Sample records for byproducts aromatic extracts

  1. Aromatics Extraction Plant Design Using Synthesis Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcox, R. J.; Nedwick, R.

    were changed. The process modified design has process conditions altered to create opportunities for heat integration. Distillation column pressure changes were the primary modifications. In this design the plant was also divided into two sections... the aid of modern synthesis techniques. The only heat integration in the Extraction Section is the Recovery Column bottoms preheating the Regenerator feed then the Stripper feed. The Distillation Section has no heat integration. This design uses 73...

  2. Optimization of Jatropha Oil Extraction and Its By-Product Utilization by Pyrolysis Method 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kongkasawan, Jinjuta 1987-

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    and biodiesel. Biofuels are derived from biomass feedstock and usually blend with gasoline or diesel fuel, but they can also be used directly on the engines (EIA, 2011b). One can categorize the biofuels by their source and type. Biofuels may be obtained from... of Jatropha Seed and Oil .................................................................8! 2.2.2. Potential of Jatropha Oils for Biofuels Production ........................................12! 2.2 Mechanical Extraction...

  3. Bacterial mutagenicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in reconstituted mixtures and crude coal tar extracts and fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onufrock, Amy Mildred

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , coal, and oil shale vary widely in the amount and nature of potentially carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Thus, potential carcinogenicity varies widely between representative PAH fractions derived from complex mixtures. PAH fractions...

  4. Bacterial mutagenicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in reconstituted mixtures and crude coal tar extracts and fractions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onufrock, Amy Mildred

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    7 8 Phenanthrene 8 9 2 6 3 5 4 Fluorene 7 6 Fluoranthene 3 10 I 9 H I, 8 7 I 6 Pyrene Il 2 111 Q 12 5 6 ltenzolclphenanthrene 2 I I 12 4 I H 5 8 7 6 Benz[ajanthracene 12 II 10 8 + ~ 5 7 6 Chrysene I 4 13 14 12 e... are associated with the coal utilization and petroleum refining industries. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons can result as thermal degradative products of combustion, pyrolysis, and pyrosynthesis. They are also derived from a variety of petroleum refining...

  5. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the roles and responsibilities of each position within the Combustion Byproducts Recyclcing Consortium.

  6. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -fired power plants derive energy by burning coal in their furnaces. These power plants generally use either. The by-product materials include coal combustion by-products, wood ash, pulp and paper industry by recycling and research needs are discussed. #12;3 2.0 MATERIALS 2.1 COAL-COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS Coal

  7. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  8. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    combustion by-products #12;3 generated by using both conventional and clean-coal technologies. A clean-coal that obtained from clean-coal technology, are not utilized in cast-concrete masonry products (bricks, blocksCenter for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik

  9. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    of coal fly ash, coal bottom ash, and used foundry sand in concrete, bricks, blocks, and8 paving stones, Wisconsin. She is involved in management,11 disposal, and sale of coal-combustion by-products. She alsoCenter for By-Products Utilization UNDER-UTILIZED COAL-COMBUSTION PRODUCTS IN PERMEABLE ROADWAY

  10. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -first Century, Hyderabad, India, February 1999. Department of Civil EngineeringandMechanics College) of foundry by-products, including foundry sand and slag. Most of these by-products are landfilled, primarily due to non-availability of economically attractive use options. Landfilling is not a desirable option

  11. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    combustion by-products (such as clean-coal ash) from power plants. Maximum recycling of such by- products regulations and increasing use of low-grade coal, the number of coal-fired power plants with flue gasCenter for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R

  12. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization CLEAN COAL BY-PRODUCTS UTILIZATION IN ROADWAY, EMBANKMENTS-fueled plants, particularly use of eastern coals, has lead to the use of clean coal and using advanced sulfur dioxide control technologies. Figure 1 shows clean coal technology benefits(2) . In 1977, the concept

  13. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization DRAFT REPORT CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN CEMENTITIOUS-MILWAUKEE #12;CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN CEMENTITIOUS PRODUCTS Progress Report by Tarun R. Naik, Rakesh of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Technologies

  14. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons for fullerene synthesis in flames

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D.

    2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides improved methods for combustion synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, employing multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels selected for high carbon conversion to extractable fullerenes. The multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels include those that contain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. More specifically, multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels contain a substantial amount of indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof. Coal tar and petroleum distillate fractions provide low cost hydrocarbon fuels containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including without limitation, indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof.

  15. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, 'clean coal' combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered 'allowable' under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and private-sector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  16. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  17. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ash in concrete (structural grade concrete, compressive strength up to 4000 psi) and flowable slurry and performance specifications for structural concrete and flowable slurry products for every day construction use developed by UWM- CBU in the past for other by-products and sources of coal ash not meeting

  18. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    limestone quarry in Wisconsin generates over 125,000 tons of quarry fines and quarry bag-house dust each limestone quarry fines and quarry bag-house dust, to reduce costs, as well as to reduce the use of expensive be used in SCC. Use of quarry by-products in SCC will lead to economical and ecological benefits

  19. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Submitted to the Electric Power Research Institute August 2009 UWM Center for By-Products-Strength Materials) for help in reducing global warming. Concrete mixtures having slump in the range of three to fourCenter for By-Products Utilization CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN CEMENTITIOUS PRODUCTS By Tarun R

  20. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    clean coal technology, are not extensively utilized in the cast concrete masonry products (bricks both conventional and clean coal technologies. A clean coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SO2Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST

  1. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute For Project 02-1/3.1D-2 Department of Civil Engineering of technology and market development for controlled low-strength material (CLSM) slurry using Illinois coal ashCenter for By-Products Utilization IMPLEMENTATION OF FLOWABLE SLURRY TECHNOLOGY IN ILLINOIS

  2. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN NO-FINES CONCRETE By Tarun R;CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN NO-FINES CONCRETE ABSTRACT By Tarun, R. Naik, Yoon-moon Chun, Rudolph N. Kraus, and Fethullah Canpolat This paper presents a detailed experimental study on the sequestration

  3. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    , compressive strength, concrete testing, fly ash, high-performance concrete, hot weather, permeability, silica Testing of Concrete", Committee 214, "Evaluation of Results of Strength Tests of Concrete", and CommitteeCenter for By-Products Utilization STRENGTH AND DURABILITY OF HIGH- PERFORMANCE CONCRETE SUBJECTED

  4. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Fellow at the UWM-CBU. His research interests include the use of coal fly ash, coal bottom ash, and used in management, disposal, and sale of coal-combustion by-Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF UNDER-UTILIZED COAL- COMBUSTION PRODUCTS IN PERMEABLE

  5. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ash to solve the concerns associated with its disposal. Wood ash consists of two different types ash and coal fly ash for use in concrete, was used to determine general suitability of wood ashCenter for By-Products Utilization WOOD ASH: A NEW SOURCE OF POZZOLANIC MATERIAL By Tarun R. Naik

  6. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    the concerns associated with its disposal. Wood ash consists of two different types of materials: fly ash for use as construction materials. Therefore, ASTM C 618, developed for volcanic ash and coal fly ashCenter for By-Products Utilization WOOD ASH: A NEW SOURCE OF POZZOLANIC MATERIAL By Tarun R. Naik

  7. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    beneficial uses of wood ash to meet the challenges associated with its disposal. Wood ash consists of two C 618 [13] developed for volcanic ash and coal fly ash for use in concrete, was used to determineCenter for By-Products Utilization RECYCLING OF WOOD ASH IN CEMENT-BASED CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS

  8. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -air entrained concrete without fly ash. Detailed results are presented. Keywords: carbon dioxide sequestrationCenter for By-Products Utilization CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN NON-AIR ENTRAINED CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik SEQUESTRATION IN NON-AIR ENTRAINED CONCRETE ABSTRACT by Tarun, R. Naik, Yoon-moon Chun, Rudolph N. Kraus

  9. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN NON-AIR ENTRAINED CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik and Applied Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MILWAUKEE #12;1 CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN NON-AIR ENTRAINED-moon Chun The objectives of this project were to sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) in concrete and study

  10. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN NO-FINES CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik, Timir C Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MILWAUKEE #12;1 CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN NO-FINES CONCRETE ABSTRACT of this project were to sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) in concrete and study the effects of carbonation

  11. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    wood with supplementary fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and coke by pulp and paper mills and wood, knots, chips, etc. with other supplementary fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and coke to generateCenter for By-Products Utilization DEVELOPMENT OF CLSM USING COAL ASH AND WOOD ASH, A SOURCE OF NEW

  12. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    in a combination with a number of fuels including coal, petroleum coke, natural gas, etc. In the mid 1990s, the unit was firing a combination of coal and petroleum coke to generate energy. It has been established;1 PROJECT 1 - COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS: CHARACTERIZATION AND USE OPTIONS Introduction An AFBC system

  13. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization PROPERTIES OF CONCRETE CONTAINING SCRAP TIRE RUBBER in a variety of rubber and plastic products, thermal incineration of waste tires for production of electricity rubber in asphalt mixes, (ii) thermal incineration of worn-out tires for the production of electricity

  14. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization APPLICATION OF SCRAP TIRE RUBBER IN ASPHALTIC MATERIALS: STATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. PRODUCING CRUMB RUBBER MODIFIER (CRM) FROM USED TIRES . . . . . 3 2.1 PRODUCTION OF CRM THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - MILWAUKEE #12;APPLICATION OF SCRAP TIRE RUBBER IN ASPHALTIC MATERIALS: STATE

  15. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Presentationand Publicationat the CBIP International Conference onFly Ash Disposal & Utilization,New Delhi, India, January 1998 foundry sand and slag. Most of these by-products are landfilled, primarily due to non-availability of economically attractive use options. Landfilling is not a desirable option because it not only causes huge

  16. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    tires generated during the year 1990 - 1991 were reused, recycled, or recovered [4]. A number of usesCenter for By-Products Utilization CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS INCORPORATING DISCARDED TIRES By Tarun R - MILWAUKEE #12;CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS INCORPORATING DISCARDED TIRES* By Tarun R. Naik Director, Center for By

  17. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST OF CLASS F FLYASHAND CLEAN-COAL ASHBLENDS FOR CAST CONCRETE PRODUCTS Authors: TarunR.Naik, Director, Center,Illinois Clean Coal Institute RudolphN.Kraus, Research Associate, UWM Center forBy-Products Utilization Shiw S

  18. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASSF FLY ASHCOAL AND CLEAN-COAL #12;-1- CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASSF FLYASHCOAL AND CLEAN-COAL ASHFOR CEMENT -Milwaukee (UWM) Daniel D.Banerjee, Project Manager,Illinois Clean Coal Institute RudolphN.Kraus, Research

  19. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Rafat Siddique of HVFA Concrete Containing Clean-Coal Ash and Class F Fly Ash By Tarun R. Naik Director, UWM Center for By-Products Utilization and Francois Botha Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute Synopsis

  20. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    flue gas. Detailed results are presented. Keywords: carbon dioxide sequestration, carbonation, carbonCenter for By-Products Utilization CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN FOAMED CONTROLLED LOW STRENGTH MATERIALS #12;1 CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN FOAMED CONTROLLED LOW STRENGTH MATERIALS by Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus

  1. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    combustion by-products are generated due to the combustion of coal in coal-fired electric power plants as carbon from unburnt coal, fire polished sand, thin-walled hollow spheres and their fragments, magnetic of HVFA concrete to establish mixture proportions for commercial production. #12;INTRODUCTION Coal

  2. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    was produced by Wisconsin Electric's coal-fired power plants. The criteria for selecting these mixtures was to utilize minimal cost materials, such as coal combustion by-products (fly ash, bottom ash, etc coal combustion waste material (fly ash) to the maximum extent possible while minimizing costs (e

  3. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF COAL-COMBUSTION PRODUCTS IN PERMEABLE PAVEMNET BASE and Published at the Raymundo Rivera International Symposium on Durability of Concrete, Monterrey, N. L., Mexico THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MILWAUKEE #12;Use of Coal-Combustion Products in Permeable Pavement Base1 2 3 4 5 6 7

  4. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    plants are the major source of generation of electricity. Coal-fired power plants derive energy by burning coal in their furnaces. These power plants generally use either pulverized coal-fired furnaces. 2.0 MATERIALS 2.1 COAL-COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS In most of the countries coal- fired thermal power

  5. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R #12;1 HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Shiw S. Singh, and Bruce for manufacture of cement-based products using ashes generated from combustion of high-sulfur coals. A clean coal

  6. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN COAL ASH AS SETTING TIME REGULATOR IN PORTLAND OF WISCONSIN ­ MILWAUKEE #12;2 Use of Clean Coal Ash as Setting Time Regulator in Portland Cement by Zichao Wu as setting time regulator for portland cement production. In this paper a source of clean coal ash (CCA

  7. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    of coal in conventional and/ or advanced clean coal technology combustors. These include fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products from advanced clean coal technology clean coal technology combustors. Over 60% of the CCBs are generated as fly ash. An estimate

  8. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    and paper mills in concrete. INTRODUCTION Concrete is a porous solid that is created by combining four basicCenter for By-Products Utilization CURING TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON HIGH-PERFORMANCE CONCRETE By Tarun For presentation and publication at the symposium entitled "High-Performance Concrete and Concrete for Marine

  9. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    . Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Shiw S. Singh, Lori- Lynn C. Pennock, and Bruce Ramme Report No. CBU-2001 with numerous projects on the use of by-product materials including utilization of used foundry sand and fly ash;2 INTRODUCTION Wood FA is generated due to combustion of wood for energy production at pulp and paper mills, saw

  10. By By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By By-Products Utilization THE ROLE OF FLOWABLE SLURRY IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENTS of Flowable Slurry in Sustainable Developments in Civil Engineering Tarun R. Naik and Rudolph N. Kraus Materials (CLSM) incorporating industrial by-products (coal fly ash, and used foundry sand). CLSM reference

  11. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F-fly ash. Some developed technologies have similar potential in the longer term. (3) Laboratory studies have been completed that indicate that much higher amounts of fly ash could be added in cement-concrete applications under some circumstances. This could significantly increase use of fly ash in cement-concrete applications. (4) A study of the long-term environmental effects of structural fills in a surface mine in Indiana was completed. This study has provided much sought after data for permitting large-volume management options in both beneficial as well as non-beneficial use settings. (5) The impact of CBRC on CCBs utilization trends is difficult to quantify. However it is fair to say that the CBRC program had a significant positive impact on increased utilization of CCBs in every region of the USA. Today, the overall utilization of CCBs is over 43%. (6) CBRC-developed knowledge base led to a large number of other projects completed with support from other sources of funding. (7) CBRC research has also had a large impact on CCBs management across the globe. Information transfer activities and visitors from leading coal producing countries such as South Africa, Australia, England, India, China, Poland, Czech Republic and Japan are truly noteworthy. (8) Overall, the CBRC has been a truly successful, cooperative research program. It has brought together researchers, industry, government, and regulators to deal with a major problem facing the USA and other coal producing countries in the world.

  12. Trace elements and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Trace elements and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in snow and ice sampled at Colle designed, built and tested. Melt water from inner part of ice core section was pumped to an ICP-SFMS and ICP-OES. Melt water from outer section was on-line extracted by solid-phase cartridges for semi

  13. Origin and significance of aromatic hydrocarbons in giant iron ore deposits of the late Archean Hamersley Basin,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brocks, Jochen J.

    Origin and significance of aromatic hydrocarbons in giant iron ore deposits of the late Archean extractable saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons. The host rocks belong to the $2.5 billion years (Ga) old Mt and Newman (Mt Whaleback). The saturated hydrocarbons in the rock extracts have the composition of highly

  14. Aust. J. Mar. Freshw. Res., 1984, 35, 119-28 Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Waters of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canberra, University of

    Aust. J. Mar. Freshw. Res., 1984, 35, 119-28 Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Waters of Port Phillip Bay of aromatic hydrocarbons in coastal waters, using solvent extraction and fluorescence emission analysis, shows and the Yarra River estuary. Introduction Pollution of the marine environment by petroleum hydrocarbons

  15. Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of the Environment is responsible for regulating fugitive air emissions from the transportation of coal combustion by-products and the permissible beneficial uses of these by...

  16. aromatic hydrocarbon components: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS 2005 April 19 ABSTRACT Interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) infrared emission features 26 Dehydrogenation of polycyclic aromatic...

  17. The Composition of Rice By-products.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1904-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the rice. e products of this machine are rice bran, some flour, and clean rice. The final process consists in polishing the rice, which gives it a ter. The by-product from this process is rice. polish. The polished rice is sorted into different grades...*7 TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS BULLETIN NO. 73. The Composition of Rice By-Products. POSTOFFICE: COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. 1904 THE BRYAN EAGLE BRYAN, TEXAS TEXAS AGRICULTURi - - OFFIGERS -- GOVERNING BOARD...

  18. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

  19. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Travaglini, Michael A. (Oliver Springs, TN)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced.

  20. A Novel, Green Technology for the Production of Aromatic Thiol from Aromatic Sulfonyl Chloride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkinson, Bradley R.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrogenation of aromatic sulfonyl chloride to produce aromatic thiol is an important industrial reaction. The aromatic thiol is a critical intermediate in the production of many pharmaceuticals as well as several agrochemicals. Density...

  1. Coal ash by-product reutilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muncy, J. [Potomac Electric Power Co., Washington, DC (United States); Miller, B. [DYNA Corp., Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) has as part of its vision and value statement that, ``We are responsible stewards of environmental and corporate resources.`` With this moral imperative in mind, a project team was charged with initiating the Coal Pile Liner Project--installing a membrane liner under the existing coal storage pile at the Morgantown Generating Station. The existing coal yard facilities were constructed prior to the current environmental regulations, and it became necessary to upgrade the storage facilities to be environmentally friendly. The project team had two objectives in this project: (1) prevent coal pile leachate from entering the groundwater system; (2) test the viability of using coal ash by-products as an aggregate substitute for concrete applications. Both objectives were met, and two additional benefits were achieved as well: (1) the use of coal ash by-products as a coal liner produced significant cost savings to the project directly; (2) the use of coal ash by-products reduced plant operation and maintenance expenses.

  2. Aromaticity and Antiaromaticity in Transition-Metal Systems....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aromaticity and Antiaromaticity in Transition-Metal Systems. Aromaticity and Antiaromaticity in Transition-Metal Systems. Abstract: Aromaticity is an important concept in chemistry...

  3. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chlorinated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method are disclosed. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis. 5 figs.

  4. Feasibility of producing jet fuel from GPGP (Great Plains Gasification Plant) by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willson, W.G.; Knudson, C.L.; Rindt, J.R.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota, is in close proximity to several Air Force bases along our northern tier. This plant is producing over 137 million cubic feet per day of high-Btu Natural Gas from North Dakota lignite. In addition, the plant generates three liquid streams, naphtha, crude phenol, and tar oil. The naphtha may be directly marketable because of its low boiling point and high aromatic content. The other two streams, totalling about 4300 barrels per day, are available as potential sources of aviation fuel jet fuel for the Air Force. The overall objective of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing aviation turbine fuel from the by-product streams of GPGP. These streams, as well as fractions, thereof, will be characterized and subsequently processed over a wide range of process conditions. The resulting turbine fuel products will be analyzed to determine their chemical and physical characteristics as compared to petroleum-based fuels to meet the military specification requirements. A second objective is to assess the conversion of the by-product streams into a new, higher-density aviation fuel. Since no performance specifications currently exist for a high-density jet fuel, reaction products and intermediates will only be characterized to indicate the feasibility of producing such a fuel. This report discusses the suitability of the tar oil stream. 5 refs., 20 figs., 15 tabs.

  5. Calculate the solubility of aromatics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Bu, L.; Nijhawan, S. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States))

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Like naphthenes and paraffins, aromatics are an important hydrocarbon component of fossil fuels. Their physical and thermodynamic property data are valuable to engineers in the chemical process industries. In particular, their solubility in water is becoming more important in engineering and environmental studies because of increasingly stringent regulations regarding health, safety and the environment. In this article the authors present water-solubility data and correlations for aromatics (benzenes) as a function of temperature. These results can be useful for engineers conducting various types of initial studies.

  6. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products. [Polychlorinated biphenyls; methylene chloride; perchloroethylene; trichlorofluoroethane; trichloroethylene; chlorobenzene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1982-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contracting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible polyhydroxy compound, such as, water, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds in the low polar or nonpolar solvent by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered for recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 2 tables.

  7. Dutch gas plant uses polymer process to treat aromatic-saturated water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-processing plant in Harlingen, The Netherlands, operated by Elf Petroland has been running a porous-polymer extraction process since 1994 to remove aromatic compounds from water associated with produced natural gas. In the period, the unit has removed dispersed and dissolved aromatic compounds to a concentration of <1 ppm with energy consumption of only 17% that of a steam stripper, according to Paul Brooks, general manager for Akzo Nobel`s Macro Porous Polymer-Extraction (MPPE) systems. The paper describes glycol treatment the MPPE separation process, and the service contract for the system.

  8. doi:10.1016/S0016-7037(00)01302-9 Release of bound aromatic hydrocarbons from late Archean and Mesoproterozoic kerogens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brocks, Jochen J.

    doi:10.1016/S0016-7037(00)01302-9 Release of bound aromatic hydrocarbons from late Archean, and higher polyaromatic hydrocarbons and alkylated homologues were generated in low relative concentrations of the hydropyrolysates are very similar to aromatic hydrocarbons obtained by solvent extraction of the host rocks

  9. CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS MADE WITH COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ash and bottom ash are produced as by-products of coal-fired electricity generation. In many countriesCONSTRUCTION MATERIALS MADE WITH COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS Lihua Wei*, Tarun R. Naik**, and Dean-Milwaukee, is being conducted to develop new low-cost construction materials primarily using coal combustion

  10. ADVANCED GASIFICATION BY-PRODUCT UTILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Ari Geertsema; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu; Harold Schobert

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported for the period September 1, 2003 to August 31, 2004. This contract is with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involves the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers.

  11. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

  12. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  13. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  14. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  15. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  16. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  17. Occurrence of chlorinated polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in tap water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiraishi, H.; Pilkington, N.H.; Otsuki, A.; Fuwa, K.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic compounds in tap waters were extracted by a modified continuous liquid-liquid extractor and analyzed by computerized gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using a fused silica capillary column. The results indicate the presence of monochlorinated derivatives of naphthalene, dibenzofuran, fluorene, fluorenone, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene and dichlorinated derivatives of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene. The parent polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their oxygenated derivatives such as fluorenone and anthraquinone were also found. It was demonstrated that chlorinated PAHs (Cl-PAHs) were really present in tap waters at 10/sup -1/-10/sup -2/ ng/L levels.

  18. Polycyclic Aromatic Triptycenes: Oxygen Substitution Cyclization Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VanVeller, Brett

    The cyclization and planarization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with concomitant oxygen substitution was achieved through acid catalyzed transetherification and oxygen-radical reactions. The triptycene scaffold ...

  19. animal byproducts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik") UTILIZING CLEAN-COAL ASH 1 This project was for the...

  20. advanced byproduct recovery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik") UTILIZING CLEAN-COAL ASH 1 This project was for the...

  1. Relaxations for Production Planning Problems with Increasing By-products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Relaxations for Production Planning Problems with Increasing By-products Srikrishna Sridhar, Jeff, James Leudtke SILO Seminars: Feb 1, 2012 #12;One slide summary Problem Description Production process involves desirable & undesirable products. Srikrishna Sridhar, Jeff Linderoth, James Leudtke SILO Seminars

  2. Oxidation kinetics of by-product calcium sulfite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Othman, Hasliza

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department) May 1992 ABSTRACT Oxidation Kinetics of By-product Calcium Sulfite. (May 1992) Hasliza Othman, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ahmed M. Gadalla The by-products obtained from the flue gas desulfurization (FGD..., suggestions and encouragement. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER Page I INTRODUCTION I I LITERATURE REVIEW A. Limestone Flue Gas Desulfurization Process . . . . . . . . . . . . B. Scaling Problem in the FGD Process...

  3. Grain Sorghum By-Product Feeds for Farm Animals.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X3.AJ.N SORGHUM BY-PRODUCT FEEDS FOR FARM ANIMALS FEED FOR LIVESTOCK -. Grain sorghum is the leading feed grain produced in Texas and in the Southwest. Its importance as a feed fc farm animals is generally recognized. Recent developments... in Texas have made available 1 livestock producers and the feed industry a considerab tonnage of sorghum gluten meal and sorghum gluten fee as by-products in sorghum grain processing. The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station conduct( a series...

  4. Computer Simulations Reveal Multiple Functions for Aromatic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computer Simulations Reveal Multiple Functions for Aromatic Residues in Cellulase Enzymes NREL researchers use high-performance computing to demonstrate fundamental roles of aromatic residues in cellulase enzyme tunnels. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) computer simulations of a key indus- trial

  5. All-Boron Aromatic Clusters as Potential New Inorganic Ligands...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boron Aromatic Clusters as Potential New Inorganic Ligands and Building Blocks in Chemistry. All-Boron Aromatic Clusters as Potential New Inorganic Ligands and Building Blocks in...

  6. Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Ari Geertsema; Frank Huggins; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Brandie M. Markley; Harold Schobert

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the recent passing of new legislation designed to permanently cap and reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities, it is more important than ever to develop and improve upon methods of controlling mercury emissions. One promising technique is carbon sorbent injection into the flue gas of the coal-fired power plant. Currently, this technology is very expensive as costly commercially activated carbons are used as sorbents. There is also a significant lack of understanding of the interaction between mercury vapor and the carbon sorbent, which adds to the difficulty of predicting the amount of sorbent needed for specific plant configurations. Due to its inherent porosity and adsorption properties as well as on-site availability, carbons derived from gasifiers are potential mercury sorbent candidates. Furthermore, because of the increasing restricted use of landfilling, the coal industry is very interested in finding uses for these materials as an alternative to the current disposal practice. The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported for the period September 1, 2004 to August 31, 2005. This contract is with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involves the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers.

  7. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  8. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  9. Simultaneous analysis of oxygenated and nitrated polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons on standard reference material 1649a (urban dust) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Simultaneous analysis of oxygenated and nitrated polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons on standard nitrated polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) and 9 oxygenated polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (OPAHs aromatic hydrocarbons; Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Oxygenated polycyclic aromatic

  10. Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Brock Marrs; Ari Geertsema; Frank Huggins; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Brandie M. Markley; Zhe Lu; Harold Schobert

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    With the passing of legislation designed to permanently cap and reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities, it is more important than ever to develop and improve upon methods of controlling mercury emissions. One promising technique is carbon sorbent injection into the flue gas of the coal-fired power plant. Currently, this technology is very expensive as costly commercially activated carbons are used as sorbents. There is also a significant lack of understanding of the interaction between mercury vapor and the carbon sorbent, which adds to the difficulty of predicting the amount of sorbent needed for specific plant configurations. Due to its inherent porosity and adsorption properties as well as on-site availability, carbons derived from gasifiers are potential mercury sorbent candidates. Furthermore, because of the increasing restricted use of landfilling, the coal industry is very interested in finding uses for these materials as an alternative to the current disposal practice. The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported. This contract was with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involved the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, assessment of the potential for leaching of Hg captured by the carbons, analysis of the slags for cement applications, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers. The objectives of this collaborative effort between the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute, and industry collaborators supplying gasifier char samples were to investigate the potential use of gasifier slag carbons as a source of low cost sorbent for Hg and NOX capture from combustion flue gas, concrete applications, polymer fillers and as a source of activated carbons. Primary objectives were to determine the relationship of surface area, pore size, pore size distribution, and mineral content on Hg storage of gasifier carbons and to define the site of Hg capture. The ability of gasifier slag carbon to capture NOX and the effect of NOX on Hg adsorption were goals. Secondary goals were the determination of the potential for use of the slags for cement and filler applications. Since gasifier chars have already gone through a devolatilization process in a reducing atmosphere in the gasifier, they only required to be activated to be used as activated carbons. Therefore, the principal objective of the work at PSU was to characterize and utilize gasification slag carbons for the production of activated carbons and other carbon fillers. Tests for the Hg and NOX adsorption potential of these activated gasifier carbons were performed at the CAER. During the course of this project, gasifier slag samples chemically and physically characterized at UK were supplied to PSU who also characterized the samples for sorption characteristics and independently tested for Hg-capture. At the CAER as-received slags were tested for Hg and NOX adsorption. The most promising of these were activated chemically. The PSU group applied thermal and steam activation to a representative group of the gasifier slag samples separated by particle sizes. The activated samples were tested at UK for Hg-sorption and NOX capture and the most promising Hg adsorbers were tested for Hg capture in a simulated flue gas. Both UK and PSU tested the use of the gasifier slag samples as fillers. The CAER analyzed the slags for possible use in cement applications

  11. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)); Haefner, R. (Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.)

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. Presently FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. However, landfill sites are becoming more scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. In summary Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD byproduct materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

  12. Toxicity Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naspinski, Christine S.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widely distributed in the environment and are generated by many sources. Though the potential of PAH-rich mixtures to cause health effects has been known for almost a century, there are still unanswered...

  13. Center for By-Products Utilization High Durability Concrete Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    TESTING · Fresh Concrete Properties ·Unit Weight (ASTM C 138) ·Air Content (ASTM C 237) ·Slump (ASTM C 143Center for By-Products Utilization High Durability Concrete Using High-Carbon Fly Ash and Pulp Mill-Products Utilization Durable Concrete in Northern Climates · Producing durable concrete in a freezing and thawing

  14. Reducing Disinfection By-Products in Small Drinking Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    not decrease the residual TOC by 0.3 mg/L. #12;Guidelines: Coagulant dosages for water supplies where NOMReducing Disinfection By-Products in Small Drinking Water Systems by M. Robin Collins, James P. Malley, Jr, & Ethan Brooke Water Treatment Technology Assistance Center Department of Civil Engineering

  15. Center for By-Products Utilization CARBONATION: AN EFFICIENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    -based materials. #12;Center for By-Products Utilization Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Cement-based Materials Early age carbonation curing for the sequestration of CO2 in cement-based products is most adopted. Recently a practical and easy way of carbon dioxide sequestration in cement-based materials has been

  16. Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hesbach, P.A.; Kachur, E.K.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. EPA has issued a final regulation for control of mercury from coal-fired power plants. An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. These adulterated by-products, both ashes and FGD material, represent the greatest challenge to the DOE goal of increased utilization of by-products. The degree of stability of capture by-products and their potential for release of mercury can have a large economic impact on material sales or the approach to disposal. One of the considerations for mercury control technology is the potential trade-off between effective but temporary mercury capture and less effective but more permanent sequestration. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed aqueous leaching procedures on a select subset of the available sample pairs. This report describes batch leaching results for mercury, arsenic, and selenium.

  17. Center for By-Products Utilization CO2 SEQUESTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    climate change, reduced GHGs, improved air quality, CO2 reduction & sequestration, and carbon offsets. #12 for the development of a technology for the carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in non-air entrained concreteCenter for By-Products Utilization CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN NON-AIR ENTRAINED CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik

  18. Chemical production from industrial by-product gases: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyke, S.E.; Moore, R.H.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for conservation of natural gas is studied and the technical and economic feasibility and the implementation of ventures to produce such chemicals using carbon monoxide and hydrogen from byproduct gases are determined. A survey was performed of potential chemical products and byproduct gas sources. Byproduct gases from the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries were selected for detailed study. Gas sampling, preliminary design, market surveys, and economic analyses were performed for specific sources in the selected industries. The study showed that production of methanol or ammonia from byproduct gas at the sites studied in the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries is technically feasible but not economically viable under current conditions. Several other applications are identified as having the potential for better economics. The survey performed identified a need for an improved method of recovering carbon monoxide from dilute gases. A modest experimental program was directed toward the development of a permselective membrane to fulfill that need. A practical membrane was not developed but further investigation along the same lines is recommended. (MCW)

  19. Remediation of Abandoned Mines Using Coal Combustion By-Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    . Maryland has about 450 coal mines out of which only 50 are active and about 150 mines produce AMD RafalkoRemediation of Abandoned Mines Using Coal Combustion By-Products Sowmya Bulusu1 ; Ahmet H. Aydilek that occurs when pyrite that is present in abandoned coal mines comes in contact with oxygen and water, which

  20. Oxidation of byproduct calcium sulfite hemihydrate from coal-fired power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Sandeep

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The flue gas desulfurization by-product from the TU Electric Martin Lake power plant near Tatum, Texas was characterized using thermal analysis, x-ray diffraction, microprobe and infrared spectroscopy. The byproduct, called gypsite, consisted of a...

  1. Feasibility Analysis of Steam Reforming of Biodiesel by-product Glycerol to Make Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Manoj

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude glycerol is the major byproduct from biodiesel industry. In general, for every 100 pounds of biodiesel produced, approximately 10 pounds of crude glycerol are produced as a by-product. As the biodiesel industry rapidly expands in the U...

  2. JASPERSE CHEM 341 TEST 4 VERSION 1 Conjugation, Diels-Alder, Aromaticity, Aromatic Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jasperse, Craig P.

    byproducts). (21 points, 3 points each) SO3HHO HNO3, H 2SO4 O + 1. HNO3, H 2SO4 2. Cl2, AlCl 3 3. Fe, HCl 1

  3. Experimental and modeling investigation of aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation in a premixed ethylene flame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castaldi, M.J.; Marinov, N.M.; Melius, C.F. [and others

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modeling has been performed to investigate aromatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbon formation pathways in a rich, sooting, ethylene-oxygen-argon premixed flame. An atmospheric pressure, laminar flat flame operated at an equivalence ratio of 2.5 was used to acquire experimental data for model validation. Gas composition analysis was conducted by an on-line gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) technique. Measurements were made in the flame and post-flame zone for a number of low molecular weight species, aliphatics, aromatics and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) ranging from two to five-aromatic fused rings. The modeling results show the key reaction sequences leading to aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon growth involve the combination of resonantly stabilized radicals. In particular, propargyl and 1-methylallenyl combination reactions lead to benzene and methyl substituted benzene formation, while polycyclic aromatics are formed from cyclopentadienyl radicals and fused rings that have a shared C{sub 5} side structure. Naphthalene production through the reaction step of cyclopentadienyl self-combination and phenanthrene formation from indenyl and cyclopentadienyl combination were shown to be important in the flame modeling study. The removal of phenyl by O{sub 2} leading to cyclopentadienyl formation is expected to play a pivotal role in the PAH or soot precursor growth process under fuel-rich oxidation conditions.

  4. Nitrated and oxygenated derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the ambient air of two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Nitrated and oxygenated derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the ambient air of two;2 Abstract The size distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and PAH derivatives of compounds. Keywords: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Oxygenated

  5. Sampling precautions for the measurement of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Sampling precautions for the measurement of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and of their oxidation products, such as nitrated and oxygenated PAHs hydrocarbons; Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Sampling

  6. Nitrated and oxygenated derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the ambient air of two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Nitrated and oxygenated derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the ambient air of two aromatic hydrocarbons, 17 nitrated PAHs (NPAHs) and 8 oxygenated PAHs (OPAHs) were carried out during hydrocarbons; Nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

  7. Estimation method for the thermochemical properties of polycyclic aromatic molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Joanna

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycyclic aromatic molecules, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have attracted considerable attention in the past few decades. They are formed during the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbon fuels and are ...

  8. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, R.E.; Dolbeare, F.A.

    1980-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 4-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes. No Drawings

  9. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Robert E. [557 Escondido Cir., Livermore, CA 94550; Dolbeare, Frank A. [5178 Diane La., Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 4-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes.

  10. Utilization of by-product gypsum in construction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephenson, Angela Lorraine

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as a by-product (called phosphogypsum) during acidulation of phosphate rock in the manufacture phosphoric acid. The sulfate is produced in either a dihydrate or a hemihydrate form depending on the operating conditions. Phosphogypsum produced... by Mobil Chemi- cal Company (Pasadena, Texas) is in the dihydrate form and was previously studied. Phosphogypsum produced by Occidental Chemical Company (White Springs, Florida), on the other hand, is produced in a hemihydrate form and transforms...

  11. Actinide extraction methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Harrup, Mason K. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Tillotson, Richard D. (Moore, ID) [Moore, ID; Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID) [Pocatello, ID

    2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of separating actinides from lanthanides are disclosed. A regio-specific/stereo-specific dithiophosphinic acid having organic moieties is provided in an organic solvent that is then contacted with an acidic medium containing an actinide and a lanthanide. The method can extend to separating actinides from one another. Actinides are extracted as a complex with the dithiophosphinic acid. Separation compositions include an aqueous phase, an organic phase, dithiophosphinic acid, and at least one actinide. The compositions may include additional actinides and/or lanthanides. A method of producing a dithiophosphinic acid comprising at least two organic moieties selected from aromatics and alkyls, each moiety having at least one functional group is also disclosed. A source of sulfur is reacted with a halophosphine. An ammonium salt of the dithiophosphinic acid product is precipitated out of the reaction mixture. The precipitated salt is dissolved in ether. The ether is removed to yield the dithiophosphinic acid.

  12. Aromaticity of Polycyclic Conjugated Hydrocarbons Milan Randic*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    Aromaticity of Polycyclic Conjugated Hydrocarbons Milan Randic´* National Institute of Chemistry Chemistry 3462 G. Clar 6n Rule versus Hu¨ckel 4n + 2 Rule 3464 H. Hydrocarbons versus Heteroatomic Systems Ordering 3476 VI. On Enumeration of Benzenoid Hydrocarbons 3477 VII. Kekule´ Valence Structures Count 3479

  13. Optimization of Jatropha Oil Extraction and Its By-Product Utilization by Pyrolysis Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kongkasawan, Jinjuta 1987-

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the price of fossil fuel has increased, petroleum resources have been restricted and the environmental effects have been of great concern. Biofuel has been considered to be a good solution because it is a clean, non-pollutant and a renewable...

  14. Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period:Dakota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","TypeWyoming"5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel

  15. Monitoring of vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for monitoring vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a high-temperature environment has an excitation source producing electromagnetic radiation, an optical path having an optical probe optically communicating the electromagnetic radiation received at a proximal end to a distal end, a spectrometer or polychromator, a detector, and a positioner coupled to the first optical path. The positioner can slidably move the distal end of the optical probe to maintain the distal end position with respect to an area of a material undergoing combustion. The emitted wavelength can be directed to a detector in a single optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration, in a dual optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration or in a dual optical probe 90.degree. side scattered configuration. The apparatus can be used to monitor an emitted wavelength of energy from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon as it fluoresces in a high temperature environment.

  16. Real-time characterization of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient aerosols and from motor-vehicle exhaust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polidori, A.; Hu, S.; Biswas, S.; Delfino, R. J; Sioutas, C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in coupled out- door/polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentration in combustionbound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons K. A. , Morris, J. ,

  17. Device for aqueous detection of nitro-aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN); Schulz, Amber L. (Bremerton, WA); Ingram, Jani C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grey, Alan E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a compact and portable detection apparatus for ro-aromatic based chemical compounds, such as nitrotoluenes, dinitrotoluenes, and trinitrotoluene (TNT). The apparatus is based upon the use of fiber optics using filtered light. The preferred process of the invention relies upon a reflective chemical sensor and optical and electronic components to monitor a decrease in fluorescence when the nitro-aromatic molecules in aqueous solution combine and react with a fluorescent polycyclic aromatic compound.

  18. A novel method of bitumen extraction from asphalt pavement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houser, T.J. (Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo (United States))

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method of extracting bitumen from asphalt pavement mixtures has been developed which does not require chlorinated or aromatic compounds for solvents. The preferred solvent is cyclohexane (although cyclopentane may be used) at high temperatures and pressures. The new method requires equipment that is less costly than the centrifuge method currently used and takes less time than extractions with Bioact but more time than when chlorocompounds are used.

  19. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons on the vegetation of a railroad right-of-way

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hancock, James Leonard

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the epicuticular leaf waxes of selected plant species growing along a railrcad right-of-way was conduct:ed near Bryan, Texas from October 1967 to February 1969, The objectives of the study were to correlate diesel... locomotive exhaust emissions to PAH on Lhe vege tation of the righL- of way and to compar'e PAH levels on right of way piants to levels on similar species growing in an area isolated from locomotive emissions, The PAH were isolated from leaf wax extracts...

  20. aromatic aldehyde production: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    virtual product and production Lemurell, Stefan 291 Production of 18F-Labeled Radiopharmaceuticals Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: One carbon Two carbon Aromatic ...

  1. aromatic diamine curing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hawaii 96822 University. University of Hawai'i at Manoa. (1) Ramdahl, T.; Bjorseth, J. Handbook of Polycyclic Aromatic Kaiser, Ralf I. 178 Photofragmentation spectroscopy of...

  2. aromatic nitro compounds: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the reactions of amines with aldehydes and with aromatic nitro - compounds in acetonitrile. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Kinetic and equilibrium studies of...

  3. aromatic hydrocarbon formation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Formation, Hamersley Group, and were collected in mines near Tom Price mature gas condensates. The aromatic fraction predominantly consists of unsubstituted two and...

  4. aromatic methoxy groups: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Formation, Hamersley Group, and were collected in mines near Tom Price mature gas condensates. The aromatic fraction predominantly consists of unsubstituted two and...

  5. aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogenesis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Ecology Websites Summary: ), and there are oil refineries on the shore. In this environment, input of aromatic hydrocarbons from petroleum and the Yarra River Estuary J. David...

  6. aromatic hydrocarbon tracers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Ecology Websites Summary: ), and there are oil refineries on the shore. In this environment, input of aromatic hydrocarbons from petroleum and the Yarra River Estuary J. David...

  7. Synthetic aggregates prepared from flue gas desulfurization by-products using various binder materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellucci, J.; Graham, U.M.; Hower, J.C.; Robl, T.L. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) by-products can be converted into environmentally safe and structurally stable aggregates. One type of synthetic aggregate was prepared using an optimum mixture of (FGD) by-products, fly ash, and water. Mineral reactions have been examined using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope.

  8. Clean coal technology. Coal utilisation by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to remove the bulk of ash contained in flue gas from coal-fired power plants coupled with increasingly strict environmental regulations in the USA result in increased generation of solid materials referred to as coal utilisation by-products, or CUBs. More than 40% of CUBs were sold or reused in the USA in 2004 compared to less than 25% in 1996. A goal of 50% utilization has been established for 2010. The American Coal Ash Association (ACCA) together with the US Department of Energy's Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPPI) and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) sponsor a number of projects that promote CUB utilization. Several are mentioned in this report. Report sections are: Executive summary; Introduction; Where do CUBs come from?; Market analysis; DOE-sponsored CUB demonstrations; Examples of best-practice utilization of CUB materials; Factors limiting the use of CUBs; and Conclusions. 14 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs., 14 photos.

  9. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

  10. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify, and to confirm or determine rate constants for, the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize soot and fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics. Stable and radical species profiles in the aromatics oxidation study are measured using molecular beam sampling with on-line mass spectrometry. The rate of soot formation measured by conventional optical techniques is found to support the hypotheses that particle inception occurs through reactive coagulation of high molecular weight PAH in competition with destruction by OHattack, and that the subsequent growth of the soot mass occurs through addition reactions of PAH and C[sub 2]H[sub 2] with the soot particles. During the first year of this reporting period, fullerenes C[sub 60] and C[sub 70] in substantial quantities were found in the flames being studied. The fullerenes were recovered, purified and spectroscopically identified. The yields of C[sub 60] and C[sub 70] were then determined over ranges of conditions in low-pressure premixed flames of benzene and oxygen.

  11. Synthesis of Aliphatic-Aromatic Copolyesters by a High Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Saad A.

    -aromatic polyesters. #12;Full Paper: Reverse-selective polymer membranes exhibiting high CO2 affinity can be used for purification of H2 in industrial gasification processes. In this work, the phy- sical properties of CO2Synthesis of Aliphatic-Aromatic Copolyesters by a High Temperature Bulk Reaction Between Poly

  12. Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donal F. Day

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The work conducted in this project is an extension of the developments itemized in DE-FG-36-04GO14236. This program is designed to help the development of a biorefinery based around a raw sugar mill, which in Louisiana is an underutilized asset. Some technical questions were answered regarding the addition of a biomass to ethanol facility to existing sugar mills. The focus of this work is on developing technology to produce ethanol and valuable by-products from bagasse. Three major areas are addressed, feedstock storage, potential by-products and the technology for producing ethanol from dilute ammonia pre-treated bagasse. Sugar mills normally store bagasse in a simple pile. During the off season there is a natural degradation of the bagasse, due to the composting action of microorganisms in the pile. This has serious implications if bagasse must be stored to operate a bagasse/biorefinery for a 300+ day operating cycle. Deterioration of the fermentables in bagasse was found to be 6.5% per month, on pile storage. This indicates that long term storage of adequate amounts of bagasse for year-round operation is probably not feasible. Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of succinic acid production were such that it could not compete with current commercial practice. To allow recovery of commercial amounts of ethanol from bagasse fermentation, research was conducted on high solids loading fermentations (using S. cerevisiae) with commercial cellulase on pretreated material. A combination of SHF/SSF treatment with fed-batch operation allowed fermentation at 30% solids loading. Supplementation of the fermentation with a small amount of black-strap molasses had results beyond expectation. There was an enhancement of conversion as well as production of ethanol levels above 6.0% w/w, which is required both for efficient distillation as well as contaminant repression. The focus of fermentation development was only on converting the cellulose to ethanol, as this yeast is not capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose (from hemicellulose). In anticipation of the future development of such an organism, we screened the commercially available xylanases to find the optimum mix for conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose. A different mixture than the spezyme/novozyme mix used in our fermentation research was found to be more efficient at converting both cellulose and hemicellulose. Efforts were made to select a mutant of Pichia stipitis for ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol. New mutation technology was developed, but an appropriate mutant has not yet been isolated. The ability to convert to stillage from biomass fermentations were determined to be suitable for anaerobic degradation and methane production. An economic model of a current sugar factory was developed in order to provide a baseline for the cost/benefit analysis of adding cellulosic ethanol production.

  13. Nutritional Status of some Aromatic Plants Grown to Produce Volatile Oils under Treated Municipal Wastewater irrigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalifa, Ramadan Khalifa Mohamed

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    used for growing aromatic plants in the arid area to produceoil for five aromatic plants , 2) evaluation of TMW assource for the tested plants and study its nutritional

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic rings synthesis Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aromatic compounds. 500 265 500 265 500 265 WAVELENGTH (nm) ARABIAN CRUDE LUBRICATING OIL... - ent aromatic hydrocarbons (ZIKTO and CARSON 1970r NEFF and ANDERSON ... Source:...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons resulting Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Res., 1984, 35, 119-28 Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Waters of Summary: fuel. (d) Lubricating oil. - 300 400 Wavelength (nm) Results Concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons... Aust. J....

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Res., 1984, 35, 119-28 Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Waters of Summary: fuel. (d) Lubricating oil. - 300 400 Wavelength (nm) Results Concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons... Bay...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons concentrations Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Res., 1984, 35, 119-28 Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Waters of Summary: fuel. (d) Lubricating oil. - 300 400 Wavelength (nm) Results Concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons... Bay...

  18. Feasibility of Detecting Byproducts of Chemical Weapons Manufacturing in Environmental Media: A Preliminary Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, L; Reynolds, J G; Koester, C; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S; Love, A H; Viani, B E

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative information on the environmental transport and fate of organophosphorus nerve agents has been limited to studies conducted at high concentration representative of acute doses (Munroe et al. 1999). Nerve agents have relatively rapidly degradation rates at acute levels, and first order degradation pathways and half-lives have been characterized. However, similar knowledge is lacking in the open literature on the long-term environmental persistence of nerve agents, their manufacturing precursors and byproducts, and their degradation products, particularly at sub-acute or chronic health levels. Although many recent publications reflect low-level detection methods for chemical weapons signature compounds extracted from a variety of different media (e.g. D'Agostino et al., 2001; Kataoka et al., 2001), little of this work answers questions regarding their adsorptive character and chemical persistence. However, these questions are a central theme to both the detection of illegal chemical weapons manufacturing, as well as determining long-term cleanup needs and health risks associated with potential terrorist acts using such agents. Adsorption onto environmental surfaces can enhance the persistence of organophosphorus compounds, particularly with strong chelators like phosphonic acids. In particular, organophosphorus compound adsorption can lead to irreversible binding (e.g. Aubin and Smith, 1992), and current methods of chemical extraction and solid-state detection are challenged to detect them. This may be particularly true if the adsorbed compound is of a low initial concentration because it may be that the most preferred adsorption sites form the strongest bonds. This is particularly true in mixed media having various adsorption domains that adsorb at different rates (e.g. Weber and Huang, 1996). For high enough initial concentrations, sorption sites become saturated and solvent extraction has a relatively high efficiency. It is no surprise that many CW fate studies can report findings using traditional extraction or solid-state methods of detection, since release concentration exceed the capacity of environmental media to adsorb or degrade them. This report documents a test using solid-state {sup 31}P-NMR and GC/MS methods to delineate two adsorbed phosphonates on a uniform silica gel substrate at different concentrations. The test sought to determine the sensitivity of {sup 31}P-NMR detection, delineate adsorption character of the phosphonates, quantify their extraction efficiency using different solvents, and test the phosphonate mobility and photodegradability under short-term idealized conditions. The results show that solid-state detection at the experimental conditions can detect individual phosphonate species down to the 100 ppm level. Sensitivity could be further increased using larger samples and longer collection times. Solvent extraction of the phosphonates from the silica gel showed that a chlorinated solvent (methylene chloride) produced poor recovery for phosphonic acids from the silica gel, whereas methanol used as a solvent achieved high extraction efficiency. The phosphonates used showed strong aqueous mobility in a silica gel column experiment, with a small but significant amount left adsorbed to the substrate. A 96 hour photo-degradation experiment showed no degradation of the compounds.

  19. Detoxification of aromatic pollutants by fungal enzymes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollag, J.M.; Dec, J. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fungal enzymes, such as laccase, peroxidase, and tyrosinase, play a prominent role in catalyzing the transformation of various aromatic compounds in the environment. The enzyme-mediated oxidative coupling reaction results in covalent binding of chlorinated phenols and anilines to soil organic matter or polymerization of the substrates in aquatic systems. Both of these processes are accompanied by a detoxification effect. Therefore, it has been postulated that they be exploited for the treatment of polluted soil and water. The mechanism and efficiency of oxidative coupling in pollutant removal were studied by incubation of chlorinated phenols and anilines with various humic substances or soil and analysis of the reaction products by chromatography and mass and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. The decontamination effect could be enhanced by optimization of the reaction conditions and immobilization of enzymes on solid materials. The results obtained strongly support the concept of using enzymes for control of environmental pollution.

  20. Fluid extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  1. avoiding by-product formation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Engineering Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied...

  2. atmospheric oxidation by-products: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Engineering Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied...

  3. arc-induced toxic by-products: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Engineering Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied...

  4. animal protein by-products: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Engineering Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied...

  5. Case Study of Optimal Byproduct Gas Distribution in Integrated Steel Mill Using Multi-Period Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makinen, K.; Kymalainen, T.; Junttila, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    byproduct gases at varying rates. The differences between gas generation and consumption rates are compensated with gas holders. However, under certain circumstances the imbalances can lead to the flaring of excessive gas or require the purchase...

  6. Strontium Isotope Study of Coal Untilization By-products Interacting with Environmental Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J; Stewart, Brian W; Capo, Rosemary C; Chapman, Elizabeth C; Schroeder, Karl T; Brubaker, Tonya M

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sequential leaching experiments on coal utilization by-products (CUB) were coupled with chemical and strontium (Sr) isotopic analyses to better understand the influence of coal type and combustion processes on CUB properties and the release of elements during interaction with environmental waters during disposal. Class C fly ash tended to release the highest quantity of minor and trace elements—including alkaline earth elements, sodium, chromium, copper, manganese, lead, titanium, and zinc—during sequential extraction, with bottom ash yielding the lowest. Strontium isotope ratios ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) in bulk-CUB samples (total dissolution of CUB) are generally higher in class F ash than in class C ash. Bulk-CUB ratios appear to be controlled by the geologic source of the mineral matter in the feed coal, and by Sr added during desulfurization treatments. Leachates of the CUB generally have Sr isotope ratios that are different than the bulk value, demonstrating that Sr was not isotopically homogenized during combustion. Variations in the Sr isotopic composition of CUB leachates were correlated with mobility of several major and trace elements; the data suggest that arsenic and lead are held in phases that contain the more radiogenic (high-{sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) component. A changing Sr isotope ratio of CUB-interacting waters in a disposal environment could forecast the release of certain strongly bound elements of environmental concern. This study lays the groundwork for the application of Sr isotopes as an environmental tracer for CUB–water interaction.

  7. Conversion of high carbon refinery by-products. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katta, S.; Henningsen, G.; Lin, Y.Y.; O`Donnell, J.

    1996-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the project is to demonstrate that a partial oxidation system, which utilizes a transport reactor, is a viable means of converting refinery wastes, byproducts, and other low value materials into valuable products. The primary product would be a high quality fuel gas, which could also be used as a source of hydrogen. The concept involves subjecting the hydrocarbon feed to pyrolysis and steam gasification in a circulating bed of solids. Carbon residue formed during pyrolysis, as well as metals in the feed, are captured by the circulating solids which are returned to the bottom of the transport reactor. Air or oxygen is introduced in this lower zone and sufficient carbon is burned, sub-stoichiometrically, to provide the necessary heat for the endothermic pyrolysis and gasification reactions. The hot solids and gases leaving this zone pass upward to contact the feed material and continue the gasification process. The Transport Reactor Test Unit (TRTU) was commissioned to conduct studies on pyrolysis of Rose Bottoms using spent FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracker) catalyst as the circulating medium and gasification of this carbon over a temperature range of 1,600 to 1,700 F. The Rose Bottoms (Residuum Oil Supercritical Extraction) was produced in the Rose unit. Studies were done in the Bench Scale Reactor Unit (BRU) to develop suitable catalyst formulations and to study the steam reforming of methane and propane in support of the experiments to be conducted in the TRTU. Studies were also conducted on gasification of coke breeze, petroleum cokes and carbon deposited on FCC catalyst. The catalytic effect of potassium on gasification of these solids was studied. Studies were conducted in the CFS (cold flow simulator) to investigate flow problems experienced in the TRTU. Results from these studies are presented in this report.

  8. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre' Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2006-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the second six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts and examination of carbon material, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking. Investigation of coal extraction as a method to produce RCO continues; the reactor modifications to filter the products hot and to do multi-stage extraction improve extraction yields from {approx}50 % to {approx}70%. Carbon characterization of co-cokes for use as various carbon artifacts continues.

  9. Land application uses for dry flue gas desulfurization by-products: Phase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick, W.; Bigham, J.; Forster, R.; Hitzhusen, F.; Lal, R.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.; Haefner, R.; Rowe, G.

    1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    New flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbing technologies create a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction product that contains sulfate and sulfite, and coal fly ash. Generally, dry FGD by-products are treated as solid wastes and disposed in landfills. However, landfill sites are becoming scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. Provided the environmental impacts are socially and scientifically acceptable, beneficial uses via recycling can provide economic benefits to both the producer and the end user of the FGD. A study titled ''Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products'' was initiated in December, 1990 to develop and demonstrate large volume, beneficial uses of FGD by-products. Phase 1 and Phase 2 reports have been published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA. Phase 3 objectives were to demonstrate, using field studies, the beneficial uses of FGD by-products (1) as an amendment material on agricultural lands and on abandoned surface coal mine land, (2) as an engineering material for soil stabilization and raid repair, and (3) to assess the environmental and economic impacts of such beneficial uses. Application of dry FGD by-product to three soils in place of agricultural limestone increased alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and corn (Zea may L.) yields. No detrimental effects on soil and plant quality were observed.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold H. Schobert; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand environmental and cost-effective strategies for the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs), mainly unburned carbon in fly ash. Unburned carbon is nowadays regarded as a waste product and its fate is mainly disposal, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, the principal objective of this work was to characterize and utilize the unburned carbon in fly ash for the production of activated carbons. The unburned carbon samples were collected from different combustion systems, including pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone, a stoker, and a fluidized bed combustor. LOI (loss-on-ignition), proximate, ultimate, and petrographic analyses were conducted, and the surface areas of the samples were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The LOIs of the unburned carbon samples varied between 21.79-84.52%. The proximate analyses showed that all the samples had very low moisture contents (0.17 to 3.39 wt %), while the volatile matter contents varied between 0.45 to 24.82 wt%. The elemental analyses show that all the unburned carbon samples consist mainly of carbon with very little hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen In addition, the potential use of unburned carbon as precursor for activated carbon (AC) was investigated. Activated carbons with specific surface area up to 1075m{sup 2}/g were produced from the unburned carbon. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was related to the properties of the unburned carbon feedstock and the activation conditions used. It was found that not all the unburned carbon samples are equally suited for activation, and furthermore, their potential as activated carbons precursors could be inferred from their physical and chemical properties. The developed porosity of the activated carbon was a function of the oxygen content, porosity and H/C ratio of the parent unburned carbon feedstock. It was observed that extended activation times and high activation temperatures increased the porosity of the produced activated carbon at the expense of the solid yield. The development of activated carbon from unburned carbon in fly ash has been proven to be a success by this study in terms of the higher surface areas of the resultant activated carbons, which are comparable with commercial activated carbons. However, unburned carbon samples obtained from coal-fired power plants as by-product have high ash content, which is unwanted for the production of activated carbons. Therefore, the separation of unburned carbon from the fly ash is expected to be beneficial for the utilization of unburned carbon to produce activated carbons with low ash content.

  11. Applications developed for byproduct /sup 85/Kr and tritium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remini, W.C.; Case, F.N.; Haff, K.W.; Tiegs, S.M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radionuclides, krypton-85 and tritium, both of which are gases under ordinary conditions, are used in many applications in industries and by the military forces. Krypton-85 is produced during the fissioning of uranium and is released during the dissolution of spent-fuel elements. It is a chemically inert gas that emits 0.695-MeV beta rays and a small yield of 0.54-MeV gammas over a half life of 10.3 years. Much of the /sup 85/Kr currently produced is released to the atmosphere; however, large-scale reprocessing of fuel will require collection of the gas and storage as a waste product. An alternative to storage is utilization, and since the chemical and radiation characteristics of /sup 85/Kr make this radionuclide a relatively low hazard from the standpoint of contamination and biological significance, a number of uses have been developed. Tritium is produced as a byproduct of the nuclear-weapons program, and it has a half life of 12.33 years. It has a 0.01861-MeV beta emission and no gamma emission. The absence of a gamma-ray energy eliminates the need for external shielding of the devices utilizing tritium, thus making them easily transportable. Many of the applications require only small quantities of /sup 85/Kr or tritium; however, these uses are important to the technology base of the nation. A significant development that has the potential for beneficial utilization of large quantities of /sup 85/Kr and of tritium involves their use in the production of low-level lighting devices. Since these lights are free from external fuel supplies, have a long half life (> 10 years), are maintenance-free, reliable, and easily deployed, both military and civilian airfield-lighting applications are being studied.

  12. aromatic hydrocarbon emissions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Detection of mid-infrared Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission Features from the Small Magellanic Cloud Astrophysics...

  13. aromatic heterocyclic compounds: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Infrared Spectroscopy of Matrix-Isolated Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds and Their Ions. 6....

  14. aromatic hydrocarbon cations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF NITROGENATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CATIONS FROM 0.7 TO 2.5...

  15. aromatic hydrocarbon emission: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Detection of mid-infrared Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission Features from the Small Magellanic Cloud Astrophysics...

  16. aromatic hydrocarbons exhibited: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 14 through March 7, 2014 Opening Reception: Friday, February 14, 5-8PM TRI-COUNTY HIGH Berdichevsky, Victor 443 The Behavior of the Aromatic Features in M101 HII...

  17. Biodegradability of select polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (pah) mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Anuradha M.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are environmentally significant because of their ubiquity and the toxicity of some. Their recalcitrance and persistence makes them problematic environmental contaminants. Microbial degradation is considered...

  18. Modeling the biodegradability and physicochemical properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitriou-Christidis, Petros

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The biodegradability and physicochemical properties of unsubstituted and methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated. The focus was on the development of models expressing the influence of molecular structure and properties...

  19. Biodegradability of select polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (pah) mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Anuradha M.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are environmentally significant because of their ubiquity and the toxicity of some. Their recalcitrance and persistence makes them problematic environmental contaminants. Microbial degradation is considered...

  20. New correlation accurately calculates water solubilities of aromatics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Bu, L.; Nijhawan, S. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States))

    1994-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A new correlation calculates reliable aromatics solubilities in water down to very low concentrations. The correlation, based on boiling point, can be used for initial engineering studies. The importance of hydrocarbon solubility in water is increasing because of health, safety, and environmental issues. The paper begins with a discussion of the importance of solubility, even at low concentrations. The new correlation is described, aromatics are compared with paraffins, and the new correlation is compared with the API correlation.

  1. Catalytic hydrogenation of an aromatic sulfonyl chloride into thiophenol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rouckout, Nicolas Julien

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    to the facile oxidation by air into disulfides [3]. Many aliphatic thiols are important starting materials for the synthesis of crop- protection agents, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and polysulfides. They are also widely used as polymerization regulators... for the preparation of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, dyes, pigments, rubber, plastics and metal finishing [3]. The current market volume for aromatic thiols was determined to be more than 10 million pounds per year [4]. Aromatic thiols are commonly synthesized...

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon distributions in Mississippi Fan sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandberg, William Allan

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON DISTRIBUTIONS IN MISSISSIPPI FAN SEDIMENTS A Thesis by WILLIAM ALLAN SANDBERG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Oceanography POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON DISTRIBUTIONS IN MISSISSIPPI FAN SEDIMENTS A Thesis by WILLIAM ALLAN SANDBERG Approved as to style and content by: James M. Brooks (Chairman of Committee) Leis M...

  3. Extractant composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Barbara F. (Los Alamos, NM); Jarvinen, Gordon D. (Los Alamos, NM); Ryan, Robert R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An organic extracting solution useful for separating elements of the actinide series of the periodic table from elements of the lanthanide series, where both are in trivalent form. The extracting solution consists of a primary ligand and a secondary ligand, preferably in an organic solvent. The primary ligand is a substituted monothio-1,3-dicarbonyl, which includes a substituted 4-acyl-2-pyrazolin-5-thione, such as 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT). The secondary ligand is a substituted phosphine oxide, such as trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO).

  4. Emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanshan Xu; Wenxin Liu; Shu Tao [Peking University, Beijing (China). Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Environmental Sciences

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emission of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) listed as U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) priority pollutants from major sources in China were compiled. Geographical distribution and temporal change of the PAH emission, as well as emission profiles, are discussed. It was estimated that the total PAH emission in China was 25,300 tons in 2003. The emission profile featured a relatively higher portion of high molecular weight (HMW) species with carcinogenic potential due to large contributions of domestic coal and coking industry. Among various sources, biomass burning, domestic coal combustion, and the coking industry contributed 60%, 20%, and 16% of the total emission, respectively. Total emission, emission density, emission intensity, and emission per capita showed geographical variations. In general, the southeastern provinces were characterized by higher emission density, while those in western and northern China featured higher emission intensity and population-normalized emission. Although energy consumption in China went up continuously during the past two decades, annual emission of PAHs fluctuated depending on the amount of domestic coal consumption, coke production, and the efficiency of energy utilization. 47 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products. Phase 2 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stehouwer, R.; Dick, W.; Bigham, J. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was initiated in December 1990 to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products. A Phase 1 report provided results of an extensive characterization of chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of 58 dry FGD by-product samples. The Phase 1 report concluded that high volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics related to their ability to substitute for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mine lands). Phase 2 objectives were (1) to conduct laboratory and greenhouse studies of FGD and soil (spoil) mixtures for agronomic and engineering applications, (2) to initiate field studies related to high volume agronomic and engineering uses, and (3) to develop the basic methodological framework for estimation of the financial and economic costs and benefits to society of several FGD reuse options and to make some preliminary runs of economic models. High volume beneficial reuses of dry FGD by-products have been successfully demonstrated. Adverse environmental impacts have been negligible. Although few sources of dry FGD by-products currently exist in Ohio and the United States there is potential for smaller coal-fired facilities to adopt S0{sub 2} scrubbing technologies that produce dry FGD material. Also much of what we have learned from studies on dry FGD by-products is applicable to the more prevalent wet FGD by-products. The adaptation of the technologies demonstrated in this project seem to be not only limited by economic constraints, but even more so, by the need to create awareness of the market potential of using these FGD by-products.

  6. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products, Phase 1 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. It is highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. The results indicated the chemical composition of the FGD by-product materials were dominated by Ca, S, Al, and Si. Many of the elements regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency reside primarily in the fly ash. Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD by-product materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

  7. Manganese peroxidase mRNA and enzyme activity levels during bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil with Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogan, B.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Schoenike, B.; Lamar, R.T.; Cullen, D. [Forest Service Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mRNA extraction from soil and quantitation by competitive reverse transcription-PCR were combined to study the expression of three manganese peroxidase (MnP) genes during removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium grown in presterilized soil. Periods of high mnp transcript levels and extractable MnP enzyme activity were temporally correlated, although separated by a short (1- to 2-day) lag period. This time frame also coincided with maximal rates of fluorene oxidation and chrysene disappearance in soil cultures, supporting the hypothesis that high ionization potential polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are oxidized in soil via MnP-dependent mechanisms. The patterns of transcript abundance over time in soil-grown P. chrysosporium were similar for all three of the mnp mRNAs studied, indicating that transcription of this gene family may be coordinately regulated under these growth conditions. 47 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Long-range transport of particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at Cape Hedo remote island site in the East China Sea between 2005 and 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) for 2004. Atmos.of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in ambient air throughpolycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban air of Hong Kong.

  9. Design manual for management of solid by-products from advanced coal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing coal conversion technologies face major obstacles in byproduct management. This project has developed several management strategies based on field trials of small-scale landfills in an earlier phase of the project, as well as on published/unpublished sources detailing regulatory issues, current industry practice, and reuse opportunities. Field testing, which forms the basis for several of the disposal alternatives presented in this design manual, was limited to byproducts from Ca-based dry SO{sub 2} control technologies, circulating fluidized bed combustion ash, and bubbling bed fluidized bed combustion ash. Data on byproducts from other advanced coal technologies and on reuse opportunities are drawn from other sources (citations following Chapter 3). Field results from the 5 test cases examined under this project, together with results from other ongoing research, provide a basis for predictive modeling of long-term performance of some advanced coal byproducts on exposure to ambient environment. This manual is intended to provide a reference database and development plan for designing, permitting, and operating facilities where advanced coal technology byproducts are managed.

  10. Technical support for the Ohio Coal Technology Program. Volume 1, Baseline of knowledge concerning by-product characteristics: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1989-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LRl and comprises two volumes. Volume I presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume II consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

  11. Metal extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covington, J.W.; Whittemore, R.G.

    1980-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In a process according to the present invention uranium is extracted into solution from its ore by leaching with an aqueous solution containing peroxomonosulphuric acid, the peroxoacid oxidizing the uranium through to its hexavalent state. Preferably the leaching is carried out at a temperature in the range of 50* to 100* C. The leach liquor can initially contain additional amounts of sulphuric acid or merely that present by virtue of the method of making the peroxomonosulphuric acid. In a preferred method of operation, the peroxoacid is introduced progressively into the leach liquor during the course of the leaching so as to maintain an electrochemical potential in the range of 450 to 650 mV. By use of the process, uranium is cleanly extracted into solution.

  12. Technologies for Extracting Valuable Metals and Compounds from Geothermal Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Stephen [SIMBOL Materials

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary Simbol Materials studied various methods of extracting valuable minerals from geothermal brines in the Imperial Valley of California, focusing on the extraction of lithium, manganese, zinc and potassium. New methods were explored for managing the potential impact of silica fouling on mineral extraction equipment, and for converting silica management by-products into commercial products.` Studies at the laboratory and bench scale focused on manganese, zinc and potassium extraction and the conversion of silica management by-products into valuable commercial products. The processes for extracting lithium and producing lithium carbonate and lithium hydroxide products were developed at the laboratory scale and scaled up to pilot-scale. Several sorbents designed to extract lithium as lithium chloride from geothermal brine were developed at the laboratory scale and subsequently scaled-up for testing in the lithium extraction pilot plant. Lithium The results of the lithium studies generated the confidence for Simbol to scale its process to commercial operation. The key steps of the process were demonstrated during its development at pilot scale: 1. Silica management. 2. Lithium extraction. 3. Purification. 4. Concentration. 5. Conversion into lithium hydroxide and lithium carbonate products. Results show that greater than 95% of the lithium can be extracted from geothermal brine as lithium chloride, and that the chemical yield in converting lithium chloride to lithium hydroxide and lithium carbonate products is greater than 90%. The product purity produced from the process is consistent with battery grade lithium carbonate and lithium hydroxide. Manganese and zinc Processes for the extraction of zinc and manganese from geothermal brine were developed. It was shown that they could be converted into zinc metal and electrolytic manganese dioxide after purification. These processes were evaluated for their economic potential, and at the present time Simbol Materials is evaluating other products with greater commercial value. Potassium Silicotitanates, zeolites and other sorbents were evaluated as potential reagents for the extraction of potassium from geothermal brines and production of potassium chloride (potash). It was found that zeolites were effective at removing potassium but the capacity of the zeolites and the form that the potassium is in does not have economic potential. Iron-silica by-product The conversion of iron-silica by-product produced during silica management operations into more valuable materials was studied at the laboratory scale. Results indicate that it is technically feasible to convert the iron-silica by-product into ferric chloride and ferric sulfate solutions which are precursors to a ferric phosphate product. However, additional work to purify the solutions is required to determine the commercial viability of this process. Conclusion Simbol Materials is in the process of designing its first commercial plant based on the technology developed to the pilot scale during this project. The investment in the commercial plant is hundreds of millions of dollars, and construction of the commercial plant will generate hundreds of jobs. Plant construction will be completed in 2016 and the first lithium products will be shipped in 2017. The plant will have a lithium carbonate equivalent production capacity of 15,000 tonnes per year. The gross revenues from the project are expected to be approximately $ 80 to 100 million annually. During this development program Simbol grew from a company of about 10 people to over 60 people today. Simbol is expected to employ more than 100 people once the plant is constructed. Simbol Materials’ business is scalable in the Imperial Valley region because there are eleven geothermal power plants already in operation, which allows Simbol to expand its business from one plant to multiple plants. Additionally, the scope of the resource is vast in terms of potential products such as lithium, manganese and zinc and potentially potassium.

  13. IGCC and PFBC By-Products: Generation, Characteristics, and Management Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following report is a compilation of data on by-products/wastes from clean coal technologies, specifically integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC). DOE had two objectives in providing this information to EPA: (1) to familiarize EPA with the DOE CCT program, CCT by-products, and the associated efforts by DOE contractors in the area of CCT by-product management and (2) to provide information that will facilitate EPA's effort by complementing similar reports from industry groups, including CIBO (Council of Industrial Boiler Owners) and EEI USWAG (Edison Electric Institute Utility Solid Waste Activities Group). The EERC cooperated and coordinated with DOE CCT contractors and industry groups to provide the most accurate and complete data on IGCC and PFBC by-products, although these technologies are only now being demonstrated on the commercial scale through the DOE CCT program.

  14. RESIDUES FROM COAL CONVERSION AND UTILIZATION: ADVANCED MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND DISPOSED BYPRODUCT DIAGENESIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory J. McCarthy; Dean G. Grier

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the project are two-fold: (1) to upgrade semi-quantitative X-ray diffraction (QXRD) methods presently used in analyzing complex coal combustion by-product (CCB) systems, with the quantitative Rietveld method, and (2) to apply this method to a set of by-product materials that have been disposed or utilized for a long period (5 years or more) in contact with the natural environment, to further study the nature of CCB diagenesis. The project is organized into three tasks to accomplish these two goals: (1) thorough characterization of a set of previously analyzed disposed by-product materials, (2) development of a set of CCB-specific protocols for Rietveld QXRD, and (3) characterization of an additional set of disposed CCB materials, including application of the protocols for Rietveld QXRD developed in Task 2.

  15. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN KAZAKHASTAN: USING OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION BY-PRODUCT SULFUR FOR COST-EFFECTIVE SECONDARY END-USE PRODUCTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KALB, P.D.; VAGIN, S.; BEALL, P.W.; LEVINTOV, B.L.

    2004-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Republic of Kazakhstan is continuing to develop its extensive petroleum reserves in the Tengiz region of the northeastern part of the Caspian Sea. Large quantities of by-product sulfur are being produced as a result of the removal of hydrogen sulfide from the oil and gas produced in the region. Lack of local markets and economic considerations limit the traditional outlets for by-product sulfur and the buildup of excess sulfur is a becoming a potential economic and environmental liability. Thus, new applications for re-use of by-product sulfur that will benefit regional economies including construction, paving and waste treatment are being developed. One promising application involves the cleanup and treatment of mercury at a Kazakhstan chemical plant. During 19 years of operation at the Pavlodar Khimprom chlor-alkali production facility, over 900 tons of mercury was lost to the soil surrounding and beneath the buildings. The Institute of Metallurgy and Ore Benefication (Almaty) is leading a team to develop and demonstrate a vacuum-assisted thermal process to extract the mercury from the soil and concentrate it as pure, elemental mercury, which will then be treated using the Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process. The use of locally produced sulfur will recycle a low-value industrial by-product to treat hazardous waste and render it safe for return to the environment, thereby helping to solve two problems at once. SPSS chemically stabilizes mercury to mercuric sulfide, which has a low vapor pressure and low solubility, and then physically encapsulates the material in a durable, monolithic solid sulfur polymer matrix. Thus, mercury is placed in a solid form very much like stable cinnabar, the form in which it is found in nature. Previous research and development has shown that the process can successfully encapsulate up to 33 wt% mercury in the solid form, while still meeting very strict regulatory standards for leachable mercury (0.025 mg/l in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure). The research and development to deploy Kazakhstan recycled sulfur for secondary applications described in this paper is being conducted with support from the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) and the U.S. Department of Energy Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (DOE IPP).

  16. Review Chlorination Disinfection By-Products in Drinking Water and Congenital Anomalies: Review and Meta-Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark J. Nieuwenhuijsen; David Martinez; James Grellier; James Bennett; Nicky Best; Nina Iszatt; Martine Vrijheid; Mireille B. Toledano

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to review epidemiologic evidence, provide summary risk estimates of the association between exposure to chlorination disinfection by-products (DBPs) and congenital anomalies, and provide recommendations for future studies. Data s o u r c e s a n d extraction: We included all published epidemiologic studies that evaluated a relationship between an index of DBP exposure (treatment, water source, DBP measurements, and both DBP measurements and personal characteristics) and risk of congenital anomalies. When three or more studies examined the same exposure index and congenital anomaly, we conducted a metaanalysis to obtain a summary risk estimate comparing the highest exposure group with the lowest exposure group. When five or more studies examined total trihalomethane (TTHM) exposure and a specific congenital anomaly, we conducted a meta-analysis to obtain exposure–response risk estimates per 10 µg/L TTHM. Data synthesis: For all congenital anomalies combined, the meta-analysis gave a statistically significant excess risk for high versus low exposure to water chlorination or TTHM [17%; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 3–34] based on a small number of studies. The meta-analysis also suggested a statistically significant excess risk for ventricular septal defects (58%; 95 % CI, 21–107), but this was

  17. Stimulating the anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated sediments by providing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    Stimulating the anaerobic degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated sediments to simulate the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in anaerobic contaminated sediments was investigated as the sole electron acceptor. Providing graphite electrodes as an electron acceptor in hydrocarbon

  18. UV RESONANCE W A N SPECTROSCOPY: A NEW TECHNIQUE FOR SPECIATION OF AROMATICS IN COMPLEX MATRICES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asher, Sanford A.

    UV RESONANCE W A N SPECTROSCOPY: A NEW TECHNIQUE FOR SPECIATION OF AROMATICS IN COMPLEX MATRICES resonance Raman spectroscopy ( 1). appears to be uniquely suited for studies of aromatic species in fuels

  19. Development of genetically engineered bacteria for production of selected aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, Thomas E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Watkins, Carolyn S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bulmer, Deborah K. (Henderson, NV); Johnson, Bruce F. (Scotia, NY); Amaratunga, Mohan (Clifton Park, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cloning and expression of genes in the common aromatic pathway of E. coli are described. A compound for which chorismate, the final product of the common aromatic pathway, is an anabolic intermediate can be produced by cloning and expressing selected genes of the common aromatic pathway and the genes coding for enzymes necessary to convert chorismate to the selected compound. Plasmids carrying selected genes of the common aromatic pathway are also described.

  20. No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl ([sup 18]F) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yushin Ding; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1993-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

  1. Succinic Acid Production with Reduced By-Product Formation in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Succinic Acid Production with Reduced By-Product Formation in the Fermentation; accepted 13 July 2000 Abstract: Succinic acid was produced by fermentation of Anaerobiospirillum-product acetic acid. The gram ratio of suc- cinic acid to acetic acid was 25.8:1, which is 6.5 times higher than

  2. Isomer discrimination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Murchison meteorite by resonant ionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Vries, Mattanjah S.

    Isomer discrimination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Murchison meteorite by resonant between isomers of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the Murchison meteorite. We measured the 2C-R2PI: Resonant ionization; Jet cooling; Mass spectrometry; Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Murchison meteorite

  3. Toxicity cutoff of aromatic hydrocarbons for luminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    Toxicity cutoff of aromatic hydrocarbons for luminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri So Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons a b s t r a c t Effects of individual petroleum hydrocarbons hydrocarbons, including benzene and its derivatives and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), were chosen

  4. Prediction of Solid Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Solubility in Water with the NRTL-PR Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Prediction of Solid Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Solubility in Water with the NRTL-PR Model of solid polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water. For this purpose, we first validate our methodology for fluid phase equilibria predictions of aromatic hydrocarbons and gas (CO2, C2H6) mixtures. Finally, we

  5. Aggregation Behavior of Two Asphaltenic Fractions in Aromatic Solvents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loh, Watson

    Aggregation Behavior of Two Asphaltenic Fractions in Aromatic Solvents Rahoma S. Mohamed* and Anto. The results indicated possible asphaltene aggregation as well as the probable existence of critical micelle fraction. Average molecular areas for asphaltenes adsorbed at different interfaces estimated from surface

  6. UV Irradiation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Clemett,3 Richard N. Zare3 Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water ice were exposed to ultra meteorites. Hydrogen and deu- terium atoms exchange readily between the PAHs and the ice, which may explain abundant and widespread class of carbon-car- rying gaseous species is believed to be PAHs (3­5). In dense

  7. Desorption Kinetics for Field-Aged Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockne, Karl J.

    Harbor Estuary. Desorption kinetics for PAHs with a log octanol- water partition coefficient greater than This study considers desorption kinetics for 12 field-aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) desorbing 6 were well- described by a one-domain diffusion model that assumes that PAHs are initially

  8. Biodegradation of Bicyclic and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockne, Karl J.

    solubility of oxygen in water. Therefore, our present understanding of PAH degradation in aerobic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are known to be biodegraded under aerobic conditions, most contaminated sediments are anaerobic. With recent results demonstrating that some bicyclics and PAHs can

  9. Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  10. Ambient aromatic hydrocarbon measurements at Welgegund, South Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaars, K.; Beukes, J. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Venter, A. D.; Josipovic, M.; Pienaar, J. J.; Vakkari, Ville; Aaltonen, H.; Laakso, H.; Kulmala, M.; Tiitta, P.; Guenther, Alex B.; Hellen, H.; Laakso, L.; Hakola, H.

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are associated with direct adverse human health effects and can have negative impacts on ecosystems due to their toxicity, as well as indirect negative effects through the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol that affect human health, crop production and regional climate. Measurements were conducted at the Welgegund measurement station (South Africa) that is considered to be a regionally representative background site. However, the site is occasionally impacted by plumes from major anthropogenic source regions in the interior of South Africa, which include the western Bushveld Igneous Complex (e.g. platinum, base metal and ferrochrome smelters), the eastern Bushveld Igneous Complex (platinum and ferrochrome smelters), the Johannesburg-Pretoria metropolitan conurbation (>10 million people), the Vaal Triangle (e.g. petrochemical and industries), the Mpumalanga Highveld (e.g. coal-fired power plants and petrochemical industry) and also a region of anti-cyclonic recirculation of air mass over the interior of South Africa. The aromatic hydrocarbon measurements were conducted with an automated sampler on Tenax-TA and Carbopack-B adsorbent tubes with heated inlet for one year. Samples were collected twice a week for two hours during daytime and two hours 1 during night-time. A thermal desorption unit, connected to a gas chromatograph and a mass 2 selective detector was used for sample preparation and analysis. Results indicated that the 3 monthly median total aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations ranged between 0.01 to 3.1 ppb. 4 Benzene levels did not exceed local air quality standards. Toluene was the most abundant 5 species, with an annual median concentration of 0.63 ppb. No statistically significant 6 differences in the concentrations measured during daytime and night-time were found and no distinct seasonal patterns were observed. Air mass back trajectory analysis proved that the lack of seasonal cycles could be attributed to patterns determining the origin of the air masses sampled. Aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations were in general significantly higher in air masses that passed over anthropocentrically impacted regions. Interspecies correlations and ratios gave some indications of the possible sources for the different aromatic hydrocarbons in the source regions defined in the paper. The highest contribution of aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations to ozone formation potential was also observed in plumes passing over anthropocentrically impacted regions.

  11. Sulfur by-product formation in the Stretford process. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trofe, T.W.; DeBerry, D.W.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid redox sulfur recovery processes remove H2S from sour gas streams and produce elemental sulfur for sale or disposal. The Stretford Process is one of the oldest commercial liquid redox processes and it is based on a vanadium and anthraquinone redox system. Improvements in the operability and reliability of the Stretford process would be beneficial to the process user. The report presents results of research focused on developing an understanding of the process parameters and factors that impact sulfur by-product formation (e.g., sodium thiosulfate and sodium sulfate) in the Stretford process. The information in the report can help current Stretford plant process users better understand the operations of their plants, especially with regards to sulfur by-product formation and control strategies.

  12. Solar Grade Silicon from Agricultural By-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard M. Laine

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, Mayaterials developed a low cost, low energy and low temperature method of purifying rice hull ash to high purity (5-6Ns) and converting it by carbothermal reduction to solar grade quality silicon (Sipv) using a self-designed and built electric arc furnace (EAF). Outside evaluation of our process by an independent engineering firm confirms that our technology greatly lowers estimated operating expenses (OPEX) to $5/kg and capital expenses (CAPEX) to $24/kg for Sipv production, which is well below best-in-class plants using a Siemens process approach (OPEX of 14/kg and CAPEX of $87/kg, respectively). The primary limiting factor in the widespread use of photovoltaic (PV) cells is the high cost of manufacturing, compared to more traditional sources to reach 6 g Sipv/watt (with averages closer to 8+g/watt). In 2008, the spot price of Sipv rose to $450/kg. While prices have since dropped to a more reasonable $25/kg; this low price level is not sustainable, meaning the longer-term price will likely return to $35/kg. The 6-8 g Si/watt implies that the Sipv used in a module will cost $0.21-0.28/watt for the best producers (45% of the cost of a traditional solar panel), a major improvement from the cost/wafer driven by the $50/kg Si costs of early 2011, but still a major hindrance in fulfilling DOE goal of lowering the cost of solar energy below $1/watt. The solar cell industry has grown by 40% yearly for the past eight years, increasing the demand for Sipv. As such, future solar silicon price spikes are expected in the next few years. Although industry has invested billions of dollars to meet this ever-increasing demand, the technology to produce Sipv remains largely unchanged requiring the energy intensive, and chlorine dependent Siemens process or variations thereof. While huge improvements have been made, current state-of-the-art industrial plant still use 65 kWh/kg of silicon purified. Our technology offers a key distinction to other technologies as it starts one step upstream from all other Sipv production efforts. Our process starts by producing high purity SiO2/C feedstocks from which Sipv can be produced in a single, chlorine free, final EAF step. Specifically, our unique technology, and the resultant SiO2/C product can serve as high purity feedstocks to existing metallurgical silicon (Simet) producers, allowing them to generate Sipv with existing US manufacturing infrastructure, reducing the overall capital and commissioning schedule. Our low energy, low CAPEX and OPEX process purifies the silica and carbon present in rice hull ash (RHA) at low temperatures (< 200C) to produce high purity (5-6 Ns) feedstock for production of Sipv using furnaces similar to those used to produce Simet. During the course of this project we partnered with Wadham Energy LP (Wadham), who burns 220k ton of rice hulls (RH)/yr generating 200 GWh of electricity/yr and >30k ton/yr RHA. The power generation step produces much more energy (42 kWh/kg of final silicon produced) than required to purify the RHA (5 kWh/kg of Sipv, compared to 65 kWh/kg noted above. Biogenic silica offers three very important foundations for producing high purity silicon. First, wastes from silica accumulating plants, such as rice, corn, many grasses, algae and grains, contain very reactive, amorphous silica from which impurities are easily removed. Second, plants take up only a limited set of, and minimal quantities of the heavy metals present in nature, meaning fewer minerals must be removed. Third, biomass combustion generates a product with intrinsic residual carbon, mixed at nanometer length scales with the SiO2. RHA is 80-90 wt% high surface area (20 m2/g), amorphous SiO2 with some simple mineral content mixed intimately with 5-15 wt% carbon. The mineral content is easily removed by low cost, acid washes using Mayaterials IP, leading to purified rice hull ash (RHAclean) at up to 6N purity. This highly reactive silica is partially extracted from RHAclean at 200 C in an environmentally benign process to adjust SiO2:C ratios to those needed in EA

  13. The utilization of flue gas desulfurization waste by-products in construction brick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berryman, Charles Wayne

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APPENDIX D. TEST PROCEDURES APPENDIX E. CONVERSION TABLES VITA 85 90 93 96 99 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Model for FGD Waste By-Product Research Unconfined Compressive Strength for Fly Ash Mixed with Various Inductions of Portland Cement 15... properties such as weight, durability, strength, density, etc. Varying mixes of bottom ash, fly ash, portland cement, and sand will be tested for possible enhancement of the hemihydrate. Also, a mix design that best utilizes all the waste by...

  14. THE INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF NEUTRAL POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ricca, Alessandra [Carl Sagan Center, SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Suite 100, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr. [Entry Systems and Technology Division, Mail Stop 230-3, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Allamandola, Louis J., E-mail: Alessandra.Ricca-1@nasa.gov, E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.gov [Space Science Division, Mail Stop 245-6, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The mid-infrared spectra of neutral homogeneous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) clusters have been computed using density functional theory including an empirical correction for dispersion. The C-H out-of-plane bending modes are redshifted for all the clusters considered in this work. The magnitude of the redshift and the peak broadening are dependent on PAH size, shape, and on the PAH arrangement in the cluster.

  15. Analytic technique measures aromatics in soil and water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, K.A.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on a technique for detecting aromatic compounds in soil and water. The technique traces its roots to a chemical reaction discovered in 1877. The reaction is an organic synthesis process that has been harnessed for the production of high-octane gasoline, synthetic rubber, plastics and synthetic detergents. More than a century later the same chemistry is used as the basis for an analytical technique that quantifies contamination caused by products.

  16. Long-Term Column Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.; White, Fredrick; Rohar, P.C.; Kim, A.G

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. The stability of mercury and any co-captured elements in the by-products could have a large economic impact if it reduced by-product sales or increasing their disposal costs. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed continuous leaching of a select subset of the available sample pairs using four leachants: water (pH=5.7), dilute sulfuric acid (pH=1.2), dilute acetic acid (pH=2.9), and sodium carbonate (pH=11.1). This report describes results obtained for mercury, arsenic, and selenium during the 5-month leaching experiments.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS FOR THE RE-EVOLUTION OF MERCURY INTO ECOSYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.A. Withum; R.M. Statnick

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EPA and state environmental agencies are suggesting that mercury (Hg) in coal combustion by-products is re-emitted into local ecosystems by additional processing to final products (i.e., wallboard, etc.), by dissolution into groundwater, or by reactions with anaerobic bacteria. This perception may limit the opportunities to use coal combustion by-products in recycle/reuse applications. In this program, CONSOL Energy is conducting a comprehensive sampling and analytical program to address this concern. If the results of this work demonstrate that re-emissions of Hg from waste disposal and by-product utilization are over-stated, additional regulations regarding coal combustion, waste disposal, and waste material utilization will not be required. This will result in continued low energy cost that is beneficial to the national economy and stability of local economies that are dependent on coal. In this quarter, laboratory equipment was assembled and blank test runs were made, manufactured aggregate and spray dryer ash samples were collected and leached, and fly ash and FGD slurry samples from an Ohio bituminous coal-fired utility were collected for leaching.

  18. Utilizing the heat content of gas-to-liquids by-product streams for commercial power generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adegoke, Adesola Ayodeji

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gas-to-liquids (GTL) processes produce a large fraction of by-products whose disposal or handling ordinarily becomes a cost rather than benefit. As an alternative strategy to market stranded gas reserves, GTL...

  19. Super critical fluid extraction of a crude oil bitumen-derived liquid and bitumen by carbon dioxide and propane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, M.D.; Hwang, J.; Hanson, F.V.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supercritical fluid extraction of complex hydrocarbon mixtures is important in separation processes, petroleum upgrading and enhanced oil recovery. In this study, a paraffinic crude oil, a bitumen- derived liquid and bitumen were extracted at several temperatures and pressures with carbon dioxide and propane to assess the effect of the size and type of compounds that makeup the feedstock on the extraction process. It was observed that the pure solvent density at the extraction conditions was not the sole variable governing extraction, and that the proximity of the extraction conditions to the pure solvent critical point affected the extraction yields and the compositions of the extracts. Heavier compounds reported to the extract phase as the extraction time increased at constant temperature and pressure and as the extraction pressure increased at constant temperature and extraction time for both the paraffin crude-propane and the bitumen-propane systems. This preferential extraction was not observed for the bitumen-derived liquid. The non-discriminatory extraction behavior of the bitumen-derived liquid was attributed to its thermal history and to the presence of the olefins and aromatics in the liquid. Phase behavior calculations using the Peng-Robinson equation of state and component lumping procedures provided reasonable agreement between calculated and experimental results for the crude oil and bitumen extractions, but failed in the prediction of the phase compositions for the bitumen-derived liquid extractions.

  20. Super critical fluid extraction of a crude oil bitumen-derived liquid and bitumen by carbon dioxide and propane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, M.D.; Hwang, J.; Hanson, F.V.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Supercritical fluid extraction of complex hydrocarbon mixtures is important in separation processes, petroleum upgrading and enhanced oil recovery. In this study, a paraffinic crude oil, a bitumen- derived liquid and bitumen were extracted at several temperatures and pressures with carbon dioxide and propane to assess the effect of the size and type of compounds that makeup the feedstock on the extraction process. It was observed that the pure solvent density at the extraction conditions was not the sole variable governing extraction, and that the proximity of the extraction conditions to the pure solvent critical point affected the extraction yields and the compositions of the extracts. Heavier compounds reported to the extract phase as the extraction time increased at constant temperature and pressure and as the extraction pressure increased at constant temperature and extraction time for both the paraffin crude-propane and the bitumen-propane systems. This preferential extraction was not observed for the bitumen-derived liquid. The non-discriminatory extraction behavior of the bitumen-derived liquid was attributed to its thermal history and to the presence of the olefins and aromatics in the liquid. Phase behavior calculations using the Peng-Robinson equation of state and component lumping procedures provided reasonable agreement between calculated and experimental results for the crude oil and bitumen extractions, but failed in the prediction of the phase compositions for the bitumen-derived liquid extractions.

  1. Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compouns as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

  2. Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.

    1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compounds as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

  3. Reduction of Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Zero-Valent Iron and Palladium Catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Hun; Shin, Won Sik; Ko, Seok-Oh; Kim, Myung-Chul

    2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is an alternative technology for soil and groundwater remediation. Zero valent iron, which is the most popular PRB material, is only applicable to halogenated aliphatic organics and some heavy metals. The objective of this study was to investigate reductive dechlorination of halogenated compounds and reduction of non-halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons using zero valent metals (ZVMs) and catalysts as reactive materials for PRBs. A group of small aromatic hydrocarbons such as monochlorophenols, phenol and benzene were readily reduced with palladium catalyst and zero valent iron. Poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also tested with the catalysts and zero valent metal combinations. The aromatic rings were reduced and partly reduced PAHs were found as the daughter compounds. The current study demonstrates reduction of aromatic compounds by ZVMs and modified catalysts and implicates that PRB is applicable not only for halogenated organic compounds but nonhalogenated aromatic compounds such as PAHs.

  4. UNDERGROUNG PLACEMENT OF COAL PROCESSING WASTE AND COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS BASED PASTE BACKFILL FOR ENHANCED MINING ECONOMICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y.P. Chugh; D. Biswas; D. Deb

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has successfully demonstrated that the extraction ratio in a room-and-pillar panel at an Illinois mine can be increased from the current value of approximately 56% to about 64%, with backfilling done from the surface upon completion of all mining activities. This was achieved without significant ground control problems due to the increased extraction ratio. The mined-out areas were backfilled from the surface with gob, coal combustion by-products (CCBs), and fine coal processing waste (FCPW)-based paste backfill containing 65%-70% solids to minimize short-term and long-term surface deformations risk. This concept has the potential to increase mine productivity, reduce mining costs, manage large volumes of CCBs beneficially, and improve the miner's health, safety, and environment. Two injection holes were drilled over the demonstration panel to inject the paste backfill. Backfilling was started on August 11, 1999 through the first borehole. About 9,293 tons of paste backfill were injected through this borehole with a maximum flow distance of 300-ft underground. On September 27, 2000, backfilling operation was resumed through the second borehole with a mixture of F ash and FBC ash. A high-speed auger mixer (new technology) was used to mix solids with water. About 6,000 tons of paste backfill were injected underground through this hole. Underground backfilling using the ''Groutnet'' flow model was simulated. Studies indicate that grout flow over 300-foot distance is possible. Approximately 13,000 tons of grout may be pumped through a single hole. The effect of backfilling on the stability of the mine workings was analyzed using SIUPANEL.3D computer program and further verified using finite element analysis techniques. Stiffness of the backfill mix is most critical for enhancing the stability of mine workings. Mine openings do not have to be completely backfilled to enhance their stability. Backfill height of about 50% of the seam height is adequate to minimize surface deformations. Freeman United Coal Company performed engineering economic evaluation studies for commercialization. They found that the costs for underground management at the Crown III mine would be slightly higher than surface management at this time. The developed technologies have commercial potential but each site must be analyzed on its merit. The Company maintains significant interest in commercializing the technology.

  5. aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading marine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Soil Microcosms: A Review CiteSeer Summary: Copyright 2001 Kansas State University Key words: bioremediation, denitrification, PAHs, sulfidogenesis...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic compounds progress Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aromatic compounds. 500 265 500 265 500 265 WAVELENGTH (nm) ARABIAN CRUDE LUBRICATING OIL... . 271 12;Although the spectra only give a qualitative analysis of the major types...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic blending compounds Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ring aromatic compounds. 500 265 500 265 500 265 WAVELENGTH (nm) ARABIAN CRUDE LUBRICATING OIL... . 271 12;Although the spectra only give a qualitative analysis of the major...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic organic compounds Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aromatic compounds. 500 265 500 265 500 265 WAVELENGTH (nm) ARABIAN CRUDE LUBRICATING OIL... . 271 12;Although the spectra only give a qualitative analysis of the major types...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic compounds effects Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aromatic compounds. 500 265 500 265 500 265 WAVELENGTH (nm) ARABIAN CRUDE LUBRICATING OIL... . 271 12;Although the spectra only give a qualitative analysis of the major types...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous polar aromatic Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Summary: is diffusion of the aqueous amine into the oil phase, then the polyurea formed early should be rich in aromatic... diisocyanate...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic compounds Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aromatic compounds. 500 265 500 265 500 265 WAVELENGTH (nm) ARABIAN CRUDE LUBRICATING OIL... . 271 12;Although the spectra only give a qualitative analysis of the major types...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic compounds part Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ring aromatic compounds. 500 265 500 265 500 265 WAVELENGTH (nm) ARABIAN CRUDE LUBRICATING OIL... . 271 12;Although the spectra only give a qualitative analysis of the major...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic compounds derived Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ring aromatic compounds. 500 265 500 265 500 265 WAVELENGTH (nm) ARABIAN CRUDE LUBRICATING OIL... . 271 12;Although the spectra only give a qualitative analysis of the major...

  14. Bimetallic cleavage of aromatic C-H bonds by rare-earth-metal complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, W; Huang, W; Dulong, F; Khan, SI; Cantat, T; Diaconescu, PL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Aromatic C-H Bonds by Rare Earth Metal Complexes Wenliangone week prior to use. Rare earth metal oxides (scandium,

  15. aromatic hydrocarbon water-soluble: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    naturally into the environment by (more) Bobak, Deanna M. 2010-01-01 12 Zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Open Access Theses and...

  16. aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of complex aromatic organic matter. While concerns remain as to the organic purity of the aerogel collection medium and the thermal effects associated 212 Conversion of polycyclic...

  17. aromatic amine 2-amino-3-methyl-9h-pyrido: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the reactions of amines with aldehydes and with aromatic nitro - compounds in acetonitrile. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Kinetic and equilibrium studies of...

  18. aromatic amine p-anilinoaniline: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the reactions of amines with aldehydes and with aromatic nitro - compounds in acetonitrile. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Kinetic and equilibrium studies of...

  19. The relative reactivity of formic esters with aromatic amines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markley, Max C.

    1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .MARKLEY I Vies* S ma y c . l k f c V i M t s RDQOSS 38M30 PREFACE. The purpose of this thesis was to determine the relative reactivity between aromatic amines and the esters of formic acid.It was proposed to first: deter­ mine the reactivity... be given Br .Ray Q,.Brewster , the director of this work, for his help and directions for carrying out this work, and to Br.Prank B.Bains for his kind assistance in many ways. 1.Broil,Journal fur Practische Chemie,1875,vol. 12,page 208. ( 2 ) TABLE...

  20. University of Delaware | Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation | Aromatics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSite Map SiteResearch Thrust Green Aromatics

  1. Potential for by-product recovery in geothermal energy operations issue paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document identifies and discusses the significant issues raised by the idea of recovering useful by-products from wastes (primarily spent brine) generated during geothermal power production. The physical availability of numerous valuable materials in geothermal brines has captured the interest of geothermal resource developers and other parties ever since their presence was known. The prospects for utilizing huge volumes of highly-saline geothermal brines for electricity generation in the Imperial Valley of California have served to maintain this interest in both private sector and government circles.

  2. Coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant of Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egorov, V.N.; Anikin, G.J. [Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works, (Russian Federation); Gross, M. [Krupp Koppers GmbH, Essen (Germany)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works, Russia, decided to erect a new coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant to replace the existing obsolete units and to improve the environmental conditions of the area. The paper deals with the technological concept and the design requirements. Commissioning is scheduled at the beginning of 1996. The paper describes H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} removal, sulfur recovery and ammonia destruction, primary gas cooling and electrostatic tar precipitation, and the distributed control system that will be installed.

  3. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

    1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This fourteenth quarterly report describes work done during the fourteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing presentations, and making and responding to two outside contacts.

  4. LARGE ABUNDANCES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN TITAN'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), E-18080 Granada (Spain); Dinelli, B. M. [ISAC-CNR, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E. [IAPS-INAF, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Moriconi, M. L. [ISAC-CNR, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J., E-mail: puertas@iaa.es [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States)

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 {mu}m in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al. We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 {mu}m. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} particles cm{sup -3}. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is {approx}430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 nm{sup 2}; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  5. Synthesis of condensed phases containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons fullerenes and nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to methods for producing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fullerenes, and nanotubes, comprising: a. heating at least one carbon-containing material to form a condensed phase comprising at least one polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon; b. collecting at least some of the condensed phase; c. reacting the condensed phase to form fullerenes and/or nanotubes.

  6. Interfacial effects in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor: degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    Interfacial effects in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor: degradation of polycyclic aromatic) was examined in a two-phase partitioning bioreactor (TPPB). TPPBs are characterized by a cell Bioreactor; Hydrophobicity 1. Introduction Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), many of which possess

  7. Information extraction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lemmond, Tracy D; Hanley, William G; Guensche, Joseph Wendell; Perry, Nathan C; Nitao, John J; Kidwell, Paul Brandon; Boakye, Kofi Agyeman; Glaser, Ron E; Prenger, Ryan James

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An information extraction system and methods of operating the system are provided. In particular, an information extraction system for performing meta-extraction of named entities of people, organizations, and locations as well as relationships and events from text documents are described herein.

  8. Succinic Acid as a Byproduct in a Corn-based Ethanol Biorefinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MBI International

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    MBI endeavored to develop a process for succinic acid production suitable for integration into a corn-based ethanol biorefinery. The project investigated the fermentative production of succinic acid using byproducts of corn mill operations. The fermentation process was attuned to include raw starch, endosperm, as the sugar source. A clean-not-sterile process was established to treat the endosperm and release the monomeric sugars. We developed the fermentation process to utilize a byproduct of corn ethanol fermentations, thin stillage, as the source of complex nitrogen and vitamin components needed to support succinic acid production in A. succinogenes. Further supplementations were eliminated without lowering titers and yields and a productivity above 0.6 g l-1 hr-1was achieved. Strain development was accomplished through generation of a recombinant strain that increased yields of succinic acid production. Isolation of additional strains with improved features was also pursued and frozen stocks were prepared from enriched, characterized cultures. Two recovery processes were evaluated at pilot scale and data obtained was incorporated into our economic analyses.

  9. Gas treatment and by-products recovery of Thailand`s first coke plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diemer, P.E.; Seyfferth, W. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Coke is needed in the blast furnace as the main fuel and chemical reactant and the main product of a coke plant. The second main product of the coke plant is coke oven gas. During treatment of the coke oven gas some coal chemicals like tar, ammonia, sulphur and benzole can be recovered as by-products. Since the market prices for these by-products are rather low and often erratic it does not in most cases justify the investment to recover these products. This is the reason why modern gas treatment plants only remove those impurities from the crude gas which must be removed for technical and environmental reasons. The cleaned gas, however, is a very valuable product as it replaces natural gas in steel work furnaces and can be used by other consumers. The surplus can be combusted in the boiler of a power plant. A good example for an optimal plant layout is the new coke oven facility of Thai Special Steel Industry (TSSI) in Rayong. The paper describes the TSSI`s coke oven gas treatment plant.

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS FOR THE RE-EVOLUTION OF MERCURY INTO ECOSYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.A. Withum; J.E. Locke; S.C. Tseng

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is concern that mercury (Hg) in coal combustion by-products might be emitted into the environment during processing to other products or after the disposal/landfill of these by-products. This perception may limit the opportunities to use coal combustion by-products in recycle/reuse applications and may result in additional, costly disposal regulations. In this program, CONSOL conducted a comprehensive sampling and analytical program to include ash, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludge, and coal combustion by-products. This work is necessary to help identify potential problems and solutions important to energy production from fossil fuels. The program objective was to evaluate the potential for mercury emissions by leaching or volatilization, to determine if mercury enters the water surrounding an active FGD disposal site and an active fly ash slurry impoundment site, and to provide data that will allow a scientific assessment of the issue. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test results showed that mercury did not leach from coal, bottom ash, fly ash, spray dryer/fabric filter ash or forced oxidation gypsum (FOG) in amounts leading to concentrations greater than the detection limit of the TCLP method (1.0 ng/mL). Mercury was detected at very low concentrations in acidic leachates from all of the fixated and more than half of the unfixated FGD sludge samples, and one of the synthetic aggregate samples. Mercury was not detected in leachates from any sample when deionized water (DI water) was the leaching solution. Mercury did not leach from electrostatic precipitator (ESP) fly ash samples collected during activated carbon injection for mercury control in amounts greater than the detection limit of the TCLP method (1.0 ng/mL). Volatilization tests could not detect mercury loss from fly ash, spray dryer/fabric filter ash, unfixated FGD sludge, or forced oxidation gypsum; the mercury concentration of these samples all increased, possibly due to absorption from ambient surroundings. Mercury loss of 18-26% was detected after 3 and 6 months at 100 F and 140 F from samples of the fixated FGD sludge. Water samples were collected from existing ground water monitoring wells around an active FGD disposal site (8 wells) and an active fly ash slurry impoundment (14 wells). These were wells that the plants have installed to comply with ground water monitoring requirements of their permits. Mercury was not detected in any of the water samples collected from monitoring wells at either site. A literature review concluded that coal combustion byproducts can be disposed of in properly designed landfills that minimize the potentially negative impacts of water intrusion that carries dissolved organic matter (DOM). Dissolved organic matter and sulfate-reducing bacteria can promote the transformation of elemental or oxidized mercury into methyl mercury. The landfill should be properly designed and capped with clays or similar materials to minimize the wet-dry cycles that promote the release of methylmercury.

  11. Simple procedures for enrichment of chlorinated aromatic pollutants from fat, water and milk for subsequent analysis by high-resolution methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egestad, B.; Curstedt, T.; Sjoevall, J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Procedures for enrichment of non-volatile chlorinated aromatic pollutants from fat, water and milk are described. /sup 14/C-DDT was used as a model compound in recovery experiments. A several thousand-fold enrichment of DDT added to butter was achieved by two consecutive straight-phase chromatographies on Lipidex 5000. Trace amounts of DDT in liter volumes of water could be quantitatively extracted by rapid filtration through 2 ml beds of Lipidex 1000. A batch extraction procedure permitted enrichment of DDT from milk after addition of n-pentylamine, methanol and water. DDT could then be eluted from the gel with retention of more than 90% of the lipids. A reversed-phase system with Lipidex 5000 could be used for separation of TCDD from DDT and PCBs. The liquid-gel chromatographic procedures are simple and suitable for clean-up of samples prior to application of high-resolution methods. 5 tables.

  12. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products. Phase 1, [Annual report], December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Haefner, R. [Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. Presently FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. However, landfill sites are becoming more scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. In summary Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD byproduct materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

  13. Gas and Particulate Sampling of Airborne Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, D.A.; Gundel, L.A.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The denuder surfaces of the gas and particle (GAP) sampler (developed at the Atmospheric Environment Service of Environment Canada) have been modified by coating with XAD-4 resin, using techniques developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the lower capacity integrated organic vapor/particle sampler (IOVPS). The resulting high capacity integrated organic gas and particle sampler (IOGAPS) has been operated in ambient air at 16.7 L min{sup -1} for a 24-hour period in Berkeley, California, USA. Simultaneous measurements were made at the same collection rate with a conventional sampler that used a filter followed by two sorbent beds. Gas and particle partition measurements were determined for 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) ranging from 2-ring to 6-ring species. The IOGAPS indicated a higher particle fraction of these compounds than did the conventional sampler, suggesting that the conventional sampler suffered from 'blow-off' losses from the particles collected on the filter.

  14. Simulated transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in artificial streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartell, S.M.; Landrum, P.F.; Giesy, J.P.; Leversee, G.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model was constructed to predict the pattern of flow and accumulation of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) (anthracene, naphthalene, and benzo(a)pyrene) in artificial streams located on the Savannah River Plant near Aiken, South Carolina. Predictions were based upon the premise that the fundamental chemistry of individual PAH contains useful information for predictive purposes. Model processes included volatilization, photolysis, sorption to sediments and particulates, and net accumulation by biota. Simulations of anthracene transport were compared to results of an experiment conducted in the streams. The model realistically predicted the concentration of dissolved anthracene through time and space. Photolytic degradation appeared to be a major pathway of anthracene flux from the streams.

  15. Recovery of solvent and by-products from organosolv black liquor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botello, J.I.; Gilarranz, M.A.; Rodriguez, F.; Oliet, M. [Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica] [Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery of alcohol and by-products from ethanol-water and methanol-water pulping liquors was studied. The recovery system proposed consists of three stages: black liquor flashing, lignin precipitation, and precipitation distillation of mother liquor. At the flash stage, 47 and 51% of the alcohol in the black liquor are recovered for ethanol and methanol processes, respectively. The lignin recovery yield at the precipitation stage is 67% for ethanol black liquor and 73% for methanol black liquor. The distillation of precipitation mother liquors enables recovery of 98% ethanol and 96% methanol from this stream as distillate, whereas the distillation residue contains significant amounts of sugars, furfural, and acetic acid that can be recovered. The study concludes with the overall mass balance for the recovery system proposed.

  16. Environmental chamber measurements of mercury flux from coal utilization by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pekney, N.J.; Martello, D.V.; Schroeder, K.T.; Granite, E.J.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An environmental chamber was constructed to measure the mercury flux from coal utilization by-product (CUB) samples. Samples of fly ash, FGD gypsum, and wallboard made from FGD gypsum were tested under both dark and illuminated conditions with or without the addition of water to the sample. Mercury releases varied widely, with 7-day experiment averages ranging from -6.8 to 73 ng/m2 h for the fly ash samples and -5.2 to 335 ng/m2 h for the FGD/wallboard samples. Initial mercury content, fly ash type, and light exposure had no observable consistent effects on the mercury flux. For the fly ash samples, the effect of a mercury control technology was to decrease the emission. For three of the four pairs of FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, the wallboard sample released less (or absorbed more) mercury than the gypsum.

  17. aromatic aldehydes catalyzed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carlo calculations. Information on branching ratio parameters for the s and p wave d+d nuclear interaction has been extracted. P. E. Knowles; A. Adamczak; J. M. Bailey; G. A....

  18. The use of gypsum and a coal desulfurization by-product to ameliorate subsoil acidity for alfalfa growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chessman, Dennis John

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    the effectiveness of surface-applied gypsum and a flue gas desulfurization by-product for reducing the toxic effects of acid subsoils on alfalfa. The materials were applied at rates of 0, 5, 10, and 15 Mg ha-1. In addition, a glasshouse experiment was conducted...

  19. Task 1.13 - Data Collection and Database Development for Clean Coal Technology By-Product Characteristics and Management Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center-Morgantown (DOE FETC) efforts in the areas of fossil fuels and clean coal technology (CCT) have included involvement with both conventional and advanced process coal conversion by-products. In 1993, DOE submitted a Report to Congress on "Barriers to the Increased Utilization of Coal Combustion Desulfurization Byproducts by Governmental and Commercial Sectors" that provided an outline of activities to remove the barriers identified in the report. DOE charged itself with participation in this process, and the work proposed in this document facilitates DOE's response to its own recommendations for action. The work reflects DOE's commitment to the coal combustion by-product (CCB) industry, to the advancement of clean coal technology, and to cooperation with other government agencies. Information from DOE projects and commercial endeavors in fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) and coal gasification is the focus of this task. The primary goal is to provide an easily accessible compilation of characterization information on the by-products from these processes to government agencies and industry to facilitate sound regulatory and management decisions. Additional written documentation will facilitate the preparation of an updated final version of background information collected for DOE in preparation of the Report to Congress on barriers to CCB utilization.

  20. Diesel fuel aromatic and cetane number effects on combustion and emissions from a prototype 1991 diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, E.J.; Jass, R.E.; Slodowske, W.J.; McCarthy, C.I.; Krodel, A.L.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book reports on a prototype 1991-model diesel engine that was tested using EPA transient emissions procedures to determine the effect of fuel properties on combustion characteristics and exhaust emissions. The eleven test fuel set focused primarily on total aromatic content, multi-ring aromatic content, and cetane number, but other fuel variables were also studied. Hydrotreating was used to obtain reductions in fuel sulfur and aromatic content. Increasing cetane number and reducing aromatic content resulted in lower emissions of hydrocarbons and NO{sub x}. Particulate emission were best predicted by sulfur content, aromatic content and 90% distillation temperature. Multi-ring aromatics showed a greater significance that total aromatics on hydrocarbon and particulate emissions. combustion parameters were highly dependent on fuel cetane number.

  1. Fission Product Extraction Process

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A new INL technology can simultaneously extract cesium and strontium for reuse. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  2. Black carbon in marine sediments : quantification and implications for the sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accardi-Dey, AmyMarie, 1976-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sorption is a key factor in determining the fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment. Here, PAH sorption is proposed as the sum of two mechanisms: absorption into a biogenic, organic carbon (OC) ...

  3. Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation N nature of the polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) they are mostly bound to the sludge and escape aerobic

  4. Photoinduced Hydrogen Abstraction from Phenols by Aromatic Ketones. A New Mechanism for Hydrogen Abstraction by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leigh, William J.

    Photoinduced Hydrogen Abstraction from Phenols by Aromatic Ketones. A New Mechanism for Hydrogen carried out of the kinetics of inter- and intramolecular phenolic hydrogen abstraction phenolic hydrogen, which yields the corresponding phenoxyl-hemipinacol biradical. The biradicals have also

  5. Chemisorption of Aromatic Compounds on Well-Defined Palladium Surfaces: Studies by Electron Spectroscopy and Electrochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ding

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemisorption of aromatic compounds, derivatized with different functional groups, on well-defined Pd(111) surfaces was studied by a combination of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), high resolution...

  6. Chemistry of Furan Conversion into Aromatics and Olefins over HZSM-5: A Model Biomass Conversion Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yu-Ting [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Huber, George W. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The conversion of furan (a model of cellulosic biomass) over HZSM-5 was investigated in a thermogravimetric analysis–mass spectrometry system, in situ Fourier transform infrared analysis, and in a continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor. Furan adsorbed as oligomers at room temperature with a 1.73 of adsorbed furan/Al ratio. These oligomers were polycyclic aromatic compounds that were converted to CO, CO?, aromatics, and olefins at temperatures from 400 to 600 °C. Aromatics (e.g., benzene, toluene, and naphthalene), oligomer isomers (e.g., benzofuran, 2,2-methylenebisfuran, and benzodioxane), and heavy oxygenates (C??{sub +} oligomers) were identified as intermediates formed inside HZSM-5 at different reaction temperatures. During furan conversion, graphite-type coke formed on the catalyst surface, which caused the aromatics and olefins formation to deactivate within the first 30 min of time on-stream. We have measured the effects of space velocity and temperature for furan conversion to help us understand the chemistry of biomass conversion inside zeolite catalysts. The major products for furan conversion included CO, CO?, allene, C?–C? olefins, benzene, toluene, styrene, benzofuran, indene, and naphthalene. The aromatics (benzene and toluene) and olefins (ethylene and propylene) selectivity decreased with increasing space velocity. Unsaturated hydrocarbons such as allene, cyclopentadiene, and aromatics selectivity increased with increasing space velocity. The product distribution was selective to olefins and CO at high temperatures (650 °C) but was selective to aromatics (benzene and toluene) at intermediate temperatures (450–600 °C). At low temperatures (450 °C), benzofuran and coke contributed 60% of the carbon selectivity. Several different reactions were occurring for furan conversion over zeolites. Some important reactions that we have identified in this study include Diels–Alder condensation (e.g., two furans form benzofuran and water), decarbonylation (e.g., furan forms CO and allene), oligomerization (allene forms olefins and aromatics plus hydrogen), and alkylation (e.g., furan plus olefins). The product distribution was far from thermodynamic equilibrium.

  7. Evidence of Reactive Aromatics As a Major Source of Peroxy Acetyl Nitrate over China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Zhen; Wang, Yuhang; Gu, Dasa; Zhao, Chun; Huey, L. G.; Stickel, Robert; Liao, Jin; Shao, Min; Zhu, T.; Zeng, Limin; Liu, Shaw C.; Chang, Chih-Chung; Amoroso, Antonio; Costabile, Francesa

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the observations of near-surface peroxy acetyl nitrate (PAN) and its precursors in Beijing, China in August of 2007. The levels of PAN are remarkably high (up to 14 ppbv), surpassing those measured over other urban regions in recent years. Analyses employing a 1-D version of a chemical transport model (Regional chEmical and trAnsport Model, REAM) indicate that aromatic non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) are the dominant (55-75%) PAN source. The major oxidation product of aromatics that produces acetyl peroxy radicals is methylglyoxal (MGLY). PAN and O3 in the observations are correlated at daytime; aromatic NMHCs appear to play an important role in O3 photochemistry. Previous NMHC measurements indicate the presence of reactive aromatics at high levels over broad polluted regions of China. Aromatics are often ignored in global and (to a lesser degree) regional 3D photochemical transport models; their emissions over China as well as photochemistry are quite uncertain.Our findings suggest that critical assessments of aromatics emissions and chemistry (such as the yields of MGLY) are necessary to understand and assess ozone photochemistry and regional pollution export in China.

  8. RESIDUES FROM COAL CONVERSION AND UTILIZATION: ADVANCED MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND DISPOSED BYPRODUCT DIAGENESIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory J. McCarthy; Dean G. Grier

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to the initiation of this study, understanding of the long-term behavior of environmentally-exposed Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBs) was lacking in (among others) two primary areas addressed in this work. First, no method had been successfully applied to achieve full quantitative analysis of the partitioning of chemical constituents into reactive or passive crystalline or noncrystalline compounds. Rather, only semi-quantitative methods were available, with large associated errors. Second, our understanding of the long-term behavior of various CCBs in contact with the natural environment was based on a relatively limited set of study materials. This study addressed these areas with two objectives, producing (1) a set of protocols for fully quantitative phase analysis using the Rietveld Quantitative X-ray Diffraction (RQXRD) method and (2) greater understanding of the hydrologic and geochemical nature of the long-term behavior of disposed and utilized CCBs. The RQXRD technique was initially tested using (1) mixtures of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) crystalline standards, and (2) mixtures of synthetic reagents simulating various CCBs, to determine accuracy and precision of the method, and to determine the most favorable protocols to follow in order to efficiently quantify multi-phase mixtures. Four sets of borehole samples of disposed or utilized CCBs were retrieved and analyzed by RQXRD according to the protocols developed under the first objective. The first set of samples, from a Class F ash settling pond in Kentucky disposed for up to 20 years, showed little mineralogical alteration, as expected. The second set of samples, from an embankment in Indiana containing a mixture of chain-grate (stoker) furnace ash and fluidized bed combustion (FBC) residues, showed formation of the mineral thaumasite, as observed in previously studied exposed FBC materials. Two high-calcium CCBs studied, including a dry-process flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-product disposed in the Midwest, and a mixture of Class C fly ash and wet process FGD by-product codisposed in North Dakota, appeared relatively unchanged mineralogically over the up to 5 and 17 years of emplacement, respectively. Each of these two materials contained mineralogies consistent with short-term hydration products of their respective starting (dry) materials. The hydration product ettringite persisted throughout the duration of emplacement at each site, and the diagenetic ash alteration product thaumasite did not form at either site. Explanations for the absence of thaumasite in these two sites include a lack of significant carbonate, sulfate, and alkalinity sources in the case of the North Dakota site, and a lack of sulfate, alkalinity, and sufficient moisture in the Midwest site. Potential for future thaumasite formation in these materials may exist if placed in contact with cold, wet materials containing the missing components listed above. In the presence of the sulfite scrubber mineral hannebachite, the ettringites formed had crystallographic unit cell dimensions smaller than those of pure sulfate ettringite, suggesting either incorporation of sulfite ions into the ettringite structure, or incorporation of silicon and carbonate ions, forming a solid solution towards thaumasite.

  9. Polycylcic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH's) in dense cloud chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valentine Wakelam; Eric Herbst

    2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Virtually all detailed gas-phase models of the chemistry of dense interstellar clouds exclude polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's). This omission is unfortunate because from the few studies that have been done on the subject, it is known that the inclusion of PAH's can affect the gas-phase chemistry strongly. We have added PAH's to our network to determine the role they play in the chemistry of cold dense cores. In the models presented here, we include radiative attachment to form PAH-, mutual neutralization between PAH anions and small positively-charged ions, and photodetachment. We also test the sensitivity of our results to changes in the size and abundance of the PAH's. Our results confirm that the inclusion of PAH's changes many of the calculated abundances of smaller species considerably. In TMC-1, the general agreement with observations is significantly improved contrary to L134N. This may indicate a difference in PAH properties between the two regions. With the inclusion of PAH's in dense cloud chemistry, high-metal elemental abundances give a satisfactory agreement with observations. As a result, we do not need to decrease the observed elemental abundances of all metals and we do not need to vary the elemental C/O ratio in order to produce large abundances of carbon species in TMC-1 (CP).

  10. A Multiscale Study of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Properties in Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Galliano

    2008-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present contribution, I summarize a systematic study of ISO and Spitzer mid-IR spectra of Galactic regions and star forming galaxies. This study quantifies the relative variations of the main aromatic features inside spatially resolved objects as well as among the integrated spectra of 50 objects. Our analysis implies that the properties of the PAHs are remarkably universal throughout our sample and at different spatial scales. In addition, the relative variations of the band ratios, as large as one order of magnitude, are mainly controled by the fraction of ionized PAHs. In particular, I show that we can rule out both the modification of the PAH size distribution and the mid-IR extinction, as an explanation of these variations. High values of the I(6.2)/I(11.3) ratio are found to be associated with the far-UV illuminated surface of PDRs, at the scale of an interstellar cloud, and associated with star formation activity, at the scale of a galaxy. Using a few well-studied Galactic regions, we provide an empirical relation between the I(6.2)/I(11.3) ratio and the ionization/recombination ratio G0/ne. Finally, I show that these trends are consistent with the detailed modeling of the PAH emission within photodissociation regions, taking into account the radiative transfer, the stochastic heating and the charge exchange between gas and dust.

  11. Polycyclic aromatic compounds in fluidized bed combustion of coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, P.M.; Beer, J.M.; Biermann, K.; Chiu, K.S.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC) have been determined in the gas and particulate effluents from fluidized bed combustion of coal, lignite, and oil shale by a number of investigators. A bibliography of the reports of these investigations is contained in a paper by Chiu, Walsh, Beer, and Biemann (1983). The concentrations of PAC in the effluents are often quite low, but depend upon the combustor configuration and operating conditions. The goal of the present investigation is to develop a mechanism consistent with measured rates of formation and destruction of PAC in atmospheric pressure fluidized bed combustion (AFBC), so that a rational approach may be taken to adjustment of conditions for minimization of PAC in the effluents. PAC are determined in samples taken from the freeboard (space above the bed), rather than from the exhaust, to observe the evolution of the PAC distribution within the combustor. Mass fractions of the most abundant PAC observed in the freeboard during AFBC of high volatile bituminous coal were reported by Chiu, et al (1983). Some correlation of the rates of disappearance of PAC with particle concentration was noted by Dutta, Chiu, Walsh, Beer, and Biemann (1983). In the present paper theoretical estimates of the rates at which PAC might be consumed by heterogeneous reactions are compared with experimental rates estimated from PAC profiles determined by Chiu et al (1983).

  12. Solvent extraction of bitumen from tar sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoon, A.Y.; Thomas, S. [Univ. of West Indies, St. Augustine (Trinidad and Tobago)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the measurement of mass transfer rates for the extraction of bitumen from tar sands using organic solvents. The experiment was carried out in an agitated vessel using a six-blade turbine mixer on a laboratory scale. To facilitate the determination of absolute mass transfer coefficients, tar sands were specially prepared in the form of spherical particles so that mass transfer area can be computed. The variables investigated in the study included: (1) solvent type (kerosene, toluene, benzene), (2) stirrer speed, 25 rpm to 1000 rpm, and (3) particle diameter, 0.4 cm to 1.2 cm. The results indicated that solvency power varied markedly with the various solvents used and that high aromatic content promoted rapid dissolution when compared with paraffinic solvents. The mass transfer rates increased with increasing stirrer speed in accordance with the relationship: k {alpha} N{sup 0.56} where k is the mass transfer coefficient and N the stirrer speed. Increasing particle diameter also resulted in decreased mass transfer rates. The results were satisfactorily correlated in terms of a Frossling type equation, Sh {alpha} Re{sub p}{sup a}Sc{sup b}.

  13. Comparative analysis of polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles isolated from four shale oils. [Polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles; thiophenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willey, C.; Pelroy, R.; Stewart, D.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the isolation of sulfur heterocycle fractions from four shale oils (Paraho, Geokinetics, Occidental, and Rio Blanco), the use of capillary column gas chromatography and mass spectrometry for the identification of individual mixture components, and a reverse (Ames) and forward mutation assay with Salmonella typhimurium to screen for possible health hazards. The major components of the Polycyclic Aromatic Sulfur Heterocycles (PASH) fractions for all four shale oils were found to be two- to three-ringed parent and alkylated thiophene compounds. In all cases the PASH fractions showed no more specific mutagenic response than the neutral PAC fractions from which they were isolated. The only mutagenic response which was detected in the PASH fractions was for the Rio Blanco shale oil and showed specific mutagenic response similar to the neutral PAC fraction from which it was isolated. Finally, the forward mutation 8-azaguanine test was apparently more sensitive than the Ames histidine reversion test in detecting mutagenic activity for the chemical fractions from the shale oils.

  14. Extraction Utility Design Specification

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Extraction Utility Design Specification January 11, 2011 Document Version 1.9 1 Revision History Date Version Section and Titles Author Summary of Change January 15, 2010 1.0 All...

  15. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.

    2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-laden wastes can be stabilized and solidified using advanced clean coal technology by-products (CCTBs)--fluid bed combustor ash and spray drier solids. These utility-generated treatment chemicals are available for purchase through brokers, and commercial applications of this process are being practiced by treaters of metal-laden hazardous waste. A complex of regulations governs this industry, and sensitivities to this complex has discouraged public documentation of treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with CCTBs. This report provides a comprehensive public documentation of laboratory studies that show the efficacy of the stabilization and solidification of metal-laden hazardous wastes--such as lead-contaminated soils and sandblast residues--through treatment with CCTBs. It then describes the extensive efforts that were made to obtain the permits allowing a commercial hazardous waste treater to utilize CCTBs as treatment chemicals and to install the equipment required to do so. It concludes with the effect of this lengthy process on the ability of the treatment company to realize the practical, physical outcome of this effort, leading to premature termination of the project.

  16. Electrolysis byproduct D2O provides a third way to mitigate CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenewerk, William Ernest [self, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid atomic power deployment may be possible without using fast breeder reactors or making undue demands on uranium resource. Using by-product D2O and thorium-U233 in CANDU and RBMK piles may circumvent need for either fast breeder reactors or seawater uranium. Atmospheric CO2 is presently increasing 2.25%/year in proportion to 2.25%/year exponential fossil fuel consumption increase. Roughly 1/3 anthropologic CO2 is removed by various CO2 sinks. CO2 removal is modelled as being proportional to 45-year-earlier CO2 amount above 280 ppm-C Water electrolysis produces roughly 0.1 kg-D20/kWe-y. Material balance assumes each electrolysis stage increases D2O bottoms concentration times 3. Except for first two electrolysis stages, all water from hydrogen consumption is returned to electrolysis. The unique characteristic of this process is the ability to economically burn all deuterium-enriched H2 in vehicles. Condensate from vehicles returns to appropriate electrolysis stage. Fuel cell condensate originally from reformed natural gas may augment second-sage feed. Atomic power expansion is 5%/year, giving 55000 GWe by 2100. World primary energy increases 2.25%/y, exceeding 4000 EJ/y by 2100. CO2 maximum is roughly 600 ppm-C around year 2085. CO2 declines back below 300 ppm-C by 2145 if the 45-year-delay seawater sink remains effective.

  17. FGD Additives to Segregate and Sequester Mercury in Solid Byproducts - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Searcy, K; Bltyhe, G M; Steen, W A

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Many mercury control strategies for U.S. coal-fired power generating plants involve co-benefit capture of oxidized mercury from flue gases treated by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. For these processes to be effective at overall mercury control, the captured mercury must not be re-emitted to the atmosphere or into surface or ground water. The project sought to identify scrubber additives and FGD operating conditions under which mercury re-emissions would decrease and mercury would remain in the liquor and be blown down from the system in the chloride purge stream. After exiting the FGD system, mercury would react with precipitating agents to form stable solid byproducts and would be removed in a dewatering step. The FGD gypsum solids, free of most of the mercury, could then be disposed or processed for reuse as wallboard or in other beneficial reuse. The project comprised extensive bench-scale FGD scrubber tests in Phases I and II. During Phase II, the approaches developed at the bench scale were tested at the pilot scale. Laboratory wastewater treatment tests measured the performance of precipitating agents in removing mercury from the chloride purge stream. Finally, the economic viability of the approaches tested was evaluated.

  18. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  19. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

  20. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Topical report, April 1, 1996--April 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.P.; Brackebusch, F.; Carpenter, J. [and others

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report represents the Final Technical Progress Report for Phase II of the overall program for a cooperative research agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy - MORGANTOWN Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC). Under the agreement, SIUC will develop and demonstrate technologies for the handling, transport, and placement in abandoned underground coal mines of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products, such as fly ash, scrubber sludge, fluidized bed combustion by-products, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground placement. The overall program is divided into three (3) phases. Phase II of the program is primarily concerned with developing and testing the hardware for the actual underground placement demonstrations. Two technologies have been identified and hardware procured for full-scale demonstrations: (1) hydraulic placement, where coal combustion by-products (CCBs) will be placed underground as a past-like mixture containing about 70 to 75 percent solids; and (2) pneumatic placement, where CCBs will be placed underground as a relatively dry material using compressed air. 42 refs., 36 figs., 36 tabs.

  1. Mineralogical and physical considerations related to the separation and recovery of constituents from aluminum smelter by-products and wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plumpton, A.J.; Wilhelmy, J.F.; Blackburn, D.; Caouette, J.L. [Centre de Recherches Minerales, Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several by-products and waste products of aluminum smelting were characterized mineralogically and physically, in order to evaluate the potential for their decontamination or separation and recovery into valuable products using mineral processing techniques. The test samples were selected from among Bayer process red mud, bath-alumina mixture, cleaned anode butts, anode recycle residues, spent potlining, saltcake and fluorogypsum. Several of these materials were shown to be composed either of highly liberated, potentially separable mineral phases, or of locked minerals which could be partially liberated by grinding to smaller but practical particle sizes. An analysis of specific physical properties of the liberated constituent mineral phases was accompanied by preliminary experimental evaluation of their separability. An assessment was made of potential mineral processing techniques including size and form differentiation, gravitational and magnetic field separation, flotation, separation based on surface charging phenomena or work function, and pneumatic tabling. The results confirmed the suitability of low-cost physical separation techniques for the treatment of some by-products and wastes. This paper presents results of a preliminary evaluation of two smelter products. The conference paper will analyze and discuss in more detail the potential for the mineral processing of these and other smelter by-products and wastes.

  2. Economic Evaluation of By-Product Power/Co-Generation Systems for Industrial Plants with Fluidized-Bed Coal Burning Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesko, J. E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic analysis of the construction and operation of by-product electric power and steam/power cogeneration systems in coal fired fluidized-bed steam cycles, located at individual industrial sites analyzed by the author, is being presented...

  3. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, M.C. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  4. Sorption characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aluminum smelter residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gijs D. Breedveld; Emilien Pelletier; Richard St. Louis; Gerard Cornelissen [Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo (Norway)

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature carbon oxidation in primary aluminum smelters results in the release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) into the environment. The main source of PAH are the anodes, which are composed of petroleum coke (black carbon, BC) and coal tar pitch. To elucidate the dominant carbonaceous phase controlling the environmental fate of PAH in aluminum smelter residues (coke BC and/or coal tar), the sorptive behavior of PAHs has been determined, using passive samplers and infinite-sink desorption methods. Samples directly from the wet scrubber were studied as well as ones from an adjacent 20-year old storage lagoon and roof dust from the smelter. Carbon-normalized distribution coefficients of native PAHs were 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected based on amorphous organic carbon (AOC)/water partitioning, which is in the same order of magnitude as reported literature values for soots and charcoals. Sorption isotherms of laboratory-spiked deuterated phenanthrene showed strong (about 100 times stronger than AOC) but nonetheless linear sorption in both fresh and aged aluminum smelter residues. The absence of nonlinear behavior typical for adsorption to BC indicates that PAH sorption in aluminum smelter residues is dominated by absorption into the semi-solid coal tar pitch matrix. Desorption experiments using Tenax showed that fresh smelter residues had a relatively large rapidly desorbing fraction of PAH (35-50%), whereas this fraction was strongly reduced (11-16%) in the lagoon and roof dust material. Weathering of the coal tar residue and/or redistribution of PAH between coal tar and BC phases could explain the reduced availability in aged samples. 38 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Effect of industrial by-products containing electron acceptors on mitigating methane emission during rice cultivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Muhammad Aslam [Department of Environmental Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202 (Bangladesh); Lee, Chang Hoon [Functional Cereal Crop Research Division, National Institute of Crop Science, RDA, 1085, Naey-dong, Milyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Yoon [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School (Brain Korea 21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Pil Joo [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School (Brain Korea 21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: pjkim@gnu.ac.kr

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three industrial by-products (fly ash, phosphogypsum and blast furnace slag), were evaluated for their potential re-use as soil amendments to reduce methane (CH{sub 4}) emission resulting from rice cultivation. In laboratory incubations, CH{sub 4} production rates from anoxic soil slurries were significantly reduced at amendment levels of 0.5%, 1%, 2% and 5% (wt wt{sup -1}), while observed CO{sub 2} production rates were enhanced. The level of suppression in methane production was the highest for phosphogypsum, followed by blast slag and then fly ash. In the greenhouse experiment, CH{sub 4} emission rates from the rice planted potted soils significantly decreased with the increasing levels (2-20 Mg ha{sup -1}) of the selected amendments applied, while rice yield simultaneously increased compared to the control treatment. At 10 Mg ha{sup -1} application level of the amendments, total seasonal CH{sub 4} emissions were reduced by 20%, 27% and 25%, while rice grain yields were increased by 17%, 15% and 23% over the control with fly ash, phosphogypsum, and blast slag amendments, respectively. The suppression of CH{sub 4} production rates as well as total seasonal CH{sub 4} flux could be due to the increased concentrations of active iron, free iron, manganese oxides, and sulfate in the amended soil, which acted as electron acceptors and controlled methanogens' activity by limiting substrates availability. Among the amendments, blast furnace slag and fly ash contributed mainly to improve the soil nutrients balance and increased the soil pH level towards neutral point, but soil acidity was developed with phosphogypsum application. Conclusively, blast slag among the selected amendments would be a suitable soil amendment for reducing CH{sub 4} emissions as well as sustaining rice productivity.

  6. Threshold voltage extraction circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoon, Siew Kuok

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to that of the saturation method. However, instead of fixing Vos ? Vos, the drain current is measured as a function of Vos while Vns is fixed at a constant low voltage of 100mV to ensure operation in the linear MOSFET region. Neglecting channel length modulation effect... transistors are layout next to the DUT of the NMOS and PMOS Vr extraction circuits respectively for extraction of Vr via graphical means. GRAPHICAL METHOD OF THE THRESHOLD-VOLTAGE MEASUREMENT Using the graphical method, the characteristics of 4n versus Vos...

  7. Supercritical fluid extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth (Pullman, WA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated or lipophilic crown ether or fluorinated dithiocarbamate. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  8. Evaluation of a new chromatographic method for aromatics in diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.W.; Fuhr, B.J.; Glavincevski, B.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new analytical method using supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) with flame ionization detection (FID) was evaluated for the determination of the aromatics in diesel fuels. The method utilizes high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a packed silica column and supercritical CO/sub 2/ as the carrier fluid. Performance evaluation was carried out using diesel fuels and secondary standards with a wide range of chemical composition. The aromatic content in the fuels was verified by the fluorescent indicator adsorption (FIA) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 1/H NMR) methods. With the exception of initial moderate cost of the instrument, the method is simple, fast (less than 20 minutes per sample) and applicable to coloured samples and samples with final boiling points of about 450/sup 0/C. Aromatic concentrations in diesels showed good correlation with FIA data. It is well suited to petroleum refinery applications as an alternate for standard FIA methods.

  9. QSAR model of the phototoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Fabiana Alves de Lima Ribeiro, Marcia Miguel Castro Ferreira*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    QSAR model of the phototoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Fabiana Alves de Lima Ribeiro of 67 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is performed and a prediction rule for the phototoxicity be produced from saturated hydrocarbons under oxygen-deficient conditions. Hydrocarbons with very low

  10. Energetics of C-H Bond Activation of Fluorinated Aromatic Hydrocarbons Using a [TpRh(CNneopentyl)] Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, William D.

    Energetics of C-H Bond Activation of Fluorinated Aromatic Hydrocarbons Using a [Tp activation of fluorinated aromatic hydrocarbons by [TpRh(CNneopentyl)] resulted in the formation of products of homogeneous transition-metal catalysts to activate and functionalize C-H bonds of hydrocarbons for industrial

  11. Kinetics and Reaction Pathways for Propane Dehydrogenation and Aromatization on Co/H-ZSM5 and H-ZSM5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Kinetics and Reaction Pathways for Propane Dehydrogenation and Aromatization on Co/H-ZSM5 and H Co/H-ZSM5 catalyzes propane dehydrogenation and aromatization reactions. Initial product selectivities, product site-yields, and the 13C content and distribution in the products of 2-13C-propane show

  12. Rubbing-Induced Molecular Reorientation on an Alignment Surface of an Aromatic Polyimide Containing Cyanobiphenyl Side Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Xiaowei

    Rubbing-Induced Molecular Reorientation on an Alignment Surface of an Aromatic Polyimide Containing to study the molecular orientation and conformation changes at a rubbed polyimide alignment-layer surface. This aromatic polyimide containing pendent cyanobiphenyl mesogens was synthesized via a polycondensation of 2

  13. Supercritical Fluid Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, K. P.; Flarsheim, W. M.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    supercritical tetrahydrofuran (583K, 10 MPa) or toluene (668K, 10 MPa) to remove 95% of the organic matter from Athabasca tar sanrls [4J. Compared to oil shale retorting at 870K which extracted 71% of the kerogen, supercritical toluene at 713K and 10 MPa...

  14. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2007-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the no cost extension period of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts for a third round of testing, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Hydrotreating and hydrogenation of the product has been completed, and due to removal of material before processing, yield of the jet fuel fraction has decreased relative to an increase in the gasoline fraction. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates that the coal derived material has more trace metals related to coal than petroleum, as seen in previous runs. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. The co-coking of the runs with the new coal have begun, with the coke yield similar to previous runs, but the gas yield is lower and the liquid yield is higher. Characterization of the products continues. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking.

  15. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible uses. Methods to reduce metal content are being evaluated.

  16. Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of Coal Combustion By-Product Disposal and Utilizaton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher; Mei Xin; Mae Sexauer Gustin; Rob Jung

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) conducted a multiyear study to evaluate the impact of mercury and other air toxic elements (ATEs) on the management of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). The ATEs evaluated in this project were arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, and selenium. The study included laboratory tasks to develop measurement techniques for mercury and ATE releases, sample characterization, and release experiments. A field task was also performed to measure mercury releases at a field site. Samples of fly ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials were collected preferentially from full-scale coal-fired power plants operating both without and with mercury control technologies in place. In some cases, samples from pilot- and bench-scale emission control tests were included in the laboratory studies. Several sets of 'paired' baseline and test fly ash and FGD materials collected during full-scale mercury emission control tests were also included in laboratory evaluations. Samples from mercury emission control tests all contained activated carbon (AC) and some also incorporated a sorbent-enhancing agent (EA). Laboratory release experiments focused on measuring releases of mercury under conditions designed to simulate CCB exposure to water, ambient-temperature air, elevated temperatures, and microbes in both wet and dry conditions. Results of laboratory evaluations indicated that: (1) Mercury and sometimes selenium are collected with AC used for mercury emission control and, therefore, present at higher concentrations than samples collected without mercury emission controls present. (2) Mercury is stable on CCBs collected from systems both without and with mercury emission controls present under most conditions tested, with the exception of vapor-phase releases of mercury exposed to elevated temperatures. (3) The presence of carbon either from added AC or from unburned coal can result in mercury being sorbed onto the CCB when exposed to ambient-temperature air. The environmental performance of the mercury captured on AC used as a sorbent for mercury emission control technologies indicated that current CCB management options will continue to be sufficiently protective of the environment, with the potential exception of exposure to elevated temperatures. The environmental performance of the other ATEs investigated indicated that current management options will be appropriate to the CCBs produced using AC in mercury emission controls.

  17. ADVANCED BYPRODUCT RECOVERY: DIRECT CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF SO2 TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Weber

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arthur D. Little, Inc., together with its commercialization partner, Engelhard Corporation, and its university partner Tufts, investigated a single-step process for direct, catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide from regenerable flue gas desulfurization processes to the more valuable elemental sulfur by-product. This development built on recently demonstrated SO{sub 2}-reduction catalyst performance at Tufts University on a DOE-sponsored program and is, in principle, applicable to processing of regenerator off-gases from all regenerable SO{sub 2}-control processes. In this program, laboratory-scale catalyst optimization work at Tufts was combined with supported catalyst formulation work at Engelhard, bench-scale supported catalyst testing at Arthur D. Little and market assessments, also by Arthur D. Little. Objectives included identification and performance evaluation of a catalyst which is robust and flexible with regard to choice of reducing gas. The catalyst formulation was improved significantly over the course of this work owing to the identification of a number of underlying phenomena that tended to reduce catalyst selectivity. The most promising catalysts discovered in the bench-scale tests at Tufts were transformed into monolith-supported catalysts at Engelhard. These catalyst samples were tested at larger scale at Arthur D. Little, where the laboratory-scale results were confirmed, namely that the catalysts do effectively reduce sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur when operated under appropriate levels of conversion and in conditions that do not contain too much water or hydrogen. Ways to overcome those limitations were suggested by the laboratory results. Nonetheless, at the end of Phase I, the catalysts did not exhibit the very stringent levels of activity or selectivity that would have permitted ready scale-up to pilot or commercial operation. Therefore, we chose not to pursue Phase II of this work which would have included further bench-scale testing, scale-up, pilot-scale (0.5 MW{sub e}) testing at conditions representative of various regenerable SO{sub 2}-control systems, preparation of a commercial process design, and development of a utility-scale demonstration plan.

  18. AFCI Transmutation Fuel Processes and By-Products Planning: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric L. Shaber

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program are to reduce high-level waste volume, reduce long-lived and radiotoxic elements, and reclaim valuable energy content of spent nuclear fuel. The AFCI chartered the Fuel Development Working Group (FDWG) to develop advanced fuels in support of the AFCI goals. The FDWG organized a phased strategy of fuel development that is designed to match the needs of the AFCI program: Phase 1 - High-burnup fuels for light-water reactors (LWRs) and tri-isotopic (TRISO) fuel for gas-cooled reactors Phase 2 – Mixed oxide fuels with minor actinides for LWRs, Am transmutation targets for LWRs, inert matrix fuels for LWRs, and TRISO fuel containing Pu and other transuranium for gas-cooled reactors Phase 3 – Fertile free or low-fertile metal, ceramic, ceramic dispersed in a metal matrix (CERMET), and ceramics dispersed in a ceramic matrix (CERCER) that would be used primarily in fast reactors. Development of advanced fuels requires the fabrication, assembly, and irradiation of prototypic fuel under bounding reactor conditions. At specialized national laboratory facilities small quantities of actinides are being fabricated into such fuel for irradiation tests. Fabrication of demonstration quantities of selected fuels for qualification testing is needed but not currently feasible, because existing manual glovebox fabrication approaches result in significant radiation exposures when larger quantities of actinides are involved. The earliest demonstration test fuels needed in the AFCI program are expected to be variants of commercial mixed oxide fuel for use in an LWR as lead test assemblies. Manufacture of such test assemblies will require isolated fabrication lines at a facility not currently available in the U.S. Such facilities are now being planned as part of an Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF). Adequate planning for and specification of actinide fuel fabrication facilities capable of producing transmutation fuels dictates the need for detailed process flows, mass balances, batch size data, and radiological dose estimates. Full definition of the materials that will need to be handled in the facility as feed material inputs, in-process fuel, scrap recycle, scrap requiring recovery, and by-product wastes is required. The feed material for demonstrating transmutation fuel fabrication will need to come from the separations of actinides from spent nuclear fuel processed in the same AFCF.

  19. Land application uses of dry FGD by-products. [Quarterly] report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick, W.A.; Beeghly, J.H.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Reclamation of mine-sites with acid overburden requires the use of alkaline amendments and represents a potential high-volume use of alkaline dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by products. In a greenhouse study, 25-cm columns of acid mine spoil were amended with two FGD by-products; lime injection multistage burners (LIMB) fly ash or pressurized fluidized bed (PFBC) fly ash at rates of 0, 4, 8, 16, and 32% by weight (0, 40, 80, 160, and 320 tons/acre). Amended spoil was covered with 20 cm of acid topsoil amended with the corresponding FGD by-product to pH 7. Column leachate pH increased with FGD amendment rate while leachate Fe, Mn, and Zn decreased, Leachate Ca, S, and Mg decreased with LIMB amendment rate and increased with PFBC amendment. Leachate concentrations of regulated metals were decreased or unaffected by FGD amendment except for Se which was increased by PFBC. Spoil pH was increased up to 8.9 by PFBC, and up to 9.2 by LIMB amendment. Spoil pH also increased with depth with FGD amendments of 16 and 32%, Yield of fescue was increased by FGD amendment of 4 to 8%. Plant tissue content of most elements was unaffected by FGD amendment rate, and no toxicity symptoms were observed. Plant Ca and Mg were increased by LIMB and PFBC respectively, while plant S, Mn and Sr were decreased. Plant Ca and B was increased by LIMB, and plant Mg and S by PFBC amendment. These results indicate dry FGD by-products are effective in ameliorating acid, spoils and have a low potential for creating adverse environmental impacts.

  20. Photochemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons: implications for ozone and secondary organic aerosol formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suh, Inseon

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -toluene reaction. The branching ratios of OH addition to ortho, para, meta, and ipso positions are predicted to be 0.52, 0.34, 0.11, and 0.03, respectively, significantly different from a recent theoretical study of the same reaction system. Aromatic peroxy...

  1. Identification of Sediment Organic Carbon Location and Association with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Contaminated Sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Identification of Sediment Organic Carbon Location and Association with Polycyclic Aromatic is known about the mechanisms of PAH and other hydrophobic organic compound sequestration and aging microspectroscopy at the NSLS beamline U10B and ALS beamline 1.4 were used to identify organic carbon location

  2. Enumeration and phylogenetic analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacteria from Puget Sound sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geiselbrecht, A.D.; Herwig, R.P.; Deming, J.W.; Staley, J.T. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are primarily released into the environment through anthropomorphic sources. PAH degradation has been known to occur in marine sediments. This paper describes the enumeration, isolation, and preliminary characterization of PAH-degrading strains from Puget Sound sediments. 38 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous, recalcitrant, and potentially carcinogenic pollutants. Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are less hydro- phobic (log Kow 3­5) and more water soluble than the high Mm PAHs; thus, they are fairly1461 Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous, recalcitrant, and potentially carcinogenic pollutants. Plants and their associated rhizosphere microbes can promote PAH dissipation, offering

  4. QSPR models of boiling point, octanolwater partition coefficient and retention time index of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    QSPR models of boiling point, octanol­water partition coefficient and retention time index Structure­Property Relationship (QSPR) analysis and study of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs (bp), octanol­ water partition coefficient ðlog KowÞ and retention time index (RI) for reversed

  5. Elimination Rate Constants of 46 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Unionid Mussel, Elliptio complanata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cope, W. Gregory

    contaminants, such as PAHs (James 1989; Neff 1979), as well as the large quantity of water that mussels individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocar- bons (PAHs) including both parent and alkyl homologues, t1/2, and t95 values reported in the literature for PAHs and other classes of hydrophobic organic

  6. Tenax as sorption sink for in vitro bioaccessibility measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    & Environment, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000, China d Soil and Water Science Department, University and maintain the desorption gradient between soil and GI solution. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were method. Inclusion of Tenax in GI solution increased bioaccessibility of PAHs in five spiked soils from 8

  7. Amine a-heteroarylation via photoredox catalysis: a homolytic aromatic substitution pathway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMillan, David W. C.

    Amine a-heteroarylation via photoredox catalysis: a homolytic aromatic substitution pathway accomplished via photoredox catalysis to generate valuable benzylic amine pharmacophores. A variety of five substitution (SNAr)3 or transi- tion metal-catalyzed approaches,4 have been extensively studied and applied

  8. Aromatic measurements of diesel fuel - A CRC round-robin study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seizinger, D.E.; Hoekman, S.K.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A round robin study to measure the aromatic levels in diesel fuels was conducted by the Chemical Characterization Panel of the Coordinating Research Council Air Pollution Research Advisory Committee (CRC-APRAC) In-house Program Group, CAPI-1-64. The fuels for this study consisted of a jet fuel, a No. 2 diesel reference fuel, and three fuels used in a CRC-sponsored diesel emission project (CAPE-32). These fuels had 90% distillation temperatures which ranged from 472/sup 0/ to 642/sup 0/ F and aromaticity levels from approximately 18 to 55% by volume. All participants used the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D1319 or modified D1319 methods to measure the aromatic levels in the selected fuels. Some participants concurrently analyzed the same fuels using other methods such as high-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, and elution chromatography (ASTM D2549). One non-participating laboratory analyzed the fuels using supercritical fluid chromatography. The results of nine participants using the D1319 methodology and other methods showed good agreement for fuels with 90% distillation temperatures less than 600/sup 0/ F. However, this round robin study showed that: 1) there is no standard method to measure aromatic levels in full boiling range diesel fuels, and 2) there are inadequacies when using the D1319 and modified D1319 methods for fuels outside of the specified property ranges.

  9. Aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism by Rhodococcus sp. I24 : computational, biochemical and transcriptional analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Jefferson A. (Jefferson Alexander), 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rhodococcus sp. 124 is a Gram-positive soil bacterium being developed for the manufacture of (-)cis-(1S,2R)-1-aminoindan-2-ol, a key precursor in the production of the HIV-1 protease inhibitor CrixivanTM, from the aromatic ...

  10. Rediscovering the Wheel. Thermochemical Analysis of Energetics of the Aromatic Diazines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chickos, James S.

    calorimetry and vapor pressure measurements. The gas and condensed phase enthalpies of formation of the parent not the case for diazabenzenes. The previous comprehensive experimental study of both the condensed and gasRediscovering the Wheel. Thermochemical Analysis of Energetics of the Aromatic Diazines Sergey P

  11. J. Mol. Biol. (1988) 201, 751-754 Aromatic Rings Act as Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levitt, Michael

    J. Mol. Biol. (1988) 201, 751-754 Aromatic Rings Act as Hydrogen Bond Acceptors Michael Levitt that there is a significant interaction between a hydrogen bond donor (like the > NH group) and the centre of a benzene ring, which acts as a hydrogen bond acceptor. This interaction, hvdrogen bond, which is about half as strong

  12. Low temperature formation of naphthalene and its role in the synthesis of PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    Hydrocarbons) in the interstellar medium Dorian S. N. Parkera , Fangtong Zhanga , Y. Seol Kima , Ralf I, and approved October 26, 2011 (received for review August 24, 2011) Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs finding challenges conventional wisdom that PAH-formation only occurs at high temperatures

  13. Technical support for the Ohio Clean Coal Technology Program. Volume 2, Baseline of knowledge concerning process modification opportunities, research needs, by-product market potential, and regulatory requirements: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1989-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LR1 and comprises two volumes. Volume 1 presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume 2 consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

  14. PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dady Dadyburjor; Philip R. Biedler; Chong Chen; L. Mitchell Clendenin; Manoj Katakdaunde; Elliot B. Kennel; Nathan D. King; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed carbon products, using mildly hydrogenated solvents to extract the organic portion of coal to create synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and carbon fibers. The focus of this effort was on development of lower cost solvents, milder hydrogenation conditions and improved yield in order to enable practical production of these products. This technology is needed because of the long-term decline in production of domestic feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. Currently, carbon products represents a market of roughly 5 million tons domestically, and 19 million tons worldwide. Carbon products are mainly derived from feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. The domestic supply of petroleum pitch is declining because of the rising price of liquid fuels, which has caused US refineries to maximize liquid fuel production. As a consequence, the long term trend has a decline in production of petroleum pitch over the past 20 years. The production of coal tar pitch, as in the case of petroleum pitch, has likewise declined significantly over the past two decades. Coal tar pitch is a byproduct of metallurgical grade coke (metcoke) production. In this industry, modern metcoke facilities are recycling coal tar as fuel in order to enhance energy efficiency and minimize environmental emissions. Metcoke production itself is dependent upon the production requirements for domestic steel. Hence, several metcoke ovens have been decommissioned over the past two decades and have not been replaced. As a consequence sources of coal tar are being taken off line and are not being replaced. The long-term trend is a reduction in coal tar pitch production. Thus import of feedstocks, mainly from Eastern Europe and China, is on the rise despite the relatively large transportation cost. To reverse this trend, a new process for producing carbon products is needed. The process must be economically competitive with current processes, and yet be environmentally friendly as well. The solvent extraction process developed uses mild hydrogenation of low cost oils to create powerful solvents that can dissolve the organic portion of coal. The insoluble portion, consisting mainly of mineral matter and fixed carbon, is removed via centrifugation or filtration, leaving a liquid solution of coal chemicals and solvent. This solution can be further refined via distillation to meet specifications for products such as synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and fibers. The most economical process recycles 85% of the solvent, which itself is obtained as a low-cost byproduct from industrial processes such as coal tar or petroleum refining. Alternatively, processes have been developed that can recycle 100% of the solvent, avoiding any need for products derived from petroleum or coal tar.

  15. CHEM333: Experiment 2: Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taber, Douglass

    ). Combine the aqueous NaOH extractions and back-extract them with ether (15 ml). Combine the ether extracts the stopcock is closed c. Before you attempt to drain the sepfunnel, remove the stopper. 2. Use a ring stand. You will also find that the funnel will not drain properly (if at all) when the stopper is one. 3

  16. Innovative Drying and Nutrients Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the extraction process. This method evaporates the water from the products but also drives off up to 70 percent dimethyl ether to extract the water from the material. The new process does not require the addition of heat to evaporate the water during the extraction process. Dimethyl ether has a lower heat

  17. Kinetics of hydrogenation of aromatics determined by carbon-13 NMR for Athabasca bitumen-derived middle distillates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yui, S.M.; Sanford, E.C. (Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada))

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High aromatics content in middle distillates is detrimental to fuel quality, as shown in such properties as smoke point of jet fuel and cetane number of diesel fuel. In the petroleum and petrochemical industries the yields from fluid catalytic cracking or steam cracking units are adversely affected by high aromatics content in the feedstock. Distillates obtained from oil sand bitumen, heavy oils, or coal liquefaction products are particularly high in aromatics. Reducing the concentration of this class of compounds is important. Aromatics hydrogenation (AHYD) is one option to achieve this result. In the current Syncrude operation a primary objective of hydrotreating is to reduce product sulfur and nitrogen contents; reducing aromatics content is an incidental result. However, the expansion plan currently under study by Syncrude includes further AHYD to improve cetane number. Predicting the product aromatics content is an important issue for this study. In the present study, hydrotreating of five Athabasca-bitumen-derived gas oils was conducted in pilot scale trickle-bed reactors using alumina-based commercial NiMo catalysts. Feedstocks originated from the distillation of virgin bitumen, and from distillates derived from treating bitumen in a fluid coker and hydrocracking pilot plant. Aromatics content was determined by the {sup 13}C NMR method. The previously developed rate equation for AHYD was modified by including power terms for space velocity and hydrogen partial pressure. The data were analyzed using the modified equation.

  18. Solvent extraction of thorium(IV), uranium(VI), and europium(III) with lipophilic alkyl-substituted pyridinium salts. Final report for subcontract 9-XZ2-1123E-1, June 1, 1992--December 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ensor, D.D.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the treatment of high level nuclear wastes, aromatic pyridinium salts which are radiation-resistant are desired for the extraction of actinides and lanthanides. The solvent extraction of Th{sup +4}, UO{sub 2}{sup +2}, and Eu{sup +3} by three aromatic extractants, 3,5-didodecylpyridinium nitrate (35PY), 2,6-didodecylpyridinium nitrate (26PY), and 1-methyl-3,5-didodecyl-pyridinium iodide (1M35PY) has been studied in nitric acid media. The general order of extractability of the three extractants in toluene was 1M35PY>> 26PY > 35PY. The overall extraction efficiency of the metal ions was Th{sup +4} >UO{sub 2}{sup +2} > Eu{sup +3}. The extraction of HNO{sub 3}, which was competitive with the extraction of metal ions, was quantitatively investigated by NaOH titration and UV spectrometry. The loading capacity suggested that the extracted species in the organic phase for thorium was (R{sub 4}N{sup +}){sub 2}Th(NO{sub 3}{sup -}){sub 6}, where R{sub 4}N{sup +} denotes 1M35PY. A comparison of 1M35PY to the well-characterized extractant, Aliquat-336, an aliphatic ammonium salt was made. At the same extractant concentration, 1M35PY extracted thorium more efficiently than Aliquat-336 at high acidity. Thorium could be readily stripped with dilute nitric acid from 1M35PY. After irradiation of 0.1M 1M35PY with {sup 60}Co at 40R/min for 48 hours, no change in the extraction efficiency of thorium was observed.

  19. Inverse hydrochemical models of aqueous extracts tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    years to improve water extraction methods, develop numericalreactions during water extraction, redox processes were notAranyossy, J.F. , 2001. Extraction of water and solutes from

  20. Fission product solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, B.A.; Bonnesen, P.V.; Sachleben, R.A. [and others

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two main objectives concerning removal of fission products from high-level tank wastes will be accomplished in this project. The first objective entails the development of an acid-side Cs solvent-extraction (SX) process applicable to remediation of the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and dissolved calcine waste (DCW) at INEEL. The second objective is to develop alkaline-side SX processes for the combined removal of Tc, Cs, and possibly Sr and for individual separation of Tc (alone or together with Sr) and Cs. These alkaline-side processes apply to tank wastes stored at Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge. This work exploits the useful properties of crown ethers and calixarenes and has shown that such compounds may be economically adapted to practical processing conditions. Potential benefits for both acid- and alkaline-side processing include order-of-magnitude concentration factors, high rejection of bulk sodium and potassium salts, and stripping with dilute (typically 10 mM) nitric acid. These benefits minimize the subsequent burden on the very expensive vitrification and storage of the high-activity waste. In the case of the SRTALK process for Tc extraction as pertechnetate anion from alkaline waste, such benefits have now been proven at the scale of a 12-stage flowsheet tested in 2-cm centrifugal contactors with a Hanford supernatant waste simulant. SRTALK employs a crown ether in a TBP-modified aliphatic kerosene diluent, is economically competitive with other applicable separation processes being considered, and has been successfully tested in batch extraction of actual Hanford double-shell slurry feed (DSSF).

  1. Extraction Utility Design Specification

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010Salt |Exelon GenerationExtraction Utility Design

  2. Extracting the Eliashberg Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1,EnergyExploring theExtracellularExtracting the

  3. Extracting the Eliashberg Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1,EnergyExploring theExtracellularExtracting

  4. Extracting the Eliashberg Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) /EmailMolecularGE, Ford,Extracting the Eliashberg

  5. The Ether Extract and the Chloroform Extract of Soils.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S.; Rather, J. B.

    1913-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I39-3I3-5m TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS BULLETIN NO. 155 JANUARY, 1913 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY TECHNICAL BULLETIN THE ETHER EXTRACT AND THE CHLORO? FORM EXTRACT OF SOILS BY G. S. FRAPS and J. B. RATHER POSTOFFICE COLLEGE STATION... postal card will bring these publications. THE ETHER EXTRACT AND THE CHLOROFORM EXTRACT OF SOILS. (t. S. FliAPS , Chemist. ?J. B. o Y . C U G O Assistant Chemist. The soil may coDtarn any of the Substances which are found in plants or animals...

  6. Long-Range Atmospheric Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: A Global 3-D Model Analysis Including Evaluation of Arctic Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Carey

    We use the global 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem to simulate long-range atmospheric transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). To evaluate the model’s ability to simulate PAHs with different volatilities, ...

  7. Effectiveness of in site biodegradation for the remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at a contaminated oil refinery, Port Arthur, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffit, Alfred Edward

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effectiveness of bioremediation for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sediments contaminated with highly weathered petroleum was evaluated at a contaminated oil refinery. The sediments were chronically contaminated...

  8. Assessing the Influence of Secondary Organic versus Primary Carbonaceous Aerosols on Long-Range Atmospheric Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, J. R.

    We use the chemical transport model GEOS-Chem to evaluate the hypothesis that atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are trapped in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) as it forms. We test the ability of three ...

  9. Estimated IR and phosphorescence emission fluxes for specific Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Red Rectangle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Mulas; G. Malloci; C. Joblin; D. Toublanc

    2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the tentative identification of the blue luminescence in the Red Rectangle by Vijh et al. (2005), we compute absolute fluxes for the vibrational IR emission and phosphorescence bands of three small polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The calculated IR spectra are compared with available ISO observations. A subset of the emission bands are predicted to be observable using presently available facilities, and can be used for an immediate, independent, discriminating test on their alleged presence in this well-known astronomical object.

  10. New avenues in the directed deprotometallation of aromatics: recent advances in directed cupration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harford, Philip J.; Peel, Andrew J.; Chevallier, Floris; Takita, Ryo; Mongin, Florence; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Wheatley, Andrew E. H.

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    )–Li interactions. #1; Figure 1 The first solid-state evidence for lithium cyanocuprate structures was revealed by ion-separated 5 and the polymer of 6. #1; Scheme 1 Formation of the dimer of Lipshutz bis(amido)cuprate 7. The issue of cyanide... by which to effect the regioselective functionalization of aromatics.#2; Historically, bases such as organolithiums and lithium dialkylamides have typically been employed for this purpose. However, either because they are highly polar or because...

  11. Phototoxicity of non-carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aquatic organisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kagan, J.; Kagan, E.D.; Kagan, I.A.; Kagan, P.A.; Quigley, S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene are phototoxic in Daphnia magna, Artemia salina, first instar larvae of Aedes aegypti, late embryonic forms of Rana pipiens, and fish (Pimephales promelas). Since polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are generated in the combustion processes held responsible for the damages of acid rain, and they are introduced into the environment through other means as well, the high phototoxicity of the major pollutants, which are not carcinogenic, suggests that greater attention must be given to their environmental significance.

  12. Broad specificity dioxygenase enzymes and the bioremediation of hazardous aromatic pollutants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonus, P.A.; Nies, L. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The release of aromatic compounds to the environment is a major source of global pollution. In particular, the contamination of soil and groundwater with benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX) is the most ubiquitous form of aromatic pollution. The major source of BTX contamination is the release of gasoline and other petroleum products. This research focused on the improvement of bioremediation of BTX through a better understanding of broad specificity dioxygenase enzymes produced by soil and sediment bacteria. The investigation utilized pure bacterial strains isolated on biphenyl, naphthalene, or toluene. These isolated aerobic bacteria were then used to investigate the specificity of the initial enzymatic attack on aromatic compounds including BTX and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The enzymatic specificity and competency of the five isolates selected for study were determined through the use of growth tests and two rapid assay techniques. The growth tests were conducted on mineral agar plates or in liquid cultures, and they were used to determine substrate specificity. In addition, rapid assays for both BTX and PCBs were carried out using various growth substrates. These assays allowed further clarification of the specificity of the dioxygenase enzymes involved in aromatic degradation. Preliminary results of the PCB assay show that biphenyl and naphthalene isolated organisms grown on biphenyl, benzoate, naphthalene, and succinate maintain production of broad specificity dioxygenase enzymes able to degrade PCBs. Likewise, the BTX assay confirms that biphenyl and naphthalene selected organisms grown on their respective selection substrates completely degrade BTX including all three xylene isomers. In comparison, the toluene selected organism that was studied was unable to degrade PCBs, but it was able to degrade all BTX constituents.

  13. Catalytic oxidation of 2-aminophenols and ortho hydroxylation of aromatic amines by tyrosinase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toussaint, O.; Lerch, K.

    1987-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The usual substrates of tyrosinase, a copper-containing monooxygenase (EC 1.14.18.1), are monophenols and o-diphenols which are both converted to o-quinones. In this paper, the authors studied the reaction of this enzyme with two new classes of substrates: aromatic amines and o-aminophenols, structural analogues of monophenols and o-diphenols, respectively. They undergo the same catalytic reactions (ortho hydroxylation and oxidation), as documented by product analysis and kinetic studies. In the presence of tyrosinase, arylamines and o-aminophenols are converted to o-quinone imines, which are isolated as quinone anils or phenoxazones. As an example, in the presence of tyrosinase, 2-amino-3-hydroxybenzoic acid (an o-aminophenol) is converted to cinnabarinic acid, a well-known phenoxazone, while p-aminotoluene (an aromatic amine) gives rise to the formation of 5-amino-2-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone 1-(4-methylanil). Kinetic studies using an oxygen electrode show that arylamines and the corresponding monophenols exhibit similar Michaelis constants. In contrast, the reaction rates observed for aromatic amines are relatively slow as compared to monophenols. The enzymatic conversion of arylamines by tryosinase is different from the typical ones: N-oxidation and ring hydroxylation without further oxidation. This difference originates from the regiospecific hydroxylation (ortho position) and subsequent oxidation of the intermediate o-aminophenol to the corresponding o-quinone imine. Finally, the well-know monooxygenase activity of tyrosinase was also confirmed for the aromatic amine p-aminotoluene, with /sup 18/O/sub 2/.

  14. Modification of the EIC hydrogen sulfide abatement process to produce valuable by-products. Final report, May 4, 1981-May 4, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Offenhartz, P. O'D.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program of analytical and experimental studies has been carried out to develop modifications of the CUPROSUL process for the desulfurization of geothermal steam. The objective of the program was to devise practical means to manipulate the chemistry of the process so that the consumption of raw materials could be controlled and a variety of valuable by-products could be produced. The process had been demonstrated, at one-tenth commercial scale, for steam of the Geysers' average composition in a configuration which resulted in essentially complete oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. The ability to control the extent of oxidation would increase process flexibility and extend its range of applicability to steams of widely varying composition. Preliminary market surveys of raw materials required for the process and by-products which could be produced indicated that controlling the oxidation of sulfides to produce elemental sulfur would probably be the preferred process option. Use of lime to treat sulfate-containing purge streams to produce by-product gypsum and ammonia for recycle or sale could also be justified for certain steam compositions. Recovery of ammonium sulfate alone from the purge stream would not normally be justified unless corecovery of other valuable by-products, such as boric acid, was possible at incremental cost. It was found that ferric sulfate was a highly effective, selective oxidant for the controlled oxidation of copper sulfide solids to produce elemental sulfur for sale and copper sulfate for recycle.

  15. Passive vapor extraction feasibility study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, V.J.

    1994-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Demonstration of a passive vapor extraction remediation system is planned for sites in the 200 West Area used in the past for the disposal of waste liquids containing carbon tetrachloride. The passive vapor extraction units will consist of a 4-in.-diameter pipe, a check valve, a canister filled with granular activated carbon, and a wind turbine. The check valve will prevent inflow of air that otherwise would dilute the soil gas and make its subsequent extraction less efficient. The granular activated carbon is used to adsorb the carbon tetrachloride from the air. The wind turbine enhances extraction rates on windy days. Passive vapor extraction units will be designed and operated to meet all applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. Based on a cost analysis, passive vapor extraction was found to be a cost-effective method for remediation of soils containing lower concentrations of volatile contaminants. Passive vapor extraction used on wells that average 10-stdft{sup 3}/min air flow rates was found to be more cost effective than active vapor extraction for concentrations below 500 parts per million by volume (ppm) of carbon tetrachloride. For wells that average 5-stdft{sup 3}/min air flow rates, passive vapor extraction is more cost effective below 100 ppm.

  16. Extraction chromatography: Progress and opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bond, A.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extraction chromatography provides a simple and effective method for the analytical and preparative-scale separation of a variety of metal ions. Recent advances in extractant design, particularly the development of extractants capable of metal ion recognition or of strong complex formation in highly acidic media, have significantly improved the utility of the technique. Advances in support design, most notably the introduction of functionalized supports to enhance metal ion retention, promise to yield further improvements. Column instability remains a significant obstacle, however, to the process-scale application of extraction chromatography. 79 refs.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot B. Kennel; Chong Chen; Dady Dadyburjor; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. Table 1 provides an overview of the major markets for carbon products. Current sources of materials for these processes generally rely on petroleum distillation products or coal tar distillates obtained as a byproduct of metcoke production facilities. In the former case, the American materials industry, just as the energy industry, is dependent upon foreign sources of petroleum. In the latter case, metcoke production is decreasing every year due to the combined difficulties associated with poor economics and a significant environmental burden. Thus, a significant need exists for an environmentally clean process which can used domestically obtained raw materials and which can still be very competitive economically.

  18. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The final report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during length of the project. The goal of this project was to integrate coal into a refinery in order to produce coal-based jet fuel, with the major goal to examine the products other than jet fuel. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal-based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. The main goal of Task 1 was the production of coal-based jet fuel and other products that would need to be utilized in other fuels or for non-fuel sources, using known refining technology. The gasoline, diesel fuel, and fuel oil were tested in other aspects of the project. Light cycle oil (LCO) and refined chemical oil (RCO) were blended, hydrotreated to removed sulfur, and hydrogenated, then fractionated in the original production of jet fuel. Two main approaches, taken during the project period, varied where the fractionation took place, in order to preserve the life of catalysts used, which includes (1) fractionation of the hydrotreated blend to remove sulfur and nitrogen, followed by a hydrogenation step of the lighter fraction, and (2) fractionation of the LCO and RCO before any hydrotreatment. Task 2 involved assessment of the impact of refinery integration of JP-900 production on gasoline and diesel fuel. Fuel properties, ignition characteristics and engine combustion of model fuels and fuel samples from pilot-scale production runs were characterized. The model fuels used to represent the coal-based fuel streams were blended into full-boiling range fuels to simulate the mixing of fuel streams within the refinery to create potential 'finished' fuels. The representative compounds of the coal-based gasoline were cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane, and for the coal-base diesel fuel they were fluorine and phenanthrene. Both the octane number (ON) of the coal-based gasoline and the cetane number (CN) of the coal-based diesel were low, relative to commercial fuels ({approx}60 ON for coal-based gasoline and {approx}20 CN for coal-based diesel fuel). Therefore, the allowable range of blending levels was studied where the blend would achieve acceptable performance. However, in both cases of the coal-based fuels, their ignition characteristics may make them ideal fuels for advanced combustion strategies where lower ON and CN are desirable. Task 3 was designed to develop new approaches for producing ultra clean fuels and value-added chemicals from refinery streams involving coal as a part of the feedstock. It consisted of the following three parts: (1) desulfurization and denitrogenation which involves both new adsorption approach for selective removal of nitrogen and sulfur and new catalysts for more effective hydrotreating and the combination of adsorption denitrogenation with hydrodesulfurization; (2) saturation of two-ring aromatics that included new design of sulfur resistant noble-metal catalysts for hydrogenation of naphthalene and tetralin in middle distillate fuels, and (3) value-added chemicals from naphthalene and biphenyl, which aimed at developing value-added organic chemicals from refinery streams such as 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 4,4{prime}-dimethylbiphenyl as precursors to advanced polymer materials. Major advances were achieved in this project in designing the catalysts and sorbent materials, and in developing fundamental understanding. The objective of Task 4 was to evaluate the effect of introducing coal into an existing petroleum refinery on the fuel oil product, specifically trace element emissions. Activities performed to accomplish this objective included analyzing two petroleum-based commercial heavy fuel oils (i.e., No. 6 fuel oils) as baseline fuels and three co-processed fuel oils, characterizing the atomization performance of a No. 6 fuel oil, measuring the combustion performance and emissions of the five fuels, specifically major, minor, and trace elements when fired in a watertube boiler designed for natural gas/fuel oil, and determining the boiler performance when firing the five fuels. Two

  19. Calixarene crown ether solvent composition and use thereof for extraction of cesium from alkaline waste solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN); Presley, Derek J. (Ooltewah, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solvent composition and corresponding method for extracting cesium (Cs) from aqueous neutral and alkaline solutions containing Cs and perhaps other competing metal ions is described. The method entails contacting an aqueous Cs-containing solution with a solvent consisting of a specific class of lipophilic calix[4]arene-crown ether extractants dissolved in a hydrocarbon-based diluent containing a specific class of alkyl-aromatic ether alcohols as modifiers. The cesium values are subsequently recovered from the extractant, and the solvent subsequently recycled, by contacting the Cs-containing organic solution with an aqueous stripping solution. This combined extraction and stripping method is especially useful as a process for removal of the radionuclide cesium-137 from highly alkaline waste solutions which are also very concentrated in sodium and potassium. No pre-treatment of the waste solution is necessary, and the cesium can be recovered using a safe and inexpensive stripping process using water, dilute (millimolar) acid solutions, or dilute (millimolar) salt solutions. An important application for this invention would be treatment of alkaline nuclear tank wastes. Alternatively, the invention could be applied to decontamination of acidic reprocessing wastes containing cesium-137.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot B. Kennel; Philip L. Biedler; Chong Chen; Dady Dadyburjor; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. A process has been developed which results in high quality binder pitch suitable for use in graphite electrodes or carbon anodes. A detailed description of the protocol is given by Clendenin. Briefly, aromatic heavy oils are hydro-treated under mild conditions in order to increase their ability to dissolve coal. An example of an aromatic heavy oil is Koppers Carbon Black Base (CBB) oil. CBB oil has been found to be an effective solvent and acceptably low cost (i.e., significantly below the market price for binder pitch, or about $280 per ton at the time of this writing). It is also possible to use solvents derived from hydrotreated coal and avoid reliance on coke oven recovery products completely if so desired.

  1. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF PHENOLS FROM WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greminger, Douglas C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste Water Treatment by Solvent Extraction," Canadian J.A.F. Preuss, "Extraction of Phenol from Water with a Liquid1980 SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF PHENOLS FROM WATER LP,WRENCE BERv

  2. Liquid-Liquid Extraction Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid-liquid extraction is the separation of one or more components of a liquid solution by contact with a second immiscible liquid called the solvent. If the components in the original liquid solution distribute themselves differently between...

  3. Hot water bitumen extraction process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rendall, J.S.

    1989-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method of extracting bitumen oils from tar-sands ore. It includes an initial conditioning step comprising crushing tar-sands ore to yield solid particles of a maximum size required by a log washer conditioner in a second conditioning step; a bitumen extraction step; a bitumen separation step; a solvent recovery step; a sand washing and water clarification step; and a sand solvent recovery step.

  4. Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Fourth quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation are conducting Phase 1 of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an on-going DOE-sponsored, University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicate that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. The performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams.

  5. Treatability study on the use of by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan for the stabilization of hazardous and radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalb, P.D.; Milian, L.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Environmental and Waste Technology Center; Yim, S.P. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst. (Korea, Republic of); Dyer, R.S.; Michaud, W.R. [Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Republic of Kazakhstan generates significant quantities of excess elemental sulfur from the production and refining of petroleum reserves. In addition, the country also produces hazardous, and radioactive wastes which require treatment/stabilization. In an effort to find secondary uses for the elemental sulfur, and simultaneously produce a material which could be used to encapsulate, and reduce the dispersion of harmful contaminants into the environment, BNL evaluated the use of the sulfur polymer cement (SPC) produced from by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan. This thermoplastic binder material forms a durable waste form with low leaching properties and is compatible with a wide range of waste types. Several hundred kilograms of Kazakhstan sulfur were shipped to the US and converted to SPC (by reaction with 5 wt% organic modifiers) for use in this study. A phosphogypsum sand waste generated in Kazakhstan during the purification of phosphate fertilizer was selected for treatment. Waste loadings of 40 wt% were easily achieved. Waste form performance testing included compressive strength, water immersion, and Accelerated Leach Testing.

  6. Treatability study on the use of by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan for the stabilization of hazardous and radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yim, Sung Paal; Kalb, P.D.; Milian, L.W.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Republic of Kazakhstan generates significant quantities of excess sulfur from the production and refining of petroleum reserves. In addition, the country also produces hazardous, and radioactive wastes which require treatment/stabilization. In an effort to find secondary uses for the elemental sulfur, and simultaneously produce a material which could be used to encapsulate, and reduce the dispersion of harmful contaminants into the environment, BNL evaluated the use of the sulfur polymer cement (SPC) produced from by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan. This thermoplastic binder material forms a durable waste form with low leaching properties and is compatible with a wide range of waste types. Several hundred kilograms of Kazakhstan sulfur were shipped to the U.S. and converted to SPC (by reaction with 5 wt% organic modifiers) for use in this study. A phosphogypsum sand waste generated in Kazakhstan during the purification of phosphate fertilizer was selected for treatment. Waste loading of 40 wt% were easily achieved. Waste form performance testing included compressive strength, water immersion, and Accelerated Leach Testing. 14 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Using HEM surveys to evaluate disposal of by-product water from CBNG development in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, B.A.; Sams, J.I.; Smith, B.D. (USGS, Denver, CO); Harbert, W.P.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production of methane from thick, extensive coal beds in the Powder River Basin ofWyoming has created water management issues. Since development began in 1997, more than 650 billion liters of water have been produced from approximately 22,000 wells. Infiltration impoundments are used widely to dispose of by-product water from coal bed natural gas (CBNG) production, but their hydrogeologic effects are poorly understood. Helicopter electromagnetic surveys (HEM) were completed in July 2003 and July 2004 to characterize the hydrogeology of an alluvial aquifer along the Powder River. The aquifer is receiving CBNG produced water discharge from infiltration impoundments. HEM data were subjected to Occam’s inversion algorithms to determine the aquifer bulk conductivity, which was then correlated to water salinity using site-specific sampling results. The HEM data provided high-resolution images of salinity levels in the aquifer, a result not attainable using traditional sampling methods. Interpretation of these images reveals clearly the produced water influence on aquifer water quality. Potential shortfalls to this method occur where there is no significant contrast in aquifer salinity and infiltrating produced water salinity and where there might be significant changes in aquifer lithology. Despite these limitations, airborne geophysical methods can provide a broadscale (watershed-scale) tool to evaluate CBNG water disposal, especially in areas where field-based investigations are logistically prohibitive. This research has implications for design and location strategies of future CBNG water surface disposal facilities within the Powder River Basin.

  8. Inverse hydrochemical models of aqueous extracts tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    processes may occur during porewater extraction such as dissolution of soluble minerals (processes taking place during aqueous extraction. Identification of GM requires knowing: 1) Aqueous complexes, 2) Mineral

  9. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

  10. Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

  11. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames. Progress report, August 15, 1990--August 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify, and to confirm or determine rate constants for, the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize soot and fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics. Stable and radical species profiles in the aromatics oxidation study are measured using molecular beam sampling with on-line mass spectrometry. The rate of soot formation measured by conventional optical techniques is found to support the hypotheses that particle inception occurs through reactive coagulation of high molecular weight PAH in competition with destruction by OHattack, and that the subsequent growth of the soot mass occurs through addition reactions of PAH and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} with the soot particles. During the first year of this reporting period, fullerenes C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} in substantial quantities were found in the flames being studied. The fullerenes were recovered, purified and spectroscopically identified. The yields of C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} were then determined over ranges of conditions in low-pressure premixed flames of benzene and oxygen.

  12. Cesium and strontium extraction using a mixed extractant solvent including crown ether and calixarene extractants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed extractant solvent including calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from an acidic solution. The DtBu18C6 may be present from approximately 0.01 M to approximately 0.4M, such as from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may form an organic phase in an extraction system that also includes an aqueous phase. Methods of extracting cesium and strontium as well as strontium alone are also disclosed.

  13. IARC Monographs on the Evaluation of Carcinogenic Risks to Humans Some Inorganic Substances, Chlorinated Hydrocarbons, Aromatic Amines, N-Nitroso Compounds,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Inorganic Substances, Chlorinated Hydrocarbons, Aromatic Amines, N-Nitroso Compounds, and Natural Products 1973; 181 pages ISBN 92 832 1202 9 (out of print) Volume 3 Certain Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, and Acrolein 1979; 513 pages ISBN 92 832 1219 3 (out of print) Volume 20 Some Halogenated Hydrocarbons 1979

  14. Cardiac toxicity of 5-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is differentially dependent on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2 isoform during zebrafish development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardiac toxicity of 5-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is differentially dependent on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor 2 isoform during zebrafish development John P. Incardona , Tiffany L. Linbo, Nathaniel L aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), commonly occur as com- plex mixtures in the environment. Recent studies using

  15. Constraining uncertainties about the sources and magnitude of ambient air exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): The state of Minnesota as a case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobscheid, Agnes B.; McKone, Thomas E.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oil, petroleum coke, bark, industrial wastewater, sludge, and/oil, waste alcohol, medical waste, solid byproducts; sludgeoil, natural gas, or other (specified as either wood, wood waste, petroleum coke, or wastewater, sludge (

  16. Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation are conducting Phase 1 of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an on-going DOE-sponsored, University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicate that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. The performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams. The principal objective of the Phase 1 program is to identify and evaluate the performance of a catalyst which is robust and flexible with regard to choice of reducing gas. In order to achieve this goal, the authors have planned a structured program including: Market/process/cost/evaluation; Lab-scale catalyst preparation/optimization studies; Lab-scale, bulk/supported catalyst kinetic studies; Bench-scale catalyst/process studies; and Utility review. Progress is reported from all three organizations.

  17. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S.; Ghafoori, N.; Paul, B.; Sevim, H.; Thomasson, E.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary environmental risk assessment on the FGD by-products to be placed underground is virtually complete. The initial mixes for pneumatic and hydraulic placement have been selected and are being subject to TCLP, ASTM, and modified SLP shake tests as well as ASTM column leaching. Results of these analyses show that the individual coal combustion residues, and the residues mixes, are non-hazardous in character. Based on available information, including well logs obtained from Peabody Coal Company, a detailed study of the geology of the placement site was completed. The study shows that the disposal site in the abandoned underground mine workings at depths of between 325 and 375 feet are well below potable groundwater resources. This, coupled with the benign nature of the residues and residues mixtures, should alleviate any concern that the underground placement will have adverse effects on groundwater resources. Seven convergence stations were installed in the proposed underground placement area of the Peabody Coal Company No. 10 mine. Several sets of convergence data were obtained from the stations. A study of materials handling and transportation of coal combustion residues from the electric power plant to the injection site has been made. The study evaluated the economics of the transportation of coal combustion residues by pneumatic trucks, by pressure differential rail cars, and by SEEC, Inc. collapsible intermodal containers (CICs) for different annual handling rates and transport distances. The preliminary physico-chemical characteristics and engineering properties of various FBC fly ash-spent bed mixes have been determined, and long-term studies of these properties are continuing.

  18. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.P.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of CCB materials. The two technologies for the underground placement that were to be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry CCB products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of CCB products with about 70% solids. The period covered by this report is the second quarter of Phase 3 of the overall program. During this period over 8,000 tons of CCB mixtures was injected using the hydraulic paste technology. This amount of material virtually filled the underground opening around the injection well, and was deemed sufficient to demonstrate fully the hydraulic injection technology. By the end of this quarter about 2,000 tons of fly ash had been placed underground using the pneumatic placement technology. While the rate of injection of about 50 tons per hour met design criteria, problems were experienced in the delivery of fly ash to the pneumatic demonstration site. The source of the fly ash, the Archer Daniels Midland Company power plant at Decatur, Illinois is some distance from the demonstration site, and often sufficient tanker trucks are not available to haul enough fly ash to fully load the injection equipment. Further, on some occasions fly ash from the plant was not available. The injection well was plugged three times during the demonstration. This typically occurred due to cementation of the FBC ash in contact with water. After considerable deliberations and in consultation with the technical project officer, it was decided to stop further injection of CCB`s underground using the developed pneumatic technology.

  19. Powder River Basin coalbed methane: The USGS role in investigating this ultimate clean coal by-product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Ochs, A.M.; Stanton, R.W.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past few decades, the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin has supplied the Nation with comparatively clean low ash and low sulfur coal. However, within the past few years, coalbed methane from the same Fort Union coal has become an important energy by-product. The recently completed US Geological Survey coal resource assessment of the Fort Union coal beds and zones in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains (Fort Union Coal Assessment Team, 1999) has added useful information to coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin has rapidly accelerated in the past three years. During this time more than 800 wells have been drilled and recent operator forecasts projected more than 5,000 additional wells to be drilled over the next few years. Development of shallow (less than 1,000 ft. deep) Fort Union coal-bed methane is confined to Campbell and Sheridan Counties, Wyoming, and Big Horn County, Montana. The purpose of this paper is to report on the US Geological Survey's role on a cooperative coalbed methane project with the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Wyoming Reservoir Management Group and several gas operators. This paper will also discuss the methodology that the USGS and the BLM will be utilizing for analysis and evaluation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Powder River Basin. The USGS and BLM need additional information of coalbed methane reservoirs to accomplish their respective resource evaluation and management missions.

  20. Speciation of chromium in feed coals and ash byproducts from Canadian power plants burning subbituminous and bituminous coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fariborz Goodarzi; Frank E. Huggins [Geological Survey of Canada-Calgary Division, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chromium species in the feed coals and ash byproducts from seven Canadian coal-fired power plants were examined using Cr X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy. Chromium in the Canadian feed coals is always found as Cr{sup 3+} but generally has a dual occurrence, as Cr{sup 3+} is distributed to varying degrees between the clay mineral illite and a poorly crystallized chromium oxyhydroxide phase associated with the organic fraction. In two subbituminous feed coals from Alberta, chromium is present largely as Cr{sup 3+}/illite, whereas in two other such coals, it is present predominantly as CrOOH. Chromium in a low-sulfur bituminous feed coal from Alberta is found mostly as Cr{sup 3+}/illite, whereas for feed coals from Nova Scotia with high sulfur contents, chromium is distributed between both Cr{sup 3+}/illite and CrOOH. Very little chromium was found in the limestone used in a fluidized-bed combustor. The chromium species in most bottom ash samples from all seven combustion units is predominantly, if not entirely, Cr{sup 3+} associated with aluminosilicate phases. Chromium speciation for subbituminous electrostatic precipitator fly ash is mostly Cr{sup 3+}, but in some cases, it is slightly lessand varies by sampling location at the plant. Chromium in fly ash from the combustion of bituminous feed coals is predominantlyCr{sup 3+}. A unique species of chromium found in one feed coal and an unrelated fly ash is metallic chromium, similar to that in stainless steel. The occurrence of this form of chromium in these materials indicates contamination from machinery, such as the coal milling machine or possibly wearing down of stainless steel parts by the coal or ash. The observation of this unexpected contamination demonstrates the power and usefulness of X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy for speciation determination. 35 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S. [and others

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 30, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC 30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground residues placement. Previous quarterly Technical Progress Reports have set forth the specific objectives of the program, as well as the management plan and the test plan for the overall program, and a discussion of these will not be repeated here. Rather, this report, will set forth the technical progress made during the period January 1 through March 31, 1995. The demonstration of the SEEC, Inc. technology for the transporting of coal combustion residues was completed with the unloading and final disposition of the three Collapsible Intermodal Containers (CIC). The loading and transport by rail of the three CIC`s was quire successful; however some difficulties were encountered in the unloading of the containers. A full topical report on the entire SEEC demonstration is being prepared. As a result of the demonstration some modifications of the SEEC concept may be undertaken. Also during the quarter the location of the injection wells at the Peabody No. 10 mine demonstration site were selected. Peabody Coal Company has developed the specifications for the wells and sought bids for the actual drilling. It is expected that the wells will be drilled early in May.

  2. Adsorption of small aromatic molecules on the ,,111... surfaces of noble metals: A density functional theory study with semiempirical corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    Adsorption of small aromatic molecules on the ,,111... surfaces of noble metals: A density 10 May 2010; published online 10 June 2010 The adsorption of benzene, thiophene, and pyridine on the 111 surface of gold and copper have been studied using density functional theory DFT . Adsorption

  3. 2094 J.Org. Chem. 1988,53, 2094-2099 Table 11. Bromination of Aromatic Hydrocarbons with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudlicky, Tomas

    Br,/aromatic = 5; solvent: carbon tetrachloride. *Chloro- benzene. tetrachloride and 1,4-dibromonaphthalenewas from ICN Biomedicals (WoelmN-Super 1). Carbon tetrachloride was dried with calcium chloride,26, 759. (10) Kovacic, P.; Wu, C. J. Org. Chem. 1961,26, 762. mmol), 2 (30 g), and carbon tetrachloride

  4. UNUSUAL STABILITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON RADICAL CATIONS IN AMORPHOUS WATER ICES UP TO 120 K: ASTRONOMICAL IMPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    during warm-up above 120 K. Earlier we found that PAH ionization is quantitative in water ice and PAH studies of PAHs in water ice. These optical studies were undertaken to overcome the limitations of severeUNUSUAL STABILITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON RADICAL CATIONS IN AMORPHOUS WATER ICES UP

  5. Activated carbon and biochar amendments decrease pore-water concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Johannes

    and biochar are effective at reducing PAH pore-water concentrations, the more expensive and non contaminants including PAHs may be taken up by organ- isms or migrate to water basins. Methods that limitActivated carbon and biochar amendments decrease pore-water concentrations of polycyclic aromatic

  6. DO THE INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES NEED ULTRAVIOLET EXCITATION? THE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON MODEL IN UV-POOR REFLECTION NEBULAE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draine, Bruce T.

    '' PAHs in reflection nebulae near stars as cool as Teff ¼ 3000 K can result in observable emis- sion at 6DO THE INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES NEED ULTRAVIOLET EXCITATION? THE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON MODEL IN UV-POOR REFLECTION NEBULAE Aigen Li and B. T. Draine Department of Astrophysical Sciences

  7. Anisotropy and Size Effects on the Optical Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caterina Cocchi; Deborah Prezzi; Alice Ruini; Marilia J. Caldas; Elisa Molinari

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic and optical properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present a strong dependence on their size and geometry. We tackle this issue by analyzing the spectral features of two prototypical classes of PAHs, belonging to D6h and D2h symmetry point groups and related to coronene as multifunctional seed. While the size variation induces an overall red shift of the spectra and a redistribution of the oscillator strength between the main peaks, a lower molecular symmetry is responsible for the appearance of new optical features. Along with broken molecular orbital degeneracies, optical peaks split and dark states are activated in the low-energy part of the spectrum. Supported by a systematic analysis of the composition and the character of the optical transitions, our results contribute in shedding light to the mechanisms responsible for spectral modifications in the visible and near UV absorption bands of medium-size PAHs.

  8. One-electron oxidation in the degradation of creosote polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by Phanerochaete chrysoporium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogan, B.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)]|[USDA Forest Service Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States); Lamar, R.T. [USDA Forest Service Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The abilities of whole cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium and P. chrysosporium manganese peroxidase-mediated lipid peroxidation reactions to degrade the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in creosote were studied. The disappearance of 12 three- to six-ring PAHs occurred in both systems. Both in vivo and in vitro, the disappearance of all PAHs was found to be very strongly correlated with ionization potential. This was true even for compounds beyond the ionization potential thresholds of lignin peroxidase and Mn{sup 3+}. Deviations from this correlation were seen in the cases of PAHs which are susceptible to radical addition reactions. These results thus begin to clarify the mechanisms of non-lignin peroxidase-labile PAH degradation in the manganese peroxidase-lipid peroxidation system and provide further evidence for the ability of this system to explain the in vivo oxidation of these compounds. 35 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Rendering graphene supports hydrophilic with non-covalent aromatic functionalization for transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pantelic, Radosav S., E-mail: pantelic@imbb.forth.gr [National Cancer Institute, 50 South Drive, Building 50, Room 4306, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Fu, Wangyang; Schoenenberger, Christian [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, Basel CH-4056 (Switzerland); Stahlberg, Henning [Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics, Biozentrum, University of Basel, Mattenstrasse 26, WRO-1058, Basel CH-4058 (Switzerland)

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous carbon films have been routinely used to enhance the preparation of frozen-hydrated samples for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), either in retaining protein concentration, providing mechanical stability or dissipating sample charge. However, strong background signal from the amorphous carbon support obstructs that of the sample, and the insulating properties of thin amorphous carbon films preclude any efficiency in dispersing charge. Graphene addresses the limitations of amorphous carbon. Graphene is a crystalline material with virtually no phase or amplitude contrast and unparalleled, high electrical carrier mobility. However, the hydrophobic properties of graphene have prevented its routine application in Cryo-TEM. This Letter reports a method for rendering graphene TEM supports hydrophilic—a convenient approach maintaining graphene's structural and electrical properties based on non-covalent, aromatic functionalization.

  10. Aromatic hydrocarbons associated with brines from geopressured wells. Annual report, fiscal 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeley, D.F.; Meriwether, J.R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Samples of cryocondensates - materials condensed at - 78.5/sup 0/C were taken on a regular basis from the gas stream for the USDOE geopressured wells. Most of the data has been taken from the Gladys McCall well as it has flowed on a regular and almost continous basis. The cryocondensates, not the ''condensate'' from gas wells, are almost exclusively aromatic hydrocarbons, primarily benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and the xylenes, but contain over 95 compounds, characterized using gas chromatographic-mass spectroscopy. The solubility in water and brine of benezene, toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene, some of the components of the cryocondensate, as well as distribution coefficients between water or brine and a standard oil have been measured. 25 refs.

  11. On-line database of the spectral properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Malloci; C. Joblin; G. Mulas

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an on-line database of computed molecular properties for a large sample of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in four charge states: -1, 0, +1, and +2. At present our database includes 40 molecules ranging in size from naphthalene and azulene (C10H8) up to circumovalene (C66H20). We performed our calculations in the framework of the density functional theory (DFT) and the time-dependent DFT to obtain the most relevant molecular parameters needed for astrophysical applications. For each molecule in the sample, our database presents in a uniform way the energetic, rotational, vibrational, and electronic properties. It is freely accessible on the web at http://astrochemistry.ca.astro.it/database/ and http://www.cesr.fr/~joblin/database/.

  12. Aromatic carboxylate effect on dimensionality of three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers: Syntheses, structures and properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ju-Wen; Gong, Chun-Hua; Hou, Li-Li; Tian, Ai-Xiang; Wang, Xiu-Li, E-mail: wangxiuli@bhu.edu.cn

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three new metal-organic coordination polymers [Co(4-bbc){sub 2}(bbbm)] (1), [Co(3,5-pdc)(bbbm)]·2H{sub 2}O (2) and [Co(1,4-ndc)(bbbm)] (3) (4-Hbbc=4-bromobenzoic acid, 3,5-H{sub 2}pdc=3,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 1,4-H{sub 2}ndc=1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid and bbbm=1,1-(1,4-butanediyl)bis-1H-benzimidazole) were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Polymer 1 is a 1D chain formed by the bbbm ligands and Co{sup II} ions. Polymer 2 exhibits a 2D network with a (3·4·5)(3{sup 2}·4·5·6{sup 2}·7{sup 4}) topology. Polymer 3 possesses a 3D three-fold interpenetrating framework. The versatile structures of title polymers indicate that the aromatic carboxylates have an important influence on the dimensionality of 1–3. Moreover, the thermal stability, electrochemical and luminescent properties of 1–3 were investigated. - graphical abstract: Three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers tuned by aromatic carboxylates were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. The aromatic carboxylates play a key role in the dimensionality of three polymers. The electrochemical and luminescent properties of three polymers were investigated. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers tuned by aromatic carboxylates were obtained. • The aromatic carboxylates have an important influence on the dimensionality of three polymers. • The electrochemical and luminescent properties of three polymers were investigated.

  13. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    in self-compacting concrete is expected to provide significant economic benefits to quarries, coal-compacting slurry has been gaining increasing acceptance (2). However, such flowable slurry typically has

  14. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    slurry(Controlled Low Strength Materials, CLSM) through an initial laboratory evaluation followed advantage of available alkalies in wood ash to activate the Class C coal ash for enhanced performance. Three

  15. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    application is discussed. A typical and very successful high- volume application of coal ash is in controlled low-strength materials (CLSM) or flowable slurry. Reviews of the state-of-the-art information on CLSM rate of CCPs. Keywords: admixtures, CLSM concrete, compaction, durability, flowable slurry, fly ash

  16. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ) and flowable slurry (Controlled Low Strength Materials, CLSM) through an initial laboratory evaluation followed in wood ash to activate coal ash. Based on the results of lab manufacturing of CLSM and concrete mixtures

  17. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    , ready- mixed concrete, and low-strength flowable concrete and slurry. The major topics included are; freezing and thawing durability; strength; sulfate resistance. #12;2 INTRODUCTION Coal is the most widely amounts of coal combustion products (CCPs), which include fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas

  18. By-Products Utilization

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    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    mineral addition to coal, and spraying coal to minimize dusting due to coal handling, transportation be used in clean-coal applications for the removal of sulfur dioxide emissions from flue gas. Since also be used in flowable slurry with or without crushed limestone fine sand. RECOMMENDATIONS

  19. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    evaluation of dredged material from Newark harbor............................ 7 Soil stabilization utilizing environment in a cost effective way while producing necessary chemicals such as lime. Lime is one of the most purchasing fabric filter bag collectors are emission regulations, capital cost and operating cost [1

  20. By-Products Utilization

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    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    after combustion of coal in conventional and advanced clean-coal technology combustors. These include and advanced clean-coal technology combustors. Although 560 million tonnes (Mt) of fly ash, bottom ash use either pulverized-coal-fired furnaces, cyclone furnaces, or advanced clean-coal technology

  1. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    technologies. A clean-coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SOxand NOxcontrol technologies, and FBC that obtained from clean-coal technology, are not utilized in cast-concrete masonry products (bricks, blocks conventional and clean-coal technologies. Fifteen high-sulfur coal ash samples were obtained from eight

  2. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    clean-coal technologies such as SO2 Control Systems, NOx Control Technology, Fluidized Bed Combustion Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute, 5776 Coal Drive, Suite 200, Carterville, IL 62918-sulfur coal. Ponded ash is usually a mixture of fly ash and bottom ash or boiler slag. Concrete was made

  3. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    is defined as the ash derived from thermal power plants using clean-coal technologies such as SO2 Control of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 784, Milwaukee, WI 53201. 4 Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute Systems, NOx Control Technology, Fluidized Bed Combustion, and Gasification Combined Cycle for reducing

  4. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    combustion of coal in conventional and advanced clean-coal technology combustors. These include fly ash clean-coal technology combustors. Although 560 million tonnes (Mt) of fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler furnaces, or advanced clean-coal technology furnaces. The ash collected from pulverized-coal-fired furnaces

  5. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    and Objectives This testing work will evaluate use of high-carbon fly ash in non-air entrained concrete in the concrete mixture. The testing work for this project will involve laboratory testing of mechanical varied types for concrete construction applications. Specific objectives for this testing work

  6. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    of New York is approximately 28% composed of leaves, grass, yard, food, and other organic waste. New York) of MSW generated per year were landfilled, 14.0% were combusted, and 31% were recycled or composted). Recycling of MSW increased 9% and composting of MSW increased 5% from 1990 to 2003, totaling 7

  7. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ash or CFAs. Based on these properties, a number of constructive use options such as #12;pollution by saw mills, pulp mills, and the wood-products industry, by burning a combination of wood products control [3], land application [9,10,11], construction materials [13,14], have been reported. However, most

  8. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    on "Management & Use of Coal Combustion Products (CCPS)" held in San Antonio, TX, January 2001. Department concrete mixtures were produced for and at the production plant of an architectural precast concrete. Majority of the foundry sand generated in Wisconsin and elsewhere are landfilled at high disposal costs

  9. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    that over 80,000 tons of gypsum wallboard is disposed each year in Wisconsin from new construction.I. has recently established a technology of using a gypsum-containing cementitious material from coal gypsum wallboard, Class C fly ash, and cement will be used as a cementitious material; and, the mixture

  10. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    International Conference onFly Ash Disposal and Utilization,onJanuary 20-22, 1998, New Delhi, India. COAL ASH and Applied Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - MILWAUKEE #12;COAL ASH GENERATIONANDUTILIZATION: A REVIEW and utilization of coal ash in many parts of the world. The utilization potential for coal ash generated from

  11. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ;2 INTRODUCTION Fly ash and bottom ash are generated due to combustion of coal in electric power plants. The annual production of fly ash and bottom ash by coal-burning power plants in the United States/bronze foundries, etc. Currently, large volumes of fly ash, bottom ash, and used foundry sand are disposed

  12. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    the ability of future generations to meet their own requirements (13). As a business model, this means is ecologically unfriendly: it consumes much energy and natural resources, and emits a number of undesirable air AND ECO-EFFICIENCY The definition of "sustainability", following the World Commission on Environment

  13. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Institute of Mexico Symposium "World of Concrete - Mexico", Guadalajara, Mexico, June 4-7, 1997. Department;-4- low interconnectivity, these pores are relatively impermeable to water. However, water removal from

  14. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    suitable for highway construction applications. 1.0 INTRODUCTION Scrapped tires are produced in the U. At the present time, landfilling is the major technique for scrap tire disposal in the country. Scrap tires used as economic advantages. Scrap tires are primarily composed of natural rubber, steel, synthetic rubber

  15. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    their tanks to meet minimum design standards, (2) test their tanks for leaks and provide controls for spills hydrocarbons (RFWI and UM 1993; API 1989). These hydrocarbons can be categorized as: gasoline and light, and mobile in the subsurface environment [API 1989]. Oxygenated compounds (oxygenates), such as alcohols

  16. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. INTRODUCTION Increasing cost of construction has-situ concrete strength can reduce construction time and cost by efficient movement of forms. Furthermore it also Milwaukee, WI 53201 Synopsis: The maturity method computes maturity of the concrete as an index to predict

  17. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    is expected to provide significant economic benefits to quarries, coal-fired power plants, and concrete

  18. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Abstract: Several new coal-fired combustion system modifications have been designed to improve the quality/or ammonia removal. These new processes have been demonstrated at various Wisconsin Electric coal fired Electric Power Company (WE) has developed three new coal ash beneficiation processes for carbon and

  19. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    . The carbonation reaction of the CLSM would also have the potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions at a coal-fired gas. This mixed gas was used to simulate a typical flue gas generated from the combustion of coal

  20. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    in this country is mostly generated by coal-fired electric power plants. These plants produce huge amounts of ash (slag) produced from coal-fired power plants increases yearly along with the development and huge demand. Naik* ABSTRACT China has one of the largest coal mining industries in the world. Electricity

  1. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    subbituminous and lignite coals. It is anticipated that increased number of coal- fired plants will utilize subbituminous and lignite coals to reduce sulfur-related emissions. Some correlation exists between chemical

  2. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -product of combustion from wood-fired boilers, at a typical paper mills and other wood burning facilities. Approximately %) of wood ash and coal fly ash; (3) non-air- entrained structural-grade concrete (up to 60 MPa 28-day compressive strength) with wood ash or its blends with coal fly ash (up to 40 %) as partial replacement

  3. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ), at 28 days, using various sources of ASTM Class F and clean coal fly ashes. For each reference mixture

  4. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -19 REP-443 November 2001 Final Technical Report Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute For Project

  5. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    with the combination of Class C fly ash and clean coal ash. Two percent to four percent sodium sulfate anhydrite

  6. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -28 REP-482 November 2002 Final Technical Report Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute For Project

  7. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ", Portland Cement Association Skokie, IL, pp. 1-10. 11. Burnham, J. C., Bennet, G. F., and Logan, T. J., 1990

  8. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -Milwaukee, P.O. Box 784, Milwaukee, WI 53201 d Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute * Director UWM products containing clean coal ash compared to conventional coal ash. Utilization of clean coal ash is much products that utilize clean coal ash. With increasing federal regulations on power plant emissions, finding

  9. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ­ Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI and Ronald H. Carty Director Illinois Clean Coal Institute Carterville, IL ABSTRACT, Naik and Singh [16] summarized various applications of fly ash generated from conventional and clean coal technologies. Uses of coal combustion by- products can be categorized into three classes: high-volum

  10. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -Products Utilization E-mail: ymchun@uwm.edu and F. D. Botha Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute 5776 Coal, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, USA. 4 Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute

  11. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    .4 April 2000 A Mid-Year Project Management Report Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute for Project for evaluation. Clean coal fly ash was obtained from Southern Illinois University and a wet collected Class F fly and Quarters Cumulative$ Cumulative Project Budget Total Illinois Clean Coal Institute Award $ 86,095 Estimated

  12. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    to establish and demonstrate technical benefits of porous, low-strength concrete that uses large amounts of non in construction materials. Porous concrete mixtures do not require air entrainment for freezing and thawing resistance. Therefore, high-carbon ash could be used in such concretes. Porous concrete mixtures were first

  13. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MILWAUKEE #12;DOE F 4600.6 (10-94) Replaces EIA-459F All Other. A market survey was developed as part of the activities of the first quarter of the project. This survey

  14. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    of Engineering and Applied Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MILWAUKEE #12;DOE F 4600.6 (10-94) Replaces EIA residuals concrete of comparable workability and strength with a reference concrete. A market survey producers and affiliated members of the National and state ready-mixed concrete associations. The survey

  15. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    generated at mill and inert solids rejected during chemical recovery processes become part of the primary residual. The water clarified by the primary treatment is passed on to the secondary treatment. Secondary dioxide and water while consuming oxygen. Secondary residual is mainly microbial biomass (called also

  16. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ). In some cases, ash generated at mill and inert solids rejected during chemical recovery processes become on to the secondary treatment. Secondary treatment is usually a biological process in which micro-organisms convert soluble organic matter to carbon dioxide and water while consuming oxygen. Secondary residual is mainly

  17. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    generated by the mill and inert #12;solids rejected during chemical recovery processes become part of the primary residual. The water clarified by the primary treatment is passed on to the secondary treatment. The secondary treatment is usually a biological process in which micro-organisms convert soluble organic matter

  18. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    generated at mill and inert solids rejected during chemical recovery processes become part of the primary residual. The water clarified by the primary treatment is passed on to the secondary treatment. Secondary dioxide and water while consuming oxygen. Secondary residual is mainly microbial biomass (also called

  19. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    solids rejected during chemical recovery processes become part of the primary residual. The water clarified by the primary treatment is passed on to the secondary treatment. Secondary treatment is usually consuming oxygen. Secondary residual is mainly microbial biomass (also called biosolids) grown during

  20. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Report No. 321 August 1997-15 Department of Civil Engineering and Mechanics College of Engineering and sand to produce concrete. The United States consumes approximately 90 million tons of Portland cement annually. The manufacture of cement is quite energy intensive. It requires approximately 3000 kJ of energy

  1. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    PRACTICE By Rudolph N. Kraus, Tarun R. Naik, and Yoon-moon Chun Report No. CBU-2006-12 REP-611 April 2006 to be mined, cement continues to be manufactured or imported, and energy is consumed in the processing briefly describes the uses of coal ash, wood ash, and used foundry sand, in concrete. Typically, one

  2. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Monosi, Giacomo Moriconi, and Tarun R. Naik Report No. CBU-2007-11 REP-632 June 2007 Presented of paper mill sludge: as a secondary raw material to produce blended cements, as a very fine sand addition energy for internal use. Such combustion fumes carry fly ashes which are collected and available as a new

  3. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -QUALITY CONCRETE (HQC)CONSTRUCTION By Tarun R.Naik Report No.CBU REP-318 May 1997 Presented andpublished with proper use of form oil to allow migration of released air pockets. Sand content should be increased]. External vibrators consume greater amounts of energy and are less effective compared to internal vibrators

  4. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    from a SO2 control technology (dry desulphuring process), and Project II deals with RCC pavement (RCCP

  5. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    control technology (dry desulphuring process), and Project II deals with RCC pavement (RCCP) containing 30

  6. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    #12;ACI member Bruce W. Ramme, P.E., Manager- Environmental Land Quality, Wisconsin Electric Power Materials, 230 Soil Cement, 232 Fly Ash and Natural Pozzolans, and 555 Recycled Materials. He is a member of ASCE, NSPE, and other professional organizations. Haifang Wen is a Transportation Engineer at Bloom

  7. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    , calcium carbonate, and/or titanium dioxide) and the biomass from biological treatment of wastewater. Fiber wastewater-treatment residuals; wood fibers. #12;Naik, Chun, & Kraus Flowable Slurry Made With Class C Fly include wastewater-treatment residuals (also called sludge), fiber reclaim, and screening rejects

  8. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ), India (45 million tons), South Africa (30 million tons), Poland (25 million tons), Germany (20 million 232, Fly Ash and Natural Pozzolans. #12;4 INTRODUCTION Coal is the most widely used source of energy

  9. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    cementitious material content exhibited higher autogenous shrinkage and lower drying shrinkage compared, specifications containing recommendations on the use of dosage rate of shrinkage-reducing admixtures and amount on Sustainable Development. He was Chairman of the ASCE Technical Committee on Emerging Materials (1995- 2000

  10. Extracting energies from the vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    She-Sheng Xue

    2000-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present and study a possible mechanism of extracting energies from the vacuum by external classical fields. Taking a constant magnetic field as an example, we discuss why and how the vacuum energy can be released in the context of quantum field theories. In addition, we give a theoretical computation showing how much vacuum energies can be released. The possibilities of experimentally detecting such a vacuum-energy releasing are discussed.

  11. Inverse hydrochemical models of aqueous extracts tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kinetic mineral dissolution during extraction. 4.3 Types ofextraction such as dissolution of soluble minerals (halite,extraction. Identification of GM requires knowing: 1) Aqueous complexes, 2) Mineral

  12. Titanium metal: extraction to application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gambogi, Joseph (USGS, Reston, VA); Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

  13. Extractable soil phosphorus in Blackland Prairie soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd, Robert Claude

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONCLUSIONS . REFERENCES. . APPENDIX. 92 . 94 99 . . 104 Vlh Table LIST OF TABLES Page Extractable soil P ratings for the TAEX, Bray I, Olsen, and TAEX 3 soil P extractants 18 Chemical properties of preliminary soil sample (Fall 1992) taken from..., and 8 0). The authors, however, noted that Olsen and TAEX extractable P also resulted in acceptable correlation values All the above extractants were highly correlated (r& 0. 94) with total P uptake for both the calcareous soil and the slightly acidic...

  14. SchoolFEFLOW Exercise Heat extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kornhuber, Ralf

    the flux: q = 0.15 m/d Pumping (heat extraction) from aquifer and re-injection (of cooled water-injected water: 20°C · T = 20°C Model Extension #12;Summer SchoolHeat extraction from sloped aquifer 22Summer SchoolFEFLOW® Exercise Heat extraction from a sloped sandstone aquifer Vertical cross

  15. Gauge Invariant Spectral Cauchy Characteristic Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey J. Handmer; Béla Szilágyi; Jeffrey Winicour

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present gauge invariant spectral Cauchy characteristic extraction. We compare gravitational waveforms extracted from a head-on black hole merger simulated in two different gauges by two different codes. We show rapid convergence, demonstrating both gauge invariance of the extraction algorithm and consistency between the legacy Pitt null code and the much faster Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC).

  16. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot B. Kennel; R. Michael Bergen; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Alfred H. Stiller; W. Morgan Summers; John W. Zondlo

    2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. The largest applications are those which support metals smelting, such as anodes for aluminum smelting and electrodes for arc furnaces. Other carbon products include materials used in creating fuels for the Direct Carbon Fuel Cell, metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, coking and composite fabrication continued using coal-derived samples. These samples were tested in direct carbon fuel cells. Methodology was refined for determining the aromatic character of hydro treated liquid, based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). Tests at GrafTech International showed that binder pitches produced using the WVU solvent extraction protocol can result in acceptable graphite electrodes for use in arc furnaces. These tests were made at the pilot scale.

  17. PRODUCTION OF FOAMS, FIBERS AND PITCHES USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chong Chen; Elliot B. Kennel; Liviu Magean; Pete G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2004-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed processes for converting coal feedstocks to carbon products, including coal-derived pitch, coke foams and fibers based on solvent extraction processes. A key technology is the use of hydrogenation accomplished at elevated temperatures and pressures to obtain a synthetic coal pitch. Hydrogenation, or partial direct liquefaction of coal, is used to modify the properties of raw coal such that a molten synthetic pitch can be obtained. The amount of hydrogen required to produce a synthetic pitch is about an order of magnitude less than the amount required to produce synthetic crude oil. Hence the conditions for synthetic pitch production consume very little hydrogen and can be accomplished at substantially lower pressure. In the molten state, hot filtration or centrifugation can be used to separate dissolved coal chemicals from mineral matter and insolubles (inertinite), resulting in the production of a purified hydrocarbon pitch. Alternatively, if hydrogenation is not used, aromatic hydrocarbon liquids appropriate for use as precursors to carbon products can obtained by dissolving coal in a solvent. As in the case for partial direct liquefaction pitches, undissolved coal is removed via hot filtration or centrifugation. Excess solvent is boiled off and recovered. The resultant solid material, referred to as Solvent Extracted Carbon Ore or SECO, has been used successfully to produce artificial graphite and carbon foam.

  18. Emissions of C6-C8 aromatic compounds in the United States: Constraints from tall tower1 and aircraft measurements2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mlllet, Dylan B.

    6, 7 5 6 1. Department of Soil, Water, and Climate, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, USA [Ahmadov et al.,18 2014; Jaars et al., 2014; Xue et al., 2014]. These aromatic VOCs (so-called BTEX

  19. Biomarkers of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure in northwest Gulf of Mexico marine fish and invertebrates: indicators of offshore petroleum contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Cynthia Marie

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Higher molecular weight Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) associated with crude oil induce CYPIAI gene expression, and this response has been utilized as a biomarker of exposure to PAHs in aquatic and marine environments. Several benthic...

  20. Two-stage hydrotreating of a bitumen-derived middle distillate to produce diesel and jet fuels, and kinetics of aromatics hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yui, S.M. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The middle distillate from a synthetic crude oil derived from Athabasca bitumen was further hydrotreated in a downflow pilot unit over a typical NiMo catalyst at 330 to 400 C, 7 to 11 MPa and 0.63 to 1.39 h{sup {minus}1} LHSV. Feed and liquid products were characterized for aromatics, cetane index (CI) and other diesel specification items. Aromatics were determined by a supercritical fluid chromatography method, while CI was determined using the correlation developed at Syncrude Canada Ltd. Also feed and selected products were distilled into a jet fuel cut (150/260 C) by spinning band distillation for the determination of smoke point and other jet fuel specification items. A good relationship between aromatics content and CI was obtained. Kinetics of aromatics hydrogenation were investigated, employing a simple-first order reversible reaction model.

  1. Batch and Flow Photochemical Benzannulations Based on the Reaction of Ynamides and Diazo Ketones. Application to the Synthesis of Polycyclic Aromatic and Heteroaromatic Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willumstad, Thomas P.

    Highly substituted polycyclic aromatic and heteroaromatic compounds are produced via a two-stage tandem benzannulation/cyclization strategy. The initial benzannulation step proceeds via a pericyclic cascade mechanism ...

  2. Effects of partial charge-transfer solute -- solvent interactions in absorption spectra of aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous and alcoholic solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Ar'ev; N. I. Lebovka; E. A. Solovieva

    2013-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for study of charge-transfer interactions between solute molecules and solvent based on the comparison of the ratios of spectral shifts of different electronic transitions in solute molecules in chemically inert solvent is proposed. The method is applicable to molecules that do not change their dipole moment on excitation. As an example, a presence of charge transfer interactions in higher electronic states of aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, phenanthrene, and naphthalene) dissolved in water and alcohols was demonstrated.

  3. A correlation of water solubility in jet fuels with API gravity: aniline point percent aromatics, and temperature.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byington, Alonzo

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CORRELATION OF WATER SOLUBILITY IN JET FUELS WITH API GRAVITY, ANILINE POINT PERCENT AROMATICS, AND TEMPERATURE A Thesis By ALONZO B YINGTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, 1964 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A CORRELATION OF MATER SOLUBILITT IH JET FUELS WITS API GEAVITT, ANILINE POINT, PERCENT ARONATICS, AND TENPERATURE A Thesis By ALOHZO BYIHGTOH Approved...

  4. Capillary chromatography of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on glass and quartz capillary columns coated with stationary polysiloxane phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, B.A.; Bulycheva, Z.Y.; Kutenev, V.F.; Topunov, V.N.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper resports a technique for analyzing automobile exhausts for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) by means of a new Biokhrom-1 chromatograph designed to operate with capillary glass and quartz columns. The method is assessed for performance and is shown to be useful in monitoring the PAH content in the environment. The detection limit for benz(a)pyrene was 0.05 ug with a relative standard deviation of 0.08 to 0.12.

  5. Influence of low and high temperature coking of H-GaMFI propane aromatization catalyst on its surface and catalytic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhary, V.R.; Kinage, A.K.; Devadas, P. [National Chemical Lab., Pune (India)] [and others] [National Chemical Lab., Pune (India); and others

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H-Gallosilicate (MFI) (i.e., H-GaMFI) zeolite shows high activity/selectivity in the aromatization of lower alkanes, which is processes of treat practical importance. The high aromatization activity of this catalyst is attributed to its high dehydrogenation activity due to the presence of high dispersed nonframework Ga-oxide species (which are formed during hydrothermal synthesis and/or pretreatments to the zeolite) along with the zeolitic acid sites (or framework Ga), resulting in a bifunctional catalyst. However, this zeolite undergoes fast catalyst deactivation in the propane aromatization. The catalyst deactivation is attributed mainly to the coke formation on the zeolite. Earlier, a few studies have been reported on the deactivation of H-GaMFI zeolite in the propane aromatization. The catalyst deactivation is attributed mainly to the coke formation on the zeolite. Earlier, a few studies have been reported on the deactivation of H-GaMFI zeolite in the propane aromatization at 500-550{degrees}C for a short time-on-stream (10 h). It is interesting to know the effect of catalyst deactivation due to coking in the propane aromatization for much longer periods both at low (at 400{degrees}C) and high (at 550{degrees}C) temperatures on the product selectivity and also on the surface (viz., sorption capacity, acidity/acid strength distribution) and catalytic properties of the zeolite. The present investigation was undertaken for this purpose. 16 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  6. Removal of phenols and aromatic amines from wastewater by a combination treatment with tyrosinase and a coagulant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wada, Shinji; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu; Tatsumi, Kenji (National Inst. for Resources and Environment, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1995-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Removal of phenols and aromatic amines from industrial wastewater by tyrosinase was investigated. A color change from colorless to dark brown was observed, but no precipitate was formed. Colored products were found to be easily removed by a combination treatment with tyrosinase and a cationic polymer coagulant containing amino group, such as hexamethylenediamine-epichlorohidrin polycondensate, polyethleneimine, or chitosan. The first two coagulants, synthetic polymers, were more effective than chitosan, a polymer produced in crustacean shells. Phenols and aromatic amines are not precipitated by any kind of coagulants, but their enzymatic reaction products are easily precipitated by a cationic polymer coagulant. These results indicate that the combination of tyrosinase and a cationic polymer coagulant is effective in removing carcinogenic phenols and aromatic amines from an aqueous solution. Immobilization of tyrosinase on magnetite gave a good retention of activity (80%) and storage stability i.e., only 5% loss after 15 days of storage at ambient temperature. In the treatment of immobilized tyrosinase, colored enzymatic reaction products were removed by less coagulant compared with soluble tyrosinase.

  7. Properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in local elliptical galaxies revealed by the Infrared Spectrograph on Spitzer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Kaneda; T. Onaka; I. Sakon; T. Kitayama; Y. Okada; T. Suzuki

    2008-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed mid-infrared spectroscopic observations of 18 local dusty elliptical galaxies by using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on board Spitzer. We have significantly detected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features from 14 out of the 18 galaxies, and thus found that the presence of PAHs is not rare but rather common in dusty elliptical galaxies. Most of these galaxies show an unusually weak 7.7 um emission feature relative to 11.3 um and 17 um emission features. A large fraction of the galaxies also exhibit H2 rotational line and ionic fine-structure line emissions, which have no significant correlation with the PAH emissions. The PAH features are well correlated with the continuum at 35 um, whereas they are not correlated with the continuum at 6 um. We conclude that the PAH emission of the elliptical galaxies is mostly of interstellar origin rather than of stellar origin, and that the unusual PAH interband strength ratios are likely to be due to a large fraction of neutral to ionized PAHs.

  8. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON EMISSION IN THE PROPLYD HST10: WHAT IS THE MECHANISM BEHIND PHOTOEVAPORATION?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vicente, S.; Kamp, I. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, Postbus 800, 9700 AV, Groningen (Netherlands); Berne, O. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Huelamo, N. [CAB (INTA-CSIC), LAEFF, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Pantin, E. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM - CNRS - Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/SAP, F-91191 sur Yvette (France); Carmona, A. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble, F-38041 (France)

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Proplyds are photodissociation-region-(PDR)-like cometary cocoons around young stars which are thought to originate through photoevaporation of the central protoplanetary disk by external UV radiation from the nearby OB stars. This Letter presents spatially resolved mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of the proplyd HST10 obtained with the Very Large Telescope/VISIR instrument. These observations allow us to detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in the proplyd PDR and to study the general properties of PAHs in proplyds for the first time. We find that PAHs in HST10 are mostly neutral and at least 50 times less abundant than typical values found for the diffuse interstellar medium or the nearby Orion Bar. With such a low PAH abundance, photoelectric heating is significantly reduced. If this low abundance pertains also to the original disk material, gas heating rates could be too low to efficiently drive photoevaporation unless other processes can be identified. Alternatively, the model behind the formation of proplyds as evaporating disks may have to be revised.

  9. The importance of snow scavenging of polychlorinated biphenyl and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon vapors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wania, F. [WECC Wania Environmental Chemists Corp., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [WECC Wania Environmental Chemists Corp., Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mackay, D. [Trent Univ., Peterborough, Ontario (Canada). Environmental and Resource Studies] [Trent Univ., Peterborough, Ontario (Canada). Environmental and Resource Studies; Hoff, J.T. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Earth Science] [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Earth Science

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, experimental data on the scavenging of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the atmosphere by snow were interpreted assuming that the distribution of chemical between particles and dissolved phase measured in the meltwater reflects the state of the chemical during the scavenging process. A consequence of this assumption is that vapor scavenging is found to be unimportant relative to particle scavenging. An alternative interpretation is presented that during melting repartitioning occurs from the dissolved phase to the particle-sorbed phase. Further, it is argued that a constant particle scavenging ratio may apply to all chemicals of the same class in the same precipitation event, and its value can be estimated from the scavenging characteristics of predominantly particle-sorbed, high molecular mass chemicals. This analysis suggests that for more volatile PCBs and PAHs vapor scavenging is an important, if not the dominating, snow scavenging process. Gas scavenging ratios obtained with this method are, as expected, negatively correlated with the vapor pressure of a substance, indicating that adsorption to the air-ice interface is the process responsible for vapor scavenging.

  10. Hydrogenation of aromatics in synthetic crude distillates catalyzed by platinum supported in molecular sieves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbara, N.; Charland, J.P. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)] [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Wilson, M.F. [CANMET, Devon, Alberta (Canada)] [CANMET, Devon, Alberta (Canada)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalytic hydrogenation of synthetic crude distillates from Canadian oil sands was carried out over platinum metal supported in pillared interlayered clay (PILC) and Y-zeolite. The molecular sieve supports were employed to modify the properties of dispersed platinum particles and improve their resistance to poisoning by sulfur. The objective was to reduce the distillate aromatic content to meet diesel emission control standards and cetane number requirements. Catalysts were prepared in a series of steps, and metal precursor was loaded using ion-exchange procedures. Characterization was done using X-ray diffraction, hydrogen chemisorption, and proton-induced X-ray emission elemental analysis. Catalytic hydrogenation reactions were carried out by processing distillate feedstocks both high (>100 ppm) and low (<10 ppm) in sulfur using a continuous-flow automated microreactor system. Experimental runs were performed to determine the reaction kinetics and Arrhenius parameters as a means of evaluating and comparing catalyst performance. Significant differences in catalyst activity were found. The Pt/Y-zeolite-alumina catalyst showed a much superior hydrogenation performance under conditions of high sulfur content. The extent of cracking and ring opening was also evaluated and was shown to be minimal under the operating conditions employed.

  11. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in marine sediments near Kitimat, British Columbia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, C.D.; Harrington, C.F.; Cullen, W.R. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Chemistry Dept.] [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Chemistry Dept.; Bright, D.A.; Reimer, K.J. [Royal Roads Military College, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada). Environmental Sciences Group] [Royal Roads Military College, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada). Environmental Sciences Group

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), like many other hydrophobic organic contaminants, are rapidly sorbed to particles and incorporated within sediments in aquatic systems. The PAH composition within the sediments reflects the source(s) from which the PAHs were derived. However, the ``source signature`` may be altered by postdepositional weathering or biodegradation. In the present study, variation in PAH composition was investigated in size-fractionated sediments and depth-fractionated sediments collected from a Canadian fjord contaminated with aluminum smelter derived PAHs. Multivariate analyses of PAH compositional data consistently showed that different sampling sites could be discriminated on the basis of their PAH composition, but smaller versus larger size fractions within a site could not. The composition of unsubstituted and alkyl-substituted PAHs in a sediment core primarily showed changes with depth that were attributable to enhancement of anthropogenic inputs in the upper core segments. No trends with sediment depth, associated with compound-specific weathering or biotransformation, were noted in the composition of anthropogenically generated PAHs. This may indicate a limited chemical and biological availability of the aluminum smelter derived PAHs.

  12. GAS-PHASE REACTIONS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON ANIONS WITH MOLECULES OF INTERSTELLAR RELEVANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demarais, Nicholas J.; Yang Zhibo; Martinez, Oscar; Wehres, Nadine; Bierbaum, Veronica M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 215 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0215 (United States); Snow, Theodore P., E-mail: Nicholas.Demarais@Colorado.edu, E-mail: Zhibo.Yang@Colorado.edu, E-mail: OMartinez@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: Nadine.Wehres@Colorado.edu, E-mail: Veronica.Bierbaum@Colorado.edu, E-mail: Theodore.Snow@Colorado.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States)

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied reactions of small dehydrogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon anions with neutral species of interstellar relevance. Reaction rate constants are measured at 300 K for the reactions of phenide (C{sub 6}H{sup -}{sub 5}), naphthalenide (C{sub 10}H{sup -}{sub 7}), and anthracenide (C{sub 14}H{sup -}{sub 9}) with atomic H, H{sub 2}, and D{sub 2} using a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube instrument. Reaction rate constants of phenide with neutral molecules (CO, O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}OH, CH{sub 3}CN, (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CO, CH{sub 3}CHO, CH{sub 3}Cl, and (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}){sub 2}O) are also measured under the same conditions. Experimental measurements are accompanied by ab initio calculations to provide insight into reaction pathways and enthalpies. Our measured reaction rate constants should prove useful in the modeling of astrophysical environments, particularly when applied to dense regions of the interstellar and circumstellar medium.

  13. Field application of a genetically engineered microorganism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bioremediation process monitoring and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayler, G.S.; Cox, C.D.; Ripp, S.; Nivens, D.E.; Werner, C.; Ahn, Y.; Matrubutham, U. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Burlage, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On October 30, 1996, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) commenced the first test release of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) for use in bioremediation. The specific objectives of the investigation were multifaceted and include (1) testing the hypothesis that a GEM can be successfully introduced and maintained in a bioremediation process, (2) testing the concept of using, at the field scale, reporter organisms for direct bioremediation process monitoring and control, and (3) acquiring data that can be used in risk assessment decision making and protocol development for future field release applications of GEMs. The genetically engineered strain under investigation is Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (King et al., 1990). The original P. fluorescens parent strain was isolated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated manufactured gas plant soil. Thus, this bacterium is able to biodegrade naphthalene (as well as other substituted naphthalenes and other PAHs) and is able to function as a living bioluminescent reporter for the presence of naphthalene contamination, its bioavailability, and the functional process of biodegradation. A unique component of this field investigation was the availability of an array of large subsurface soil lysimeters. This article describes the experience associated with the release of a genetically modified microorganism, the lysimeter facility and its associated instrumentation, as well as representative data collected during the first eighteen months of operation.

  14. The Quantitation of Sulfur Mustard By-Products, Sulfur-Containing Herbicides, and Organophosphonates in Soil and Concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomkins, B.A., Sega, G.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)], Macnaughton, S.J. [Microbial Insights, Inc., Rockford, TN (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past fifty years, the facilities at Rocky Mountain Arsenal have been used for the manufacturing, bottling, and shipping sulfur- containing herbicides, sulfur mustard, and Sarin. There is a need for analytical methods capable of determining these constituents quickly to determine exactly how specific waste structural materials should be handled, treated, and landfilled.These species are extracted rapidly from heated samples of soil or crushed concrete using acetonitrile at elevated pressure, then analyzed using a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame photometric detector. Thiodiglycol, the major hydrolysis product of sulfur mustard, must be converted to a silylated derivative prior to quantitation. Detection limits, calculated using two statistically-unbiased protocols, ranged between 2-13 micrograms analyte/g soil or concrete.

  15. Extracting inorganics from scrap tires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, R.; Wertz, D.L. [Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Scrap tires contain several inorganic moieties in abundances >0.5% which are impregnated into their carbonaceous matrix. These inorganic species are known to produce acid rain, toxic aerosols, and boiler scale and could produce unwanted catalytic effects as well. It is our position that the potential of recycling scrap tires would be considerably enhanced if the inorganics in question - S, Ca, and Zn - were removed prior to attempts to upgrade the carbonaceous matrix. Using non-mechanical methods, we are attempting to cleave the adherence between the co-polymer matrix and to extract the inorganics. The efficiency of our methods is being measured by wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometry and by other methods.

  16. Proceedings of Office of Surface Mining Coal Combustion By-product Government/Regulatory Panel: University of Kentucky international ash utilization symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vories, K.C. (ed.)

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Short papers are given on: the Coal Combustion Program (C2P2) (J. Glenn); regional environmental concerns with disposal of coal combustion wastes at mines (T. FitzGerald); power plant waste mine filling - an environmental perspective (L.G. Evans); utility industry perspective regarding coal combustion product management and regulation (J. Roewer); coal combustion products opportunities for beneficial use (D.C. Goss); state perspective on mine placement of coal combustion by-products (G.E. Conrad); Texas regulations provide for beneficial use of coal combustion ash (S.S. Ferguson); and the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act - a response to concerns about placement of CCBs at coal mine sites (K.C. Vories). The questions and answers are also included.

  17. Reducing Energy Usage in Extractive Distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saxena, A. C.; Bhandari, V. A.

    , .. ~ REDUCING ENERGY USAGE IN,EXTRACTIVE DISTILLATION A. C. Saxena V. A. Bhandari Polysar Limited Sarnia, Ontario, Canada Abstract Butadiene 1:3 is separated from other C. hydrocarbons by extractive distillation in a sieve plate tower.... To improve the energy efficiency, butadiene recovery and productivity of the extractive distillation process, many process changes have been made. Their rationale, the methodology used to implement the various changes, and how they affected the process...

  18. Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1992-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and americium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU's together with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU's and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal. 3 figs.

  19. Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and amercium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N.N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU`s to gather with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU`s and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal.

  20. Determination of Extractives in Biomass: Laboratory Analytical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    steps. This procedure uses a two-step extraction process to remove water soluble and ethanol soluble material. Water soluble materials may include inorganic material,...

  1. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Technologies for Extracting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technologies for Extracting Valuable Metals and Compounds from Geothermal Fluids Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About...

  2. Shock processing of interstellar dust and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the supernova remnant N132D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Tappe; J. Rho; W. T. Reach

    2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed the oxygen-rich Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) supernova remnant N132D (SNR 0525-69.6), using all instruments onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, IRS, IRAC, and MIPS (Infrared Spectrograph, Infrared Array Camera, Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer). The 5-40 micron IRS spectra toward the southeastern shell of the remnant show a steeply rising continuum with [NeIII] and [OIV] as well as PAH emission. We also present the spectrum of a fast moving ejecta knot, previously detected at optical wavelengths, which is dominated by strong [NeIII] and [OIV] emission lines. We interpret the continuum as thermal emission from swept-up, shock-heated dust grains in the expanding shell of N132D, which is clearly visible in the MIPS 24 micron image. A 15-20 micron emission hump appears superposed on the dust continuum, and we attribute this to PAH C-C-C bending modes. We also detect the well-known 11.3 micron PAH C-H bending feature, and find the integrated strength of the 15-20 micron hump about a factor of seven stronger than the 11.3 micron band in the shell of the remnant. IRAC 3-9 micron images do not show clear evidence of large-scale, shell-like emission from the remnant, partly due to confusion with the ambient ISM material. However, we identified several knots of shocked interstellar gas based on their distinct infrared colors. We discuss the bright infrared continuum and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features with respect to dust processing in young supernova remnants.

  3. Phototransformation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) on a Non-Semi Conductive Surface Such as Silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabestani, R., Sigman, M.E.

    1997-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), by products of fossil fuel production and consumption, constitute a large class of environmental pollutants. These toxic and sometimes carcinogenic compounds are also found in coal tar and fly ash. When released into the air, they can be sorbed onto particulates present in the atmosphere where they find their way into soil and ground water upon being washed by rain. During their residence time in the environment, PAHs will be exposed to solar radiation and may undergo phototransformation to other products. Thus, light induced photodegradation of PM`s at the solid/air interfaces can play a significant role in their depletion. Light-induced processes have been claimed to enhance transformation of these PM`s in the environment. However, detailed studies on the nature and identities of photoproducts formed during the transformation of these compounds on solid surfaces is scarce. Since insulators such as silica, alumina,silicoaluminates and calcium carbonate are believed to constitute up 20-30% of inorganic particulates present in the atmosphere, they serve as environmentally relevant model surfaces to study the photophysical and photochemical behavior of PM`s. Although photochemistry of organic compounds adsorbed on solid surfaces has received much attention in recent years, the specific properties of the interface which influence photoprocesses and the exact mechanism of interaction between a surface and a substrate are often not well understood. We have investigated the photochemistry of many PAHs including eight that are on Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) sixteen priority pollutant PAH list shown in Table 1 at silica/air interface.

  4. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fresh and smoked fish samples from three Nigerian cities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akpan, V.; Lodovici, M.; Dolara, P. (Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Florence (Italy))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nigeria is a major producer of crude oil in sub-Saharan Africa. In-shore and off-shore wells are located in richly watered creeks in the southern part of the country. Although published data on environmental impact assessment of the petroleum industry in Nigeria are lacking, there is a growing concern about the possible contamination of estuarine and coastal waters and of marine species by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs). PAHs are ubiquitous priority pollutants that occur naturally in crude oil, automobile exhaust emissions and smoke condensates from incomplete combustion of carbonaceous materials. PAHs with high molecular weight are less readily biodegraded by indigenous microorganisms in some regions, and given their marked hydrophobic characteristics, may persist in the aqueous environment, thus contaminating the food chain by bioaccumulating in aquatic species like fish and mussels. Major Nigerian oil wells are located in the vicinity of breeding and harvesting sites serving the fresh-water fishing industry. Large hauls of fresh fish are normally consumed cooked in soups or smoke cured in handcrafted traditional ovens using freshly cut red mangrove (Rhizophora racemosa) wood as fuel. Though smoke curing is economical and may ensure longer conservation of fish, it undoubtedly increases the burden of PAHs in finished products as a result of partial charring and from smoke condensates or mangroves that also contain PAHs in measurable quantities as reported by Asita et al. (1991). Apart from PAHs analyzed by Emerole (1980) in smoked food samples from Ibadan using simple analytical methods, those from industrial and other anthropogenic sources have rarely been analyzed in Nigeria. We tried therefore to update the data and address this discrepancy. 14 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. EXTINCTION AND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON INTENSITY VARIATIONS ACROSS THE H II REGION IRAS 12063-6259

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stock, D. J.; Peeters, E.; Otaguro, J. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Bik, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial variations in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) band intensities are normally attributed to the physical conditions of the emitting PAHs, however in recent years it has been suggested that such variations are caused mainly by extinction. To resolve this question, we have obtained near-infrared (NIR), mid-infrared (MIR), and radio observations of the compact H II region IRAS 12063-6259. We use these data to construct multiple independent extinction maps and also to measure the main PAH features (6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.2 {mu}m) in the MIR. Three extinction maps are derived: the first using the NIR hydrogen lines and case B recombination theory; the second combining the NIR data with radio data; and the third making use of the Spitzer/IRS MIR observations to measure the 9.8 {mu}m silicate absorption feature using the Spoon method and PAHFIT (as the depth of this feature can be related to overall extinction). The silicate absorption over the bright, southern component of IRAS 12063-6259 is almost absent while the other methods find significant extinction. While such breakdowns of the relationship between the NIR extinction and the 9.8 {mu}m absorption have been observed in molecular clouds, they have never been observed for H II regions. We then compare the PAH intensity variations in the Spitzer/IRS data after dereddening to those found in the original data. It was found that in most cases, the PAH band intensity variations persist even after dereddening, implying that extinction is not the main cause of the PAH band intensity variations.

  6. Effect of irradiance spectra on the photoinduced toxicity of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, S.A.; Mount, D.R.; Burkhard, L.P.; Ankley, G.T.; Makynen, E.A.; Leonard, E.N.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoinduced toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is dependent on the concentration of compounds present and the dose of light received. Of the light present, only those wavelengths absorbed by the compound have the potential to initiate the photochemical events underlying phototoxicity. This suggests that variation in light spectra present in natural waters, arising from variation in dissolved organic carbon composition, is an important determinant of phototoxicity risk in specific, PAH-contaminated waterbodies. To quantify the effect of environmentally realistic variation in light spectra on toxicity, brine shrimp (Artemia salina) assays were conducted under various light spectra and with three PAHs (pyrene, fluoranthene, and anthracene) of known phototoxicity potential. In these spectral assays, the total ultraviolet light present was equivalent; only the spectral characteristics varied. Based on the absorbance spectra of these PAHs, it was predicted that toxicity, quantified using immobilization as the endpoint, would vary significantly among light spectra in pyrene assays, but not in anthracene assays, and that variation in toxicity in fluoranthene assays would be intermediate. The results supported these assumptions. In the pyrene exposures, the glass filter time to 50% population immobilization (IT50) (39.5 min) was 117% longer than the KCr filter IT50 (18.2 min). In the fluoranthene exposures, the glass filter IT50 (49.5 min) was 27% longer than the KCr filter IT50 (39.1 min). In the anthracene exposures, the glass filter IT50 (62.2 min) was not statistically different from the KCr filter IT50 (63.8 min). Comparison of these results with the results of assays conducted under neutral-density filters (that change intensity but not spectral distribution) demonstrate that multiplying spectral intensity by wavelength-specific absorbance accurately predicts relative photoinduced toxicity among the experimental treatments. These results indicate that quantifying the spectral characteristics of PAH-contaminated aquatic environments may be an important component of risk assessment at these sites.

  7. Differential toxicity of heterocyclic aromatic amines and their mixture in metabolically competent HepaRG cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumont, Julie, E-mail: Julie.Dumont@pasteur-lille.f [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Josse, Rozenn, E-mail: Rozenn.Josse@univ-rennes1.f [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Lambert, Carine, E-mail: Carine.Lambert45@gmail.co [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Antherieu, Sebastien, E-mail: Sebastien.Antherieu@univ-rennes1.f [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Le Hegarat, Ludovic, E-mail: l.lehegarat@afssa.f [Agence Francaise de Securite Sanitaire des Aliments, F-35300 Fougeres (France); Aninat, Caroline, E-mail: Caroline.Aninat@univ-rennes1.f [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Robin, Marie-Anne, E-mail: Marie-Anne.Robin@inserm.f [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane, E-mail: Christiane.Guillouzo@univ-rennes1.f [Inserm U991, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France); Universite de Rennes 1, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, F-35043 Rennes cedex (France)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human exposure to heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA) usually occurs through mixtures rather than individual compounds. However, the toxic effects and related mechanisms of co-exposure to HAA in humans remain unknown. We compared the effects of two of the most common HAA, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline (MeIQx), individually or in combination, in the metabolically competent human hepatoma HepaRG cells. Various endpoints were measured including cytotoxicity, apoptosis, oxidative stress and DNA damage by the comet assay. Moreover, the effects of PhIP and/or MeIQx on mRNA expression and activities of enzymes involved in their activation and detoxification pathways were evaluated. After a 24 h treatment, PhIP and MeIQx, individually and in combination, exerted differential effects on apoptosis, oxidative stress, DNA damage and cytochrome P450 (CYP) activities. Only PhIP induced DNA damage. It was also a stronger inducer of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression and activity than MeIQx. In contrast, only MeIQx exposure resulted in a significant induction of CYP1A2 activity. The combination of PhIP with MeIQx induced an oxidative stress and showed synergistic effects on apoptosis. However, PhIP-induced genotoxicity was abolished by a co-exposure with MeIQx. Such an inhibitory effect could be explained by a significant decrease in CYP1A2 activity which is responsible for PhIP genotoxicity. Our findings highlight the need to investigate interactions between HAA when assessing risks for human health and provide new insights in the mechanisms of interaction between PhIP and MeIQx.

  8. Polyphenoloxidases immobilized in organic gels: Properties and applications in the detoxification of aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crecchio, C.; Ruggiero, P.; Pizzigallo, M.D.R. [Univ. di Bari (Italy). Ist. di Chimica Agraria

    1995-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Gelatine gels originate from water in oil microemulsions in which the ternary system consists of isooctane/sulfosuccinic acid bis [2-ethyl hexyl] ester/water; the solubilization of gelatin in the water pool of these microemulsions transforms them into viscous gels in which it is possible to cosolubilize various reactive molecules. These gels were used to immobilize two phenoloxidases, a laccase from Trametes versicolor and a tyrosinase from mushroom. The best balance between gel retention and catalytic activity was reached at a gelatine concentration of 2.5% (w/v) in the case of tyrosinase, while laccase immobilization was independent of gelatine concentration. Both enzymes kept the same optimum pH as the corresponding soluble controls, while a partial loss of activity was observed when they were immobilized. Immobilized enzymes showed an increased stability when incubated for several days at 4 C with a very low release from the gels in the incubation solutions. The immobilization of tyrosinase and of laccase enhanced stability to thermal inactivation. Furthermore, gel-entrapped tyrosinase was almost completely preserved from proteolysis: more than 80% of the activity was maintained, while only 25% of the soluble control activity was detected after the same proteolytic treatments. A column packed with gel-immobilized tyrosinase was used to demonstrate that enzymes immobilized with this technique may be reused several times in the same reaction without loosing their efficiency. Finally, gel-entrapped tyrosinase and laccase were capable of removing naturally occurring and xenobiotic aromatic compounds from aqueous suspensions with different degrees of efficiency.

  9. On-site profiling and speciation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at manufactured gas plant sites by a high temperature transfer line, membrane inlet probe coupled to a photoionization detector and gas chromatography/mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Considine; Albert Robbat Jr. [Tufts University, Medford, MA (United States). Chemistry Department, Center for Field Analytical Studies and Technology

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new high temperature transfer line, membrane inlet probe (HTTL-MIP) coupled to a photoionization detector (PID) and gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) was used to rapidly profile and speciate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the subsurface. PID signals were in agreement with GC/MS results. Correlation coefficients of 0.92 and 0.99 were obtained for discrete and composite samples collected from the same exact location. Continuous probe advancement with PID detection found coal tar, a dense nonaqueous phase liquid, in soil channels and saturated media. When samples were collected conventionally, split, solvent extracted, and analyzed in the field and confirmation laboratory, GC/MS measurement precision and accuracy were indistinguishable; despite the fact the field laboratory produced data five times faster than the laboratory using standard EPA methods. No false positive/negatives were found. Based on these findings, increased confidence in site conceptual models should be obtained, since PID response indicated total PAH presence/absence in 'real-time', while GC/MS provided information as to which PAH was present and at what concentration. Incorporation of this tool into a dynamic workplan will provide more data at less cost enabling environmental scientists, engineers, and regulators to better understand coal tar migration and its impact on human health and the environment. 24 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Liquid-liquid equilibria for mixtures of an alkane + an aromatic hydrocarbon + 1,4-dicyanobutane at 298.15 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letcher, T.M.; Naicker, P.K.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The separation of pure aromatic and aliphatic compounds from their mixtures is an important goal in chemical operations (e.g., Fischer-Tropsch synthesis) that produce both types of compounds. In this work the authors have used 1,4-dicyanobutane (DCB) as a potential solvent for this separation. Liquid-liquid equilibrium results for mixtures of an alkane + an aromatic hydrocarbon + 1,4-dicyanobutane at 298.15 K are reported, where the alkane is hexane or nonane or dodecane or hexadecane and the aromatic hydrocarbon is benzene or methylbenzene or 1,2-dimethylbenzene, or 1,3-dimethylbenzene, or 1,4-dimethylbenzene or 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene or ethylbenzene. The results show that there is a small increase in the two-phase region as the chain length of the alkane is increased. The type of aromatic hydrocarbon present in the mixture has a noticeable effect on the slopes of the tie lines. There is also an increase in the area of the two phase-region with increasing substitution of methyl groups on the benzene ring. NRTL and UNIQUAC models were correlated to the data. The results show that 1,4-dicyanobutane may be used as a solvent for the separation of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons.

  11. Reaction mechanisms in aromatic hydrocarbon formation involving the C{sub 5}H{sub 5} cyclopentadienyl moiety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melius, C.F.; Colvin, M.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Marinov, N.M.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Senkan, S.M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum chemical BAC-MP4 and BAC-MP2 methods have been used to investigate the reaction mechanisms leading to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) ring formation. In particular the authors have determined the elementary reaction steps in the conversion of two cyclopentadienyl radicals to naphthalene. This reaction mechanism is shown to be an extension of the mechanism occurring in the H atom-assisted conversion of fulvene to benzene. The net reaction involves the formation of dihydrofulvalene, which eliminates a hydrogen atom and then rearranges to form naphthalene through a series of ring closures and openings. The importance of forming the {single_bond}CR({center_dot}){single_bond}CHR{single_bond}CR{prime}{double_bond}CR{double_prime}-moiety, which can undergo rearrangement to form three-carbon-atom ring structures, is illustrated with the C{sub 4}H{sub 7} system. The ability of hydrogen atoms to migrate around the cyclopentadienyl moiety is illustrated both for methyl-cyclopentadiene, C{sub 5}H{sub 5}CH{sub 3}, and dihydrofulvalene, C{sub 5}H{sub 5}C{sub 5}H{sub 5}, as well as for their radical species, C{sub 6}H{sub 7} and C{sub 5}H{sub 5}C{sub 5}H{sub 4}. The mobility of hydrogen in the cyclopentadienyl moiety plays an important role both in providing resonance-stabilized radical products and in creating the {single_bond}CR({center_dot}){single_bond}CHR{single_bond}CR{prime}{double_bond}CR{double_prime}-moiety for ring formation. The results illustrate the radical pathway for converting five-membered rings to aromatic six-membered rings. Furthermore, the results indicate the important catalytic role of H atoms in the aromatic ring formation process.

  12. Summary of Topic1 Fusion Power Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Extraction and Tritium Fuel Cycle · What choices are available for material, coolant, breeder, configuration availability of external tritium supply? #12;FW/Blanket concepts for fusion power extraction and tritium&D and facilities strongly overlap RAFM Steel PbLi Breeder Helium Cooled Ceramic Breeder Beryllium Helium Cooled Pb

  13. Transposon extraction protocol Maitreya Dunham November 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Maitreya

    Transposon extraction protocol Maitreya Dunham November 2006 modification of the Qiagen HSE precipitate. Mix equal amounts of DNA from each digest if multiple digests. Extraction In a screw-cap tube (Qiagen), and water to bring to 30 µl total. Heat for 15 minutes at 95C with a 100C block on top (blocks

  14. Design of the ILC RTML extraction lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seletskiy, S.; Tenenbaum, P.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ILC [1] Damping Ring to the Main Linac beamline (RTML) contains three extraction lines (EL). Each EL can be used both for an emergency abort dumping of the beam and tune-up continual train-by-train extraction. Two of the extraction lines are located downstream of the first and second stages of the RTML bunch compressor, and must accept both compressed and uncompressed beam with energy spreads of 2.5% and 0.15%, respectively. In this paper we report on an optics design that allowed minimizing the length of the extraction lines while offsetting the beam dumps from the main line by the distance required for acceptable radiation levels in the service tunnel. The proposed extraction lines can accommodate beams with different energy spreads while at the same time providing the beam size acceptable for the aluminum dump window.

  15. Membrane Extraction for Detoxification of Biomass Hydrolysates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grzenia, D. L.; Schell, D. J.; Wickramasinghe, S. R.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Membrane extraction was used for the removal of sulfuric acid, acetic acid, 5-hydroxymethyl furfural and furfural from corn stover hydrolyzed with dilute sulfuric acid. Microporous polypropylene hollow fiber membranes were used. The organic extractant consisted of 15% Alamine 336 in: octanol, a 50:50 mixture of oleyl alcohol:octanol or oleyl alcohol. Rapid removal of sulfuric acid, 5-hydroxymethyl and furfural was observed. The rate of acetic acid removal decreased as the pH of the hydrolysate increased. Regeneration of the organic extractant was achieved by back extraction into an aqueous phase containing NaOH and ethanol. A cleaning protocol consisting of flushing the hydrolysate compartment with NaOH and the organic phase compartment with pure organic phase enabled regeneration and reuse of the module. Ethanol yields from hydrolysates detoxified by membrane extraction using 15% Alamine 336 in oleyl alcohol were about 10% higher than those from hydrolysates detoxified using ammonium hydroxide treatment.

  16. Modified Extraction Scheme for the CERN PS Multi-Turn Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilardoni, S; Hernalsteens, C; Lachaize, A; Métral, G

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-activation of the extraction magnetic septum of the CERN PS machine was observed due to the losses of the continuous beam extracted via the Multi-Turn Extraction (MTE) method. A possible mitigation measure consists of using an existing electrostatic septum, located upstream of the extraction magnetic septum, to deflect the beam. This would highly decrease the beam losses, and hence the induced activation, during the rise time of the MTE kickers due to the reduced thickness of the electrostatic septum with respect to the magnetic one. The layout of this new extraction will be described in detail and the results of beam measurements presented.

  17. Design of the ILC RTML Extraction Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seletskiy, S.; Tenenbaum, P.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The ILC [1] Damping Ring to the Main Linac beamline (RTML) contains three extraction lines (EL). Each EL can be used both for an emergency abort dumping of the beam and tune-up continual train-by-train extraction. Two of the extraction lines are located downstream of the first and second stages of the RTML bunch compressor, and must accept both compressed and uncompressed beam with energy spreads of 2.5% and 0.15%, respectively. In this paper we report on an optics design that allowed minimizing the length of the extraction lines while offsetting the beam dumps from the main line by the distance required for acceptable radiation levels in the service tunnel. The proposed extraction lines can accommodate beams with different energy spreads while at the same time providing the beam size acceptable for the aluminum dump window. The RTML incorporates three extraction lines, which can be used for either an emergency beam abort or for a train-by-train extraction. The first EL is located downstream of the Damping Ring extraction arc. The other two extraction lines are located downstream of each stage of the two-stage bunch compressor. The first extraction line (EL1) receives 5GeV beam with an 0.15% energy spread. The extraction line located downstream of the first stage of bunch compressor (ELBC1) receives both compressed and uncompressed beam, and therefore must accept beam with both 5 and 4.88GeV energy, and 0.15% and 2.5% energy spread, respectively. The extraction line located after the second stage of the bunch compressor (ELBC2) receives 15GeV beam with either 0.15 or 1.8% energy spread. Each of the three extraction lines is equipped with the 220kW aluminum ball dump, which corresponds to the power of the continuously dumped beam with 5GeV energy, i.e., the beam trains must be delivered to the ELBC2 dump at reduced repetition rate.

  18. Remediating pesticide contaminated soils using solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahle-Demessie, E.; Meckes, M.C.; Richardson, T.L. [National Management Research Lab., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p{prime}-DDT, p,p{prime}-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as solvents over a wide range of operating conditions. It was demonstrated that a six-stage methanol extraction using a solvent-to-soil ratio of 1.6 can decrease pesticide levels in the soil by more than 99% and reduce the volume of material requiring further treatment by 25 times or more. The high solubility of the pesticides in methanol resulted in rapid extraction rates, with the system reaching quasi-equilibrium state in 30 minutes. The extraction efficiency was influenced by the number of extraction stages, the solvent-to-soil ratio, and the soil moisture content. Various methods were investigated to regenerate and recycle the solvent. Evaporation and solvent stripping are low cost and reliable methods for removing high pesticide concentrations from the solvent. For low concentrations, GAC adsorption may be used. Precipitating and filtering pesticides by adding water to the methanol/pesticide solution was not successful when tested with soil extracts. 26 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Direct production of hydrogen and aromatics from methane or natural gas: Review of recent U.S. patents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the year 2000, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has granted a dozen patents for inventions related to methane dehydroaromatization processes. One of them was granted to UOP LLC (Des Plaines). It relates to a catalyst composition and preparation method. Two patents were granted to Conoco Phillips Company (Houston, TX). One was aimed at securing a process and operating conditions for methane aromatization. The other was aimed at securing a process that may be integrated with separation of wellhead fluids and blending of the aromatics produced from the gas with the crude. Nine patents were granted to ExxonMobil Chemical Patents Inc. (Houston, TX). Most of these were aimed at securing a dehydroaromatization process where methane-containing feedstock moves counter currently to a particulate catalyst. The coked catalyst is heated or regenerated either in the reactor, by cyclic operation, or in annex equipment, and returned to the reactor. The reactor effluent stream may be separated in its main components and used or recycled as needed. A brief summary of those inventions is presented in this review.

  20. LC-1H NMR characterization studies of tricyclic aromatics and olefins in diesel fuels. Final report, September 1982-31 December 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blass, T.E.; Bebout, W.R.; Caswell, K.A.; Allen, L.; Dorn, H.C.

    1986-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    New analytical approaches for determination of 1) tricyclic aromatics, 2) alkenes, and weight % data in Naval diesel fuels are described. Tricyclic aromatics are detected and characterized at concentrations as low as approx. 0.25% in diesel fuels. Various analytical approaches for characterizing alkenes in diesel fuels are also explored, including: 1) chromatographic separation of the alkene fraction in diesel fuels by AgNO/sub 3/ impregnated chromatographic columns, and 2) a /sup 19/F NMR tagging method characterizing alkenes. Finally, a calculative method for conversion of LC-1H NMR molar data to weight % data for each chromatographic fraction in a fuel is described.

  1. Residues from coal conversion and utilization: Advanced mineralogical characterization and disposed byproduct diagenesis. [Semiannual report, 1 Mar 1999--31 Aug 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory J. McCarthy; Dean G. Grier

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the project is to learn more about the phenomenon of coal conversion byproduct (CCB) diagenesis, first described by this group and co-workers at UND EERC seven years ago. CCB diagenesis is a change in the mineralogy that occurs after some CCBs are disposed in a landfill or utilized for a civil engineering application. Regulatory environmental tests and civil engineering tests are typically performed on as-generated CCBs, or on CCBs hydrated and cured for relatively short periods such as 7 or 28 days. One would like to know whether the results of these short-term tests will be valid years later. A change in mineralogy means a gain, loss or chemical redistribution of major, minor and trace elements, and alteration of physical properties. To attain this goal, two objectives were defined: (1) to develop improved methodology for quantitating mineralogy of these complex crystalline phase assemblages, and (2) to investigate the phenomenon of CCB diagenesis further by studying materials recovered from disposal landfills or civil engineering works. Objective 1--Hydrated CCBs are chemically and mineralogically complex, which makes quantitative mineralogy determination by conventional X-ray diffraction unusable or unreliable. The whole-pattern Rietveld quantitative X-ray diffraction (RQXRD) method, however, can overcome many of the problems and seems well suited to improve reliability. Two tasks were defined in the proposal: Task 1--Completion by October 1997. Prepare a reference set of CCBs for use in developing Rietveld QXRD. The reference materials will come primarily from in-house samples of advanced coal technology byproducts. The work will include SEM/EMPA characterization at UND EERC. Task 2--Completion by October 1997. Develop protocols for Rietveld QXRD analysis of CCBs. Make CCB structure data and protocols available on a Website. Determine levels of sensitivity, precision, and accuracy. Objective 2--Five types of CCBs disposed in landfills were studied between 1989 and 1994. Diagenesis was observed in three of the five materials. To obtain a more generic understanding of CCB diagenesis, additional materials and different environmental settings need to be studied. Task 3--Completion by end of project. Apply RQXRD protocols developed in Task 2 to core samples of utilized or disposed CCBs from at least five additional sites. Use results to gain a better understanding of CCB diagenesis.

  2. Residues from coal conversion and utilization: Advanced mineralogical characterization and disposed byproduct diagenesis. [Semiannual report, 1 Sep 1998--28 Feb 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory J. McCarthy; Dean G. Grier

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the project is to learn more about the phenomenon of coal conversion byproduct (CCB) diagenesis, first described by the group and co-workers at UND EERC seven years ago. CCB diagenesis is a change in the mineralogy that occurs after some CCBs are disposed in a landfill or utilized for a civil engineering application. Regulatory environmental tests and civil engineering tests are typically performed on as-generated CCBs, or on CCBs hydrated and cured for relatively short periods such as 7 or 28 days. One would like to know whether the results of these short-term tests will be valid years later. A change in mineralogy means a gain, loss or chemical redistribution of major, minor and trace elements, and alteration of physical properties. To attain this goal, two objectives were defined: (1) to develop improved methodology for quantitating mineralogy of these complex crystalline phase assemblages, and (2) to investigate the phenomenon of CCB diagenesis further by studying materials recovered from disposal landfills or civil engineering works. Objective 1--Hydrated CCBs are chemically and mineralogically complex, which makes quantitative mineralogy determination by conventional X-ray diffraction unusable or unreliable. The whole-pattern Rietveld quantitative X-ray diffraction (RQXRD) method, however, can overcome many of the problems and seems well suited to improve reliability. Two tasks were defined in the proposal: Task 1--Completion by October 1997. Prepare a reference set of CCBs for use in developing Rietveld QXRD. The reference materials will come primarily from in-house samples of advanced coal technology byproducts. The work will include SEM/EMPA characterization at UND EERC. Task 2--Completion by October 1997. Develop protocols for Rietveld QXRD analysis of CCBs. Make CCB structure data and protocols available on a Website. Determine levels of sensitivity, precision, and accuracy. Objective 2--Five types of CCBs disposed in landfills were studied between 1989 and 1994. Diagenesis was observed in three of the five materials. To obtain a more generic understanding of CCB diagenesis, additional materials and different environmental settings need to be studied. Task 3--Completion by end of project. Apply RQXRD protocols developed in Task 2 to core samples of utilized or disposed CCBs from at least five additional sites. Use results to gain a better understanding of CCB diagenesis.

  3. Use of Xenon Difluoride to Clean Hazardous By-Products in Ion Implanter Source Housings, Turbo Pumps, and Fore-Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Despres, J.; Chambers, B.; Bishop, S.; Kaim, R.; Letaj, S.; Sergi, S.; Sweeney, J.; Tang, Y.; Wilson, S.; Yedave, S. [ATMI, 7 Commerce Drive, Danbury, CT, 06810 (United States)

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the use of xenon difluoride to clean deposits in the source housing, source turbo pump, and source turbo pump fore-line of ion implanters. Xenon difluoride has previously been shown to be effective in increasing the lifetime of the ion source{sup 1,2} and this paper presents an extension of the technology to other areas within the tool. Process by-products that are deposited in the source housing, turbo pump, and turbo pump fore-line can not only pose productivity issues, in the case of coatings on insulators, but can also be flammable and toxic in the case of deposits formed within the turbo pump and fore-line. The results presented in this paper detail the initial successful examples of using xenon difluoride to clean these deposits.ATMI has shown that xenon difluoride is capable of cleaning an insulator in an ion implanter. Typically during use an insulator will become increasingly coated with deposits that could lead to productivity problems. By introducing xenon difluoride into the source housing the insulator residues were effectively cleaned in-situ, thereby extending the maintenance interval and resulting in significant consumable savings.Similar deposits that form in the turbo pump and fore-line could not only lead to production problems due to turbo pump failure or fore-line build-up, but pose significant health risks during the ex-situ cleaning process. Through internal testing ATMI has shown that xenon difluoride is able to clean phosphorus and germanium deposits located within a turbo pump. Additionally, testing has demonstrated that the turbo pump fore-line can be cleaned in-situ without the need to remove these components, thereby virtually eliminating the possibility of fires. The cleaning reaction progress and by-products were monitored using FTIR spectrometry and thermocouples.In order to efficiently clean the source housing, turbo pump, and turbo pump fore-line xenon difluoride delivery must be optimized. This paper also details a hardware concept that maximizes xenon difluoride delivery and allows the clean to be done in a way that is viable for production ion implanters.

  4. Extraction Steam Controls at EPLA-W

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinker, J. L.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ExxonMobil's Baton Rouge site encompasses a world-scale refinery, chemical plant and third party power station. Historically, inflexible and unreliable control systems on two high-pressure, extracting/condensing steam turbines prevented the site...

  5. Cheaper oil extraction Taking a closer look

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be extracted from oil fields. Liquid CO2 is increasingly used industrially to replace common petrochemical-flammable and environmentally responsible alternative to conventional petrochemical solvents. For example, even water

  6. Extracting secret keys from integrated circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Daihyun, 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern cryptographic protocols are based on the premise that only authorized participants can obtain secret keys and access to information systems. However, various kinds of tampering methods have been devised to extract ...

  7. The extraction of work from quantum coherence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamil Korzekwa; Matteo Lostaglio; Jonathan Oppenheim; David Jennings

    2015-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We critically assess the problem of extracting work from a coherent superposition of energy eigenstates of an individual qubit system. By carefully taking into account all the resources involved in the thermodynamic transformations in a fully quantum-mechanical treatment, we show that there exists a thermal machine that can come arbitrarily close to extracting all the coherence as work. The machine only needs to act on individual copies of a state and can be reused. On the other hand, we show that for any thermal machine with finite resources not all the coherence of a state can be extracted as work. We provide explicit protocols extracting work from coherence when the resources of a thermal machine are bounded, a scenario potentially relevant for the thermodynamics at the nanoscale.

  8. Fluidized bed gasification of extracted coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aquino, D.C.; DaPrato, P.L.; Gouker, T.R.; Knoer, P.

    1984-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal or similar carbonaceous solids are extracted by contacting the solids in an extraction zone with an aqueous solution having a pH above 12.0 at a temperature between 65/sup 0/C and 110/sup 0/C for a period of time sufficient to remove bitumens from the coal into said aqueous solution, and the extracted solids are then gasified at an elevated pressure and temperature in a fluidized bed gasification zone (60) wherein the density of the fluidized bed is maintained at a value above 160 kg/m/sup 3/. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, water is removed from the aqueous solution in order to redeposit the extracted bitumens onto the solids prior to the gasification step. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Fluidized bed gasification of extracted coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aquino, Dolores C. (Houston, TX); DaPrato, Philip L. (Westfield, NJ); Gouker, Toby R. (Baton Rouge, LA); Knoer, Peter (Houston, TX)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal or similar carbonaceous solids are extracted by contacting the solids in an extraction zone (12) with an aqueous solution having a pH above 12.0 at a temperature between 65.degree. C. and 110.degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to remove bitumens from the coal into said aqueous solution and the extracted solids are then gasified at an elevated pressure and temperature in a fluidized bed gasification zone (60) wherein the density of the fluidized bed is maintained at a value above 160 kg/m.sup.3. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, water is removed from the aqueous solution in order to redeposit the extracted bitumens onto the solids prior to the gasification step.

  10. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietz, Mark (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  11. Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur. First quarterly technical progress report, [October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benedek, K. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation will be conducting Phase I of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. this catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria or zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an ongoing DOE-sponsored University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicates that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. the performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams.

  12. High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines - Phase I: Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project proposes to use pneumatically or hydraulically emplaced dry-flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products to backfill the adits left by highwall mining. Backfilling highwall mine adits with dry-FGD materials is technically attractive. The use of an active highwall mine would allow the dry-FGD material to be brought in using the same transportation network used to move the coal out, eliminating the need to recreated the transportation infrastructure, thereby saving costs. Activities during the period included the negotiations leading to the final cooperative agreement for the project and the implementation of the necessary instruments at the University of Kentucky to administer the project. Early in the negotiations, a final agreement on a task structure was reached and a milestone plan was filed. A review was initiated of the original laboratory plan as presented in the proposal, and tentative modifications were developed. Selection of a mine site was made early; the Pleasant Valley mine in Greenup County was chosen. Several visits were made to the mine site to begin work on the hydrologic monitoring plan. The investigation of the types of permits needed to conduct the project was initiated. Considerations concerning the acceptance and implementation of technologies led to the choice of circulating fluidized bed ash as the primary material for the study. Finally, the membership of a Technical Advisory Committee for the study was assembled.

  13. Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call:...

  14. Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable Power Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable...

  15. aerogel keystones extraction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    level due to evaporation. Threeevaporation for xerogel and supercritical extraction for aerogel. Supercritical extraction enables the removal of interstitial liquid Carrington,...

  16. aromatica extracts correlates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thus from which any extractable work can only come from correlations. We compute the maximum extractable work for general entangled states, separable states, and states with...

  17. Extraction of RNA-Trizol RNA extraction from M. tuberculosis (Mahenthiralingam 1998) is useful for RT-PCR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extraction of RNA-Trizol RNA extraction from M. tuberculosis (Mahenthiralingam 1998) is useful of isopropanol. 10. Precipitate overnight at ­20°C. Prepare cold 70% ethanol with DEPC treated water. Centrifuge DNA is present, repeat Trizol extraction. #12;

  18. An in situ intercomparison exercise on passive samplers for the monitoring of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and pesticides in surface water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pesticides in surface waters. Various PSs were used and compared at 2 rivers sites aromatic hydrocarbons and pesticides in surface water C. Miège1* , N. Mazzella2 , S. Schiavone1 , A. Dabrin, the interlaboratory variability of field blanks, time weighted average water concentrations and its uncertainties

  19. NATIONAL PRESS RELEASE I PARIS I 30 AUGUST 2013 Brown algae contain phlorotannins, aromatic (phenolic) compounds that are unique in the plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    NATIONAL PRESS RELEASE I PARIS I 30 AUGUST 2013 Brown algae contain phlorotannins, aromatic elucidated the key step in the production of these compounds in Ectocarpus siliculosus, a small brown alga phlorotannins from brown algae for use in industry was a complex process, and the biosynthesis pathways

  20. Time-dependent density functional study of the electronic excited states of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirata, So; Head-Gordon, Martin P.; Szczepanski, Jan; Vala, Martin

    2003-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A uniform, comprehensive theoretical interpretation of spectroscopic data is presented for 53 radical ion species of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH’s) with the aid of (Tamm–Dancoff) time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). TDDFT is capable of predicting the transition energies to the low-lying excited states of PAH ions with quantitative accuracy (the standard deviation from experimental results being less than 0.3 eV) and their intensity patterns qualitatively correctly. The accuracy is hardly affected by the sizes of PAH ions (azulene through dinaphthocoronene), the types of transitions (Koopmans or satellite transitions), the types of orbi-tals involved (*←, *←, or *← transitions), the types of ions (cations or anions), or other geometrical or electronic perturbations (non-planarity, sp3 carbons, or heterocyclic or non-benzenoid rings)

  1. Influence of co-attached aromatics on the thermolysis of surface-immobilized 1,3-diphenylpropane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Biggs, C.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technique of model compound immobilization by covalent surface attachment is being employed to investigate the potential impact of restricted diffusional mobility on the thermal reactivity of coal. This restricted mobility may be imposed in coal as a consequence of its cross-linked, macromolecular structure. Thermolysis studies at 345--400{degree}C of model coal structures covalently attached to a silica surface have shown that significant perturbations in free-radical reaction mechanisms can occur, and result in altered reaction rates and product distributions compared with corresponding fluid phase behavior. In the current study, we are beginning to probe the influence of the structure of co-attached aromatic molecules such as biphenyl and diphenylmethane on the reaction rate and regioselectivity in the thermolysis of surface-attached 1,3-diphenylpropane. 6 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Reexamination of Pure Qubit Work Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max F. Frenzel; David Jennings; Terry Rudolph

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Many work extraction or information erasure processes in the literature involve the raising and lowering of energy levels via external fields. But even if the actual system is treated quantum mechanically, the field is assumed to be classical and of infinite strength, hence not developing any correlations with the system or experiencing back-actions. We extend these considerations to a fully quantum mechanical treatment, by studying a spin-1/2 particle coupled to a finite-sized directional quantum reference frame, a spin-l system, which models an external field. With this concrete model together with a bosonic thermal bath, we analyse the back-action a finite-size field suffers during a quantum-mechanical work extraction process, the effect this has on the extractable work, and highlight a range of assumptions commonly made when considering such processes. The well-known semi-classical treatment of work extraction from a pure qubit predicts a maximum extractable work W = kT log 2 for a quasi-static process, which holds as a strict upper bound in the fully quantum mechanical case, and is only attained in the classical limit. We also address the problem of emergent local time-dependence in a joint system with globally fixed Hamiltonian.

  3. GeothermalHeat Extraction Anna Przybycin Feliks Nueske Mark Riesland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kornhuber, Ralf

    : 70% 32.8 m3/d water extraction - Extraction temperature: 12°C = aquifer temperature Injection the cold-water plume reaches the extraction well Is this realistic under practical considerations? ProbablyGeothermal­Heat Extraction Anna Przybycin ­ Feliks Nueske ­ Mark Riesland #12;1) Hydrogeological

  4. PAPER 2004-028 The Effect of Bitumen Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schramm, Laurier L.

    1 PAPER 2004-028 The Effect of Bitumen Extraction Shear Conditions on Froth Treatment Performance U processing: extraction and froth treatment. The most common extraction process is hot water bitumen extraction where bitumen is produced in a froth consisting of bitumen, water, and inorganic solids. The froth

  5. Hierarchical Iso-Surface Extraction Computer Graphics Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desbrun, Mathieu

    Hierarchical Iso-Surface Extraction Ulf Labsik Computer Graphics Group University of Erlangen Kai of our hierarchical iso-surface extraction algorithm. Abstract The extraction and display of iso construct a hierarchy of volumes and extract an iso-surface from the coarsest resolution with a standard

  6. Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IL); Binder, Thomas P. (Decatur, IL); Rammelsberg, Anne M. (Decatur, IL)

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

  7. Equilibrium of molybdenum in selected extraction systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tkac, Peter; Paulenova, Alena [Radiation Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-5903 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concentration of molybdenum(VI) in dissolved irradiated nuclear fuel is comparable with the concentrations of Tc, Am and Np. Therefore it is of big interest to understand its behavior under conditions related to the UREX/TRUEX process. The effect of the poly-speciation of molybdenum in aqueous solution on its extraction by neutral solvents TBP and CMPO/TBP was studied. Extraction yields of molybdenum decreased significantly when AHA was added to aqueous phase. Our investigation confirmed a strong ability of the aceto-hydroxamic acid to form complexes with Mo in high acidic solutions. Spectroscopic data (UV-Vis) confirmed that a fraction of the Mo(VI)-AHA complex is present in the organic phase after extraction. (authors)

  8. Membrane contactor assisted extraction/reaction process employing ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Yupo J. (Naperville, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL)

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a functionalized membrane contactor extraction/reaction system and method for extracting target species from multi-phase solutions utilizing ionic liquids. One preferred embodiment of the invented method and system relates to an extraction/reaction system wherein the ionic liquid extraction solutions act as both extraction solutions and reaction mediums, and allow simultaneous separation/reactions not possible with prior art technology.

  9. Vapor Extraction Well Performance and Recommendations for Transitioning to Passive Extraction at the Former DUS-II Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Dennis G.; Noonkester, Jay V.; Looney, Brian B.

    2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation evaluated mass extraction rate from individual wells associated with the Western Sector Treatment System (formerly known as the DUS-II project). This was critical since each individual well can have a radius of influence in excess of 100-ft when operating using an active extraction system. Future soil vapor extraction should use the existing active extraction system, supplemented with deployment of passive extraction where appropriate.

  10. Extraction and Analysis of Facebook Friendship Relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Emilio

    Chapter 12 Extraction and Analysis of Facebook Friendship Relations Salvatore Catanese, Pasquale De and Social scientists. We present our long-term research effort in analyzing Facebook, the largest and arguably most successful OSN today: it gathers more than 500 million users. Access to data about Facebook

  11. Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, D.I.C.; Avgerinos, G.C.

    1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15 and about 70 C and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours. 6 figs.

  12. Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Daniel I. C. (Belmont, MA); Avgerinos, George C. (Newton Center, MA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15.degree. and about 70.degree. C. and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours.

  13. Logical Structure Extraction from Software Requirements Documents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czarnecki, Krzysztof

    Documents I. INTRODUCTION Requirements management (RM) tools store and manipu- late software requirementsLogical Structure Extraction from Software Requirements Documents Rehan Rauf, Michal Antkiewicz,mantkiew,kczarnec}@gsd.uwaterloo.ca Abstract--Software requirements documents (SRDs) are often authored in general-purpose rich-text editors

  14. Extracting gluon condensate from the average plaquette

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Taekoon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The perturbative contribution in the average plaquette is subtracted using Borel summation and the remnant of the plaquette is shown to scale as a dim-4 condensate. A critical review is presented of the renormalon subtraction scheme that claimed a dim-2 condensate. The extracted gluon condensate is compared with the latest result employing high order (35-loop) calculation in the stochastic perturbation theory.

  15. Extracting Artifact Lifecycle Models from Metadata History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godfrey, Michael W.

    Extracting Artifact Lifecycle Models from Metadata History Olga Baysal, Oleksii Kononenko, Reid, Canada {obaysal, okononen, rtholmes, migod}@cs.uwaterloo.ca Abstract--Software developers and managers make decisions based on the understanding they have of their software systems. This understanding

  16. Inverse hydrochemical models of aqueous extracts tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous extract test is a laboratory technique commonly used to measure the amount of soluble salts of a soil sample after adding a known mass of distilled water. Measured aqueous extract data have to be re-interpreted in order to infer porewater chemical composition of the sample because porewater chemistry changes significantly due to dilution and chemical reactions which take place during extraction. Here we present an inverse hydrochemical model to estimate porewater chemical composition from measured water content, aqueous extract, and mineralogical data. The model accounts for acid-base, redox, aqueous complexation, mineral dissolution/precipitation, gas dissolution/ex-solution, cation exchange and surface complexation reactions, of which are assumed to take place at local equilibrium. It has been solved with INVERSE-CORE{sup 2D} and been tested with bentonite samples taken from FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) in situ test. The inverse model reproduces most of the measured aqueous data except bicarbonate and provides an effective, flexible and comprehensive method to estimate porewater chemical composition of clays. Main uncertainties are related to kinetic calcite dissolution and variations in CO2(g) pressure.

  17. Vapour extraction of heavy oil and bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, K.A.; Butler, R.M. [Univ. of Calgary (Canada)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the process of vapor extraction for the recovery of petroleum and bitumen. The selection of solvent is critical, and it is shown that butane may be a good solvent for shallow reservoirs. Experiments are described in a Hele-Shaw cell and Packed Visual Model.

  18. Organic electroluminescent devices having improved light extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY)

    2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic electroluminescent devices having improved light extraction include a light-scattering medium disposed adjacent thereto. The light-scattering medium has a light scattering anisotropy parameter g in the range from greater than zero to about 0.99, and a scatterance parameter S less than about 0.22 or greater than about 3.

  19. Evolutionary Algorithms for Definition Extraction Claudia Borg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Gordon J.

    Evolutionary Algorithms for Definition Extraction Claudia Borg Dept. of I.C.S. University of Malta claudia.borg@um.edu.mt Mike Rosner Dept. of I.C.S. University of Malta mike.rosner@um.edu.mt Gordon Pace Dept. of Computer Science University of Malta gordon.pace@um.edu.mt Abstract Books and other text

  20. H-gallosilicate (MFI) propane aromatization catalyst: Influence of Si/Ga ratio on acidity, activity and deactivation due to coking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhary, V.R.; Kinage, A.K.; Sivadinarayana, C. [National Chemical Lab., Pune (India)] [and others] [National Chemical Lab., Pune (India); and others

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Influence of bulk Si/Ga ratio of H-gallosilicate (MFI) on its degalliation (during calcination for removal of template and deammoniation of NH{sub 4} form), acidity/acid strength distribution (measured by stepwise thermal desorption and chemisorption of pyridine at 50-400{degrees}C using GC techniques and also by acid catalyzed model reactions viz. iso-octane cracking and toluene disproportionation) and initial activity/product selectivity and catalyst deactivation in propane aromatization (at 550{degrees}C) has been investigated. Framework Si/Ga ratio was measured by {sup 29}Si MAS NMR. Information on the external acid sites is obtained by isooctane cracking. The influence of poisoning of strong acid sites (by pyridine) on acid catalyzed model reactions and the effect of deactivation on the product distribution in the propane aromatization have also been studied. 21 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.