationships and interactions that shape them. (D2.Geo.2.K-2) D3: Gather relevant information from one or two sources while using the origin

  5. Energy Literacy Social Studies Guides

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    does transportation impact the environment? Energy Literacy Essential Principle 7: The quality of life of individuals and societies is affected by energy choices. C3 Framework for Social Studies Focus Indicators D1: Identify disciplinary ideas associated with a compelling question. (D1.2.K-2) D2: Identify the benefits and costs of making various personal decisions. (D2.Eco.2.K-2) D3: Gather relevant information from one or two sources while using the origin and structure to guide the selection.

  6. Office of the Chief Information Officer DOERM@hq.doe.gov

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Program Records Official (PRO) 1 to support their respective RM processes. PROs are senior-level officials with HQ and Field oversight, budgetary, and signature authority to approve records issues. PROs are appointed using DOE F 243.3, Records Contact Appointment, and are tracked and reported by the DOE RM Program. AUTHORITIES  Title 36, Chapter XII, Subchapter B, Part 1220, Subpart B, Section 1220.34(d)  DOE O 243.1B, Records Management Program, Paragraph 5d(3)(a) DUTIES &

  7. Final New England Clean Power Link Project Environmental Impact Statement Appendix D-F

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    D U.S. Department of Energy October 2015 D-1 APPENDIX D ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED BUT ELIMINATED FROM FURTHER ANALYSIS Final New England Clean Power Link EIS Appendix D U.S. Department of Energy October 2015 D-2 This Page Intentionally Left Blank Final New England Clean Power Link EIS Appendix D U.S. Department of Energy October 2015 D-3 New England Clean Power Link Project Alternatives Considered but Eliminated from Further Analysis The New England Clean Power Link (NECPL) Project (Project) would

  8. A geometric level set model for ultrasounds analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarti, A.; Malladi, R.

    1999-10-01

    We propose a partial differential equation (PDE) for filtering and segmentation of echocardiographic images based on a geometric-driven scheme. The method allows edge-preserving image smoothing and a semi-automatic segmentation of the heart chambers, that regularizes the shapes and improves edge fidelity especially in presence of distinct gaps in the edge map as is common in ultrasound imagery. A numerical scheme for solving the proposed PDE is borrowed from level set methods. Results on human in vivo acquired 2D, 2D+time,3D, 3D+time echocardiographic images are shown.

  9. Physics opportunities with HELIOS+AIRIS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    opportunities with HELIOS (+AIRIS) HELIOS excels at direct transfer reactions * Neutron stripping - (d,p) - σ ~ 1-50 mb/sr * Proton stripping - ( 3 He,d) - σ ~ .1-10 mb/sr * Proton pickup - (d, 3 He) - σ ~ few mb/sr * Neutron pickup - (d,t) - σ ~ few mb/sr * Two-neutron stripping - (t,p) σ ~ .1- few mb/sr * Proton-neutron pickup - (d,α) σ ~ .1- few mb/sr * Proton-neutron stripping - (α,d) σ ~ .1- few mb/sr Most reactions are within reach with beam intensities down to approximately 10 4

  10. Microsoft Word - S06401_IC.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Photos of T Building Rooms with Special ICs This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls June 2010 Doc. No. S06401 Page D-1 Figure D-1. T Building Rooms with Special ICs Annual Assessment of the Effectiveness of Site-Wide Institutional Controls U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. S06401 June 2010 Page D-2 Figure D-2. T Bldg. Room 16 View A Figure D-3. T Bldg. Room 16 View B Figure D-4. T Bldg. Room 16 View

  11. ORNL Evaluation of Electrabel Safety Cases for Doel 3 / Tihange 2: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, Bennett Richard; Dickson, Terry L.; Gorti, Sarma B.; Klasky, Hilda B.; Nanstad, Randy K.; Sokolov, Mikhail A.; Williams, Paul T.; Server, W. L.

    2015-11-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performed a detailed technical review of the 2015 Electrabel (EBL) Safety Cases prepared for the Belgium reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) at Doel 3 and Tihange 2 (D3/T2). The Federal Agency for Nuclear Control (FANC) in Belgium commissioned ORNL to provide a thorough assessment of the existing safety margins against cracking of the RPVs due to the presence of almost laminar flaws found in each RPV. Initial efforts focused on surveying relevant literature that provided necessary background knowledge on the issues related to the quasilaminar flaws observed in D3/T2 reactors. Next, ORNL proceeded to develop an independent quantitative assessment of the entire flaw population in the two Belgian reactors according to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Criteria for Protection Against Failure, New York (1992 and 2004). That screening assessment of all EBL-characterized flaws in D3/T2 used ORNL tools, methodologies, and the ASME Code Case N-848, Alternative Characterization Rules for QuasiLaminar Flaws . Results and conclusions from the ORNL flaw acceptance assessments of D3/T2 were compared with those from the 2015 EBL Safety Cases. Specific findings of the ORNL evaluation of that part of the EBL structural integrity assessment focusing on stability of the flaw population subjected to primary design transients include the following: ORNL s analysis results were similar to those of EBL in that very few characterized flaws were found not compliant with the ASME (1992) acceptance criterion. ORNL s application of the more recent ASME Section XI (2004) produced only four noncompliant flaws, all due to LOCAs. The finding of a greater number of non-compliant flaws in the EBL screening assessment is due principally to a significantly more restrictive (conservative) criterion for flaw size acceptance used by EBL. ORNL s screening assessment results (obtained using an analysis methodology different from that of EBL) are interpreted herein as confirming the EBL screening results for D3/T2. ORNL s independent refined analysis demonstrated the EBL-characterized flaw 1660, which is non-compliant in the ORNL and EBL screening assessment, is rendered compliant when modeled as a more realistic individual quasi-laminar flaw using a 3-D XFEM analysis approach. ORNL s and EBL s refined analyses are in good agreement for the flaw 1660 close to the clad/base metal interface; ORNL is not persuaded that repeating this exercise for more than one non-compliant flaw is necessary to accept the EBL conclusions derived from the aggregate of EBL refined analysis results. ORNL General Conclusions Regarding the Structural Integrity Assessment (SIA) Conducted by EBL for D3/T2 Based on comparative evaluations of ORNL and EBL SIA analyses and on consideration of other results, ORNL is in agreement with the general conclusions reported by Electrabel in their RPV D3/T2 Technical Summary Note of April 14, 2015: More than 99 percent of flaws in D3/T2 meet the defined screening criterion, rendering them benign with respect to initiation in the event of a design transient. Refined analyses of non-compliant flaws from the screening assessment indicate that only 11 of the 16196 detected flaws have a critical reference-temperature material index (designated RTNDT) that implies the possibility of the initiation of cleavage fracture at some future time. For those 11 2 flaws, the calculated margin in RTNDT (a measure of acceptable embrittlement relative to end-ofservice-life conditions) is significant, being greater than 80 C. Fatigue crack growth is not a concern in the flaw-acceptability analyses. Primary stress re-evaluation confirms that the collapse pressure is more than 1.5 times the design pressure in the presence of defects detected in D3/T2. Sufficient conservatisms are built into the input data and into the different steps of the SIA; in some cases, those conservatisms are quantified and imply that additional margins exist in the SIA. Taken as a whole, the foregoing results and conclusions confirm the structural integrity of Doel 3 and Tihange 2 under all design transients with ample margin in the presence of the 16196 detected flaws.

  12. K9/9J)$&95LL"4-5&&

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exotic proton-rich nuclei !"#"$%&'%()*+&,-./$$"&0%1/$%#&2%3/-%4/-5& ,62,7&89"-&:""1$.&;< 4= >;? 4= &:%5&@A;B& !"#$%#$&'()%#*%#$+%,-./0.--.123454%6*77&8*9&:*';% ,-./$$"&0%1/$%#&2%3/-%4/-5& 8$)("-9)45&/C&D*)$3E-.=& 8$)("-9)45&/C&:%-5#%$*&&

  13. Argonne In-Flight Radioactive Ion Separator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In-Flight Radioactive Ion Separator www.phy.anl.gov/airis B. B. Back, C. Dickerson, C. R. Hoffman, B. P. Kay, B. Mustapha, J. A. Nolen, P. Ostroumov, R. C. Pardo, K. E. Rehm, G. Savard, J. P. Schiffer, D. Seweryniak - Argonne National Laboratory S. Manikonda, M. Alcorta - Former Collaborators 2 ATLAS In-Flight Radioactive Beam Program ● Nuclear astrophysics ● (,p) & (p,) ● Fusion cross sections ● Single-particle structure ● (d,p) & (d, 3 He), etc. w/ HELIOS ● Impact of

  14. Control room habitability system review models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilpin, H. )

    1990-12-01

    This report provides a method of calculating control room operator doses from postulated reactor accidents and chemical spills as part of the resolution of TMI Action Plan III.D.3.4. The computer codes contained in this report use source concentrations calculated by either TACT5, FPFP, or EXTRAN, and transport them via user-defined flow rates to the control room envelope. The codes compute doses to six organs from up to 150 radionuclides (or 1 toxic chemical) for time steps as short as one second. Supporting codes written in Clipper assist in data entry and manipulation, and graphically display the results of the FORTRAN calculations. 7 refs., 22 figs.

  15. Dynamical and Physical Processes Associated with Orographic Precipitation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in a Conditionally Unstable Uniform Flow: Variation in Basic Wind Speed and CAPE | Argonne National Laboratory Dynamical and Physical Processes Associated with Orographic Precipitation in a Conditionally Unstable Uniform Flow: Variation in Basic Wind Speed and CAPE May 19, 2016 2:00PM to 3:00PM Presenter Gökhan Sever, North Carolina A&amp;T State University Location Building 240, Room 4301 Type Seminar Series EVS Seminar Abstract: A series of systematic two/three-dimensional (2D/3D)

  16. U

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE O 484.1 6-30-2014 Page Paragraph Changed To 7 5.i(3) to 5.i(2) ... human and/or animal subjects, the responsible program Secretarial Officer must ensure that DOE ... ... human and/or animal subjects, ensure that DOE ... 8 5.j(4)b from DHS consistent with DOE policy [see paragraph 5j(1)]. from DHS consistent with DOE policy [see paragraph 5k(3)]. 9 5.k(10) ... is required by this Order (paragraphs 4g and 4i). ... is required by this Order (paragraphs 4e and 4g). 11 6.d(3) ... but performed in

  17. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    File 4: Building Shell, Equipment, and Multibuilding Facilities (CBECS89.A04) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format CASEID Building identifier BLDGID4 1- 5 Census region REGION4 7- 7 $REGION. Census division CENDIV4 9- 9 $CENDIV. B2 Square footage SQFTC4 11- 12 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA4 14- 15 $ACTIVTY. D2 Tenants control amount of heat HTCNTL4 17- 17 $YESNO. D3 Heating controlled by thermostat HTTHRM4 19- 19 $YESNO. D4

  18. Microsoft Word - S05767_PostClosureInspRpt.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NDEP Correspondence and Record of Review This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Post-Closure Inspection & Monitoring Report for CAU 417 October 2009 Doc. No. S05767 Page D-1 Post-Closure Inspection & Monitoring Report for CAU 417 U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. S05767 October 2009 Page D-2 U.S. Department of Energy Post-Closure Inspection & Monitoring Report for CAU 417 October 2009 Doc. No. S05767 Page D-3 Due Date 12-23-09 Review No. 1 Project Offsites -

  19. Microsoft Word - S06246_VP_Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NFSS Vicinity Property T This page intentionally left blank Assessment Data Excerpt from Comprehensive Radiological Survey Off-Site Property T Niagara Falls Storage Site Appendix D NFSS Vicinity Property T Page D-1 This page intentionally left blank Appendix D NFSS Vicinity Property T Page D-2 Appendix D NFSS Vicinity Property T Page D-3 Appendix D NFSS Vicinity Property T Page D-4 Appendix D NFSS Vicinity Property T Page D-5 Appendix D NFSS Vicinity Property T Page D-6 Appendix D NFSS Vicinity

  20. Microsoft Word - appxd

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    the RFSOG Appendix D, Page 1 D.1 Points of Compliance Appendix D, Page 2 D.2 Points of Evaluation Appendix D, Page 3 D.3 Area of Concern Wells and SW018 Appendix D, Page 4 D.4 Sentinel Wells Appendix D, Page 5 D.5 Evaluation Wells Appendix D, Page 6 D.6 RCRA Wells Appendix D, Page 7 D.7 Groundwater Treatment Systems Appendix D, Page 8 D.8 Original Landfill Surface Water Appendix D, Page 9 D.9 Pre-discharge Pond Sampling Appendix D, Page 10

  1. Microsoft Word - appxd.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    the RFSOG Appendix D, Page 1 D.1 Points of Compliance Appendix D, Page 2 D.2 Points of Evaluation Appendix D, Page 3 D.3 Area of Concern Wells, Boundary Wells, and SW018 Appendix D, Page 4 D.4 Sentinel Wells Appendix D, Page 5 D.5 Evaluation Wells Appendix D, Page 6 D.6 RCRA Wells Appendix D, Page 7 D.7 Groundwater Treatment Systems Appendix D, Page 8 D.8 Original Landfill Surface Water Appendix D, Page 9 D.9 Pre-discharge Pond Sampling Appendix D, Page 10 D.10 Investigative Monitoring Has water

  2. Microsoft Word - EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Revision 35 Final 6-27-2012.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ms. Galanti - 2 - PPPO-03-1309473-12 Enclosures: 1. Response to October 3, 2011 comments on D3 EEiCA document 2. Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Plant Support Buildings and Structures at the Portsmouth Gaseous Di ffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio cc w/enclosures: Vince.Adams@lex.doe.gov, PPPOIPORTS Rache1.B lumenfeld@lex.doe.gov, PPPOfLEX Jud.Lilly@lex.doe.gov, PPPOIPORTS Ray.Miskelley@lex.doe.gov, PPPOfLEX William.Murph ie@lex .doe.gov, PPPOfPORTS Kristi.Wiehle@lex.doe.gov, PPPOIPORTS

  3. Ti3CrCu4: A possible 2-D ferromagnetic spin fluctuating system (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | DOE PAGES Ti3CrCu4: A possible 2-D ferromagnetic spin fluctuating system Title: Ti3CrCu4: A possible 2-D ferromagnetic spin fluctuating system Authors: Dhar, S. K. [1] ; Provino, A. [2] ; Manfrinetti, P. [2] ; Kulkarni, R. [1] ; Goyal, Neeraj [1] ; Paudyal, D. [3] + Show Author Affiliations Department of Condensed Matter Physics & Materials Science, T.I.F.R., Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai, 400005, India Department of Chemistry, University of Genova, Via Dodecaneso 31, 16146

  4. Towards an explicit model of D-brane inflation (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Towards an explicit model of D-brane inflation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Towards an explicit model of D-brane inflation We present a detailed analysis of an explicit model of warped D-brane inflation, incorporating the effects of moduli stabilization. We consider the potential for D3-brane motion in a warped conifold background that includes fluxes and holomorphically embedded D7-branes involved in moduli stabilization. Although the D7-branes significantly modify the

  5. NMMSS News nov 2012.cdr

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SAMS 8 Crosswalk to SAMS D-2/D-3 Updates Training Courses NMMSS Germantown Operations NMMSS Team Members NMMSS Due Dates 2012 NMMSS Calendar NMMSS Mailing Addresses SAMS 8, the most current version is available upon request. If you would like a copy of this software please request by E-Mail (NMMSS@nnsa.doe.gov), FAX (301-903-1998) or phone Greg Perry at (301-903-3656). Please provide the name and address of the person it is to be sent to as well as the RIS ID. November 2012 NMMSS 2012 Meeting

  6. Three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann model for magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendoza, M.; Munoz, J. D.

    2008-02-15

    We develop a three-dimensional (3D) lattice Boltzmann model that recovers in the continuous limit the two-fluids theory for plasmas, and consequently includes the generalized Ohm's law. The model reproduces the magnetic reconnection process just by giving the right initial equilibrium conditions in the magnetotail, without any assumption on the resistivity in the diffusive region. In this model, the plasma is handled similar to two fluids with an interaction term, each one with distribution functions associated to a cubic lattice with 19 velocities (D3Q19). The electromagnetic fields are considered as a third fluid with an external force on a cubic lattice with 13 velocities (D3Q13). The model can simulate either viscous fluids in the incompressible limit or nonviscous compressible fluids, and successfully reproduces both the Hartmann flow and the magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail. The reconnection rate in the magnetotail obtained with this model lies between R=0.062 and R=0.073, in good agreement with the observations.

  7. In-flight observations of low-mode ρR asymmetries in NIF implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Rygg, J. R.; Kritcher, A.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hicks, D. G.; Friedrich, S.; Bionta, R.; et al

    2015-05-01

    Charged-particle spectroscopy is used to assess implosion symmetry in ignition-scale indirect-drive implosions for the first time. Surrogate D3He gas-filled implosions at the National Ignition Facility produce energetic protons via D+3He fusion that are used to measure the implosion areal density (ρR) at the shock-bang time. By using protons produced several hundred ps before the main compression bang, the implosion is diagnosed in-flight at a convergence ratio of 3-5 just prior to peak velocity. This isolates acceleration-phase asymmetry growth. For many surrogate implosions, proton spectrometers placed at the north pole and equator reveal significant asymmetries with amplitudes routinely ≳10%, which aremore » interpreted as l=2 Legendre modes. With significant expected growth by stagnation, it is likely that these asymmetries would degrade the final implosion performance. X-ray self-emission images at stagnation show asymmetries that are positively correlated with the observed in-flight asymmetries and comparable in magnitude, contradicting growth models; this suggests that the hot-spot shape does not reflect the stagnated shell shape or that significant residual kinetic energy exists at stagnation. More prolate implosions are observed when the laser drive is sustained (“no-coast”), implying a significant time-dependent asymmetry in peak drive.« less

  8. Using multiple secondary fusion products to evaluate fuel ρR, electron temperature, and mix in deuterium-filled implosions at the NIF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Lahmann, B.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; et al

    2015-08-25

    In deuterium-filled inertial confinement fusion implosions, the secondary fusion processes D(3He,p)4He and D(T,n)4He occur, as the primary fusion products 3He and T react in flight with thermal deuterons. In implosions with moderate fuel areal density (~ 5–100 mg/cm2), the secondary D-3He reaction saturates, while the D-T reaction does not, and the combined information from these secondary products is used to constrain both the areal density and either the plasma electron temperature or changes in the composition due to mix of shell material into the fuel. The underlying theory of this technique is developed and applied to three classes of implosionsmore » on the National Ignition Facility: direct-drive exploding pushers, indirect-drive 1-shock and 2-shock implosions,and polar direct-drive implosions. In the 1- and 2-shock implosions, the electron temperature is inferred to be 0.65 x and 0.33 x the burn-averaged ion temperature, respectively. The inferred mixed mass in the polar direct-drive implosions is in agreement with measurements using alternative techniques.« less

  9. Study of the negative ion extraction mechanism from a double-ion plasma in negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goto, I.; Nishioka, S.; Hatayama, A.; Miyamoto, K.

    2015-04-08

    We have developed a 2D3V-PIC model of the extraction region, aiming to clarify the basic extraction mechanism of H{sup −} ions from the double-ion plasma in H{sup −} negative ion sources. The result shows the same tendency of the H{sup −} ion density n{sub H{sup −}} as that observed in the experiments, i.e.,n{sub H{sup −}} in the upstream region away from the plasma meniscus (H{sup −} emitting surface) has been reduced by applying the extraction voltage. At the same time, relatively slow temporal oscillation of the electric potential compared with the electron plasma frequency has been observed in the extraction region. Results of the systematic study using a 1D3V-PIC model with the uniform magnetic field confirm the result that the electrostatic oscillation is identified to be lower hybrid wave. The effect of this oscillation on the H{sup −} transport will be studied in the future.

  10. Energy levels, oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for Si-like P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abou El-Maaref, A.; Uosif, M.A.M.; Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2012-07-15

    Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p, 3s{sup 2}3p4d, 3s{sup 2}3p5s and 3s{sup 2}3p5p configurations of silicon-like ions P II, S III, Cl IV, Ar V and K VI have been calculated using configuration-interaction version 3 (CIV3). We compared our data with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels are also given.

  11. Oral administration of drugs with hypersensitivity potential induces germinal center hyperplasia in secondary lymphoid organ/tissue in Brown Norway rats, and this histological lesion is a promising candidate as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence in humans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamura, Akitoshi Miyawaki, Izuru; Yamada, Toru; Kimura, Juki; Funabashi, Hitoshi

    2013-08-15

    It is important to evaluate the potential of drug hypersensitivity as well as other adverse effects during the preclinical stage of the drug development process, but validated methods are not available yet. In the present study we examined whether it would be possible to develop a new predictive model of drug hypersensitivity using Brown Norway (BN) rats. As representative drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans, phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), amoxicillin (AMX), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) were orally administered to BN rats for 28 days to investigate their effects on these animals by examinations including observation of clinical signs, hematology, determination of serum IgE levels, histology, and flow cytometric analysis. Skin rashes were not observed in any animals treated with these drugs. Increases in the number of circulating inflammatory cells and serum IgE level did not necessarily occur in the animals treated with these drugs. However, histological examination revealed that germinal center hyperplasia was commonly induced in secondary lymphoid organs/tissues in the animals treated with these drugs. In cytometric analysis, changes in proportions of lymphocyte subsets were noted in the spleen of the animals treated with PHT or CBZ during the early period of administration. The results indicated that the potential of drug hypersensitivity was identified in BN rat by performing histological examination of secondary lymphoid organs/tissues. Data obtained herein suggested that drugs with hypersensitivity potential in humans gained immune reactivity in BN rat, and the germinal center hyperplasia induced by administration of these drugs may serve as a predictive biomarker for drug hypersensitivity occurrence. - Highlights: We tested Brown Norway rats as a candidate model for predicting drug hypersensitivity. The allergic drugs did not induce skin rash, whereas D-penicillamine did so in the rats. Some of allergic drugs increased inflammatory cells and IgE, but the others did not. The allergic drugs commonly induced germinal center hyperplasia in lymphoid tissues. Some of these allergic drugs transiently increased CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells in the spleen.

  12. CYP2E1-dependent and leptin-mediated hepatic CD57 expression on CD8 + T cells aid progression of environment-linked nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seth, Ratanesh Kumar; Das, Suvarthi; Kumar, Ashutosh; Chanda, Anindya; Kadiiska, Maria B.; Michelotti, Gregory; Manautou, Jose; Diehl, Anna Mae; Chatterjee, Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    Environmental toxins induce a novel CYP2E1/leptin signaling axis in liver. This in turn activates a poorly characterized innate immune response that contributes to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) progression. To identify the relevant subsets of T-lymphocytes in CYP2E1-dependent, environment-linked NASH, we utilized a model of diet induced obese (DIO) mice that are chronically exposed to bromodichloromethane. Mice deficient in CYP2E1, leptin (ob/ob mice), or both T and B cells (Pfp/Rag2 double knockout (KO) mice) were used to delineate the role of each of these factors in metabolic oxidative stress-induced T cell activation. Results revealed that elevated levels of lipid peroxidation, tyrosyl radical formation, mitochondrial tyrosine nitration and hepatic leptin as a consequence of metabolic oxidative stress caused increased levels of hepatic CD57, a marker of peripheral blood lymphocytes including NKT cells. CD8 + CD57 + cytotoxic T cells but not CD4 + CD57 + cells were significantly decreased in mice lacking CYP2E1 and leptin. There was a significant increase in the levels of T cell cytokines IL-2, IL-1?, and IFN-? in bromodichloromethane exposed DIO mice but not in mice that lacked CYP2E1, leptin or T and B cells. Apoptosis as evidenced by TUNEL assay and levels of cleaved caspase-3 was significantly lower in leptin and Pfp/Rag2 KO mice and highly correlated with protection from NASH. The results described above suggest that higher levels of oxidative stress-induced leptin mediated CD8 + CD57 + T cells play an important role in the development of NASH. It also provides a novel insight of immune dysregulation and may be a key biomarker in NASH. - Highlights: Metabolic oxidative stress caused increased levels of hepatic CD57 expression. CD8+ CD57+ cytotoxic T cells were decreased in mice lacking CYP2E1 and leptin. There was a significant increase in T cell cytokines in toxin-treated mice. Apoptosis was significantly lower in leptin and Pfp/Rag2 KO mice. Leptin mediated CD8+CD57+ T cells play an important role in NASH.

  13. Development of Biomarkers for Chronic Beryllium Disease in Mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Terry

    2013-01-25

    Beryllium is a strategic metal, indispensable for national defense programs in aerospace, telecommunications, electronics, and weaponry. Exposure to beryllium is an extensively documented occupational hazard that causes irreversible, debilitating granulomatous lung disease in as much as 3 - 5% of exposed workers. Mechanistic research on beryllium exposure-disease relationships has been severely limited by a general lack of a sufficient CBD animal model. We have now developed and tested an animal model which can be used for dissecting dose-response relationships and pathogenic mechanisms and for testing new diagnostic and treatment paradigms. We have created 3 strains of transgenic mice in which the human antigen-presenting moiety, HLA-DP, was inserted into the mouse genome. Each mouse strain contains HLA-DPB1 alleles that confer different magnitude of risk for chronic beryllium disease (CBD): HLA-DPB1*0401 (odds ratio = 0.2), HLA-DPB1*0201 (odds ratio = 15), HLA-DPB1*1701 (odds ratio = 240). Our preliminary work has demonstrated that the *1701 allele, as predicted by human studies, results in the greatest degree of sensitization in a mouse ear swelling test. We have also completed dose-response experiments examining beryllium-induced lung granulomas and identified susceptible and resistant inbred strains of mice (without the human transgenes) as well as quantitative trait loci that may contain gene(s) that modify the immune response to beryllium. In this grant application, we propose to use the transgenic and ?normal inbred strains of mice to identify biomarkers for the progression of beryllium sensitization and CBD. To achieve this goal, we propose to compare the sensitivity and accuracy of the lymphocyte proliferation test (blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) with the ELISPOT test in the three HLA-DP transgenic mice strains throughout a 6 month treatment with beryllium particles. Because of the availability of high-throughput proteomics, we will also identify changes in potential protein biomarkers in beryllium-treated mice. We will correlate these findings with the ability of the transgenic mice to develop a beryllium-specific adaptive immune response in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. We will also determine whether beryllium-responsive CD4+ T cells in blood and BAL correlate with the onset of granuloma formation. Thus, we will provide the scientific community with biomarkers of sensitization and disease progression for CBD. These biomarkers will serve as critical tools for development of improved industrial hygiene and therapeutic interventions.

  14. Human non-neutralizing HIV-1 envelope monoclonal antibodies limit the number of founder viruses during SHIV mucosal infection in rhesus macaques

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Santra, Sampa; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Warrier, Ranjit; Nicely, Nathan I.; Liao, Hua -Xin; Pollara, Justin; Liu, Pinghuang; Alam, S. Munir; Zhang, Ruijun; Cocklin, Sarah L.; et al

    2015-08-03

    HIV-1 mucosal transmission begins with virus or virus-infected cells moving through mucus across mucosal epithelium to infect CD4⁺ T cells. Although broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) are the type of HIV-1 antibodies that are most likely protective, they are not induced with current vaccine candidates. In contrast, antibodies that do not neutralize primary HIV-1 strains in the TZM-bl infection assay are readily induced by current vaccine candidates and have also been implicated as secondary correlates of decreased HIV-1 risk in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial. Here, we have studied the capacity of anti-Env monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against either the immunodominant regionmore » of gp41 (7B2 IgG1), the first constant region of gp120 (A32 IgG1), or the third variable loop (V3) of gp120 (CH22 IgG1) to modulate in vivo rectal mucosal transmission of a high-dose simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-BaL) in rhesus macaques. 7B2 IgG1 or A32 IgG1, each containing mutations to enhance Fc function, was administered passively to rhesus macaques but afforded no protection against productive clinical infection while the positive control antibody CH22 IgG1 prevented infection in 4 of 6 animals. Enumeration of transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses revealed that passive infusion of each of the three antibodies significantly reduced the number of T/F genomes. Some antibodies that bind HIV-1 Env but fail to neutralize virus in traditional neutralization assays may limit the number of T/F viruses involved in transmission without leading to enhancement of viral infection. For one of these mAbs, gp41 mAb 7B2, we provide the first co-crystal structure in complex with a common cyclical loop motif demonstrated to be critical for infection by other retroviruses.« less

  15. Human non-neutralizing HIV-1 envelope monoclonal antibodies limit the number of founder viruses during SHIV mucosal infection in rhesus macaques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santra, Sampa; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Warrier, Ranjit; Nicely, Nathan I.; Liao, Hua -Xin; Pollara, Justin; Liu, Pinghuang; Alam, S. Munir; Zhang, Ruijun; Cocklin, Sarah L.; Shen, Xiaoying; Duffy, Ryan; Xia, Shi -Mao; Schutte, Robert J.; Pemble IV, Charles W.; Dennison, S. Moses; Li, Hui; Chao, Andrew; Vidnovic, Kora; Evans, Abbey; Klein, Katja; Kumar, Amit; Robinson, James; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N.; Montefiori, David C.; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Robb, Merlin L.; Michael, Nelson L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Soderberg, Kelly A.; Giorgi, Elena E.; Blair, Lily; Korber, Bette T.; Moog, Christiane; Shattock, Robin J.; Letvin, Norman L.; Schmitz, Joern E.; Moody, M. A.; Gao, Feng; Ferrari, Guido; Shaw, George M.; Haynes, Barton F.; Douek, Daniel C.

    2015-08-03

    HIV-1 mucosal transmission begins with virus or virus-infected cells moving through mucus across mucosal epithelium to infect CD4⁺ T cells. Although broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) are the type of HIV-1 antibodies that are most likely protective, they are not induced with current vaccine candidates. In contrast, antibodies that do not neutralize primary HIV-1 strains in the TZM-bl infection assay are readily induced by current vaccine candidates and have also been implicated as secondary correlates of decreased HIV-1 risk in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial. Here, we have studied the capacity of anti-Env monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against either the immunodominant region of gp41 (7B2 IgG1), the first constant region of gp120 (A32 IgG1), or the third variable loop (V3) of gp120 (CH22 IgG1) to modulate in vivo rectal mucosal transmission of a high-dose simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-BaL) in rhesus macaques. 7B2 IgG1 or A32 IgG1, each containing mutations to enhance Fc function, was administered passively to rhesus macaques but afforded no protection against productive clinical infection while the positive control antibody CH22 IgG1 prevented infection in 4 of 6 animals. Enumeration of transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses revealed that passive infusion of each of the three antibodies significantly reduced the number of T/F genomes. Some antibodies that bind HIV-1 Env but fail to neutralize virus in traditional neutralization assays may limit the number of T/F viruses involved in transmission without leading to enhancement of viral infection. For one of these mAbs, gp41 mAb 7B2, we provide the first co-crystal structure in complex with a common cyclical loop motif demonstrated to be critical for infection by other retroviruses.

  16. Synthesis, structures and properties of a family of four two-dimensional coordination polymers constructed from 5-hydroxyisophthalate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Kou-Lin; Zhang, Jing-Bo; Jing, Chu-Yue; Zhang, Lei; Walton, Richard I.; Zhu, Peizhi; Ng, Seik Weng

    2014-03-15

    Four 2D coordination polymers (CPs) with different structures containing the multifunctional ligand 5-hydroxyisophthalate (5-OH-BDC{sup 2?}), [Zn(5-OH-BDC)(btb)]2H{sub 2}O (1), [Cd(5-OH-BDC)(btp)(H{sub 2}O)]3H{sub 2}O (2), [Cd(5-OH-BDC)(bth){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]H{sub 2}O (3) and [Pb(5-OH-BDC)]H{sub 2}O (4) [btp=1, 3-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)propane, btb=1,4-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)butane, bth=1, 6-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)hexane] were obtained. 13 were synthesised hydrothermally, while 4 was obtained under ambient condition. The adjacent (2D?2D) polycatenated 2D layers of 1 polythread in a parallel manner to form an unusual 2D?3D polythreaded framework. 2 contains an undulated 2D (4, 4) network and further extends into an embracing double-layer structure through the CH? and ?? stacking interactions. 3 exhibits a non-interpenetrating 2D (4, 4)-network. 4 exhibits a 2D double-layered binodal (4, 4)-net containing oblong nanochannels with symbol (4{sup 3}6{sup 3}){sub 2}. Reversible dehydrationrehydration is observed in 1, 2 and 4, which fall within the category of recoverable collapsing and guest-induced re-formation frameworks, while 3 exhibits irreversible dehydrationrehydration behaviour. The solid state fluorescent properties of 14 have been investigated. -- Graphical abstract: Among four 2D CPs reported, 1 is an unusual 2D?3D polythreaded framework. 4 exhibits 2D double-layered binodal (4, 4)-net containing nanochannels. Reversible dehydrationrehydration is observed in 1, 2 and 4. Highlights: Four 2D CPs based on 5-hydroxyisophthalate with d{sup 10} and Pb(II) ions were reported. 1 is an unusual 2D?3D polythreaded framework. 4 shows a binodal (4, 4)-connected 2D double-layer network with nanochannels. The materials 1, 2 and 4 show reversible dehydrationrehydration behaviours. Solid state fluorescent properties were investigated.

  17. C:\Forms\HQ F 1410.4.cdr

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HQ-F-1410.4 (11-79) 2 . SENT F ROM ( NAME OF OFFI CE) 5. RECEI VED BY ( NAME OR OFFI CE) Thank you for your cooperation. Please return promptly. SECTI ON A ( O P T I O N A L F O L D ) ( O P T I O N A L F O L D ) 3 . DAT E 6 . DAT E ORI GI NAT I NG OF F I CE USE 8 . DAT E DI SPAT CHED FOR RETURN 4 . T I ME 7 . T I ME T I ME RETURNED - - DAT E 9 . T I ME A M A M A M A M P M P M P M P M 1 . CONTROL NO. TO: RETURN TO: ORIGINATOR FILL IN: ORIGINATOR FILL IN: RECIPIENT FILL IN: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF

  18. Bioenergy Technologies Office | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  19. Measurement of the triple-differential cross section for photon+jets production in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2013-11-24

    A measurement of the triple-differential cross section, $ {{{{{\\mathrm{d}}^3}\\sigma }} \\left/ {{\\left( {\\mathrm{d}\\mathrm{p}_T^{\\gamma}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\gamma }}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\mathrm{jet}}}} \\right)}} \\right.} $ , in photon + jets final states using a data sample from proton-proton collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} $ = 7 TeV is presented. This sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.14 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. Photons and jets are reconstructed within a pseudorapidity range of |?| 30 GeV, respectively. The measurements aremorecompared to theoretical predictions from the sherpa leading-order QCD Monte Carlo event generator and the next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculation from jetphox. The predictions are found to be consistent with the data over most of the examined kinematic region.less

  20. Better Buildings Network View

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  1. Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective graphene surface using dispersion corrected DFT studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijayakumar, M.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2013-10-15

    To analyze the lithium ion interaction with realistic graphene surfaces, we carried out dispersion corrected DFT-D3 studies on graphene with common point defects and chemisorbed oxygen containing functional groups along with defect free graphene surface. Our study reveals that, the interaction between lithium ion (Li+) and graphene is mainly through the delocalized π electron of pure graphene layer. However, the oxygen containing functional groups pose high adsorption energy for lithium ion due to the Li-O ionic bond formation. Similarly, the point defect groups interact with lithium ion through possible carbon dangling bonds and/or cation-π type interactions. Overall these defect sites render a preferential site for lithium ions compared with pure graphene layer. Based on these findings, the role of graphene surface defects in lithium battery performance were discussed.

  2. Optimized electrode placement along the channel of a Hall thruster for ion focusing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qing, Shaowei, E-mail: qshaowei@gmail.com [Power Engineering Institute, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); E, Peng [Department of Electrical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Xia, Guangqing [State Key Laboratory of Structural Analysis for Industrial Equipment, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Tang, Ming-Chun [College of Communication Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Duan, Ping [School of Physics, Dalian Maritime University, Dalian 116026 (China)

    2014-01-21

    An optimal placement of the segmented electrode for increasing the lifetime of the Aton-type Hall thruster, i.e., reducing the plume divergence, is demonstrated using a 2D3V fully kinetic Particle-in-Cell method. Segmented electrodes, embedded near the ionization region of non-segmented case and biased above anode potential, lead to an increased separation between the ionization and acceleration regions and the formation of an efficient acceleration electric field configuration as potential lens. Due to this electrode placement, the sheath near the ceramic walls of the acceleration region is collapsed and an excellent ion beam focusing is demonstrated. The potential contour pockets around the electrodes and the sheath collapse phenomenon are also discussed.

  3. Diversity Strategies for Nuclear Power Plant Instrumentation and Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Richard Thomas; Belles, Randy; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit; Holcomb, David Eugene; Korsah, Kofi; Loebl, Andy; Mays, Gary T; Muhlheim, Michael David; Mullens, James Allen; Poore III, Willis P; Qualls, A L; Wilson, Thomas L; Waterman, Michael E.

    2010-02-01

    This report presents the technical basis for establishing acceptable mitigating strategies that resolve diversity and defense-in-depth (D3) assessment findings and conform to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements. The research approach employed to establish appropriate diversity strategies involves investigation of available documentation on D3 methods and experience from nuclear power and nonnuclear industries, capture of expert knowledge and lessons learned, determination of best practices, and assessment of the nature of common-cause failures (CCFs) and compensating diversity attributes. The research described in this report does not provide guidance on how to determine the need for diversity in a safety system to mitigate the consequences of potential CCFs. Rather, the scope of this report provides guidance to the staff and nuclear industry after a licensee or applicant has performed a D3 assessment per NUREG/CR-6303 and determined that diversity in a safety system is needed for mitigating the consequences of potential CCFs identified in the evaluation of the safety system design features. Succinctly, the purpose of the research described in this report was to answer the question, 'If diversity is required in a safety system to mitigate the consequences of potential CCFs, how much diversity is enough?' The principal results of this research effort have identified and developed diversity strategies, which consist of combinations of diversity attributes and their associated criteria. Technology, which corresponds to design diversity, is chosen as the principal system characteristic by which diversity criteria are grouped to form strategies. The rationale for this classification framework involves consideration of the profound impact that technology-focused design diversity provides. Consequently, the diversity usage classification scheme involves three families of strategies: (1) different technologies, (2) different approaches within the same technology, and (3) different architectures within the same technology. Using this convention, the first diversity usage family, designated Strategy A, is characterized by fundamentally diverse technologies. Strategy A at the system or platform level is illustrated by the example of analog and digital implementations. The second diversity usage family, designated Strategy B, is achieved through the use of distinctly different technologies. Strategy B can be described in terms of different digital technologies, such as the distinct approaches represented by general-purpose microprocessors and field-programmable gate arrays. The third diversity usage family, designated Strategy C, involves the use of variations within a technology. An example of Strategy C involves different digital architectures within the same technology, such as that provided by different microprocessors (e.g., Pentium and Power PC). The grouping of diversity criteria combinations according to Strategies A, B, and C establishes baseline diversity usage and facilitates a systematic organization of strategic approaches for coping with CCF vulnerabilities. Effectively, these baseline sets of diversity criteria constitute appropriate CCF mitigating strategies for digital safety systems. The strategies represent guidance on acceptable diversity usage and can be applied directly to ensure that CCF vulnerabilities identified through a D3 assessment have been adequately resolved. Additionally, a framework has been generated for capturing practices regarding diversity usage and a tool has been developed for the systematic assessment of the comparative effect of proposed diversity strategies (see Appendix A).

  4. Multistage ion acceleration in finite overdense target with a relativistic laser pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinha, Ujjwal [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-07-15

    Multistage ion acceleration has been analytically and computationally studied in the relativistic regime. For non-relativistic piston velocities, this phenomenon has been described before. But, as we go to relativistic piston velocities, the non-relativistic results hold no more. We have presented a fully relativistic calculation for second stage ion velocities and energies. To verify our calculations, we performed a fully relativistic 1D3V particle in cell simulations using the code LPIC++. It has been found that the relativistic calculations matched very well with the simulation results. Also, it has been seen that at relativistic piston velocities, the non-relativistic results differed by a significant margin. The feasibility of this process has been further established by three dimensional particle in cell simulations.

  5. LgCOOleS, Se*&,,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ; "Ofice Mem . m *" ' ' *IilCl:t Consists of & " ' / Of LgCOOleS, Se*&,, es * UNITED STATES G-OVERNM NT <;$)~~ 3i;t-j /Lj ' , ~~~' jCjC;O c) TO I LT. :s. Clnr!te, ,;or,~~~,~' , -.,,..:-:-Y"' r~-;i~.L.-Z.:r DATE: uL"C!.,?r 6, 1' ?L9 A meting mj: !1:1d in i:1CG bet,. _ ^ .- ',cel representatives 51 ;.2rshz:i sr.3 the A;.35 to nwotiztc .the prices for producing FY-1: (brow oxise), _1 I%-; (green salt and .?T-12 (he::.-iZluoriic) fcr the sc2or.d 3,uarter of

  6. Diagnostics and required R and D for control of DEMO grade plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Hyeon K.

    2014-08-21

    Even if the diagnostics of ITER performs as expected, installation and operation of the diagnostic systems in Demo device will be much harsher than those of the present ITER device. In order to operate the Demo grade plasmas, which may have a higher beta limit, safely with very limited number of simple diagnostic system, it requires a well defined predictable plasma modelling in conjunction with the reliable control system for burn control and potential harmful instabilities. Development of such modelling in ITER is too risky and the logical choice would be utilization of the present day steady state capable devices such as KSTAR and EAST. In order to fulfill this mission, sophisticated diagnostic systems such as 2D/3D imaging systems can validate the physics in the theoretical modeling and challenge the predictable capability.

  7. Importance of Size and Distribution of Ni Nanoparticles for the Hydrodeoxygenation of Microalgae Oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Wenji; Zhao, Chen; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2013-07-22

    Improved synthetic approaches for preparing small-sized Ni nanoparticles (d=3 nm) supported on HBEA zeolite have been explored and compared with the traditional impregnation method. The formation of surface nickel silicate/aluminate involved in the two precipitation processes are inferred to lead to the stronger interaction between the metal and the support. The lower Brnsted acid concentrations of these two Ni/HBEA catalysts compared with the parent zeolite caused by the partial exchange of Brnsted acid sites by Ni2+ cations do not influence the hydrodeoxygenation rates, but alter the product selectivity. Higher initial rates and higher stability have been achieved with these optimized catalysts for the hydrodeoxygenation of stearic acid and microalgae oil. Small metal particles facilitate high initial catalytic activity in the fresh sample and size uniformity ensures high catalyst stability.

  8. Final Report for "Analyzing and visualizing next generation climate data"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pletzer, Alexander

    2012-11-13

    The project "Analyzing and visualizing next generation climate data" adds block-structured (mosaic) grid support, parallel processing, and 2D/3D curvilinear interpolation to the open-source UV-CDAT climate data analysis tool. Block structured grid support complies to the Gridspec extension submitted to the Climate and Forecast metadata conventions. It contains two parts: aggregation of data spread over multiple mosaic tiles (M-SPEC) and aggregation of temporal data stored in different files (F-SPEC). Together, M-SPEC and F-SPEC allow users to interact with data stored in multiple files as if the data were in a single file. For computational expensive tasks, a flexible, multi-dimensional, multi-type distributed array class allows users to process data in parallel using remote memory access. Both nodal and cell based interpolation is supported; users can choose between different interpolation libraries including ESMF and LibCF depending on the their particular needs.

  9. Development of Fuel Shuffling Module for PHISICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allan Mabe; Andrea Alfonsi; Cristian Rabiti; Aaron Epiney; Michael Lineberry

    2013-06-01

    PHISICS (Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for the INL Code System) [4] code toolkit has been in development at the Idaho National Laboratory. This package is intended to provide a modern analysis tool for reactor physics investigation. It is designed with the mindset to maximize accuracy for a given availability of computational resources and to give state of the art tools to the modern nuclear engineer. This is obtained by implementing several different algorithms and meshing approaches among which the user will be able to choose, in order to optimize his computational resources and accuracy needs. The software is completely modular in order to simplify the independent development of modules by different teams and future maintenance. The package is coupled with the thermo-hydraulic code RELAP5-3D [3]. In the following the structure of the different PHISICS modules is briefly recalled, focusing on the new shuffling module (SHUFFLE), object of this paper.

  10. Atomic Physics Effects on Convergent, Child-Langmuir Ion Flow between Nearly Transparent Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santarius, John F.; Emmert, Gilbert A.

    2013-11-07

    Research during this project at the University of Wisconsin Fusion Technology Institute (UW FTI) on ion and neutral flow through an arbitrary, monotonic potential difference created by nearly transparent electrodes accomplished the following: (1) developed and implemented an integral equation approach for atomic physics effects in helium plasmas; (2) extended the analysis to coupled integral equations that treat atomic and molecular deuterium ions and neutrals; (3) implemented the key deuterium and helium atomic and molecular cross sections; (4) added negative ion production and related cross sections; and (5) benchmarked the code against experimental results. The analysis and codes treat the species D0, D20, D+, D2+, D3+, D and, separately at present, He0 and He+. Extensions enhanced the analysis and related computer codes to include He++ ions plus planar and cylindrical geometries.

  11. Real time in situ detection of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rollins, Andrew W.; Smith, Jared D.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2010-06-11

    A new field instrument is described that quantifies total particle phase organic nitrates. The instrument is based on the thermal dissociation laser induced fluorescence (TD-LIF) method that thermally converts nitrates to NO2 which is then detected by LIF. This instrument is unique in its ability to provide fast sensitive measurements of particle phase organic nitrates, without interference from inorganic nitrate. Here we use it to quantify organic nitrates in SOA generated from high-NOx photooxidation of limonene, a-pinene, D-3-carene, and tridecane. In these experiments the organic nitrate moiety is observed to be 6-15percent of the total SOA mass, depending on the organic precursor.

  12. International Energy Outlook 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Appendix D Table D3. World gross domestic product (GDP) by region expressed in purchasing power parity, High Oil Price case, 2009-2040 (billion 2005 dollars) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-2040 2009 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 15,498 15,929 17,914 20,777 23,647 26,726 30,368 34,751 2.6 United States a 12,758 13,063 14,519 16,803 19,017 21,301 23,998 27,270 2.5 Canada 1,165 1,202 1,351 1,524 1,701 1,897 2,148 2,445 2.4 Mexico/Chile 1,575

  13. Computes Generalized Electromagnetic Interactions Between Structures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-05-18

    Eiger is primarily in integral equation code for both frequency-domain electromagnetics and electrostatics. There is also some finiate element capability. In the frequency-domain version there are different Green's functions in the code, 2D, 3D free space, symmetry-plane Green's functions, periodic Green's functions, and layered media Green's functions. There are thin slot models for coupling into cavities. There is a thin wire algorithm as well as junction basis functions for attachment of a wire to amore » conducting surface. The code is written in Fortran 90 using object oriented design. The code has the capability to run both in parallel and serial modes. The code is a suite consisting of pre-processor (Jungfrau), the physics code (EIGER), and post processor (Moench).« less

  14. Measurement of the triple-differential cross section for photon+jets production in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2013-06-03

    A measurement of the triple-differential cross section, $ {{{{{\\mathrm{d}}^3}\\sigma }} \\left/ {{\\left( {\\mathrm{d}\\mathrm{p}_T^{\\gamma}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\gamma }}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\mathrm{jet}}}} \\right)}} \\right.} $ , in photon + jets final states using a data sample from proton-proton collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} $ = 7 TeV is presented. This sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.14 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. Photons and jets are reconstructed within a pseudorapidity range of |?| 30 GeV, respectively. The measurements aremorecompared to theoretical predictions from the sherpa leading-order QCD Monte Carlo event generator and the next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculation from jetphox. Lastly, the predictions are found to be consistent with the data over most of the examined kinematic region.less

  15. Fragility of ferromagnetic double exchange interactions and pressure tuning of magnetism in 3d–5d double perovskite Sr₂FeOsO₆

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Veiga, L. S. I.; Fabbris, G.; van Veenendaal, M.; Souza-Neto, N. M.; Feng, H. L.; Yamaura, K.; Haskel, D.

    2015-06-19

    The ability to tune exchange (magnetic) interactions between 3d transition metals in perovskite structures has proven to be a powerful route to discovery of novel properties. Here we demonstrate that the introduction of 3d-5d exchange pathways in double perovskites enables additional tunability, a result of the large spatial extent of 5d wave functions. Using x-ray probes of magnetism and structure at high pressure, we show that compression of Sr₂FeOsO₆ drives an unexpected continuous change in the sign of Fe-Os exchange interactions and a transition from antiferromagnetic to ferrimagnetic order. We analyze the relevant electron-electron interactions, shedding light into fundamental differencesmore » with the more thoroughly studied 3d-3d systems.« less

  16. Callan-Symanzik equation and asymptotic freedom in the Marr-Shimamoto model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarfone, Leonard M.

    2010-05-15

    The exactly soluble nonrelativistic Marr-Shimamoto model was introduced in 1964 as an example of the Lee model with a propagator and a nontrivial vertex function. An exactly soluble relativistic version of this model, known as the Zachariasen model, has been found to be asymptotically free in terms of coupling constant renormalization at an arbitrary spacelike momentum and on the basis of exact solutions of the Gell-Mann-Low equations. This is accomplished with conventional cut-off regularization by setting up the Yukawa and Fermi coupling constants at Euclidean momenta in terms of on mass-shell couplings and then taking the asymptotic limit. In view of this background, it may be expected that an investigation of the nonrelativistic Marr-Shimamoto theory may also exhibit asymptotic freedom in view of its manifest mathematical similarity to that of the Zachariasen model. To prove this point, the present paper prefers to examine asymptotic freedom in the nonrelativistic Marr-Shimamoto theory using the powerful concepts of the renormalization group and the Callan-Symanzik equation, in conjunction with the specificity of dimensional regularization and on-shell renormalization. This approach is based on calculations of the Callan-Symanzik coefficients and determinations of the effective coupling constants. It is shown that the Marr-Shimamoto theory is asymptotically free for dimensions D<3 and for values of D>3 occurring in periodic intervals over the range of 0

  17. Motivation deficit in ADHD is associated with dysfunction of the dopamine reward pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Newcorn, J.H.; Kollins, S.H.; Wigal, T.L.; Telang, F.; Folwer, J.S.; Goldstein, R.Z.; Klein, N.; Logan, J.; Wong, C.; Swanson, J.M.

    2010-08-17

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is typically characterized as a disorder of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity but there is increasing evidence of deficits in motivation. Using positron emission tomography (PET), we showed decreased function in the brain dopamine reward pathway in adults with ADHD, which, we hypothesized, could underlie the motivation deficits in this disorder. To evaluate this hypothesis, we performed secondary analyses to assess the correlation between the PET measures of dopamine D2/D3 receptor and dopamine transporter availability (obtained with [{sup 11}C]raclopride and [{sup 11}C]cocaine, respectively) in the dopamine reward pathway (midbrain and nucleus accumbens) and a surrogate measure of trait motivation (assessed using the Achievement scale on the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire or MPQ) in 45 ADHD participants and 41 controls. The Achievement scale was lower in ADHD participants than in controls (11 {+-} 5 vs 14 {+-} 3, P < 0.001) and was significantly correlated with D2/D3 receptors (accumbens: r = 0.39, P < 0.008; midbrain: r = 0.41, P < 0.005) and transporters (accumbens: r = 0.35, P < 0.02) in ADHD participants, but not in controls. ADHD participants also had lower values in the Constraint factor and higher values in the Negative Emotionality factor of the MPQ but did not differ in the Positive Emotionality factor - and none of these were correlated with the dopamine measures. In ADHD participants, scores in the Achievement scale were also negatively correlated with symptoms of inattention (CAARS A, E and SWAN I). These findings provide evidence that disruption of the dopamine reward pathway is associated with motivation deficits in ADHD adults, which may contribute to attention deficits and supports the use of therapeutic interventions to enhance motivation in ADHD.

  18. Structure and Mechanism of ORF36, an Amino Sugar Oxidizing Enzyme in Everninomicin Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vey, Jessica L.; Al-Mestarihi, Ahmad; Hu, Yunfeng; Funk, Michael A.; Bachmann, Brian O.; Iverson, T.M.

    2010-12-07

    Everninomicin is a highly modified octasaccharide that belongs to the orthosomycin family of antibiotics and possesses potent Gram-positive antibiotic activity, including broad-spectrum efficacy against multidrug resistant enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus. Among its distinctive structural features is a nitro sugar, L-evernitrose, analogues of which decorate a variety of natural products. Recently, we identified a nitrososynthase enzyme encoded by orf36 from Micromonospora carbonacea var. africana that mediates the flavin-dependent double oxidation of synthetically generated thymidine diphosphate (TDP)-L-epi-vancosamine to the corresponding nitroso sugar. Herein, we utilize a five-enzyme in vitro pathway both to verify that ORF36 catalyzes oxidation of biogenic TDP-L-epi-vancosamine and to determine whether ORF36 exhibits catalytic competence for any of its biosynthetic progenitors, which are candidate substrates for nitrososynthases in vivo. Progenitors solely undergo single-oxidation reactions and terminate in the hydroxylamine oxidation state. Performing the in vitro reactions in the presence of {sup 18}O{sub 2} establishes that molecular oxygen, rather than oxygen from water, is incorporated into ORF36-generated intermediates and products and identifies an off-pathway product that correlates with the oxidation product of a progenitor substrate. The 3.15 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structure of ORF36 reveals a tetrameric enzyme that shares a fold with acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and class D flavin-containing monooxygenases, including the nitrososynthase KijD3. However, ORF36 and KijD3 have unusually open active sites in comparison to these related enzymes. Taken together, these studies map substrate determinants and allow the proposal of a minimal monooxygenase mechanism for amino sugar oxidation by ORF36.

  19. QCAD simulation and optimization of semiconductor double quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Erik; Gao, Xujiao; Kalashnikova, Irina; Muller, Richard Partain; Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Young, Ralph Watson

    2013-12-01

    We present the Quantum Computer Aided Design (QCAD) simulator that targets modeling quantum devices, particularly silicon double quantum dots (DQDs) developed for quantum qubits. The simulator has three di erentiating features: (i) its core contains nonlinear Poisson, e ective mass Schrodinger, and Con guration Interaction solvers that have massively parallel capability for high simulation throughput, and can be run individually or combined self-consistently for 1D/2D/3D quantum devices; (ii) the core solvers show superior convergence even at near-zero-Kelvin temperatures, which is critical for modeling quantum computing devices; (iii) it couples with an optimization engine Dakota that enables optimization of gate voltages in DQDs for multiple desired targets. The Poisson solver includes Maxwell- Boltzmann and Fermi-Dirac statistics, supports Dirichlet, Neumann, interface charge, and Robin boundary conditions, and includes the e ect of dopant incomplete ionization. The solver has shown robust nonlinear convergence even in the milli-Kelvin temperature range, and has been extensively used to quickly obtain the semiclassical electrostatic potential in DQD devices. The self-consistent Schrodinger-Poisson solver has achieved robust and monotonic convergence behavior for 1D/2D/3D quantum devices at very low temperatures by using a predictor-correct iteration scheme. The QCAD simulator enables the calculation of dot-to-gate capacitances, and comparison with experiment and between solvers. It is observed that computed capacitances are in the right ballpark when compared to experiment, and quantum con nement increases capacitance when the number of electrons is xed in a quantum dot. In addition, the coupling of QCAD with Dakota allows to rapidly identify which device layouts are more likely leading to few-electron quantum dots. Very efficient QCAD simulations on a large number of fabricated and proposed Si DQDs have made it possible to provide fast feedback for design comparison and optimization.

  20. A slow-forming isopeptide bond in the structure of the major pilin SpaD from Corynebacterium diphtheriae has implications for pilus assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Hae Joo; Paterson, Neil G.; Kim, Chae Un; Middleditch, Martin; Chang, Chungyu; Ton-That, Hung; Baker, Edward N.

    2014-05-01

    Two crystal structures of the major pilin SpaD from C. diphtheriae have been determined at 1.87 and 2.5 Å resolution. The N-terminal domain is found to contain an isopeptide bond that forms slowly over time in the recombinant protein. Given its structural context, this provides insight into the relationship between internal isopeptide-bond formation and pilus assembly. The Gram-positive organism Corynebacterium diphtheriae, the cause of diphtheria in humans, expresses pili on its surface which it uses for adhesion and colonization of its host. These pili are covalent protein polymers composed of three types of pilin subunit that are assembled by specific sortase enzymes. A structural analysis of the major pilin SpaD, which forms the polymeric backbone of one of the three types of pilus expressed by C. diphtheriae, is reported. Mass-spectral and crystallographic analysis shows that SpaD contains three internal Lys–Asn isopeptide bonds. One of these, shown by mass spectrometry to be located in the N-terminal D1 domain of the protein, only forms slowly, implying an energy barrier to bond formation. Two crystal structures, of the full-length three-domain protein at 2.5 Å resolution and of a two-domain (D2-D3) construct at 1.87 Å resolution, show that each of the three Ig-like domains contains a single Lys–Asn isopeptide-bond cross-link, assumed to give mechanical stability as in other such pili. Additional stabilizing features include a disulfide bond in the D3 domain and a calcium-binding loop in D2. The N-terminal D1 domain is more flexible than the others and, by analogy with other major pilins of this type, the slow formation of its isopeptide bond can be attributed to its location adjacent to the lysine used in sortase-mediated polymerization during pilus assembly.

  1. Registration of clinical volumes to beams-eye-view images for real-time tracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, Jonathan H.; Rottmann, Joerg; Lewis, John H.; Mishra, Pankaj; Berbeco, Ross I.; Keall, Paul J.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The authors combine the registration of 2D beams eye view (BEV) images and 3D planning computed tomography (CT) images, with relative, markerless tumor tracking to provide automatic absolute tracking of physician defined volumes such as the gross tumor volume (GTV). Methods: During treatment of lung SBRT cases, BEV images were continuously acquired with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) operating in cine mode. For absolute registration of physician-defined volumes, an intensity based 2D/3D registration to the planning CT was performed using the end-of-exhale (EoE) phase of the four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). The volume was converted from Hounsfield units into electron density by a calibration curve and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were generated for each beam geometry. Using normalized cross correlation between the DRR and an EoE BEV image, the best in-plane rigid transformation was found. The transformation was applied to physician-defined contours in the planning CT, mapping them into the EPID image domain. A robust multiregion method of relative markerless lung tumor tracking quantified deviations from the EoE position. Results: The success of 2D/3D registration was demonstrated at the EoE breathing phase. By registering at this phase and then employing a separate technique for relative tracking, the authors are able to successfully track target volumes in the BEV images throughout the entire treatment delivery. Conclusions: Through the combination of EPID/4DCT registration and relative tracking, a necessary step toward the clinical implementation of BEV tracking has been completed. The knowledge of tumor volumes relative to the treatment field is important for future applications like real-time motion management, adaptive radiotherapy, and delivered dose calculations.

  2. Density functional theory based generalized effective fragment potential method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Kiet A. E-mail: ruth.pachter@wpafb.af.mil; Pachter, Ruth E-mail: ruth.pachter@wpafb.af.mil; Day, Paul N.

    2014-06-28

    We present a generalized Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT) based effective fragment potential (EFP2-DFT) method for the treatment of solvent effects. Similar to the original Hartree-Fock (HF) based potential with fitted parameters for water (EFP1) and the generalized HF based potential (EFP2-HF), EFP2-DFT includes electrostatic, exchange-repulsion, polarization, and dispersion potentials, which are generated for a chosen DFT functional for a given isolated molecule. The method does not have fitted parameters, except for implicit parameters within a chosen functional and the dispersion correction to the potential. The electrostatic potential is modeled with a multipolar expansion at each atomic center and bond midpoint using Stone's distributed multipolar analysis. The exchange-repulsion potential between two fragments is composed of the overlap and kinetic energy integrals and the nondiagonal KS matrices in the localized molecular orbital basis. The polarization potential is derived from the static molecular polarizability. The dispersion potential includes the intermolecular D3 dispersion correction of Grimme et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 132, 154104 (2010)]. The potential generated from the CAMB3LYP functional has mean unsigned errors (MUEs) with respect to results from coupled cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples with a complete basis set limit (CCSD(T)/CBS) extrapolation, of 1.7, 2.2, 2.0, and 0.5 kcal/mol, for the S22, water-benzene clusters, water clusters, and n-alkane dimers benchmark sets, respectively. The corresponding EFP2-HF errors for the respective benchmarks are 2.41, 3.1, 1.8, and 2.5 kcal/mol. Thus, the new EFP2-DFT-D3 method with the CAMB3LYP functional provides comparable or improved results at lower computational cost and, therefore, extends the range of applicability of EFP2 to larger system sizes.

  3. Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daila S. Gridley, PhD

    2012-03-30

    FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Supported by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64345 Project ID: 0012965 Award Register#: ER64345 Project Manager: Noelle F. Metting, Sc.D. Phone: 301-903-8309 Division SC-23.2 noelle.metting@science.doe.gov Submitted March 2012 To: https://www.osti.gov/elink/241.3.jsp Title: Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation PI: Daila S. Gridley, Ph.D. Human low dose radiation data have been derived primarily from studies of space and airline flight personnel, nuclear plant workers and others exposed occupationally, as well as victims in the vicinity of atomic bomb explosions. The findings remain inconclusive due to population inconsistencies and complex interactions among total dose, dose rate, radiation quality and age at exposure. Thus, safe limits for low dose occupational irradiation are currently based on data obtained with doses far exceeding the levels expected for the general population and health risks have been largely extrapolated using the linear-nonthreshold dose-response model. The overall working hypothesis of the present study is that priming with low dose, low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can ameliorate the response to acute high-dose radiation exposure. We also propose that the efficacy of low-dose induced protection will be dependent upon the form and regimen of the high-dose exposure: photons versus protons versus simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE). The emphasis has been on gene expression and function of CD4+ T helper (Th) lymphocytes harvested from spleens of whole-body irradiated C57BL/6 mice, a strain that provides the genetic background for many genetically engineered strains. Evaluations of the responses of other selected cells, tissues such as skin, and organs such as lung, liver and brain were also initiated (partially funded by other sources). The long-term goal is to provide information that will be useful in estimating human health risks due to radiation that may occur during exposures in the work environment, nuclear/radiological catastrophes, as well as radiotherapy. Several papers have been published, accepted for publication or are in preparation. A number of poster and oral presentations have been made at scientific conferences and workshops. Archived tissues of various types will continue to be evaluated via funding from other sources (the DoE Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science and this specific grant will be appropriately included in the Acknowledgements of all subsequent publications/presentations). A post-doc and several students have participated in this study. More detailed description of the accomplishments is described in attached file.

  4. A polymorphism in metallothionein 1A (MT1A) is associated with cadmium-related excretion of urinary beta 2‐microglobulin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Lijian; Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shanxi Medical University, Shanxi ; Chang, Xiuli; Rentschler, Gerda; Tian, Liting; Zhu, Guoying; Chen, Xiao; Jin, Taiyi; Broberg, Karin

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: Cadmium (Cd) toxicity of the kidney varies between individuals despite similar exposure levels. In humans Cd is mainly bound to metallothioneins (MT), which scavenge its toxic effects. Here we analyzed whether polymorphisms in MT genes MT1A and MT2A influence Cd-related kidney damage. Methods: In a cross-sectional study N = 512 volunteers were selected from three areas in South-Eastern China, which to varying degree were Cd-polluted from a smelter (control area [median Cd in urine U-Cd = 2.67 μg/L], moderately [U-Cd = 4.23 μg/L] and highly [U-Cd = 9.13 μg/L] polluted areas). U-Cd and blood Cd (B-Cd) concentrations were measured by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. MT1A rs11076161 (G/A), MT2A rs10636 (G/C) and MT2A rs28366003 (A/G) were determined by Taqman assays; urinary N-Acetyl-beta-(D)-Glucosaminidase (UNAG) by spectrometry, and urinary β2-microglobulin (UB2M) by ELISA. Results: Higher B-Cd (natural log-transformed) with increasing number of MT1A rs11076161 A-alleles was found in the highly polluted group (p-value trend = 0.033; all p-values adjusted for age, sex, and smoking). In a linear model a significant interaction between rs11076161 genotype and B-Cd was found for UNAG (p = 0.001) and UB2M concentrations (p = 0.001). Carriers of the rs11076161 AA genotype showed steeper slopes for the associations between Cd in blood and natural log-transformed UB2M (β = 1.2, 95% CI 0.72–1.6) compared to GG carriers (β = 0.30, 95% CI 0.15–0.45). Also for UNAG (natural log-transformed) carriers of the AA genotype had steeper slopes (β = 0.55, 95% CI 0.27–0.84) compared to GG carriers (β = 0.018, 95% CI − 0.79–0.11). Conclusions: MT1A rs11076161 was associated with B-Cd concentrations and Cd-induced kidney toxicity at high exposure levels. -- Highlights: ► Cadmium is toxic to the kidney but the susceptibility differs between individuals. ► The toxic effect of cadmium is scavenged by metallothioneins. ► A common variant of metallothionein 1A was genotyped in 512 cadmium exposed humans. ► Variant carriers of this polymorphism showed more kidney damage from cadmium. ► The frequency of these variants needs to be taken into account in risk assessment.

  5. Prenatal cadmium exposure alters postnatal immune cell development and function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, Miranda L.; Holásková, Ida; Elliott, Meenal; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B.

    2012-06-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is generally found in low concentrations in the environment due to its widespread and continual use, however, its concentration in some foods and cigarette smoke is high. Although evidence demonstrates that adult exposure to Cd causes changes in the immune system, there are limited reports of immunomodulatory effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. This study was designed to investigate the effects of prenatal exposure to Cd on the immune system of the offspring. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose of CdCl{sub 2} (10 ppm) and the effects on the immune system of the offspring were assessed at two time points following birth (2 and 7 weeks of age). Thymocyte and splenocyte phenotypes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Prenatal Cd exposure did not affect thymocyte populations at 2 and 7 weeks of age. In the spleen, the only significant effect on phenotype was a decrease in the number of macrophages in male offspring at both time points. Analysis of cytokine production by stimulated splenocytes demonstrated that prenatal Cd exposure decreased IL-2 and IL-4 production by cells from female offspring at 2 weeks of age. At 7 weeks of age, splenocyte IL-2 production was decreased in Cd-exposed males while IFN-γ production was decreased from both male and female Cd-exposed offspring. The ability of the Cd-exposed offspring to respond to immunization with a S. pneumoniae vaccine expressing T-dependent and T-independent streptococcal antigens showed marked increases in the levels of both T-dependent and T-independent serum antibody levels compared to control animals. CD4{sup +}FoxP3{sup +}CD25{sup +} (nTreg) cell percentages were increased in the spleen and thymus in all Cd-exposed offspring except in the female spleen where a decrease was seen. CD8{sup +}CD223{sup +} T cells were markedly decreased in the spleens in all offspring at 7 weeks of age. These findings suggest that even very low levels of Cd exposure during gestation can result in long term detrimental effects on the immune system of the offspring and these effects are to some extent sex-specific. -- Highlights: ► Prenatal exposure to Cd causes no thymocyte phenotype changes in the offspring ► Analysis of the splenocyte phenotype demonstrates a macrophage-specific effect only in male offspring ► The cytokine profiles suggest an effect on peripheral Th1 cells in female and to a lesser degree in male offspring ► There was a marked increase in serum anti-streptococcal antibody levels after immunization in both sexes ► There was a marked decrease in the numbers of splenic CD8{sup +}CD223{sup +} cells in both sexes.

  6. RELATIVISTIC (E > 0.6, > 2.0, AND > 4.0 MeV) ELECTRON ACCELERATION AT GEOSYNCHRONOUS ORBIT DURING HIGH-INTENSITY, LONG-DURATION, CONTINUOUS AE ACTIVITY (HILDCAA) EVENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajra, Rajkumar; Echer, Ezequiel; Gonzalez, Walter D.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Santolik, Ondrej

    2015-01-20

    Radiation-belt relativistic (E > 0.6, > 2.0, and > 4.0MeV) electron acceleration is studied for solar cycle 23 (1995-2008). High-intensity, long-duration, continuous AE activity (HILDCAA) events are considered as the basis of the analyses. All of the 35 HILDCAA events under study were found to be characterized by flux enhancements of magnetospheric relativistic electrons of all three energies compared to the pre-event flux levels. For the E > 2.0MeV electron fluxes, enhancement of >50% occurred during 100% of HILDCAAs. Cluster-4 passes were examined for electromagnetic chorus waves in the 5 < L < 10 and 0 < MLT < 12 region when wave data were available. Fully 100% of these HILDCAA cases were associated with enhanced whistler-mode chorus waves. The enhancements of E > 0.6, > 2.0, and > 4.0MeV electrons occurred ?1.0day, ?1.5days, and ?2.5days after the statistical HILDCAA onset, respectively. The statistical acceleration rates for the three energy ranges were ?1.8 10{sup 5}, 2.2 10{sup 3}, and 1.0 10{sup 1} cm{sup 2} s{sup 1} sr{sup 1} d{sup 1}, respectively. The relativistic electron-decay timescales were determined to be ?7.7, 5.5, and 4.0days for the three energy ranges, respectively. The HILDCAAs were divided into short-duration (D ? 3days) and long-duration (D > 3days) events to study the dependence of relativistic electron variation on HILDCAA duration. For long-duration events, the flux enhancements during HILDCAAs with respect to pre-event fluxes were ?290%, 520%, and 82% for E > 0.6, > 2.0, and > 4.0MeV electrons, respectively. The enhancements were ?250%, 400%, and 27% respectively, for short-duration events. The results are discussed with respect to the current understanding of radiation-belt dynamics.

  7. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Singly and Doubly Charged Higher Fullerenes at Low Temperatures: C76-, C78-, C84- and C76(2-), C78(2-), C84(2-)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xue B.; Woo, Hin-koon; Yang, Jie; Kappes, Manfred M.; Wang, Lai S.

    2007-12-06

    Photoelectron spectroscopy of vibrationally cold singly and doubly charged higher fullerenes, Cn and Cn2 (n = 76, 78, and 84), has been investigated at several photon energies. Vibrationally resolved spectra are obtained for both the singly and doubly charged species and for n = 78 and 84 transitions from different isomers are also observed. The electron affinities (EAs) of C76, C78, and C84 are accurately determined to be 2.9750.010 eV for C76, 3.200.01 eV for C78(C2v), 3.1650.010 eV for C78(D3), 3.230.02 for C78(C2v), 3.1850.010 eV for C84(D2), and 3.260.02 eV for C84(D2d). The second EAs of the higher fullerenes, which represent the electronic stability of the doubly charged anions, are measured to be 0.3250.010 eV for C76, 0.440.02 eV for C78(C2v), 0.530.02 eV for C78(D3), 0.600.04 eV for C78(C2v), 0.6150.010 eV for C84(D2d), and 0.820.01 eV for C84(D2). The spectra of the dianions are observed to be similar to that of the singly charged anions, suggesting that the charging induces relatively small structural changes to the fullerene cages. The onsite Coulomb repulsions in the doubly charged fullerenes are directly measured from the differences of the first and second EAs and reveal strong correlation effects between the two extra electrons. The repulsive Coulomb barriers in the doubly charged fullerenes are estimated from the cutoff in the photoelectron spectra and are found to be consistent with estimates from an electrostatic model.

  8. Carbocation Stability in H-ZSM5 at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, Glen A.; Cheng, Lei; Bu, Lintao; Kim, Seonah; Robichaud, David J.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2015-10-26

    Zeolites are common catalysts for multiple industrial applications, including alcohol dehydration to produce olefins, and given their commercial importance, reaction mechanisms in zeolites have long been proposed and studied. Some proposed reaction mechanisms for alcohol dehydration exhibit noncyclic carbocation intermediates or transition states that resemble carbocations, and several previous studies suggest that the tert-butyl cation is the only noncyclic cation more stable than the corresponding chemisorbed species with the hydrocarbon bound to the framework oxygen (i.e., an alkoxide). To determine if carbocations can exist at high temperatures in zeolites, where these catalysts are finding new applications for biomass vapor-phase upgrading (~500 C), the stability of carbocations and the corresponding alkoxides were calculated with two ONIOM embedding methods (M06-2X/6-311G(d,p):M06-2X/3-21G) and (PBE-D3/6-311G(d,p):PBE-D3/3-21G) and plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) using the PBE functional corrected with entropic and TkatchenkoScheffler van der Waals corrections. Additionally, the embedding methods tested are unreliable at finding minima for primary carbocations, and only secondary or higher carbocations can be described with embedding methods consistent with the periodic DFT results. The relative energy between the carbocations and alkoxides differs significantly between the embedding and the periodic DFT methods. The difference is between ~0.23 and 14.30 kcal/mol depending on the molecule, the model, and the functional chosen for the embedding method. At high temperatures, the pw-DFT calculations predict that the allyl, isopropyl, and sec-butyl cations exhibit negligible populations while acetyl and tert-butyl cations exhibit significant populations (>10%). Furthermore, the periodic DFT results indicate that mechanisms including secondary and tertiary carbocations intermediates or carbocations stabilized by adjacent oxygen or double bonds are possible at high temperatures relevant to some industrial uses of zeolite catalysts, although as the minority species in most cases.

  9. Two-phase frictional pressure drop of R-134a and R-410A refrigerant-oil mixtures in straight tubes and U-type wavy tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ing Youn; Wu, Yu-Shi; Chang, Yu-Juei; Wang, Chi-Chuan

    2007-02-15

    This study presents single-phase and two-phase pressure drop data for R-134a/oil mixture flowing in a wavy tube with inner diameter of D=5.07mm and curvature ratio 2R/D=5.18 and R-410A/oil mixture flowing in a wavy tube of D=3.25mm and 2R/D=3.91. Both mixtures have oil concentration C=0%, 1%, 3% and 5% for the tests. The ratio of frictional factor between U-bend in wavy tube and straight tube (f{sub C}/f{sub S}) is about 3.5 for Re<2500 and is approximate 2.5 for Re=3500-25,000 for oil and liquid R-134a mixture flowing in the 5.07mm diameter wavy tube. The influence of oil concentration on single-phase friction factor is negligible, provided that the properties are based on the mixture of lubricant and refrigerant. The ratio between two-phase pressure gradients of U-bend and straight tube is about 2.5-3.5. This ratio is increased with oil concentration and vapor quality. The influence of oil is augmented at a higher mass flux for liquid spreading around the periphery at an annular flow pattern. Moreover, the influence of lubricant becomes more evident of a U-bend configuration. This is associated the induced swirled flow motion and an early change of flow pattern from stratified to annular flow pattern. The frictional two-phase multiplier for straight tube can be fairly correlated by using the Chisholm correlation for the data having Martinelli parameter X between 0.05 and 1.0. Fridel correlation also shows a good agreement with a mean deviation of 17.6% to all the straight tube data. For the two-phase pressure drop in U-bend, the revised Geary correlation agrees very well with the R-134a and R-410A oil-refrigerant data with a mean deviation of 16.4%. (author)

  10. Effects of chemo-mechanical polishing on CdZnTe X-ray and gamma-ray detectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Egarievwe, Stephen E.; Hossain, Anwar; Okwechime, Ifechukwude O.; Gul, Rubi; James, Ralph B.

    2015-06-23

    Here, mechanically polishing cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) wafers for x-ray and gamma-ray detectors often is inadequate in removing surface defects caused by cutting them from the ingots. Fabrication-induced defects, such as surface roughness, dangling bonds, and nonstoichiometric surfaces, often are reduced through polishing and etching the surface. In our earlier studies of mechanical polishing with alumina powder, etching with hydrogen bromide in hydrogen peroxide solution, and chemomechanical polishing with bromine–methanol–ethylene glycol solution, we found that the chemomechanical polishing process produced the least surface leakage current. In this research, we focused on using two chemicals to chemomechanically polish CdZnTe wafers aftermore » mechanical polishing, viz. bromine–methanol–ethylene glycol (BME) solution, and hydrogen bromide (HBr) in a hydrogen peroxide and ethylene–glycol solution. We used x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), current–voltage (I–V) measurements, and Am-241 spectral response measurements to characterize and compare the effects of each solution. The results show that the HBr-based solution produced lower leakage current than the BME solution. Results from using the same chemomechanical polishing solution on two samples confirmed that the surface treatment affects the measured bulk current (a combination of bulk and surface currents). XPS results indicate that the tellurium oxide to tellurium peak ratios for the mechanical polishing process were reduced significantly by chemomechanical polishing using the BME solution (78.9% for Te 3d5/2O2 and 76.7% for Te 3d3/2O2) compared with the HBr-based solution (27.6% for Te 3d5/2O2 and 35.8% for Te 3d3/2O2). Spectral response measurements showed that the 59.5-keV peak of Am-241 remained under the same channel number for all three CdZnTe samples. While the BME-based solution gave a better performance of 7.15% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) compared with 7.59% FWHM for the HBr-based solution, the latter showed a smaller variation in performance of 0.39% FWHM over 7 days compared with 0.69% for the BME-based solution.« less

  11. Ab initio calculation of the electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martiniano, Hugo F. M. C.; Galamba, Nuno; Cabral, Benedito J. Costa; Departamento de Qumica e Bioqumica, Faculdade de Cincias, Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa; Instituto de Fsica da Universidade de So Paulo, CP 66318, 05314-970 So Paulo, SP

    2014-04-28

    The electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water was investigated by coupling a one-body energy decomposition scheme to configurations generated by classical and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD). A Frenkel exciton Hamiltonian formalism was adopted and the excitation energies in the liquid phase were calculated with the equation of motion coupled cluster with single and double excitations method. Molecular dynamics configurations were generated by different approaches. Classical MD were carried out with the TIP4P-Ew and AMOEBA force fields. The BLYP and BLYP-D3 exchange-correlation functionals were used in BOMD. Theoretical and experimental results for the electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water are in good agreement. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the structure of liquid water predicted by the different models and the electronic absorption spectrum. The theoretical gas to liquid phase blue-shift of the peak positions of the electronic absorption spectrum is in good agreement with experiment. The overall shift is determined by a competition between the OH stretching of the water monomer in liquid water that leads to a red-shift and polarization effects that induce a blue-shift. The results illustrate the importance of coupling many-body energy decomposition schemes to molecular dynamics configurations to carry out ab initio calculations of the electronic properties in liquid phase.

  12. Ternary superlattice boosting interface-stabilized magnetic chirality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Gong; Schmid, Andreas K.; N'Diaye, Alpha T.; Wu, Yizheng

    2015-02-09

    In cobalt-nickel multilayers grown on iridium surfaces, magnetic homo-chirality can be stabilized by Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions (DMI) at the interface with the substrate. When thickness of the multilayers is increased beyond threshold values, then non-chiral bulk properties exceed interface contributions and this type of chirality vanishes. Here, we use spin-polarized low energy electron microscopy to measure these thickness thresholds, and we determine estimates of the strength of the DMI from the measurements. Even though the same 5d heavy metal is used as a substrate, a remarkably large variation is found between the two 3d magnets: our results indicate that the strength of the DMI at Co/Ir interfaces is three times larger than at Ni/Ir interfaces. We show how this finding provides ways to extend interfacial-DMI stabilization of domain wall chirality to 3d/5d/3d ternary multilayers such as [Ni/Ir/Co]{sub n}. Such strategies may extend chirality-control to larger film thickness and a wider range of substrates, which may be useful for designing new spintronics devices.

  13. Electron heating enhancement by frequency-chirped laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazdani, E.; Afarideh, H.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.; Riazi, Z.; Hora, H.

    2014-09-14

    Propagation of a chirped laser pulse with a circular polarization through an uprising plasma density profile is studied by using 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulation. The laser penetration depth is increased in an overdense plasma compared to an unchirped pulse. The induced transparency due to the laser frequency chirp results in an enhanced heating of hot electrons as well as increased maximum longitudinal electrostatic field at the back side of the solid target, which is very essential in target normal sheath acceleration regime of proton acceleration. For an applied chirp parameter between 0.008 and 0.01, the maximum amount of the electrostatic field is improved by a factor of 2. Furthermore, it is noticed that for a chirped laser pulse with a?=5, because of increasing the plasma transparency length, the laser pulse can penetrate up to about n{sub e}?6n{sub c}, where n{sub c} is plasma critical density. It shows 63% increase in the effective critical density compared to the relativistic induced transparency regime for an unchirped condition.

  14. DISCOVERY OF A NEW FAINT DWARF GALAXY ASSOCIATED WITH NGC253

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sand, D. J.; Crnojevi?, D.; Strader, J.; Toloba, E.; Guhathakurta, P.; Caldwell, N.; McLeod, B.; Seth, A. C.

    2014-09-20

    We report the discovery of a new faint dwarf galaxy, which we dub Scl-MM-Dw1, at a projected distance of ?65kpc from the spiral galaxy NGC253. The discovery results from the Panoramic Imaging Survey of Centaurus and Sculptor (PISCeS), a program with the Magellan/Megacam imager to study faint substructure in resolved stellar light around massive galaxies outside of the Local Group. We measure a tip of the red giant branch distance to Scl-MM-Dw1 of D=3.90.5Mpc, consistent with that of NGC253, making their association likely. The new dwarf's stellar population is complex, with an old, metal-poor red giant branch (?10Gyr, [Fe/H]?2), and an asymptotic giant branch with an age of ?500Myr. Scl-MM-Dw1 has a half-light radius of r{sub h} =34050pc and an absolute magnitude of M{sub V} = 10.30.6mag, comparable to the Milky Way's satellites at the same luminosity. Once complete, our imaging survey of NGC253 and other nearby massive galaxies will provide a census of faint substructure in halos beyond the Local Group, both to put our own environment into context and to confront models of hierarchical structure formation.

  15. Addendum to the remedial investigation report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, Spoil Area 1, and SY-200 Yard) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Main text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    This addendum to the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was prepared in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for reporting the results of a site characterization for public review. This addendum is a supplement to a document that was previously issued in January 1995 and that provided the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of the 1993 investigation performed at OU 2. The January 1995 D2 version of the RI Report on Bear Creek Valley OU 2 included information on risk assessments that have evaluated impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in the document formed the basis for the development of the Feasibility Study Report. This addendum includes revisions to four chapters of information that were a part of the document issued in January 1995. Specifically, it includes revisions to Chaps. 2, 3, 4, and 9. Volume 1 of this document is not being reissued in its entirety as a D3 version because only the four chapters just mentioned have been affected by requested changes. Note also that Volume 2 of this RI Report on Bear Creek Valley OU 2 is not being reissued in conjunction with Volume 1 of this document because there have been no changes requested or made to the previously issued version of Volume 2 of this document.

  16. Constraints on the progenitor system of the type Ia supernova 2014J from pre-explosion Hubble space telescope imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Patrick L.; Fox, Ori D.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Shen, Ken J.; Zheng, WeiKang; Graham, Melissa L.; Tucker, Brad E.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Schaefer, Gail

    2014-07-20

    We constrain the properties of the progenitor system of the highly reddened Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2014J in Messier 82 (M82; d ? 3.5 Mpc). We determine the supernova (SN) location using Keck-II K-band adaptive optics images, and we find no evidence for flux from a progenitor system in pre-explosion near-ultraviolet through near-infrared Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images. Our upper limits exclude systems having a bright red giant companion, including symbiotic novae with luminosities comparable to that of RS Ophiuchi. While the flux constraints are also inconsistent with predictions for comparatively cool He-donor systems (T ? 35,000 K), we cannot preclude a system similar to V445 Puppis. The progenitor constraints are robust across a wide range of R{sub V} and A{sub V} values, but significantly greater values than those inferred from the SN light curve and spectrum would yield proportionally brighter luminosity limits. The comparatively faint flux expected from a binary progenitor system consisting of white dwarf stars would not have been detected in the pre-explosion HST imaging. Infrared HST exposures yield more stringent constraints on the luminosities of very cool (T < 3000 K) companion stars than was possible in the case of SN Ia 2011fe.

  17. Radiation-induced defects in GaN bulk grown by halide vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duc, Tran Thien; Pozina, Galia; Son, Nguyen Tien; Janzn, Erik; Hemmingsson, Carl; Ohshima, Takeshi

    2014-09-08

    Defects induced by electron irradiation in thick free-standing GaN layers grown by halide vapor phase epitaxy were studied by deep level transient spectroscopy. In as-grown materials, six electron traps, labeled D2 (E{sub C}0.24?eV), D3 (E{sub C}0.60?eV), D4 (E{sub C}0.69?eV), D5 (E{sub C}0.96?eV), D7 (E{sub C}1.19?eV), and D8, were observed. After 2?MeV electron irradiation at a fluence of 1??10{sup 14?}cm{sup ?2}, three deep electron traps, labeled D1 (E{sub C}0.12?eV), D5I (E{sub C}0.89?eV), and D6 (E{sub C}1.14?eV), were detected. The trap D1 has previously been reported and considered as being related to the nitrogen vacancy. From the annealing behavior and a high introduction rate, the D5I and D6 centers are suggested to be related to primary intrinsic defects.

  18. When Spreadsheets Become Software - Quality Control Challenges and Approaches - 13360

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fountain, Stefanie A.; Chen, Emmie G.; Beech, John F.; Wyatt, Elizabeth E.; Quinn, Tanya B.; Seifert, Robert W.

    2013-07-01

    As part of a preliminary waste acceptance criteria (PWAC) development, several commercial models were employed, including the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance model (HELP) [1], the Disposal Unit Source Term - Multiple Species model (DUSTMS) [2], and the Analytical Transient One, Two, and Three-Dimensional model (AT123D) [3]. The results of these models were post-processed in MS Excel spreadsheets to convert the model results to alternate units, compare the groundwater concentrations to the groundwater concentration thresholds, and then to adjust the waste contaminant masses (based on average concentration over the waste volume) as needed in an attempt to achieve groundwater concentrations at the limiting point of assessment that would meet the compliance concentrations while maximizing the potential use of the landfill (i.e., maximizing the volume of projected waste being generated that could be placed in the landfill). During the course of the PWAC calculation development, one of the Microsoft (MS) Excel spreadsheets used to post-process the results of the commercial model packages grew to include more than 575,000 formulas across 18 worksheets. This spreadsheet was used to assess six base scenarios as well as nine uncertainty/sensitivity scenarios. The complexity of the spreadsheet resulted in the need for a rigorous quality control (QC) procedure to verify data entry and confirm the accuracy of formulas. (authors)

  19. Kinetic mix mechanisms in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; Hoffman, N.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; et al

    2014-05-19

    Shock-driven implosions of thin-shell capsules, or ''exploding pushers,'' generate low-density, high-temperature plasmas in which hydrodynamic instability growth is negligible and kinetic effects can play an important role. Data from implosions of thin deuterated-plastic shells with hydroequivalent D3He gas fills ranging from pure deuterium to pure 3He [H. G. Rinderknecht et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 135001 (2014)] were obtained to evaluate non-hydrodynamic fuel-shell mix mechanisms. Simulations of the experiments including reduced ion kinetic models support ion diffusion as an explanation for these data. Several additional kinetic mechanisms are investigated and compared to the data to determine which are important inmore » the experiments. Shock acceleration of shell deuterons is estimated to introduce mix less than or comparable to the amount required to explain the data. Beam-target mechanisms are found to produce yields at most an order of magnitude less than the observations« less

  20. Measurement of the triple-differential cross section for photon+jets production in proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2013-06-03

    A measurement of the triple-differential cross section,more » $$ {{{{{\\mathrm{d}}^3}\\sigma }} \\left/ {{\\left( {\\mathrm{d}\\mathrm{p}_T^{\\gamma}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\gamma }}\\mathrm{d}{\\eta^{\\mathrm{jet}}}} \\right)}} \\right.} $$ , in photon + jets final states using a data sample from proton-proton collisions at $$ \\sqrt{s} $$ = 7 TeV is presented. This sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.14 fb$$^{-1}$$ collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. Photons and jets are reconstructed within a pseudorapidity range of |η| < 2.5, and are required to have transverse momenta in the range 40 < $$ p_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{jet}} $$ < 300 GeV and $$ p_{\\mathrm{T}}^{\\mathrm{jet}} $$ > 30 GeV, respectively. The measurements are compared to theoretical predictions from the sherpa leading-order QCD Monte Carlo event generator and the next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculation from jetphox. Lastly, the predictions are found to be consistent with the data over most of the examined kinematic region.« less

  1. High-efficiency acceleration in the laser wakefield by a linearly increasing plasma density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Kegong; Wu, Yuchi; Zhu, Bin; Zhang, Zhimeng; Zhao, Zongqing; Zhou, Weimin; Hong, Wei; Cao, Leifeng; Gu, Yuqiu

    2014-12-15

    The acceleration length and the peak energy of the electron beam are limited by the dephasing effect in the laser wakefield acceleration with uniform plasma density. Based on 2D-3V particle in cell simulations, the effects of a linearly increasing plasma density on the electron acceleration are investigated broadly. Comparing with the uniform plasma density, because of the prolongation of the acceleration length and the gradually increasing accelerating field due to the increasing plasma density, the electron beam energy is twice higher in moderate nonlinear wakefield regime. Because of the lower plasma density, the linearly increasing plasma density can also avoid the dark current caused by additional injection. At the optimal acceleration length, the electron energy can be increased from 350 MeV (uniform) to 760 MeV (linearly increasing) with the energy spread of 1.8%, the beam duration is 5 fs and the beam waist is 1.25 μm. This linearly increasing plasma density distribution can be achieved by a capillary with special gas-filled structure, and is much more suitable for experiment.

  2. Ab initio many-body calculations of nucleon-4He scattering with three-nucleon forces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hupin, Guillaume; Langhammer, Joachim; Navratil, Petr; Quaglioni, Sofia; Calci, Angelo; Roth, Robert

    2013-11-27

    We extend the ab initio no-core shell model/resonating-group method to include three-nucleon (3N) interactions for the description of nucleon-nucleus collisions. We outline the formalism, give algebraic expressions for the 3N-force integration kernels, and discuss computational aspects of two alternative implementations. The extended theoretical framework is then applied to nucleon-4He elastic scattering using similarity-renormalization-group (SRG)-evolved nucleon-nucleon plus 3N potentials derived from chiral effective field theory. We analyze the convergence properties of the calculated phase shifts and explore their dependence upon the SRG evolution parameter. We include up to six excited states of the 4He target and find significant effects from themore » inclusion of the chiral 3N force, e.g., it enhances the spin-orbit splitting between the 3/2– and 1/2– resonances and leads to an improved agreement with the phase shifts obtained from an accurate R-matrix analysis of the five-nucleon experimental data. As a result, we find remarkably good agreement with measured differential cross sections at various energies below the d+3H threshold, while analyzing powers manifest larger deviations from experiment for certain energies and angles.« less

  3. Model year 2010 Honda insight level-1 testing report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rask, E.; Bocci, D.; Duoba, M.; Lohse-Busch, H.

    2011-03-22

    As a part of the US Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), a model year 2010 Honda Insight was procured by eTec (Phoenix, AZ) and sent to ANL's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility for the purposes of vehicle-level testing in support of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). Data was acquired during testing using non-intrusive sensors, vehicle network information, and facilities equipment (emissions and dynamometer data). Standard drive cycles, performance cycles, steady-state cycles and A/C usage cycles were tested. Much of this data is openly available for download in ANL's Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D3). The major results are shown here in this report. Given the preliminary nature of this assessment, the majority of the testing was done over standard regulatory cycles and seeks to obtain a general overview of how the vehicle performs. These cycles include the US FTP cycle (Urban) and Highway Fuel Economy Test cycle as well as the US06, a more aggressive supplemental regulatory cycle. Data collection for this testing was kept at a fairly high level and includes emissions and fuel measurements from an exhaust emissions bench, high-voltage and accessory current and voltage from a DC power analyzer, and CAN bus data such as engine speed, engine load, and electric machine operation when available. The following sections will seek to explain some of the basic operating characteristics of the MY2010 Insight and provide insight into unique features of its operation and design.

  4. Exploration of the Transition from the Hydrodynamic-like to the Strongly Kinetic Regime in Shock-Driven Implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hoffman, N. M.; Amendt, P. A.; Atzeni, S.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Sio, H.; Johnson, M. Gatu; et al

    2014-05-05

    Clear evidence of the transition from hydrodynamiclike to strongly kinetic shock-driven implosions is, for the first time, revealed and quantitatively assessed. Implosions with a range of initial equimolar D3He gas densities show that as the density is decreased, hydrodynamic simulations strongly diverge from and increasingly over-predict the observed nuclear yields, from a factor of ~2 at 3.1 mg/cm3 to a factor of 100 at 0.14 mg/cm3. (The corresponding Knudsen number, the ratio of ion mean-free path to minimum shell radius, varied from 0.3 to 9; similarly, the ratio of fusion burn duration to ion diffusion time, another figure of meritmore » of kinetic effects, varied from 0.3 to 14.) This result is shown to be unrelated to the effects of hydrodynamic mix. As a first step to garner insight into this transition, a reduced ion kinetic (RIK) model that includes gradient-diffusion and loss-term approximations to several transport processes was implemented within the framework of a one-dimensional radiation-transport code. After empirical calibration, the RIK simulations reproduce the observed yield trends, largely as a result of ion diffusion and the depletion of the reacting tail ions.« less

  5. Reaction Pathways and Energetics of Etheric C−O Bond Cleavage Catalyzed by Lanthanide Triflates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Atesin, Abdurrahman C.; Li, Zhi; Curtiss, Larry A.; Marks, Tobin J.

    2013-07-15

    Efficient and selective cleavage of etheric C−O bonds is crucial for converting biomass into platform chemicals and liquid transportation fuels. In this contribution, computational methods at the DFT B3LYP level of theory are employed to understand the efficacy of lanthanide triflate catalysts (Ln(OTf)3, Ln = La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Yb, and Lu) in cleaving etheric C−O bonds. In agreement with experiment, the calculations indicate that the reaction pathway for C−O cleavage occurs via a C−H → O−H proton transfer in concert with weakening of the C−O bond of the coordinated ether substrate to ultimately yield a coordinated alkenol. The activation energy for this process falls as the lanthanide ionic radius decreases, reflecting enhanced metal ion electrophilicity. Details of the reaction mechanism for Yb(OTf)3-catalyzed ring opening are explored in depth, and for 1-methyl-d3-butyl phenyl ether, the computed primary kinetic isotope effect of 2.4 is in excellent agreement with experiment (2.7), confirming that etheric ring-opening pathway involves proton transfer from the methyl group alpha to the etheric oxygen atom, which is activated by the electrophilic lanthanide ion. Calculations of the catalytic pathway using eight different ether substrates indicate that the more rapid cleavage of acyclic versus cyclic ethers is largely due to entropic effects, with the former C−O bond scission processes increasing the degrees of freedom/particles as the transition state is approached.

  6. In vivo generator for radioimmunotherapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mausner, Leonard F.; Srivastava, Suresh G.; Straub, Rita F.

    1988-01-01

    The present invention involves labeling monoclonal antibodies with intermediate half-life radionuclides which decay to much shorter half-life daughters with desirable high energy beta emissions. Since the daughter will be in equilibrium with the parent, it can exert an in-situ tumoricidal effect over a prolonged period in a localized fashion, essentially as an "in-vivo generator". This approach circumvents the inverse relationship between half-life and beta decay energy. Compartmental modeling was used to determine the relative distribution of dose from both parent and daughter nuclei in target and non-target tissues. Actual antibody biodistribution data have been used to fit realistic rate constants for a model containing tumor, blood, and non-tumor compartments. These rate constants were then used in a variety of simulations for two generator systems, Ba-128/Cs-128 (t.sub.1/2 =2.4d/3.6m) and Pd-112/Ag-112 (t.sub.1/2 =0.9d/192m). The results show that higher tumor/background dose ratios may be achievable by virtue of the rapid excretion of a chemically different daughter during the uptake and clearance phases. This modeling also quantitatively demonstrates the favorable impact on activity distribution of a faster monoclonal antibody tumor uptake, especially when the antibody is labeled with a radionuclide with a comparable half-life.

  7. Absorptivity of semiconductors used in the production of solar cell panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosyachenko, L. A. Grushko, E. V.; Mikityuk, T. I.

    2012-04-15

    The dependence of the absorptivity of semiconductors on the thickness of the absorbing layer is studied for crystalline silicon (c-Si), amorphous silicon (a-Si), cadmium telluride (CdTe), copper indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}, CIS), and copper gallium diselenide (CuGaSe{sub 2}, CGS). The calculations are performed with consideration for the spectral distribution of AM1.5 standard solar radiation and the absorption coefficients of the materials. It is shown that, in the region of wavelengths {lambda} = {lambda}{sub g} = hc/E{sub g}, almost total absorption of the photons in AM1.5 solar radiation is attained in c-Si at the thickness d = 7-8 mm, in a-Si at d = 30-60 {mu}m, in CdTe at d = 20-30 {mu}m, and in CIS and CGS at d = 3-4 {mu}m. The results differ from previously reported data for these materials (especially for c-Si). In previous publications, the thickness needed for the semiconductor to absorb solar radiation completely was identified with the effective light penetration depth at a certain wavelength in the region of fundamental absorption for the semiconductor.

  8. Entropy of near-extremal black holes in AdS5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, Joan; Balasubramanian, Vijay; de Boer, Jan; Jejjala, Vishnu; Simon, Joan

    2007-07-24

    We construct the microstates of near-extremal black holes in AdS_5 x S5 as gases of defects distributed in heavy BPS operators in the dual SU(N) Yang-Mills theory. These defects describe open strings on spherical D3-branes in the S5, and we show that they dominate the entropy by directly enumerating them and comparing the results with a partition sum calculation. We display new decoupling limits in which the field theory of the lightest open strings on the D-branes becomes dual to a near-horizon region of the black hole geometry. In the single-charge black hole we find evidence for an infrared duality between SU(N) Yang-Mills theories that exchanges the rank of the gauge group with an R-charge. In the two-charge case (where pairs of branes intersect on a line), the decoupled geometry includes an AdS_3 factor with a two-dimensional CFT dual. The degeneracy in this CFT accounts for the black hole entropy. In the three-charge case (where triples of branes intersect at a point), the decoupled geometry contains an AdS_2 factor. Below a certain critical mass, the two-charge system displays solutions with naked timelike singularities even though they do not violate a BPS bound. We suggest a string theoretic resolution of these singularities.

  9. Hyperfine-induced spin relaxation of a diffusively moving carrier in low dimensions: Implications for spin transport in organic semiconductors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mkhitaryan, V. V.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2015-08-24

    The hyperfine coupling between the spin of a charge carrier and the nuclear spin bath is a predominant channel for the carrier spin relaxation in many organic semiconductors. We theoretically investigate the hyperfine-induced spin relaxation of a carrier performing a random walk on a d-dimensional regular lattice, in a transport regime typical for organic semiconductors. We show that in d=1 and 2, the time dependence of the space-integrated spin polarization P(t) is dominated by a superexponential decay, crossing over to a stretched-exponential tail at long times. The faster decay is attributed to multiple self-intersections (returns) of the random-walk trajectories, whichmore » occur more often in lower dimensions. We also show, analytically and numerically, that the returns lead to sensitivity of P(t) to external electric and magnetic fields, and this sensitivity strongly depends on dimensionality of the system (d=1 versus d=3). We investigate in detail the coordinate dependence of the time-integrated spin polarization σ(r), which can be probed in the spin-transport experiments with spin-polarized electrodes. We also demonstrate that, while σ(r) is essentially exponential, the effect of multiple self-intersections can be identified in transport measurements from the strong dependence of the spin-decay length on the external magnetic and electric fields.« less

  10. Decontamination systems information and research program. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    Progress reports are given on the following projects: (A) Subsurface contaminants, containment and remediation: 1.1 Characteristic evaluation of grout barriers in grout testing chamber; 1.2 Development of standard test protocols and barrier design models for desiccation barriers; 1.3 Development of standard test protocols and barrier design models for in-situ formed barriers -- technical support; 1.4 Laboratory studies and field testing at the DOE/RMI Extrusion Plant (Ashtabula, Ohio); 1.5 Use of drained enhanced soil flushing for contaminants removal; (B) Mixed waste characterization, treatment and disposal: Analysis of the Vortec cyclone melting system for remediation of PCB contaminated soils using computational fluid dynamics; (C) Decontamination and decommissioning: 3.1 Production and evaluation of biosorbents and cleaning solutions for use in D and D; 3.2 Use of Spintek centrifugal membrane technology and sorbents/cleaning solutions in the D and D of DOE facilities; (D) Cross-cutting innovative technologies: 4.1 Use of centrifugal membrane technology with novel membranes to treat hazardous/radioactive wastes; 4.2 Environmental pollution control devices based on novel forms of carbon; 4.3 Design of rotating membrane filtration system for remediation technologies; and (E) Outreach: Small business technical based support.

  11. Dependence of the Electron Beam Energy and Types of Surface to Determine EBSD Indexing Reliability in Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2012-04-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a powerful technique for the surface microstructure analysis. EBSD analysis of cubic yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) in two and three dimensions (2-D, 3-D) is demonstrated using sequential slicing from a focused ion beam (FIB) followed by EBSD mapping to represent 3-D reconstructed high density grain structure with random orientation. The statistics related to accuracy of EBSD band detection shows that probability of accurate grain orientation detection increased significantly when the electron beam energy is increased from 10 kV to 30 kV. As a result of better sampling with increased interaction volume, a disparity between local and average grain orientation angle also exhibited the dependence of the electron beam energy to determine the accuracy of grain orientation. To study the accuracy and quality of EBSD band detection as a function of surface roughness and over layer formation, rapid EBSD measurement tests are performed on (a) YSZ surfaces ion-polished at ion beam energies of 65 nA at 30 kV and 1 nA at 30 kV and (b) carbon coated versus uncoated YSZ surfaces. The EBSD results at both 10 kV and 30 kV electron beam energies indicate that EBSD band detection accuracy is negatively affected by surface roughness and amorphous over layer formation.

  12. Discussion series on PURPA related topics: load management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturgeon, J I

    1980-08-01

    The Discussion Series on PURPA Related Topics is composed of five volumes: Metering, Billing, Information to Customers, Load Management Techniques and Master Metering. These reports are based on twenty-five Demonstration and Implementation projects sponsored and directed during the past five years by the US Department of Energy, Office of Utility Systems. Each of the topics bears directly on one or more of the federal standards contained in the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA). This volume, Load Management Techniques, relates primarily to the Time-of-Day rates standard, PURPA IB(d)3. The experiences related in this report deal, in part, with the procedures and equipment which are affected when time-of-day rates are implemented. One goal of this report is to describe how people in a variety of settings have dealt with the many practical issues in load management. Another is to highlight the lessons and summarize the experiences of the Project participants. This report does not stand as a manual nor provide prescriptive guidelines on how to deal with the topic. Rather it offers an account for those charged with the responsibility of implementing PURPA requirements to learn from the insights and problems which occurred during the Rate Demonstration projects.

  13. Discussion series on PURPA related topics: information to customers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturgeon, J I

    1980-08-01

    This volume relates primarily to Time-of-Day rates standard, PURPA IB(d)3, and deals with the content and methods of providing rate and conservation information to customers when Time-of-Day rates are used. Information to customers in the Demonstration and Pilot Projects fell mainly into four categories: administrative communications; explanations of new rate structures; information and advice on load management; and facts, recommendations and encouragements about energy conservation and end-use improvement. Administrative communications were about such matters as the existence of Projects, their funding, their periods of performance, the selection of their test customers, conditions of participation, procedural changes during the tests, and the time and conditions of ending the tests. These communications were important to good customer cooperation. All Demonstration Projects devoted considerable effort to the crucial task of clearly explaining the rationale of Time-of-Use (TOU) pricing and the test rate structures. The Projects then presented the concept of TOU pricing as a means of (a) fairly charging customers the true cost of their electricity and (b) rewarding them for shifting consumption to times when costs are less. For the most part, Demonstration Projects gave specific information on the individual customer's own rate structure and none on any others that were under test. The information was presented in face-to-face interviews, group presentations, television, radio, and print media, and traveling exhibits. The results are evaluated. (LCL)

  14. Energy levels, oscillator strengths, and radiative rates for Si-like Zn XVII, Ga XVIII, Ge XIX, and As XX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abou El-Maaref, A.; Allam, S.H.; El-Sherbini, Th.M.

    2014-01-15

    The energy levels, oscillator strengths, line strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the terms belonging to the 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 2}, 3s3p{sup 3}, 3s{sup 2}3p3d, 3s{sup 2}3p4s, 3s{sup 2}3p4p and 3s{sup 2}3p4d configurations of silicon-like ions (Zn XVII, Ga XVIII, Ge XIX, and As XX) have been calculated using the configuration-interaction code CIV3. The calculations have been carried out in the intermediate coupling scheme using the BreitPauli Hamiltonian. The present calculations have been compared with the available experimental data and other theoretical calculations. Most of our calculations of energy levels and oscillator strengths (in length form) show good agreement with both experimental and theoretical data. Lifetimes of the excited levels have also been calculated. -- Highlights: We have calculated the fine-structure energy levels of Si-like Zn, Ga, Ge and As. The calculations are performed using the configuration interaction method (CIV3). We have calculated the oscillator strengths, line strengths and transition rates. The wavelengths of the transitions are listed in this article. We also have made comparisons between our data and other calculations.

  15. Grande Ronde Basin Supplementation Program; Lostine River, 2000 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onjukka, Sam T.; Harbeck, Jim

    2003-03-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) identified supplementation as a high priority to achieve its goal of increasing runs of anadromous fish in the Columbia Basin. Supplementation activities in the Lostine River and associated monitoring and evaluation conducted by the Nez Perce Tribe relate directly to the needs addressed in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.4L.1 of the Program mandates that appropriate research accompany any proposed supplementation. In addition, measure 7.3B.2 of the Program stresses the need for evaluating supplementation projects to assess their ability to increase production. Finally, Section 7.4D.3 encourages the study of hatchery rearing and release strategies to improve survival and adaptation of cultured fish. In 1997, Oregon Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (ODFW) requested a modification of Permit 1011 to allow the take of adult spring chinook salmon. In 1998, the Nez Perce Tribe also requested a permit specific to activities on Lostine River. The permit was issued in 2000. A special condition in the permits required the development of a long term management plan for the spring chinook salmon of the Grande Ronde Basin. The Nez Perce Tribe, ODFW, and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) completed a formal long range plan entitled ''Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program''. The program proposes to increase the survival of spring chinook salmon in the Grand Ronde Basin through hatchery intervention. Adult salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, and the Upper Grande Ronde River are used for a conventional supplementation program in the basin. The Nez Perce program currently operates under the ESA Section 10 Permit 1149.

  16. Grande Ronde Basin Supplementation Program; Lostine River, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onjukka, Sam T.; Harbeck, Jim

    2003-03-01

    The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) identified supplementation as a high priority to achieve its goal of increasing runs of anadromous fish in the Columbia Basin. Supplementation activities in the Lostine River and associated monitoring and evaluation conducted by the Nez Perce Tribe relate directly to the needs addressed in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.4L.1 of the Program mandates that appropriate research accompany any proposed supplementation. In addition, measure 7.3B.2 of the Program stresses the need for evaluating supplementation projects to assess their ability to increase production. Finally, Section 7.4D.3 encourages the study of hatchery rearing and release strategies to improve survival and adaptation of cultured fish. In 1997, Oregon Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (ODFW) requested a modification of Permit 1011 to allow the take of adult spring chinook salmon. In 1998, the Nez Perce Tribe also requested a permit specific to activities on Lostine River. The permit was issued in 2000. A special condition in the permits required the development of a long term management plan for the spring chinook salmon of the Grande Ronde Basin. The Nez Perce Tribe, ODFW, and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) completed a formal long range plan entitled ''Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program''. The program proposes to increase the survival of spring chinook salmon in the Grand Ronde Basin through hatchery intervention. Adult salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, and the Upper Grande Ronde River are used for a conventional supplementation program in the basin. The Nez Perce program currently operates under the ESA Section 10 Permit 1149.

  17. Gasdynamic Model of Turbulent Combustion in TNT Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E

    2010-01-08

    A model is proposed to simulate turbulent combustion in confined TNT explosions. It is based on: (i) the multi-component gasdynamic conservation laws, (ii) a fast-chemistry model for TNT-air combustion, (iii) a thermodynamic model for frozen reactants and equilibrium products, (iv) a high-order Godunov scheme providing a non-diffusive solution of the governing equations, and (v) an ILES approach whereby adaptive mesh refinement is used to capture the energy bearing scales of the turbulence on the grid. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of explosion fields from 1.5-g PETN/TNT charges were performed. Explosions in six different chambers were studied: three calorimeters (volumes of 6.6-l, 21.2-l and 40.5-l with L/D = 1), and three tunnels (L/D = 3.8, 4.65 and 12.5 with volumes of 6.3-l) - to investigate the influence of chamber volume and geometry on the combustion process. Predicted pressures histories were quite similar to measured pressure histories for all cases studied. Experimentally, mass fraction of products, Y{sub p}{sup exp}, reached a peak value of 88% at an excess air ratio of twice stoichiometric, and then decayed with increasing air dilution; mass fractions Y{sub p}{sup calc} computed from the numerical simulations followed similar trends. Based on this agreement, we conclude that the dominant effect that controls the rate of TNT combustion with air is the turbulent mixing rate; the ILES approach along with the fast-chemistry model used here adequately captures this effect.

  18. Digital I and C system upgrade integration technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, H. W.; Shih, C.; Wang, J. R.; Huang, K. C.

    2012-07-01

    This work developed an integration technique for digital I and C system upgrade, the utility can replace the I and C systems step by step systematically by this method. Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) developed a digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C) replacement integration technique on the basis of requirement of the three existing nuclear power plants (NPPs), which are Chin-Shan (CS) NPP, Kuo-Sheng (KS) NPP, and Maanshan (MS) NPP, in Taiwan, and also developed the related Critical Digital Review (CDR) Procedure. The digital I and C replacement integration technique includes: (I) Establishment of Nuclear Power Plant Digital Replacement Integration Guideline, (2) Preliminary Investigation on I and C System Digitalization, (3) Evaluation on I and C System Digitalization, and (4) Establishment of I and C System Digitalization Architectures. These works can be a reference for performing I and C system digital replacement integration of the three existing NPPs of Taiwan Power Company (TPC). A CDR is the review for a critical system digital I and C replacement. The major reference of this procedure is EPRI TR- 1011710 (2005) 'Handbook for Evaluating Critical Digital Equipment and Systems' which was published by the Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI). With this document, INER developed a TPC-specific CDR procedure. Currently, CDR becomes one of the policies for digital I and C replacement in TPC. The contents of this CDR procedure include: Scope, Responsibility, Operation Procedure, Operation Flow Chart, CDR review items. The CDR review items include the comparison of the design change, Software Verification and Validation (SVandV), Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Evaluation of Diversity and Defense-in-depth (D3), Evaluation of Watchdog Timer, Evaluation of Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC), Evaluation of Grounding for System/Component, Seismic Evaluation, Witness and Inspection, Lessons Learnt from the Digital I and C Failure Events. A solid review can assure the quality of the digital I and C system replacement. (authors)

  19. Inhalation reproductive toxicology studies: Sperm morphology study of n-hexane in B6C3F1 mice: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mast, T.J.; Hackett, P.L.; Decker, J.R.; Westerberg, R.B.; Sasser, L.B.; McClanahan, B.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Evanoff, J.J.

    1988-08-01

    The straight-chain hydrocarbon, n-hexane, is a volatile, ubiquitous solvent routinely used in industrial environments. Although myelinated nerve tissue is the primary target organ of hexane, the testes have also been identified as being sensitive to hexacarbon exposure. The objective of this study was to evaluate the epididymal sperm morphology of male B6D3F1 mice 5 weeks after exposure to 0, 200, 1000, or 5000 ppM n-hexane, 20 h/day for 5 consecutive days. Two concurrent positive control groups of animals were injected intraperitoneally with either 200 or 250 mg/kg ethyl methanesulfonate, a known mutagen, once each day for 5 consecutive days. The mice were weighed just prior to the first day of exposure and at weekly intervals until sacrifice. During the fifth post-exposure week the animals were killed and examined for gross lesions of the reproductive tract and suspensions of the epididymal sperm were prepared for morphological evaluations. The appearance and behavior of the mice were unremarkable throughout the experiment and there were no deaths. No evidence of lesions in any organ was noted at sacrifice. Mean body weights of male mice exposed to n-hexane were not significantly different from those for the 0-ppM animals at any time during the study. Analyses of the sperm morphology data obtained 5 weeks post-exposure (the only time point examined) indicated that exposure of male mice to relatively high concentrations of n-hexane vapor for 5 days produced no significant effects on the morphology of sperm relative to that of the 0-ppM control group. 24 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Attenuation of acute nitrogen mustard-induced lung injury, inflammation and fibrogenesis by a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malaviya, Rama; Venosa, Alessandro; Hall, LeRoy; Gow, Andrew J.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-12-15

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a toxic vesicant known to cause damage to the respiratory tract. Injury is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In these studies we analyzed the effects of transient inhibition of iNOS using aminoguanidine (AG) on NM-induced pulmonary toxicity. Rats were treated intratracheally with 0.125 mg/kg NM or control. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and lung tissue were collected 1 d28 d later and lung injury, oxidative stress and fibrosis assessed. NM exposure resulted in progressive histopathological changes in the lung including multifocal lesions, perivascular and peribronchial edema, inflammatory cell accumulation, alveolar fibrin deposition, bronchiolization of alveolar septal walls, and fibrosis. This was correlated with trichrome staining and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) was also increased in the lung following NM exposure, along with levels of protein and inflammatory cells in BAL, consistent with oxidative stress and alveolar-epithelial injury. Both classically activated proinflammatory (iNOS{sup +} and cyclooxygenase-2{sup +}) and alternatively activated profibrotic (YM-1{sup +} and galectin-3{sup +}) macrophages appeared in the lung following NM administration; this was evident within 1 d, and persisted for 28 d. AG administration (50 mg/kg, 2 /day, 1 d3 d) abrogated NM-induced injury, oxidative stress and inflammation at 1 d and 3 d post exposure, with no effects at 7 d or 28 d. These findings indicate that nitric oxide generated via iNOS contributes to acute NM-induced lung toxicity, however, transient inhibition of iNOS is not sufficient to protect against pulmonary fibrosis. -- Highlights: ? Nitrogen mustard (NM) induces acute lung injury and fibrosis. ? Pulmonary toxicity is associated with increased expression of iNOS. ? Transient inhibition of iNOS attenuates acute lung injury induced by NM.

  1. Coligand-regulated assembly, fluorescence, and magnetic properties of Co(II) and Cd(II) complexes with a non-coplanar dicarboxylate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xin, Ling-Yun; Liu, Guang-Zhen; Ma, Lu-Fang; Wang, Li-Ya

    2013-10-15

    A non-coplanar dicarboxylate ndca (H{sub 2}ndca=5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid), combining with various dipyridyl-typed tectons, constructs six Cd(II)/Co(II) coordination polymers under hydrothermal conditions, namely [Co(ndca)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (1), ([Co(ndca)(bpe)(H{sub 2}O)]H{sub 2}O){sub n} (2), [Co(ndca)(bpa){sub 0.5}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (3), [Cd(ndca)(bpe)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} (4), ([Cd(ndca)(bpa)(H{sub 2}O)]0.5H{sub 2}O){sub n} (5), and ([Cd(ndca)(bpp) (H{sub 2}O)]H{sub 2}O){sub n} (6) (bpe=1,2-di(4-pyridyl)ethylene, bpa=1,2-bi(4-pyridyl)ethane, and bpp=1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane). All these compounds contain various metal(II)carboxylate motifs, including carboxylate binuclear (2, 4, 5), carboxylate chain (1, 6) and carboxylate layer (3), which are further extended by dipyridyl-typed coligands to afford a vast diversity of the structures with 2D pyknotic layers (1, 6), 2D open layer (5), 2D?3D interpenetrated networks (2,4), and 3D pillared-layer framework (3), respectively. In addition, fluorescent spectra of Cd(II) complexes and magnetic properties of Co(II) complexes are also given. - Graphical abstract: Six various cadmium(II)/cobalt(II)organic frameworks were constructed by 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid and different bis(pyridine) rod-like tectons, and Cd (II) complexes exhibit blueviolet emissions, whereas Co (II) complexes show antiferromagnetic behaviours. Display Omitted.

  2. TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC MODELING & INVERSION OF CO2 SATURATION FOR SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark A. Meadows

    2006-03-31

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into subsurface aquifers for geologic storage/sequestration, and into subsurface hydrocarbon reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery, has become an important topic to the nation because of growing concerns related to global warming and energy security. In this project we developed new ways to predict and quantify the effects of CO2 on seismic data recorded over porous reservoir/aquifer rock systems. This effort involved the research and development of new technology to: (1) Quantitatively model the rock physics effects of CO2 injection in porous saline and oil/brine reservoirs (both miscible and immiscible). (2) Quantitatively model the seismic response to CO2 injection (both miscible and immiscible) from well logs (1D). (3) Perform quantitative inversions of time-lapse 4D seismic data to estimate injected CO2 distributions within subsurface reservoirs and aquifers. This work has resulted in an improved ability to remotely monitor the injected CO2 for safe storage and enhanced hydrocarbon recovery, predict the effects of CO2 on time-lapse seismic data, and estimate injected CO2 saturation distributions in subsurface aquifers/reservoirs. We applied our inversion methodology to a 3D time-lapse seismic dataset from the Sleipner CO2 sequestration project, Norwegian North Sea. We measured changes in the seismic amplitude and traveltime at the top of the Sleipner sandstone reservoir and used these time-lapse seismic attributes in the inversion. Maps of CO2 thickness and its standard deviation were generated for the topmost layer. From this information, we estimated that 7.4% of the total CO2 injected over a five-year period had reached the top of the reservoir. This inversion approach could also be applied to the remaining levels within the anomalous zone to obtain an estimate of the total CO2 injected.

  3. Characterization of a Genuine Lron(V)-Nitrido Species By Nuclear Resonant Vibrational Spectroscopy Coupled to Density Functional Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrenko, T.; George, S.D.; Aliaga-Alcalde, N.; Bill, E.; Mienert, B.; Xiao, Y.; Guo, Y.; Sturhahn, W.; Cramer, S.P.; Wieghardt, K.; Neese, F.; /Bonn U., LTC /SLAC, SSRL /Max Planck Inst., Mulheim /UC, Davis /Argonne /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-10-19

    The characterization of high-valent iron species is of interest due to their relevance to biological reaction mechanisms. Recently, we have synthesized and characterized an [Fe(V)-nitrido-cyclam-acetato]+ complex, which has been characterized by M{umlt o}ssbauer, magnetic susceptibility data, and XAS spectroscopies combined with DFT calculations. The results of this study indicated that the [Fe(V)-nitrido-cyclam-acetato]+ complex is an unusual d3 system with a nearly orbitally degenerate S = 1/2 ground state. Although the calculations predicted fairly different Fe-N stretching frequencies for the S = 1/2 and the competing S = 3/2 ground states, a direct experimental determination of this important fingerprint quantity was missing. Here we apply synchrotron-based nuclear resonance vibrational scattering (NRVS) to characterize the Fe-N stretching frequency of an Fe(V)-nitrido complex and its Fe(III)-azide precursor. The NRVS data show a new isolated band at 864 cm-1 in the Fe(V)-nitrido complex that is absent in the precursor. The NRVS spectra are fit and simulated using a DFT approach, and the new feature is unambiguously assigned to a Fe(V)-N stretch. The calculated Fe-N stretching frequency is too high by {approx}75 cm-1. Anharmonic contributions to the Fe-N stretching frequency have been evaluated and have been found to be small (-5.5 cm-1). The NRVS data provided a unique opportunity to obtain this vibrational information, which had eluded characterization by more traditional vibrational spectroscopies.

  4. Gold(I) chloride adducts of 1,3-bis(di-2-pyridylphosphino)propane: synthesis, structural studies and antitumour activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphreys, Anthony S.; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Berners-Price, Susan J.; Koutsantonis, George A.; Skelton, Brian W.; White, Allan H.

    2008-06-30

    The novel water soluble bidentate phosphine ligand 1,3-bis(di-2-pyridylphosphino)propane (d2pypp) has been synthesized by a convenient route involving treatment of 2-pyridyllithium with Cl{sub 2}P(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}PCl{sub 2} and isolation in crystalline form as the hydrochloride salt. The synthesis of the precursor Cl{sub 2}P(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}PCl{sub 2} has been optimized by the use of triphosgene as the chlorinating agent. The 2:1 and 1:2 AuCl:d2pypp adducts have been synthesized and characterized by NMR spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray studies, and shown to be of the form (AuCl){sub 2}({mu}-d2pypp-P,P{prime}) and Au(d2pypp-P,P{prime}){sub 2}Cl(-3.75H{sub 2}O), respectively. The latter is more lipophilic than analogous 1:2 adducts of gold(I) chloride with the diphosphine ligands 1,2-bis(di-n-pyridylphosphino)ethane (dnpype) for n = 2, 3 and 4, based on measurement of the n-octanol-water partition coefficient (log P = -0.46). A single crystal structure determination of the 1:2 Au(I) complex of the 3-pyridyl ethane ligand shows it to be of the form [Au(d3pype-P,P{prime}){sub 2}]Cl {center_dot} 5H{sub 2}O. The in vitro cytotoxic activity of [Au(d2pypp){sub 2}]Cl was assessed in human normal and cancer breast cells and selective toxicity to the cancer cells found. The significance of these results to the antitumour properties of chelated 1:2 Au(I) diphosphine complexes is discussed.

  5. Markov Jump Processes Approximating a Non-Symmetric Generalized Diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Limic, Nedzad

    2011-08-15

    Consider a non-symmetric generalized diffusion X( Dot-Operator ) in Double-Struck-Capital-R {sup d} determined by the differential operator A(x) = -{Sigma}{sub ij} {partial_derivative}{sub i}a{sub ij}(x){partial_derivative}{sub j} + {Sigma}{sub i} b{sub i}(x){partial_derivative}{sub i}. In this paper the diffusion process is approximated by Markov jump processes X{sub n}( Dot-Operator ), in homogeneous and isotropic grids G{sub n} Subset-Of Double-Struck-Capital-R {sup d}, which converge in distribution in the Skorokhod space D([0,{infinity}), Double-Struck-Capital-R {sup d}) to the diffusion X( Dot-Operator ). The generators of X{sub n}( Dot-Operator ) are constructed explicitly. Due to the homogeneity and isotropy of grids, the proposed method for d{>=}3 can be applied to processes for which the diffusion tensor {l_brace}a{sub ij}(x){r_brace}{sub 11}{sup dd} fulfills an additional condition. The proposed construction offers a simple method for simulation of sample paths of non-symmetric generalized diffusion. Simulations are carried out in terms of jump processes X{sub n}( Dot-Operator ). For piece-wise constant functions a{sub ij} on Double-Struck-Capital-R {sup d} and piece-wise continuous functions a{sub ij} on Double-Struck-Capital-R {sup 2} the construction and principal algorithm are described enabling an easy implementation into a computer code.

  6. Comparison of the high-pressure behavior of the cerium oxides Ce2O3 and CeO2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lipp, M. J.; Jeffries, J. R.; Cynn, H.; Park Klepeis, J. -H.; Evans, W. J.; Mortensen, D. R.; Seidler, G. T.; Xiao, Y.; Chow, P.

    2016-02-09

    We studied the high-pressure behavior of Ce2O3 using angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction to 70 GPa and compared with that of CeO2. Up to the highest pressure Ce2O3 remains in the hexagonal phase (space group 164, P ¯32/m1) typical for the lanthanide sesquioxides. We did not observe a theoretically predicted phase instability for 30 GPa. The isothermal bulk modulus and its pressure derivative for the quasihydrostatic case are B0 = 111 ± 2 GPa, B'0 = 4.7 ± 0.3, and for the case without pressure-transmitting medium B0 = 104 ±4 GPa, B'0 = 6.5 ± 0.4. Starting from ambient-pressure magnetic susceptibility measurementsmore » for both oxides in highly purified form,we find that the Ce atom in Ce2O3 behaves like a trivalent Ce3+ ion (2.57μB per Ce atom) in contrast to previously published data. Since x-ray emission spectroscopy of the Lγ (4d3/2 → 2p1/2) transition is sensitive to the 4f -electron occupancy, we also followed the high-pressure dependence of this line for both oxides up to 50 GPa. We observed no change of the respective line shape, indicating that the 4f -electron configuration is stable for both materials. We posit from this data that the 4f electrons do not drive the volume collapse of CeO2 from the high-symmetry, low-pressure fluorite structure to the lower-symmetry orthorhombic phase.« less

  7. Sci-Vis Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-03-11

    SVF is a full featured OpenGL 3d framework that allows for rapid creation of complex visualizations. The SVF framework handles much of the lifecycle and complex tasks required for a 3d visualization. Unlike a game framework SVF was designed to use fewer resources, work well in a windowed environment, and only render when necessary. The scene also takes advantage of multiple threads to free up the UI thread as much as possible. Shapes (actors) inmore » the scene are created by adding or removing functionality (through support objects) during runtime. This allows a highly flexible and dynamic means of creating highly complex actors without the code complexity (it also helps overcome the lack of multiple inheritance in Java.) All classes are highly customizable and there are abstract classes which are intended to be subclassed to allow a developer to create more complex and highly performant actors. There are multiple demos included in the framework to help the developer get started and shows off nearly all of the functionality. Some simple shapes (actors) are already created for you such as text, bordered text, radial text, text area, complex paths, NURBS paths, cube, disk, grid, plane, geometric shapes, and volumetric area. It also comes with various camera types for viewing that can be dragged, zoomed, and rotated. Picking or selecting items in the scene can be accomplished in various ways depending on your needs (raycasting or color picking.) The framework currently has functionality for tooltips, animation, actor pools, color gradients, 2d physics, text, 1d/2d/3d textures, children, blending, clipping planes, view frustum culling, custom shaders, and custom actor states« less

  8. Variation of char structure during anthracite pyrolysis catalyzed by Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and its influence on char combustion reactivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xuzhong Gong; Zhancheng Guo; Zhi Wang

    2009-09-15

    Effects of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the pyrolysis reactivity of demineralized anthracite were investigated by a thermo-gravimetric analyzer, indicating that pyrolysis reactivity of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-loaded demineralized anthracite was higher than that of raw demineralized anthracite when temperature is over 500{sup o}C. Chars were prepared from the two coal samples in muffle with heating progress, and their structures were analyzed using SEM, FTIR, XRD, and Raman. FTIR results showed that absorption peaks of functional groups on the surface of char from catalytic pyrolysis at 700{sup o}C were more than that of char from noncatalytic pyrolysis. Raman results demonstrated values of (I{sub D3} + I{sub D4})/IG of chars from catalytic pyrolysis and noncatalytic pyrolysis were 4.76 and 3.86, respectively, indicating that ordering of the char was decreased by Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. XRD analysis revealed that diffraction angle of the 002 peak did not shift; however, L{sub a} and L{sub c} decreased, indicating degree of graphitization for microcrystalline structure of char from catalytic pyrolysis was decreased. The results of FTIR, XRD, and Raman of the char showed that catalytic pyrolysis improved the formation of free radicals, while hindered polymerization and forming of basic structure units. Finally, combustion reactivity of the three chars, including char of raw demineralized anthracite (char-A), char of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-loaded demineralized anthracite (char-B), and char of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-loaded demineralized anthracite washed by HCl (char-C), was investigated using TG and indicated that their active order was char-B > char-C > char-A. The results corroborated that Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} changed structure of anthracite char and improved combustion reactivity.

  9. Fine-structure calculations of energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for sulfur-like iron, Fe XI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abou El-Maaref, A.; Ahmad, Mahmoud; Allam, S.H.

    2014-05-15

    Energy levels, oscillator strengths, and transition probabilities for transitions among the 14 LS states belonging to configurations of sulfur-like iron, Fe XI, have been calculated. These states are represented by configuration interaction wavefunctions and have configurations 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 4}, 3s3p{sup 5}, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}3d, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}4s, 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}4p, and 3s{sup 2}3p{sup 3}4d, which give rise to 123 fine-structure energy levels. Extensive configuration interaction calculations using the CIV3 code have been performed. To assess the importance of relativistic effects, the intermediate coupling scheme by means of the BreitPauli Hamiltonian terms, such as the one-body mass correction and Darwin term, and spinorbit, spinother-orbit, and spinspin corrections, are incorporated within the code. These incorporations adjusted the energy levels, therefore the calculated values are close to the available experimental data. Comparisons between the present calculated energy levels as well as oscillator strengths and both experimental and theoretical data have been performed. Our results show good agreement with earlier works, and they might be useful in thermonuclear fusion research and astrophysical applications. -- Highlights: Accurate atomic data of iron ions are needed for identification of solar corona. Extensive configuration interaction wavefunctions including 123 fine-structure levels have been calculated. The relativistic effects by means of the BreitPauli Hamiltonian terms are incorporated. This incorporation adjusts the energy levels, therefore the calculated values are close to experimental values.

  10. D-Branes in Curved Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGreevy, John Austen; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2005-07-06

    This thesis is a study of D-branes in string compactifications. In this context, D-branes are relevant as an important component of the nonperturbative spectrum, as an incisive probe of these backgrounds, and as a natural stringy tool for localizing gauge interactions. In the first part of the thesis, we discuss half-BPS D-branes in compactifications of type II string theory on Calabi-Yau threefolds. The results we describe for these objects are pertinent both in their role as stringy brane-worlds, and in their role as solitonic objects. In particular, we determine couplings of these branes to the moduli determining the closed-string geometry, both perturbatively and non-perturbatively in the worldsheet expansion. We provide a local model for transitions in moduli space where the BPS spectrum jumps, and discuss the extension of mirror symmetry between Calabi-Yau manifolds to the case when D-branes are present. The next section is an interlude which provides some applications of D-branes to other curved backgrounds of string theory. In particular, we discuss a surprising phenomenon in which fundamental strings moving through background Ramond-Ramond fields dissolve into large spherical D3-branes. This mechanism is used to explain a previously-mysterious fact discovered via the AdS-CFT correspondence. Next, we make a connection between type IIA string vacua of the type discussed in the first section and M-theory compactifications on manifolds of G{sub 2} holonomy. Finally we discuss constructions of string vacua which do not have large radius limits. In the final part of the thesis, we develop techniques for studying the worldsheets of open strings ending on the curved D-branes studied in the first section. More precisely, we formulate a large class of massive two-dimensional gauge theories coupled to boundary matter, which flow in the infrared to the relevant boundary conformal field theories. Along with many other applications, these techniques are used to describe world-volume theories of point-like D-probes of various Calabi-Yau threefolds.

  11. HYPERFINE-DEPENDENT gf-VALUES OF Mn I LINES IN THE 1.49-1.80 ?m H BAND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersson, M.; Hutton, R.; Zou, Y. [The Key Lab of Applied Ion Beam Physics, Ministry of Education (China); Grumer, J.; Brage, T. [Division of Mathematical Physics, Department of Physics, Lund University (Sweden); Ryde, N.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R. [Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University (Sweden); Jnsson, P., E-mail: rhutton@fudan.edu.cn [School of Technology, Malm University (Sweden)

    2015-01-01

    The three MnI lines at 17325, 17339, and 17349 are among the 25 strongest lines (log (gf) > 0.5) in the Hband. They are all heavily broadened due to hyperfine structure, and the profiles of these lines have so far not been understood. Earlier studies of these lines even suggested that they were blended. In this work, the profiles of these three infrared (IR) lines have been studied theoretically and compared to experimental spectra to assist in the complete understanding of the solar spectrum in the IR. It is shown that the structure of these lines cannot be described in the conventional way using the diagonal A and B hyperfine interaction constants. The off-diagonal hyperfine interaction not only has a large impact on the energies of the hyperfine levels, but also introduces a large intensity redistribution among the hyperfine lines, changing the line profiles dramatically. By performing large-scale calculations of the diagonal and off-diagonal hyperfine interaction and the gf-values between the upper and lower hyperfine levels and using a semi-empirical fitting procedure, we achieved agreement between our synthetic and experimental spectra. Furthermore, we compare our results with observations of stellar spectra. The spectra of the Sun and the K1.5 III red giant star Arcturus were modeled in the relevant region, 1.73-1.74 ?m, using our theoretically predicted gf-values and energies for each individual hyperfine line. Satisfactory fits were obtained and clear improvements were found using our new data compared with the old available MnI data. A complete list of energies and gf-values for all the 3d {sup 5}4s({sup 7} S)4d e{sup 6}D - 3d {sup 5}4s({sup 7} S)4f w{sup 6}F hyperfine lines are available as supporting material, whereas only the stronger lines are presented and discussed in detail in this paper.

  12. Evaluation of behaviour and survival of fish exposed to an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amaral, Stephen; Bevelhimer, Mark S; Cada, Glenn F; Giza, Daniel; Jacobsen, Paul; McMahon, Brian; Pracheil, Brenda M

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have evaluated fish injury and mortality at hydrokinetic (HK) turbines, but because these studies focused on the impacts of these turbines in situ they were unable to evaluate fish responses to controlled environmental characteristics (e.g., current velocity and light or dark conditions). In this study, we used juvenile hybrid Striped Bass (HSB; Striped Bass Morone saxatilis White Bass M. chrysops; N D 620), Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (N D 3,719), and White Sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus (N D 294) in a series of laboratory experiments to (1) evaluate the ability of fish to avoid entrainment through an axial-flow HKmoreturbine, (2) evaluate fish injury and survival associated with turbine entrainment, and (3) compare the effects of different HK turbines on fish. We found that the probability of turbine entrainment was species dependent and highest for HSB. Across species, current velocity influenced entrainment probability. Among entrained fish, observed survival rates were generally >0.95. The probability of injury for surviving entrained fish only differed from that for nonentrained fish for Rainbow Trout and in general was not >0.20. The probability of injury following entrainment was greater only for HSB, although there were no differences in injury rates between fish that were turbine entrained and those that were not, suggesting that injuries were not turbine related. Taking turbine entrainment, survival, and injury estimates together allowed us to estimate the probability of a randomly selected fish in a population proximate to an HK turbine surviving passage or remaining uninjured after passage. For species and current velocities for which there was a significant effect due to entrainment, we estimated, for instance, that HSB had a survival probability of 0.95 and that Rainbow Trout and White Sturgeon had a >0.99 probability of survival. Similarly, by combining these estimates with those from previous studies, we derived total passage survival probabilities >0.90 but generally approaching 1.00 across different HK turbine types, fish species, and fish lengths.less

  13. Evaluation of behavior and survival of fish exposed to an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amaral, Stephen V.; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; ?ada, Glenn F.; Giza, Daniel J.; Jacobson, Paul T.; McMahon, Brian J.; Pracheil, Brenda M.

    2015-02-06

    Previous studies have evaluated fish injury and mortality at hydrokinetic (HK) turbines, but because these studies focused on the impacts of these turbines in situ they were unable to evaluate fish responses to controlled environmental characteristics (e.g., current velocity and light or dark conditions). In this study, we used juvenile hybrid Striped Bass (HSB; Striped Bass Morone saxatilis White Bass M. chrysops; N D 620), Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (N D 3,719), and White Sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus (N D 294) in a series of laboratory experiments to (1) evaluate the ability of fish to avoid entrainment through an axial-flow HK turbine, (2) evaluate fish injury and survival associated with turbine entrainment, and (3) compare the effects of different HK turbines on fish. We found that the probability of turbine entrainment was species dependent and highest for HSB. Across species, current velocity influenced entrainment probability. Among entrained fish, observed survival rates were generally >0.95. The probability of injury for surviving entrained fish only differed from that for nonentrained fish for Rainbow Trout and in general was not >0.20. The probability of injury following entrainment was greater only for HSB, although there were no differences in injury rates between fish that were turbine entrained and those that were not, suggesting that injuries were not turbine related. Taking turbine entrainment, survival, and injury estimates together allowed us to estimate the probability of a randomly selected fish in a population proximate to an HK turbine surviving passage or remaining uninjured after passage. For species and current velocities for which there was a significant effect due to entrainment, we estimated, for instance, that HSB had a survival probability of 0.95 and that Rainbow Trout and White Sturgeon had a >0.99 probability of survival. By combining these estimates with those from previous studies, we derived total passage survival probabilities >0.90 but generally approaching 1.00 across different HK turbine types, fish species, and fish lengths.

  14. Improved Design of Motors for Increased Efficiency in Residential Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pragasen Pillay

    2008-12-31

    Research progress on understanding magnetic steel core losses is presented in this report. Three major aspects have been thoroughly investigated: 1, experimental characterization of core losses, 2, fundamental physical understanding of core losses and development of core loss formulas, and 3, design of more efficient machine based on the new formulations. Considerable progress has been achieved during the four years of research and the main achievements are summarized in the following: For the experimental characterization, a specially designed advanced commercial test bench was commissioned in addition to the development of a laboratory system with advanced capabilities. The measured properties are core losses at low and higher frequencies, with sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal excitations, at different temperatures, with different measurement apparatus (Toroids, Epstein etc). An engineering-based core loss formula has been developed which considers skin effect. The formula can predict core losses for both sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal flux densities and frequencies up to 4000 Hz. The formula is further tested in electric machines. The formula error range is 1.1% - 7.6% while the standard formulas can have % errors between -8.5% {-+} 44.7%. Two general core loss formulas, valid for different frequencies and thickness, have been developed by analytically and numerically solving Maxwell's equations based on a physical investigation of the dynamic hysteresis effects of magnetic materials. To our knowledge, they are the first models that can offer accurate core loss prediction over a wide range of operating frequencies and lamination thicknesses without a massive experimental database of core losses. The engineering core loss formula has been used with commercial software. The formula performs better than the modified Steinmetz and Bertotti's model used in Cedrat/Magsoft Flux 2D/3D. The new formula shows good correlation with measured results under both sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal excitations. A permanent magnet synchronous motor has been designed with the use of the engineering formula with Flux2D. There was acceptable agreement between predictions and measurements. This was further tested on an induction motor with toroid results.

  15. Recovery of dopamine transporters with methamphetamine detoxification is not linked to changes in dopamine release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Smith, Lisa; Fowler, Joanna S.; Telang, Frank; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-07-21

    Metamphetamine’s widepread abuse and concerns that it may increase Parkinson’s disease led us to assess if the reported loss of dopamine transporters (DAT) in methamphetamine abusers (MA) reflected damage to dopamine neurons. Using PET with [11C]cocaine to measure DAT, and with [11C]raclopride to measure dopamine release (assessed as changes in specific binding of [11C]raclopride between placebo and methylphenidate), which was used as marker of dopamine neuronal function, we show that MA (n=16), tested during early detoxification, had lower DAT (20-30%) but overall normal DA release in striatum (except for a small decrease in left putamen), when compared to controls (n=15). In controls, DAT were positively correlated with DA release (higher DAT associated with larger DA increases), consistent with DAT serving as markers of DA terminals. In contrast, MA showed a trend for a negative correlation (p=0.07) (higher DAT associated with lower DA increases), consistent with reduced DA re-uptake following DAT downregulation. MA who remained abstinent nine-months later (n=9) showed significant increases in DAT (20%) but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases did not change. In contrast, in controls, DAT did not change when retested 9 months later but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases in ventral striatum were reduced (p=0.05). Baseline D2/D3 receptors in caudate were lower in MA than in controls and did not change with detoxification, nor did they change in the controls upon retest. The loss of DAT in the MA, which was not associated with a concomitant reduction in dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT loss reflected DA terminal degneration; as well as the recovery of DAT after protracted detoxification, which was not associated with increased dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT increases reflected terminal regeneration, indicate that the loss of DAT in these MA does not reflect degeneration of dopamine terminals.

  16. Analysis of fission gas release kinetics by on-line mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zerega, Y.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Parrat, D.; Carette, M.; Brkic, B.; Lyoussi, A.; Bignan, G.; Janulyte, A.; Andre, J.; Pontillon, Y.; Ducros, G.; Taylor, S.

    2011-07-01

    The release of fission gas (Xe and Kr) and helium out of nuclear fuel materials in normal operation of a nuclear power reactor can constitute a strong limitation of the fuel lifetime. Moreover, radioactive isotopes of Xe and Kr contribute significantly to the global radiological source term released in the primary coolant circuit in case of accidental situations accompanied by fuel rod loss of integrity. As a consequence, fission gas release investigation is of prime importance for the nuclear fuel cycle economy, and is the driven force of numerous R and D programs. In this domain, for solving current fuel behavior understanding issues, preparing the development of new fuels (e.g. for Gen IV power systems) and for improving the modeling prediction capability, there is a marked need for innovations in the instrumentation field, mainly for: . Quantification of very low fission gas concentrations, released from fuel sample and routed in sweeping lines. Monitoring of quick gas release variations by quantification of elementary release during a short period of time. Detection of a large range of atomic masses (e.g. H{sub 2}, HT, He, CO, CO{sub 2}, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe), together with a performing separation of isotopes for Xe and Kr elements. Coupling measurement of stable and radioactive gas isotopes, by using in parallel mass spectrometry and gamma spectrometry techniques. To fulfill these challenging needs, a common strategy for analysis equipment implementation has been set up thanks to a recently launched collaboration between the CEA and the Univ. of Provence, with the technological support of the Liverpool Univ.. It aims at developing a chronological series of mass spectrometer devices based upon mass filter and 2D/3D ion traps with Fourier transform operating mode and having increasing levels of performances to match the previous challenges for out-of pile and in-pile experiments. The final objective is to install a high performance online mass spectrometer coupled to a gamma spectrometer in the fission product laboratory of the future Jules Horowitz Material Test Reactor. An intermediate step will consist of testing first equipment on an existing experimental facility in the LECA-STAR Hot Cell Laboratory of the CEA Cadarache. This paper presents the scientific and operational stakes linked to fission gas issues, resumes the current state of art for analyzing them in nuclear facilities, then presents the skills gathered through this collaboration to overcome technological bottlenecks. Finally it describes the implementation strategy in nuclear research facilities of the CEA Cadarache. (authors)

  17. Recovery of dopamine transporters with methamphetamine detoxification is not linked to changes in dopamine release

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Volkow, Nora D.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Smith, Lisa; Fowler, Joanna S.; Telang, Frank; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-07-21

    Metamphetamine’s widepread abuse and concerns that it may increase Parkinson’s disease led us to assess if the reported loss of dopamine transporters (DAT) in methamphetamine abusers (MA) reflected damage to dopamine neurons. Using PET with [11C]cocaine to measure DAT, and with [11C]raclopride to measure dopamine release (assessed as changes in specific binding of [11C]raclopride between placebo and methylphenidate), which was used as marker of dopamine neuronal function, we show that MA (n=16), tested during early detoxification, had lower DAT (20-30%) but overall normal DA release in striatum (except for a small decrease in left putamen), when compared to controls (n=15).more » In controls, DAT were positively correlated with DA release (higher DAT associated with larger DA increases), consistent with DAT serving as markers of DA terminals. In contrast, MA showed a trend for a negative correlation (p=0.07) (higher DAT associated with lower DA increases), consistent with reduced DA re-uptake following DAT downregulation. MA who remained abstinent nine-months later (n=9) showed significant increases in DAT (20%) but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases did not change. In contrast, in controls, DAT did not change when retested 9 months later but methylphenidate-induced dopamine increases in ventral striatum were reduced (p=0.05). Baseline D2/D3 receptors in caudate were lower in MA than in controls and did not change with detoxification, nor did they change in the controls upon retest. The loss of DAT in the MA, which was not associated with a concomitant reduction in dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT loss reflected DA terminal degneration; as well as the recovery of DAT after protracted detoxification, which was not associated with increased dopamine release as would have been expected if DAT increases reflected terminal regeneration, indicate that the loss of DAT in these MA does not reflect degeneration of dopamine terminals.« less

  18. Evaluation of behavior and survival of fish exposed to an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amaral, Stephen V.; Bevelhimer, Mark S.; ?ada, Glenn F.; Giza, Daniel J.; Jacobson, Paul T.; McMahon, Brian J.; Pracheil, Brenda M.

    2015-02-06

    Previous studies have evaluated fish injury and mortality at hydrokinetic (HK) turbines, but because these studies focused on the impacts of these turbines in situ they were unable to evaluate fish responses to controlled environmental characteristics (e.g., current velocity and light or dark conditions). In this study, we used juvenile hybrid Striped Bass (HSB; Striped Bass Morone saxatilis White Bass M. chrysops; N D 620), Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (N D 3,719), and White Sturgeon Acipenser transmontanus (N D 294) in a series of laboratory experiments to (1) evaluate the ability of fish to avoid entrainment through an axial-flow HKmoreturbine, (2) evaluate fish injury and survival associated with turbine entrainment, and (3) compare the effects of different HK turbines on fish. We found that the probability of turbine entrainment was species dependent and highest for HSB. Across species, current velocity influenced entrainment probability. Among entrained fish, observed survival rates were generally >0.95. The probability of injury for surviving entrained fish only differed from that for nonentrained fish for Rainbow Trout and in general was not >0.20. The probability of injury following entrainment was greater only for HSB, although there were no differences in injury rates between fish that were turbine entrained and those that were not, suggesting that injuries were not turbine related. Taking turbine entrainment, survival, and injury estimates together allowed us to estimate the probability of a randomly selected fish in a population proximate to an HK turbine surviving passage or remaining uninjured after passage. For species and current velocities for which there was a significant effect due to entrainment, we estimated, for instance, that HSB had a survival probability of 0.95 and that Rainbow Trout and White Sturgeon had a >0.99 probability of survival. By combining these estimates with those from previous studies, we derived total passage survival probabilities >0.90 but generally approaching 1.00 across different HK turbine types, fish species, and fish lengths.less

  19. SU-E-J-119: What Effect Have the Volume Defined in the Alignment Clipbox for Cervical Cancer Using Automatic Registration Methods for Cone- Beam CT Verification?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, W; Yang, H; Wang, Y; Jia, H; Xie, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of different clipbox volumes with automated registration techniques using commercially available software with on board volumetric imaging(OBI) for treatment verification in cervical cancer patients. Methods: Fifty cervical cancer patients received daily CBCT scans(on-board imaging v1.5 system, Varian Medical Systems) during the first treatment week and weekly thereafter were included this analysis. A total of 450 CBCT scans were registered to the planning CTscan using pelvic clipbox(clipbox-Pelvic) and around PTV clip box(clipbox- PTV). The translations(anterior-posterior, left-right, superior-inferior) and the rotations(yaw, pitch and roll) errors for each matches were recorded. The setup errors and the systematic and random errors for both of the clip-boxes were calculated. Paired Samples t test was used to analysis the differences between clipbox-Pelvic and clipbox-PTV. Results: . The SD of systematic error(?) was 1.0mm, 2.0mm,3.2mm and 1.9mm,2.3mm, 3.0mm in the AP, LR and SI directions for clipbox-Pelvic and clipbox-PTV, respectively. The average random error(?)was 1.7mm, 2.0mm,4.2mm and 1.7mm,3.4mm, 4.4mm in the AP, LR and SI directions for clipbox-Pelvic and clipbox-PTV, respectively. But, only the SI direction was acquired significantly differences between two image registration volumes(p=0.002,p=0.01 for mean and SD). For rotations, the yaw mean/SD and the pitch SD were acquired significantly differences between clipbox-Pelvic and clipbox-PTV. Conclusion: The defined volume for Image registration is important for cervical cancer when 3D/3D match was used. The alignment clipbox can effect the setup errors obtained. Further analysis is need to determine the optimal defined volume to use the image registration in cervical cancer. Conflict of interest: none.

  20. Determining the exchange parameters of spin-1 metal-organic molecular magnets in pulsed magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcdonald, Ross D; Singleton, John; Lancaster, Tom; Goddard, Paul; Manson, Jamie

    2011-01-14

    We nave measured the high-field magnetization of a number of Ni-based metal-organic molecular magnets. These materials are self-assembly coordination polymers formed from transition metal ions and organic ligands. The chemistry of the compounds is versatile allowing many structures with different magnetic properties to be formed. These studies follow on from previous measurements of the Cu-based analogues in which we showed it was possible to extract the exchange parameters of low-dimensional magnets using pulsed magnetic fields. In our recent experiments we have investigated the compound (Ni(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2})PF{sub 6}, where pyz = pyrazine, and the Ni-ions are linked in a quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) square lattice via the pyrazine molecules, with the layers held together by HF{sub 2} ligands. We also investigated Ni(NCS){sub 2}(pyzdo){sub 2}, where pyzdo = pyrazine dioxide. The samples are grown at Eastern Washington University using techniques described elsewhere. Measurements are performed at the pulsed magnetic field laboratory in Los Alamos. The magnetization of powdered samples is determined using a compensated coil magnetometer in a 65 T short pulse magnet. Temperatures as low as 500 mK are achievable using a {sup 3}He cryostat. The main figure shows the magnetization of the spin-1 [Ni(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]PF{sub 6} compound at 1.43 K. The magnetization rises slowly at first, achieving a rounded saturation whose midpoint is around 19 T. A small anomaly is also seen in the susceptibility at low fields ({approx}3 T), which might be attributed to a spin-flop transition. In contrast, the spin-1/2 [Cu(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]PF{sub 6} measured previously has a saturation magnetization of 35.5 T and a strongly concave form of M(B) below this field. This latter compound was shown to be a good example of a Q2D Heisenberg antiferromagnet with the strong exchange coupling (J{sub 2D} = 12.4 K, J{sub {perpendicular}}/J{sub 2D} {approx} 10{sup -2}) directed along the Cu-pyz-Cu directions. The structure of the two compounds is similar, but in the case of the Cu-compound the Cu-Cu pathways are linear, whereas in the Ni-compound they are kinked. The pulsed-field data combined with information from temperature-dependent susceptibility, muon-spin rotation, electron-spin resonance and ligand-field calculations suggest that, far from being magnetically Q2D, the Ni-compound is fairly one-dimensional with the dominant exchange (J{sub 1D} = 3.1 K and J{sub {perpendicular}}/J{sub 1D} = 0.63) directed along the Ni-FHF-Ni direction. Ni(NCS){sub 2}(pyzdo){sub 2} was also investigated. Previous ultra-high field measurements using the 100 T magnet have shown that this compound has a saturation field close to 80 T. The purpose of the present studies is to map out the phase diagram of this material at mid-range fields. The data are shown in the inset to the figure. This continuing project probes the ability of organic ligands to mediate magnetic exchange, the link between structure, dimensionality and bulk magnetic properties, as well as the role of spin number in quantum magnets. Ultimately the investigations aim to determine to what extent it is possible to produce self-assembly molecular materials with tailor-made magnetic characteristics.

  1. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine(s)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwok, Doris; Boucher, Cheryl

    2009-09-30

    Energy independence and fuel savings are hallmarks of the nations energy strategy. The advancement of natural gas reciprocating engine power generation technology is critical to the nations future. A new engine platform that meets the efficiency, emissions, fuel flexibility, cost and reliability/maintainability targets will enable American manufacturers to have highly competitive products that provide substantial environmental and economic benefits in the US and in international markets. Along with Cummins and Waukesha, Caterpillar participated in a multiyear cooperative agreement with the Department of Energy to create a 50% efficiency natural gas powered reciprocating engine system with a 95% reduction in NOx emissions by the year 2013. This platform developed under this agreement will be a significant contributor to the US energy strategy and will enable gas engine technology to remain a highly competitive choice, meeting customer cost of electricity targets, and regulatory environmental standard. Engine development under the Advanced Reciprocating Engine System (ARES) program was divided into phases, with the ultimate goal being approached in a series of incremental steps. This incremental approach would promote the commercialization of ARES technologies as soon as they emerged from development and would provide a technical and commercial foundation of later-developing technologies. Demonstrations of the Phase I and Phase II technology were completed in 2004 and 2008, respectively. Program tasks in Phase III included component and system development and testing from 2009-2012. Two advanced ignition technology evaluations were investigated under the ARES program: laser ignition and distributed ignition (DIGN). In collaboration with Colorado State University (CSU), a laser ignition system was developed to provide ignition at lean burn and high boost conditions. Much work has been performed in Caterpillars DIGN program under the ARES program. This work has consisted of both modeling and single cylinder engine experiments to quantify DIGN performance. The air handling systems of natural gas engines dissipate a percentage of available energy as a result of both flow losses and turbomachinery inefficiencies. An analytical study was initiated to increase compressor efficiency by employing a 2-stage inter-cooled compressor. Caterpillar also studied a turbo-compound system that employs a power turbine to recover energy from the exhaust gases for improved engine efficiency. Several other component and system investigations were undertaken during the final phase of the program to reach the ultimate ARES goals. An intake valve actuation system was developed and tested to improve engine efficiency, durability and load acceptance. Analytical modeling and materials testing were performed to evaluate the performance of steel pistons and compacted graphite iron cylinder head. Effort was made to improve the detonation sensing system by studying and comparing the performance of different pressure sensors. To reduce unburned hydrocarbon emissions, different camshafts were designed and built to investigate the effect of exhaust valve opening timing and value overlap. 1-D & 3-D coupled simulation was used to study intake and exhaust manifold dynamics with the goal of reducing load in-balance between cylinders. Selective catalytic reduction with on-board reductant generation to reduce NOx emissions was also engine tested. An effective mean to successfully deploy ARES technologies into the energy markets is to deploy demonstration projects in the field. In 2010, NETL and Caterpillar agreed to include a new opportunity fuel deliverable and two field demonstrations in the ARES program. An Organic Rankine Cycle system was designed with production intent incorporating lessons learned from the Phase II demonstration. Unfortunately, business conditions caused Caterpillar to cancel this demonstration in 2011. Nonetheless, Caterpillar partnered with a local dealer to deploy an ARES class engine using syngas from a biomass gasifier as

  2. Evaluation of image guided motion management methods in lung cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Ling; Yan, Di; Liang, Jian; Ionascu, Dan; Mangona, Victor; Yang, Kai; Zhou, Jun

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy and reliability of three target localization methods for image guided motion management in lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods: Three online image localization methods, including (1) 2D method based on 2D cone beam (CB) projection images, (2) 3D method using 3D cone beam CT (CBCT) imaging, and (3) 4D method using 4D CBCT imaging, have been evaluated using a moving phantom controlled by (a) 1D theoretical breathing motion curves and (b) 3D target motion patterns obtained from daily treatment of 3 lung cancer patients. While all methods are able to provide target mean position (MP), the 2D and 4D methods can also provide target motion standard deviation (SD) and excursion (EX). For each method, the detected MP/SD/EX values are compared to the analytically calculated actual values to calculate the errors. The MP errors are compared among three methods and the SD/EX errors are compared between the 2D and 4D methods. In the theoretical motion study (a), the dependency of MP/SD/EX error on EX is investigated with EX varying from 2.0 cm to 3.0 cm with an increment step of 0.2 cm. In the patient motion study (b), the dependency of MP error on target sizes (2.0 cm and 3.0 cm), motion patterns (four motions per patient) and EX variations is investigated using multivariant linear regression analysis. Results: In the theoretical motion study (a), the MP detection errors are −0.2 ± 0.2, −1.5 ± 1.1, and −0.2 ± 0.2 mm for 2D, 3D, and 4D methods, respectively. Both the 2D and 4D methods could accurately detect motion pattern EX (error < 1.2 mm) and SD (error < 1.0 mm). In the patient motion study (b), MP detection error vector (mm) with the 2D method (0.7 ± 0.4) is found to be significantly less than with the 3D method (1.7 ± 0.8,p < 0.001) and the 4D method (1.4 ± 1.0, p < 0.001) using paired t-test. However, no significant difference is found between the 4D method and the 3D method. Based on multivariant linear regression analysis, the variances of MP error in SI direction explained by target sizes, motion patterns, and EX variations are 9% with the 2D method, 74.4% with the 3D method, and 27% with the 4D method. The EX/SD detection errors are both < 1.0 mm for the 2D method and < 2.0 mm for the 4D method. Conclusions: The 2D method provides the most accurate MP detection regardless of the motion pattern variations, while its performance is limited by the accuracy of target identification in the projection images. The 3D method causes the largest error in MP determination, and its accuracy significantly depends on target sizes, motion patterns, and EX variations. The 4D method provides moderate MP detection results, while its accuracy relies on a regular motion pattern. In addition, the 2D and 4D methods both provide accurate measurement of the motion SD/EX, providing extra information for motion management.

  3. Kauai Island Utility Cooperative energy storage study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhil, Abbas Ali; Yamane, Mike; Murray, Aaron T.

    2009-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories performed an assessment of the benefits of energy storage for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative. This report documents the methodology and results of this study from a generation and production-side benefits perspective only. The KIUC energy storage study focused on the economic impact of using energy storage to shave the system peak, which reduces generator run time and consequently reduces fuel and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. It was determined that a 16-MWh energy storage system would suit KIUC's needs, taking into account the size of the 13 individual generation units in the KIUC system and a system peak of 78 MW. The analysis shows that an energy storage system substantially reduces the run time of Units D1, D2, D3, and D5 - the four smallest and oldest diesel generators at the Port Allen generating plant. The availability of stored energy also evens the diurnal variability of the remaining generation units during the off- and on-peak periods. However, the net economic benefit is insufficient to justify a load-leveling type of energy storage system at this time. While the presence of storage helps reduce the run time of the smaller and older units, the economic dispatch changes and the largest most efficient unit in the KIUC system, the 27.5-MW steam-injected combustion turbine at Kapaia, is run for extra hours to provide the recharge energy for the storage system. The economic benefits of the storage is significantly reduced because the charging energy for the storage is derived from the same fuel source as the peak generation source it displaces. This situation would be substantially different if there were a renewable energy source available to charge the storage. Especially, if there is a wind generation resource introduced in the KIUC system, there may be a potential of capturing the load-leveling benefits as well as using the storage to dampen the dynamic instability that the wind generation could introduce into the KIUC grid. General Electric is presently conducting such a study and results of this study will be available in the near future. Another study conducted by Electric Power Systems, Inc. (EPS) in May 2006 took a broader approach to determine the causes of KIUC system outages. This study concluded that energy storage with batteries will provide stability benefits and possibly eliminate the load shedding while also providing positive voltage control. Due to the lack of fuel diversity in the KIUC generation mix, SNL recommends that KIUC continue its efforts to quantify the dynamic benefits of storage. The value of the dynamic benefits, especially as an enabler of renewable generation such as wind energy, may be far greater than the production cost benefits alone. A combination of these benefits may provide KIUC sufficient positive economic and operational benefits to implement an energy storage project that will contribute to the overall enhancement of the KIUC system.

  4. Composition and production rate of pharmaceutical and chemical waste from Xanthi General Hospital in Greece

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voudrias, Evangelos; Goudakou, Lambrini; Kermenidou, Marianthi; Softa, Aikaterini

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We studied pharmaceutical and chemical waste production in a Greek hospital. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total pharmaceutical waste was 12.4 {+-} 3.90 g/patient/d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of total hazardous medical waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unit production rate for total chemical waste was 5.8 {+-} 2.2 g/patient/d. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to determine the composition and production rates of pharmaceutical and chemical waste produced by Xanthi General Hospital in Greece (XGH). This information is important to design and cost management systems for pharmaceutical and chemical waste, for safety and health considerations and for assessing environmental impact. A total of 233 kg pharmaceutical and 110 kg chemical waste was collected, manually separated and weighed over a period of five working weeks. The total production of pharmaceutical waste comprised 3.9% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Total pharmaceutical waste was classified in three categories, vial waste comprising 51.1%, syringe waste with 11.4% and intravenous therapy (IV) waste with 37.5% w/w of the total. Vial pharmaceutical waste only was further classified in six major categories: antibiotics, digestive system drugs, analgesics, hormones, circulatory system drugs and 'other'. Production data below are presented as average (standard deviation in parenthesis). The unit production rates for total pharmaceutical waste for the hospital were 12.4 (3.90) g/patient/d and 24.6 (7.48) g/bed/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for vial waste 6.4 (1.6) g/patient/d and 13 (2.6) g/bed/d, (2) for syringe waste 1.4 (0.4) g/patient/d and 2.8 (0.8) g/bed/d and (3) for IV waste 4.6 (3.0) g/patient/d and 9.2 (5.9) g/bed/d. Total chemical waste was classified in four categories, chemical reagents comprising 18.2%, solvents with 52.3%, dyes and tracers with 18.2% and solid waste with 11.4% w/w of the total. The total production of chemical waste comprised 1.8% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. Thus, the sum of pharmaceutical and chemical waste was 5.7% w/w of the total hazardous medical waste produced by the hospital. The unit production rates for total chemical waste for the hospital were 5.8 (2.2) g/patient/d and 1.1 (0.4) g/exam/d. The respective unit production rates were: (1) for reagents 1.7 (2.4) g/patient/d and 0.3 (0.4) g/examination/d, (2) for solvents 248 (127) g/patient/d and 192 (101) g/examination/d, (3) for dyes and tracers 4.7 (1.4) g/patient/d and 2.5 (0.9) g/examination/d and (4) for solid waste 54 (28) g/patient/d and 42 (22) g/examination/d.

  5. Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, UTE Mountain UTE Reservation, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Hachey

    2007-09-30

    The goals of this project were: (1) To enhance recovery of oil contained within algal mounds on the Ute Mountain Ute tribal lands. (2) To promote the use of advanced technology and expand the technical capability of the Native American Oil production corporations by direct assistance in the current project and dissemination of technology to other Tribes. (3) To develop an understanding of multicomponent seismic data as it relates to the variations in permeability and porosity of algal mounds, as well as lateral facies variations, for use in both reservoir development and exploration. (4) To identify any undiscovered algal mounds for field-extension within the area of seismic coverage. (5) To evaluate the potential for applying CO{sub 2} floods, steam floods, water floods or other secondary or tertiary recovery processes to increase production. The technical work scope was carried out by: (1) Acquiring multicomponent seismic data over the project area; (2) Processing and reprocessing the multicomponent data to extract as much geological and engineering data as possible within the budget and time-frame of the project; (3) Preparing maps and data volumes of geological and engineering data based on the multicomponent seismic and well data; (4) Selecting drilling targets if warranted by the seismic interpretation; (5) Constructing a static reservoir model of the project area; and (6) Constructing a dynamic history-matched simulation model from the static model. The original project scope covered a 6 mi{sup 2} (15.6 km{sup 2}) area encompassing two algal mound fields (Towaoc and Roadrunner). 3D3C seismic data was to acquired over this area to delineate mound complexes and image internal reservoir properties such as porosity and fluid saturations. After the project began, the Red Willow Production Company, a project partner and fully-owned company of the Southern Ute Tribe, contributed additional money to upgrade the survey to a nine-component (3D9C) survey. The purpose of this upgrade to nine components was to provide additional shear wave component data that might prove useful in delineating internal mound reservoir attributes. Also, Red Willow extended the P-wave portion of the survey to the northwest of the original 6 mi{sup 2} (15.6 km{sup 2}) 3D9C area in order to extend coverage further to the northwest to the Marble Wash area. In order to accomplish this scope of work, 3D9C seismic data set covering two known reservoirs was acquired and processed. Three-dimensional, zero-offset vertical seismic profile (VSP) data was acquired to determine the shear wave velocities for processing the sh3Dseismic data. Anisotropic velocity, and azimuthal AVO processing was carried out in addition to the conventional 3D P-wave data processing. All P-, PS- and S-wave volumes of the seismic data were interpreted to map the seismic response. The interpretation consisted of conventional cross-plots of seismic attributes vs. geological and reservoir engineering data, as well as multivariate and neural net analyses to assess whether additional resolution on exploration and engineering parameters could be achieved through the combined use of several seismic variables. Engineering data in the two reservoirs was used to develop a combined lithology, structure and permeability map. On the basis of the seismic data, a well was drilled into the northern mound trend in the project area. This well, Roadrunner No.9-2, was brought into production in late April 2006 and continues to produce modest amounts of oil and gas. As of the end of August 2007, the well has produced approximately 12,000 barrels of oil and 32,000 mcf of gas. A static reservoir model was created from the seismic data interpretations and well data. The seismic data was tied to various markers identified in the well logs, which in turn were related to lithostratigraphy. The tops and thicknesses of the various units were extrapolated from well control based upon the seismic data that was calibrated to the well picks. The reservoir engineering properties were available from a number of wells in the project area. Multivariate regressions of seismic attributes versus engineering parameters, such as porosity, were then used to guide interpolation away from well control. These formed the basis for dynamic reservoir simulations. The simulations were used to assess the potential for additional reservoir development, and to provide insight as to how well the multivariate approach worked for assigning more realistic values of internal mound reservoir properties.

  6. Prediction of PFC Plasma Fluxes by Improved Edge/Scrape-off-layer Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rognlien, T

    2009-02-26

    Large, localized plasma heat exhaust, subsequent inward transport of eroded impurities, and distribution of tritium to walls comprise one of the most critical class of problems for the development of tokamak fusion reactors. The magnitude and temporal duration of the heat fluxes is controlled by two factors: (1) the plasma power coming into the edge from the core, and (2), the physics processes in the edge/scrape-off-layer (SOL) that distribute the power to Plasma Facing Components (PFCs), both in space and in time. Given that the plasma power is largely determined by the fusion power desired, here I address model development needs for item (2), the distribution of power to PFCs, which naturally carries with it the capability for transport of impurities and tritium. Another key issue not addressed here is the impact of edge plasma transport on the plasma pedestal parameters. The nature of plasma transport in the edge/SOL region has long be differentiated from that in the bulk core, initially because of the larger fluctuation amplitudes that are observed, with density fluctuations relative to the time-average sometimes approaching as high as unity in the SOL. More recent measurements have shown addition effects such as strong intermittency, filamentation, toroidal asymmetry, and large flows [1]. These characteristics have a direct impact on plasma energy and particle fluxes to PFCs and on the flow of impurities in the edge. The theory of the edge/SOL is complicated by the steep gradients, multi-dimensional nature of plasma/neutral variations, and as mentioned above, the strong relative fluctuation levels compared to the core region. Furthermore, the strong interaction of the plasma with neutrals and the associated radiative effects for partially ionized plasma are important, Consequently, theoretical models typically need to be, or should be, more complicated, which may be one reason model development has lagged that in the core (funding being another reason). Simulation models of the edge/SOL can be divided into transport codes, which give the slow evolution of the plasma profiles and fluxes in a complex environment, and turbulence codes, which model the unstable, strongly fluctuating plasma state and thus (ideally) provide transport coefficients to the transport codes; this latter connect has only been made for a very limited set of simulations. The edge transport codes are either 2D fluid or now emerging 4D (2r,2v) kinetic. The turbulence codes are 2D and 3D fluid (only one U.S. 3D code spans the separatrix), and emerging 5D gyrokinetic codes. Many of the transport simulations to model plasma fluxes use ad hoc radial transport coefficients, rendering them more in the class of 'interpretive' simulations, not predictive; this limitation makes fundamental prediction for heat-flux widths and edge/SOL transport in general unobtainable at present. Even if there was a strong connection made between transport and turbulence codes, there is not yet a clear consensus in the community concerning the controlling instabilities and turbulence features, even for fixed plasma profiles. In comparison, the core turbulence simulations/theory/experiment have standard benchmarks (e.g., the Cyclone case), agree on many aspects of the big picture of the dominant ion transport, and have made good progress on electron transport. Again this core/edge difference can at least partially be traced to both the inherent difficulty of the edge problem and the stronger historical support for core simulation development; as the edge issue for high-power devices increases in importance, the funding prior should be change. No theory/simulation can be trusted without substantial experimental validation. The edge/SOL area is physically more accessible, but also more complex (2D-3D variations) and also different plasma parameters than for core diagnostics. Among the valuable diagnostics for transport are IRTV, thermocouples, Langmuir probes (but with maximum incident plasma power limitations), Thomson scattering, and visible. For turbulence diagnostics, we h

  7. Fiscal Year 2010 Phased Construction Completion Report for EU Z2-32 in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2010-02-01

    The Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOEIORJO 1-2161 &D2) (Zone 2 ROD) acknowledged that most of the 800 acres in Zone 2 were contaminated, but that sufficient data to confirm the levels of contamination were lacking. The Zone 2 ROD further specified that a sampling strategy for filling the data gaps would be developed. The Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOEIORIO 1 -2224&D3) (RDRJRAWP) defined the sampling strategy as the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS), generally following the approach used for characterization of the Zone I exposure units (EUs). The Zone 2 ROD divided the Zone 2 area into seven geographic areas and 44 EUs. To facilitate the data quality objectives (DQOs) of the DVS process, the RDR/RAWP regrouped the 44 EUs into 12 DQO scoping EU groups. These groups facilitated the DQO process by placing similar facilities and their support facilities together, which allowed identification of data gaps. The EU groups were no longer pertinent after DQO planning was completed and characterization was conducted as areas became accessible. As the opportunity to complete characterization became available, the planned DVS program was completed for the EU addressed in this document (EU Z2-32). The purpose of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR) is to address the following: (1) Document DVS characterization results for EU Z2-32. (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation and determine if the EU meets the Zone 2 ROD requirements for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs. (3) Identify additional areas not defined in the Zone 2 ROD that require remediation based on the DVS evaluation results. (4) Describe the remedial action performed in the K-1066-G Yard in EU Z2-32. Approximately 18.4 acres are included in the EU addressed in this PCCR. Based on results of the DVS evaluation, all 18.4 acres are recommended for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs. There are no Federal Facility Agreement Sites included in Appendix A of the Zone 2 ROD in EU Z2-32. The Zone 2 ROD requires land use controls to prevent disturbance of soils below 10 ft deep and to restrict future land use to industrial/commercial activities. In response to stakeholder comments, the U.S. Department of Energy agreed to re-evaluate the need for such land use restrictions. This document includes a screening evaluation to determine the likelihood of land use controls in EU Z2-32 being modified to: (1) eliminate the restriction on disturbance of soils below 10 ft bgs where data indicate the absence of residual contamination at any depth that would result in an unacceptable risk to the future industrial worker, and (2) permit alternative land uses that would be protective of future site occupants. Results of this screening evaluation indicate a high probability that restrictions on disturbing soil below 10 ft bgs could be safely eliminated for EU Z2-32. A qualitative screening evaluation considered the likelihood of unrestricted land use being protective of future site occupants. Based on this qualitative assessment, all 18.4 acres addressed in this PCCR were assigned a high probability for consideration of release for unrestricted land use. This document contains the main text (Sects. 1 through 13) and one appendix. The main text addresses the purpose for this PCCR as described above. Additional supporting detail (e.g., field work and data summaries, graphics) is provided in the EU Z2-32 technical memorandum (Appendix A). Historical and DVS analytical data used in this PCCR are provided on a compact disc accompanying this document and can be accessed through the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System.

  8. Fiscal Year 2008 Phased Construction Completion Report for EU Z2-33 in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-09-11

    The Record of Decision for Soil, Buried Waste, and Subsurface Structure Actions in Zone 2, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2161&D2) (Zone 2 ROD) acknowledged that most of the 800 acres in Zone 2 were contaminated, but that sufficient data to confirm the levels of contamination were lacking. The Zone 2 ROD further specified that a sampling strategy for filling the data gaps would be developed. The Remedial Design Report/Remedial Action Work Plan for Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2224&D3) (Zone 2 RDR/RAWP) defined the sampling strategy as the Dynamic Verification Strategy (DVS), generally following the approach used for characterization of the Zone 1 exposure units (EUs). The Zone 2 ROD divided the Zone 2 area into seven geographic areas and 44 EUs. To facilitate the data quality objectives (DQOs) of the DVS process, the Zone 2 RDR/RAWP regrouped the 44 EUs into 12 DQO scoping EU groups. These groups facilitated the DQO process by placing similar facilities and their support facilities together and allowing identification of data gaps. The EU groups were no longer pertinent after DQO planning was completed and characterization was conducted as areas became accessible. As the opportunity to complete characterization became available, the planned DVS program and remedial actions (RAs) were completed for EU Z2-33. Remedial action was also performed at two additional areas in adjacent EU Z2-42 because of their close proximity and similar nature to a small surface soil RA in EU Z2-33. Remedial actions for building slabs performed in EU Z2-33 during fiscal year (FY) 2007 were reported in the Fiscal Year 2007 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2723&D1). Recommended RAs for EU Z2-42 were described in the Fiscal Year 2006 Phased Construction Completion Report for the Zone 2 Soils, Slabs, and Subsurface Structures at East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE/OR/01-2317&D2). Remedial actions performed in the Balance of Site (BOS) Laboratory Area of EU Z2-33 and two small areas in EU Z2-42 are described in Sects. 5 through 10 of this Phased Construction Completion Report (PCCR). The purpose of this PCCR is to address the following: (1) Document DVS characterization results for EU Z2-33; (2) Describe and document the risk evaluation and determine if the EU meets the Zone 2 ROD requirements for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs; (3) Identify additional areas not defined in the Zone 2 ROD that require remediation based on the DVS evaluation results; and (4) Describe RAs performed in the EU Z2-33 BOS Laboratory Area and two small areas in EU Z2-42. Approximately 18 acres in EU Z2-33 are addressed in this PCCR. Based on the results of the DVS evaluation and RAs performed, all 18 acres are recommended for unrestricted industrial use to 10 ft bgs. Three Federal Facility Agreement sites are addressed and recommended for no further action within this acreage, including: (1) K-1004-L Recirculating Cooling Water Lines Leak Sites; (2) K-1044 Heavy Equipment Repair Shop; and (3) K-1015-A Laundry Pit. Remedial actions for EU Z2-33 were developed in response to DVS characterization results described in the EU Z2-33 Technical Memorandum (Appendix A) and to support reindustrialization of the East Tennessee Technology Park as a commercial industrial park. Remediation criteria were designed for the protection of a future industrial worker who normally would not have the potential for exposure to soil below 10ft bgs. Accordingly, the Zone 2 ROD required land use controls to prevent disturbance of soils below 10 ft deep and to restrict future land use to industrial/commercial activities. In response to stakeholder comments, the U.S. Department of Energy agreed to re-evaluate the need for such land use restrictions. This document includes a screening evaluation to determine the likelihood of land use controls in EU Z2-33 being modified to: (1) eliminate the restriction on disturbance of soils below 10 ft bgs where data indicate the absence of residual contamination at any depth that would result in an unacceptable risk to the future industrial worker, and (2) permit alternative land uses that would be protective of future site occupants. Results of this screening evaluation indicate a low probability that restrictions on disturbing soil below 10 ft bgs could be safely eliminated for EU Z2-33. A qualitative screening evaluation considered the likelihood of unrestricted land use being protective of future site occupants. Based on this qualitative assessment, all 18 acres addressed in this PCCR were assigned a low probability for consideration of release for unrestricted land use.