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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Aromatics Extraction Plant Design Using Synthesis Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to extract an aromatics stream from a C 6 -C o heart cut of hydrogenated pyrolysis gasoline, leaving a raffinate containing paraffins and naphthenes. The Distillation Section distills the aromatics stream into high purity benzene, toluene, and Co... aromatics and a stream of C g and heavier Rromatics. Figure 1 shows the major flows and equipment relevant to this study. A lean solvent extracts the aromatics from the feed in the Extractor and the nonaromatic raffinate is sent to battery limits...

Wilcox, R. J.; Nedwick, R.

2

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons extracted Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Toxic Contamination Summary: called aromatic hydrocarbons. These include harmful pollutants like dioxins, PCBs and a group called... polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)....

3

Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the roles and responsibilities of each position within the Combustion Byproducts Recyclcing Consortium.

Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul chugh; James Hower

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Synergistic selective extraction of actinides(III) over lanthanides from nitric acid using new aromatic diorganyldithiophosphinic acids and neutral organophosphorus compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New aromatic dithiophosphinic acids (R{sub 2}PSSH) with R = C{sub 6}H{sub 5{sup {minus}}}, ClC{sub 6}H{sub 4{sup {minus}}}, FC{sub 6}H{sub 4{sup {minus}}} and CH{sub 3}C{sub 6}H{sub 4{sup {minus}}} were synthesized, characterized and tested as potential separating agents for trivalent actinides over lanthanides. The extraction of Am(III), Eu(III) and other lanthanides was carried out from nitric acid medium with mixtures of R{sub 2}PSSHs and neutral organophosphorus compounds. There was no detectable extraction when R{sub 2}PSSHs were used alone as extractants for either Am(III) or Eu(III) (D{sub Am,Eu} < 10{sup {minus}3}) under the experimental conditions used in this study. High separation factors (D{sub Am}/D{sub Eu} > 20) with D{sub Am} > 1 were achieved in the nitric acid range 0.1--1 mol/L by means of a synergistic mixture of bis(chlorophenyl)dithiophosphinic acid + tributylphosphate (TBP), trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) or tributylphosphine oxide (TBPO). The high radiation resistance (up to 10{sup 6} Gy absorbed {gamma}-doses) of the extractants was also demonstrated.

Modolo, G.; Odoj, R. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-first Century, Hyderabad, India, February 1999. Department of Civil EngineeringandMechanics College) of foundry by-products, including foundry sand and slag. Most of these by-products are landfilled, primarily due to non-availability of economically attractive use options. Landfilling is not a desirable option

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

6

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion by-products #12;3 generated by using both conventional and clean-coal technologies. A clean-coal that obtained from clean-coal technology, are not utilized in cast-concrete masonry products (bricks, blocksCenter for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

7

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MILWAUKEE #12;USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH combustion by-products (such as clean-coal ash) from power plants. Maximum recycling of such by- products

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

8

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization CLEAN COAL BY-PRODUCTS UTILIZATION IN ROADWAY, EMBANKMENTS-fueled plants, particularly use of eastern coals, has lead to the use of clean coal and using advanced sulfur dioxide control technologies. Figure 1 shows clean coal technology benefits(2) . In 1977, the concept

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

9

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%) were used in producing the concrete mixtures. The water to cementitious materials ratio was kept with and without by-products, and soil and groundwater remediation technologies including bioremediation. ACI

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

10

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization DRAFT REPORT CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN CEMENTITIOUS-MILWAUKEE #12;CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN CEMENTITIOUS PRODUCTS Progress Report by Tarun R. Naik, Rakesh of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Technologies

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

11

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon exposure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aust. J. Mar. Freshw. Res., 1984, 35, 119-28 Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Waters of Port Phillip Bay... of aromatic hydrocarbons in coastal waters, using solvent extraction and...

12

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons phahs Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WH, Caton JE. 1983. Extraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for qualitative analysis. In... : Handbook of Polycyclic Aromatic ... Source: Rock, Chris - Department of...

13

Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, 'clean coal' combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered 'allowable' under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and private-sector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, clean coal combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered allowable under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons for fullerene synthesis in flames  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides improved methods for combustion synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, employing multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels selected for high carbon conversion to extractable fullerenes. The multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels include those that contain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. More specifically, multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels contain a substantial amount of indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof. Coal tar and petroleum distillate fractions provide low cost hydrocarbon fuels containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including without limitation, indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof.

Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D.

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

16

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wood with supplementary fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and coke by pulp and paper mills and wood, knots, chips, etc. with other supplementary fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and coke to generateCenter for By-Products Utilization DEVELOPMENT OF CLSM USING COAL ASH AND WOOD ASH, A SOURCE OF NEW

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

17

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a combination with a number of fuels including coal, petroleum coke, natural gas, etc. In the mid 1990s, the unit was firing a combination of coal and petroleum coke to generate energy. It has been established;1 PROJECT 1 - COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS: CHARACTERIZATION AND USE OPTIONS Introduction An AFBC system

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

18

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presentationand Publicationat the CBIP International Conference onFly Ash Disposal & Utilization,New Delhi, India, January 1998 foundry sand and slag. Most of these by-products are landfilled, primarily due to non-availability of economically attractive use options. Landfilling is not a desirable option because it not only causes huge

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

19

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include workability, water requirement, bleeding, segregation, air content, time of set, and temperature with and without by-products, and soil and groundwater remediation technologies including bioremediation. ACI for power production. Its combustion in electric power plants produces large amounts of fly ash and bottom

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

20

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-strength materials (CLSM); and, future research needs. The fresh concrete properties discussed are workability, water with and without by-products, and soil and groundwater remediation technologies including bioremediation. ACI for power production. Its combustion in electric power plants produces large amounts of fly ash and bottom

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

clean coal technology, are not extensively utilized in the cast concrete masonry products (bricks both conventional and clean coal technologies. A clean coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SO2Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

22

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute For Project 02-1/3.1D-2 Department of Civil Engineering of technology and market development for controlled low-strength material (CLSM) slurry using Illinois coal ashCenter for By-Products Utilization IMPLEMENTATION OF FLOWABLE SLURRY TECHNOLOGY IN ILLINOIS

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

23

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and paper mills in concrete. INTRODUCTION Concrete is a porous solid that is created by combining four basicCenter for By-Products Utilization CURING TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON HIGH-PERFORMANCE CONCRETE By Tarun For presentation and publication at the symposium entitled "High-Performance Concrete and Concrete for Marine

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

24

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Shiw S. Singh, Lori- Lynn C. Pennock, and Bruce Ramme Report No. CBU-2001 with numerous projects on the use of by-product materials including utilization of used foundry sand and fly ash;2 INTRODUCTION Wood FA is generated due to combustion of wood for energy production at pulp and paper mills, saw

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

25

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASSF FLY ASHCOAL AND CLEAN-COAL #12;-1- CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASSF FLYASHCOAL AND CLEAN-COAL ASHFOR CEMENT -Milwaukee (UWM) Daniel D.Banerjee, Project Manager,Illinois Clean Coal Institute RudolphN.Kraus, Research

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

26

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST OF CLASS F FLYASHAND CLEAN-COAL ASHBLENDS FOR CAST CONCRETE PRODUCTS Authors: TarunR.Naik, Director, Center,Illinois Clean Coal Institute RudolphN.Kraus, Research Associate, UWM Center forBy-Products Utilization Shiw S

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

27

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN NO-FINES CONCRETE By Tarun R;CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN NO-FINES CONCRETE ABSTRACT By Tarun, R. Naik, Yoon-moon Chun, Rudolph N. Kraus, and Fethullah Canpolat This paper presents a detailed experimental study on the sequestration

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

28

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN COAL ASH AS SETTING TIME REGULATOR IN PORTLAND OF WISCONSIN ­ MILWAUKEE #12;2 Use of Clean Coal Ash as Setting Time Regulator in Portland Cement by Zichao Wu as setting time regulator for portland cement production. In this paper a source of clean coal ash (CCA

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

29

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R #12;1 HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Shiw S. Singh, and Bruce for manufacture of cement-based products using ashes generated from combustion of high-sulfur coals. A clean coal

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

30

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of coal in conventional and/ or advanced clean coal technology combustors. These include fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products from advanced clean coal technology clean coal technology combustors. Over 60% of the CCBs are generated as fly ash. An estimate

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

31

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECONOMICAL SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Yoon-moon Chun, Fethullah Canpolat #12;USE OF FLY ASH AND LIMESTONE QUARRY BY-PRODUCTS FOR DEVELOPING ECONOMICAL SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE material in the development of economical self-compacting concrete (SCC). Class C fly ash was also used

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

32

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, and Yoon-moon Chun Report No. CBU-2004 of Limestone Quarry By-Products for Developing Economical Self-Compacting Concrete Principle Investigator Name. For this proposed project, self-compacting concrete mixtures will be developed for prototype production that utilize

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

33

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE (SCC) OR SELF- LEVELING CONCRETE (SLC - MILWAUKEE #12;2 SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE (SCC) OR SELF ­LEVELING CONCRETE (SLC) INTRODUCTION Self-compacting as the concrete which can be placed and compacted into every corner of a form work, purely by means of its self

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

34

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Yoon-moon Chun, Fethullah Canpolat ECONOMICAL SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE by Tarun R. Naik* , Rudolph N. Kraus** , Yoon-moon Chun*** , Fethullah of limestone-quarry by-product material in the development of economical self-compacting concrete (SCC). Class

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

35

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik and Rakesh Kumar Report No. CBU-2003-15 REP-509 April 2003 CONCRETE April 2003 REP-509 #12;ii Use of Limestone Quarry By-Products for Developing Economical Self-Compacting in the production of economical self-compacting concrete. OBJECTIVE: The primary objective of this project

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

36

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, compressive strength, concrete testing, fly ash, high-performance concrete, hot weather, permeability, silica Testing of Concrete", Committee 214, "Evaluation of Results of Strength Tests of Concrete", and CommitteeCenter for By-Products Utilization STRENGTH AND DURABILITY OF HIGH- PERFORMANCE CONCRETE SUBJECTED

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

37

adherent polycyclic aromatic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Risk in First Nations People Exposed to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Near In-situ Bitumen Extraction in Cold Lake, Alberta . Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary:...

38

Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F-fly ash. Some developed technologies have similar potential in the longer term. (3) Laboratory studies have been completed that indicate that much higher amounts of fly ash could be added in cement-concrete applications under some circumstances. This could significantly increase use of fly ash in cement-concrete applications. (4) A study of the long-term environmental effects of structural fills in a surface mine in Indiana was completed. This study has provided much sought after data for permitting large-volume management options in both beneficial as well as non-beneficial use settings. (5) The impact of CBRC on CCBs utilization trends is difficult to quantify. However it is fair to say that the CBRC program had a significant positive impact on increased utilization of CCBs in every region of the USA. Today, the overall utilization of CCBs is over 43%. (6) CBRC-developed knowledge base led to a large number of other projects completed with support from other sources of funding. (7) CBRC research has also had a large impact on CCBs management across the globe. Information transfer activities and visitors from leading coal producing countries such as South Africa, Australia, England, India, China, Poland, Czech Republic and Japan are truly noteworthy. (8) Overall, the CBRC has been a truly successful, cooperative research program. It has brought together researchers, industry, government, and regulators to deal with a major problem facing the USA and other coal producing countries in the world.

Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Coal extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal is extracted using a mixed solvent which includes a substantially aromatic component and a substantially naphthenic component, at a temperature of 400/sup 0/ to 500/sup 0/C. Although neither component is an especially good solvent for coal by itself, the use of mixed solvent gives greater flexibility to the process and offers efficiency gains.

Clarke, J.W.; Kimber, G.M.; Rantell, T.D.; Snape, C.E.

1985-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

40

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons exhibited Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Port Phillip Bay... of aromatic hydrocarbons in coastal waters, using solvent extraction and fluorescence emission analysis, shows... of hydrocarbon inputs....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of the Environment is responsible for regulating fugitive air emissions from the transportation of coal combustion by-products and the permissible beneficial uses of these by...

42

Center for By-Products Utilization CO2 SEQUESTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN NON-AIR ENTRAINED CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik. Maximize environmental benefits: resource conservation, clean water, and clean air. #12;Center for By-Products, Italy, June 30, 2010. #12;Center for By-Products Utilization UWM Center for By-Products Utilization

Saldin, Dilano

43

aromatic hydrocarbon components: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS 2005 April 19 ABSTRACT Interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) infrared emission features 26 Dehydrogenation of polycyclic aromatic...

44

E-Print Network 3.0 - avoiding by-product formation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

78 By-Products Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization ECONOMICAL SELF-CONSOLIDATING CONCRETE FOR THE WISCONSIN... production using by-product materials to...

45

Center for By-Products Utilization Environment, Energy, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

benefits: resource conservation, clean water, and clean air. #12;Center for By-Products Utilization Basic;Center for By-Products Utilization RESOURCE CONSERVATION CLEAN WATER and CLEAN AIR "The earth, the seaCenter for By-Products Utilization Environment, Energy, and Economic Benefits of Using Recyclable

Saldin, Dilano

46

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Travaglini, Michael A. (Oliver Springs, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

48

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted solvent extraction Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aromatic Hydrocarbons in kerosene and bio-kerosene soot Summary: and discussion 3.1. Ultrasonic-assisted extraction Currently,there are twobasic typesofultrasonicinstrumentation......

49

Feasibility of producing jet fuel from GPGP (Great Plains Gasification Plant) by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota, is in close proximity to several Air Force bases along our northern tier. This plant is producing over 137 million cubic feet per day of high-Btu Natural Gas from North Dakota lignite. In addition, the plant generates three liquid streams, naphtha, crude phenol, and tar oil. The naphtha may be directly marketable because of its low boiling point and high aromatic content. The other two streams, totalling about 4300 barrels per day, are available as potential sources of aviation fuel jet fuel for the Air Force. The overall objective of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing aviation turbine fuel from the by-product streams of GPGP. These streams, as well as fractions, thereof, will be characterized and subsequently processed over a wide range of process conditions. The resulting turbine fuel products will be analyzed to determine their chemical and physical characteristics as compared to petroleum-based fuels to meet the military specification requirements. A second objective is to assess the conversion of the by-product streams into a new, higher-density aviation fuel. Since no performance specifications currently exist for a high-density jet fuel, reaction products and intermediates will only be characterized to indicate the feasibility of producing such a fuel. This report discusses the suitability of the tar oil stream. 5 refs., 20 figs., 15 tabs.

Willson, W.G.; Knudson, C.L.; Rindt, J.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chloated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis.

Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Calculate the solubility of aromatics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Like naphthenes and paraffins, aromatics are an important hydrocarbon component of fossil fuels. Their physical and thermodynamic property data are valuable to engineers in the chemical process industries. In particular, their solubility in water is becoming more important in engineering and environmental studies because of increasingly stringent regulations regarding health, safety and the environment. In this article the authors present water-solubility data and correlations for aromatics (benzenes) as a function of temperature. These results can be useful for engineers conducting various types of initial studies.

Yaws, C.L.; Bu, L.; Nijhawan, S. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States))

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Center for By-Products Utilization Sustainable Concrete with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

landfilling them but also leads to the reduction of the the environmental pollution. #12;Center for ByCenter for By-Products Utilization Sustainable Concrete with Industrial and Post-Consumer By Construction Materials and Technologies, Ancona, Italy, June 2010 #12;Center for By-Products Utilization Why

Saldin, Dilano

53

ADVANCED GASIFICATION BY-PRODUCT UTILIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported for the period September 1, 2003 to August 31, 2004. This contract is with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involves the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers.

Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Ari Geertsema; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu; Harold Schobert

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products. [Polychlorinated biphenyls; methylene chloride; perchloroethylene; trichlorofluoroethane; trichloroethylene; chlorobenzene  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contracting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible polyhydroxy compound, such as, water, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds in the low polar or nonpolar solvent by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered for recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 2 tables.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

1982-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

Dutch gas plant uses polymer process to treat aromatic-saturated water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A gas-processing plant in Harlingen, The Netherlands, operated by Elf Petroland has been running a porous-polymer extraction process since 1994 to remove aromatic compounds from water associated with produced natural gas. In the period, the unit has removed dispersed and dissolved aromatic compounds to a concentration of <1 ppm with energy consumption of only 17% that of a steam stripper, according to Paul Brooks, general manager for Akzo Nobel`s Macro Porous Polymer-Extraction (MPPE) systems. The paper describes glycol treatment the MPPE separation process, and the service contract for the system.

NONE

1998-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

56

Relaxations for Production Planning Problems with Increasing By-products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relaxations for Production Planning Problems with Increasing By-products Srikrishna Sridhar, Jeff, James Leudtke SILO Seminars: Feb 1, 2012 #12;One slide summary Problem Description Production process involves desirable & undesirable products. Srikrishna Sridhar, Jeff Linderoth, James Leudtke SILO Seminars

Sheridan, Jennifer

57

animal byproducts: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik") UTILIZING CLEAN-COAL ASH 1 This project was for the...

58

advanced byproduct recovery: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik") UTILIZING CLEAN-COAL ASH 1 This project was for the...

59

Grain Sorghum By-Product Feeds for Farm Animals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X3.AJ.N SORGHUM BY-PRODUCT FEEDS FOR FARM ANIMALS FEED FOR LIVESTOCK -. Grain sorghum is the leading feed grain produced in Texas and in the Southwest. Its importance as a feed fc farm animals is generally recognized. Recent developments... in Texas have made available 1 livestock producers and the feed industry a considerab tonnage of sorghum gluten meal and sorghum gluten fee as by-products in sorghum grain processing. The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station conduct( a series...

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the recent passing of new legislation designed to permanently cap and reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities, it is more important than ever to develop and improve upon methods of controlling mercury emissions. One promising technique is carbon sorbent injection into the flue gas of the coal-fired power plant. Currently, this technology is very expensive as costly commercially activated carbons are used as sorbents. There is also a significant lack of understanding of the interaction between mercury vapor and the carbon sorbent, which adds to the difficulty of predicting the amount of sorbent needed for specific plant configurations. Due to its inherent porosity and adsorption properties as well as on-site availability, carbons derived from gasifiers are potential mercury sorbent candidates. Furthermore, because of the increasing restricted use of landfilling, the coal industry is very interested in finding uses for these materials as an alternative to the current disposal practice. The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported for the period September 1, 2004 to August 31, 2005. This contract is with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involves the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers.

Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Ari Geertsema; Frank Huggins; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Brandie M. Markley; Harold Schobert

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Prediction of Solid Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Solubility in Water with the NRTL-PR Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processes of PAH with subcritical water [5,6] since it provides the extractability limit which can be used groups, for the representation of the solubility of solid PAH in subcritical water. These hal-00872639Prediction of Solid Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Solubility in Water with the NRTL-PR Model

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

62

Occurrence of chlorinated polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in tap water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic compounds in tap waters were extracted by a modified continuous liquid-liquid extractor and analyzed by computerized gas chromatography/mass spectrometry using a fused silica capillary column. The results indicate the presence of monochlorinated derivatives of naphthalene, dibenzofuran, fluorene, fluorenone, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene and dichlorinated derivatives of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene. The parent polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their oxygenated derivatives such as fluorenone and anthraquinone were also found. It was demonstrated that chlorinated PAHs (Cl-PAHs) were really present in tap waters at 10/sup -1/-10/sup -2/ ng/L levels.

Shiraishi, H.; Pilkington, N.H.; Otsuki, A.; Fuwa, K.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Polycyclic Aromatic Triptycenes: Oxygen Substitution Cyclization Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The cyclization and planarization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with concomitant oxygen substitution was achieved through acid catalyzed transetherification and oxygen-radical reactions. The triptycene scaffold ...

VanVeller, Brett

64

Computer Simulations Reveal Multiple Functions for Aromatic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer Simulations Reveal Multiple Functions for Aromatic Residues in Cellulase Enzymes NREL researchers use high-performance computing to demonstrate fundamental roles of aromatic residues in cellulase enzyme tunnels. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) computer simulations of a key indus- trial

65

All-Boron Aromatic Clusters as Potential New Inorganic Ligands...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Boron Aromatic Clusters as Potential New Inorganic Ligands and Building Blocks in Chemistry. All-Boron Aromatic Clusters as Potential New Inorganic Ligands and Building Blocks in...

66

Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the passing of legislation designed to permanently cap and reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities, it is more important than ever to develop and improve upon methods of controlling mercury emissions. One promising technique is carbon sorbent injection into the flue gas of the coal-fired power plant. Currently, this technology is very expensive as costly commercially activated carbons are used as sorbents. There is also a significant lack of understanding of the interaction between mercury vapor and the carbon sorbent, which adds to the difficulty of predicting the amount of sorbent needed for specific plant configurations. Due to its inherent porosity and adsorption properties as well as on-site availability, carbons derived from gasifiers are potential mercury sorbent candidates. Furthermore, because of the increasing restricted use of landfilling, the coal industry is very interested in finding uses for these materials as an alternative to the current disposal practice. The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported. This contract was with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involved the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, assessment of the potential for leaching of Hg captured by the carbons, analysis of the slags for cement applications, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers. The objectives of this collaborative effort between the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute, and industry collaborators supplying gasifier char samples were to investigate the potential use of gasifier slag carbons as a source of low cost sorbent for Hg and NOX capture from combustion flue gas, concrete applications, polymer fillers and as a source of activated carbons. Primary objectives were to determine the relationship of surface area, pore size, pore size distribution, and mineral content on Hg storage of gasifier carbons and to define the site of Hg capture. The ability of gasifier slag carbon to capture NOX and the effect of NOX on Hg adsorption were goals. Secondary goals were the determination of the potential for use of the slags for cement and filler applications. Since gasifier chars have already gone through a devolatilization process in a reducing atmosphere in the gasifier, they only required to be activated to be used as activated carbons. Therefore, the principal objective of the work at PSU was to characterize and utilize gasification slag carbons for the production of activated carbons and other carbon fillers. Tests for the Hg and NOX adsorption potential of these activated gasifier carbons were performed at the CAER. During the course of this project, gasifier slag samples chemically and physically characterized at UK were supplied to PSU who also characterized the samples for sorption characteristics and independently tested for Hg-capture. At the CAER as-received slags were tested for Hg and NOX adsorption. The most promising of these were activated chemically. The PSU group applied thermal and steam activation to a representative group of the gasifier slag samples separated by particle sizes. The activated samples were tested at UK for Hg-sorption and NOX capture and the most promising Hg adsorbers were tested for Hg capture in a simulated flue gas. Both UK and PSU tested the use of the gasifier slag samples as fillers. The CAER analyzed the slags for possible use in cement applications

Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Brock Marrs; Ari Geertsema; Frank Huggins; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Brandie M. Markley; Zhe Lu; Harold Schobert

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

67

Land application uses for dry FGD by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. Presently FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. However, landfill sites are becoming more scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. In summary Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD byproduct materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)); Haefner, R. (Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Resource recovery - a byproduct of hazardous waste incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three principal areas of a chlorinated hydrocarbon waste disposal system for a typical vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) facility are described: the incinerator, the energy-recovery system, and the byproduct-recovery system. The overall efficiency of the energy- and *byproduct-recovery systems is dependent on the optimization of the primary combustor. An example is presented in table form which lists typical waste quantities for the plant and operating costs, including utility requirements for the incinerator system, the quench, absorber and scrubber. Savings that can result by the addition of the energy- and acid-recovery systems can pay for the waste disposal system and return money to the plant.

Santoleri, J.J.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

71

Chemical production from industrial by-product gases: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for conservation of natural gas is studied and the technical and economic feasibility and the implementation of ventures to produce such chemicals using carbon monoxide and hydrogen from byproduct gases are determined. A survey was performed of potential chemical products and byproduct gas sources. Byproduct gases from the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries were selected for detailed study. Gas sampling, preliminary design, market surveys, and economic analyses were performed for specific sources in the selected industries. The study showed that production of methanol or ammonia from byproduct gas at the sites studied in the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries is technically feasible but not economically viable under current conditions. Several other applications are identified as having the potential for better economics. The survey performed identified a need for an improved method of recovering carbon monoxide from dilute gases. A modest experimental program was directed toward the development of a permselective membrane to fulfill that need. A practical membrane was not developed but further investigation along the same lines is recommended. (MCW)

Lyke, S.E.; Moore, R.H.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. EPA has issued a final regulation for control of mercury from coal-fired power plants. An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. These adulterated by-products, both ashes and FGD material, represent the greatest challenge to the DOE goal of increased utilization of by-products. The degree of stability of capture by-products and their potential for release of mercury can have a large economic impact on material sales or the approach to disposal. One of the considerations for mercury control technology is the potential trade-off between effective but temporary mercury capture and less effective but more permanent sequestration. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed aqueous leaching procedures on a select subset of the available sample pairs. This report describes batch leaching results for mercury, arsenic, and selenium.

Hesbach, P.A.; Kachur, E.K.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Center for By-Products Utilization High Durability Concrete Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TESTING · Fresh Concrete Properties ·Unit Weight (ASTM C 138) ·Air Content (ASTM C 237) ·Slump (ASTM C 143Center for By-Products Utilization High Durability Concrete Using High-Carbon Fly Ash and Pulp Mill-Products Utilization Durable Concrete in Northern Climates · Producing durable concrete in a freezing and thawing

Saldin, Dilano

74

Oxidation of byproduct calcium sulfite hemihydrate from coal-fired power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The flue gas desulfurization by-product from the TU Electric Martin Lake power plant near Tatum, Texas was characterized using thermal analysis, x-ray diffraction, microprobe and infrared spectroscopy. The byproduct, called gypsite, consisted of a...

Bhatt, Sandeep

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

JASPERSE CHEM 341 TEST 4 VERSION 1 Conjugation, Diels-Alder, Aromaticity, Aromatic Reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

byproducts). (21 points, 3 points each) SO3HHO HNO3, H 2SO4 O + 1. HNO3, H 2SO4 2. Cl2, AlCl 3 3. Fe, HCl 1

Jasperse, Craig P.

76

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic plant production Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

"Production of green aromatics... Sciences. Renewable Aromatics and Olefins from Solid Biomass by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: Design of New... into aromatics and olefins with...

77

Actinide extraction methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of separating actinides from lanthanides are disclosed. A regio-specific/stereo-specific dithiophosphinic acid having organic moieties is provided in an organic solvent that is then contacted with an acidic medium containing an actinide and a lanthanide. The method can extend to separating actinides from one another. Actinides are extracted as a complex with the dithiophosphinic acid. Separation compositions include an aqueous phase, an organic phase, dithiophosphinic acid, and at least one actinide. The compositions may include additional actinides and/or lanthanides. A method of producing a dithiophosphinic acid comprising at least two organic moieties selected from aromatics and alkyls, each moiety having at least one functional group is also disclosed. A source of sulfur is reacted with a halophosphine. An ammonium salt of the dithiophosphinic acid product is precipitated out of the reaction mixture. The precipitated salt is dissolved in ether. The ether is removed to yield the dithiophosphinic acid.

Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Harrup, Mason K. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Tillotson, Richard D. (Moore, ID) [Moore, ID; Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID) [Pocatello, ID

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

78

Experimental and modeling investigation of aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation in a premixed ethylene flame  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modeling has been performed to investigate aromatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbon formation pathways in a rich, sooting, ethylene-oxygen-argon premixed flame. An atmospheric pressure, laminar flat flame operated at an equivalence ratio of 2.5 was used to acquire experimental data for model validation. Gas composition analysis was conducted by an on-line gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) technique. Measurements were made in the flame and post-flame zone for a number of low molecular weight species, aliphatics, aromatics and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) ranging from two to five-aromatic fused rings. The modeling results show the key reaction sequences leading to aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon growth involve the combination of resonantly stabilized radicals. In particular, propargyl and 1-methylallenyl combination reactions lead to benzene and methyl substituted benzene formation, while polycyclic aromatics are formed from cyclopentadienyl radicals and fused rings that have a shared C{sub 5} side structure. Naphthalene production through the reaction step of cyclopentadienyl self-combination and phenanthrene formation from indenyl and cyclopentadienyl combination were shown to be important in the flame modeling study. The removal of phenyl by O{sub 2} leading to cyclopentadienyl formation is expected to play a pivotal role in the PAH or soot precursor growth process under fuel-rich oxidation conditions.

Castaldi, M.J.; Marinov, N.M.; Melius, C.F. [and others

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 4-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes. No Drawings

Smith, R.E.; Dolbeare, F.A.

1980-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

80

Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 4-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes.

Smith, Robert E. [557 Escondido Cir., Livermore, CA 94550; Dolbeare, Frank A. [5178 Diane La., Livermore, CA 94550

1980-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Estimation method for the thermochemical properties of polycyclic aromatic molecules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polycyclic aromatic molecules, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have attracted considerable attention in the past few decades. They are formed during the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbon fuels and are ...

Yu, Joanna

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Optimization of Jatropha Oil Extraction and Its By-Product Utilization by Pyrolysis Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bio-Energy Testing and Analysis Laboratory EERE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EIA Energy Information Administration FC Fixed Carbon GC Gas Chromatography HID Helium Ionization Detector LSD Least Significant Difference NTP Normal..., resulting in 50 wt.% oil yield, 23 wt.% char, 17 wt.% gas and ash. 20 CHAPTER III METHODOLOGY All experiments of this study were performed at the Bio-Energy Testing and Analysis Laboratory (BETA Lab) of the Biological and Agricultural...

Kongkasawan, Jinjuta 1987-

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

83

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon phenanthrene Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dioxins are lipophilic organic pollutants occurring... absorption, pig INTRODUCTION Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)...

84

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons based Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aromatic Hydrocarbons Volatile Organic... Compounds Toxic Organic Halogenated Dioxins Furans (dioxins) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons found... Rana Novini ATOC 3500 Burn...

85

E-Print Network 3.0 - acidic polycyclic aromatic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dioxins are lipophilic organic pollutants occurring... absorption, pig INTRODUCTION Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)...

86

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne polycyclic aromatic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aromatic Hydrocarbons Volatile Organic... Compounds Toxic Organic Halogenated Dioxins Furans (dioxins) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons found... has been criticized for...

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons assessment Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aromatic Hydrocarbons Volatile Organic... Compounds Toxic Organic Halogenated Dioxins Furans (dioxins) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons found... of airborne soot. The air...

88

aromatic hydrocarbons coated: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: ??Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants, known human lung carcinogens, and potent mammary carcinogens in animal models....

89

A Novel, Green Technology for the Production of Aromatic Thiol from Aromatic Sulfonyl Chloride  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Functional Theory (DFT), a quantum mechanical method, was used to investigate the new aromatic thiol production technology at the molecular level in aspects including reaction species adsorption and transition state determination. Plant design methods...

Atkinson, Bradley R.

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

90

Evaluation of the Effects of Green Tea Extracts on Bone Homeostasis in the Ts65Dn Down Syndrome Mouse Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation of the Effects of Green Tea Extracts on Bone Homeostasis in the Ts65Dn Down Syndrome- gallate (EGCG), an aromatic polyphenol found in high concentrations in green tea, is a known inhibitor

Zhou, Yaoqi

91

Structural analysis of extracts from spent hydroprocessing catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solvent extracts from spent commercial naphtha and gas oil hydrotreating catalysts were examined in order to elucidate the structure of adsorbed poisons. Amides were identified in the extracts and made up 20-30% of the basic compounds. The oxygen content of the extracts was as high as 28% by weight. Some of this oxygen may be associated with metal complexes or present as inorganic material. Infrared spectroscopic analysis revealed very strong absorptions due to carbonyls, suggesting that compounds such as ketones and carboxylic acids were present. The extracted compounds consisted of saturated (paraffinic and naphthenic) structures and aromatic groups, with >50% boiling at +343/sup 0/c. These results suggest polymerization of species on the surface of the catalyst, rather than condensation of aromatic structures to form coke.

Choi, J.H.K.; Gray, M.R.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Monitoring of vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for monitoring vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a high-temperature environment has an excitation source producing electromagnetic radiation, an optical path having an optical probe optically communicating the electromagnetic radiation received at a proximal end to a distal end, a spectrometer or polychromator, a detector, and a positioner coupled to the first optical path. The positioner can slidably move the distal end of the optical probe to maintain the distal end position with respect to an area of a material undergoing combustion. The emitted wavelength can be directed to a detector in a single optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration, in a dual optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration or in a dual optical probe 90.degree. side scattered configuration. The apparatus can be used to monitor an emitted wavelength of energy from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon as it fluoresces in a high temperature environment.

Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Removal of trace olefins from aromatic hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is described for treating a hydrocarbon process stream by converting trace quantities of olefinic impurities to nonolefinic hydrocarbons. The process comprises contacting the process stream, which contains trace olefins in an amount of from about 50 to about 2000 as measured by Bromine Index and at least 80% by weight of aromatic and naphthenic hydrocarbons having from 6 to 20 carbon atoms per molecule, at reaction conditions which ensure liquid phase operation with a solid catalyst composite comprising a crystalline aluminosilicate zeolite and a refractory inorganic oxide. A catalytic olefin-consuming alkylation reaction then produces an essentially olefinfree product stream with approximately the same quantity and distribution of aromatic and naphthenic hydrocarbons as contained in the process stream.

Sachtler, J.W.A.; Barger, P.T.

1989-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

94

Synthetic aggregates prepared from flue gas desulfurization by-products using various binder materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) by-products can be converted into environmentally safe and structurally stable aggregates. One type of synthetic aggregate was prepared using an optimum mixture of (FGD) by-products, fly ash, and water. Mineral reactions have been examined using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope.

Bellucci, J.; Graham, U.M.; Hower, J.C.; Robl, T.L. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Clean coal technology. Coal utilisation by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need to remove the bulk of ash contained in flue gas from coal-fired power plants coupled with increasingly strict environmental regulations in the USA result in increased generation of solid materials referred to as coal utilisation by-products, or CUBs. More than 40% of CUBs were sold or reused in the USA in 2004 compared to less than 25% in 1996. A goal of 50% utilization has been established for 2010. The American Coal Ash Association (ACCA) together with the US Department of Energy's Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPPI) and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) sponsor a number of projects that promote CUB utilization. Several are mentioned in this report. Report sections are: Executive summary; Introduction; Where do CUBs come from?; Market analysis; DOE-sponsored CUB demonstrations; Examples of best-practice utilization of CUB materials; Factors limiting the use of CUBs; and Conclusions. 14 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs., 14 photos.

NONE

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

A novel method of bitumen extraction from asphalt pavement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method of extracting bitumen from asphalt pavement mixtures has been developed which does not require chlorinated or aromatic compounds for solvents. The preferred solvent is cyclohexane (although cyclopentane may be used) at high temperatures and pressures. The new method requires equipment that is less costly than the centrifuge method currently used and takes less time than extractions with Bioact but more time than when chlorocompounds are used.

Houser, T.J. (Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo (United States))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work conducted in this project is an extension of the developments itemized in DE-FG-36-04GO14236. This program is designed to help the development of a biorefinery based around a raw sugar mill, which in Louisiana is an underutilized asset. Some technical questions were answered regarding the addition of a biomass to ethanol facility to existing sugar mills. The focus of this work is on developing technology to produce ethanol and valuable by-products from bagasse. Three major areas are addressed, feedstock storage, potential by-products and the technology for producing ethanol from dilute ammonia pre-treated bagasse. Sugar mills normally store bagasse in a simple pile. During the off season there is a natural degradation of the bagasse, due to the composting action of microorganisms in the pile. This has serious implications if bagasse must be stored to operate a bagasse/biorefinery for a 300+ day operating cycle. Deterioration of the fermentables in bagasse was found to be 6.5% per month, on pile storage. This indicates that long term storage of adequate amounts of bagasse for year-round operation is probably not feasible. Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of succinic acid production were such that it could not compete with current commercial practice. To allow recovery of commercial amounts of ethanol from bagasse fermentation, research was conducted on high solids loading fermentations (using S. cerevisiae) with commercial cellulase on pretreated material. A combination of SHF/SSF treatment with fed-batch operation allowed fermentation at 30% solids loading. Supplementation of the fermentation with a small amount of black-strap molasses had results beyond expectation. There was an enhancement of conversion as well as production of ethanol levels above 6.0% w/w, which is required both for efficient distillation as well as contaminant repression. The focus of fermentation development was only on converting the cellulose to ethanol, as this yeast is not capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose (from hemicellulose). In anticipation of the future development of such an organism, we screened the commercially available xylanases to find the optimum mix for conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose. A different mixture than the spezyme/novozyme mix used in our fermentation research was found to be more efficient at converting both cellulose and hemicellulose. Efforts were made to select a mutant of Pichia stipitis for ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol. New mutation technology was developed, but an appropriate mutant has not yet been isolated. The ability to convert to stillage from biomass fermentations were determined to be suitable for anaerobic degradation and methane production. An economic model of a current sugar factory was developed in order to provide a baseline for the cost/benefit analysis of adding cellulosic ethanol production.

Donal F. Day

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Device for aqueous detection of nitro-aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a compact and portable detection apparatus for nitro-aromatic based chemical compounds, such as nitrotoluenes, dinitrotoluenes, and trinitrotoluene (TNT). The apparatus is based upon the use of fiber optics using filtered light. The preferred process of the invention relies upon a reflective chemical sensor and optical and electronic components to monitor a decrease in fluorescence when the nitro-aromatic molecules in aqueous solution combine and react with a fluorescent polycyclic aromatic compound. 4 figures.

Reagen, W.K.; Schulz, A.L.; Ingram, J.C.; Lancaster, G.D.; Grey, A.E.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

99

aromatic aldehyde production: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

virtual product and production Lemurell, Stefan 291 Production of 18F-Labeled Radiopharmaceuticals Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: One carbon Two carbon Aromatic ...

100

aromatic diamine curing: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hawaii 96822 University. University of Hawai'i at Manoa. (1) Ramdahl, T.; Bjorseth, J. Handbook of Polycyclic Aromatic Kaiser, Ralf I. 178 Photofragmentation spectroscopy of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

aromatic nitro compounds: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the reactions of amines with aldehydes and with aromatic nitro - compounds in acetonitrile. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Kinetic and equilibrium studies of...

102

aromatic hydrocarbon carcinogenesis: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Ecology Websites Summary: ), and there are oil refineries on the shore. In this environment, input of aromatic hydrocarbons from petroleum and the Yarra River Estuary J. David...

103

Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

All-Metal Aromaticity and Antiaromaticity. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre theAdministratorCFMFusionReview Off-site JanuaryAromaticity

105

Fluid extraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

UTILIZATION OF LOW NOx COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low NO{sub x} combustion practices are critical for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from power plants. These low NO{sub x} combustion practices, however, generate high residual carbon contents in the fly ash produced. These high carbon contents threaten utilization of this combustion by-product. This research has successfully developed a separation technology to render fly ash into useful, quality-controlled materials. This technology offers great flexibility and has been shown to be applicable to all of the fly ashes tested (more than 10). The separated materials can be utilized in traditional fly ash applications, such as cement and concrete, as well as in nontraditional applications such as plastic fillers, metal matrix composites, refractories, and carbon adsorbents. Technologies to use beneficiated fly ash in these applications are being successfully developed. In the future, we will continue to refine the separation and utilization technologies to expand the utilization of fly ash. The disposal of more than 31 million tons of fly ash per year is an important environmental issue. With continued development, it will be possible to increase economic, energy and environmental benefits by re-directing more of this fly ash into useful materials.

J.Y. Hwang; X. Huang; M.G. McKimpson; R.E. Tieder; A.M. Hein; J.M. Gillis; D.C. Popko; K.L. Paxton; Z. Li; X. Liu; X. Song; R.I. Kramer

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

.. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in nearshore marine sediments of Australia*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

143 . .. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in nearshore marine sediments of Australia* W.A. Maher and J. Aislabiet Water Research Centre, University of Canberra, PO Box /, Belconnen,ACT 26/6, Australia aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in nearshore marine sediments of Australia isdiscussed. Available information

Canberra, University of

108

Case Study of Optimal Byproduct Gas Distribution in Integrated Steel Mill Using Multi-Period Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? ? ? Case Study of Optimal Byproduct Gas Distribution in Integrated Steel Mill Using Multi-Period Optimization KIMMO M?KINEN BUSINESS MANAGER TONI KYM?L?INEN PRODUCT MANAGER JAAKKO JUNTTILA SALES MANAGER ABB OY HELSINKI FINLAND...

Makinen, K.; Kymalainen, T.; Junttila, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

atmospheric oxidation by-products: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utilization Engineering Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied...

110

arc-induced toxic by-products: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utilization Engineering Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied...

111

animal protein by-products: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utilization Engineering Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied...

112

Conversion of high carbon refinery by-products. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the project is to demonstrate that a partial oxidation system, which utilizes a transport reactor, is a viable means of converting refinery wastes, byproducts, and other low value materials into valuable products. The primary product would be a high quality fuel gas, which could also be used as a source of hydrogen. The concept involves subjecting the hydrocarbon feed to pyrolysis and steam gasification in a circulating bed of solids. Carbon residue formed during pyrolysis, as well as metals in the feed, are captured by the circulating solids which are returned to the bottom of the transport reactor. Air or oxygen is introduced in this lower zone and sufficient carbon is burned, sub-stoichiometrically, to provide the necessary heat for the endothermic pyrolysis and gasification reactions. The hot solids and gases leaving this zone pass upward to contact the feed material and continue the gasification process. The Transport Reactor Test Unit (TRTU) was commissioned to conduct studies on pyrolysis of Rose Bottoms using spent FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracker) catalyst as the circulating medium and gasification of this carbon over a temperature range of 1,600 to 1,700 F. The Rose Bottoms (Residuum Oil Supercritical Extraction) was produced in the Rose unit. Studies were done in the Bench Scale Reactor Unit (BRU) to develop suitable catalyst formulations and to study the steam reforming of methane and propane in support of the experiments to be conducted in the TRTU. Studies were also conducted on gasification of coke breeze, petroleum cokes and carbon deposited on FCC catalyst. The catalytic effect of potassium on gasification of these solids was studied. Studies were conducted in the CFS (cold flow simulator) to investigate flow problems experienced in the TRTU. Results from these studies are presented in this report.

Katta, S.; Henningsen, G.; Lin, Y.Y.; O`Donnell, J.

1996-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic compounds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Science, Office of Summary: Sciences. Renewable Aromatics and Olefins from Solid Biomass by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: Design of New... into aromatics and olefins with...

114

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic rings synthesis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Science, Office of Summary: Sciences. Renewable Aromatics and Olefins from Solid Biomass by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: Design of New... into aromatics and olefins with...

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic compounds part Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Energy Innovation, an Energy... Sciences. Renewable Aromatics and Olefins from Solid Biomass by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: Design of New... into aromatics and olefins with...

116

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic compounds derived Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Science, Office of Summary: Sciences. Renewable Aromatics and Olefins from Solid Biomass by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: Design of New... into aromatics and olefins with...

117

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic molecules suggested Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results have shown that these new... Sciences. Renewable Aromatics and Olefins from Solid Biomass by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: Design of New... into aromatics and olefins with...

118

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic c48n12 azafullerene Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Science, Office of Summary: Sciences. Renewable Aromatics and Olefins from Solid Biomass by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: Design of New... into aromatics and olefins with...

119

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic blending compounds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Science, Office of Summary: Sciences. Renewable Aromatics and Olefins from Solid Biomass by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: Design of New... into aromatics and olefins with...

120

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic compounds progress Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Science, Office of Summary: Sciences. Renewable Aromatics and Olefins from Solid Biomass by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: Design of New... into aromatics and olefins with...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic compound mixtures Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Science, Office of Summary: Sciences. Renewable Aromatics and Olefins from Solid Biomass by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: Design of New... into aromatics and olefins with...

122

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic compounds effects Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Science, Office of Summary: Sciences. Renewable Aromatics and Olefins from Solid Biomass by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: Design of New... into aromatics and olefins with...

123

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic molecules mini-review Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results have shown that these new... Sciences. Renewable Aromatics and Olefins from Solid Biomass by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: Design of New... into aromatics and olefins with...

124

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic geranyl derivatives Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Science, Office of Summary: Sciences. Renewable Aromatics and Olefins from Solid Biomass by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: Design of New... into aromatics and olefins with...

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic substitution reaction Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Science, Office of Summary: Sciences. Renewable Aromatics and Olefins from Solid Biomass by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: Design of New... into aromatics and olefins with...

126

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic reactive intermediates Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and allene as intermediates... Sciences. Renewable Aromatics and Olefins from Solid Biomass by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: Design of New... into aromatics and olefins with...

127

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic molecules application Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results have shown that these new... Sciences. Renewable Aromatics and Olefins from Solid Biomass by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: Design of New... into aromatics and olefins with...

128

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons alcohols Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mathematics 29 UV Irradiation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Ices Summary: UV Irradiation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Ices: Production of Alcohols,...

129

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon contamination Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: called aromatic hydrocarbons. These include harmful pollutants like dioxins, PCBs and a group called... polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs are...

130

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon-exposed lung Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in non-smoking and smoking lung cancer... of the fetus. These mutageniccarcinogenic pollutants include aromatic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic... of transplacental exposure...

131

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient polycyclic aromatic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Adducts in Mothers Summary: . Exposure to genotoxins present in ambient air in Bangkok, Thailand: particle associated polycyclic aromatic... DNA Damage from Polycyclic Aromatic...

132

Utilization of by-products from alkaline hydroxide preservation of whole broiler carcasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UTILIZATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM ALKALINE HYDROXIDE PRESERVATION OF WHOLE BROILER CARCASSES A Thesis by TRUITT PRESTON NIEMEYER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2002 Major Subject: Poultry Science UTILIZATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM ALKALINE HYDROXIDE PRESERVATION OF WHOLE BROILER CARCASSES A Thesis by TRUITT PRESTON NIEMEYER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies...

Niemeyer, Truitt Preston

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Optimum energy and by-product recovery in chlorinated hydrocarbon disposal systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper covers the three principal areas of a chlorinated hydrocarbon waste disposal system for a typical vinyl chloride monomer facility. These are the incineration, the energy recovery system, and the by-product recovery system. It is shown that the overall efficiency of the energy and by-product recovery systems is dependent on the optimization of the primary combustor (incineration system). 11 refs.

Santoleri, J.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Land application uses for dry flue gas desulfurization by-products: Phase 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbing technologies create a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction product that contains sulfate and sulfite, and coal fly ash. Generally, dry FGD by-products are treated as solid wastes and disposed in landfills. However, landfill sites are becoming scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. Provided the environmental impacts are socially and scientifically acceptable, beneficial uses via recycling can provide economic benefits to both the producer and the end user of the FGD. A study titled ''Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products'' was initiated in December, 1990 to develop and demonstrate large volume, beneficial uses of FGD by-products. Phase 1 and Phase 2 reports have been published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA. Phase 3 objectives were to demonstrate, using field studies, the beneficial uses of FGD by-products (1) as an amendment material on agricultural lands and on abandoned surface coal mine land, (2) as an engineering material for soil stabilization and raid repair, and (3) to assess the environmental and economic impacts of such beneficial uses. Application of dry FGD by-product to three soils in place of agricultural limestone increased alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and corn (Zea may L.) yields. No detrimental effects on soil and plant quality were observed.

Dick, W.; Bigham, J.; Forster, R.; Hitzhusen, F.; Lal, R.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.; Haefner, R.; Rowe, G.

1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the second six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts and examination of carbon material, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking. Investigation of coal extraction as a method to produce RCO continues; the reactor modifications to filter the products hot and to do multi-stage extraction improve extraction yields from {approx}50 % to {approx}70%. Carbon characterization of co-cokes for use as various carbon artifacts continues.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre' Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2006-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

136

DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand environmental and cost-effective strategies for the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs), mainly unburned carbon in fly ash. Unburned carbon is nowadays regarded as a waste product and its fate is mainly disposal, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, the principal objective of this work was to characterize and utilize the unburned carbon in fly ash for the production of activated carbons. The unburned carbon samples were collected from different combustion systems, including pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone, a stoker, and a fluidized bed combustor. LOI (loss-on-ignition), proximate, ultimate, and petrographic analyses were conducted, and the surface areas of the samples were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The LOIs of the unburned carbon samples varied between 21.79-84.52%. The proximate analyses showed that all the samples had very low moisture contents (0.17 to 3.39 wt %), while the volatile matter contents varied between 0.45 to 24.82 wt%. The elemental analyses show that all the unburned carbon samples consist mainly of carbon with very little hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen In addition, the potential use of unburned carbon as precursor for activated carbon (AC) was investigated. Activated carbons with specific surface area up to 1075m{sup 2}/g were produced from the unburned carbon. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was related to the properties of the unburned carbon feedstock and the activation conditions used. It was found that not all the unburned carbon samples are equally suited for activation, and furthermore, their potential as activated carbons precursors could be inferred from their physical and chemical properties. The developed porosity of the activated carbon was a function of the oxygen content, porosity and H/C ratio of the parent unburned carbon feedstock. It was observed that extended activation times and high activation temperatures increased the porosity of the produced activated carbon at the expense of the solid yield. The development of activated carbon from unburned carbon in fly ash has been proven to be a success by this study in terms of the higher surface areas of the resultant activated carbons, which are comparable with commercial activated carbons. However, unburned carbon samples obtained from coal-fired power plants as by-product have high ash content, which is unwanted for the production of activated carbons. Therefore, the separation of unburned carbon from the fly ash is expected to be beneficial for the utilization of unburned carbon to produce activated carbons with low ash content.

Harold H. Schobert; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

137

Detoxification of aromatic pollutants by fungal enzymes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fungal enzymes, such as laccase, peroxidase, and tyrosinase, play a prominent role in catalyzing the transformation of various aromatic compounds in the environment. The enzyme-mediated oxidative coupling reaction results in covalent binding of chlorinated phenols and anilines to soil organic matter or polymerization of the substrates in aquatic systems. Both of these processes are accompanied by a detoxification effect. Therefore, it has been postulated that they be exploited for the treatment of polluted soil and water. The mechanism and efficiency of oxidative coupling in pollutant removal were studied by incubation of chlorinated phenols and anilines with various humic substances or soil and analysis of the reaction products by chromatography and mass and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. The decontamination effect could be enhanced by optimization of the reaction conditions and immobilization of enzymes on solid materials. The results obtained strongly support the concept of using enzymes for control of environmental pollution.

Bollag, J.M.; Dec, J. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Land application uses for dry FGD by-products, Phase 1 report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. It is highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. The results indicated the chemical composition of the FGD by-product materials were dominated by Ca, S, Al, and Si. Many of the elements regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency reside primarily in the fly ash. Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD by-product materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Land application uses for dry FGD by-products. Phase 2 report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was initiated in December 1990 to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products. A Phase 1 report provided results of an extensive characterization of chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of 58 dry FGD by-product samples. The Phase 1 report concluded that high volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics related to their ability to substitute for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mine lands). Phase 2 objectives were (1) to conduct laboratory and greenhouse studies of FGD and soil (spoil) mixtures for agronomic and engineering applications, (2) to initiate field studies related to high volume agronomic and engineering uses, and (3) to develop the basic methodological framework for estimation of the financial and economic costs and benefits to society of several FGD reuse options and to make some preliminary runs of economic models. High volume beneficial reuses of dry FGD by-products have been successfully demonstrated. Adverse environmental impacts have been negligible. Although few sources of dry FGD by-products currently exist in Ohio and the United States there is potential for smaller coal-fired facilities to adopt S0{sub 2} scrubbing technologies that produce dry FGD material. Also much of what we have learned from studies on dry FGD by-products is applicable to the more prevalent wet FGD by-products. The adaptation of the technologies demonstrated in this project seem to be not only limited by economic constraints, but even more so, by the need to create awareness of the market potential of using these FGD by-products.

Stehouwer, R.; Dick, W.; Bigham, J. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Environmentally Safe, Large Volume Utilization Applications for Gasification Byproducts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples of gasification by-products produced at Polk Station and Eastman Chemical were obtained and characterized. Bulk samples were prepared for utilization studies by screening at the appropriate size fractions where char and vitreous frit distinctly partitioned. Vitreous frit was concentrated in the +20 mesh fraction while char predominated in the -20+100 mesh fraction. The vitreous frit component derived from each gasifier slag source was evaluated for use as a pozzolan and as aggregate. Pozzolan testing required grinding the frit to very fine sizes which required a minimum of 60 kwhr/ton. Grinding studies showed that the energy requirement for grinding the Polk slag were slightly higher than for the Eastman slag. Fine-ground slag from both gasifiers showed pozzoalnic activity in mortar cube testing and met the ASTM C618 strength requirements after only 3 days. Pozzolanic activity was further examined using British Standard 196-5, and results suggest that the Polk slag was more reactive than the Eastman slag. Neither aggregate showed significant potential for undergoing alkali-silica reactions when used as concrete aggregate with ASTM test method 1260. Testing was conducted to evaluate the use of the frit product as a component of cement kiln feed. The clinker produced was comprised primarily of the desirable components Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5} and Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} after raw ingredient proportions were adjusted to reduce the amount of free lime present in the clinker. A mobile processing plant was designed to produce 100 tons of carbon from the Eastman slag to conduct evaluations for use as recycle fuel. The processing plant was mounted on a trailer and hauled to the site for use. Two product stockpiles were generated; the frit stockpile contained 5% LOI while the carbon stockpile contained 62% LOI. The products were used to conduct recycle fuel tests. A processing plant was designed to separate the slag produced at Eastman into 3 usable products. The coarse frit has been shown to be suitable for use as clinker feed for producing Portland cement. The intermediate-size product is enriched in carbon (58-62% C) and may be used as recycle fuel either in the gasifier or in a PC boiler. The fines product contains 30-40% C and may also be used as a recycle gasifier fuel, as is presently done at TECO's Polk Station, however, due to gasifier operating requirements for the production of syngas, this is not feasible at Eastman.

J.G. Groppo; R. Rathbone

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Design manual for management of solid by-products from advanced coal technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing coal conversion technologies face major obstacles in byproduct management. This project has developed several management strategies based on field trials of small-scale landfills in an earlier phase of the project, as well as on published/unpublished sources detailing regulatory issues, current industry practice, and reuse opportunities. Field testing, which forms the basis for several of the disposal alternatives presented in this design manual, was limited to byproducts from Ca-based dry SO{sub 2} control technologies, circulating fluidized bed combustion ash, and bubbling bed fluidized bed combustion ash. Data on byproducts from other advanced coal technologies and on reuse opportunities are drawn from other sources (citations following Chapter 3). Field results from the 5 test cases examined under this project, together with results from other ongoing research, provide a basis for predictive modeling of long-term performance of some advanced coal byproducts on exposure to ambient environment. This manual is intended to provide a reference database and development plan for designing, permitting, and operating facilities where advanced coal technology byproducts are managed.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Biodegradability of select polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (pah) mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are environmentally significant because of their ubiquity and the toxicity of some. Their recalcitrance and persistence makes them problematic environmental contaminants. Microbial degradation is considered...

Desai, Anuradha M.

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

143

aromatic hydrocarbon emissions: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Detection of mid-infrared Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission Features from the Small Magellanic Cloud Astrophysics...

144

aromatic hydrocarbon emission: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Detection of mid-infrared Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission Features from the Small Magellanic Cloud Astrophysics...

145

Technologies for Extracting Valuable Metals and Compounds from Geothermal Fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary Simbol Materials studied various methods of extracting valuable minerals from geothermal brines in the Imperial Valley of California, focusing on the extraction of lithium, manganese, zinc and potassium. New methods were explored for managing the potential impact of silica fouling on mineral extraction equipment, and for converting silica management by-products into commercial products.` Studies at the laboratory and bench scale focused on manganese, zinc and potassium extraction and the conversion of silica management by-products into valuable commercial products. The processes for extracting lithium and producing lithium carbonate and lithium hydroxide products were developed at the laboratory scale and scaled up to pilot-scale. Several sorbents designed to extract lithium as lithium chloride from geothermal brine were developed at the laboratory scale and subsequently scaled-up for testing in the lithium extraction pilot plant. Lithium The results of the lithium studies generated the confidence for Simbol to scale its process to commercial operation. The key steps of the process were demonstrated during its development at pilot scale: 1. Silica management. 2. Lithium extraction. 3. Purification. 4. Concentration. 5. Conversion into lithium hydroxide and lithium carbonate products. Results show that greater than 95% of the lithium can be extracted from geothermal brine as lithium chloride, and that the chemical yield in converting lithium chloride to lithium hydroxide and lithium carbonate products is greater than 90%. The product purity produced from the process is consistent with battery grade lithium carbonate and lithium hydroxide. Manganese and zinc Processes for the extraction of zinc and manganese from geothermal brine were developed. It was shown that they could be converted into zinc metal and electrolytic manganese dioxide after purification. These processes were evaluated for their economic potential, and at the present time Simbol Materials is evaluating other products with greater commercial value. Potassium Silicotitanates, zeolites and other sorbents were evaluated as potential reagents for the extraction of potassium from geothermal brines and production of potassium chloride (potash). It was found that zeolites were effective at removing potassium but the capacity of the zeolites and the form that the potassium is in does not have economic potential. Iron-silica by-product The conversion of iron-silica by-product produced during silica management operations into more valuable materials was studied at the laboratory scale. Results indicate that it is technically feasible to convert the iron-silica by-product into ferric chloride and ferric sulfate solutions which are precursors to a ferric phosphate product. However, additional work to purify the solutions is required to determine the commercial viability of this process. Conclusion Simbol Materials is in the process of designing its first commercial plant based on the technology developed to the pilot scale during this project. The investment in the commercial plant is hundreds of millions of dollars, and construction of the commercial plant will generate hundreds of jobs. Plant construction will be completed in 2016 and the first lithium products will be shipped in 2017. The plant will have a lithium carbonate equivalent production capacity of 15,000 tonnes per year. The gross revenues from the project are expected to be approximately $ 80 to 100 million annually. During this development program Simbol grew from a company of about 10 people to over 60 people today. Simbol is expected to employ more than 100 people once the plant is constructed. Simbol Materials business is scalable in the Imperial Valley region because there are eleven geothermal power plants already in operation, which allows Simbol to expand its business from one plant to multiple plants. Additionally, the scope of the resource is vast in terms of potential products such as lithium, manganese and zinc and potentially potassium.

Harrison, Stephen [SIMBOL Materials

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

New correlation accurately calculates water solubilities of aromatics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new correlation calculates reliable aromatics solubilities in water down to very low concentrations. The correlation, based on boiling point, can be used for initial engineering studies. The importance of hydrocarbon solubility in water is increasing because of health, safety, and environmental issues. The paper begins with a discussion of the importance of solubility, even at low concentrations. The new correlation is described, aromatics are compared with paraffins, and the new correlation is compared with the API correlation.

Yaws, C.L.; Bu, L.; Nijhawan, S. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States))

1994-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

147

Emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emission of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) listed as U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) priority pollutants from major sources in China were compiled. Geographical distribution and temporal change of the PAH emission, as well as emission profiles, are discussed. It was estimated that the total PAH emission in China was 25,300 tons in 2003. The emission profile featured a relatively higher portion of high molecular weight (HMW) species with carcinogenic potential due to large contributions of domestic coal and coking industry. Among various sources, biomass burning, domestic coal combustion, and the coking industry contributed 60%, 20%, and 16% of the total emission, respectively. Total emission, emission density, emission intensity, and emission per capita showed geographical variations. In general, the southeastern provinces were characterized by higher emission density, while those in western and northern China featured higher emission intensity and population-normalized emission. Although energy consumption in China went up continuously during the past two decades, annual emission of PAHs fluctuated depending on the amount of domestic coal consumption, coke production, and the efficiency of energy utilization. 47 refs., 6 figs.

Shanshan Xu; Wenxin Liu; Shu Tao [Peking University, Beijing (China). Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Environmental Sciences

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

RESIDUES FROM COAL CONVERSION AND UTILIZATION: ADVANCED MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND DISPOSED BYPRODUCT DIAGENESIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of the project are two-fold: (1) to upgrade semi-quantitative X-ray diffraction (QXRD) methods presently used in analyzing complex coal combustion by-product (CCB) systems, with the quantitative Rietveld method, and (2) to apply this method to a set of by-product materials that have been disposed or utilized for a long period (5 years or more) in contact with the natural environment, to further study the nature of CCB diagenesis. The project is organized into three tasks to accomplish these two goals: (1) thorough characterization of a set of previously analyzed disposed by-product materials, (2) development of a set of CCB-specific protocols for Rietveld QXRD, and (3) characterization of an additional set of disposed CCB materials, including application of the protocols for Rietveld QXRD developed in Task 2.

Gregory J. McCarthy; Dean G. Grier

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

IGCC and PFBC By-Products: Generation, Characteristics, and Management Practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following report is a compilation of data on by-products/wastes from clean coal technologies, specifically integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC). DOE had two objectives in providing this information to EPA: (1) to familiarize EPA with the DOE CCT program, CCT by-products, and the associated efforts by DOE contractors in the area of CCT by-product management and (2) to provide information that will facilitate EPA's effort by complementing similar reports from industry groups, including CIBO (Council of Industrial Boiler Owners) and EEI USWAG (Edison Electric Institute Utility Solid Waste Activities Group). The EERC cooperated and coordinated with DOE CCT contractors and industry groups to provide the most accurate and complete data on IGCC and PFBC by-products, although these technologies are only now being demonstrated on the commercial scale through the DOE CCT program.

Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Manganese peroxidase mRNA and enzyme activity levels during bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil with Phanerochaete chrysosporium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

mRNA extraction from soil and quantitation by competitive reverse transcription-PCR were combined to study the expression of three manganese peroxidase (MnP) genes during removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium grown in presterilized soil. Periods of high mnp transcript levels and extractable MnP enzyme activity were temporally correlated, although separated by a short (1- to 2-day) lag period. This time frame also coincided with maximal rates of fluorene oxidation and chrysene disappearance in soil cultures, supporting the hypothesis that high ionization potential polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are oxidized in soil via MnP-dependent mechanisms. The patterns of transcript abundance over time in soil-grown P. chrysosporium were similar for all three of the mnp mRNAs studied, indicating that transcription of this gene family may be coordinately regulated under these growth conditions. 47 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Bogan, B.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Schoenike, B.; Lamar, R.T.; Cullen, D. [Forest Service Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN KAZAKHASTAN: USING OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION BY-PRODUCT SULFUR FOR COST-EFFECTIVE SECONDARY END-USE PRODUCTS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Republic of Kazakhstan is continuing to develop its extensive petroleum reserves in the Tengiz region of the northeastern part of the Caspian Sea. Large quantities of by-product sulfur are being produced as a result of the removal of hydrogen sulfide from the oil and gas produced in the region. Lack of local markets and economic considerations limit the traditional outlets for by-product sulfur and the buildup of excess sulfur is a becoming a potential economic and environmental liability. Thus, new applications for re-use of by-product sulfur that will benefit regional economies including construction, paving and waste treatment are being developed. One promising application involves the cleanup and treatment of mercury at a Kazakhstan chemical plant. During 19 years of operation at the Pavlodar Khimprom chlor-alkali production facility, over 900 tons of mercury was lost to the soil surrounding and beneath the buildings. The Institute of Metallurgy and Ore Benefication (Almaty) is leading a team to develop and demonstrate a vacuum-assisted thermal process to extract the mercury from the soil and concentrate it as pure, elemental mercury, which will then be treated using the Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process. The use of locally produced sulfur will recycle a low-value industrial by-product to treat hazardous waste and render it safe for return to the environment, thereby helping to solve two problems at once. SPSS chemically stabilizes mercury to mercuric sulfide, which has a low vapor pressure and low solubility, and then physically encapsulates the material in a durable, monolithic solid sulfur polymer matrix. Thus, mercury is placed in a solid form very much like stable cinnabar, the form in which it is found in nature. Previous research and development has shown that the process can successfully encapsulate up to 33 wt% mercury in the solid form, while still meeting very strict regulatory standards for leachable mercury (0.025 mg/l in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure). The research and development to deploy Kazakhstan recycled sulfur for secondary applications described in this paper is being conducted with support from the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) and the U.S. Department of Energy Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (DOE IPP).

KALB, P.D.; VAGIN, S.; BEALL, P.W.; LEVINTOV, B.L.

2004-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

152

Review Chlorination Disinfection By-Products in Drinking Water and Congenital Anomalies: Review and Meta-Analyses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Objectives: The aim of this study was to review epidemiologic evidence, provide summary risk estimates of the association between exposure to chlorination disinfection by-products (DBPs) and congenital anomalies, and provide recommendations for future studies. Data s o u r c e s a n d extraction: We included all published epidemiologic studies that evaluated a relationship between an index of DBP exposure (treatment, water source, DBP measurements, and both DBP measurements and personal characteristics) and risk of congenital anomalies. When three or more studies examined the same exposure index and congenital anomaly, we conducted a metaanalysis to obtain a summary risk estimate comparing the highest exposure group with the lowest exposure group. When five or more studies examined total trihalomethane (TTHM) exposure and a specific congenital anomaly, we conducted a meta-analysis to obtain exposureresponse risk estimates per 10 g/L TTHM. Data synthesis: For all congenital anomalies combined, the meta-analysis gave a statistically significant excess risk for high versus low exposure to water chlorination or TTHM [17%; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 334] based on a small number of studies. The meta-analysis also suggested a statistically significant excess risk for ventricular septal defects (58%; 95 % CI, 21107), but this was

Mark J. Nieuwenhuijsen; David Martinez; James Grellier; James Bennett; Nicky Best; Nina Iszatt; Martine Vrijheid; Mireille B. Toledano

153

Phase behavior of CO{sub 2}/crude oil mixtures in supercritical fluid extraction system: Experimental data and modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuous multiple-contact extractions of a crude oil were carried out with supercritical CO{sub 2} in order to assess the effect of the density and critical point of a solvent on the extraction performance as a function of process variables. Most of the extraction performance was solvent density dependent. In the vicinity of the critical point of CO{sub 2}, however, the solvent density was not the only parameter that governed extraction yields. The results of simulated distillation and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses of extracts represented that the earlier extracts contained lighter compounds and the latter extracts contained progressively heavier compounds. As the extraction proceeded, relatively greater amounts of paraffinic compounds and lesser amounts of naphthenic and aromatic compounds were extracted. This compositional change occurring during a dynamic extraction was also ascertained by phase equilibrium calculations using the Soave-Redlich-Kwong equation of state and a component-lumping procedure.

Hwang, J. [Kyung In Energy Co., Inchon (Korea, Republic of). R and D Center; Park, S.J. [Dongguk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Advanced Byproduct Recovery: Direct Catalytic Reduction of Sulfur Dioxide to Elemental Sulfur.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 170 wet scrubber systems applied, to 72,000 MW of U.S., coal-fired, utility boilers are in operation or under construction. In these systems, the sulfur dioxide removed from the boiler flue gas is permanently bound to a sorbent material, such as lime or limestone. The sulfated sorbent must be disposed of as a waste product or, in some cases, sold as a byproduct (e.g. gypsum). Due to the abundance and low cost of naturally occurring gypsum, and the costs associated with producing an industrial quality product, less than 7% of these scrubbers are configured to produce usable gypsum (and only 1% of all units actually sell the byproduct). The disposal of solid waste from each of these scrubbers requires a landfill area of approximately 200 to 400 acres. In the U.S., a total of 19 million tons of disposable FGD byproduct are produced, transported and disposed of in landfills annually. The use of regenerable sorbent technologies has the potential to reduce or eliminate solid waste production, transportation and disposal. In a regenerable sorbent system, the sulfur dioxide in the boiler flue gas is removed by the sorbent in an adsorber. The S0{sub 2}s subsequently released, in higher concentration, in a regenerator. All regenerable systems produce an off-gas stream from the regenerator that must be processed further in order to obtain a salable byproduct, such as elemental sulfur, sulfuric acid or liquid S0{sub 2}.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Succinic Acid Production with Reduced By-Product Formation in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Succinic Acid Production with Reduced By-Product Formation in the Fermentation; accepted 13 July 2000 Abstract: Succinic acid was produced by fermentation of Anaerobiospirillum-product acetic acid. The gram ratio of suc- cinic acid to acetic acid was 25.8:1, which is 6.5 times higher than

156

1 Solvent-Extractable Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Biochar: 2 Influence of Pyrolysis Temperature and Feedstock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion (or 30 pyrolysis) of plant biomass are important natural constituents 31 of soils and sediments.1 45 different starting materials. 46 Pyrolysis of biomass is known to produce a wide variety of 47 low and high molecular weight (LMW and HMW, respectively) 48 PAHs depending on the biomass type, pyrolysis

157

Bacterial mutagenicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in reconstituted mixtures and crude coal tar extracts and fractions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

factors which assume additive interactions between individual PAHS. The mutagenic interactions of PAH mixtures were investigated using the Salmonellalmicrosome assay. Two groups of samples included PAH mixtures modeling a coal tar and an environmental...

Onufrock, Amy Mildred

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

159

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic side chain Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

side chain Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aromatic side chain Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Role of Aromatic Side Chains in the...

160

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic amine p-anilinoaniline Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1H, aromatic), 6.86 (m, 2H, aromatic), 4.52 (s, 2H, amine), 3.92 (s... with stearoyl chloride to yield compound 6. The two nitro groups were hydrogenated to afford di-amine 7......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Development of genetically engineered bacteria for production of selected aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The cloning and expression of genes in the common aromatic pathway of E. coli are described. A compound for which chorismate, the final product of the common aromatic pathway, is an anabolic intermediate can be produced by cloning and expressing selected genes of the common aromatic pathway and the genes coding for enzymes necessary to convert chorismate to the selected compound. Plasmids carrying selected genes of the common aromatic pathway are also described.

Ward, Thomas E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Watkins, Carolyn S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bulmer, Deborah K. (Henderson, NV); Johnson, Bruce F. (Scotia, NY); Amaratunga, Mohan (Clifton Park, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons fluorene Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrocarbons... Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous organic pollutants in urban environments... in the urbanized and rapidly urbanizing areas. Keywords...

163

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrocarbons... Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous organic pollutants in urban environments... in the urbanized and rapidly urbanizing areas. Keywords...

164

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons pah5 Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous, recalcitrant, and potentially carcinogenic pollutants. Plants Summary: 1461 Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous,...

165

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons inenvironmental Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrocarbons... Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous organic pollutants in urban environments... in the urbanized and rapidly urbanizing areas. Keywords...

166

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon o-quinones Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrocarbons... Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous organic pollutants in urban environments... in the urbanized and rapidly urbanizing areas. Keywords...

167

E-Print Network 3.0 - astronomical polycyclic aromatic Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrocarbons... Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous organic pollutants in urban environments... in the urbanized and rapidly urbanizing areas. Keywords...

168

Formation mechanism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in methane flames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formation mechanism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in methane flames K. Siegmanna) Swiss 96822 Received 24 August 1999; accepted 13 October 1999 A laminar diffusion flame of methane exhausts,7­17 coal-fired, electricity generating power plants,18,19 tobacco smoke,20 residential wood

Sattler, Klaus

169

FROM INTERSTELLAR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND ICE TO ASTROBIOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

photolysis of these ices produces a host of new compounds, some of which show intriguing prebiotic behavior1 FROM INTERSTELLAR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND ICE TO ASTROBIOLOGY LOUIS J. ALLAMANDOLA, the concept of ices in dense molecular clouds ignored, and the notion of large, abundant, gas phase, carbon

170

Physical Models of Noncovalent Interactions Involving Aromatic Rings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-aromatic rings are often quite favourable. For example, the above computed interaction energies for model ethene-benzene and butadiene-benzene complexes are substantial (0.85 and 1.50 kcal mol1 for ethene and butadiene, respectively). In the latter case...

Bloom, Jacob Walter Goldstein

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

171

Aggregation Behavior of Two Asphaltenic Fractions in Aromatic Solvents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aggregation Behavior of Two Asphaltenic Fractions in Aromatic Solvents Rahoma S. Mohamed* and Anto. The results indicated possible asphaltene aggregation as well as the probable existence of critical micelle fraction. Average molecular areas for asphaltenes adsorbed at different interfaces estimated from surface

Loh, Watson

172

Sulfur by-product formation in the Stretford process. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid redox sulfur recovery processes remove H2S from sour gas streams and produce elemental sulfur for sale or disposal. The Stretford Process is one of the oldest commercial liquid redox processes and it is based on a vanadium and anthraquinone redox system. Improvements in the operability and reliability of the Stretford process would be beneficial to the process user. The report presents results of research focused on developing an understanding of the process parameters and factors that impact sulfur by-product formation (e.g., sodium thiosulfate and sodium sulfate) in the Stretford process. The information in the report can help current Stretford plant process users better understand the operations of their plants, especially with regards to sulfur by-product formation and control strategies.

Trofe, T.W.; DeBerry, D.W.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Solar Grade Silicon from Agricultural By-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, Mayaterials developed a low cost, low energy and low temperature method of purifying rice hull ash to high purity (5-6Ns) and converting it by carbothermal reduction to solar grade quality silicon (Sipv) using a self-designed and built electric arc furnace (EAF). Outside evaluation of our process by an independent engineering firm confirms that our technology greatly lowers estimated operating expenses (OPEX) to $5/kg and capital expenses (CAPEX) to $24/kg for Sipv production, which is well below best-in-class plants using a Siemens process approach (OPEX of 14/kg and CAPEX of $87/kg, respectively). The primary limiting factor in the widespread use of photovoltaic (PV) cells is the high cost of manufacturing, compared to more traditional sources to reach 6 g Sipv/watt (with averages closer to 8+g/watt). In 2008, the spot price of Sipv rose to $450/kg. While prices have since dropped to a more reasonable $25/kg; this low price level is not sustainable, meaning the longer-term price will likely return to $35/kg. The 6-8 g Si/watt implies that the Sipv used in a module will cost $0.21-0.28/watt for the best producers (45% of the cost of a traditional solar panel), a major improvement from the cost/wafer driven by the $50/kg Si costs of early 2011, but still a major hindrance in fulfilling DOE goal of lowering the cost of solar energy below $1/watt. The solar cell industry has grown by 40% yearly for the past eight years, increasing the demand for Sipv. As such, future solar silicon price spikes are expected in the next few years. Although industry has invested billions of dollars to meet this ever-increasing demand, the technology to produce Sipv remains largely unchanged requiring the energy intensive, and chlorine dependent Siemens process or variations thereof. While huge improvements have been made, current state-of-the-art industrial plant still use 65 kWh/kg of silicon purified. Our technology offers a key distinction to other technologies as it starts one step upstream from all other Sipv production efforts. Our process starts by producing high purity SiO2/C feedstocks from which Sipv can be produced in a single, chlorine free, final EAF step. Specifically, our unique technology, and the resultant SiO2/C product can serve as high purity feedstocks to existing metallurgical silicon (Simet) producers, allowing them to generate Sipv with existing US manufacturing infrastructure, reducing the overall capital and commissioning schedule. Our low energy, low CAPEX and OPEX process purifies the silica and carbon present in rice hull ash (RHA) at low temperatures (< 200C) to produce high purity (5-6 Ns) feedstock for production of Sipv using furnaces similar to those used to produce Simet. During the course of this project we partnered with Wadham Energy LP (Wadham), who burns 220k ton of rice hulls (RH)/yr generating 200 GWh of electricity/yr and >30k ton/yr RHA. The power generation step produces much more energy (42 kWh/kg of final silicon produced) than required to purify the RHA (5 kWh/kg of Sipv, compared to 65 kWh/kg noted above. Biogenic silica offers three very important foundations for producing high purity silicon. First, wastes from silica accumulating plants, such as rice, corn, many grasses, algae and grains, contain very reactive, amorphous silica from which impurities are easily removed. Second, plants take up only a limited set of, and minimal quantities of the heavy metals present in nature, meaning fewer minerals must be removed. Third, biomass combustion generates a product with intrinsic residual carbon, mixed at nanometer length scales with the SiO2. RHA is 80-90 wt% high surface area (20 m2/g), amorphous SiO2 with some simple mineral content mixed intimately with 5-15 wt% carbon. The mineral content is easily removed by low cost, acid washes using Mayaterials IP, leading to purified rice hull ash (RHAclean) at up to 6N purity. This highly reactive silica is partially extracted from RHAclean at 200 C in an environmentally benign process to adjust SiO2:C ratios to those needed in EA

Richard M. Laine

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

174

Department of Energy plan for recovery and utilization of nuclear byproducts from defense wastes. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear wastes from the defense production cycle contain many uniquely useful, intrinsically valuable, and strategically important materials. These materials have a wide range of known and potential applications in food technology, agriculture, energy, public health, medicine, industrial technology, and national security. Furthermore, their removal from the nuclear waste stream can facilitate waste management and yield economic, safety, and environmental advantages in the management and disposal of the residual nuclear wastes that have no redemptive value. This document is the program plan for implementing the recovery and beneficial use of these valuable materials. An Executive Summary of this document, DOE/DP-0013, Vol. 1, January 1983, is available. Program policy, goals and strategy are stated in Section 2. Implementation tasks, schedule and funding are detailed in Section 3. The remaining five sections and the appendixes provide necessary background information to support these two sections. Section 4 reviews some of the unique properties of the individual byproduct materials and describes both demonstrated and potential applications. The amounts of byproduct materials that are available now for research and demonstration purposes, and the amounts that could be recovered in the future for expanded applications are detailed in Section 5. Section 6 describes the effects byproduct recovery and utilization have on the management and final disposal of nuclear wastes. The institutional issues that affect the recovery, processing and utilization of nuclear byproducts are discussed in Section 7. Finally, Section 8 presents a generalized mathematical process by which applications can be evaluated and prioritized (rank-ordered) to provide planning data for program management.

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

The utilization of flue gas desulfurization waste by-products in construction brick  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPENDIX D. TEST PROCEDURES APPENDIX E. CONVERSION TABLES VITA 85 90 93 96 99 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Model for FGD Waste By-Product Research Unconfined Compressive Strength for Fly Ash Mixed with Various Inductions of Portland Cement 15... properties such as weight, durability, strength, density, etc. Varying mixes of bottom ash, fly ash, portland cement, and sand will be tested for possible enhancement of the hemihydrate. Also, a mix design that best utilizes all the waste by...

Berryman, Charles Wayne

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Long-Term Column Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. The stability of mercury and any co-captured elements in the by-products could have a large economic impact if it reduced by-product sales or increasing their disposal costs. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed continuous leaching of a select subset of the available sample pairs using four leachants: water (pH=5.7), dilute sulfuric acid (pH=1.2), dilute acetic acid (pH=2.9), and sodium carbonate (pH=11.1). This report describes results obtained for mercury, arsenic, and selenium during the 5-month leaching experiments.

Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.; White, Fredrick; Rohar, P.C.; Kim, A.G

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Department of Energy plan for recovery and utilization of nuclear byproducts from defense wastes. Volume 1. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear byproducts are a major national resource that has yet to be incorporated into the economy. The current Defense Byproducts Program is designed to match specific military and commercial needs with the availability of valuable products which are currently treated as waste at considerable expense in waste management costs. This program plan focuses on a few specific areas with the greatest potential for near-term development and application. It also recognizes the need for a continuing effort to develop new applications for byproducts and to continue to assess the impacts on waste management. The entire program has been, and will continue to be structured so as to ensure the safety of the public and maintain the purity of the environment. Social and institutional concerns have been recognized and will be handled appropriately. A significant effort will be undertaken to inform the public of the benefits of byproduct use and of the care being taken to ensure safe, efficient operation.

None

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Joint Test Plan to Identify the Gaseous By-Products of CH3I Loading on AgZ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this test plan is to describe research to determine the gaseous by-products of the adsorption of CH3I on hydrogen reduced silver exchanged mordenite (AgZ).

R. T. Jubin; N. R. Soelberg; D. M. Strachan; T. M. Nenoff; B. B. Spencer

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, May 1995--August 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fourth quarterly report describes work done during the fourth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh`s project on the {open_quotes}Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.{close_quote} Participating with the university on this project are Dravo Lime Company, Mill Service, Inc., and the Center for Hazardous Materials Research. This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focussed upon the production of six sets of samples with high water content for solidification testing and the mixing of five dry samples for solidification testing by the Proctor method. Twenty-eight day compressive strengths are reported for five of the six sets of samples with high water content. The report also discusses completion of the format of the database and the inclusion in it of all data collected to date. Special reports presented during the quarter include the Continuation Application, a News Release, and modification to the Test Plan. Work is progressing on the NEPA report and the Topical Report. The activity on the project during the fourth quarter of Phase one, as presented in the following sections, has fallen into six major areas: (1) Completion of by-product evaluations, (2) Completion of analyses of six wastes, (3) Initiation of eleven solidification tests, (4) Continued extraction and extract analysis of solidified samples, (5) Development of the database, and (6) Production of reports.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Ambient aromatic hydrocarbon measurements at Welgegund, South Africa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aromatic hydrocarbons are associated with direct adverse human health effects and can have negative impacts on ecosystems due to their toxicity, as well as indirect negative effects through the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol that affect human health, crop production and regional climate. Measurements were conducted at the Welgegund measurement station (South Africa) that is considered to be a regionally representative background site. However, the site is occasionally impacted by plumes from major anthropogenic source regions in the interior of South Africa, which include the western Bushveld Igneous Complex (e.g. platinum, base metal and ferrochrome smelters), the eastern Bushveld Igneous Complex (platinum and ferrochrome smelters), the Johannesburg-Pretoria metropolitan conurbation (>10 million people), the Vaal Triangle (e.g. petrochemical and industries), the Mpumalanga Highveld (e.g. coal-fired power plants and petrochemical industry) and also a region of anti-cyclonic recirculation of air mass over the interior of South Africa. The aromatic hydrocarbon measurements were conducted with an automated sampler on Tenax-TA and Carbopack-B adsorbent tubes with heated inlet for one year. Samples were collected twice a week for two hours during daytime and two hours 1 during night-time. A thermal desorption unit, connected to a gas chromatograph and a mass 2 selective detector was used for sample preparation and analysis. Results indicated that the 3 monthly median total aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations ranged between 0.01 to 3.1 ppb. 4 Benzene levels did not exceed local air quality standards. Toluene was the most abundant 5 species, with an annual median concentration of 0.63 ppb. No statistically significant 6 differences in the concentrations measured during daytime and night-time were found and no distinct seasonal patterns were observed. Air mass back trajectory analysis proved that the lack of seasonal cycles could be attributed to patterns determining the origin of the air masses sampled. Aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations were in general significantly higher in air masses that passed over anthropocentrically impacted regions. Interspecies correlations and ratios gave some indications of the possible sources for the different aromatic hydrocarbons in the source regions defined in the paper. The highest contribution of aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations to ozone formation potential was also observed in plumes passing over anthropocentrically impacted regions.

Jaars, K.; Beukes, J. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Venter, A. D.; Josipovic, M.; Pienaar, J. J.; Vakkari, Ville; Aaltonen, H.; Laakso, H.; Kulmala, M.; Tiitta, P.; Guenther, Alex B.; Hellen, H.; Laakso, L.; Hakola, H.

2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Super critical fluid extraction of a crude oil bitumen-derived liquid and bitumen by carbon dioxide and propane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercritical fluid extraction of complex hydrocarbon mixtures is important in separation processes, petroleum upgrading and enhanced oil recovery. In this study, a paraffinic crude oil, a bitumen- derived liquid and bitumen were extracted at several temperatures and pressures with carbon dioxide and propane to assess the effect of the size and type of compounds that makeup the feedstock on the extraction process. It was observed that the pure solvent density at the extraction conditions was not the sole variable governing extraction, and that the proximity of the extraction conditions to the pure solvent critical point affected the extraction yields and the compositions of the extracts. Heavier compounds reported to the extract phase as the extraction time increased at constant temperature and pressure and as the extraction pressure increased at constant temperature and extraction time for both the paraffin crude-propane and the bitumen-propane systems. This preferential extraction was not observed for the bitumen-derived liquid. The non-discriminatory extraction behavior of the bitumen-derived liquid was attributed to its thermal history and to the presence of the olefins and aromatics in the liquid. Phase behavior calculations using the Peng-Robinson equation of state and component lumping procedures provided reasonable agreement between calculated and experimental results for the crude oil and bitumen extractions, but failed in the prediction of the phase compositions for the bitumen-derived liquid extractions.

Deo, M.D.; Hwang, J.; Hanson, F.V.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Super critical fluid extraction of a crude oil bitumen-derived liquid and bitumen by carbon dioxide and propane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercritical fluid extraction of complex hydrocarbon mixtures is important in separation processes, petroleum upgrading and enhanced oil recovery. In this study, a paraffinic crude oil, a bitumen- derived liquid and bitumen were extracted at several temperatures and pressures with carbon dioxide and propane to assess the effect of the size and type of compounds that makeup the feedstock on the extraction process. It was observed that the pure solvent density at the extraction conditions was not the sole variable governing extraction, and that the proximity of the extraction conditions to the pure solvent critical point affected the extraction yields and the compositions of the extracts. Heavier compounds reported to the extract phase as the extraction time increased at constant temperature and pressure and as the extraction pressure increased at constant temperature and extraction time for both the paraffin crude-propane and the bitumen-propane systems. This preferential extraction was not observed for the bitumen-derived liquid. The non-discriminatory extraction behavior of the bitumen-derived liquid was attributed to its thermal history and to the presence of the olefins and aromatics in the liquid. Phase behavior calculations using the Peng-Robinson equation of state and component lumping procedures provided reasonable agreement between calculated and experimental results for the crude oil and bitumen extractions, but failed in the prediction of the phase compositions for the bitumen-derived liquid extractions.

Deo, M.D.; Hwang, J.; Hanson, F.V.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

UNDERGROUNG PLACEMENT OF COAL PROCESSING WASTE AND COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS BASED PASTE BACKFILL FOR ENHANCED MINING ECONOMICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has successfully demonstrated that the extraction ratio in a room-and-pillar panel at an Illinois mine can be increased from the current value of approximately 56% to about 64%, with backfilling done from the surface upon completion of all mining activities. This was achieved without significant ground control problems due to the increased extraction ratio. The mined-out areas were backfilled from the surface with gob, coal combustion by-products (CCBs), and fine coal processing waste (FCPW)-based paste backfill containing 65%-70% solids to minimize short-term and long-term surface deformations risk. This concept has the potential to increase mine productivity, reduce mining costs, manage large volumes of CCBs beneficially, and improve the miner's health, safety, and environment. Two injection holes were drilled over the demonstration panel to inject the paste backfill. Backfilling was started on August 11, 1999 through the first borehole. About 9,293 tons of paste backfill were injected through this borehole with a maximum flow distance of 300-ft underground. On September 27, 2000, backfilling operation was resumed through the second borehole with a mixture of F ash and FBC ash. A high-speed auger mixer (new technology) was used to mix solids with water. About 6,000 tons of paste backfill were injected underground through this hole. Underground backfilling using the ''Groutnet'' flow model was simulated. Studies indicate that grout flow over 300-foot distance is possible. Approximately 13,000 tons of grout may be pumped through a single hole. The effect of backfilling on the stability of the mine workings was analyzed using SIUPANEL.3D computer program and further verified using finite element analysis techniques. Stiffness of the backfill mix is most critical for enhancing the stability of mine workings. Mine openings do not have to be completely backfilled to enhance their stability. Backfill height of about 50% of the seam height is adequate to minimize surface deformations. Freeman United Coal Company performed engineering economic evaluation studies for commercialization. They found that the costs for underground management at the Crown III mine would be slightly higher than surface management at this time. The developed technologies have commercial potential but each site must be analyzed on its merit. The Company maintains significant interest in commercializing the technology.

Y.P. Chugh; D. Biswas; D. Deb

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Determination of small dialkyl organophosphonates at microgram/l concentrations in contaminated groundwaters using multiple extraction membrane disks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Di-isopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP) and dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) are byproducts and surrogates for Sarin (GB) and VX; they are readily quantitated at {mu}g/L concentrations in groundwaters. Liter aqueous samples are fortified with triethylphosphate, then passed through a sandwich of 3 preconditioned extraction disks: glass fiber filter to remove particulates, C{sub 18}-based extraction disk to collect DIMP, and carbon-based extraction disk to collect DMMP. The two extraction disks are dried and extracted with MeOH. After the extract is fortified with with diethyl ethylphosphonate internal standard, it is analyzed using a gas chromatograph with a nitrogen- phosphorus detector. When the pump and treat criterion is used, detection limits for DMMP and DIMP are 2 {mu}g/L. Method recovery is 40-50%, based on synthetic groundwaters containing 0.2-50 {mu}g/L of each analyte. DIMP and DMMP are cleanly resolved.

Tomkins, B.A.; Griest, W.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hearle, D.R. [Parkdale High School, Riverdale, MD (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon distributions in Mississippi Fan sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/ / / / / / glg. 4. Diag~am showing the morphology and lithologic bed associations of a submarine fan (adapted from IIANER, 1971). 16 indicative of land-sourced organic matter even in the intraslope basins. Furthermore, KENNICUTT et ai, (1986a) concluded.... Sandberg, B. A. , University of Colorado Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. James M. Brooks Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) distributions in Upper Pleistocene sediments of the Mississippi Fan and two intraslope basins in the Gulf of Mexico...

Sandberg, William Allan

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

THE INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF NEUTRAL POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mid-infrared spectra of neutral homogeneous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) clusters have been computed using density functional theory including an empirical correction for dispersion. The C-H out-of-plane bending modes are redshifted for all the clusters considered in this work. The magnitude of the redshift and the peak broadening are dependent on PAH size, shape, and on the PAH arrangement in the cluster.

Ricca, Alessandra [Carl Sagan Center, SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Suite 100, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr. [Entry Systems and Technology Division, Mail Stop 230-3, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Allamandola, Louis J., E-mail: Alessandra.Ricca-1@nasa.gov, E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.gov [Space Science Division, Mail Stop 245-6, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

187

Potential for by-product recovery in geothermal energy operations issue paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document identifies and discusses the significant issues raised by the idea of recovering useful by-products from wastes (primarily spent brine) generated during geothermal power production. The physical availability of numerous valuable materials in geothermal brines has captured the interest of geothermal resource developers and other parties ever since their presence was known. The prospects for utilizing huge volumes of highly-saline geothermal brines for electricity generation in the Imperial Valley of California have served to maintain this interest in both private sector and government circles.

None

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This sixteenth quarterly report describes work done during the sixteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant of Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works, Russia, decided to erect a new coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant to replace the existing obsolete units and to improve the environmental conditions of the area. The paper deals with the technological concept and the design requirements. Commissioning is scheduled at the beginning of 1996. The paper describes H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} removal, sulfur recovery and ammonia destruction, primary gas cooling and electrostatic tar precipitation, and the distributed control system that will be installed.

Egorov, V.N.; Anikin, G.J. [Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works, (Russian Federation); Gross, M. [Krupp Koppers GmbH, Essen (Germany)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fifteenth quarterly report describes work done during the fifteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing and giving presentations, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

191

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This seventeenth quarterly report describes work done during the seventeenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, submitting a manuscript and making and responding to one outside contact.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fourteenth quarterly report describes work done during the fourteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing presentations, and making and responding to two outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

193

Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compounds as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.

1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

194

Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compouns as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Information extraction system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An information extraction system and methods of operating the system are provided. In particular, an information extraction system for performing meta-extraction of named entities of people, organizations, and locations as well as relationships and events from text documents are described herein.

Lemmond, Tracy D; Hanley, William G; Guensche, Joseph Wendell; Perry, Nathan C; Nitao, John J; Kidwell, Paul Brandon; Boakye, Kofi Agyeman; Glaser, Ron E; Prenger, Ryan James

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

196

Succinic Acid as a Byproduct in a Corn-based Ethanol Biorefinery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MBI endeavored to develop a process for succinic acid production suitable for integration into a corn-based ethanol biorefinery. The project investigated the fermentative production of succinic acid using byproducts of corn mill operations. The fermentation process was attuned to include raw starch, endosperm, as the sugar source. A clean-not-sterile process was established to treat the endosperm and release the monomeric sugars. We developed the fermentation process to utilize a byproduct of corn ethanol fermentations, thin stillage, as the source of complex nitrogen and vitamin components needed to support succinic acid production in A. succinogenes. Further supplementations were eliminated without lowering titers and yields and a productivity above 0.6 g l-1 hr-1was achieved. Strain development was accomplished through generation of a recombinant strain that increased yields of succinic acid production. Isolation of additional strains with improved features was also pursued and frozen stocks were prepared from enriched, characterized cultures. Two recovery processes were evaluated at pilot scale and data obtained was incorporated into our economic analyses.

MBI International

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Gas treatment and by-products recovery of Thailand`s first coke plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coke is needed in the blast furnace as the main fuel and chemical reactant and the main product of a coke plant. The second main product of the coke plant is coke oven gas. During treatment of the coke oven gas some coal chemicals like tar, ammonia, sulphur and benzole can be recovered as by-products. Since the market prices for these by-products are rather low and often erratic it does not in most cases justify the investment to recover these products. This is the reason why modern gas treatment plants only remove those impurities from the crude gas which must be removed for technical and environmental reasons. The cleaned gas, however, is a very valuable product as it replaces natural gas in steel work furnaces and can be used by other consumers. The surplus can be combusted in the boiler of a power plant. A good example for an optimal plant layout is the new coke oven facility of Thai Special Steel Industry (TSSI) in Rayong. The paper describes the TSSI`s coke oven gas treatment plant.

Diemer, P.E.; Seyfferth, W. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

Liquid--liquid equilibria by use of UNIFAC for gasohol extraction systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A synthetic naphtha cut composed of a mixture of paraffinic, aromatic, and naphthenic hydrocarbons has been studied as a solvent to directly produce gasohol. The equilibria in these highly nonideal liquid mixtures has been estimated by the UNIFAC group contribution method. The process would appear to be simple and direct to produce gasohol by liquid--liquid extraction with this naphtha and could compete with existing azeotropic distillation processes.

Furzer, I.A.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons biodegradation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

rapidly urbanizing areas. Keywords polycyclic aromatic ... Source: Ma, Lena - Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and...

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

rapidly urbanizing areas. Keywords polycyclic aromatic ... Source: Ma, Lena - Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon neutrals Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RANDHIR S. MAKKAR and KARL J. ROCKNE... --Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination of the environment represents a serious threat to the health... bioremediation...

202

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon pah-degrading Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

degradation Summary: Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation N... , terminate in the sludge, and can be released to the...

203

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon exhaust Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Quantification of Local Ozone Production Attributable to Automobile Hydrocarbon Emissions Summary: : Acetylenes: Aromatics: 57 15 2 26 A breakdown of 17...

204

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons pah Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 19 Deuterated PAHs in space To appear as Summary: fluorescence from UV pumped, large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules (PAHs, Allamandola et al.,...

205

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons pahs Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 19 Deuterated PAHs in space To appear as Summary: fluorescence from UV pumped, large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules (PAHs, Allamandola et al.,...

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon pah Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 19 Deuterated PAHs in space To appear as Summary: fluorescence from UV pumped, large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules (PAHs, Allamandola et al.,...

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon clusters Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aliphatic chains as key intermediates for the nucleation Summary: to macromolecular building blocks (nanoparticles) that eventually turn into soot. Polycyclic aromatic...

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons concentrations Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

773 K, 20 k... staging on (a) C6+ aromatics to C1 + C2 selectivity ratios; (b) propane to ... Source: Iglesia, Enrique - Department of Chemical Engineering, University...

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

773 K, 20 k... staging on (a) C6+ aromatics to C1 + C2 selectivity ratios; (b) propane to ... Source: Iglesia, Enrique - Department of Chemical Engineering, University...

210

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic white spirit Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

white spirit Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aromatic white spirit Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 International Journal of Mass...

211

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic aliphatic copolyester Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

changes... . An investigation of the aromatic and aliphatic structural changes in the coking coals during carbonisation using... of heat treated coal in relation to the...

212

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon compounds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bases in Iraq and Afghanistan that lack Summary: Compounds Toxic Organic Halogenated Dioxins Furans (dioxins) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons found... and detected all of the...

213

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

coal, oil, gas... called aromatic hydrocarbons. These include harmful pollutants like dioxins, PCBs and a group called Source: Rock, Chris - Department of Biological Sciences,...

214

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric polycyclic aromatic Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

burning of coal, oil, gas... called aromatic hydrocarbons. These include harmful pollutants like dioxins, PCBs and a group called... by atmospheric currents and ocean currents...

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons modulate Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

S0045-6535(02)00145-5 Summary: Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dioxins are lipophilic organic pollutants occurring... absorption, pig INTRODUCTION...

216

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon tracers Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

S0045-6535(02)00145-5 Summary: Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dioxins are lipophilic organic pollutants occurring... absorption, pig INTRODUCTION...

217

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic pollutants exit Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Toxic Contamination Summary: called aromatic hydrocarbons. These include harmful pollutants like dioxins, PCBs and a group called... the Pacific Ocean carry evidence of...

218

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon water-soluble Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

S0045-6535(02)00145-5 Summary: Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dioxins are lipophilic organic pollutants occurring... with their lipophilicity and water...

219

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon receptor Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aromatic hydrocarbons... the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), through which dioxins and dioxin-like compounds cause altered gene... -methylcholanthrene AHH: aryl...

220

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic organic compounds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bases in Iraq and Afghanistan that lack Summary: Compounds Toxic Organic Halogenated Dioxins Furans (dioxins) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons found... and detected all of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic chemical compounds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bases in Iraq and Afghanistan that lack Summary: Compounds Toxic Organic Halogenated Dioxins Furans (dioxins) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons found... in burn pits include, but...

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated soil...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

soil... hydrocarbon degraders, and polycyclic aromatic ... Source: Ma, Lena - Soil and Water Science Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and...

223

aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading marine: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Soil Microcosms: A Review CiteSeer Summary: Copyright 2001 Kansas State University Key words: bioremediation, denitrification, PAHs, sulfidogenesis...

224

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic-radical oxidation chemistry Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemistry Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aromatic-radical oxidation chemistry Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Predicting Preignition...

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic nucleophilic substitution Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aromatic nucleophilic substitution Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 October CUME Organic Chemistry Summary: , Thomas H. Fisher, and Debbie B. Saebo, A Low-Temperature Internal...

226

aromatic amine 2-amino-3-methyl-9h-pyrido: Topics by E-print...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the reactions of amines with aldehydes and with aromatic nitro - compounds in acetonitrile. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Kinetic and equilibrium studies of...

227

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic thiol monolayers Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Applied Physics, Yale University Collection: Materials Science ; Engineering 23 Modification and Stability of Aromatic Self-Assembled Monolayers upon Irradiation with Energetic...

228

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons investigated Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

compounds with two multiple-ringed polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) or naphthenic hydrocarbons... Prediction of hydrocarbon molecular structure using infrared, Raman,...

229

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon investigation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

compounds with two multiple-ringed polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) or naphthenic hydrocarbons... Prediction of hydrocarbon molecular structure using infrared, Raman,...

230

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons evaluated Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

compounds with two multiple-ringed polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) or naphthenic hydrocarbons... Prediction of hydrocarbon molecular structure using infrared, Raman,...

231

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon diol-epoxide Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

compounds with two multiple-ringed polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) or naphthenic hydrocarbons... Prediction of hydrocarbon molecular structure using infrared, Raman,...

232

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon residues Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

compounds with two multiple-ringed polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) or naphthenic hydrocarbons... Prediction of hydrocarbon molecular structure using infrared, Raman,...

233

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbons analyses Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

compounds with two multiple-ringed polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) or naphthenic hydrocarbons... Prediction of hydrocarbon molecular structure using infrared, Raman,...

234

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic sulfur heterocycles Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

distribution in the oil fractions obtained by thermal cracking of Jordanian El-Lajjun oil Shale Summary: . Polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles IV. Determination of polycyclic...

235

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic non-basmati rice Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that can modulate susceptibility include proliferation rates... but greater indoor coal use). Biomarkers were: WBC aromatic-DNA adducts by 32 P-postlabeling and PAH Source:...

236

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ydrocarbonDegradation It was hypothesized... aromatic hydrocarbon degradation. Hypothesis Test Result Groundwater stimulates Fe(lll) reduction Cell... Hydrocarbon Degradation At...

237

CHARACTERIZATION OF COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS FOR THE RE-EVOLUTION OF MERCURY INTO ECOSYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is concern that mercury (Hg) in coal combustion by-products might be emitted into the environment during processing to other products or after the disposal/landfill of these by-products. This perception may limit the opportunities to use coal combustion by-products in recycle/reuse applications and may result in additional, costly disposal regulations. In this program, CONSOL conducted a comprehensive sampling and analytical program to include ash, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludge, and coal combustion by-products. This work is necessary to help identify potential problems and solutions important to energy production from fossil fuels. The program objective was to evaluate the potential for mercury emissions by leaching or volatilization, to determine if mercury enters the water surrounding an active FGD disposal site and an active fly ash slurry impoundment site, and to provide data that will allow a scientific assessment of the issue. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test results showed that mercury did not leach from coal, bottom ash, fly ash, spray dryer/fabric filter ash or forced oxidation gypsum (FOG) in amounts leading to concentrations greater than the detection limit of the TCLP method (1.0 ng/mL). Mercury was detected at very low concentrations in acidic leachates from all of the fixated and more than half of the unfixated FGD sludge samples, and one of the synthetic aggregate samples. Mercury was not detected in leachates from any sample when deionized water (DI water) was the leaching solution. Mercury did not leach from electrostatic precipitator (ESP) fly ash samples collected during activated carbon injection for mercury control in amounts greater than the detection limit of the TCLP method (1.0 ng/mL). Volatilization tests could not detect mercury loss from fly ash, spray dryer/fabric filter ash, unfixated FGD sludge, or forced oxidation gypsum; the mercury concentration of these samples all increased, possibly due to absorption from ambient surroundings. Mercury loss of 18-26% was detected after 3 and 6 months at 100 F and 140 F from samples of the fixated FGD sludge. Water samples were collected from existing ground water monitoring wells around an active FGD disposal site (8 wells) and an active fly ash slurry impoundment (14 wells). These were wells that the plants have installed to comply with ground water monitoring requirements of their permits. Mercury was not detected in any of the water samples collected from monitoring wells at either site. A literature review concluded that coal combustion byproducts can be disposed of in properly designed landfills that minimize the potentially negative impacts of water intrusion that carries dissolved organic matter (DOM). Dissolved organic matter and sulfate-reducing bacteria can promote the transformation of elemental or oxidized mercury into methyl mercury. The landfill should be properly designed and capped with clays or similar materials to minimize the wet-dry cycles that promote the release of methylmercury.

J.A. Withum; J.E. Locke; S.C. Tseng

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Land application uses for dry FGD by-products. Phase 1, [Annual report], December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. Presently FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. However, landfill sites are becoming more scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. In summary Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD byproduct materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Haefner, R. [Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Clean-coal technology by-products used in a highway embankment stabilization demonstration project. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clean-coal technology by-products are used in a highway embankment demonstration project. This research chronicles the procedures used in the process and analyzes the stability of a repaired highway embankment. The reconstructed slope is analyzed using an Intelligent Discussion Support System that was developed from a slope stability program. Water quality studies are performed and an instrumentation plan is suggested. The calculated factors of safety and the observed embankment performance give indications that the field demonstration project was a success. Long-term monitoring will be the best barometer for determining embankment gross movement and the future of FGD by-products as a stabilizing material.

Nodjomian, S.M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Environmental chamber measurements of mercury flux from coal utilization by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An environmental chamber was constructed to measure the mercury flux from coal utilization by-product (CUB) samples. Samples of fly ash, FGD gypsum, and wallboard made from FGD gypsum were tested under both dark and illuminated conditions with or without the addition of water to the sample. Mercury releases varied widely, with 7-day experiment averages ranging from -6.8 to 73 ng/m2 h for the fly ash samples and -5.2 to 335 ng/m2 h for the FGD/wallboard samples. Initial mercury content, fly ash type, and light exposure had no observable consistent effects on the mercury flux. For the fly ash samples, the effect of a mercury control technology was to decrease the emission. For three of the four pairs of FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, the wallboard sample released less (or absorbed more) mercury than the gypsum.

Pekney, N.J.; Martello, D.V.; Schroeder, K.T.; Granite, E.J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Recovery of solvent and by-products from organosolv black liquor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recovery of alcohol and by-products from ethanol-water and methanol-water pulping liquors was studied. The recovery system proposed consists of three stages: black liquor flashing, lignin precipitation, and precipitation distillation of mother liquor. At the flash stage, 47 and 51% of the alcohol in the black liquor are recovered for ethanol and methanol processes, respectively. The lignin recovery yield at the precipitation stage is 67% for ethanol black liquor and 73% for methanol black liquor. The distillation of precipitation mother liquors enables recovery of 98% ethanol and 96% methanol from this stream as distillate, whereas the distillation residue contains significant amounts of sugars, furfural, and acetic acid that can be recovered. The study concludes with the overall mass balance for the recovery system proposed.

Botello, J.I.; Gilarranz, M.A.; Rodriguez, F.; Oliet, M. [Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica] [Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Fission Product Extraction Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new INL technology can simultaneously extract cesium and strontium for reuse. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Coal extraction process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sub-divided coal is extracted under non-thermally destructive conditions with a solvent liquid containing a compound having the general formula:

Hammack, R. W.; Sears, J. T.; Stiller, A. H.

1981-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

244

Fission Product Extraction Process  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A new INL technology can simultaneously extract cesium and strontium for reuse. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

245

Methanol production with elemental phosphorus byproduct gas: technical and economic feasibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of using a typical, elemental, phosphorus byproduct gas stream in methanol production is assessed. The purpose of the study is to explore the potential of a substitute for natural gas. The first part of the study establishes economic tradeoffs between several alternative methods of supplying the hydrogen which is needed in the methanol synthesis process to react with CO from the off gas. The preferred alternative is the Battelle Process, which uses natural gas in combination with the off gas in an economically sized methanol plant. The second part of the study presents a preliminary basic design of a plant to (1) clean and compress the off gas, (2) return recovered phosphorus to the phosphorus plant, and (3) produce methanol by the Battelle Process. Use of elemental phosphorus byproduct gas in methanol production appears to be technically feasible. The Battelle Process shows a definite but relatively small economic advantage over conventional methanol manufacture based on natural gas alone. The process would be economically feasible only where natural gas supply and methanol market conditions at a phosphorus plant are not significantly less favorable than at competing methanol plants. If off-gas streams from two or more phosphorus plants could be combined, production of methanol using only offgas might also be economically feasible. The North American methanol market, however, does not seem likely to require another new methanol project until after 1990. The off-gas cleanup, compression, and phosphorus-recovery system could be used to produce a CO-rich stream that could be economically attractive for production of several other chemicals besides methanol.

Lyke, S.E.; Moore, R.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Advanced Byproduct Recovery: Direct Catalytic Reduction of Sulfur Dioxide to Elemental Sulfur. Fifth quarterly technical progress report, December 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 170 wet scrubber systems applied, to 72,000 MW of U.S., coal-fired, utility boilers are in operation or under construction. In these systems, the sulfur dioxide removed from the boiler flue gas is permanently bound to a sorbent material, such as lime or limestone. The sulfated sorbent must be disposed of as a waste product or, in some cases, sold as a byproduct (e.g. gypsum). Due to the abundance and low cost of naturally occurring gypsum, and the costs associated with producing an industrial quality product, less than 7% of these scrubbers are configured to produce usable gypsum (and only 1% of all units actually sell the byproduct). The disposal of solid waste from each of these scrubbers requires a landfill area of approximately 200 to 400 acres. In the U.S., a total of 19 million tons of disposable FGD byproduct are produced, transported and disposed of in landfills annually. The use of regenerable sorbent technologies has the potential to reduce or eliminate solid waste production, transportation and disposal. In a regenerable sorbent system, the sulfur dioxide in the boiler flue gas is removed by the sorbent in an adsorber. The S0{sub 2}s subsequently released, in higher concentration, in a regenerator. All regenerable systems produce an off-gas stream from the regenerator that must be processed further in order to obtain a salable byproduct, such as elemental sulfur, sulfuric acid or liquid S0{sub 2}.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Advanced Byproduct Recovery: Direct Catalytic Reduction of Sulfur Dioxide to Elemental Sulfur. Sixth quarterly technical progress report, January - March 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 170 wet scrubber systems applied, to 72,000 MW of U.S., coal-fired, utility boilers are in operation or under construction. In these systems, the sulfur dioxide removed from the boiler flue gas is permanently bound to a sorbent material, such as lime or limestone. The sulfated sorbent must be disposed of as a waste product or, in some cases, sold as a byproduct (e.g. gypsum). Due to the abundance and low cost of naturally occurring gypsum, and the costs associated with producing an industrial quality product, less than 7% of these scrubbers are configured to produce usable gypsum (and only 1% of all units actually sell the byproduct). The disposal of solid waste from each of these scrubbers requires a landfill area of approximately 200 to 400 acres. In the U.S., a total of 19 million tons of disposable FGD byproduct are produced, transported and disposed of in landfills annually. The use of regenerable sorbent technologies has the potential to reduce or eliminate solid waste production, transportation and disposal. In a regenerable sorbent system, the sulfur dioxide in the boiler flue gas is removed by the sorbent in an adsorber. The S0{sub 2}s subsequently released, in higher concentration, in a regenerator. All regenerable systems produce an off-gas stream from the regenerator that must be processed further in order to obtain a salable byproduct, such as elemental sulfur, sulfuric acid or liquid S0{sub 2}.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Management of dry gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of coal combustion by-products. The two technologies for the underground placement that will be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry coal combustion by-products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of combustion by-products with about 70% solids. Phase 2 of the overall program began April 1, 1996. The principal objective of Phase 2 is to develop and fabricate the equipment for both the pneumatic and hydraulic placement technologies, and to conduct a limited, small-scale shakedown test of the pneumatic and hydraulic placement equipment. The shakedown test originally was to take place on the surface, in trenches dug for the tests. However, after a thorough study it was decided, with the concurrence of DOE-METC, to drill additional injection wells and conduct the shakedown tests underground. This will allow a more thorough test of the placement equipment.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

249

Task 1.13 - Data Collection and Database Development for Clean Coal Technology By-Product Characteristics and Management Practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center-Morgantown (DOE FETC) efforts in the areas of fossil fuels and clean coal technology (CCT) have included involvement with both conventional and advanced process coal conversion by-products. In 1993, DOE submitted a Report to Congress on "Barriers to the Increased Utilization of Coal Combustion Desulfurization Byproducts by Governmental and Commercial Sectors" that provided an outline of activities to remove the barriers identified in the report. DOE charged itself with participation in this process, and the work proposed in this document facilitates DOE's response to its own recommendations for action. The work reflects DOE's commitment to the coal combustion by-product (CCB) industry, to the advancement of clean coal technology, and to cooperation with other government agencies. Information from DOE projects and commercial endeavors in fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) and coal gasification is the focus of this task. The primary goal is to provide an easily accessible compilation of characterization information on the by-products from these processes to government agencies and industry to facilitate sound regulatory and management decisions. Additional written documentation will facilitate the preparation of an updated final version of background information collected for DOE in preparation of the Report to Congress on barriers to CCB utilization.

Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Simple procedures for enrichment of chlorinated aromatic pollutants from fat, water and milk for subsequent analysis by high-resolution methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Procedures for enrichment of non-volatile chlorinated aromatic pollutants from fat, water and milk are described. /sup 14/C-DDT was used as a model compound in recovery experiments. A several thousand-fold enrichment of DDT added to butter was achieved by two consecutive straight-phase chromatographies on Lipidex 5000. Trace amounts of DDT in liter volumes of water could be quantitatively extracted by rapid filtration through 2 ml beds of Lipidex 1000. A batch extraction procedure permitted enrichment of DDT from milk after addition of n-pentylamine, methanol and water. DDT could then be eluted from the gel with retention of more than 90% of the lipids. A reversed-phase system with Lipidex 5000 could be used for separation of TCDD from DDT and PCBs. The liquid-gel chromatographic procedures are simple and suitable for clean-up of samples prior to application of high-resolution methods. 5 tables.

Egestad, B.; Curstedt, T.; Sjoevall, J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Gas and Particulate Sampling of Airborne Polycyclic Aromatic Compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The denuder surfaces of the gas and particle (GAP) sampler (developed at the Atmospheric Environment Service of Environment Canada) have been modified by coating with XAD-4 resin, using techniques developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the lower capacity integrated organic vapor/particle sampler (IOVPS). The resulting high capacity integrated organic gas and particle sampler (IOGAPS) has been operated in ambient air at 16.7 L min{sup -1} for a 24-hour period in Berkeley, California, USA. Simultaneous measurements were made at the same collection rate with a conventional sampler that used a filter followed by two sorbent beds. Gas and particle partition measurements were determined for 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) ranging from 2-ring to 6-ring species. The IOGAPS indicated a higher particle fraction of these compounds than did the conventional sampler, suggesting that the conventional sampler suffered from 'blow-off' losses from the particles collected on the filter.

Lane, D.A.; Gundel, L.A.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

aromatic aldehydes catalyzed: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carlo calculations. Information on branching ratio parameters for the s and p wave d+d nuclear interaction has been extracted. P. E. Knowles; A. Adamczak; J. M. Bailey; G. A....

253

Diesel fuel aromatic and cetane number effects on combustion and emissions from a prototype 1991 diesel engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book reports on a prototype 1991-model diesel engine that was tested using EPA transient emissions procedures to determine the effect of fuel properties on combustion characteristics and exhaust emissions. The eleven test fuel set focused primarily on total aromatic content, multi-ring aromatic content, and cetane number, but other fuel variables were also studied. Hydrotreating was used to obtain reductions in fuel sulfur and aromatic content. Increasing cetane number and reducing aromatic content resulted in lower emissions of hydrocarbons and NO{sub x}. Particulate emission were best predicted by sulfur content, aromatic content and 90% distillation temperature. Multi-ring aromatics showed a greater significance that total aromatics on hydrocarbon and particulate emissions. combustion parameters were highly dependent on fuel cetane number.

Sienicki, E.J.; Jass, R.E.; Slodowske, W.J.; McCarthy, C.I.; Krodel, A.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Extraction Utility Design Specification  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Extraction Utility Design Specification January 11, 2011 Document Version 1.9 1 Revision History Date Version Section and Titles Author Summary of Change January 15, 2010 1.0 All...

255

Liquid chromatographic extraction medium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Liquid chromatographic extraction medium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

257

Solvent extraction of bitumen from tar sands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the measurement of mass transfer rates for the extraction of bitumen from tar sands using organic solvents. The experiment was carried out in an agitated vessel using a six-blade turbine mixer on a laboratory scale. To facilitate the determination of absolute mass transfer coefficients, tar sands were specially prepared in the form of spherical particles so that mass transfer area can be computed. The variables investigated in the study included: (1) solvent type (kerosene, toluene, benzene), (2) stirrer speed, 25 rpm to 1000 rpm, and (3) particle diameter, 0.4 cm to 1.2 cm. The results indicated that solvency power varied markedly with the various solvents used and that high aromatic content promoted rapid dissolution when compared with paraffinic solvents. The mass transfer rates increased with increasing stirrer speed in accordance with the relationship: k {alpha} N{sup 0.56} where k is the mass transfer coefficient and N the stirrer speed. Increasing particle diameter also resulted in decreased mass transfer rates. The results were satisfactorily correlated in terms of a Frossling type equation, Sh {alpha} Re{sub p}{sup a}Sc{sup b}.

Hoon, A.Y.; Thomas, S. [Univ. of West Indies, St. Augustine (Trinidad and Tobago)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

FGD Additives to Segregate and Sequester Mercury in Solid Byproducts - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many mercury control strategies for U.S. coal-fired power generating plants involve co-benefit capture of oxidized mercury from flue gases treated by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. For these processes to be effective at overall mercury control, the captured mercury must not be re-emitted to the atmosphere or into surface or ground water. The project sought to identify scrubber additives and FGD operating conditions under which mercury re-emissions would decrease and mercury would remain in the liquor and be blown down from the system in the chloride purge stream. After exiting the FGD system, mercury would react with precipitating agents to form stable solid byproducts and would be removed in a dewatering step. The FGD gypsum solids, free of most of the mercury, could then be disposed or processed for reuse as wallboard or in other beneficial reuse. The project comprised extensive bench-scale FGD scrubber tests in Phases I and II. During Phase II, the approaches developed at the bench scale were tested at the pilot scale. Laboratory wastewater treatment tests measured the performance of precipitating agents in removing mercury from the chloride purge stream. Finally, the economic viability of the approaches tested was evaluated.

Searcy, K; Bltyhe, G M; Steen, W A

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

259

Electrolysis byproduct D2O provides a third way to mitigate CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rapid atomic power deployment may be possible without using fast breeder reactors or making undue demands on uranium resource. Using by-product D2O and thorium-U233 in CANDU and RBMK piles may circumvent need for either fast breeder reactors or seawater uranium. Atmospheric CO2 is presently increasing 2.25%/year in proportion to 2.25%/year exponential fossil fuel consumption increase. Roughly 1/3 anthropologic CO2 is removed by various CO2 sinks. CO2 removal is modelled as being proportional to 45-year-earlier CO2 amount above 280 ppm-C Water electrolysis produces roughly 0.1 kg-D20/kWe-y. Material balance assumes each electrolysis stage increases D2O bottoms concentration times 3. Except for first two electrolysis stages, all water from hydrogen consumption is returned to electrolysis. The unique characteristic of this process is the ability to economically burn all deuterium-enriched H2 in vehicles. Condensate from vehicles returns to appropriate electrolysis stage. Fuel cell condensate originally from reformed natural gas may augment second-sage feed. Atomic power expansion is 5%/year, giving 55000 GWe by 2100. World primary energy increases 2.25%/y, exceeding 4000 EJ/y by 2100. CO2 maximum is roughly 600 ppm-C around year 2085. CO2 declines back below 300 ppm-C by 2145 if the 45-year-delay seawater sink remains effective.

Schenewerk, William Ernest [self, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal-laden wastes can be stabilized and solidified using advanced clean coal technology by-products (CCTBs)--fluid bed combustor ash and spray drier solids. These utility-generated treatment chemicals are available for purchase through brokers, and commercial applications of this process are being practiced by treaters of metal-laden hazardous waste. A complex of regulations governs this industry, and sensitivities to this complex has discouraged public documentation of treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with CCTBs. This report provides a comprehensive public documentation of laboratory studies that show the efficacy of the stabilization and solidification of metal-laden hazardous wastes--such as lead-contaminated soils and sandblast residues--through treatment with CCTBs. It then describes the extensive efforts that were made to obtain the permits allowing a commercial hazardous waste treater to utilize CCTBs as treatment chemicals and to install the equipment required to do so. It concludes with the effect of this lengthy process on the ability of the treatment company to realize the practical, physical outcome of this effort, leading to premature termination of the project.

James T. Cobb, Jr.

2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Utilization of low NO{sub x} coal combustion by-products. Quarterly report, April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is studying a beneficiation process to make power plant fly ash a more useful by-product. The tasks include: (1) Laboratory characterization: Sample collection; Material characterization; and Lab testing of ash processing operations; (2) Pilot plant testing of the separation of carbon from fly ash; (3) Product testing: Concrete testing and Plastic fillers; and (4) Market and economic analysis. Appendices present information on material characterization, laboratory testing of a flotation process, pilot runs, and concrete testing results.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Chemisorption of Aromatic Compounds on Well-Defined Palladium Surfaces: Studies by Electron Spectroscopy and Electrochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The chemisorption of aromatic compounds, derivatized with different functional groups, on well-defined Pd(111) surfaces was studied by a combination of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), high resolution...

Li, Ding

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

263

Noncovalent ????? interaction between graphene and aromatic molecule: Structure, energy, and nature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Noncovalent ????? interactions between graphene and aromatic molecules have been studied by using density functional theory with empirical dispersion correction (?B97X-D) combined with zeroth-order symmetry adapted perturbation theory (SAPT0). Excellent agreement of the interaction energies computed by means of ?B97X-D and spin component scaled (SCS) SAPT0 methods, respectively, shows great promise for the two methods in the study of the adsorption of aromatic molecules on graphene. The other important finding in this study is that, according to SCS-SAPT0 analyses, ????? interactions between graphene and aromatic molecules are largely dependent on both dispersion and electrostatic type interactions. It is also noticed that ????? interactions become stronger and more dispersive (less electrostatic) upon substitution of the very electronegative fluorine atoms onto the aromatic molecules.

Wang, Weizhou, E-mail: wzw@lynu.edu.cn, E-mail: ybw@gzu.edu.cn; Zhang, Yu [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang 471022 (China)] [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang 471022 (China); Wang, Yi-Bo, E-mail: wzw@lynu.edu.cn, E-mail: ybw@gzu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and Key Laboratory of Guizhou High Performance Computational Chemistry, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China)] [Department of Chemistry and Key Laboratory of Guizhou High Performance Computational Chemistry, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China)

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

264

Black carbon in marine sediments : quantification and implications for the sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorption is a key factor in determining the fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment. Here, PAH sorption is proposed as the sum of two mechanisms: absorption into a biogenic, organic carbon (OC) ...

Accardi-Dey, AmyMarie, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic polyamide membranes Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aromatic polyamide membranes Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Desalination, 95 (1994) 325-345 Elsevier Science B.V....

266

Photoinduced Hydrogen Abstraction from Phenols by Aromatic Ketones. A New Mechanism for Hydrogen Abstraction by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photoinduced Hydrogen Abstraction from Phenols by Aromatic Ketones. A New Mechanism for Hydrogen carried out of the kinetics of inter- and intramolecular phenolic hydrogen abstraction phenolic hydrogen, which yields the corresponding phenoxyl-hemipinacol biradical. The biradicals have also

Leigh, William J.

267

Mineralogical and physical considerations related to the separation and recovery of constituents from aluminum smelter by-products and wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several by-products and waste products of aluminum smelting were characterized mineralogically and physically, in order to evaluate the potential for their decontamination or separation and recovery into valuable products using mineral processing techniques. The test samples were selected from among Bayer process red mud, bath-alumina mixture, cleaned anode butts, anode recycle residues, spent potlining, saltcake and fluorogypsum. Several of these materials were shown to be composed either of highly liberated, potentially separable mineral phases, or of locked minerals which could be partially liberated by grinding to smaller but practical particle sizes. An analysis of specific physical properties of the liberated constituent mineral phases was accompanied by preliminary experimental evaluation of their separability. An assessment was made of potential mineral processing techniques including size and form differentiation, gravitational and magnetic field separation, flotation, separation based on surface charging phenomena or work function, and pneumatic tabling. The results confirmed the suitability of low-cost physical separation techniques for the treatment of some by-products and wastes. This paper presents results of a preliminary evaluation of two smelter products. The conference paper will analyze and discuss in more detail the potential for the mineral processing of these and other smelter by-products and wastes.

Plumpton, A.J.; Wilhelmy, J.F.; Blackburn, D.; Caouette, J.L. [Centre de Recherches Minerales, Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Topical report, April 1, 1996--April 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report represents the Final Technical Progress Report for Phase II of the overall program for a cooperative research agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy - MORGANTOWN Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC). Under the agreement, SIUC will develop and demonstrate technologies for the handling, transport, and placement in abandoned underground coal mines of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products, such as fly ash, scrubber sludge, fluidized bed combustion by-products, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground placement. The overall program is divided into three (3) phases. Phase II of the program is primarily concerned with developing and testing the hardware for the actual underground placement demonstrations. Two technologies have been identified and hardware procured for full-scale demonstrations: (1) hydraulic placement, where coal combustion by-products (CCBs) will be placed underground as a past-like mixture containing about 70 to 75 percent solids; and (2) pneumatic placement, where CCBs will be placed underground as a relatively dry material using compressed air. 42 refs., 36 figs., 36 tabs.

Chugh, Y.P.; Brackebusch, F.; Carpenter, J. [and others

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Solvent extraction studies of holmium with acidic extractants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid-liquid extraction studies of holmium with 2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester, naphthenic, and Versatic 10 acids have been carried out. The nature of the extracted species and the extraction equilibrium constants of these systems have been determined from aqueous nitrate solution. The extraction mechanism and complexation models have been proposed. 11 refs., 8 figs.

Gaikwad, A.G.; Damodaran, A.D. (CSIR, Trivandrum (India))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels standard requires 36 billion gallons of renewable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels studies. Current research focuses on impacts of feeding by-prod- ucts of the bioenergy industry on Animal

271

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and fatal ischemic heart disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several toxicologic and epidemiologic studies have produced evidence that occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) is a risk factor for ischemic heart disease (IHD). However, a clear exposure-response relation has not been demonstrated. We studied a relation between exposure to PAH and mortality from IHD (418 cases) in a cohort of 12,367 male asphalt workers from Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Israel, The Netherlands and Norway. Exposures to benzo(a)pyrene were assessed quantitatively using measurement-driven exposure models. Exposure to coal tar was assessed in a semiquantitative manner on the basis of information supplied by company representatives. We carried out sensitivity analyses to assess potential confounding by tobacco smoking. Both cumulative and average exposure indices for benzo(a)pyrene were positively associated with mortality from IHD. The highest relative risk for fatal IHD was observed for average benzo(a)pyrene exposures of 273 ng/m{sup 3} or higher, for which the relative risk was 1.64(95% confidence interval = 1.13-2.38). Similar results were obtained for coal tar exposure. Sensitivity analysis indicated that even in a realistic scenario of confounding by smoking, we would observe approximately 20% to 40% excess risk in IHD in the highest PAH-exposure categories. Our results lend support to the hypothesis that occupational PAH exposure causes fatal IHD and demonstrate a consistent exposure-response relation for this association.

Burstyn, I.; Kromhout, H.; Partanen, T.; Svane, O.; Langard, S.; Ahrens, W.; Kauppinen, T.; Stucker, I.; Shaham, J.; Heederik, D.; Ferro, G.; Heikkila, P.; Hooiveld, M.; Johansen, C.; Randem, B.G.; Boffetta, P. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A Multiscale Study of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Properties in Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present contribution, I summarize a systematic study of ISO and Spitzer mid-IR spectra of Galactic regions and star forming galaxies. This study quantifies the relative variations of the main aromatic features inside spatially resolved objects as well as among the integrated spectra of 50 objects. Our analysis implies that the properties of the PAHs are remarkably universal throughout our sample and at different spatial scales. In addition, the relative variations of the band ratios, as large as one order of magnitude, are mainly controled by the fraction of ionized PAHs. In particular, I show that we can rule out both the modification of the PAH size distribution and the mid-IR extinction, as an explanation of these variations. High values of the I(6.2)/I(11.3) ratio are found to be associated with the far-UV illuminated surface of PDRs, at the scale of an interstellar cloud, and associated with star formation activity, at the scale of a galaxy. Using a few well-studied Galactic regions, we provide an empirical relation between the I(6.2)/I(11.3) ratio and the ionization/recombination ratio G0/ne. Finally, I show that these trends are consistent with the detailed modeling of the PAH emission within photodissociation regions, taking into account the radiative transfer, the stochastic heating and the charge exchange between gas and dust.

F. Galliano

2008-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

273

Evaluation of pitches and cokes from solvent-extracted coal materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three initial coal-extracted (C-E) samples were received from the West Virginia University (WVU) Chemical Engineering Department. Two samples had been hydrogenated to obtain pitches that satisfy Theological requirements. One of the hydrogenated (HC-E) samples had been extracted by toluene to remove ash and higher molecular weight aromatic compounds. We were unable to measure the softening point and viscosity of the non-hydro treated solid extract sample, Positive characteristics in the HC-E materials were softening points of 113-119{degrees}C, low sulfur and ash. The oxygen and nitrogen content of the HC-E samples may limit future usage in premium carbon and graphite products. Coking values were similar to petroleum pitches. Laboratory anode testing indicates that in combination with standard coal-tar pitch, the HC-E material can be used as a binder pitch.

McHenry, E.R.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Supercritical fluid extraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated or lipophilic crown ether or fluorinated dithiocarbamate. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth (Pullman, WA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

New perspectives on the cancer risks of trichloroethylene, its metabolites, and chlorination by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientific developments in the 1990`s have important implications for the assessment of cancer risks posed by exposures to trichloroethylene (TCE). These new developments include: epidemiological studies; experimental studies of TCE carcinogenicity, metabolism and metabolite carcinogenicity; applications of new physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for TCE; and new pharmacodynamic data obtained for TCE and its rhetabolites. Following a review of previous assessments of TCE carcinogenicity, each of these new sets of developments is summarized. The new epidemiological data do not provide evidence of TCE carcinogenicity in humans, and the new pharmacodynamic data support the hypothesis that TCE carcinogenicity is caused by TCE-induced cytotoxicity. Based on this information, PBPK-based estimates for likely no-adverse effect levels (NOAELs) for human exposures to TCE are calculated to be 16 ppb for TCE in air respired 24 hr/day, and 210 ppb for TCE in drinking water. Cancer risks of zero are predicted for TCE exposures below these calculated NOAELs. For comparison, hypothetical cancer risks posed by lifetime ingestive and multiroute household exposures to TCE in drinking water, at the currently enforced Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) concentration of 5 ppb are extrapolated from animal bioassay data using a conservative, linear dose-response model. These TCE-related risks are compared to corresponding ones associated with concentrations of chlorination by-products (CBP) in household water. It is shown that, from the standpoint of comparative hypothetical cancer risks, based on conservative linear dose-response extrapolations, there would likely be no health benefit, and more likely a possible health detriment, associated with any switch from a household water supply containing <375 ppb TCE to one containing CBP at levels corresponding to the currently proposed 80-ppb MCL for total trihalomethanes.

Bogen, K.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Slone, T.; Gold, L.S.; Manley, N.; Revzan, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

276

Effect of industrial by-products containing electron acceptors on mitigating methane emission during rice cultivation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three industrial by-products (fly ash, phosphogypsum and blast furnace slag), were evaluated for their potential re-use as soil amendments to reduce methane (CH{sub 4}) emission resulting from rice cultivation. In laboratory incubations, CH{sub 4} production rates from anoxic soil slurries were significantly reduced at amendment levels of 0.5%, 1%, 2% and 5% (wt wt{sup -1}), while observed CO{sub 2} production rates were enhanced. The level of suppression in methane production was the highest for phosphogypsum, followed by blast slag and then fly ash. In the greenhouse experiment, CH{sub 4} emission rates from the rice planted potted soils significantly decreased with the increasing levels (2-20 Mg ha{sup -1}) of the selected amendments applied, while rice yield simultaneously increased compared to the control treatment. At 10 Mg ha{sup -1} application level of the amendments, total seasonal CH{sub 4} emissions were reduced by 20%, 27% and 25%, while rice grain yields were increased by 17%, 15% and 23% over the control with fly ash, phosphogypsum, and blast slag amendments, respectively. The suppression of CH{sub 4} production rates as well as total seasonal CH{sub 4} flux could be due to the increased concentrations of active iron, free iron, manganese oxides, and sulfate in the amended soil, which acted as electron acceptors and controlled methanogens' activity by limiting substrates availability. Among the amendments, blast furnace slag and fly ash contributed mainly to improve the soil nutrients balance and increased the soil pH level towards neutral point, but soil acidity was developed with phosphogypsum application. Conclusively, blast slag among the selected amendments would be a suitable soil amendment for reducing CH{sub 4} emissions as well as sustaining rice productivity.

Ali, Muhammad Aslam [Department of Environmental Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202 (Bangladesh); Lee, Chang Hoon [Functional Cereal Crop Research Division, National Institute of Crop Science, RDA, 1085, Naey-dong, Milyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Yoon [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School (Brain Korea 21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Pil Joo [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School (Brain Korea 21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: pjkim@gnu.ac.kr

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Comparative analysis of polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles isolated from four shale oils. [Polycyclic aromatic sulfur heterocycles; thiophenes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the isolation of sulfur heterocycle fractions from four shale oils (Paraho, Geokinetics, Occidental, and Rio Blanco), the use of capillary column gas chromatography and mass spectrometry for the identification of individual mixture components, and a reverse (Ames) and forward mutation assay with Salmonella typhimurium to screen for possible health hazards. The major components of the Polycyclic Aromatic Sulfur Heterocycles (PASH) fractions for all four shale oils were found to be two- to three-ringed parent and alkylated thiophene compounds. In all cases the PASH fractions showed no more specific mutagenic response than the neutral PAC fractions from which they were isolated. The only mutagenic response which was detected in the PASH fractions was for the Rio Blanco shale oil and showed specific mutagenic response similar to the neutral PAC fraction from which it was isolated. Finally, the forward mutation 8-azaguanine test was apparently more sensitive than the Ames histidine reversion test in detecting mutagenic activity for the chemical fractions from the shale oils.

Willey, C.; Pelroy, R.; Stewart, D.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

Lin, M.C. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Sorption characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aluminum smelter residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature carbon oxidation in primary aluminum smelters results in the release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) into the environment. The main source of PAH are the anodes, which are composed of petroleum coke (black carbon, BC) and coal tar pitch. To elucidate the dominant carbonaceous phase controlling the environmental fate of PAH in aluminum smelter residues (coke BC and/or coal tar), the sorptive behavior of PAHs has been determined, using passive samplers and infinite-sink desorption methods. Samples directly from the wet scrubber were studied as well as ones from an adjacent 20-year old storage lagoon and roof dust from the smelter. Carbon-normalized distribution coefficients of native PAHs were 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected based on amorphous organic carbon (AOC)/water partitioning, which is in the same order of magnitude as reported literature values for soots and charcoals. Sorption isotherms of laboratory-spiked deuterated phenanthrene showed strong (about 100 times stronger than AOC) but nonetheless linear sorption in both fresh and aged aluminum smelter residues. The absence of nonlinear behavior typical for adsorption to BC indicates that PAH sorption in aluminum smelter residues is dominated by absorption into the semi-solid coal tar pitch matrix. Desorption experiments using Tenax showed that fresh smelter residues had a relatively large rapidly desorbing fraction of PAH (35-50%), whereas this fraction was strongly reduced (11-16%) in the lagoon and roof dust material. Weathering of the coal tar residue and/or redistribution of PAH between coal tar and BC phases could explain the reduced availability in aged samples. 38 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Gijs D. Breedveld; Emilien Pelletier; Richard St. Louis; Gerard Cornelissen [Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo (Norway)

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the no cost extension period of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts for a third round of testing, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Hydrotreating and hydrogenation of the product has been completed, and due to removal of material before processing, yield of the jet fuel fraction has decreased relative to an increase in the gasoline fraction. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates that the coal derived material has more trace metals related to coal than petroleum, as seen in previous runs. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. The co-coking of the runs with the new coal have begun, with the coke yield similar to previous runs, but the gas yield is lower and the liquid yield is higher. Characterization of the products continues. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2007-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible uses. Methods to reduce metal content are being evaluated.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

282

ADVANCED BYPRODUCT RECOVERY: DIRECT CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF SO2 TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arthur D. Little, Inc., together with its commercialization partner, Engelhard Corporation, and its university partner Tufts, investigated a single-step process for direct, catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide from regenerable flue gas desulfurization processes to the more valuable elemental sulfur by-product. This development built on recently demonstrated SO{sub 2}-reduction catalyst performance at Tufts University on a DOE-sponsored program and is, in principle, applicable to processing of regenerator off-gases from all regenerable SO{sub 2}-control processes. In this program, laboratory-scale catalyst optimization work at Tufts was combined with supported catalyst formulation work at Engelhard, bench-scale supported catalyst testing at Arthur D. Little and market assessments, also by Arthur D. Little. Objectives included identification and performance evaluation of a catalyst which is robust and flexible with regard to choice of reducing gas. The catalyst formulation was improved significantly over the course of this work owing to the identification of a number of underlying phenomena that tended to reduce catalyst selectivity. The most promising catalysts discovered in the bench-scale tests at Tufts were transformed into monolith-supported catalysts at Engelhard. These catalyst samples were tested at larger scale at Arthur D. Little, where the laboratory-scale results were confirmed, namely that the catalysts do effectively reduce sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur when operated under appropriate levels of conversion and in conditions that do not contain too much water or hydrogen. Ways to overcome those limitations were suggested by the laboratory results. Nonetheless, at the end of Phase I, the catalysts did not exhibit the very stringent levels of activity or selectivity that would have permitted ready scale-up to pilot or commercial operation. Therefore, we chose not to pursue Phase II of this work which would have included further bench-scale testing, scale-up, pilot-scale (0.5 MW{sub e}) testing at conditions representative of various regenerable SO{sub 2}-control systems, preparation of a commercial process design, and development of a utility-scale demonstration plan.

Robert S. Weber

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

AFCI Transmutation Fuel Processes and By-Products Planning: Interim Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program are to reduce high-level waste volume, reduce long-lived and radiotoxic elements, and reclaim valuable energy content of spent nuclear fuel. The AFCI chartered the Fuel Development Working Group (FDWG) to develop advanced fuels in support of the AFCI goals. The FDWG organized a phased strategy of fuel development that is designed to match the needs of the AFCI program: Phase 1 - High-burnup fuels for light-water reactors (LWRs) and tri-isotopic (TRISO) fuel for gas-cooled reactors Phase 2 Mixed oxide fuels with minor actinides for LWRs, Am transmutation targets for LWRs, inert matrix fuels for LWRs, and TRISO fuel containing Pu and other transuranium for gas-cooled reactors Phase 3 Fertile free or low-fertile metal, ceramic, ceramic dispersed in a metal matrix (CERMET), and ceramics dispersed in a ceramic matrix (CERCER) that would be used primarily in fast reactors. Development of advanced fuels requires the fabrication, assembly, and irradiation of prototypic fuel under bounding reactor conditions. At specialized national laboratory facilities small quantities of actinides are being fabricated into such fuel for irradiation tests. Fabrication of demonstration quantities of selected fuels for qualification testing is needed but not currently feasible, because existing manual glovebox fabrication approaches result in significant radiation exposures when larger quantities of actinides are involved. The earliest demonstration test fuels needed in the AFCI program are expected to be variants of commercial mixed oxide fuel for use in an LWR as lead test assemblies. Manufacture of such test assemblies will require isolated fabrication lines at a facility not currently available in the U.S. Such facilities are now being planned as part of an Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF). Adequate planning for and specification of actinide fuel fabrication facilities capable of producing transmutation fuels dictates the need for detailed process flows, mass balances, batch size data, and radiological dose estimates. Full definition of the materials that will need to be handled in the facility as feed material inputs, in-process fuel, scrap recycle, scrap requiring recovery, and by-product wastes is required. The feed material for demonstrating transmutation fuel fabrication will need to come from the separations of actinides from spent nuclear fuel processed in the same AFCF.

Eric L. Shaber

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of Coal Combustion By-Product Disposal and Utilizaton  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) conducted a multiyear study to evaluate the impact of mercury and other air toxic elements (ATEs) on the management of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). The ATEs evaluated in this project were arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, and selenium. The study included laboratory tasks to develop measurement techniques for mercury and ATE releases, sample characterization, and release experiments. A field task was also performed to measure mercury releases at a field site. Samples of fly ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials were collected preferentially from full-scale coal-fired power plants operating both without and with mercury control technologies in place. In some cases, samples from pilot- and bench-scale emission control tests were included in the laboratory studies. Several sets of 'paired' baseline and test fly ash and FGD materials collected during full-scale mercury emission control tests were also included in laboratory evaluations. Samples from mercury emission control tests all contained activated carbon (AC) and some also incorporated a sorbent-enhancing agent (EA). Laboratory release experiments focused on measuring releases of mercury under conditions designed to simulate CCB exposure to water, ambient-temperature air, elevated temperatures, and microbes in both wet and dry conditions. Results of laboratory evaluations indicated that: (1) Mercury and sometimes selenium are collected with AC used for mercury emission control and, therefore, present at higher concentrations than samples collected without mercury emission controls present. (2) Mercury is stable on CCBs collected from systems both without and with mercury emission controls present under most conditions tested, with the exception of vapor-phase releases of mercury exposed to elevated temperatures. (3) The presence of carbon either from added AC or from unburned coal can result in mercury being sorbed onto the CCB when exposed to ambient-temperature air. The environmental performance of the mercury captured on AC used as a sorbent for mercury emission control technologies indicated that current CCB management options will continue to be sufficiently protective of the environment, with the potential exception of exposure to elevated temperatures. The environmental performance of the other ATEs investigated indicated that current management options will be appropriate to the CCBs produced using AC in mercury emission controls.

David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher; Mei Xin; Mae Sexauer Gustin; Rob Jung

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, February--May 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon the laboratory treatment of six wastes with three by-products and the evaluation of the stability of the resulting eighteen materials. Other efforts during the third quarter have been directed toward completion of the collection and analysis of by-products, the identification of a suitable fourth by-product, and the definition of the approach to the solidification tests. The activity on the project during the third quarter of Phase One has fallen into three major areas: acquiring and analyzing by-products; treating hazardous wastes with by-products in the laboratory and analyzing the results; and conducting administrative activities, including public relations and personnel additions. The hazardous wastes that are used include industrial wastewater treatment residue from battery manufacturing plant; contaminated soil from a remediation project conducted at a munitions depot; contaminated soil from a remediation project conducted at an abandoned industrial site; contaminated soil from a remediation project conducted at a former sewage treatment plant; air pollution control dust from basic oxygen furnace steel production; and air pollution control ash from municipal waste incineration.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

PRODUCTION OF CARBON PRODUCTS USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed carbon products, using mildly hydrogenated solvents to extract the organic portion of coal to create synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and carbon fibers. The focus of this effort was on development of lower cost solvents, milder hydrogenation conditions and improved yield in order to enable practical production of these products. This technology is needed because of the long-term decline in production of domestic feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. Currently, carbon products represents a market of roughly 5 million tons domestically, and 19 million tons worldwide. Carbon products are mainly derived from feedstocks such as petroleum pitch and coal tar pitch. The domestic supply of petroleum pitch is declining because of the rising price of liquid fuels, which has caused US refineries to maximize liquid fuel production. As a consequence, the long term trend has a decline in production of petroleum pitch over the past 20 years. The production of coal tar pitch, as in the case of petroleum pitch, has likewise declined significantly over the past two decades. Coal tar pitch is a byproduct of metallurgical grade coke (metcoke) production. In this industry, modern metcoke facilities are recycling coal tar as fuel in order to enhance energy efficiency and minimize environmental emissions. Metcoke production itself is dependent upon the production requirements for domestic steel. Hence, several metcoke ovens have been decommissioned over the past two decades and have not been replaced. As a consequence sources of coal tar are being taken off line and are not being replaced. The long-term trend is a reduction in coal tar pitch production. Thus import of feedstocks, mainly from Eastern Europe and China, is on the rise despite the relatively large transportation cost. To reverse this trend, a new process for producing carbon products is needed. The process must be economically competitive with current processes, and yet be environmentally friendly as well. The solvent extraction process developed uses mild hydrogenation of low cost oils to create powerful solvents that can dissolve the organic portion of coal. The insoluble portion, consisting mainly of mineral matter and fixed carbon, is removed via centrifugation or filtration, leaving a liquid solution of coal chemicals and solvent. This solution can be further refined via distillation to meet specifications for products such as synthetic pitches, cokes, carbon foam and fibers. The most economical process recycles 85% of the solvent, which itself is obtained as a low-cost byproduct from industrial processes such as coal tar or petroleum refining. Alternatively, processes have been developed that can recycle 100% of the solvent, avoiding any need for products derived from petroleum or coal tar.

Dady Dadyburjor; Philip R. Biedler; Chong Chen; L. Mitchell Clendenin; Manoj Katakdaunde; Elliot B. Kennel; Nathan D. King; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Evaluation of a new chromatographic method for aromatics in diesel fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new analytical method using supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) with flame ionization detection (FID) was evaluated for the determination of the aromatics in diesel fuels. The method utilizes high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a packed silica column and supercritical CO/sub 2/ as the carrier fluid. Performance evaluation was carried out using diesel fuels and secondary standards with a wide range of chemical composition. The aromatic content in the fuels was verified by the fluorescent indicator adsorption (FIA) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 1/H NMR) methods. With the exception of initial moderate cost of the instrument, the method is simple, fast (less than 20 minutes per sample) and applicable to coloured samples and samples with final boiling points of about 450/sup 0/C. Aromatic concentrations in diesels showed good correlation with FIA data. It is well suited to petroleum refinery applications as an alternate for standard FIA methods.

Lee, S.W.; Fuhr, B.J.; Glavincevski, B.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Technical support for the Ohio Clean Coal Technology Program. Volume 2, Baseline of knowledge concerning process modification opportunities, research needs, by-product market potential, and regulatory requirements: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LR1 and comprises two volumes. Volume 1 presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume 2 consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1989-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

289

Ligand-exchange chromatography of aromatic amines on resin-bound cobalt ion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of cobalt metal for the selective separation of aromatic amines is completed with a chemically bonded diamine and glyoxime functional groups onto Lycopodium clavatum. Oximes and amines are excellent complexing agents for transition metal ions. Cobalt(II) metal ions can easily be immobilized on bis-diaminoethyl-glyoximated sporopollenin (bDAEG-sporopollenin). The ligand-exchange behavior of modified Lycopodium clavatum with respect to aromatic amines was investigated. This will permit the evaluation of bDAEG-sporopollenin ligand exchangers for their utilization as sorbents in the recovery, pollution control, and elimination of amines from wastewater.

Pehlivan, E.; Vural, U.S.; Ayar, A.; Yildiz, S. [Selcuk Univ., Konya (Turkey)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Activated carbon and biochar amendments decrease pore-water concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge Patryk Oleszczuk a,b, , Sarah E. Hale a , Johannes Lehmann c , Gerard Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Bioavailability Sewage sludge a b s t r a c t The aim of the research of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sewage sludge. Two different biochars (MSB and PMW) and two ACs

Lehmann, Johannes

291

Kinetics and Reaction Pathways for Propane Dehydrogenation and Aromatization on Co/H-ZSM5 and H-ZSM5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kinetics and Reaction Pathways for Propane Dehydrogenation and Aromatization on Co/H-ZSM5 and H Co/H-ZSM5 catalyzes propane dehydrogenation and aromatization reactions. Initial product selectivities, product site-yields, and the 13C content and distribution in the products of 2-13C-propane show

Iglesia, Enrique

292

Fission product solvent extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two main objectives concerning removal of fission products from high-level tank wastes will be accomplished in this project. The first objective entails the development of an acid-side Cs solvent-extraction (SX) process applicable to remediation of the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and dissolved calcine waste (DCW) at INEEL. The second objective is to develop alkaline-side SX processes for the combined removal of Tc, Cs, and possibly Sr and for individual separation of Tc (alone or together with Sr) and Cs. These alkaline-side processes apply to tank wastes stored at Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge. This work exploits the useful properties of crown ethers and calixarenes and has shown that such compounds may be economically adapted to practical processing conditions. Potential benefits for both acid- and alkaline-side processing include order-of-magnitude concentration factors, high rejection of bulk sodium and potassium salts, and stripping with dilute (typically 10 mM) nitric acid. These benefits minimize the subsequent burden on the very expensive vitrification and storage of the high-activity waste. In the case of the SRTALK process for Tc extraction as pertechnetate anion from alkaline waste, such benefits have now been proven at the scale of a 12-stage flowsheet tested in 2-cm centrifugal contactors with a Hanford supernatant waste simulant. SRTALK employs a crown ether in a TBP-modified aliphatic kerosene diluent, is economically competitive with other applicable separation processes being considered, and has been successfully tested in batch extraction of actual Hanford double-shell slurry feed (DSSF).

Moyer, B.A.; Bonnesen, P.V.; Sachleben, R.A. [and others

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Extracting the Eliashberg Function  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolution Enhanced Oil RecoveryExtracellularExtracting the

294

Extracting the Eliashberg Function  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolution Enhanced Oil RecoveryExtracellularExtracting

295

Extracting the Eliashberg Function  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolution Enhanced OilExtracting the Eliashberg Function

296

Extracting the Eliashberg Function  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolution Enhanced OilExtracting the Eliashberg

297

Extraction Utility Design Specification  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit|Department of Energy56Executive212-2012 June 2012Extraction Utility

298

Aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism by Rhodococcus sp. I24 : computational, biochemical and transcriptional analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rhodococcus sp. 124 is a Gram-positive soil bacterium being developed for the manufacture of (-)cis-(1S,2R)-1-aminoindan-2-ol, a key precursor in the production of the HIV-1 protease inhibitor CrixivanTM, from the aromatic ...

Parker, Jefferson A. (Jefferson Alexander), 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Aromatic measurements of diesel fuel - A CRC round-robin study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A round robin study to measure the aromatic levels in diesel fuels was conducted by the Chemical Characterization Panel of the Coordinating Research Council Air Pollution Research Advisory Committee (CRC-APRAC) In-house Program Group, CAPI-1-64. The fuels for this study consisted of a jet fuel, a No. 2 diesel reference fuel, and three fuels used in a CRC-sponsored diesel emission project (CAPE-32). These fuels had 90% distillation temperatures which ranged from 472/sup 0/ to 642/sup 0/ F and aromaticity levels from approximately 18 to 55% by volume. All participants used the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D1319 or modified D1319 methods to measure the aromatic levels in the selected fuels. Some participants concurrently analyzed the same fuels using other methods such as high-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, and elution chromatography (ASTM D2549). One non-participating laboratory analyzed the fuels using supercritical fluid chromatography. The results of nine participants using the D1319 methodology and other methods showed good agreement for fuels with 90% distillation temperatures less than 600/sup 0/ F. However, this round robin study showed that: 1) there is no standard method to measure aromatic levels in full boiling range diesel fuels, and 2) there are inadequacies when using the D1319 and modified D1319 methods for fuels outside of the specified property ranges.

Seizinger, D.E.; Hoekman, S.K.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Identification of Sediment Organic Carbon Location and Association with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Contaminated Sediment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification of Sediment Organic Carbon Location and Association with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Contaminated Sediment Upal Ghosh1 , Richard G. Luthy1 , J. Seb Gillette2 , and Richard N long-term issue confronting sediment bioremediation is the lack of understanding of contaminant-sediment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for treatment in EU, followed by spreading on land, which accounted for 37% of the sewage sludge produced allow recycling of nutrients. Hence, bioprocessed sewage sludge application on agricultural soilRemoval of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation N

302

Scintillators based on aromatic dye molecules doped in a sol-gel and N. Solovieva  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scintillators based on aromatic dye molecules doped in a sol-gel glass host M. Nikla and N. Fast energy transfer from the glass host to the dye luminescent centers was found. While the overall. In a trial to combine organic dye-based emission centers with an inorganic host, lead

Strathclyde, University of

303

Can Metallapyrimidines Be Aromatic? A Computational Study into a New Class of Metallacycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density functional theory. Nucleus independent chemical shifts (NICS) placed above the ring (NICS(1)zz are a cornerstone of electronic structure theory. Aromaticity is so fundamental that introductory chemistry books that fascinates experimental and theoretical chemists alike.2 The bonding theories developed to explain benzene

Schlegel, H. Bernhard

304

SIDE GROUP ADDITION TO THE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CORONENE BY ULTRAVIOLET PHOTOLYSIS IN COSMIC ICE ANALOGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ated aromatics can be produced in D2O ice photolysis experiments under interstellar conditions IN COSMIC ICE ANALOGS Max P. Bernstein,1,2 Jamie E. Elsila,3 Jason P. Dworkin,1,2 Scott A. Sandford,1 Louis Ultraviolet photolysis of various coronene-ice mixtures at low temperature and pressure caused the addi- tion

Zare, Richard N.

305

UV Resonance Raman Characterization of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Coal Liquid Distillates*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UV Resonance Raman Characterization of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Coal Liquid Distillates samples, such as petroleum and coal, or for man-made samples, such as coal liquids, a major desire- nique for studying coal-liquid samples. 1-4 We demon- strated that the Raman spectra of polycyclic

Asher, Sanford A.

306

Environmental Research 105 (2007) 101118 Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(6.8 million, US Census Bureau, 2000) and urbanized region and is subject to polycyclic aromatic congestion in the US (TTI, 2003). The Bay receives freshwater inflow primarily from the Delta.10.007 ?Corresponding author. Fax: +1 510 746 7300. E-mail address: john@sfei.org (J.R.M. Ross). #12;wastewater

307

Nitrated and oxygenated derivatives of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the ambient air of two  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Size distribution; Atmospheric pollution; POVA (POllution des Vallées, published in "Atmospheric Environment 42, 173 (2008) 55 à 64" DOI : 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2007.10.008 #12 was determined during the intensive sampling campaigns of the POVA (POllution des Vallées Alpines) research

Boyer, Edmond

308

Rediscovering the Wheel. Thermochemical Analysis of Energetics of the Aromatic Diazines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

calorimetry and vapor pressure measurements. The gas and condensed phase enthalpies of formation of the parent not the case for diazabenzenes. The previous comprehensive experimental study of both the condensed and gasRediscovering the Wheel. Thermochemical Analysis of Energetics of the Aromatic Diazines Sergey P

Chickos, James S.

309

A new carbon-13 method for determining aromatic, naphthenic and paraffinic carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The determination of the relative percentages of aromatic, naphthenic and paraffinic carbon in samples of natural origin is important for many petroleum related studies including processing, geological studies, and certain product specifications. The normal method is the n-d-M method which requires the measurement of refractive index, density and molecular weight and a ternary correlation diagram to obtain the relative carbon percentages. It is difficult or inconvenient to make n-d-M measurements of very heavy products and the presence of significant amounts of polar materials makes n-d-M results inaccurate. The average molecular parameters determinable by a number of NMR techniques are directly or indirectly related to the percentage of various carbon types present in the mixture. Unfortunately, all the standard techniques we have examined have some built-in assumption which does not allow the accurate calculation of relative carbon percentages. For example, any proton technique applicable to aromatic fractions will give potentially low values for naphthenic carbon because naphthenic carbon is normally determined from the ..beta..-CH/sub 2/ region of tetralin-type structures (1.65-1.9 ppm). This is a very specific kind of naphthenic structure and to the extent that more than one saturate ring is asymmetrically condensed to the aromatic ring or that the saturate rings are not directly condensed to the aromatic rings, the method will fail.

Galya, L.G.; Young, D.C.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

J. Mol. Biol. (1988) 201, 751-754 Aromatic Rings Act as Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Mol. Biol. (1988) 201, 751-754 Aromatic Rings Act as Hydrogen Bond Acceptors Michael Levitt that there is a significant interaction between a hydrogen bond donor (like the > NH group) and the centre of a benzene ring, which acts as a hydrogen bond acceptor. This interaction, hvdrogen bond, which is about half as strong

Levitt, Michael

311

Extraction of fossil fuel with guanadine extracting agent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subdivided coal, oil shale or tar sands is extracted under non-thermally destructive conditions with a solvent liquid containing a compound having the general formula: (R1-)2 N-C(=N-R)-N(-R2)2 Where R, R/sub 1/, and R/sub 2/ are each hydrogen atoms, lower alkyl (C/sub 1/-C/sub 4/) groups, or phenyl groups; provided that the compound has a decomposition temperature higher than the temperature of the extraction, and the extraction temperature is below the softening or decomposition temperature of the material being extracted.

Case, G.D.; Bekowies, P.J.; Panson, A.G.; Stiller, A.H.

1984-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

312

Extraction chromatography: Progress and opportunities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extraction chromatography provides a simple and effective method for the analytical and preparative-scale separation of a variety of metal ions. Recent advances in extractant design, particularly the development of extractants capable of metal ion recognition or of strong complex formation in highly acidic media, have significantly improved the utility of the technique. Advances in support design, most notably the introduction of functionalized supports to enhance metal ion retention, promise to yield further improvements. Column instability remains a significant obstacle, however, to the process-scale application of extraction chromatography. 79 refs.

Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bond, A.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Passive vapor extraction feasibility study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demonstration of a passive vapor extraction remediation system is planned for sites in the 200 West Area used in the past for the disposal of waste liquids containing carbon tetrachloride. The passive vapor extraction units will consist of a 4-in.-diameter pipe, a check valve, a canister filled with granular activated carbon, and a wind turbine. The check valve will prevent inflow of air that otherwise would dilute the soil gas and make its subsequent extraction less efficient. The granular activated carbon is used to adsorb the carbon tetrachloride from the air. The wind turbine enhances extraction rates on windy days. Passive vapor extraction units will be designed and operated to meet all applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. Based on a cost analysis, passive vapor extraction was found to be a cost-effective method for remediation of soils containing lower concentrations of volatile contaminants. Passive vapor extraction used on wells that average 10-stdft{sup 3}/min air flow rates was found to be more cost effective than active vapor extraction for concentrations below 500 parts per million by volume (ppm) of carbon tetrachloride. For wells that average 5-stdft{sup 3}/min air flow rates, passive vapor extraction is more cost effective below 100 ppm.

Rohay, V.J.

1994-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

Kinetics of hydrogenation of aromatics determined by carbon-13 NMR for Athabasca bitumen-derived middle distillates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High aromatics content in middle distillates is detrimental to fuel quality, as shown in such properties as smoke point of jet fuel and cetane number of diesel fuel. In the petroleum and petrochemical industries the yields from fluid catalytic cracking or steam cracking units are adversely affected by high aromatics content in the feedstock. Distillates obtained from oil sand bitumen, heavy oils, or coal liquefaction products are particularly high in aromatics. Reducing the concentration of this class of compounds is important. Aromatics hydrogenation (AHYD) is one option to achieve this result. In the current Syncrude operation a primary objective of hydrotreating is to reduce product sulfur and nitrogen contents; reducing aromatics content is an incidental result. However, the expansion plan currently under study by Syncrude includes further AHYD to improve cetane number. Predicting the product aromatics content is an important issue for this study. In the present study, hydrotreating of five Athabasca-bitumen-derived gas oils was conducted in pilot scale trickle-bed reactors using alumina-based commercial NiMo catalysts. Feedstocks originated from the distillation of virgin bitumen, and from distillates derived from treating bitumen in a fluid coker and hydrocracking pilot plant. Aromatics content was determined by the {sup 13}C NMR method. The previously developed rate equation for AHYD was modified by including power terms for space velocity and hydrogen partial pressure. The data were analyzed using the modified equation.

Yui, S.M.; Sanford, E.C. (Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada))

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Modification of the EIC hydrogen sulfide abatement process to produce valuable by-products. Final report, May 4, 1981-May 4, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program of analytical and experimental studies has been carried out to develop modifications of the CUPROSUL process for the desulfurization of geothermal steam. The objective of the program was to devise practical means to manipulate the chemistry of the process so that the consumption of raw materials could be controlled and a variety of valuable by-products could be produced. The process had been demonstrated, at one-tenth commercial scale, for steam of the Geysers' average composition in a configuration which resulted in essentially complete oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. The ability to control the extent of oxidation would increase process flexibility and extend its range of applicability to steams of widely varying composition. Preliminary market surveys of raw materials required for the process and by-products which could be produced indicated that controlling the oxidation of sulfides to produce elemental sulfur would probably be the preferred process option. Use of lime to treat sulfate-containing purge streams to produce by-product gypsum and ammonia for recycle or sale could also be justified for certain steam compositions. Recovery of ammonium sulfate alone from the purge stream would not normally be justified unless corecovery of other valuable by-products, such as boric acid, was possible at incremental cost. It was found that ferric sulfate was a highly effective, selective oxidant for the controlled oxidation of copper sulfide solids to produce elemental sulfur for sale and copper sulfate for recycle.

Offenhartz, P. O'D.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. Table 1 provides an overview of the major markets for carbon products. Current sources of materials for these processes generally rely on petroleum distillation products or coal tar distillates obtained as a byproduct of metcoke production facilities. In the former case, the American materials industry, just as the energy industry, is dependent upon foreign sources of petroleum. In the latter case, metcoke production is decreasing every year due to the combined difficulties associated with poor economics and a significant environmental burden. Thus, a significant need exists for an environmentally clean process which can used domestically obtained raw materials and which can still be very competitive economically.

Elliot B. Kennel; Chong Chen; Dady Dadyburjor; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

317

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The final report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during length of the project. The goal of this project was to integrate coal into a refinery in order to produce coal-based jet fuel, with the major goal to examine the products other than jet fuel. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal-based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. The main goal of Task 1 was the production of coal-based jet fuel and other products that would need to be utilized in other fuels or for non-fuel sources, using known refining technology. The gasoline, diesel fuel, and fuel oil were tested in other aspects of the project. Light cycle oil (LCO) and refined chemical oil (RCO) were blended, hydrotreated to removed sulfur, and hydrogenated, then fractionated in the original production of jet fuel. Two main approaches, taken during the project period, varied where the fractionation took place, in order to preserve the life of catalysts used, which includes (1) fractionation of the hydrotreated blend to remove sulfur and nitrogen, followed by a hydrogenation step of the lighter fraction, and (2) fractionation of the LCO and RCO before any hydrotreatment. Task 2 involved assessment of the impact of refinery integration of JP-900 production on gasoline and diesel fuel. Fuel properties, ignition characteristics and engine combustion of model fuels and fuel samples from pilot-scale production runs were characterized. The model fuels used to represent the coal-based fuel streams were blended into full-boiling range fuels to simulate the mixing of fuel streams within the refinery to create potential 'finished' fuels. The representative compounds of the coal-based gasoline were cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane, and for the coal-base diesel fuel they were fluorine and phenanthrene. Both the octane number (ON) of the coal-based gasoline and the cetane number (CN) of the coal-based diesel were low, relative to commercial fuels ({approx}60 ON for coal-based gasoline and {approx}20 CN for coal-based diesel fuel). Therefore, the allowable range of blending levels was studied where the blend would achieve acceptable performance. However, in both cases of the coal-based fuels, their ignition characteristics may make them ideal fuels for advanced combustion strategies where lower ON and CN are desirable. Task 3 was designed to develop new approaches for producing ultra clean fuels and value-added chemicals from refinery streams involving coal as a part of the feedstock. It consisted of the following three parts: (1) desulfurization and denitrogenation which involves both new adsorption approach for selective removal of nitrogen and sulfur and new catalysts for more effective hydrotreating and the combination of adsorption denitrogenation with hydrodesulfurization; (2) saturation of two-ring aromatics that included new design of sulfur resistant noble-metal catalysts for hydrogenation of naphthalene and tetralin in middle distillate fuels, and (3) value-added chemicals from naphthalene and biphenyl, which aimed at developing value-added organic chemicals from refinery streams such as 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 4,4{prime}-dimethylbiphenyl as precursors to advanced polymer materials. Major advances were achieved in this project in designing the catalysts and sorbent materials, and in developing fundamental understanding. The objective of Task 4 was to evaluate the effect of introducing coal into an existing petroleum refinery on the fuel oil product, specifically trace element emissions. Activities performed to accomplish this objective included analyzing two petroleum-based commercial heavy fuel oils (i.e., No. 6 fuel oils) as baseline fuels and three co-processed fuel oils, characterizing the atomization performance of a No. 6 fuel oil, measuring the combustion performance and emissions of the five fuels, specifically major, minor, and trace elements when fired in a watertube boiler designed for natural gas/fuel oil, and determining the boiler performance when firing the five fuels. Two

Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Bio-processing of solid wastes and secondary resources for metal extraction - A review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Review focuses on bio-extraction of metals from solid wastes of industries and consumer goods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bio-processing of certain effluents/wastewaters with metals is also included in brief. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantity/composition of wastes are assessed, and microbes used and leaching conditions included. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bio-recovery using bacteria, fungi and archaea is highlighted for resource recycling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Process methodology/mechanism, R and D direction and scope of large scale use are briefly included. - Abstract: Metal containing wastes/byproducts of various industries, used consumer goods, and municipal waste are potential pollutants, if not treated properly. They may also be important secondary resources if processed in eco-friendly manner for secured supply of contained metals/materials. Bio-extraction of metals from such resources with microbes such as bacteria, fungi and archaea is being increasingly explored to meet the twin objectives of resource recycling and pollution mitigation. This review focuses on the bio-processing of solid wastes/byproducts of metallurgical and manufacturing industries, chemical/petrochemical plants, electroplating and tanning units, besides sewage sludge and fly ash of municipal incinerators, electronic wastes (e-wastes/PCBs), used batteries, etc. An assessment has been made to quantify the wastes generated and its compositions, microbes used, metal leaching efficiency etc. Processing of certain effluents and wastewaters comprising of metals is also included in brief. Future directions of research are highlighted.

Lee, Jae-chun [Mineral Resources Research Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), Gwahang-no, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Pandey, Banshi Dhar, E-mail: bd_pandey@yahoo.co.uk [Mineral Resources Research Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), Gwahang-no, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); CSIR - National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Long-Range Atmospheric Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: A Global 3-D Model Analysis Including Evaluation of Arctic Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the global 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem to simulate long-range atmospheric transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). To evaluate the models ability to simulate PAHs with different volatilities, ...

Friedman, Carey

320

Structure of middle distillate fuels on the atomic carbon and hydrogen to carbon ratio at alpha position to aromatic rings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The alkyl, naphthenic, or total carbon atoms of the functional groups at alpha position to aromatic rings and their hydrogen to carbon ratio are some of the important parameters for structural analysis of fossil fuel products. In this paper, the authors present a number of novel formula-structure relationships for precise determination of different carbon atom types at alpha position to aromatic rings and the average number of hydrogens per alpha-carbon.

Glavincevski, B.; Gulder, O.L.; Gardner, L

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Catalytic oxidation of 2-aminophenols and ortho hydroxylation of aromatic amines by tyrosinase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The usual substrates of tyrosinase, a copper-containing monooxygenase (EC 1.14.18.1), are monophenols and o-diphenols which are both converted to o-quinones. In this paper, the authors studied the reaction of this enzyme with two new classes of substrates: aromatic amines and o-aminophenols, structural analogues of monophenols and o-diphenols, respectively. They undergo the same catalytic reactions (ortho hydroxylation and oxidation), as documented by product analysis and kinetic studies. In the presence of tyrosinase, arylamines and o-aminophenols are converted to o-quinone imines, which are isolated as quinone anils or phenoxazones. As an example, in the presence of tyrosinase, 2-amino-3-hydroxybenzoic acid (an o-aminophenol) is converted to cinnabarinic acid, a well-known phenoxazone, while p-aminotoluene (an aromatic amine) gives rise to the formation of 5-amino-2-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone 1-(4-methylanil). Kinetic studies using an oxygen electrode show that arylamines and the corresponding monophenols exhibit similar Michaelis constants. In contrast, the reaction rates observed for aromatic amines are relatively slow as compared to monophenols. The enzymatic conversion of arylamines by tryosinase is different from the typical ones: N-oxidation and ring hydroxylation without further oxidation. This difference originates from the regiospecific hydroxylation (ortho position) and subsequent oxidation of the intermediate o-aminophenol to the corresponding o-quinone imine. Finally, the well-know monooxygenase activity of tyrosinase was also confirmed for the aromatic amine p-aminotoluene, with /sup 18/O/sub 2/.

Toussaint, O.; Lerch, K.

1987-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

322

Quantification of in situ polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation at a petroleum contaminated site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contaminated area located in the Port Arthur Refinery of Fina Oil and Chemical Company (FINA). The soil within these area had been chronically contaminated with Bunker C fuel oil spills. As this contamination was considered a potential threat... formed as products of combustion (Gibson, 1977). Their hydrophobic properties and low water solubility make them adsorb to sediments and migrate with them through rivers, lakes and oceans (Cerniglia and Heitkamp, 1989). Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons...

Conti, Enzo Mario

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Calixarene crown ether solvent composition and use thereof for extraction of cesium from alkaline waste solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solvent composition and corresponding method for extracting cesium (Cs) from aqueous neutral and alkaline solutions containing Cs and perhaps other competing metal ions is described. The method entails contacting an aqueous Cs-containing solution with a solvent consisting of a specific class of lipophilic calix[4]arene-crown ether extractants dissolved in a hydrocarbon-based diluent containing a specific class of alkyl-aromatic ether alcohols as modifiers. The cesium values are subsequently recovered from the extractant, and the solvent subsequently recycled, by contacting the Cs-containing organic solution with an aqueous stripping solution. This combined extraction and stripping method is especially useful as a process for removal of the radionuclide cesium-137 from highly alkaline waste solutions which are also very concentrated in sodium and potassium. No pre-treatment of the waste solution is necessary, and the cesium can be recovered using a safe and inexpensive stripping process using water, dilute (millimolar) acid solutions, or dilute (millimolar) salt solutions. An important application for this invention would be treatment of alkaline nuclear tank wastes. Alternatively, the invention could be applied to decontamination of acidic reprocessing wastes containing cesium-137.

Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN); Presley, Derek J. (Ooltewah, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Liquid-Liquid Extraction Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liquid-liquid extraction is the separation of one or more components of a liquid solution by contact with a second immiscible liquid called the solvent. If the components in the original liquid solution distribute themselves differently between...

Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Hot water bitumen extraction process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of extracting bitumen oils from tar-sands ore. It includes an initial conditioning step comprising crushing tar-sands ore to yield solid particles of a maximum size required by a log washer conditioner in a second conditioning step; a bitumen extraction step; a bitumen separation step; a solvent recovery step; a sand washing and water clarification step; and a sand solvent recovery step.

Rendall, J.S.

1989-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

326

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

327

Treatability study on the use of by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan for the stabilization of hazardous and radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Republic of Kazakhstan generates significant quantities of excess elemental sulfur from the production and refining of petroleum reserves. In addition, the country also produces hazardous, and radioactive wastes which require treatment/stabilization. In an effort to find secondary uses for the elemental sulfur, and simultaneously produce a material which could be used to encapsulate, and reduce the dispersion of harmful contaminants into the environment, BNL evaluated the use of the sulfur polymer cement (SPC) produced from by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan. This thermoplastic binder material forms a durable waste form with low leaching properties and is compatible with a wide range of waste types. Several hundred kilograms of Kazakhstan sulfur were shipped to the US and converted to SPC (by reaction with 5 wt% organic modifiers) for use in this study. A phosphogypsum sand waste generated in Kazakhstan during the purification of phosphate fertilizer was selected for treatment. Waste loadings of 40 wt% were easily achieved. Waste form performance testing included compressive strength, water immersion, and Accelerated Leach Testing.

Kalb, P.D.; Milian, L.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Environmental and Waste Technology Center; Yim, S.P. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst. (Korea, Republic of); Dyer, R.S.; Michaud, W.R. [Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Treatability study on the use of by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan for the stabilization of hazardous and radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Republic of Kazakhstan generates significant quantities of excess sulfur from the production and refining of petroleum reserves. In addition, the country also produces hazardous, and radioactive wastes which require treatment/stabilization. In an effort to find secondary uses for the elemental sulfur, and simultaneously produce a material which could be used to encapsulate, and reduce the dispersion of harmful contaminants into the environment, BNL evaluated the use of the sulfur polymer cement (SPC) produced from by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan. This thermoplastic binder material forms a durable waste form with low leaching properties and is compatible with a wide range of waste types. Several hundred kilograms of Kazakhstan sulfur were shipped to the U.S. and converted to SPC (by reaction with 5 wt% organic modifiers) for use in this study. A phosphogypsum sand waste generated in Kazakhstan during the purification of phosphate fertilizer was selected for treatment. Waste loading of 40 wt% were easily achieved. Waste form performance testing included compressive strength, water immersion, and Accelerated Leach Testing. 14 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Yim, Sung Paal; Kalb, P.D.; Milian, L.W.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Fourth quarterly technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation are conducting Phase 1 of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an on-going DOE-sponsored, University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicate that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. The performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

331

Cesium and strontium extraction using a mixed extractant solvent including crown ether and calixarene extractants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mixed extractant solvent including calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from an acidic solution. The DtBu18C6 may be present from approximately 0.01 M to approximately 0.4M, such as from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may form an organic phase in an extraction system that also includes an aqueous phase. Methods of extracting cesium and strontium as well as strontium alone are also disclosed.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

332

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. These carbon products include materials used in metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. A process has been developed which results in high quality binder pitch suitable for use in graphite electrodes or carbon anodes. A detailed description of the protocol is given by Clendenin. Briefly, aromatic heavy oils are hydro-treated under mild conditions in order to increase their ability to dissolve coal. An example of an aromatic heavy oil is Koppers Carbon Black Base (CBB) oil. CBB oil has been found to be an effective solvent and acceptably low cost (i.e., significantly below the market price for binder pitch, or about $280 per ton at the time of this writing). It is also possible to use solvents derived from hydrotreated coal and avoid reliance on coke oven recovery products completely if so desired.

Elliot B. Kennel; Philip L. Biedler; Chong Chen; Dady Dadyburjor; Liviu Magean; Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

333

Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, November 1994--February 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This second quarterly report describes work during the second three months of the University of Pittsburgh`s (Pitt`s) project on the {open_quotes}Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.{close_quotes} Participating with Pitt on this project are Dravo Lime Company (DLC), Mill Service, Inc. (MSI) and the Center for Hazardous Materials Research (CHMR). The report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focussed upon the acquisition of by-product samples and their initial analysis. Other efforts during the second quarter have been directed toward identifying the first hazardous waste samples and preparing for their treatment and analysis. Relatively little data has yet been collected. Major presentation of technical details and data will appear for the first time in the third quarterly report. The activity on the project during the second quarter of Phase One, as presented in the following sections, has fallen into seven areas: (1) Acquiring by-products, (2) Analyzing by-products, (3) Identifying, analyzing and treating suitable hazardous wastes, (4) Carrying out the quality assurance/quality control program, (5) Developing background, and (6) Initiating public relations

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Preliminary evaluation of the use of the greater confinement disposal concept for the disposal of Fernald 11e(2) byproduct material at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a preliminary evaluation of the ability of the greater confinement disposal boreholes at the Nevada Test Site to provide long-term isolation of radionuclides from the disposal of vitrified byproduct material. The byproduct material is essentially concentrated residue from processing uranium ore that contains a complex mixture of radionuclides, many of which are long-lived and present in concentrations greater than 100,000 picoCuries per gram. This material has been stored in three silos at the fernald Environmental Management Project since the early 1950s and will be vitrified into 6,000 yd{sup 3} (4,580 m{sup 3}) of glass gems prior to disposal. This report documents Sandia National Laboratories` preliminary evaluation for disposal of the byproduct material and includes: the selection of quantitative performance objectives; a conceptual model of the disposal system and the waste; results of the modeling; identified issues, and activities necessary to complete a full performance assessment.

Cochran, J.R.; Brown, T.J.; Stockman, H.W.; Gallegos, D.P.; Conrad, S.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Price, L.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); [Beta Inc. (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Powder River Basin coalbed methane: The USGS role in investigating this ultimate clean coal by-product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past few decades, the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin has supplied the Nation with comparatively clean low ash and low sulfur coal. However, within the past few years, coalbed methane from the same Fort Union coal has become an important energy by-product. The recently completed US Geological Survey coal resource assessment of the Fort Union coal beds and zones in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains (Fort Union Coal Assessment Team, 1999) has added useful information to coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin has rapidly accelerated in the past three years. During this time more than 800 wells have been drilled and recent operator forecasts projected more than 5,000 additional wells to be drilled over the next few years. Development of shallow (less than 1,000 ft. deep) Fort Union coal-bed methane is confined to Campbell and Sheridan Counties, Wyoming, and Big Horn County, Montana. The purpose of this paper is to report on the US Geological Survey's role on a cooperative coalbed methane project with the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Wyoming Reservoir Management Group and several gas operators. This paper will also discuss the methodology that the USGS and the BLM will be utilizing for analysis and evaluation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Powder River Basin. The USGS and BLM need additional information of coalbed methane reservoirs to accomplish their respective resource evaluation and management missions.

Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Ochs, A.M.; Stanton, R.W.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation are conducting Phase 1 of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an on-going DOE-sponsored, University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicate that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. The performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams. The principal objective of the Phase 1 program is to identify and evaluate the performance of a catalyst which is robust and flexible with regard to choice of reducing gas. In order to achieve this goal, the authors have planned a structured program including: Market/process/cost/evaluation; Lab-scale catalyst preparation/optimization studies; Lab-scale, bulk/supported catalyst kinetic studies; Bench-scale catalyst/process studies; and Utility review. Progress is reported from all three organizations.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary environmental risk assessment on the FGD by-products to be placed underground is virtually complete. The initial mixes for pneumatic and hydraulic placement have been selected and are being subject to TCLP, ASTM, and modified SLP shake tests as well as ASTM column leaching. Results of these analyses show that the individual coal combustion residues, and the residues mixes, are non-hazardous in character. Based on available information, including well logs obtained from Peabody Coal Company, a detailed study of the geology of the placement site was completed. The study shows that the disposal site in the abandoned underground mine workings at depths of between 325 and 375 feet are well below potable groundwater resources. This, coupled with the benign nature of the residues and residues mixtures, should alleviate any concern that the underground placement will have adverse effects on groundwater resources. Seven convergence stations were installed in the proposed underground placement area of the Peabody Coal Company No. 10 mine. Several sets of convergence data were obtained from the stations. A study of materials handling and transportation of coal combustion residues from the electric power plant to the injection site has been made. The study evaluated the economics of the transportation of coal combustion residues by pneumatic trucks, by pressure differential rail cars, and by SEEC, Inc. collapsible intermodal containers (CICs) for different annual handling rates and transport distances. The preliminary physico-chemical characteristics and engineering properties of various FBC fly ash-spent bed mixes have been determined, and long-term studies of these properties are continuing.

Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S.; Ghafoori, N.; Paul, B.; Sevim, H.; Thomasson, E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of CCB materials. The two technologies for the underground placement that were to be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry CCB products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of CCB products with about 70% solids. The period covered by this report is the second quarter of Phase 3 of the overall program. During this period over 8,000 tons of CCB mixtures was injected using the hydraulic paste technology. This amount of material virtually filled the underground opening around the injection well, and was deemed sufficient to demonstrate fully the hydraulic injection technology. By the end of this quarter about 2,000 tons of fly ash had been placed underground using the pneumatic placement technology. While the rate of injection of about 50 tons per hour met design criteria, problems were experienced in the delivery of fly ash to the pneumatic demonstration site. The source of the fly ash, the Archer Daniels Midland Company power plant at Decatur, Illinois is some distance from the demonstration site, and often sufficient tanker trucks are not available to haul enough fly ash to fully load the injection equipment. Further, on some occasions fly ash from the plant was not available. The injection well was plugged three times during the demonstration. This typically occurred due to cementation of the FBC ash in contact with water. After considerable deliberations and in consultation with the technical project officer, it was decided to stop further injection of CCB`s underground using the developed pneumatic technology.

Chugh, Y.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

2 Extracting and trapping biogenic 3 volatile organic compounds stored  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Subcritical water extraction; UAE, Ultrasound-assisted extraction 36 1. Introduction Plants release

Goldstein, Allen

340

Uranium Ore Uranium is extracted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Milling of Uranium Ore Uranium is extracted from ore with strong acids or bases. The uranium is concentrated in a solid substance called"yellowcake." Chemical Conversion Plants convert the uranium in yellowcake to uranium hexafluoride (UF6 ), a compound that can be made into nuclear fuel. Enrichment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

Parallel algorithms for inductance extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 3. Pin Connect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 C. The Inductance Extraction Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 ix CHAPTER Page V COMPARISON WITH EXISTING WORK . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 A. Ground Plane... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 1. Shared Memory Parallelization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 2. Mixed Mode Parallelization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 3. Distributed Memory Parallelization . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 VII CONCLUSIONS...

Mahawar, Hemant

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

342

Compounds having aromatic rings and side-chain amide-functionality and a method for transporting monovalent anions across biological membranes using the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound containing at least two aromatic rings covalently bonded together, with each aromatic ring containing at least one oxyacetamide-based side chain, the compound being capable of forming a chloride ion channel across a lipid bilayer, and transporting chloride ion across the lipid bilayer.

Davis, Jeffery T. (College Park, MD); Sidorov, Vladimir (Richmond, VA); Kotch, Frank W. (New Phila., PA)

2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

343

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the National Seminar on Building Materials and Technology for Sustainable Developments, CEPT-SBST, Ahmedabad a leading role in the sustainable development of the cement and concrete industry in this century. Sustainable design and construction of structures have a small impact on the environment, use "green

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

344

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

suitable for highway construction applications. 1.0 INTRODUCTION Scrapped tires are produced in the U. At the present time, landfilling is the major technique for scrap tire disposal in the country. Scrap tires used as economic advantages. Scrap tires are primarily composed of natural rubber, steel, synthetic rubber

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

345

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-28 REP-482 November 2002 Final Technical Report Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute For Project

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

346

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the combination of Class C fly ash and clean coal ash. Two percent to four percent sodium sulfate anhydrite

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

347

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-19 REP-443 November 2001 Final Technical Report Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute For Project

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

348

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), at 28 days, using various sources of ASTM Class F and clean coal fly ashes. For each reference mixture

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

349

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

different types of compressed gases, compressed air, carbon dioxide, and a mixed gas. This mixed gas the compressive strength and binding the carbon dioxide in the carbonation-reaction products. The carbonation-reaction of the CLSM would also have the potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions at a coal-fired power plant

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

350

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Conference onFly Ash Disposal and Utilization,onJanuary 20-22, 1998, New Delhi, India. COAL ASH and embankments, pavement and subbase courses, subgrade stabilizations, landfill cover, soil improvement, land

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

351

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pozzolans in Concrete, Chennai (Madras), India, July 2001. Department of Civil Engineering and Mechanics for construction, landfill space conservation as well as preserving virgin materials that would otherwise

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

352

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

", Portland Cement Association Skokie, IL, pp. 1-10. 11. Burnham, J. C., Bennet, G. F., and Logan, T. J., 1990

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

353

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is presented below. #12;Gasoline and Light Distillates Gasolines are blends of petroleum derived chemicals hydrocarbons (RFWI and UM 1993; API 1989). These hydrocarbons can be categorized as: gasoline and light are highly soluble components in gasoline and can be present up to a maximum concentration of 10% [API 1989

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

354

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is carried in the flue gas, separated by electrostatic precipitators, and collected in a field of hoppers in the dry form or mixed with water and discharged as slurry into locations called ash pond - wet method

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

355

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), including construction materials, metal recovery, and pollution control. Landfilling is becoming very of some heavy metals, the use of wood fly ash as a soil supplement is also becoming limited; in addition

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

356

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of cellulose fibers and papermaking fillers (kaolinitic clay, calcium carbonate, and/or titanium dioxide). In some cases, ash generated at mill and inert solids rejected during chemical recovery processes become soluble organic matter to carbon dioxide and water while consuming oxygen. Secondary residual is mainly

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

357

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

currently being produced by Manitowoc Public Utilities. Flowable Materials have up to 1200 psi compressive of water, and consist mostly of ash or similar materials. It is believed that concrete Bricks, Blocks in manufacturing Blended Cements. Soil stabilization or site remediation is another significant potential use

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

358

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consume all of the ashes currently being produced by Manitowoc Public Utilities. Flowable Materials have little portland cement and a lot of water, and consist mostlyof ash or similar materials. It is believed fly ash in manufacturing Blended Cements. Soil stabilization or site remediation is another

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

359

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

would consume all of the wood ashes produced at Consolidated Papers. Flowable Materials have up to 1200 portland cement and a lot of water, and consist mostly of ash or similar materials. It is believed remediation is another significant potential use of the ashes. For example, for log-yard paving (Roller

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

360

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

clean-coal technologies such as SO2 Control Systems, NOx Control Technology, Fluidized Bed Combustion Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute, 5776 Coal Drive, Suite 200, Carterville, IL 62918-sulfur coal. Ponded ash is usually a mixture of fly ash and bottom ash or boiler slag. Concrete was made

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is defined as the ash derived from thermal power plants using clean-coal technologies such as SO2 Control of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 784, Milwaukee, WI 53201. 4 Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute Systems, NOx Control Technology, Fluidized Bed Combustion, and Gasification Combined Cycle for reducing

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

362

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion of coal in conventional and advanced clean-coal technology combustors. These include fly ash clean-coal technology combustors. Although 560 million tonnes (Mt) of fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler furnaces, or advanced clean-coal technology furnaces. The ash collected from pulverized-coal-fired furnaces

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

363

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

after combustion of coal in conventional and advanced clean-coal technology combustors. These include and advanced clean-coal technology combustors. Although 560 million tonnes (Mt) of fly ash, bottom ash use either pulverized-coal-fired furnaces, cyclone furnaces, or advanced clean-coal technology

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

364

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies. A clean-coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SOxand NOxcontrol technologies, and FBC that obtained from clean-coal technology, are not utilized in cast-concrete masonry products (bricks, blocks conventional and clean-coal technologies. Fifteen high-sulfur coal ash samples were obtained from eight

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

365

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ash or CFAs. Based on these properties, a number of constructive use options such as #12;pollution by saw mills, pulp mills, and the wood-products industry, by burning a combination of wood products control [3], land application [9,10,11], construction materials [13,14], have been reported. However, most

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

366

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the ability of future generations to meet their own requirements (13). As a business model, this means is ecologically unfriendly: it consumes much energy and natural resources, and emits a number of undesirable air AND ECO-EFFICIENCY The definition of "sustainability", following the World Commission on Environment

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

367

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to establish and demonstrate technical benefits of porous, low-strength concrete that uses large amounts of non in construction materials. Porous concrete mixtures do not require air entrainment for freezing and thawing resistance. Therefore, high-carbon ash could be used in such concretes. Porous concrete mixtures were first

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

368

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are recycled/reused. #12;2 Naik et al. [2] evaluated the literature concerning use of polymers and used containing discardedpolyethylene terephthalate (PET) derived from soda bottles in manufacture of polymer concrete. The PET was chemically modified to produce a liquid resin using facilities available

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

369

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-burning electricity gene-ration is the current principal energy source. The total amounts of fly ash and bottom ash, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee #12;The bar graph (Fig. 1) compares the production and utilization of fly shows the percentage of various usage of fly ash in China in 1988 [1]. Fig. 2 Percentage of Fly Ash

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

370

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Products Utilization University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee ABSTRACT This project consisted of performance testing at a typical electric power plant. One of the goals of this project was to determine the feasibility of using. The carbonation reaction of the CLSM would also have the potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions at a coal-fired

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

371

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generated at mill and inert solids rejected during chemical recovery processes become part of the primary residual. The water clarified by the primary treatment is passed on to the secondary treatment. Secondary dioxide and water while consuming oxygen. Secondary residual is mainly microbial biomass (called also

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

372

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generated by the mill and inert #12;solids rejected during chemical recovery processes become part of the primary residual. The water clarified by the primary treatment is passed on to the secondary treatment. The secondary treatment is usually a biological process in which micro-organisms convert soluble organic matter

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

373

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generated at mill and inert solids rejected during chemical recovery processes become part of the primary residual. The water clarified by the primary treatment is passed on to the secondary treatment. Secondary dioxide and water while consuming oxygen. Secondary residual is mainly microbial biomass (also called

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

374

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solids rejected during chemical recovery processes become part of the primary residual. The water clarified by the primary treatment is passed on to the secondary treatment. Secondary treatment is usually consuming oxygen. Secondary residual is mainly microbial biomass (also called biosolids) grown during

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

375

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report No. 321 August 1997-15 Department of Civil Engineering and Mechanics College of Engineering and sand to produce concrete. The United States consumes approximately 90 million tons of Portland cement annually. The manufacture of cement is quite energy intensive. It requires approximately 3000 kJ of energy

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

376

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report No. CBU-1997-19 October 1997 For presentation and publication at the CBIP International Conference as carbon from unburnt coal, fire polished sand, thin-walled hollow spheres and their fragments, magnetic to the producer, lost resources and energy, and environmental problems. To solve these problems, it is essential

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

377

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRACTICE By Rudolph N. Kraus, Tarun R. Naik, and Yoon-moon Chun Report No. CBU-2006-12 REP-611 April 2006 to be mined, cement continues to be manufactured or imported, and energy is consumed in the processing briefly describes the uses of coal ash, wood ash, and used foundry sand, in concrete. Typically, one

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

378

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Rakesh Kumar Report No. CBU-2003-08 REP-503 March 2003 A CBU Report Department of Civil Engineering.6 billion tons of cement, 10 billion tons of sand and rock, and 1 billion tons of mixing water (Mehta, 2001 plants are the major source of generation of electricity. Coal-fired power plants derive energy

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

379

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monosi, Giacomo Moriconi, and Tarun R. Naik Report No. CBU-2007-11 REP-632 June 2007 Presented of paper mill sludge: as a secondary raw material to produce blended cements, as a very fine sand addition energy for internal use. Such combustion fumes carry fly ashes which are collected and available as a new

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

380

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a variety of rubber and plastic products, thermal incineration of waste tires for production of electricity rubber in asphalt mixes, (ii) thermal incineration of worn-out tires for the production of electricity

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manager at the Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI). He is involved in implementing and monitoring) coal-ash and by replacing up to 9% of aggregates with wet-collected, low-lime, coarse coal-ash. Cast of coal fly ash, coal bottom ash, and used foundry sand in concrete and cast-concrete products

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

382

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be used in clean-coal applications for the removal of sulfur dioxide emissions from flue gas. Since mineral addition to coal, and spraying coal to minimize dusting due to coal handling, transportation

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

383

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Dairyland Power Cooperative, La Crosse, WI; Madison Gas and Electric Company, Madison, WI; National Minerals contents or use thereof. This report does not constitute a standard, specification, or regulation

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

384

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Products Utilization E-mail: ymchun@uwm.edu and F. D. Botha Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute 5776 Coal, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, USA. 4 Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

385

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 784, Milwaukee, WI 53201 d Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute * Director UWM products containing clean coal ash compared to conventional coal ash. Utilization of clean coal ash is much products that utilize clean coal ash. With increasing federal regulations on power plant emissions, finding

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

386

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.4 April 2000 A Mid-Year Project Management Report Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute for Project for evaluation. Clean coal fly ash was obtained from Southern Illinois University and a wet collected Class F fly and Quarters Cumulative$ Cumulative Project Budget Total Illinois Clean Coal Institute Award $ 86,095 Estimated

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

387

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI and Ronald H. Carty Director Illinois Clean Coal Institute Carterville, IL ABSTRACT, Naik and Singh [16] summarized various applications of fly ash generated from conventional and clean coal technologies. Uses of coal combustion by- products can be categorized into three classes: high-volum

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

388

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the Cement and Concrete Institute of Mexico Symposium "Worldof Concrete - Mexico," Guadalajara, Mexico, June with proper use of form oil to allow migration of released air pockets. Sand content should be increased

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

389

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

addition for mortars and concretes, especially for self-compacting concrete. This marble powder showed on self-compacting concrete mixtures (1-6). MATERIALS Portland Cement A commercial portland AND CONCRETE By Valeria Corinaldesi, Giacomo Moriconi, and Tarun R. Naik Report No. CBU-2005-09 REP-580 August

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

390

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dust in self-consolidating concrete (SCC). A control SCC mixture was made, in which ASTM C 618 Class C fly ash: tarun@uwm.edu (T. R. Naik). 1. Introduction Self-consolidating concrete (SCC), a relatively recent- compacting concrete, super-workable concrete, highly flowable concrete, non-vibrating concrete, and other

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

391

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was carried out to utilize wood ash in making self- compacting controlled low-strength materials (CLSM), air and Presentation at the Seventh CANMET/ACI International Conference on Recent Advances in Concrete Technology, Las-entrained and non-air- entrained concretes, and bricks/blocks/paving stones. Initial test results indicated

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

392

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of consistency and fluidity, self-leveling and self-compacting, contain very little portland cement, and large applications, such as Roller Compacted Concrete for industrial plants, materials handling yards, parking lots quantities of ash and water. It is believed that concrete Bricks, Blocks, and Paving Stones can also be made

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

393

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6 concretes, especially for self-compacting concrete. This marble powder showed a very high7 Blaine AND CONCRETE By Valeria Corinaldesi, Giacomo Moriconi, and Tarun R. Naik Report No. CBU-2007-07 REP-628 #12;1 CHARACTERIZATION OF MARBLE POWDER FOR ITS USE IN1 MORTAR AND CONCRETE2 3 Valeria Corinaldesi

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

394

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be handled without segregation. It is also referred to as self-compacting concrete, super-workable concrete SELF- CONSOLIDATING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Yoon-moon Chun, Fethullah Canpolat-Dust in Manufacturing Economical Self-Consolidating Concrete T. R. Naika, *, R. N. Krausa , Y. Chuna , F. Canpolata , R

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

395

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-reinforced concrete, self-compacting concrete, ultra-high-strength concrete, conductive concrete, self-curing concrete chemical environments and complex applied loading conditions. The recent development of self-compacting-performance concrete, high-durability concrete (HDC), roller compacted concrete, high-volume fly ash concrete, fiber

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

396

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ash. Paving applications, such as Roller Compacted Concrete for industrial plants, parking lots be used in Self-Consolidating Concrete applications. This type of concrete requires additional fines that concrete Bricks, Blocks, and Paving Stones can also be made with the Corn Products' coal ash. Additionally

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

397

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Self-Compactability of Fresh Concrete............................................... 6 Slump-Flow Test Energies Fly Ash for Developing Economical Self- Consolidating Concrete (by Tarun R. Naik, Yoon-moon Chun, particularly the viscosity modifying admixture (VMA), for producing an economical self- consolidating concrete

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

398

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-leveling, self-compacting, cementitious material, which has a consistency similar to a pancake batter. CLSM can fibrous residuals from pulp and paper mills. The flowable slurry will meet ACI (American Concrete Institute) 229 recommendations for flowable Controlled Low-Strength Materials (CLSM). CLSM is a self

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

399

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is defined as a self compacted, cementitious material used primarily as a backfill in lieu of compacted fill and published at the third CANMET/ACI International Symposium on Advances in Concrete Technology, Auckland, New of low strength fill materials and has been known by many other names. The American Concrete Institute

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

400

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ash. A clean-coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SO2 control technologies. Investigations were CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Rafat Siddique, Berlin, Germany, October 2003 Department of Civil Engineering and Mechanics College of Engineering

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Objectives This testing work will evaluate use of high-carbon fly ash in non-air entrained concrete in the concrete mixture. The testing work for this project will involve laboratory testing of mechanical varied types for concrete construction applications. Specific objectives for this testing work

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

402

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of New York is approximately 28% composed of leaves, grass, yard, food, and other organic waste. New York) of MSW generated per year were landfilled, 14.0% were combusted, and 31% were recycled or composted). Recycling of MSW increased 9% and composting of MSW increased 5% from 1990 to 2003, totaling 7

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

403

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of landfilling is increasing due to strict environmental regulations and limited availability of landfill space a stricter environmental regulation. In light of these, it is essential to develop beneficial uses of wood and publication at the ACI Maharastra Chapter, Mumbai, India, July 2001. Department of Civil Engineering

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

404

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;ACI member Bruce W. Ramme, P.E., Manager- Environmental Land Quality, Wisconsin Electric Power Materials, 230 Soil Cement, 232 Fly Ash and Natural Pozzolans, and 555 Recycled Materials. He is a member of ASCE, NSPE, and other professional organizations. Haifang Wen is a Transportation Engineer at Bloom

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

405

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, calcium carbonate, and/or titanium dioxide) and the biomass from biological treatment of wastewater. Fiber wastewater-treatment residuals; wood fibers. #12;Naik, Chun, & Kraus Flowable Slurry Made With Class C Fly include wastewater-treatment residuals (also called sludge), fiber reclaim, and screening rejects

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

406

Titanium metal: extraction to application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

Gambogi, Joseph (USGS, Reston, VA); Gerdemann, Stephen J.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

QSAR model of the phototoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons Fabiana Alves de Lima Ribeiro, Marcia Miguel Castro Ferreira*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of carcinogenic and toxic potential. These chemicals are well known as water, sediment, soil and air contaminants [1­5]. They are predominant in urban and rural areas, due to the burning of wood and coal, exhaust molecular masses, including even methane, may act as precursors for the polycyclic aromatic compounds. Low

Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

408

DO THE INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES NEED ULTRAVIOLET EXCITATION? THE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON MODEL IN UV-POOR REFLECTION NEBULAE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'' PAHs in reflection nebulae near stars as cool as Teff 3000 K can result in observable emis- sion at 6DO THE INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES NEED ULTRAVIOLET EXCITATION? THE POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON MODEL IN UV-POOR REFLECTION NEBULAE Aigen Li and B. T. Draine Department of Astrophysical Sciences

Draine, Bruce T.

409

2094 J.Org. Chem. 1988,53, 2094-2099 Table 11. Bromination of Aromatic Hydrocarbons with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Br,/aromatic = 5; solvent: carbon tetrachloride. *Chloro- benzene. tetrachloride and 1,4-dibromonaphthalenewas from ICN Biomedicals (WoelmN-Super 1). Carbon tetrachloride was dried with calcium chloride,26, 759. (10) Kovacic, P.; Wu, C. J. Org. Chem. 1961,26, 762. mmol), 2 (30 g), and carbon tetrachloride

Hudlicky, Tomas

410

MHUG process for production of low sulfur and low aromatic diesel fuel. [Medium-pressure Hydro UpGrading  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new hydro-upgrading process operated under medium pressure has been developed to reduce the sulfur and the aromatics content in light cycle oil (LCO). Two catalysts were used in series in this technology. The commercial RN-1 catalyst, which is known as having high activity in hydrodenitrogenation, desulfurization and aromatic saturation, was chosen as the first catalyst. The second one was a nickel-tungsten zeolite catalyst, named RT-5, which was developed by RIPP specially for hydrogenolysis of naphthenic and aromatic hydrocarbons. The pilot plant tests showed that high quality diesel oil with aromatics content less than 20 v% and sulfur content less than 0.05 wt% could be produced from various LCO/straight-run-gas-oil (SRGO) blended feedstocks under hydrogen partial pressure of 6.4 MPa. The reaction temperature and overall space velocity (S.V.) varied in the range of 350--380 C and 0.6--1.2 h[sup [minus]1], respectively, depending on the properties of the feedstocks to be processed and the upgrading depth required. Several examples presented also illustrated that this technology could be used to prepare catalytic reforming feedstock as well, which is in urgent need in China. A life test operated in relatively high severity for 3,000 hr. indicated that the catalysts possessed excellent stability. A commercial demonstration unit has been running well since the last Oct 1.

Shi, Yu Lin; Shi, Jian Wen; Zhang, Xin Wei; Shi, Ya Hua; Li, Da Dong (SINOPEC, Beijing (China). Research Inst. of Petroleum Processing)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Gauge Invariant Spectral Cauchy Characteristic Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present gauge invariant spectral Cauchy characteristic extraction. We compare gravitational waveforms extracted from a head-on black hole merger simulated in two different gauges by two different codes. We show rapid convergence, demonstrating both gauge invariance of the extraction algorithm and consistency between the legacy Pitt null code and the much faster Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC).

Casey J. Handmer; Bla Szilgyi; Jeffrey Winicour

2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

412

Anisotropy and Size Effects on the Optical Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electronic and optical properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present a strong dependence on their size and geometry. We tackle this issue by analyzing the spectral features of two prototypical classes of PAHs, belonging to D6h and D2h symmetry point groups and related to coronene as multifunctional seed. While the size variation induces an overall red shift of the spectra and a redistribution of the oscillator strength between the main peaks, a lower molecular symmetry is responsible for the appearance of new optical features. Along with broken molecular orbital degeneracies, optical peaks split and dark states are activated in the low-energy part of the spectrum. Supported by a systematic analysis of the composition and the character of the optical transitions, our results contribute in shedding light to the mechanisms responsible for spectral modifications in the visible and near UV absorption bands of medium-size PAHs.

Caterina Cocchi; Deborah Prezzi; Alice Ruini; Marilia J. Caldas; Elisa Molinari

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

413

One-electron oxidation in the degradation of creosote polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by Phanerochaete chrysoporium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The abilities of whole cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium and P. chrysosporium manganese peroxidase-mediated lipid peroxidation reactions to degrade the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in creosote were studied. The disappearance of 12 three- to six-ring PAHs occurred in both systems. Both in vivo and in vitro, the disappearance of all PAHs was found to be very strongly correlated with ionization potential. This was true even for compounds beyond the ionization potential thresholds of lignin peroxidase and Mn{sup 3+}. Deviations from this correlation were seen in the cases of PAHs which are susceptible to radical addition reactions. These results thus begin to clarify the mechanisms of non-lignin peroxidase-labile PAH degradation in the manganese peroxidase-lipid peroxidation system and provide further evidence for the ability of this system to explain the in vivo oxidation of these compounds. 35 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Bogan, B.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)]|[USDA Forest Service Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States); Lamar, R.T. [USDA Forest Service Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

THE INFRARED SPECTRA OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS WITH SOME OR ALL HYDROGEN ATOMS REMOVED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The loss of one hydrogen from C{sub 96}H{sub 24} does not significantly affect the infrared spectra of the neutral, cation, or anion. Excluding a very weak C-C stretching band at 5.1 ?m, the loss of two adjacent duo hydrogens does not significantly affect the spectra compared with the parent. Removing all of the hydrogen atoms significantly increases the intensity of the new C-C stretching band, and, for the cation, shifts it to a longer (5.2 ?m) wavelength. Observations show a feature near 5.25 ?m, which has been attributed to overtone and combination bands from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This current work suggests that dehydrogenated PAHs might also contribute to this band, but its weakness implies that fully dehydrogenated cationic or dicationic species are very rare.

Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr. [Entry Systems and Technology Division, Mail Stop 230-3, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Ricca, Alessandra, E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.gov, E-mail: Alessandra.Ricca-1@nasa.gov [Carl Sagan Center, SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

415

On-line database of the spectral properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an on-line database of computed molecular properties for a large sample of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in four charge states: -1, 0, +1, and +2. At present our database includes 40 molecules ranging in size from naphthalene and azulene (C10H8) up to circumovalene (C66H20). We performed our calculations in the framework of the density functional theory (DFT) and the time-dependent DFT to obtain the most relevant molecular parameters needed for astrophysical applications. For each molecule in the sample, our database presents in a uniform way the energetic, rotational, vibrational, and electronic properties. It is freely accessible on the web at http://astrochemistry.ca.astro.it/database/ and http://www.cesr.fr/~joblin/database/.

G. Malloci; C. Joblin; G. Mulas

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

416

Rendering graphene supports hydrophilic with non-covalent aromatic functionalization for transmission electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amorphous carbon films have been routinely used to enhance the preparation of frozen-hydrated samples for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), either in retaining protein concentration, providing mechanical stability or dissipating sample charge. However, strong background signal from the amorphous carbon support obstructs that of the sample, and the insulating properties of thin amorphous carbon films preclude any efficiency in dispersing charge. Graphene addresses the limitations of amorphous carbon. Graphene is a crystalline material with virtually no phase or amplitude contrast and unparalleled, high electrical carrier mobility. However, the hydrophobic properties of graphene have prevented its routine application in Cryo-TEM. This Letter reports a method for rendering graphene TEM supports hydrophilica convenient approach maintaining graphene's structural and electrical properties based on non-covalent, aromatic functionalization.

Pantelic, Radosav S., E-mail: pantelic@imbb.forth.gr [National Cancer Institute, 50 South Drive, Building 50, Room 4306, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Fu, Wangyang; Schoenenberger, Christian [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, Basel CH-4056 (Switzerland); Stahlberg, Henning [Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics, Biozentrum, University of Basel, Mattenstrasse 26, WRO-1058, Basel CH-4058 (Switzerland)

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Aromatic carboxylate effect on dimensionality of three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers: Syntheses, structures and properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three new metal-organic coordination polymers [Co(4-bbc){sub 2}(bbbm)] (1), [Co(3,5-pdc)(bbbm)]2H{sub 2}O (2) and [Co(1,4-ndc)(bbbm)] (3) (4-Hbbc=4-bromobenzoic acid, 3,5-H{sub 2}pdc=3,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 1,4-H{sub 2}ndc=1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid and bbbm=1,1-(1,4-butanediyl)bis-1H-benzimidazole) were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Polymer 1 is a 1D chain formed by the bbbm ligands and Co{sup II} ions. Polymer 2 exhibits a 2D network with a (345)(3{sup 2}456{sup 2}7{sup 4}) topology. Polymer 3 possesses a 3D three-fold interpenetrating framework. The versatile structures of title polymers indicate that the aromatic carboxylates have an important influence on the dimensionality of 13. Moreover, the thermal stability, electrochemical and luminescent properties of 13 were investigated. - graphical abstract: Three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers tuned by aromatic carboxylates were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. The aromatic carboxylates play a key role in the dimensionality of three polymers. The electrochemical and luminescent properties of three polymers were investigated. Display Omitted - Highlights: Three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers tuned by aromatic carboxylates were obtained. The aromatic carboxylates have an important influence on the dimensionality of three polymers. The electrochemical and luminescent properties of three polymers were investigated.

Zhang, Ju-Wen; Gong, Chun-Hua; Hou, Li-Li; Tian, Ai-Xiang; Wang, Xiu-Li, E-mail: wangxiuli@bhu.edu.cn

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Solvent extraction of inorganic acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the solution by a sim?. le process that is economically =ttrsctlve is of con- sider. ble interest~ Dilute "olution; of hydrochloric, nitric and sul- furic acid d; occur in many processes either alone or toga- th: r . 'he use of li. , uid-li~uid extraction...~~ram for hexyl c~rbitol- water-nitric acid 17 ~ Distribution die, r m for hoxl'' ca:-bitol- watcr-sulfur'c acid Table 1. . 'xperimental d ta of amyl alcohol-water-!!Cl Pa, e 33 2. Experimental data of isoamyl alcohol-water- HC1 34 3 ~ Cxperimental data...

Ysrael, Miguel Curie

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. The largest applications are those which support metals smelting, such as anodes for aluminum smelting and electrodes for arc furnaces. Other carbon products include materials used in creating fuels for the Direct Carbon Fuel Cell, metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, coking and composite fabrication continued using coal-derived samples. These samples were tested in direct carbon fuel cells. Methodology was refined for determining the aromatic character of hydro treated liquid, based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). Tests at GrafTech International showed that binder pitches produced using the WVU solvent extraction protocol can result in acceptable graphite electrodes for use in arc furnaces. These tests were made at the pilot scale.

Elliot B. Kennel; R. Michael Bergen; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Alfred H. Stiller; W. Morgan Summers; John W. Zondlo

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

420

PRODUCTION OF FOAMS, FIBERS AND PITCHES USING A COAL EXTRACTION PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored project developed processes for converting coal feedstocks to carbon products, including coal-derived pitch, coke foams and fibers based on solvent extraction processes. A key technology is the use of hydrogenation accomplished at elevated temperatures and pressures to obtain a synthetic coal pitch. Hydrogenation, or partial direct liquefaction of coal, is used to modify the properties of raw coal such that a molten synthetic pitch can be obtained. The amount of hydrogen required to produce a synthetic pitch is about an order of magnitude less than the amount required to produce synthetic crude oil. Hence the conditions for synthetic pitch production consume very little hydrogen and can be accomplished at substantially lower pressure. In the molten state, hot filtration or centrifugation can be used to separate dissolved coal chemicals from mineral matter and insolubles (inertinite), resulting in the production of a purified hydrocarbon pitch. Alternatively, if hydrogenation is not used, aromatic hydrocarbon liquids appropriate for use as precursors to carbon products can obtained by dissolving coal in a solvent. As in the case for partial direct liquefaction pitches, undissolved coal is removed via hot filtration or centrifugation. Excess solvent is boiled off and recovered. The resultant solid material, referred to as Solvent Extracted Carbon Ore or SECO, has been used successfully to produce artificial graphite and carbon foam.

Chong Chen; Elliot B. Kennel; Liviu Magean; Pete G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

2004-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Quantitation of Sulfur Mustard By-Products, Sulfur-Containing Herbicides, and Organophosphonates in Soil and Concrete  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past fifty years, the facilities at Rocky Mountain Arsenal have been used for the manufacturing, bottling, and shipping sulfur- containing herbicides, sulfur mustard, and Sarin. There is a need for analytical methods capable of determining these constituents quickly to determine exactly how specific waste structural materials should be handled, treated, and landfilled.These species are extracted rapidly from heated samples of soil or crushed concrete using acetonitrile at elevated pressure, then analyzed using a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame photometric detector. Thiodiglycol, the major hydrolysis product of sulfur mustard, must be converted to a silylated derivative prior to quantitation. Detection limits, calculated using two statistically-unbiased protocols, ranged between 2-13 micrograms analyte/g soil or concrete.

Tomkins, B.A., Sega, G.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)], Macnaughton, S.J. [Microbial Insights, Inc., Rockford, TN (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

Extracting inorganics from scrap tires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scrap tires contain several inorganic moieties in abundances >0.5% which are impregnated into their carbonaceous matrix. These inorganic species are known to produce acid rain, toxic aerosols, and boiler scale and could produce unwanted catalytic effects as well. It is our position that the potential of recycling scrap tires would be considerably enhanced if the inorganics in question - S, Ca, and Zn - were removed prior to attempts to upgrade the carbonaceous matrix. Using non-mechanical methods, we are attempting to cleave the adherence between the co-polymer matrix and to extract the inorganics. The efficiency of our methods is being measured by wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometry and by other methods.

Cummings, R.; Wertz, D.L. [Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and americium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU's together with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU's and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and americium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU's together with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU's and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal. 3 figs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1992-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

425

Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and amercium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N.N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU`s to gather with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU`s and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Inner-Shell Excitation Spectroscopy of Fused-Ring Aromatic Molecules by Electron Energy Loss and X-ray Raman Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recorded under scattering conditions where electric dipole transitions dominate (2.5 keV residual energy aromatics in bulk samples that are opaque to soft X-rays, such as coals and heavy hydrocarbon deposits. 1

Hitchcock, Adam P.

427

Two-stage hydrotreating of a bitumen-derived middle distillate to produce diesel and jet fuels, and kinetics of aromatics hydrogenation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The middle distillate from a synthetic crude oil derived from Athabasca bitumen was further hydrotreated in a downflow pilot unit over a typical NiMo catalyst at 330 to 400 C, 7 to 11 MPa and 0.63 to 1.39 h{sup {minus}1} LHSV. Feed and liquid products were characterized for aromatics, cetane index (CI) and other diesel specification items. Aromatics were determined by a supercritical fluid chromatography method, while CI was determined using the correlation developed at Syncrude Canada Ltd. Also feed and selected products were distilled into a jet fuel cut (150/260 C) by spinning band distillation for the determination of smoke point and other jet fuel specification items. A good relationship between aromatics content and CI was obtained. Kinetics of aromatics hydrogenation were investigated, employing a simple-first order reversible reaction model.

Yui, S.M. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

Comparison of aromatic hydrocarbon measurements made by PTR-MS, DOAS and GC-FID during the MCMA 2003 Field Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comparison of aromatic hydrocarbon measurements is reported for the CENICA supersite in the district of Iztapalapa during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field experiment in April 2003 (MCMA 2003). Data from three ...

Jobson, B. T.

429

Batch and Flow Photochemical Benzannulations Based on the Reaction of Ynamides and Diazo Ketones. Application to the Synthesis of Polycyclic Aromatic and Heteroaromatic Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Highly substituted polycyclic aromatic and heteroaromatic compounds are produced via a two-stage tandem benzannulation/cyclization strategy. The initial benzannulation step proceeds via a pericyclic cascade mechanism ...

Willumstad, Thomas P.

430

Emissions of C6-C8 aromatic compounds in the United States: Constraints from tall tower1 and aircraft measurements2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6, 7 5 6 1. Department of Soil, Water, and Climate, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN, USA [Ahmadov et al.,18 2014; Jaars et al., 2014; Xue et al., 2014]. These aromatic VOCs (so-called BTEX

Mlllet, Dylan B.

431

The unusual hydrocarbon emission from the early carbon star HD 100764: The connection between aromatics and aliphatics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have used the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on the Spitzer Space Telescope to obtain spectra of HD 100764, an apparently single carbon star with a circumstellar disk. The spectrum shows emission features from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are shifted to longer wavelengths than normally seen, as characteristic of ``class C'' systems in the classification scheme of Peeters et al. All seven of the known class C PAH sources are illuminated by radiation fields that are cooler than those which typically excite PAH emission features. The observed wavelength shifts are consistent with hydrocarbon mixtures containing both aromatic and aliphatic bonds. We propose that the class C PAH spectra are distinctive because the carbonaceous material has not been subjected to a strong ultraviolet radiation field, allowing relatively fragile aliphatic materials to survive.

G. C. Sloan; M. Jura; W. W. Duley; K. E. Kraemer; J. Bernard-Salas; W. J. Forrest; B. Sargent; A. Li; D. J. Barry; C. J. Bohac; D. M. Watson; J. R. Houck

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

432

Determination of Extractives in Biomass: Laboratory Analytical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Extractives in Biomass Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 7172005 A. Sluiter, R. Ruiz, C. Scarlata, J. Sluiter, and D. Templeton Technical Report NRELTP-510-42619...

433

Aqueous Enzymatic Extraction Of Wheat Germ Oil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of this study is to investigate the aqueous enzymatic extraction of wheat germ oil. Four enzymes (Viscozyme L, Multifect CX 13l, Multifect CX (more)

Xie, Meizhen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Technologies for Extracting...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technologies for Extracting Valuable Metals and Compounds from Geothermal Fluids Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About...

435

Accelerated solvent extraction of petroleum contaminated sediments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Attempts have been made in recent years to find acceptable alternatives to classical soxhlet extraction of petroleum contaminated sediments. One such method that is very (more)

Bauguss, Jeffery Lynn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Removal of phenols and aromatic amines from wastewater by a combination treatment with tyrosinase and a coagulant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Removal of phenols and aromatic amines from industrial wastewater by tyrosinase was investigated. A color change from colorless to dark brown was observed, but no precipitate was formed. Colored products were found to be easily removed by a combination treatment with tyrosinase and a cationic polymer coagulant containing amino group, such as hexamethylenediamine-epichlorohidrin polycondensate, polyethleneimine, or chitosan. The first two coagulants, synthetic polymers, were more effective than chitosan, a polymer produced in crustacean shells. Phenols and aromatic amines are not precipitated by any kind of coagulants, but their enzymatic reaction products are easily precipitated by a cationic polymer coagulant. These results indicate that the combination of tyrosinase and a cationic polymer coagulant is effective in removing carcinogenic phenols and aromatic amines from an aqueous solution. Immobilization of tyrosinase on magnetite gave a good retention of activity (80%) and storage stability i.e., only 5% loss after 15 days of storage at ambient temperature. In the treatment of immobilized tyrosinase, colored enzymatic reaction products were removed by less coagulant compared with soluble tyrosinase.

Wada, Shinji; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu; Tatsumi, Kenji (National Inst. for Resources and Environment, Ibaraki (Japan))

1995-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

The importance of snow scavenging of polychlorinated biphenyl and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon vapors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, experimental data on the scavenging of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the atmosphere by snow were interpreted assuming that the distribution of chemical between particles and dissolved phase measured in the meltwater reflects the state of the chemical during the scavenging process. A consequence of this assumption is that vapor scavenging is found to be unimportant relative to particle scavenging. An alternative interpretation is presented that during melting repartitioning occurs from the dissolved phase to the particle-sorbed phase. Further, it is argued that a constant particle scavenging ratio may apply to all chemicals of the same class in the same precipitation event, and its value can be estimated from the scavenging characteristics of predominantly particle-sorbed, high molecular mass chemicals. This analysis suggests that for more volatile PCBs and PAHs vapor scavenging is an important, if not the dominating, snow scavenging process. Gas scavenging ratios obtained with this method are, as expected, negatively correlated with the vapor pressure of a substance, indicating that adsorption to the air-ice interface is the process responsible for vapor scavenging.

Wania, F. [WECC Wania Environmental Chemists Corp., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [WECC Wania Environmental Chemists Corp., Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Mackay, D. [Trent Univ., Peterborough, Ontario (Canada). Environmental and Resource Studies] [Trent Univ., Peterborough, Ontario (Canada). Environmental and Resource Studies; Hoff, J.T. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Earth Science] [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Earth Science

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Hydrogenation of aromatics in synthetic crude distillates catalyzed by platinum supported in molecular sieves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalytic hydrogenation of synthetic crude distillates from Canadian oil sands was carried out over platinum metal supported in pillared interlayered clay (PILC) and Y-zeolite. The molecular sieve supports were employed to modify the properties of dispersed platinum particles and improve their resistance to poisoning by sulfur. The objective was to reduce the distillate aromatic content to meet diesel emission control standards and cetane number requirements. Catalysts were prepared in a series of steps, and metal precursor was loaded using ion-exchange procedures. Characterization was done using X-ray diffraction, hydrogen chemisorption, and proton-induced X-ray emission elemental analysis. Catalytic hydrogenation reactions were carried out by processing distillate feedstocks both high (>100 ppm) and low (<10 ppm) in sulfur using a continuous-flow automated microreactor system. Experimental runs were performed to determine the reaction kinetics and Arrhenius parameters as a means of evaluating and comparing catalyst performance. Significant differences in catalyst activity were found. The Pt/Y-zeolite-alumina catalyst showed a much superior hydrogenation performance under conditions of high sulfur content. The extent of cracking and ring opening was also evaluated and was shown to be minimal under the operating conditions employed.

Kimbara, N.; Charland, J.P. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)] [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Wilson, M.F. [CANMET, Devon, Alberta (Canada)] [CANMET, Devon, Alberta (Canada)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Measurement of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in the plume of Kuwait oil well fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following their retreat from Kuwait during February and March of 1991, the Iraqi Army set fire to over 500 oil wells dispersed throughout the Kuwait oil fields. During the period of sampling from July to August 1991, it was estimated that between 3.29 {times} 10{sup 6} barrels per day of crude oil were combusted. The resulting fires produced several plumes of black and white smoke that coalesced to form a composite ``super`` plume. Because these fires were uncontrolled, significant quantities of organic materials were dispersed into the atmosphere and drifted throughout the Middle East. The organic particulants associated with the plume of the oil well fires had a potential to be rich in polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds. Based on the extreme mutagenic and carcinogenic activities of PAHs found in laboratory testing, a serious health threat to the population of that region potentially existed. Furthermore, the Kuwait oil fire plumes represented a unique opportunity to study the atmospheric chemistry associated with PAHs in the plume. If samples were collected near the plume source and from the plume many kilometers downwind from the source, comparisons could be made to better understand atmospheric reactions associated with particle-bound and gas-phase PAHs. To help answer health-related concerns and to better understand the fate and transport of PAHs in an atmospheric environment, a sampling and analysis program was developed.

Olsen, K.B.; Wright, C.W.; Veverka, C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ball, J.C. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States). Scientific Research Lab.; Stevens, R. [US Environmental Protection Agency (United States). Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Lab.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Highly efficient blue OLEDs based on diphenylaminofluorenylstyrenes end-capped with heterocyclic aromatics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we have designed four diphenylaminofluorenylstyrene derivatives end-capped with heterocyclic aromatic groups, such as 9-phenylcabazole, 4-dibenzofuran, 2-benzoxazole, 2-quinoxaline, respectively. These materials showed blue to red fluorescence with maximum emission wavelengths of 476611 nm, respectively, which were dependent on the structural and electronic nature of end-capping groups. To explore the electroluminescent properties of these materials, multilayer OLEDs were fabricated in the following sequence: ITO/DNTPD (40 nm)/NPB (20 nm)/2% doped in MADN (20 nm)/Alq{sub 3} (40 nm)/Liq. (1 nm)/Al. Among those, a device exhibited a highly efficient blue emission with the maximum luminance of 14,480 cd/m{sup 2} at 9 V, the luminous efficiency of 5.38 cd/A at 20 mA/cm{sup 2}, power efficiency of 2.77 lm/W at 20 mA/cm{sup 2}, and CIE{sub x,y} coordinates of (0.147, 0.152) at 8 V, respectively.

Oh, Suhyun [Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kum Hee; Kim, Young Kwan [Department of Information Display, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Information Display, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Seung Soo, E-mail: ssyoon@skku.edu [Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contamination in marine sediments near Kitimat, British Columbia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), like many other hydrophobic organic contaminants, are rapidly sorbed to particles and incorporated within sediments in aquatic systems. The PAH composition within the sediments reflects the source(s) from which the PAHs were derived. However, the ``source signature`` may be altered by postdepositional weathering or biodegradation. In the present study, variation in PAH composition was investigated in size-fractionated sediments and depth-fractionated sediments collected from a Canadian fjord contaminated with aluminum smelter derived PAHs. Multivariate analyses of PAH compositional data consistently showed that different sampling sites could be discriminated on the basis of their PAH composition, but smaller versus larger size fractions within a site could not. The composition of unsubstituted and alkyl-substituted PAHs in a sediment core primarily showed changes with depth that were attributable to enhancement of anthropogenic inputs in the upper core segments. No trends with sediment depth, associated with compound-specific weathering or biotransformation, were noted in the composition of anthropogenically generated PAHs. This may indicate a limited chemical and biological availability of the aluminum smelter derived PAHs.

Simpson, C.D.; Harrington, C.F.; Cullen, W.R. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Chemistry Dept.] [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada). Chemistry Dept.; Bright, D.A.; Reimer, K.J. [Royal Roads Military College, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada). Environmental Sciences Group] [Royal Roads Military College, Victoria, British Columbia (Canada). Environmental Sciences Group

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Field application of a genetically engineered microorganism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bioremediation process monitoring and control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On October 30, 1996, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) commenced the first test release of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) for use in bioremediation. The specific objectives of the investigation were multifaceted and include (1) testing the hypothesis that a GEM can be successfully introduced and maintained in a bioremediation process, (2) testing the concept of using, at the field scale, reporter organisms for direct bioremediation process monitoring and control, and (3) acquiring data that can be used in risk assessment decision making and protocol development for future field release applications of GEMs. The genetically engineered strain under investigation is Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (King et al., 1990). The original P. fluorescens parent strain was isolated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated manufactured gas plant soil. Thus, this bacterium is able to biodegrade naphthalene (as well as other substituted naphthalenes and other PAHs) and is able to function as a living bioluminescent reporter for the presence of naphthalene contamination, its bioavailability, and the functional process of biodegradation. A unique component of this field investigation was the availability of an array of large subsurface soil lysimeters. This article describes the experience associated with the release of a genetically modified microorganism, the lysimeter facility and its associated instrumentation, as well as representative data collected during the first eighteen months of operation.

Sayler, G.S.; Cox, C.D.; Ripp, S.; Nivens, D.E.; Werner, C.; Ahn, Y.; Matrubutham, U. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Burlage, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

GAS-PHASE REACTIONS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON ANIONS WITH MOLECULES OF INTERSTELLAR RELEVANCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied reactions of small dehydrogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon anions with neutral species of interstellar relevance. Reaction rate constants are measured at 300 K for the reactions of phenide (C{sub 6}H{sup -}{sub 5}), naphthalenide (C{sub 10}H{sup -}{sub 7}), and anthracenide (C{sub 14}H{sup -}{sub 9}) with atomic H, H{sub 2}, and D{sub 2} using a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube instrument. Reaction rate constants of phenide with neutral molecules (CO, O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}OH, CH{sub 3}CN, (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CO, CH{sub 3}CHO, CH{sub 3}Cl, and (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}){sub 2}O) are also measured under the same conditions. Experimental measurements are accompanied by ab initio calculations to provide insight into reaction pathways and enthalpies. Our measured reaction rate constants should prove useful in the modeling of astrophysical environments, particularly when applied to dense regions of the interstellar and circumstellar medium.

Demarais, Nicholas J.; Yang Zhibo; Martinez, Oscar; Wehres, Nadine; Bierbaum, Veronica M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 215 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0215 (United States); Snow, Theodore P., E-mail: Nicholas.Demarais@Colorado.edu, E-mail: Zhibo.Yang@Colorado.edu, E-mail: OMartinez@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: Nadine.Wehres@Colorado.edu, E-mail: Veronica.Bierbaum@Colorado.edu, E-mail: Theodore.Snow@Colorado.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States)

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

444

POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON EMISSION IN THE PROPLYD HST10: WHAT IS THE MECHANISM BEHIND PHOTOEVAPORATION?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proplyds are photodissociation-region-(PDR)-like cometary cocoons around young stars which are thought to originate through photoevaporation of the central protoplanetary disk by external UV radiation from the nearby OB stars. This Letter presents spatially resolved mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of the proplyd HST10 obtained with the Very Large Telescope/VISIR instrument. These observations allow us to detect polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in the proplyd PDR and to study the general properties of PAHs in proplyds for the first time. We find that PAHs in HST10 are mostly neutral and at least 50 times less abundant than typical values found for the diffuse interstellar medium or the nearby Orion Bar. With such a low PAH abundance, photoelectric heating is significantly reduced. If this low abundance pertains also to the original disk material, gas heating rates could be too low to efficiently drive photoevaporation unless other processes can be identified. Alternatively, the model behind the formation of proplyds as evaporating disks may have to be revised.

Vicente, S.; Kamp, I. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, Postbus 800, 9700 AV, Groningen (Netherlands); Berne, O. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Huelamo, N. [CAB (INTA-CSIC), LAEFF, P.O. Box 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Pantin, E. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM - CNRS - Universite Paris Diderot, IRFU/SAP, F-91191 sur Yvette (France); Carmona, A. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble, F-38041 (France)

2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

445

Multisolvent successive extractive refining of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A selected group of commercial solvents, namely, anthracene oil (AO), ethylenediamine (EDA), and liquid paraffin (LP), were used for successive extraction of Assam coal. Hot AO provided a wide range of mixed solvents that dissociate chemically and interact favorably with dissociated and undissociated coal macromolecules (like dissolves like). This resulted in the enhancement of the EDA extractability of the AO-pretreated residual coal. EDA is a good swelling solvent and results in physical dissociation of coal molecules. The residual coal obtained after EDA extraction was subjected to extraction with LP, an H-donor, high-boiling (330--360 C) solvent. LP thermally dissociates coal macromolecules and interacts with the coal at its plastic stage at the free radical pockets. The mechanism and molecular dynamics of the multisolvent successive extraction of Assam coal using AO-EDA-LP solvents are discussed. In early attempts, successive extractions did not modify the extraction yield in the single solvent showing the maximum extraction. However, the AO-EDA-LP extraction resulted in the extraction of 70% coal, more than for any of the individual solvents used. Therefore, AO-EDA-LP extraction of coal affords a process yielding a superclean, high-heating value fuel from coal under milder conditions. Several uses of superclean coal have been recommended. Present studies have revealed a new concept concerning the structure of coal having 30% polyaromatic condensed entangled rings and 70% triaromatic-heterocyclic-naphthenic-aliphatic structure. The insolubility of coal is due to the polyfunctional-heterocyclic-condensed structure having a polyaromatic core with intermacromolecular entanglements.

Sharma, D.K.; Singh, S.K. [Indian Inst. of Tech., New Delhi (India)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Summary of Topic1 Fusion Power Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extraction and Tritium Fuel Cycle What choices are available for material, coolant, breeder, configuration availability of external tritium supply? #12;FW/Blanket concepts for fusion power extraction and tritium&D and facilities strongly overlap RAFM Steel PbLi Breeder Helium Cooled Ceramic Breeder Beryllium Helium Cooled Pb

Abdou, Mohamed

447

Cheaper oil extraction Taking a closer look  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solvent for commercial-scale enhanced oil recovery to increase the amount of crude oil that canCONTENTS Cheaper oil extraction Taking a closer look at the eye Computational Science takes inside for more details #12;Greener, cheaper oil extraction Geographical and geological concerns

448

Modified Extraction Scheme for the CERN PS Multi-Turn Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-activation of the extraction magnetic septum of the CERN PS machine was observed due to the losses of the continuous beam extracted via the Multi-Turn Extraction (MTE) method. A possible mitigation measure consists of using an existing electrostatic septum, located upstream of the extraction magnetic septum, to deflect the beam. This would highly decrease the beam losses, and hence the induced activation, during the rise time of the MTE kickers due to the reduced thickness of the electrostatic septum with respect to the magnetic one. The layout of this new extraction will be described in detail and the results of beam measurements presented.

Gilardoni, S; Hernalsteens, C; Lachaize, A; Mtral, G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Polyphenoloxidases immobilized in organic gels: Properties and applications in the detoxification of aromatic compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gelatine gels originate from water in oil microemulsions in which the ternary system consists of isooctane/sulfosuccinic acid bis [2-ethyl hexyl] ester/water; the solubilization of gelatin in the water pool of these microemulsions transforms them into viscous gels in which it is possible to cosolubilize various reactive molecules. These gels were used to immobilize two phenoloxidases, a laccase from Trametes versicolor and a tyrosinase from mushroom. The best balance between gel retention and catalytic activity was reached at a gelatine concentration of 2.5% (w/v) in the case of tyrosinase, while laccase immobilization was independent of gelatine concentration. Both enzymes kept the same optimum pH as the corresponding soluble controls, while a partial loss of activity was observed when they were immobilized. Immobilized enzymes showed an increased stability when incubated for several days at 4 C with a very low release from the gels in the incubation solutions. The immobilization of tyrosinase and of laccase enhanced stability to thermal inactivation. Furthermore, gel-entrapped tyrosinase was almost completely preserved from proteolysis: more than 80% of the activity was maintained, while only 25% of the soluble control activity was detected after the same proteolytic treatments. A column packed with gel-immobilized tyrosinase was used to demonstrate that enzymes immobilized with this technique may be reused several times in the same reaction without loosing their efficiency. Finally, gel-entrapped tyrosinase and laccase were capable of removing naturally occurring and xenobiotic aromatic compounds from aqueous suspensions with different degrees of efficiency.

Crecchio, C.; Ruggiero, P.; Pizzigallo, M.D.R. [Univ. di Bari (Italy). Ist. di Chimica Agraria

1995-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

450

EXTINCTION AND POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON INTENSITY VARIATIONS ACROSS THE H II REGION IRAS 12063-6259  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spatial variations in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) band intensities are normally attributed to the physical conditions of the emitting PAHs, however in recent years it has been suggested that such variations are caused mainly by extinction. To resolve this question, we have obtained near-infrared (NIR), mid-infrared (MIR), and radio observations of the compact H II region IRAS 12063-6259. We use these data to construct multiple independent extinction maps and also to measure the main PAH features (6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.2 {mu}m) in the MIR. Three extinction maps are derived: the first using the NIR hydrogen lines and case B recombination theory; the second combining the NIR data with radio data; and the third making use of the Spitzer/IRS MIR observations to measure the 9.8 {mu}m silicate absorption feature using the Spoon method and PAHFIT (as the depth of this feature can be related to overall extinction). The silicate absorption over the bright, southern component of IRAS 12063-6259 is almost absent while the other methods find significant extinction. While such breakdowns of the relationship between the NIR extinction and the 9.8 {mu}m absorption have been observed in molecular clouds, they have never been observed for H II regions. We then compare the PAH intensity variations in the Spitzer/IRS data after dereddening to those found in the original data. It was found that in most cases, the PAH band intensity variations persist even after dereddening, implying that extinction is not the main cause of the PAH band intensity variations.

Stock, D. J.; Peeters, E.; Otaguro, J. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Bik, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Phototransformation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) on a Non-Semi Conductive Surface Such as Silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), by products of fossil fuel production and consumption, constitute a large class of environmental pollutants. These toxic and sometimes carcinogenic compounds are also found in coal tar and fly ash. When released into the air, they can be sorbed onto particulates present in the atmosphere where they find their way into soil and ground water upon being washed by rain. During their residence time in the environment, PAHs will be exposed to solar radiation and may undergo phototransformation to other products. Thus, light induced photodegradation of PM`s at the solid/air interfaces can play a significant role in their depletion. Light-induced processes have been claimed to enhance transformation of these PM`s in the environment. However, detailed studies on the nature and identities of photoproducts formed during the transformation of these compounds on solid surfaces is scarce. Since insulators such as silica, alumina,silicoaluminates and calcium carbonate are believed to constitute up 20-30% of inorganic particulates present in the atmosphere, they serve as environmentally relevant model surfaces to study the photophysical and photochemical behavior of PM`s. Although photochemistry of organic compounds adsorbed on solid surfaces has received much attention in recent years, the specific properties of the interface which influence photoprocesses and the exact mechanism of interaction between a surface and a substrate are often not well understood. We have investigated the photochemistry of many PAHs including eight that are on Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) sixteen priority pollutant PAH list shown in Table 1 at silica/air interface.

Dabestani, R., Sigman, M.E.

1997-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

452

Remediating pesticide contaminated soils using solvent extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p{prime}-DDT, p,p{prime}-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as solvents over a wide range of operating conditions. It was demonstrated that a six-stage methanol extraction using a solvent-to-soil ratio of 1.6 can decrease pesticide levels in the soil by more than 99% and reduce the volume of material requiring further treatment by 25 times or more. The high solubility of the pesticides in methanol resulted in rapid extraction rates, with the system reaching quasi-equilibrium state in 30 minutes. The extraction efficiency was influenced by the number of extraction stages, the solvent-to-soil ratio, and the soil moisture content. Various methods were investigated to regenerate and recycle the solvent. Evaporation and solvent stripping are low cost and reliable methods for removing high pesticide concentrations from the solvent. For low concentrations, GAC adsorption may be used. Precipitating and filtering pesticides by adding water to the methanol/pesticide solution was not successful when tested with soil extracts. 26 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

Sahle-Demessie, E.; Meckes, M.C.; Richardson, T.L. [National Management Research Lab., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

Residues from coal conversion and utilization: Advanced mineralogical characterization and disposed byproduct diagenesis. [Semiannual report, 1 Mar 1999--31 Aug 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the project is to learn more about the phenomenon of coal conversion byproduct (CCB) diagenesis, first described by this group and co-workers at UND EERC seven years ago. CCB diagenesis is a change in the mineralogy that occurs after some CCBs are disposed in a landfill or utilized for a civil engineering application. Regulatory environmental tests and civil engineering tests are typically performed on as-generated CCBs, or on CCBs hydrated and cured for relatively short periods such as 7 or 28 days. One would like to know whether the results of these short-term tests will be valid years later. A change in mineralogy means a gain, loss or chemical redistribution of major, minor and trace elements, and alteration of physical properties. To attain this goal, two objectives were defined: (1) to develop improved methodology for quantitating mineralogy of these complex crystalline phase assemblages, and (2) to investigate the phenomenon of CCB diagenesis further by studying materials recovered from disposal landfills or civil engineering works. Objective 1--Hydrated CCBs are chemically and mineralogically complex, which makes quantitative mineralogy determination by conventional X-ray diffraction unusable or unreliable. The whole-pattern Rietveld quantitative X-ray diffraction (RQXRD) method, however, can overcome many of the problems and seems well suited to improve reliability. Two tasks were defined in the proposal: Task 1--Completion by October 1997. Prepare a reference set of CCBs for use in developing Rietveld QXRD. The reference materials will come primarily from in-house samples of advanced coal technology byproducts. The work will include SEM/EMPA characterization at UND EERC. Task 2--Completion by October 1997. Develop protocols for Rietveld QXRD analysis of CCBs. Make CCB structure data and protocols available on a Website. Determine levels of sensitivity, precision, and accuracy. Objective 2--Five types of CCBs disposed in landfills were studied between 1989 and 1994. Diagenesis was observed in three of the five materials. To obtain a more generic understanding of CCB diagenesis, additional materials and different environmental settings need to be studied. Task 3--Completion by end of project. Apply RQXRD protocols developed in Task 2 to core samples of utilized or disposed CCBs from at least five additional sites. Use results to gain a better understanding of CCB diagenesis.

Gregory J. McCarthy; Dean G. Grier

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Residues from coal conversion and utilization: Advanced mineralogical characterization and disposed byproduct diagenesis. [Semiannual report, 1 Sep 1998--28 Feb 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the project is to learn more about the phenomenon of coal conversion byproduct (CCB) diagenesis, first described by the group and co-workers at UND EERC seven years ago. CCB diagenesis is a change in the mineralogy that occurs after some CCBs are disposed in a landfill or utilized for a civil engineering application. Regulatory environmental tests and civil engineering tests are typically performed on as-generated CCBs, or on CCBs hydrated and cured for relatively short periods such as 7 or 28 days. One would like to know whether the results of these short-term tests will be valid years later. A change in mineralogy means a gain, loss or chemical redistribution of major, minor and trace elements, and alteration of physical properties. To attain this goal, two objectives were defined: (1) to develop improved methodology for quantitating mineralogy of these complex crystalline phase assemblages, and (2) to investigate the phenomenon of CCB diagenesis further by studying materials recovered from disposal landfills or civil engineering works. Objective 1--Hydrated CCBs are chemically and mineralogically complex, which makes quantitative mineralogy determination by conventional X-ray diffraction unusable or unreliable. The whole-pattern Rietveld quantitative X-ray diffraction (RQXRD) method, however, can overcome many of the problems and seems well suited to improve reliability. Two tasks were defined in the proposal: Task 1--Completion by October 1997. Prepare a reference set of CCBs for use in developing Rietveld QXRD. The reference materials will come primarily from in-house samples of advanced coal technology byproducts. The work will include SEM/EMPA characterization at UND EERC. Task 2--Completion by October 1997. Develop protocols for Rietveld QXRD analysis of CCBs. Make CCB structure data and protocols available on a Website. Determine levels of sensitivity, precision, and accuracy. Objective 2--Five types of CCBs disposed in landfills were studied between 1989 and 1994. Diagenesis was observed in three of the five materials. To obtain a more generic understanding of CCB diagenesis, additional materials and different environmental settings need to be studied. Task 3--Completion by end of project. Apply RQXRD protocols developed in Task 2 to core samples of utilized or disposed CCBs from at least five additional sites. Use results to gain a better understanding of CCB diagenesis.

Gregory J. McCarthy; Dean G. Grier

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Use of Xenon Difluoride to Clean Hazardous By-Products in Ion Implanter Source Housings, Turbo Pumps, and Fore-Lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of xenon difluoride to clean deposits in the source housing, source turbo pump, and source turbo pump fore-line of ion implanters. Xenon difluoride has previously been shown to be effective in increasing the lifetime of the ion source{sup 1,2} and this paper presents an extension of the technology to other areas within the tool. Process by-products that are deposited in the source housing, turbo pump, and turbo pump fore-line can not only pose productivity issues, in the case of coatings on insulators, but can also be flammable and toxic in the case of deposits formed within the turbo pump and fore-line. The results presented in this paper detail the initial successful examples of using xenon difluoride to clean these deposits.ATMI has shown that xenon difluoride is capable of cleaning an insulator in an ion implanter. Typically during use an insulator will become increasingly coated with deposits that could lead to productivity problems. By introducing xenon difluoride into the source housing the insulator residues were effectively cleaned in-situ, thereby extending the maintenance interval and resulting in significant consumable savings.Similar deposits that form in the turbo pump and fore-line could not only lead to production problems due to turbo pump failure or fore-line build-up, but pose significant health risks during the ex-situ cleaning process. Through internal testing ATMI has shown that xenon difluoride is able to clean phosphorus and germanium deposits located within a turbo pump. Additionally, testing has demonstrated that the turbo pump fore-line can be cleaned in-situ without the need to remove these components, thereby virtually eliminating the possibility of fires. The cleaning reaction progress and by-products were monitored using FTIR spectrometry and thermocouples.In order to efficiently clean the source housing, turbo pump, and turbo pump fore-line xenon difluoride delivery must be optimized. This paper also details a hardware concept that maximizes xenon difluoride delivery and allows the clean to be done in a way that is viable for production ion implanters.

Despres, J.; Chambers, B.; Bishop, S.; Kaim, R.; Letaj, S.; Sergi, S.; Sweeney, J.; Tang, Y.; Wilson, S.; Yedave, S. [ATMI, 7 Commerce Drive, Danbury, CT, 06810 (United States)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

456

On-site profiling and speciation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at manufactured gas plant sites by a high temperature transfer line, membrane inlet probe coupled to a photoionization detector and gas chromatography/mass spectrometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new high temperature transfer line, membrane inlet probe (HTTL-MIP) coupled to a photoionization detector (PID) and gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) was used to rapidly profile and speciate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the subsurface. PID signals were in agreement with GC/MS results. Correlation coefficients of 0.92 and 0.99 were obtained for discrete and composite samples collected from the same exact location. Continuous probe advancement with PID detection found coal tar, a dense nonaqueous phase liquid, in soil channels and saturated media. When samples were collected conventionally, split, solvent extracted, and analyzed in the field and confirmation laboratory, GC/MS measurement precision and accuracy were indistinguishable; despite the fact the field laboratory produced data five times faster than the laboratory using standard EPA methods. No false positive/negatives were found. Based on these findings, increased confidence in site conceptual models should be obtained, since PID response indicated total PAH presence/absence in 'real-time', while GC/MS provided information as to which PAH was present and at what concentration. Incorporation of this tool into a dynamic workplan will provide more data at less cost enabling environmental scientists, engineers, and regulators to better understand coal tar migration and its impact on human health and the environment. 24 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Thomas Considine; Albert Robbat Jr. [Tufts University, Medford, MA (United States). Chemistry Department, Center for Field Analytical Studies and Technology

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Determination of absolute molecular mass distribution and other structural properties of kraft lignin samples.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Lignin is an aromatic macromolecule present in wood and also a by-product in the process of making paper. For a long time, this by-product (more)

Chedid, Fadia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Fluidized bed gasification of extracted coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coal or similar carbonaceous solids are extracted by contacting the solids in an extraction zone (12) with an aqueous solution having a pH above 12.0 at a temperature between 65.degree. C. and 110.degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to remove bitumens from the coal into said aqueous solution and the extracted solids are then gasified at an elevated pressure and temperature in a fluidized bed gasification zone (60) wherein the density of the fluidized bed is maintained at a value above 160 kg/m.sup.3. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, water is removed from the aqueous solution in order to redeposit the extracted bitumens onto the solids prior to the gasification step.

Aquino, Dolores C. (Houston, TX); DaPrato, Philip L. (Westfield, NJ); Gouker, Toby R. (Baton Rouge, LA); Knoer, Peter (Houston, TX)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Fluidized bed gasification of extracted coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coal or similar carbonaceous solids are extracted by contacting the solids in an extraction zone with an aqueous solution having a pH above 12.0 at a temperature between 65/sup 0/C and 110/sup 0/C for a period of time sufficient to remove bitumens from the coal into said aqueous solution, and the extracted solids are then gasified at an elevated pressure and temperature in a fluidized bed gasification zone (60) wherein the density of the fluidized bed is maintained at a value above 160 kg/m/sup 3/. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, water is removed from the aqueous solution in order to redeposit the extracted bitumens onto the solids prior to the gasification step. 2 figs., 1 tab.

Aquino, D.C.; DaPrato, P.L.; Gouker, T.R.; Knoer, P.

1984-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

460

Extracting secret keys from integrated circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modern cryptographic protocols are based on the premise that only authorized participants can obtain secret keys and access to information systems. However, various kinds of tampering methods have been devised to extract ...

Lim, Daihyun, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Extraction Steam Controls at EPLA-W  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ExxonMobil's Baton Rouge site encompasses a world-scale refinery, chemical plant and third party power station. Historically, inflexible and unreliable control systems on two high-pressure, extracting/condensing steam turbines prevented the site...

Brinker, J. L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Information Extraction from Voicemail Transcripts Martin Jansche  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information Extraction from Voicemail Transcripts Martin Jansche Department of Linguistics The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210, USA jansche.1@osu.edu Steven P. Abney AT&T Labs ­ Research 180 Park

Abney, Steven P.

463

ECG Feature Extraction Techniques - A Survey Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECG Feature Extraction plays a significant role in diagnosing most of the cardiac diseases. One cardiac cycle in an ECG signal consists of the P-QRS-T waves. This feature extraction scheme determines the amplitudes and intervals in the ECG signal for subsequent analysis. The amplitudes and intervals value of P-QRS-T segment determines the functioning of heart of every human. Recently, numerous research and techniques have been developed for analyzing the ECG signal. The proposed schemes were mostly based on Fuzzy Logic Methods, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), Genetic Algorithm (GA), Support Vector Machines (SVM), and other Signal Analysis techniques. All these techniques and algorithms have their advantages and limitations. This proposed paper discusses various techniques and transformations proposed earlier in literature for extracting feature from an ECG signal. In addition this paper also provides a comparative study of various methods proposed by researchers in extracting the feature from ECG signal.

Karpagachelvi, S; Sivakumar, M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Reaction mechanisms in aromatic hydrocarbon formation involving the C{sub 5}H{sub 5} cyclopentadienyl moiety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quantum chemical BAC-MP4 and BAC-MP2 methods have been used to investigate the reaction mechanisms leading to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) ring formation. In particular the authors have determined the elementary reaction steps in the conversion of two cyclopentadienyl radicals to naphthalene. This reaction mechanism is shown to be an extension of the mechanism occurring in the H atom-assisted conversion of fulvene to benzene. The net reaction involves the formation of dihydrofulvalene, which eliminates a hydrogen atom and then rearranges to form naphthalene through a series of ring closures and openings. The importance of forming the {single_bond}CR({center_dot}){single_bond}CHR{single_bond}CR{prime}{double_bond}CR{double_prime}-moiety, which can undergo rearrangement to form three-carbon-atom ring structures, is illustrated with the C{sub 4}H{sub 7} system. The ability of hydrogen atoms to migrate around the cyclopentadienyl moiety is illustrated both for methyl-cyclopentadiene, C{sub 5}H{sub 5}CH{sub 3}, and dihydrofulvalene, C{sub 5}H{sub 5}C{sub 5}H{sub 5}, as well as for their radical species, C{sub 6}H{sub 7} and C{sub 5}H{sub 5}C{sub 5}H{sub 4}. The mobility of hydrogen in the cyclopentadienyl moiety plays an important role both in providing resonance-stabilized radical products and in creating the {single_bond}CR({center_dot}){single_bond}CHR{single_bond}CR{prime}{double_bond}CR{double_prime}-moiety for ring formation. The results illustrate the radical pathway for converting five-membered rings to aromatic six-membered rings. Furthermore, the results indicate the important catalytic role of H atoms in the aromatic ring formation process.

Melius, C.F.; Colvin, M.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Marinov, N.M.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Senkan, S.M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Liquid-liquid equilibria for mixtures of an alkane + an aromatic hydrocarbon + 1,4-dicyanobutane at 298.15 K  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The separation of pure aromatic and aliphatic compounds from their mixtures is an important goal in chemical operations (e.g., Fischer-Tropsch synthesis) that produce both types of compounds. In this work the authors have used 1,4-dicyanobutane (DCB) as a potential solvent for this separation. Liquid-liquid equilibrium results for mixtures of an alkane + an aromatic hydrocarbon + 1,4-dicyanobutane at 298.15 K are reported, where the alkane is hexane or nonane or dodecane or hexadecane and the aromatic hydrocarbon is benzene or methylbenzene or 1,2-dimethylbenzene, or 1,3-dimethylbenzene, or 1,4-dimethylbenzene or 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene or ethylbenzene. The results show that there is a small increase in the two-phase region as the chain length of the alkane is increased. The type of aromatic hydrocarbon present in the mixture has a noticeable effect on the slopes of the tie lines. There is also an increase in the area of the two phase-region with increasing substitution of methyl groups on the benzene ring. NRTL and UNIQUAC models were correlated to the data. The results show that 1,4-dicyanobutane may be used as a solvent for the separation of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons.

Letcher, T.M.; Naicker, P.K.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

Dietz, Mark (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

INFRARED LUMINOSITIES AND AROMATIC FEATURES IN THE 24 {mu}m FLUX-LIMITED SAMPLE OF 5MUSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study a 24 {mu}m selected sample of 330 galaxies observed with the infrared spectrograph for the 5 mJy Unbiased Spitzer Extragalactic Survey. We estimate accurate total infrared luminosities by combining mid-IR spectroscopy and mid-to-far infrared photometry, and by utilizing new empirical spectral templates from Spitzer data. The infrared luminosities of this sample range mostly from 10{sup 9} L{sub sun} to 10{sup 13.5} L{sub sun}, with 83% in the range 10{sup 10} L{sub sun} < L{sub IR} < 10{sup 12} L{sub sun}. The redshifts range from 0.008 to 4.27, with a median of 0.144. The equivalent widths of the 6.2 {mu}m aromatic feature have a bimodal distribution, probably related to selection effects. We use the 6.2 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon equivalent width (PAH EW) to classify our objects as starburst (SB)-dominated (44%), SB-AGN composite (22%), and active galactic nucleus (AGN)-dominated (34%). The high EW objects (SB-dominated) tend to have steeper mid-IR to far-IR spectral slopes and lower L{sub IR} and redshifts. The low EW objects (AGN-dominated) tend to have less steep spectral slopes and higher L{sub IR} and redshifts. This dichotomy leads to a gross correlation between EW and slope, which does not hold within either group. AGN-dominated sources tend to have lower log(L{sub PAH7.7{sub {mu}m}}/L{sub PAH11.3{sub {mu}m}}) ratios than star-forming galaxies, possibly due to preferential destruction of the smaller aromatics by the AGN. The log(L{sub PAH7.7{sub {mu}m}}/L{sub PAH11.3{sub {mu}m}}) ratios for star-forming galaxies are lower in our sample than the ratios measured from the nuclear spectra of nearby normal galaxies, most probably indicating a difference in the ionization state or grain size distribution between the nuclear regions and the entire galaxy. Finally, we provide a calibration relating the monochromatic continuum or aromatic feature luminosity to L{sub IR} for different types of objects.

Wu Yanling; Helou, George; Shi Yong, E-mail: yanling@ipac.caltech.ed, E-mail: gxh@ipac.caltech.ed, E-mail: yong@ipac.caltech.ed [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable Power Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable...

469

Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call:...

470

Investigation of magnetic nanoparticles for the rapid extraction...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanoparticles for the rapid extraction and assay of alpha-emitting radionuclides from urine: Investigation of magnetic nanoparticles for the rapid extraction and assay of...

471

Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur. First quarterly technical progress report, [October--December 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation will be conducting Phase I of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. this catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria or zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an ongoing DOE-sponsored University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicates that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. the performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams.

Benedek, K. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines - Phase I: Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project proposes to use pneumatically or hydraulically emplaced dry-flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products to backfill the adits left by highwall mining. Backfilling highwall mine adits with dry-FGD materials is technically attractive. The use of an active highwall mine would allow the dry-FGD material to be brought in using the same transportation network used to move the coal out, eliminating the need to recreated the transportation infrastructure, thereby saving costs. Activities during the period included the negotiations leading to the final cooperative agreement for the project and the implementation of the necessary instruments at the University of Kentucky to administer the project. Early in the negotiations, a final agreement on a task structure was reached and a milestone plan was filed. A review was initiated of the original laboratory plan as presented in the proposal, and tentative modifications were developed. Selection of a mine site was made early; the Pleasant Valley mine in Greenup County was chosen. Several visits were made to the mine site to begin work on the hydrologic monitoring plan. The investigation of the types of permits needed to conduct the project was initiated. Considerations concerning the acceptance and implementation of technologies led to the choice of circulating fluidized bed ash as the primary material for the study. Finally, the membership of a Technical Advisory Committee for the study was assembled.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Size exclusion chromatography for the unambiguous detection of aliphatics in fractions from petroleum vacuum residues, coal liquids, and standard materials, in the presence of aromatics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method has been developed using size exclusion chromatography (SEC) in heptane eluent that can detect aliphatics unambiguously without fractionation to remove aromatics. Spherical molecules such as colloidal silicas elute at the exclusion limit, while alkanes up to C{sub 50} elute through the porosity of the column. Detection of aliphatics was defined by use of an evaporative light scattering (ELS) detector with the simultaneous absence of UV absorbance at 300 nm. Alkanes smaller than C{sub 12} were not detected because the conditions of operation of the ELS caused their evaporation. All aromatics eluted after the permeation limit of about 25 min and were not detected until well after 45 min by their UV absorbance. The SEC method was applied to petroleum vacuum residues and coal liquids, and their fractions were soluble in pentane or heptane. High-temperature (HT) GC-MS confirmed the presence of alkanes in the pentane- and heptane-soluble fractions of petroleum vacuum residues, but did not elute any of the aromatics known to be present from SEC. Alkanes were examined in pentane-soluble fractions of a coal digest and a low-temperature coal tar; alkanes up to C{sub 40} were detected in the low-temperature tar and, although present in the digest, were masked by aromatics. No alkanes were detected by either SEC or HT GC-MS in fractions from a coal tar pitch. Aromatics in coal liquids and one petroleum residue were also examined by SEC using NMP as eluent and by UV fluorescence spectroscopy. The SEC method will find application to pentane- and heptane-soluble fractions of petroleum liquids and coal liquids where the alkanes are concentrated relative to the more abundant aromatics. 43 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Eiman M. Al-Muhareb; Fatma Karaca; Trevor J. Morgan; Alan A. Herod; Ian D. Bull; Rafael Kandiyoti [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

474

LC-1H NMR characterization studies of tricyclic aromatics and olefins in diesel fuels. Final report, September 1982-31 December 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New analytical approaches for determination of 1) tricyclic aromatics, 2) alkenes, and weight % data in Naval diesel fuels are described. Tricyclic aromatics are detected and characterized at concentrations as low as approx. 0.25% in diesel fuels. Various analytical approaches for characterizing alkenes in diesel fuels are also explored, including: 1) chromatographic separation of the alkene fraction in diesel fuels by AgNO/sub 3/ impregnated chromatographic columns, and 2) a /sup 19/F NMR tagging method characterizing alkenes. Finally, a calculative method for conversion of LC-1H NMR molar data to weight % data for each chromatographic fraction in a fuel is described.

Blass, T.E.; Bebout, W.R.; Caswell, K.A.; Allen, L.; Dorn, H.C.

1986-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

475

Reexamination of Pure Qubit Work Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many work extraction or information erasure processes in the literature involve the raising and lowering of energy levels via external fields. But even if the actual system is treated quantum mechanically, the field is assumed to be classical and of infinite strength, hence not developing any correlations with the system or experiencing back-actions. We extend these considerations to a fully quantum mechanical treatment, by studying a spin-1/2 particle coupled to a finite-sized directional quantum reference frame, a spin-l system, which models an external field. With this concrete model together with a bosonic thermal bath, we analyse the back-action a finite-size field suffers during a quantum-mechanical work extraction process, the effect this has on the extractable work, and highlight a range of assumptions commonly made when considering such processes. The well-known semi-classical treatment of work extraction from a pure qubit predicts a maximum extractable work W = kT log 2 for a quasi-static process, which holds as a strict upper bound in the fully quantum mechanical case, and is only attained in the classical limit. We also address the problem of emergent local time-dependence in a joint system with globally fixed Hamiltonian.

Max F. Frenzel; David Jennings; Terry Rudolph

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

476

PAPER 2004-028 The Effect of Bitumen Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PAPER 2004-028 The Effect of Bitumen Extraction Shear Conditions on Froth Treatment Performance U processing: extraction and froth treatment. The most common extraction process is hot water bitumen extraction where bitumen is produced in a froth consisting of bitumen, water, and inorganic solids. The froth

Schramm, Laurier L.

477

Hierarchical Iso-Surface Extraction Computer Graphics Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hierarchical Iso-Surface Extraction Ulf Labsik Computer Graphics Group University of Erlangen Kai of our hierarchical iso-surface extraction algorithm. Abstract The extraction and display of iso construct a hierarchy of volumes and extract an iso-surface from the coarsest resolution with a standard

Desbrun, Mathieu

478

Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IL); Binder, Thomas P. (Decatur, IL); Rammelsberg, Anne M. (Decatur, IL)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

479

Membrane contactor assisted extraction/reaction process employing ionic liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a functionalized membrane contactor extraction/reaction system and method for extracting target species from multi-phase solutions utilizing ionic liquids. One preferred embodiment of the invented method and system relates to an extraction/reaction system wherein the ionic liquid extraction solutions act as both extraction solutions and reaction mediums, and allow simultaneous separation/reactions not possible with prior art technology.

Lin, Yupo J. (Naperville, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

480

Spatial and temporal variation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls in Crassostrea virginica and sediments from Galveston Bay, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

naphthalene 2-methylnaphthalene 1-methylnaphthalene biphenyl 2, 6-dimethylnaphthalene acenaphthene fluorene phenanthrene anthracene 1-methylphenanthrene fluoranthene pryene benz[a]anthracene chrysene benzo[e]pyrene benzo[a]pyrene perylene... trichlorobiphenyls tetrachlorobiphenyls pentachlorobiphenyls hexachlorobiphenyls heptachlorobiphenyls octachlorobiphenyls nonachlorobiphenyls Aromatic Internal Standards Pesticide Internal Standards naphthalene-dg acenaphthene-dlO phenanthrene-dlO chrysene...

Fox, Richard George

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "byproducts aromatic extracts" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

NATIONAL PRESS RELEASE I PARIS I 30 AUGUST 2013 Brown algae contain phlorotannins, aromatic (phenolic) compounds that are unique in the plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL PRESS RELEASE I PARIS I 30 AUGUST 2013 Brown algae contain phlorotannins, aromatic elucidated the key step in the production of these compounds in Ectocarpus siliculosus, a small brown alga phlorotannins from brown algae for use in industry was a complex process, and the biosynthesis pathways

Canet, Léonie

482

Vapor Extraction Well Performance and Recommendations for Transitioning to Passive Extraction at the Former DUS-II Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This investigation evaluated mass extraction rate from individual wells associated with the Western Sector Treatment System (formerly known as the DUS-II project). This was critical since each individual well can have a radius of influence in excess of 100-ft when operating using an active extraction system. Future soil vapor extraction should use the existing active extraction system, supplemented with deployment of passive extraction where appropriate.

Jackson, Dennis G.; Noonkester, Jay V.; Looney, Brian B.

2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

483

Inverse hydrochemical models of aqueous extracts tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aqueous extract test is a laboratory technique commonly used to measure the amount of soluble salts of a soil sample after adding a known mass of distilled water. Measured aqueous extract data have to be re-interpreted in order to infer porewater chemical composition of the sample because porewater chemistry changes significantly due to dilution and chemical reactions which take place during extraction. Here we present an inverse hydrochemical model to estimate porewater chemical composition from measured water content, aqueous extract, and mineralogical data. The model accounts for acid-base, redox, aqueous complexation, mineral dissolution/precipitation, gas dissolution/ex-solution, cation exchange and surface complexation reactions, of which are assumed to take place at local equilibrium. It has been solved with INVERSE-CORE{sup 2D} and been tested with bentonite samples taken from FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) in situ test. The inverse model reproduces most of the measured aqueous data except bicarbonate and provides an effective, flexible and comprehensive method to estimate porewater chemical composition of clays. Main uncertainties are related to kinetic calcite dissolution and variations in CO2(g) pressure.

Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

484

Extractable soil phosphorus in Blackland Prairie soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Texas Agricultural Extension Service (TAEX) Soil Testing Laboratory currently utilizes a single phosphorus (P) extractant consisting of 1.43 M NH4OAc, 1. 0 M HCl, and 0.025 M EDTA-PH 4.2 to estimate plant available P for all soils in Texas...

Byrd, Robert Claude

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

485

Logical Structure Extraction from Software Requirements Documents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Documents I. INTRODUCTION Requirements management (RM) tools store and manipu- late software requirementsLogical Structure Extraction from Software Requirements Documents Rehan Rauf, Michal Antkiewicz,mantkiew,kczarnec}@gsd.uwaterloo.ca Abstract--Software requirements documents (SRDs) are often authored in general-purpose rich-text editors

Czarnecki, Krzysztof

486

Extracting gluon condensate from the average plaquette  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The perturbative contribution in the average plaquette is subtracted using Borel summation and the remnant of the plaquette is shown to scale as a dim-4 condensate. A critical review is presented of the renormalon subtraction scheme that claimed a dim-2 condensate. The extracted gluon condensate is compared with the latest result employing high order (35-loop) calculation in the stochastic perturbation theory.

Lee, Taekoon

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Extracting Artifact Lifecycle Models from Metadata History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extracting Artifact Lifecycle Models from Metadata History Olga Baysal, Oleksii Kononenko, Reid, Canada {obaysal, okononen, rtholmes, migod}@cs.uwaterloo.ca Abstract--Software developers and managers make decisions based on the understanding they have of their software systems. This understanding

Godfrey, Michael W.

488

Vapour extraction of heavy oil and bitumen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the process of vapor extraction for the recovery of petroleum and bitumen. The selection of solvent is critical, and it is shown that butane may be a good solvent for shallow reservoirs. Experiments are described in a Hele-Shaw cell and Packed Visual Model.

Das, K.A.; Butler, R.M. [Univ. of Calgary (Canada)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

489

Organic electroluminescent devices having improved light extraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic electroluminescent devices having improved light extraction include a light-scattering medium disposed adjacent thereto. The light-scattering medium has a light scattering anisotropy parameter g in the range from greater than zero to about 0.99, and a scatterance parameter S less than about 0.22 or greater than about 3.

Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY)

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

490

Extraction and Analysis of Facebook Friendship Relations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 12 Extraction and Analysis of Facebook Friendship Relations Salvatore Catanese, Pasquale De and Social scientists. We present our long-term research effort in analyzing Facebook, the largest and arguably most successful OSN today: it gathers more than 500 million users. Access to data about Facebook

Ferrara, Emilio

491

Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15 and about 70 C and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours. 6 figs.

Wang, D.I.C.; Avgerinos, G.C.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

492

Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15.degree. and about 70.degree. C. and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours.

Wang, Daniel I. C. (Belmont, MA); Avgerinos, George C. (Newton Center, MA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Supercritical Fluid Extraction- Process Simulation and Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIMULATION P-1 SFE FEED PUMP SUPERCRITICAL FLUID EXTRACTOR (SFE) 2 T-1 10 7 .r D-2 SFE BOnoMS FLASH 9 222 The extract is decanted and fed to the fractionator to recover solvent carbon dioxide overhead and waterlIPA/carbon dioxide out...

Martin, C. L.; Seibert, A. F.

494

Extractive Institutions in Colonial Africa Federico Tadei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of colonies, such indigenous population density and ease of settlement for the coloniz- ers. Finally, I studyExtractive Institutions in Colonial Africa Thesis by Federico Tadei In Partial Fulfillment on prices to agricultural producers and labor institutions in French Africa, I show that (1

Winfree, Erik

495

UV-vis spectra of singlet state cationic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Time-dependent density functional theory study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical study of singlet state cations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is performed. Appropriate symmetry suitable for further calculations is chosen for each of the systems studied. The excitation states of such species are obtained by the time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) method. The computations are performed using both Pople and electronic response properties basis sets. The results obtained with the use of different basis sets are compared. The electronic transitions are described and the relationships for the lowest-lying transitions states of different species are found. The properties of in-plane and out-of-plane transitions are also delineated. The TD-DFT results are compared with the experimental data available.

Dominikowska, Justyna, E-mail: justyna@uni.lodz.pl; Domagala, Malgorzata; Palusiak, Marcin [Department of Theoretical and Structural Chemistry, University of ?d?, Pomorska 163/165, 90-236 ?d? (Poland)] [Department of Theoretical and Structural Chemistry, University of ?d?, Pomorska 163/165, 90-236 ?d? (Poland)

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

496

Time-dependent density functional study of the electronic excited states of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon radical ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A uniform, comprehensive theoretical interpretation of spectroscopic data is presented for 53 radical ion species of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH’s) with the aid of (Tamm–Dancoff) time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). TDDFT is capable of predicting the transition energies to the low-lying excited states of PAH ions with quantitative accuracy (the standard deviation from experimental results being less than 0.3 eV) and their intensity patterns qualitatively correctly. The accuracy is hardly affected by the sizes of PAH ions (azulene through dinaphthocoronene), the types of transitions (Koopmans or satellite transitions), the types of orbi-tals involved (*←, *←, or *← transitions), the types of ions (cations or anions), or other geometrical or electronic perturbations (non-planarity, sp3 carbons, or heterocyclic or non-benzenoid rings)

Hirata, So; Head-Gordon, Martin P.; Szczepanski, Jan; Vala, Martin

2003-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

497

Influence of co-attached aromatics on the thermolysis of surface-immobilized 1,3-diphenylpropane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technique of model compound immobilization by covalent surface attachment is being employed to investigate the potential impact of restricted diffusional mobility on the thermal reactivity of coal. This restricted mobility may be imposed in coal as a consequence of its cross-linked, macromolecular structure. Thermolysis studies at 345--400{degree}C of model coal structures covalently attached to a silica surface have shown that significant perturbations in free-radical reaction mechanisms can occur, and result in altered reaction rates and product distributions compared with corresponding fluid phase behavior. In the current study, we are beginning to probe the influence of the structure of co-attached aromatic molecules such as biphenyl and diphenylmethane on the reaction rate and regioselectivity in the thermolysis of surface-attached 1,3-diphenylpropane. 6 refs., 1 tab.

Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Biggs, C.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

By By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

229 1994)." CLSM is primarily used for nonstructural applications such as a backfill material foundations, or as a fill for abandoned tunnels, sewers, storage tanks, etc. Water permeation through CLSM can

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

499

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

500

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Phelps, Cindy (Moscow, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z