Sample records for byproducts ab source

  1. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ash in concrete (structural grade concrete, compressive strength up to 4000 psi) and flowable slurry and performance specifications for structural concrete and flowable slurry products for every day construction use developed by UWM- CBU in the past for other by-products and sources of coal ash not meeting

  2. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ash to solve the concerns associated with its disposal. Wood ash consists of two different types ash and coal fly ash for use in concrete, was used to determine general suitability of wood ashCenter for By-Products Utilization WOOD ASH: A NEW SOURCE OF POZZOLANIC MATERIAL By Tarun R. Naik

  3. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    the concerns associated with its disposal. Wood ash consists of two different types of materials: fly ash for use as construction materials. Therefore, ASTM C 618, developed for volcanic ash and coal fly ashCenter for By-Products Utilization WOOD ASH: A NEW SOURCE OF POZZOLANIC MATERIAL By Tarun R. Naik

  4. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    wood with supplementary fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and coke by pulp and paper mills and wood, knots, chips, etc. with other supplementary fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and coke to generateCenter for By-Products Utilization DEVELOPMENT OF CLSM USING COAL ASH AND WOOD ASH, A SOURCE OF NEW

  5. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    plants are the major source of generation of electricity. Coal-fired power plants derive energy by burning coal in their furnaces. These power plants generally use either pulverized coal-fired furnaces. 2.0 MATERIALS 2.1 COAL-COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS In most of the countries coal- fired thermal power

  6. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN COAL ASH AS SETTING TIME REGULATOR IN PORTLAND OF WISCONSIN ­ MILWAUKEE #12;2 Use of Clean Coal Ash as Setting Time Regulator in Portland Cement by Zichao Wu as setting time regulator for portland cement production. In this paper a source of clean coal ash (CCA

  7. Performance evaluation of source extraction in wireless sensor networks Hong-Bin Chen a,b,*, Chi Kong Tse a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tse, Chi K. "Michael"

    Performance evaluation of source extraction in wireless sensor networks Hong-Bin Chen a,b,*, Chi wireless sensor networks are evaluated. The sensor observations are assumed to be linear instantaneous: Available online 6 May 2008 Keywords: Wireless sensor network Blind source separation Cluster Performance

  8. Use of Xenon Difluoride to Clean Hazardous By-Products in Ion Implanter Source Housings, Turbo Pumps, and Fore-Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Despres, J.; Chambers, B.; Bishop, S.; Kaim, R.; Letaj, S.; Sergi, S.; Sweeney, J.; Tang, Y.; Wilson, S.; Yedave, S. [ATMI, 7 Commerce Drive, Danbury, CT, 06810 (United States)

    2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the use of xenon difluoride to clean deposits in the source housing, source turbo pump, and source turbo pump fore-line of ion implanters. Xenon difluoride has previously been shown to be effective in increasing the lifetime of the ion source{sup 1,2} and this paper presents an extension of the technology to other areas within the tool. Process by-products that are deposited in the source housing, turbo pump, and turbo pump fore-line can not only pose productivity issues, in the case of coatings on insulators, but can also be flammable and toxic in the case of deposits formed within the turbo pump and fore-line. The results presented in this paper detail the initial successful examples of using xenon difluoride to clean these deposits.ATMI has shown that xenon difluoride is capable of cleaning an insulator in an ion implanter. Typically during use an insulator will become increasingly coated with deposits that could lead to productivity problems. By introducing xenon difluoride into the source housing the insulator residues were effectively cleaned in-situ, thereby extending the maintenance interval and resulting in significant consumable savings.Similar deposits that form in the turbo pump and fore-line could not only lead to production problems due to turbo pump failure or fore-line build-up, but pose significant health risks during the ex-situ cleaning process. Through internal testing ATMI has shown that xenon difluoride is able to clean phosphorus and germanium deposits located within a turbo pump. Additionally, testing has demonstrated that the turbo pump fore-line can be cleaned in-situ without the need to remove these components, thereby virtually eliminating the possibility of fires. The cleaning reaction progress and by-products were monitored using FTIR spectrometry and thermocouples.In order to efficiently clean the source housing, turbo pump, and turbo pump fore-line xenon difluoride delivery must be optimized. This paper also details a hardware concept that maximizes xenon difluoride delivery and allows the clean to be done in a way that is viable for production ion implanters.

  9. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the roles and responsibilities of each position within the Combustion Byproducts Recyclcing Consortium.

  10. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -fired power plants derive energy by burning coal in their furnaces. These power plants generally use either. The by-product materials include coal combustion by-products, wood ash, pulp and paper industry by recycling and research needs are discussed. #12;3 2.0 MATERIALS 2.1 COAL-COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS Coal

  11. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ashlines: To promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing.

  12. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    combustion by-products #12;3 generated by using both conventional and clean-coal technologies. A clean-coal that obtained from clean-coal technology, are not utilized in cast-concrete masonry products (bricks, blocksCenter for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik

  13. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    of coal fly ash, coal bottom ash, and used foundry sand in concrete, bricks, blocks, and8 paving stones, Wisconsin. She is involved in management,11 disposal, and sale of coal-combustion by-products. She alsoCenter for By-Products Utilization UNDER-UTILIZED COAL-COMBUSTION PRODUCTS IN PERMEABLE ROADWAY

  14. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -first Century, Hyderabad, India, February 1999. Department of Civil EngineeringandMechanics College) of foundry by-products, including foundry sand and slag. Most of these by-products are landfilled, primarily due to non-availability of economically attractive use options. Landfilling is not a desirable option

  15. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    combustion by-products (such as clean-coal ash) from power plants. Maximum recycling of such by- products regulations and increasing use of low-grade coal, the number of coal-fired power plants with flue gasCenter for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R

  16. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization CLEAN COAL BY-PRODUCTS UTILIZATION IN ROADWAY, EMBANKMENTS-fueled plants, particularly use of eastern coals, has lead to the use of clean coal and using advanced sulfur dioxide control technologies. Figure 1 shows clean coal technology benefits(2) . In 1977, the concept

  17. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization DRAFT REPORT CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN CEMENTITIOUS-MILWAUKEE #12;CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN CEMENTITIOUS PRODUCTS Progress Report by Tarun R. Naik, Rakesh of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Technologies

  18. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, 'clean coal' combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered 'allowable' under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and private-sector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  19. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, “clean coal” combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered “allowable” under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  20. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F-fly ash. Some developed technologies have similar potential in the longer term. (3) Laboratory studies have been completed that indicate that much higher amounts of fly ash could be added in cement-concrete applications under some circumstances. This could significantly increase use of fly ash in cement-concrete applications. (4) A study of the long-term environmental effects of structural fills in a surface mine in Indiana was completed. This study has provided much sought after data for permitting large-volume management options in both beneficial as well as non-beneficial use settings. (5) The impact of CBRC on CCBs utilization trends is difficult to quantify. However it is fair to say that the CBRC program had a significant positive impact on increased utilization of CCBs in every region of the USA. Today, the overall utilization of CCBs is over 43%. (6) CBRC-developed knowledge base led to a large number of other projects completed with support from other sources of funding. (7) CBRC research has also had a large impact on CCBs management across the globe. Information transfer activities and visitors from leading coal producing countries such as South Africa, Australia, England, India, China, Poland, Czech Republic and Japan are truly noteworthy. (8) Overall, the CBRC has been a truly successful, cooperative research program. It has brought together researchers, industry, government, and regulators to deal with a major problem facing the USA and other coal producing countries in the world.

  1. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    limestone quarry in Wisconsin generates over 125,000 tons of quarry fines and quarry bag-house dust each limestone quarry fines and quarry bag-house dust, to reduce costs, as well as to reduce the use of expensive be used in SCC. Use of quarry by-products in SCC will lead to economical and ecological benefits

  2. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Submitted to the Electric Power Research Institute August 2009 UWM Center for By-Products-Strength Materials) for help in reducing global warming. Concrete mixtures having slump in the range of three to fourCenter for By-Products Utilization CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN CEMENTITIOUS PRODUCTS By Tarun R

  3. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    clean coal technology, are not extensively utilized in the cast concrete masonry products (bricks both conventional and clean coal technologies. A clean coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SO2Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST

  4. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute For Project 02-1/3.1D-2 Department of Civil Engineering of technology and market development for controlled low-strength material (CLSM) slurry using Illinois coal ashCenter for By-Products Utilization IMPLEMENTATION OF FLOWABLE SLURRY TECHNOLOGY IN ILLINOIS

  5. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN NO-FINES CONCRETE By Tarun R;CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN NO-FINES CONCRETE ABSTRACT By Tarun, R. Naik, Yoon-moon Chun, Rudolph N. Kraus, and Fethullah Canpolat This paper presents a detailed experimental study on the sequestration

  6. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    , compressive strength, concrete testing, fly ash, high-performance concrete, hot weather, permeability, silica Testing of Concrete", Committee 214, "Evaluation of Results of Strength Tests of Concrete", and CommitteeCenter for By-Products Utilization STRENGTH AND DURABILITY OF HIGH- PERFORMANCE CONCRETE SUBJECTED

  7. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Fellow at the UWM-CBU. His research interests include the use of coal fly ash, coal bottom ash, and used in management, disposal, and sale of coal-combustion by-Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF UNDER-UTILIZED COAL- COMBUSTION PRODUCTS IN PERMEABLE

  8. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    beneficial uses of wood ash to meet the challenges associated with its disposal. Wood ash consists of two C 618 [13] developed for volcanic ash and coal fly ash for use in concrete, was used to determineCenter for By-Products Utilization RECYCLING OF WOOD ASH IN CEMENT-BASED CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS

  9. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -air entrained concrete without fly ash. Detailed results are presented. Keywords: carbon dioxide sequestrationCenter for By-Products Utilization CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN NON-AIR ENTRAINED CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik SEQUESTRATION IN NON-AIR ENTRAINED CONCRETE ABSTRACT by Tarun, R. Naik, Yoon-moon Chun, Rudolph N. Kraus

  10. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN NON-AIR ENTRAINED CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik and Applied Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MILWAUKEE #12;1 CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN NON-AIR ENTRAINED-moon Chun The objectives of this project were to sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) in concrete and study

  11. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN NO-FINES CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik, Timir C Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MILWAUKEE #12;1 CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN NO-FINES CONCRETE ABSTRACT of this project were to sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) in concrete and study the effects of carbonation

  12. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    in a combination with a number of fuels including coal, petroleum coke, natural gas, etc. In the mid 1990s, the unit was firing a combination of coal and petroleum coke to generate energy. It has been established;1 PROJECT 1 - COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS: CHARACTERIZATION AND USE OPTIONS Introduction An AFBC system

  13. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization PROPERTIES OF CONCRETE CONTAINING SCRAP TIRE RUBBER in a variety of rubber and plastic products, thermal incineration of waste tires for production of electricity rubber in asphalt mixes, (ii) thermal incineration of worn-out tires for the production of electricity

  14. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization APPLICATION OF SCRAP TIRE RUBBER IN ASPHALTIC MATERIALS: STATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. PRODUCING CRUMB RUBBER MODIFIER (CRM) FROM USED TIRES . . . . . 3 2.1 PRODUCTION OF CRM THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - MILWAUKEE #12;APPLICATION OF SCRAP TIRE RUBBER IN ASPHALTIC MATERIALS: STATE

  15. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Presentationand Publicationat the CBIP International Conference onFly Ash Disposal & Utilization,New Delhi, India, January 1998 foundry sand and slag. Most of these by-products are landfilled, primarily due to non-availability of economically attractive use options. Landfilling is not a desirable option because it not only causes huge

  16. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    tires generated during the year 1990 - 1991 were reused, recycled, or recovered [4]. A number of usesCenter for By-Products Utilization CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS INCORPORATING DISCARDED TIRES By Tarun R - MILWAUKEE #12;CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS INCORPORATING DISCARDED TIRES* By Tarun R. Naik Director, Center for By

  17. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST OF CLASS F FLYASHAND CLEAN-COAL ASHBLENDS FOR CAST CONCRETE PRODUCTS Authors: TarunR.Naik, Director, Center,Illinois Clean Coal Institute RudolphN.Kraus, Research Associate, UWM Center forBy-Products Utilization Shiw S

  18. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASSF FLY ASHCOAL AND CLEAN-COAL #12;-1- CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASSF FLYASHCOAL AND CLEAN-COAL ASHFOR CEMENT -Milwaukee (UWM) Daniel D.Banerjee, Project Manager,Illinois Clean Coal Institute RudolphN.Kraus, Research

  19. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Rafat Siddique of HVFA Concrete Containing Clean-Coal Ash and Class F Fly Ash By Tarun R. Naik Director, UWM Center for By-Products Utilization and Francois Botha Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute Synopsis

  20. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    flue gas. Detailed results are presented. Keywords: carbon dioxide sequestration, carbonation, carbonCenter for By-Products Utilization CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN FOAMED CONTROLLED LOW STRENGTH MATERIALS #12;1 CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN FOAMED CONTROLLED LOW STRENGTH MATERIALS by Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus

  1. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    combustion by-products are generated due to the combustion of coal in coal-fired electric power plants as carbon from unburnt coal, fire polished sand, thin-walled hollow spheres and their fragments, magnetic of HVFA concrete to establish mixture proportions for commercial production. #12;INTRODUCTION Coal

  2. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    was produced by Wisconsin Electric's coal-fired power plants. The criteria for selecting these mixtures was to utilize minimal cost materials, such as coal combustion by-products (fly ash, bottom ash, etc coal combustion waste material (fly ash) to the maximum extent possible while minimizing costs (e

  3. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF COAL-COMBUSTION PRODUCTS IN PERMEABLE PAVEMNET BASE and Published at the Raymundo Rivera International Symposium on Durability of Concrete, Monterrey, N. L., Mexico THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MILWAUKEE #12;Use of Coal-Combustion Products in Permeable Pavement Base1 2 3 4 5 6 7

  4. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By-Products Utilization HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R #12;1 HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Shiw S. Singh, and Bruce for manufacture of cement-based products using ashes generated from combustion of high-sulfur coals. A clean coal

  5. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    of coal in conventional and/ or advanced clean coal technology combustors. These include fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products from advanced clean coal technology clean coal technology combustors. Over 60% of the CCBs are generated as fly ash. An estimate

  6. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    and paper mills in concrete. INTRODUCTION Concrete is a porous solid that is created by combining four basicCenter for By-Products Utilization CURING TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON HIGH-PERFORMANCE CONCRETE By Tarun For presentation and publication at the symposium entitled "High-Performance Concrete and Concrete for Marine

  7. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    . Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Shiw S. Singh, Lori- Lynn C. Pennock, and Bruce Ramme Report No. CBU-2001 with numerous projects on the use of by-product materials including utilization of used foundry sand and fly ash;2 INTRODUCTION Wood FA is generated due to combustion of wood for energy production at pulp and paper mills, saw

  8. By By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Center for By By-Products Utilization THE ROLE OF FLOWABLE SLURRY IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENTS of Flowable Slurry in Sustainable Developments in Civil Engineering Tarun R. Naik and Rudolph N. Kraus Materials (CLSM) incorporating industrial by-products (coal fly ash, and used foundry sand). CLSM reference

  9. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ), at 28 days, using various sources of ASTM Class F and clean coal fly ashes. For each reference mixture

  10. Identification of the ECR zone in the SWISSCASE ECR ion source M. Bodendorfer a,b,*, K. Altwegg a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalang, Robert C.

    resonance Ion source ECR ion source a b s t r a c t The magnetic field of the permanent magnet electron simulated and experimentally investigated. For the first time the magnetized volume qualified for electron calculations in ECR related applications such as ECR ion engines and ECR ion implanters. Ã? 2008 Elsevier B

  11. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ), India (45 million tons), South Africa (30 million tons), Poland (25 million tons), Germany (20 million 232, Fly Ash and Natural Pozzolans. #12;4 INTRODUCTION Coal is the most widely used source of energy

  12. Chemical production from industrial by-product gases: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyke, S.E.; Moore, R.H.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for conservation of natural gas is studied and the technical and economic feasibility and the implementation of ventures to produce such chemicals using carbon monoxide and hydrogen from byproduct gases are determined. A survey was performed of potential chemical products and byproduct gas sources. Byproduct gases from the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries were selected for detailed study. Gas sampling, preliminary design, market surveys, and economic analyses were performed for specific sources in the selected industries. The study showed that production of methanol or ammonia from byproduct gas at the sites studied in the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries is technically feasible but not economically viable under current conditions. Several other applications are identified as having the potential for better economics. The survey performed identified a need for an improved method of recovering carbon monoxide from dilute gases. A modest experimental program was directed toward the development of a permselective membrane to fulfill that need. A practical membrane was not developed but further investigation along the same lines is recommended. (MCW)

  13. Attachment B Applicants must submit properly completed 1(A/B), S1(A/B), and S5(A/B) forms to certify or precertify

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Attachment B Applicants must submit properly completed 1(A/B), S1(A/B), and S5(A/B) forms of the facility · Specific fuel type · Source of the fuel (onsite, delivered, etc.) #12;2 The S5 form and they each have 3 delivery entities, then 15 S5 form "packets" are required, all with all three sections

  14. Thermonuclear Reflect AB-Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The author offers a new kind of thermonuclear reflect reactor. The remarkable feature of this new reactor is a three net AB reflector, which confines the high temperature plasma. The plasma loses part of its energy when it contacts with the net but this loss can be compensated by an additional permanent plasma heating. When the plasma is rarefied (has a small density), the heat flow to the AB reflector is not large and the temperature in the triple reflector net is lower than 2000 - 3000 K. This offered AB-reactor has significantly less power then the currently contemplated power reactors with magnetic or inertial confinement (hundreds-thousands of kW, not millions of kW). But it is enough for many vehicles and ships and particularly valuable for tunnelers, subs and space apparatus, where air to burn chemical fuel is at a premium or simply not available. The author has made a number of innovations in this reactor, researched its theory, developed methods of computation, made a sample computation of typical project. The main point of preference for the offered reactor is its likely cheapness as a power source. Key words: Micro-thermonuclear reactor, Multi-reflex AB-thermonuclear reactor, Self-magnetic AB-thermonuclear reactor, aerospace thermonuclear engine.

  15. Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of the Environment is responsible for regulating fugitive air emissions from the transportation of coal combustion by-products and the permissible beneficial uses of these by...

  16. The Composition of Rice By-products.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1904-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the rice. e products of this machine are rice bran, some flour, and clean rice. The final process consists in polishing the rice, which gives it a ter. The by-product from this process is rice. polish. The polished rice is sorted into different grades...*7 TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS BULLETIN NO. 73. The Composition of Rice By-Products. POSTOFFICE: COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS. 1904 THE BRYAN EAGLE BRYAN, TEXAS TEXAS AGRICULTURi - - OFFIGERS -- GOVERNING BOARD...

  17. Design manual for management of solid by-products from advanced coal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing coal conversion technologies face major obstacles in byproduct management. This project has developed several management strategies based on field trials of small-scale landfills in an earlier phase of the project, as well as on published/unpublished sources detailing regulatory issues, current industry practice, and reuse opportunities. Field testing, which forms the basis for several of the disposal alternatives presented in this design manual, was limited to byproducts from Ca-based dry SO{sub 2} control technologies, circulating fluidized bed combustion ash, and bubbling bed fluidized bed combustion ash. Data on byproducts from other advanced coal technologies and on reuse opportunities are drawn from other sources (citations following Chapter 3). Field results from the 5 test cases examined under this project, together with results from other ongoing research, provide a basis for predictive modeling of long-term performance of some advanced coal byproducts on exposure to ambient environment. This manual is intended to provide a reference database and development plan for designing, permitting, and operating facilities where advanced coal technology byproducts are managed.

  18. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products. Phase 2 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stehouwer, R.; Dick, W.; Bigham, J. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was initiated in December 1990 to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products. A Phase 1 report provided results of an extensive characterization of chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of 58 dry FGD by-product samples. The Phase 1 report concluded that high volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics related to their ability to substitute for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mine lands). Phase 2 objectives were (1) to conduct laboratory and greenhouse studies of FGD and soil (spoil) mixtures for agronomic and engineering applications, (2) to initiate field studies related to high volume agronomic and engineering uses, and (3) to develop the basic methodological framework for estimation of the financial and economic costs and benefits to society of several FGD reuse options and to make some preliminary runs of economic models. High volume beneficial reuses of dry FGD by-products have been successfully demonstrated. Adverse environmental impacts have been negligible. Although few sources of dry FGD by-products currently exist in Ohio and the United States there is potential for smaller coal-fired facilities to adopt S0{sub 2} scrubbing technologies that produce dry FGD material. Also much of what we have learned from studies on dry FGD by-products is applicable to the more prevalent wet FGD by-products. The adaptation of the technologies demonstrated in this project seem to be not only limited by economic constraints, but even more so, by the need to create awareness of the market potential of using these FGD by-products.

  19. Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Brock Marrs; Ari Geertsema; Frank Huggins; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Brandie M. Markley; Zhe Lu; Harold Schobert

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    With the passing of legislation designed to permanently cap and reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities, it is more important than ever to develop and improve upon methods of controlling mercury emissions. One promising technique is carbon sorbent injection into the flue gas of the coal-fired power plant. Currently, this technology is very expensive as costly commercially activated carbons are used as sorbents. There is also a significant lack of understanding of the interaction between mercury vapor and the carbon sorbent, which adds to the difficulty of predicting the amount of sorbent needed for specific plant configurations. Due to its inherent porosity and adsorption properties as well as on-site availability, carbons derived from gasifiers are potential mercury sorbent candidates. Furthermore, because of the increasing restricted use of landfilling, the coal industry is very interested in finding uses for these materials as an alternative to the current disposal practice. The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported. This contract was with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involved the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, assessment of the potential for leaching of Hg captured by the carbons, analysis of the slags for cement applications, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers. The objectives of this collaborative effort between the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute, and industry collaborators supplying gasifier char samples were to investigate the potential use of gasifier slag carbons as a source of low cost sorbent for Hg and NOX capture from combustion flue gas, concrete applications, polymer fillers and as a source of activated carbons. Primary objectives were to determine the relationship of surface area, pore size, pore size distribution, and mineral content on Hg storage of gasifier carbons and to define the site of Hg capture. The ability of gasifier slag carbon to capture NOX and the effect of NOX on Hg adsorption were goals. Secondary goals were the determination of the potential for use of the slags for cement and filler applications. Since gasifier chars have already gone through a devolatilization process in a reducing atmosphere in the gasifier, they only required to be activated to be used as activated carbons. Therefore, the principal objective of the work at PSU was to characterize and utilize gasification slag carbons for the production of activated carbons and other carbon fillers. Tests for the Hg and NOX adsorption potential of these activated gasifier carbons were performed at the CAER. During the course of this project, gasifier slag samples chemically and physically characterized at UK were supplied to PSU who also characterized the samples for sorption characteristics and independently tested for Hg-capture. At the CAER as-received slags were tested for Hg and NOX adsorption. The most promising of these were activated chemically. The PSU group applied thermal and steam activation to a representative group of the gasifier slag samples separated by particle sizes. The activated samples were tested at UK for Hg-sorption and NOX capture and the most promising Hg adsorbers were tested for Hg capture in a simulated flue gas. Both UK and PSU tested the use of the gasifier slag samples as fillers. The CAER analyzed the slags for possible use in cement applications

  20. -Ammonia Borane (3) -Polyether ammnonia borane (AB)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Deog Ki

    ( 7) [3]. 7. AB . [1] Kim, Y.; Kim, Y.; Yeo, S.; Kim, K.; Koh, K. J.-E.; Seo, J.-E.; Shin, S. J.; Choi, D.-K.; Yoon, C. W.; Nam, S. W. J. Power Sources 2013, 229, 170. [2] Seo, J.-E et al. J. Power

  1. AB Space Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2008-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    On 4 January 2007 the author published the article Wireless Transfer of Electricity in Outer Space in http://arxiv.org wherein he offered and researched a new revolutionary method of transferring electric energy in space. In that same article, he offered a new engine which produces a large thrust without throwing away large amounts of reaction mass (unlike the conventional rocket engine). In the current article, the author develops the theory of this kind of impulse engine and computes a sample project which shows the big possibilities opened by this new AB-Space Engine. The AB-Space Engine gets the energy from ground-mounted power; a planet electric station can transfer electricity up to 1000 millions (and more) of kilometers by plasma wires. Author shows that AB-Space Engine can produce thrust of 10 tons (and more). That can accelerate a space ship to some thousands of kilometers/second. AB-Space Engine has a staggering specific impulse owing to the very small mass expended. The AB-Space Engine reacts not by expulsion of its own mass (unlike rocket engine) but against the mass of its planet of origin (located perhaps a thousand of millions of kilometers away) through the magnetic field of its plasma cable. For creating this plasma cable the AB-Space Engine spends only some kg of hydrogen.

  2. Coal ash by-product reutilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muncy, J. [Potomac Electric Power Co., Washington, DC (United States); Miller, B. [DYNA Corp., Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) has as part of its vision and value statement that, ``We are responsible stewards of environmental and corporate resources.`` With this moral imperative in mind, a project team was charged with initiating the Coal Pile Liner Project--installing a membrane liner under the existing coal storage pile at the Morgantown Generating Station. The existing coal yard facilities were constructed prior to the current environmental regulations, and it became necessary to upgrade the storage facilities to be environmentally friendly. The project team had two objectives in this project: (1) prevent coal pile leachate from entering the groundwater system; (2) test the viability of using coal ash by-products as an aggregate substitute for concrete applications. Both objectives were met, and two additional benefits were achieved as well: (1) the use of coal ash by-products as a coal liner produced significant cost savings to the project directly; (2) the use of coal ash by-products reduced plant operation and maintenance expenses.

  3. SOURCE?

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy (DOE) in partnership with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), is an open-source code package designed to be a common, low-cost, standardized tool...

  4. CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS MADE WITH COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ash and bottom ash are produced as by-products of coal-fired electricity generation. In many countriesCONSTRUCTION MATERIALS MADE WITH COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS Lihua Wei*, Tarun R. Naik**, and Dean-Milwaukee, is being conducted to develop new low-cost construction materials primarily using coal combustion

  5. ADVANCED GASIFICATION BY-PRODUCT UTILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Ari Geertsema; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu; Harold Schobert

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported for the period September 1, 2003 to August 31, 2004. This contract is with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involves the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers.

  6. animal byproducts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik") UTILIZING CLEAN-COAL ASH 1 This project was for the...

  7. advanced byproduct recovery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik") UTILIZING CLEAN-COAL ASH 1 This project was for the...

  8. Relaxations for Production Planning Problems with Increasing By-products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Relaxations for Production Planning Problems with Increasing By-products Srikrishna Sridhar, Jeff, James Leudtke SILO Seminars: Feb 1, 2012 #12;One slide summary Problem Description Production process involves desirable & undesirable products. Srikrishna Sridhar, Jeff Linderoth, James Leudtke SILO Seminars

  9. Oxidation kinetics of by-product calcium sulfite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Othman, Hasliza

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department) May 1992 ABSTRACT Oxidation Kinetics of By-product Calcium Sulfite. (May 1992) Hasliza Othman, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ahmed M. Gadalla The by-products obtained from the flue gas desulfurization (FGD..., suggestions and encouragement. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER Page I INTRODUCTION I I LITERATURE REVIEW A. Limestone Flue Gas Desulfurization Process . . . . . . . . . . . . B. Scaling Problem in the FGD Process...

  10. Grain Sorghum By-Product Feeds for Farm Animals.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X3.AJ.N SORGHUM BY-PRODUCT FEEDS FOR FARM ANIMALS FEED FOR LIVESTOCK -. Grain sorghum is the leading feed grain produced in Texas and in the Southwest. Its importance as a feed fc farm animals is generally recognized. Recent developments... in Texas have made available 1 livestock producers and the feed industry a considerab tonnage of sorghum gluten meal and sorghum gluten fee as by-products in sorghum grain processing. The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station conduct( a series...

  11. Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Ari Geertsema; Frank Huggins; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Brandie M. Markley; Harold Schobert

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the recent passing of new legislation designed to permanently cap and reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities, it is more important than ever to develop and improve upon methods of controlling mercury emissions. One promising technique is carbon sorbent injection into the flue gas of the coal-fired power plant. Currently, this technology is very expensive as costly commercially activated carbons are used as sorbents. There is also a significant lack of understanding of the interaction between mercury vapor and the carbon sorbent, which adds to the difficulty of predicting the amount of sorbent needed for specific plant configurations. Due to its inherent porosity and adsorption properties as well as on-site availability, carbons derived from gasifiers are potential mercury sorbent candidates. Furthermore, because of the increasing restricted use of landfilling, the coal industry is very interested in finding uses for these materials as an alternative to the current disposal practice. The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported for the period September 1, 2004 to August 31, 2005. This contract is with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involves the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers.

  12. AB Levitator and Electricity Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author researched this new idea - support of flight by any aerial vehicles at significant altitude solely by the magnetic field of the planet. It is shown that current technology allows humans to create a light propulsion (AB engine) which does not depend on air, water or ground terrain. Simultaniosly, this revolutionary thruster is a device for the storage of electricity which is extracted and is replenished (during braking) from/into the storage with 100 percent efficiency. The relative weight ratio of this engine is 0.01 - 0.1 (from thrust). For some types of AB engine (toroidal form) the thrust easily may be changed in any direction without turning of engine. The author computed many projects using different versions of offered AB engine: small device for levitation-flight of a human (including flight from Earth to Outer Space), fly VTOL car (track), big VTOL aircrat, suspended low altitude stationary satellite, powerful Space Shuttle-like booster for travel to the Moon and Mars without spending energy (spended energy is replenished in braking when ship returns from other planet to its point of origin), using AB-devices in military, in sea-going ships (submarimes), in energy industry (for example. as small storage of electric energy) and so on. The vehicles equipped with AB propulsion can take flight for days and cover distances of tens thousands of kilometers at hypersonic or extra-atmosphere space speeds. The work contains tens of inventions and innovations which solves problems and breaks limitations which appear in solution of these very complex revolutionary ideas. Key word: AB levitator, levitation, non-rocket outer space flight, electric energy storage, AB propulsion, AB engine, Bolonkin.

  13. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)); Haefner, R. (Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.)

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. Presently FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. However, landfill sites are becoming more scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. In summary Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD byproduct materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold H. Schobert; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand environmental and cost-effective strategies for the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs), mainly unburned carbon in fly ash. Unburned carbon is nowadays regarded as a waste product and its fate is mainly disposal, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, the principal objective of this work was to characterize and utilize the unburned carbon in fly ash for the production of activated carbons. The unburned carbon samples were collected from different combustion systems, including pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone, a stoker, and a fluidized bed combustor. LOI (loss-on-ignition), proximate, ultimate, and petrographic analyses were conducted, and the surface areas of the samples were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The LOIs of the unburned carbon samples varied between 21.79-84.52%. The proximate analyses showed that all the samples had very low moisture contents (0.17 to 3.39 wt %), while the volatile matter contents varied between 0.45 to 24.82 wt%. The elemental analyses show that all the unburned carbon samples consist mainly of carbon with very little hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen In addition, the potential use of unburned carbon as precursor for activated carbon (AC) was investigated. Activated carbons with specific surface area up to 1075m{sup 2}/g were produced from the unburned carbon. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was related to the properties of the unburned carbon feedstock and the activation conditions used. It was found that not all the unburned carbon samples are equally suited for activation, and furthermore, their potential as activated carbons precursors could be inferred from their physical and chemical properties. The developed porosity of the activated carbon was a function of the oxygen content, porosity and H/C ratio of the parent unburned carbon feedstock. It was observed that extended activation times and high activation temperatures increased the porosity of the produced activated carbon at the expense of the solid yield. The development of activated carbon from unburned carbon in fly ash has been proven to be a success by this study in terms of the higher surface areas of the resultant activated carbons, which are comparable with commercial activated carbons. However, unburned carbon samples obtained from coal-fired power plants as by-product have high ash content, which is unwanted for the production of activated carbons. Therefore, the separation of unburned carbon from the fly ash is expected to be beneficial for the utilization of unburned carbon to produce activated carbons with low ash content.

  15. Succinic Acid as a Byproduct in a Corn-based Ethanol Biorefinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MBI International

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    MBI endeavored to develop a process for succinic acid production suitable for integration into a corn-based ethanol biorefinery. The project investigated the fermentative production of succinic acid using byproducts of corn mill operations. The fermentation process was attuned to include raw starch, endosperm, as the sugar source. A clean-not-sterile process was established to treat the endosperm and release the monomeric sugars. We developed the fermentation process to utilize a byproduct of corn ethanol fermentations, thin stillage, as the source of complex nitrogen and vitamin components needed to support succinic acid production in A. succinogenes. Further supplementations were eliminated without lowering titers and yields and a productivity above 0.6 g l-1 hr-1was achieved. Strain development was accomplished through generation of a recombinant strain that increased yields of succinic acid production. Isolation of additional strains with improved features was also pursued and frozen stocks were prepared from enriched, characterized cultures. Two recovery processes were evaluated at pilot scale and data obtained was incorporated into our economic analyses.

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - ab initio protein Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . Proteins 2007;68:48-56. VVC 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Key words: ab initio folding; protein folding; pro- tein... years ... Source: Skolnick, Jeff - Center for the Study of Systems...

  17. Center for By-Products Utilization High Durability Concrete Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    TESTING · Fresh Concrete Properties ·Unit Weight (ASTM C 138) ·Air Content (ASTM C 237) ·Slump (ASTM C 143Center for By-Products Utilization High Durability Concrete Using High-Carbon Fly Ash and Pulp Mill-Products Utilization Durable Concrete in Northern Climates · Producing durable concrete in a freezing and thawing

  18. Reducing Disinfection By-Products in Small Drinking Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    not decrease the residual TOC by 0.3 mg/L. #12;Guidelines: Coagulant dosages for water supplies where NOMReducing Disinfection By-Products in Small Drinking Water Systems by M. Robin Collins, James P. Malley, Jr, & Ethan Brooke Water Treatment Technology Assistance Center Department of Civil Engineering

  19. Center for By-Products Utilization CARBONATION: AN EFFICIENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    -based materials. #12;Center for By-Products Utilization Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Cement-based Materials Early age carbonation curing for the sequestration of CO2 in cement-based products is most adopted. Recently a practical and easy way of carbon dioxide sequestration in cement-based materials has been

  20. Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hesbach, P.A.; Kachur, E.K.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. EPA has issued a final regulation for control of mercury from coal-fired power plants. An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. These adulterated by-products, both ashes and FGD material, represent the greatest challenge to the DOE goal of increased utilization of by-products. The degree of stability of capture by-products and their potential for release of mercury can have a large economic impact on material sales or the approach to disposal. One of the considerations for mercury control technology is the potential trade-off between effective but temporary mercury capture and less effective but more permanent sequestration. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed aqueous leaching procedures on a select subset of the available sample pairs. This report describes batch leaching results for mercury, arsenic, and selenium.

  1. Center for By-Products Utilization CO2 SEQUESTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    climate change, reduced GHGs, improved air quality, CO2 reduction & sequestration, and carbon offsets. #12 for the development of a technology for the carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in non-air entrained concreteCenter for By-Products Utilization CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN NON-AIR ENTRAINED CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik

  2. Remediation of Abandoned Mines Using Coal Combustion By-Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    . Maryland has about 450 coal mines out of which only 50 are active and about 150 mines produce AMD RafalkoRemediation of Abandoned Mines Using Coal Combustion By-Products Sowmya Bulusu1 ; Ahmet H. Aydilek that occurs when pyrite that is present in abandoned coal mines comes in contact with oxygen and water, which

  3. Oxidation of byproduct calcium sulfite hemihydrate from coal-fired power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Sandeep

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The flue gas desulfurization by-product from the TU Electric Martin Lake power plant near Tatum, Texas was characterized using thermal analysis, x-ray diffraction, microprobe and infrared spectroscopy. The byproduct, called gypsite, consisted of a...

  4. Feasibility Analysis of Steam Reforming of Biodiesel by-product Glycerol to Make Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Manoj

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude glycerol is the major byproduct from biodiesel industry. In general, for every 100 pounds of biodiesel produced, approximately 10 pounds of crude glycerol are produced as a by-product. As the biodiesel industry rapidly expands in the U...

  5. Feasibility of producing jet fuel from GPGP (Great Plains Gasification Plant) by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willson, W.G.; Knudson, C.L.; Rindt, J.R.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota, is in close proximity to several Air Force bases along our northern tier. This plant is producing over 137 million cubic feet per day of high-Btu Natural Gas from North Dakota lignite. In addition, the plant generates three liquid streams, naphtha, crude phenol, and tar oil. The naphtha may be directly marketable because of its low boiling point and high aromatic content. The other two streams, totalling about 4300 barrels per day, are available as potential sources of aviation fuel jet fuel for the Air Force. The overall objective of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing aviation turbine fuel from the by-product streams of GPGP. These streams, as well as fractions, thereof, will be characterized and subsequently processed over a wide range of process conditions. The resulting turbine fuel products will be analyzed to determine their chemical and physical characteristics as compared to petroleum-based fuels to meet the military specification requirements. A second objective is to assess the conversion of the by-product streams into a new, higher-density aviation fuel. Since no performance specifications currently exist for a high-density jet fuel, reaction products and intermediates will only be characterized to indicate the feasibility of producing such a fuel. This report discusses the suitability of the tar oil stream. 5 refs., 20 figs., 15 tabs.

  6. Utilization of by-product gypsum in construction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephenson, Angela Lorraine

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as a by-product (called phosphogypsum) during acidulation of phosphate rock in the manufacture phosphoric acid. The sulfate is produced in either a dihydrate or a hemihydrate form depending on the operating conditions. Phosphogypsum produced... by Mobil Chemi- cal Company (Pasadena, Texas) is in the dihydrate form and was previously studied. Phosphogypsum produced by Occidental Chemical Company (White Springs, Florida), on the other hand, is produced in a hemihydrate form and transforms...

  7. Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period:Dakota" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","TypeWyoming"5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel

  8. Solibro AB | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCity Corp Jump to:Solibro AB Jump to: navigation, search

  9. Minesto AB | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole Inc JumpMicroPlanet Name:I & IIMinesto AB Jump to:

  10. Ab-Initio Molecular Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas D. Kühne

    2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer simulation methods, such as Monte Carlo or Molecular Dynamics, are very powerful computational techniques that provide detailed and essentially exact information on classical many-body problems. With the advent of ab-initio molecular dynamics, where the forces are computed on-the-fly by accurate electronic structure calculations, the scope of either method has been greatly extended. This new approach, which unifies Newton's and Schr\\"odinger's equations, allows for complex simulations without relying on any adjustable parameter. This review is intended to outline the basic principles as well as a survey of the field. Beginning with the derivation of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, the Car-Parrinello method and the recently devised efficient and accurate Car-Parrinello-like approach to Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, which unifies best of both schemes are discussed. The predictive power of this novel second-generation Car-Parrinello approach is demonstrated by a series of applications ranging from liquid metals, to semiconductors and water. This development allows for ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations on much larger length and time scales than previously thought feasible.

  11. Synthetic aggregates prepared from flue gas desulfurization by-products using various binder materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellucci, J.; Graham, U.M.; Hower, J.C.; Robl, T.L. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) by-products can be converted into environmentally safe and structurally stable aggregates. One type of synthetic aggregate was prepared using an optimum mixture of (FGD) by-products, fly ash, and water. Mineral reactions have been examined using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope.

  12. Ab-Initio Molecular Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kühne, Thomas D

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer simulations and molecular dynamics in particular, is a very powerful method to provide detailed and essentially exact informations of classical many-body problems. With the advent of \\textit{ab-initio} molecular dynamics, where the forces are computed on-the-fly by accurate electronic structure calculations, the scope of either method has been greatly extended. This new approach, which unifies Newton's and Schr\\"odinger's equations, allows for complex simulations without relying on any adjustable parameter. This review is intended to outline the basic principles as well as a survey of the field. Beginning with the derivation of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, the Car-Parrinello method as well as novel hybrid scheme that unifies best of either approach are discussed. The predictive power is demonstrated by a series of applications ranging from insulators to semiconductors and even metals in condensed phases.

  13. Clean coal technology. Coal utilisation by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to remove the bulk of ash contained in flue gas from coal-fired power plants coupled with increasingly strict environmental regulations in the USA result in increased generation of solid materials referred to as coal utilisation by-products, or CUBs. More than 40% of CUBs were sold or reused in the USA in 2004 compared to less than 25% in 1996. A goal of 50% utilization has been established for 2010. The American Coal Ash Association (ACCA) together with the US Department of Energy's Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPPI) and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) sponsor a number of projects that promote CUB utilization. Several are mentioned in this report. Report sections are: Executive summary; Introduction; Where do CUBs come from?; Market analysis; DOE-sponsored CUB demonstrations; Examples of best-practice utilization of CUB materials; Factors limiting the use of CUBs; and Conclusions. 14 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs., 14 photos.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation and ab intio studies of electrolytes...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Molecular dynamics simulation and ab intio studies of electrolytes and electrolyteelectrode interfaces Molecular dynamics simulation and ab intio studies of electrolytes and...

  15. abs: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the magnetic field of its plasma cable. For creating this plasma cable the AB-Space Engine spends only some kg of hydrogen. Alexander Bolonkin 2008-03-02 2 -Ammonia Borane...

  16. Svensk Krnbrnslehantering AB Swedish Nuclear Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Döös, Kristofer

    Svensk Kärnbränslehantering AB Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co Box 250, SE-101 24.skb.se. #12;3 Abstract In the safety assessment of a potential repository for spent nuclear fuel

  17. Statistical analysis of wind energy in Chile David Watts a,b,*, Danilo Jara a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    Data Bank Statistical analysis of wind energy in Chile David Watts a,b,*, Danilo Jara December 2010 Keywords: Wind Wind speed Energy Capacity factor Electricity Chile a b s t r a c t Bearing has been remarkably influenced by new requirements e the search for new energy supply sources has

  18. Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donal F. Day

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The work conducted in this project is an extension of the developments itemized in DE-FG-36-04GO14236. This program is designed to help the development of a biorefinery based around a raw sugar mill, which in Louisiana is an underutilized asset. Some technical questions were answered regarding the addition of a biomass to ethanol facility to existing sugar mills. The focus of this work is on developing technology to produce ethanol and valuable by-products from bagasse. Three major areas are addressed, feedstock storage, potential by-products and the technology for producing ethanol from dilute ammonia pre-treated bagasse. Sugar mills normally store bagasse in a simple pile. During the off season there is a natural degradation of the bagasse, due to the composting action of microorganisms in the pile. This has serious implications if bagasse must be stored to operate a bagasse/biorefinery for a 300+ day operating cycle. Deterioration of the fermentables in bagasse was found to be 6.5% per month, on pile storage. This indicates that long term storage of adequate amounts of bagasse for year-round operation is probably not feasible. Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of succinic acid production were such that it could not compete with current commercial practice. To allow recovery of commercial amounts of ethanol from bagasse fermentation, research was conducted on high solids loading fermentations (using S. cerevisiae) with commercial cellulase on pretreated material. A combination of SHF/SSF treatment with fed-batch operation allowed fermentation at 30% solids loading. Supplementation of the fermentation with a small amount of black-strap molasses had results beyond expectation. There was an enhancement of conversion as well as production of ethanol levels above 6.0% w/w, which is required both for efficient distillation as well as contaminant repression. The focus of fermentation development was only on converting the cellulose to ethanol, as this yeast is not capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose (from hemicellulose). In anticipation of the future development of such an organism, we screened the commercially available xylanases to find the optimum mix for conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose. A different mixture than the spezyme/novozyme mix used in our fermentation research was found to be more efficient at converting both cellulose and hemicellulose. Efforts were made to select a mutant of Pichia stipitis for ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol. New mutation technology was developed, but an appropriate mutant has not yet been isolated. The ability to convert to stillage from biomass fermentations were determined to be suitable for anaerobic degradation and methane production. An economic model of a current sugar factory was developed in order to provide a baseline for the cost/benefit analysis of adding cellulosic ethanol production.

  19. RESIDUES FROM COAL CONVERSION AND UTILIZATION: ADVANCED MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND DISPOSED BYPRODUCT DIAGENESIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory J. McCarthy; Dean G. Grier

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to the initiation of this study, understanding of the long-term behavior of environmentally-exposed Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBs) was lacking in (among others) two primary areas addressed in this work. First, no method had been successfully applied to achieve full quantitative analysis of the partitioning of chemical constituents into reactive or passive crystalline or noncrystalline compounds. Rather, only semi-quantitative methods were available, with large associated errors. Second, our understanding of the long-term behavior of various CCBs in contact with the natural environment was based on a relatively limited set of study materials. This study addressed these areas with two objectives, producing (1) a set of protocols for fully quantitative phase analysis using the Rietveld Quantitative X-ray Diffraction (RQXRD) method and (2) greater understanding of the hydrologic and geochemical nature of the long-term behavior of disposed and utilized CCBs. The RQXRD technique was initially tested using (1) mixtures of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) crystalline standards, and (2) mixtures of synthetic reagents simulating various CCBs, to determine accuracy and precision of the method, and to determine the most favorable protocols to follow in order to efficiently quantify multi-phase mixtures. Four sets of borehole samples of disposed or utilized CCBs were retrieved and analyzed by RQXRD according to the protocols developed under the first objective. The first set of samples, from a Class F ash settling pond in Kentucky disposed for up to 20 years, showed little mineralogical alteration, as expected. The second set of samples, from an embankment in Indiana containing a mixture of chain-grate (stoker) furnace ash and fluidized bed combustion (FBC) residues, showed formation of the mineral thaumasite, as observed in previously studied exposed FBC materials. Two high-calcium CCBs studied, including a dry-process flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-product disposed in the Midwest, and a mixture of Class C fly ash and wet process FGD by-product codisposed in North Dakota, appeared relatively unchanged mineralogically over the up to 5 and 17 years of emplacement, respectively. Each of these two materials contained mineralogies consistent with short-term hydration products of their respective starting (dry) materials. The hydration product ettringite persisted throughout the duration of emplacement at each site, and the diagenetic ash alteration product thaumasite did not form at either site. Explanations for the absence of thaumasite in these two sites include a lack of significant carbonate, sulfate, and alkalinity sources in the case of the North Dakota site, and a lack of sulfate, alkalinity, and sufficient moisture in the Midwest site. Potential for future thaumasite formation in these materials may exist if placed in contact with cold, wet materials containing the missing components listed above. In the presence of the sulfite scrubber mineral hannebachite, the ettringites formed had crystallographic unit cell dimensions smaller than those of pure sulfate ettringite, suggesting either incorporation of sulfite ions into the ettringite structure, or incorporation of silicon and carbonate ions, forming a solid solution towards thaumasite.

  20. Exotic Nuclear Structures and Reactions from an Ab Initio Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldmeier, Hans

    -505 -5 0 5 #12;Nuclear Degrees of Freedom Nordic Winter Meeting on FAIR Physics - 2 nucleon few;Modern Nuclear Structure ­ Ab Initio Nordic Winter Meeting on FAIR Physics - 3 Ab Initio : from;Modern Nuclear Structure ­ Ab Initio Nordic Winter Meeting on FAIR Physics - 6 Ab initio treatment: solve

  1. avoiding by-product formation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Engineering Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied...

  2. atmospheric oxidation by-products: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Engineering Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied...

  3. arc-induced toxic by-products: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Engineering Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied...

  4. animal protein by-products: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Engineering Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied...

  5. Case Study of Optimal Byproduct Gas Distribution in Integrated Steel Mill Using Multi-Period Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makinen, K.; Kymalainen, T.; Junttila, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    byproduct gases at varying rates. The differences between gas generation and consumption rates are compensated with gas holders. However, under certain circumstances the imbalances can lead to the flaring of excessive gas or require the purchase...

  6. Pore structure of soot deposits from several combustion Karl J. Rockne a,b,*, Gary L. Taghon b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockne, Karl J.

    (typically when the C/O2 ratio >2) by internal combustion engines, industrial and domestic combustion sourcesPore structure of soot deposits from several combustion sources Karl J. Rockne a,b,*, Gary L. Taghon b , David S. Kosson a,1 a Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Rutgers, The State

  7. Land application uses for dry flue gas desulfurization by-products: Phase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick, W.; Bigham, J.; Forster, R.; Hitzhusen, F.; Lal, R.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.; Haefner, R.; Rowe, G.

    1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    New flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbing technologies create a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction product that contains sulfate and sulfite, and coal fly ash. Generally, dry FGD by-products are treated as solid wastes and disposed in landfills. However, landfill sites are becoming scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. Provided the environmental impacts are socially and scientifically acceptable, beneficial uses via recycling can provide economic benefits to both the producer and the end user of the FGD. A study titled ''Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products'' was initiated in December, 1990 to develop and demonstrate large volume, beneficial uses of FGD by-products. Phase 1 and Phase 2 reports have been published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA. Phase 3 objectives were to demonstrate, using field studies, the beneficial uses of FGD by-products (1) as an amendment material on agricultural lands and on abandoned surface coal mine land, (2) as an engineering material for soil stabilization and raid repair, and (3) to assess the environmental and economic impacts of such beneficial uses. Application of dry FGD by-product to three soils in place of agricultural limestone increased alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and corn (Zea may L.) yields. No detrimental effects on soil and plant quality were observed.

  8. Applications developed for byproduct /sup 85/Kr and tritium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remini, W.C.; Case, F.N.; Haff, K.W.; Tiegs, S.M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radionuclides, krypton-85 and tritium, both of which are gases under ordinary conditions, are used in many applications in industries and by the military forces. Krypton-85 is produced during the fissioning of uranium and is released during the dissolution of spent-fuel elements. It is a chemically inert gas that emits 0.695-MeV beta rays and a small yield of 0.54-MeV gammas over a half life of 10.3 years. Much of the /sup 85/Kr currently produced is released to the atmosphere; however, large-scale reprocessing of fuel will require collection of the gas and storage as a waste product. An alternative to storage is utilization, and since the chemical and radiation characteristics of /sup 85/Kr make this radionuclide a relatively low hazard from the standpoint of contamination and biological significance, a number of uses have been developed. Tritium is produced as a byproduct of the nuclear-weapons program, and it has a half life of 12.33 years. It has a 0.01861-MeV beta emission and no gamma emission. The absence of a gamma-ray energy eliminates the need for external shielding of the devices utilizing tritium, thus making them easily transportable. Many of the applications require only small quantities of /sup 85/Kr or tritium; however, these uses are important to the technology base of the nation. A significant development that has the potential for beneficial utilization of large quantities of /sup 85/Kr and of tritium involves their use in the production of low-level lighting devices. Since these lights are free from external fuel supplies, have a long half life (> 10 years), are maintenance-free, reliable, and easily deployed, both military and civilian airfield-lighting applications are being studied.

  9. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products, Phase 1 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. It is highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. The results indicated the chemical composition of the FGD by-product materials were dominated by Ca, S, Al, and Si. Many of the elements regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency reside primarily in the fly ash. Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD by-product materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

  10. MELCOR 1.8.2 assessment: Aerosol experiments ABCOVE AB5, AB6, AB7, and LACE LA2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souto, F.J.; Haskin, F.E. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Kmetyk, L.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MELCOR computer code has been used to model four of the large-scale aerosol behavior experiments conducted in the Containment System Test Facility (CSTF) vessel. Tests AB5, AB6 and AB7 of the ABCOVE program simulate the dry aerosol conditions during a hypothetical severe accident in an LMFBR. Test LA2 of the LACE program simulates aerosol behavior in a condensing steam environment during a postulated severe accident in an LWR with failure to isolate the containment. The comparison of code results to experimental data show that MELCOR is able to correctly predict most of the thermal-hydraulic results in the four tests. MELCOR predicts reasonably well the dry aerosol behavior of the ABCOVE tests, but significant disagreements are found in the aerosol behavior modelling for the LA2 experiment. These results tend to support some of the concerns about the MELCOR modelling of steam condensation onto aerosols expressed in previous works. During these analyses, a limitation in the MELCOR input was detected for the specification of the aerosol parameters for more than one component. A Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) sensitivity study of the aerosol dynamic constants is presented for test AB6. The study shows the importance of the aerosol shape factors in the aerosol deposition behavior, and reveals that MELCOR input/output processing is highly labor intensive for uncertainty and sensitivity analyses based on LHS.

  11. Strontium Isotope Study of Coal Untilization By-products Interacting with Environmental Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J; Stewart, Brian W; Capo, Rosemary C; Chapman, Elizabeth C; Schroeder, Karl T; Brubaker, Tonya M

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sequential leaching experiments on coal utilization by-products (CUB) were coupled with chemical and strontium (Sr) isotopic analyses to better understand the influence of coal type and combustion processes on CUB properties and the release of elements during interaction with environmental waters during disposal. Class C fly ash tended to release the highest quantity of minor and trace elements—including alkaline earth elements, sodium, chromium, copper, manganese, lead, titanium, and zinc—during sequential extraction, with bottom ash yielding the lowest. Strontium isotope ratios ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) in bulk-CUB samples (total dissolution of CUB) are generally higher in class F ash than in class C ash. Bulk-CUB ratios appear to be controlled by the geologic source of the mineral matter in the feed coal, and by Sr added during desulfurization treatments. Leachates of the CUB generally have Sr isotope ratios that are different than the bulk value, demonstrating that Sr was not isotopically homogenized during combustion. Variations in the Sr isotopic composition of CUB leachates were correlated with mobility of several major and trace elements; the data suggest that arsenic and lead are held in phases that contain the more radiogenic (high-{sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) component. A changing Sr isotope ratio of CUB-interacting waters in a disposal environment could forecast the release of certain strongly bound elements of environmental concern. This study lays the groundwork for the application of Sr isotopes as an environmental tracer for CUB–water interaction.

  12. Conversion of high carbon refinery by-products. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katta, S.; Henningsen, G.; Lin, Y.Y.; O`Donnell, J.

    1996-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the project is to demonstrate that a partial oxidation system, which utilizes a transport reactor, is a viable means of converting refinery wastes, byproducts, and other low value materials into valuable products. The primary product would be a high quality fuel gas, which could also be used as a source of hydrogen. The concept involves subjecting the hydrocarbon feed to pyrolysis and steam gasification in a circulating bed of solids. Carbon residue formed during pyrolysis, as well as metals in the feed, are captured by the circulating solids which are returned to the bottom of the transport reactor. Air or oxygen is introduced in this lower zone and sufficient carbon is burned, sub-stoichiometrically, to provide the necessary heat for the endothermic pyrolysis and gasification reactions. The hot solids and gases leaving this zone pass upward to contact the feed material and continue the gasification process. The Transport Reactor Test Unit (TRTU) was commissioned to conduct studies on pyrolysis of Rose Bottoms using spent FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracker) catalyst as the circulating medium and gasification of this carbon over a temperature range of 1,600 to 1,700 F. The Rose Bottoms (Residuum Oil Supercritical Extraction) was produced in the Rose unit. Studies were done in the Bench Scale Reactor Unit (BRU) to develop suitable catalyst formulations and to study the steam reforming of methane and propane in support of the experiments to be conducted in the TRTU. Studies were also conducted on gasification of coke breeze, petroleum cokes and carbon deposited on FCC catalyst. The catalytic effect of potassium on gasification of these solids was studied. Studies were conducted in the CFS (cold flow simulator) to investigate flow problems experienced in the TRTU. Results from these studies are presented in this report.

  13. Technical support for the Ohio Coal Technology Program. Volume 1, Baseline of knowledge concerning by-product characteristics: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1989-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LRl and comprises two volumes. Volume I presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume II consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

  14. Parking Lot Sealcoat: An Unrecognized Source of Urban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    structures stemming from their origins: coal tar is a byproduct of the production of coke from coal, whereas,maydominateloadingofPAHstourbanwaterbodies in the United States. Particles in runoff from parking lots with coal-tar emulsion sealcoat had mean and cement lots. Diagnostic ratios of individual PAHs indicating sources are similar for particles from coal

  15. Engineering Science AB: Electrical Rev. Aug 2014 1/3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering Science ­ AB: Electrical Rev. Aug 2014 1/3 Plan of Study for the Electrical ­ System Programming & Machine Organization ___________ Sophomore Forum ___________ Electrical Engineering ___________ ___________ ___________ ___________ #12;Engineering Science ­ AB: Electrical Rev. Aug 2014 2/3 Hardware CIRCLE ONE ES 52

  16. IGCC and PFBC By-Products: Generation, Characteristics, and Management Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following report is a compilation of data on by-products/wastes from clean coal technologies, specifically integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC). DOE had two objectives in providing this information to EPA: (1) to familiarize EPA with the DOE CCT program, CCT by-products, and the associated efforts by DOE contractors in the area of CCT by-product management and (2) to provide information that will facilitate EPA's effort by complementing similar reports from industry groups, including CIBO (Council of Industrial Boiler Owners) and EEI USWAG (Edison Electric Institute Utility Solid Waste Activities Group). The EERC cooperated and coordinated with DOE CCT contractors and industry groups to provide the most accurate and complete data on IGCC and PFBC by-products, although these technologies are only now being demonstrated on the commercial scale through the DOE CCT program.

  17. RESIDUES FROM COAL CONVERSION AND UTILIZATION: ADVANCED MINERALOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND DISPOSED BYPRODUCT DIAGENESIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory J. McCarthy; Dean G. Grier

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the project are two-fold: (1) to upgrade semi-quantitative X-ray diffraction (QXRD) methods presently used in analyzing complex coal combustion by-product (CCB) systems, with the quantitative Rietveld method, and (2) to apply this method to a set of by-product materials that have been disposed or utilized for a long period (5 years or more) in contact with the natural environment, to further study the nature of CCB diagenesis. The project is organized into three tasks to accomplish these two goals: (1) thorough characterization of a set of previously analyzed disposed by-product materials, (2) development of a set of CCB-specific protocols for Rietveld QXRD, and (3) characterization of an additional set of disposed CCB materials, including application of the protocols for Rietveld QXRD developed in Task 2.

  18. AB3 Proton NMR Using Tensor Algebra Frank Rioux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    AB3 Proton NMR Using Tensor Algebra Frank Rioux Professor Emeritus of Chemistry CSB|SJU The purpose of this tutorial is to calculate the NMR spectrum of a four proton AB3 system in Hz) are for the AB3 proton system 1,1dichloroethane at 60 MHz. A 350.0 B 120.0 Jab 10.00 Hamiltonian

  19. PAST RECIPIENTS OF THE HAA AWARD 1990 Harriet B. Belin, AB '43

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, ABE '66 Alan H. Hammerman AB '55 M. Carolyn Hughes AB '54 Suzanne S. Labiner, MAT '55 Stanley Jonathan Byrnes DBA '80 Michael Holland AB '66 Barbara Meyer AB '62 Roland Smith EdD '88 Beverly Sullivan

  20. Succinic Acid Production with Reduced By-Product Formation in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Succinic Acid Production with Reduced By-Product Formation in the Fermentation; accepted 13 July 2000 Abstract: Succinic acid was produced by fermentation of Anaerobiospirillum-product acetic acid. The gram ratio of suc- cinic acid to acetic acid was 25.8:1, which is 6.5 times higher than

  1. PRE-TRANSITIONAL DISK NATURE OF THE AB Aur DISK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honda, M. [Department of Information Sciences, Kanagawa University, 2946 Tsuchiya, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1293 (Japan); Inoue, A. K. [College of General Education, Osaka Sangyo University, 3-1-1 Nakagaito, Daito, Osaka 574-8530 (Japan); Okamoto, Y. K. [Institute of Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences, Faculty of Science, Ibaraki University, 2-1-1 Bunkyo, Mito, Ibaraki 310-8512 (Japan); Kataza, H.; Fujiwara, H.; Kamizuka, T. [Department of Infrared Astrophysics, Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Fukagawa, M. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Yamashita, T.; Tamura, M.; Hashimoto, J. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Fujiyoshi, T. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Miyata, T.; Sako, S. [Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Sakon, I.; Onaka, T. [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disk around AB Aur was imaged and resolved at 24.6 {mu}m using the Cooled Mid-infrared Camera and Spectrometer on the 8.2 m Subaru Telescope. The Gaussian full width at half-maximum of the source size is estimated to be 90 {+-} 6 AU, indicating that the disk extends further out at 24.6 {mu}m than at shorter wavelengths. In order to interpret the extended 24.6 {mu}m image, we consider a disk with a reduced surface density within a boundary radius R{sub c} , which is motivated by radio observations that suggest a reduced inner region within about 100 AU from the star. Introducing the surface density reduction factor f{sub c} for the inner disk, we determine that the best match with the observed radial intensity profile at 24.6 {mu}m is achieved with R{sub c} = 88 AU and f{sub c} = 0.01. We suggest that the extended emission at 24.6 {mu}m is due to the enhanced emission from a wall-like structure at the boundary radius (the inner edge of the outer disk), which is caused by a jump in the surface density at R{sub c} . Such a reduced inner disk and geometrically thick outer disk structure can also explain the more point-like nature at shorter wavelengths. We also note that this disk geometry is qualitatively similar to a pre-transitional disk, suggesting that the AB Aur disk is in a pre-transitional disk phase.

  2. AB Tehachapi Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwiki Home Jweers's APTAPFinal Report |AB Tehachapi

  3. Review Chlorination Disinfection By-Products in Drinking Water and Congenital Anomalies: Review and Meta-Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mark J. Nieuwenhuijsen; David Martinez; James Grellier; James Bennett; Nicky Best; Nina Iszatt; Martine Vrijheid; Mireille B. Toledano

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to review epidemiologic evidence, provide summary risk estimates of the association between exposure to chlorination disinfection by-products (DBPs) and congenital anomalies, and provide recommendations for future studies. Data s o u r c e s a n d extraction: We included all published epidemiologic studies that evaluated a relationship between an index of DBP exposure (treatment, water source, DBP measurements, and both DBP measurements and personal characteristics) and risk of congenital anomalies. When three or more studies examined the same exposure index and congenital anomaly, we conducted a metaanalysis to obtain a summary risk estimate comparing the highest exposure group with the lowest exposure group. When five or more studies examined total trihalomethane (TTHM) exposure and a specific congenital anomaly, we conducted a meta-analysis to obtain exposure–response risk estimates per 10 µg/L TTHM. Data synthesis: For all congenital anomalies combined, the meta-analysis gave a statistically significant excess risk for high versus low exposure to water chlorination or TTHM [17%; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 3–34] based on a small number of studies. The meta-analysis also suggested a statistically significant excess risk for ventricular septal defects (58%; 95 % CI, 21–107), but this was

  4. EVIDENCE FOR RADIOGENIC SULFUR-32 IN TYPE AB PRESOLAR SILICON CARBIDE GRAINS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujiya, Wataru; Hoppe, Peter [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Hahn-Meitner-Weg 1, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)] [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Hahn-Meitner-Weg 1, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Zinner, Ernst [Laboratory for Space Sciences and Physics Department, Campus Box 1105, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)] [Laboratory for Space Sciences and Physics Department, Campus Box 1105, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Pignatari, Marco [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)] [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Herwig, Falk, E-mail: wataru.fujiya@mpic.de, E-mail: peter.hoppe@mpic.de, E-mail: ekz@wustl.edu, E-mail: mpignatari@gmail.com, E-mail: fherwig@uvic.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Canada, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Canada, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report C, Si, and S isotope measurements on 34 presolar silicon carbide grains of Type AB, characterized by {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C < 10. Nitrogen, Mg-Al-, and Ca-Ti-isotopic compositions were measured on a subset of these grains. Three grains show large {sup 32}S excesses, a signature that has been previously observed for grains from supernovae (SNe). Enrichments in {sup 32}S may be due to contributions from the Si/S zone and the result of S molecule chemistry in still unmixed SN ejecta or due to incorporation of radioactive {sup 32}Si from C-rich explosive He shell ejecta. However, a SN origin remains unlikely for the three AB grains considered here, because of missing evidence for {sup 44}Ti, relatively low {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al ratios (a few times 10{sup –3}), and radiogenic {sup 32}S along with low {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios. Instead, we show that born-again asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars that have undergone a very-late thermal pulse (VLTP), known to have low {sup 12}C/{sup 13}C ratios and enhanced abundances of the light s-process elements, can produce {sup 32}Si, which makes such stars attractive sources for AB grains with {sup 32}S excesses. This lends support to the proposal that at least some AB grains originate from born-again AGB stars, although uncertainties in the born-again AGB star models and possible variations of initial S-isotopic compositions in the parent stars of AB grains make it difficult to draw a definitive conclusion.

  5. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of ion–solid interactio...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interactions in materials, with the determination of threshold displacement energies with ab initio accuracy, and prediction of a new mechanism for defect generation...

  6. Sulfur by-product formation in the Stretford process. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trofe, T.W.; DeBerry, D.W.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid redox sulfur recovery processes remove H2S from sour gas streams and produce elemental sulfur for sale or disposal. The Stretford Process is one of the oldest commercial liquid redox processes and it is based on a vanadium and anthraquinone redox system. Improvements in the operability and reliability of the Stretford process would be beneficial to the process user. The report presents results of research focused on developing an understanding of the process parameters and factors that impact sulfur by-product formation (e.g., sodium thiosulfate and sodium sulfate) in the Stretford process. The information in the report can help current Stretford plant process users better understand the operations of their plants, especially with regards to sulfur by-product formation and control strategies.

  7. Micro -Thermonuclear AB-Reactors for Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The author offers several innovations that he first suggested publicly early in 1983 for the AB multi-reflex engine, space propulsion, getting energy from plasma, etc. (see: A. Bolonkin, Non-Rocket Space Launch and Flight, Elsevier, London, 2006, Chapters 12, 3A). It is the micro-thermonuclear AB-Reactors. That is new micro-thermonuclear reactor with very small fuel pellet that uses plasma confinement generated by multi-reflection of laser beam or its own magnetic field. The Lawson criterion increases by hundreds of times. The author also suggests a new method of heating the power-making fuel pellet by outer electric current as well as new direct method of transformation of ion kinetic energy into harvestable electricity. These offered innovations dramatically decrease the size, weight and cost of thermonuclear reactor, installation, propulsion system and electric generator. Non-industrial countries can produce these researches and constructions. Currently, the author is researching the efficiency of these innovations for two types of the micro-thermonuclear reactors: multi-reflection reactor (ICF) and self-magnetic reactor (MCF).

  8. The utilization of flue gas desulfurization waste by-products in construction brick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berryman, Charles Wayne

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APPENDIX D. TEST PROCEDURES APPENDIX E. CONVERSION TABLES VITA 85 90 93 96 99 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Model for FGD Waste By-Product Research Unconfined Compressive Strength for Fly Ash Mixed with Various Inductions of Portland Cement 15... properties such as weight, durability, strength, density, etc. Varying mixes of bottom ash, fly ash, portland cement, and sand will be tested for possible enhancement of the hemihydrate. Also, a mix design that best utilizes all the waste by...

  9. Long-Term Column Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.; White, Fredrick; Rohar, P.C.; Kim, A.G

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. The stability of mercury and any co-captured elements in the by-products could have a large economic impact if it reduced by-product sales or increasing their disposal costs. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed continuous leaching of a select subset of the available sample pairs using four leachants: water (pH=5.7), dilute sulfuric acid (pH=1.2), dilute acetic acid (pH=2.9), and sodium carbonate (pH=11.1). This report describes results obtained for mercury, arsenic, and selenium during the 5-month leaching experiments.

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS FOR THE RE-EVOLUTION OF MERCURY INTO ECOSYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.A. Withum; R.M. Statnick

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EPA and state environmental agencies are suggesting that mercury (Hg) in coal combustion by-products is re-emitted into local ecosystems by additional processing to final products (i.e., wallboard, etc.), by dissolution into groundwater, or by reactions with anaerobic bacteria. This perception may limit the opportunities to use coal combustion by-products in recycle/reuse applications. In this program, CONSOL Energy is conducting a comprehensive sampling and analytical program to address this concern. If the results of this work demonstrate that re-emissions of Hg from waste disposal and by-product utilization are over-stated, additional regulations regarding coal combustion, waste disposal, and waste material utilization will not be required. This will result in continued low energy cost that is beneficial to the national economy and stability of local economies that are dependent on coal. In this quarter, laboratory equipment was assembled and blank test runs were made, manufactured aggregate and spray dryer ash samples were collected and leached, and fly ash and FGD slurry samples from an Ohio bituminous coal-fired utility were collected for leaching.

  11. Utilizing the heat content of gas-to-liquids by-product streams for commercial power generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adegoke, Adesola Ayodeji

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gas-to-liquids (GTL) processes produce a large fraction of by-products whose disposal or handling ordinarily becomes a cost rather than benefit. As an alternative strategy to market stranded gas reserves, GTL...

  12. Solar Grade Silicon from Agricultural By-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard M. Laine

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, Mayaterials developed a low cost, low energy and low temperature method of purifying rice hull ash to high purity (5-6Ns) and converting it by carbothermal reduction to solar grade quality silicon (Sipv) using a self-designed and built electric arc furnace (EAF). Outside evaluation of our process by an independent engineering firm confirms that our technology greatly lowers estimated operating expenses (OPEX) to $5/kg and capital expenses (CAPEX) to $24/kg for Sipv production, which is well below best-in-class plants using a Siemens process approach (OPEX of 14/kg and CAPEX of $87/kg, respectively). The primary limiting factor in the widespread use of photovoltaic (PV) cells is the high cost of manufacturing, compared to more traditional sources to reach 6 g Sipv/watt (with averages closer to 8+g/watt). In 2008, the spot price of Sipv rose to $450/kg. While prices have since dropped to a more reasonable $25/kg; this low price level is not sustainable, meaning the longer-term price will likely return to $35/kg. The 6-8 g Si/watt implies that the Sipv used in a module will cost $0.21-0.28/watt for the best producers (45% of the cost of a traditional solar panel), a major improvement from the cost/wafer driven by the $50/kg Si costs of early 2011, but still a major hindrance in fulfilling DOE goal of lowering the cost of solar energy below $1/watt. The solar cell industry has grown by 40% yearly for the past eight years, increasing the demand for Sipv. As such, future solar silicon price spikes are expected in the next few years. Although industry has invested billions of dollars to meet this ever-increasing demand, the technology to produce Sipv remains largely unchanged requiring the energy intensive, and chlorine dependent Siemens process or variations thereof. While huge improvements have been made, current state-of-the-art industrial plant still use 65 kWh/kg of silicon purified. Our technology offers a key distinction to other technologies as it starts one step upstream from all other Sipv production efforts. Our process starts by producing high purity SiO2/C feedstocks from which Sipv can be produced in a single, chlorine free, final EAF step. Specifically, our unique technology, and the resultant SiO2/C product can serve as high purity feedstocks to existing metallurgical silicon (Simet) producers, allowing them to generate Sipv with existing US manufacturing infrastructure, reducing the overall capital and commissioning schedule. Our low energy, low CAPEX and OPEX process purifies the silica and carbon present in rice hull ash (RHA) at low temperatures (< 200C) to produce high purity (5-6 Ns) feedstock for production of Sipv using furnaces similar to those used to produce Simet. During the course of this project we partnered with Wadham Energy LP (Wadham), who burns 220k ton of rice hulls (RH)/yr generating 200 GWh of electricity/yr and >30k ton/yr RHA. The power generation step produces much more energy (42 kWh/kg of final silicon produced) than required to purify the RHA (5 kWh/kg of Sipv, compared to 65 kWh/kg noted above. Biogenic silica offers three very important foundations for producing high purity silicon. First, wastes from silica accumulating plants, such as rice, corn, many grasses, algae and grains, contain very reactive, amorphous silica from which impurities are easily removed. Second, plants take up only a limited set of, and minimal quantities of the heavy metals present in nature, meaning fewer minerals must be removed. Third, biomass combustion generates a product with intrinsic residual carbon, mixed at nanometer length scales with the SiO2. RHA is 80-90 wt% high surface area (20 m2/g), amorphous SiO2 with some simple mineral content mixed intimately with 5-15 wt% carbon. The mineral content is easily removed by low cost, acid washes using Mayaterials IP, leading to purified rice hull ash (RHAclean) at up to 6N purity. This highly reactive silica is partially extracted from RHAclean at 200 C in an environmentally benign process to adjust SiO2:C ratios to those needed in EA

  13. ab initio dynamics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ab initio dynamics First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Ab-Initio Molecular Dynamics...

  14. ab initio nuclear: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ab initio nuclear First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Nuclear Structure - "ab initio"...

  15. Ab initio potential energy surfaces for NH,,3 -...NH,,3 -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ab initio potential energy surfaces for NH,,3 - ...­NH,,3 - ... with analytical long range Liesbeth, Poland Received 16 September 2009; accepted 7 November 2009; published online 10 December 2009; publisher error corrected 15 December 2009 We present four-dimensional ab initio potential energy surfaces

  16. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serdar Elhatisari; Dean Lee; Gautam Rupak; Evgeny Epelbaum; Hermann Krebs; Timo A. Lähde; Thomas Luu; Ulf-G. Meißner

    2015-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei comprise a major part of stellar nucleosynthesis and hypothesized mechanisms for thermonuclear supernovae. In an effort towards understanding alpha processes from first principles, we describe in this letter the first ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of nucleons and apply a technique called the adiabatic projection method to reduce the eight-body system to an effective two-cluster system. We find good agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for S-wave and D-wave scattering. The computational scaling with particle number suggests that alpha processes involving heavier nuclei are also within reach in the near future.

  17. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei comprise a major part of stellar nucleosynthesis and hypothesized mechanisms for thermonuclear supernovae. In an effort towards understanding alpha processes from first principles, we describe in this letter the first ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of nucleons and apply a technique called the adiabatic projection method to reduce the eight-body system to an effective two-cluster system. We find good agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for S-wave and D-wave scattering. The computational scaling with particle number suggests that alpha processes involving heavier nuclei are also within reach in the near future.

  18. FSO Hersemann/ AB D~~

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    made in this document and to pursue cost-effective poiution prevention opportunities. Pollution prevention (source reduction and other practices that eliminate or reduce the...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - ab initio folding Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fold recogniion Ab initio Methods... Methods Ab initio methods: solution of a protein folding problem search in conformational space Energy... Protein Structure Analysis...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - ab-initio potential energy Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ab initio methods: solution... Methods Ab initio methods: solution of a protein folding problem search in conformational space Energy... Protein Structure Analysis...

  1. Potential for by-product recovery in geothermal energy operations issue paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document identifies and discusses the significant issues raised by the idea of recovering useful by-products from wastes (primarily spent brine) generated during geothermal power production. The physical availability of numerous valuable materials in geothermal brines has captured the interest of geothermal resource developers and other parties ever since their presence was known. The prospects for utilizing huge volumes of highly-saline geothermal brines for electricity generation in the Imperial Valley of California have served to maintain this interest in both private sector and government circles.

  2. Coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant of Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egorov, V.N.; Anikin, G.J. [Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works, (Russian Federation); Gross, M. [Krupp Koppers GmbH, Essen (Germany)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works, Russia, decided to erect a new coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant to replace the existing obsolete units and to improve the environmental conditions of the area. The paper deals with the technological concept and the design requirements. Commissioning is scheduled at the beginning of 1996. The paper describes H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} removal, sulfur recovery and ammonia destruction, primary gas cooling and electrostatic tar precipitation, and the distributed control system that will be installed.

  3. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

    1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This fourteenth quarterly report describes work done during the fourteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing presentations, and making and responding to two outside contacts.

  4. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.P.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of CCB materials. The two technologies for the underground placement that were to be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry CCB products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of CCB products with about 70% solids. The period covered by this report is the second quarter of Phase 3 of the overall program. During this period over 8,000 tons of CCB mixtures was injected using the hydraulic paste technology. This amount of material virtually filled the underground opening around the injection well, and was deemed sufficient to demonstrate fully the hydraulic injection technology. By the end of this quarter about 2,000 tons of fly ash had been placed underground using the pneumatic placement technology. While the rate of injection of about 50 tons per hour met design criteria, problems were experienced in the delivery of fly ash to the pneumatic demonstration site. The source of the fly ash, the Archer Daniels Midland Company power plant at Decatur, Illinois is some distance from the demonstration site, and often sufficient tanker trucks are not available to haul enough fly ash to fully load the injection equipment. Further, on some occasions fly ash from the plant was not available. The injection well was plugged three times during the demonstration. This typically occurred due to cementation of the FBC ash in contact with water. After considerable deliberations and in consultation with the technical project officer, it was decided to stop further injection of CCB`s underground using the developed pneumatic technology.

  5. New AB-Thermonuclear Reactor for Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two main methods of nulcear fusion: inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). Existing thermonuclear reactors are very complex, expensive, large, and heavy. They cannot achieve the Lawson creterion. The author offers an innovation. ICF has on the inside surface of the shell-shaped combustion chamber a covering of small Prism Reflectors (PR) and plasma reflector. These prism reflectors have a noteworthy advantage, in comparison with conventional mirror and especially with conventional shell: they multi-reflect the heat and laser radiation exactly back into collision with the fuel target capsule (pellet). The plasma reflector reflects the Bremsstrahlung radiation. The offered innovation decreases radiation losses, creates significant radiation pressure and increases the reaction time. The Lawson criterion increases by hundreds of times. The size, cost, and weight of a typical installation will decrease by tens of times. The author is researching the efficiency of these innovations. Keywords: Thermonuclear reactor, Multi-reflex AB-thermonuclear reactor, aerospace thermonuclear engine. This work is presented as paper AIAA-2006-7225 to Space-2006 Conference, 19-21 September, 2006, San Jose, CA, USA.

  6. Gas treatment and by-products recovery of Thailand`s first coke plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diemer, P.E.; Seyfferth, W. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Coke is needed in the blast furnace as the main fuel and chemical reactant and the main product of a coke plant. The second main product of the coke plant is coke oven gas. During treatment of the coke oven gas some coal chemicals like tar, ammonia, sulphur and benzole can be recovered as by-products. Since the market prices for these by-products are rather low and often erratic it does not in most cases justify the investment to recover these products. This is the reason why modern gas treatment plants only remove those impurities from the crude gas which must be removed for technical and environmental reasons. The cleaned gas, however, is a very valuable product as it replaces natural gas in steel work furnaces and can be used by other consumers. The surplus can be combusted in the boiler of a power plant. A good example for an optimal plant layout is the new coke oven facility of Thai Special Steel Industry (TSSI) in Rayong. The paper describes the TSSI`s coke oven gas treatment plant.

  7. OpenAtom -- Ab initio molecular dynamics package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberto Car

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OpenAtom is a highly scalable and portable parallel application for molecular dynamics simulations at the quantum level. It implements the Car-Parrinello ab-initio Molecular Dynamics (CPAIMD) method.

  8. ab initio dynamic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Ab-Initio Molecular Dynamics Condensed Matter (arXiv) Summary: Computer simulation methods, such as Monte Carlo or...

  9. ab eia label: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the magnetic field of its plasma cable. For creating this plasma cable the AB-Space Engine spends only some kg of hydrogen. Alexander Bolonkin 2008-03-02 10 Specific and...

  10. abs fep fre: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the magnetic field of its plasma cable. For creating this plasma cable the AB-Space Engine spends only some kg of hydrogen. Alexander Bolonkin 2008-03-02 20 Il Museo Storico...

  11. abs para fins: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the magnetic field of its plasma cable. For creating this plasma cable the AB-Space Engine spends only some kg of hydrogen. Alexander Bolonkin 2008-03-02 29 The mechanics of...

  12. ab vattenburna utslaepp: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the magnetic field of its plasma cable. For creating this plasma cable the AB-Space Engine spends only some kg of hydrogen. Alexander Bolonkin 2008-03-02 2 -Ammonia Borane...

  13. ab initto determination: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the magnetic field of its plasma cable. For creating this plasma cable the AB-Space Engine spends only some kg of hydrogen. Alexander Bolonkin 2008-03-02 14 Radio Continuum...

  14. abs alkyl benzenesulfonates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the magnetic field of its plasma cable. For creating this plasma cable the AB-Space Engine spends only some kg of hydrogen. Alexander Bolonkin 2008-03-02 13 Involvement of...

  15. abs 1b bis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the magnetic field of its plasma cable. For creating this plasma cable the AB-Space Engine spends only some kg of hydrogen. Alexander Bolonkin 2008-03-02 18 U of Winnipeg...

  16. aircraft ab prib: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the magnetic field of its plasma cable. For creating this plasma cable the AB-Space Engine spends only some kg of hydrogen. Alexander Bolonkin 2008-03-02 9 Aircraft...

  17. abs terpolymer estudo: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the magnetic field of its plasma cable. For creating this plasma cable the AB-Space Engine spends only some kg of hydrogen. Alexander Bolonkin 2008-03-02 9 -Ammonia Borane...

  18. ab inition calcultaions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the magnetic field of its plasma cable. For creating this plasma cable the AB-Space Engine spends only some kg of hydrogen. Alexander Bolonkin 2008-03-02 14 -Ammonia Borane...

  19. ab binding alters: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the magnetic field of its plasma cable. For creating this plasma cable the AB-Space Engine spends only some kg of hydrogen. Alexander Bolonkin 2008-03-02 30 Alzheimer's...

  20. abs nanocomposites derived: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the magnetic field of its plasma cable. For creating this plasma cable the AB-Space Engine spends only some kg of hydrogen. Alexander Bolonkin 2008-03-02 38 Radio Continuum...

  1. Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Low-Energy Recoil...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    than the ions on lattice sites in perfect MO2. Citation: Xiao HY, Y Zhang, and WJ Weber.2012."Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Low-Energy Recoil Eventsin ThO2,...

  2. AB 2160 GREEN BUILDING REPORT FOR SUBMISSION TO THE GOVERNOR'S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION AB 2160 GREEN BUILDING REPORT FOR SUBMISSION TO THE GOVERNOR'S GREEN and Resource-Efficient (Green Building) Projects to the Governor's Green Action Team on several topics related to the 2004 Green Building Initiative

  3. AB Proton NMR Using Tensor Algebra Frank Rioux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    AB Proton NMR Using Tensor Algebra Frank Rioux Professor Emeritus of Chemistry CSB|SJU The purpose of this tutorial is to deviate from the usual matrix mechanics approach to the ABC proton nmr system in order

  4. ab initio reconstruction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 An ab initio approach to free-energy reconstruction using logarithmic mean force dynamics CERN Preprints Summary:...

  5. CHARACTERIZATION OF COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS FOR THE RE-EVOLUTION OF MERCURY INTO ECOSYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.A. Withum; J.E. Locke; S.C. Tseng

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is concern that mercury (Hg) in coal combustion by-products might be emitted into the environment during processing to other products or after the disposal/landfill of these by-products. This perception may limit the opportunities to use coal combustion by-products in recycle/reuse applications and may result in additional, costly disposal regulations. In this program, CONSOL conducted a comprehensive sampling and analytical program to include ash, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludge, and coal combustion by-products. This work is necessary to help identify potential problems and solutions important to energy production from fossil fuels. The program objective was to evaluate the potential for mercury emissions by leaching or volatilization, to determine if mercury enters the water surrounding an active FGD disposal site and an active fly ash slurry impoundment site, and to provide data that will allow a scientific assessment of the issue. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test results showed that mercury did not leach from coal, bottom ash, fly ash, spray dryer/fabric filter ash or forced oxidation gypsum (FOG) in amounts leading to concentrations greater than the detection limit of the TCLP method (1.0 ng/mL). Mercury was detected at very low concentrations in acidic leachates from all of the fixated and more than half of the unfixated FGD sludge samples, and one of the synthetic aggregate samples. Mercury was not detected in leachates from any sample when deionized water (DI water) was the leaching solution. Mercury did not leach from electrostatic precipitator (ESP) fly ash samples collected during activated carbon injection for mercury control in amounts greater than the detection limit of the TCLP method (1.0 ng/mL). Volatilization tests could not detect mercury loss from fly ash, spray dryer/fabric filter ash, unfixated FGD sludge, or forced oxidation gypsum; the mercury concentration of these samples all increased, possibly due to absorption from ambient surroundings. Mercury loss of 18-26% was detected after 3 and 6 months at 100 F and 140 F from samples of the fixated FGD sludge. Water samples were collected from existing ground water monitoring wells around an active FGD disposal site (8 wells) and an active fly ash slurry impoundment (14 wells). These were wells that the plants have installed to comply with ground water monitoring requirements of their permits. Mercury was not detected in any of the water samples collected from monitoring wells at either site. A literature review concluded that coal combustion byproducts can be disposed of in properly designed landfills that minimize the potentially negative impacts of water intrusion that carries dissolved organic matter (DOM). Dissolved organic matter and sulfate-reducing bacteria can promote the transformation of elemental or oxidized mercury into methyl mercury. The landfill should be properly designed and capped with clays or similar materials to minimize the wet-dry cycles that promote the release of methylmercury.

  6. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products. Phase 1, [Annual report], December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Haefner, R. [Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. Presently FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. However, landfill sites are becoming more scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. In summary Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD byproduct materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

  7. Recovery of solvent and by-products from organosolv black liquor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botello, J.I.; Gilarranz, M.A.; Rodriguez, F.; Oliet, M. [Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica] [Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery of alcohol and by-products from ethanol-water and methanol-water pulping liquors was studied. The recovery system proposed consists of three stages: black liquor flashing, lignin precipitation, and precipitation distillation of mother liquor. At the flash stage, 47 and 51% of the alcohol in the black liquor are recovered for ethanol and methanol processes, respectively. The lignin recovery yield at the precipitation stage is 67% for ethanol black liquor and 73% for methanol black liquor. The distillation of precipitation mother liquors enables recovery of 98% ethanol and 96% methanol from this stream as distillate, whereas the distillation residue contains significant amounts of sugars, furfural, and acetic acid that can be recovered. The study concludes with the overall mass balance for the recovery system proposed.

  8. Environmental chamber measurements of mercury flux from coal utilization by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pekney, N.J.; Martello, D.V.; Schroeder, K.T.; Granite, E.J.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An environmental chamber was constructed to measure the mercury flux from coal utilization by-product (CUB) samples. Samples of fly ash, FGD gypsum, and wallboard made from FGD gypsum were tested under both dark and illuminated conditions with or without the addition of water to the sample. Mercury releases varied widely, with 7-day experiment averages ranging from -6.8 to 73 ng/m2 h for the fly ash samples and -5.2 to 335 ng/m2 h for the FGD/wallboard samples. Initial mercury content, fly ash type, and light exposure had no observable consistent effects on the mercury flux. For the fly ash samples, the effect of a mercury control technology was to decrease the emission. For three of the four pairs of FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, the wallboard sample released less (or absorbed more) mercury than the gypsum.

  9. The use of gypsum and a coal desulfurization by-product to ameliorate subsoil acidity for alfalfa growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chessman, Dennis John

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    the effectiveness of surface-applied gypsum and a flue gas desulfurization by-product for reducing the toxic effects of acid subsoils on alfalfa. The materials were applied at rates of 0, 5, 10, and 15 Mg ha-1. In addition, a glasshouse experiment was conducted...

  10. Task 1.13 - Data Collection and Database Development for Clean Coal Technology By-Product Characteristics and Management Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center-Morgantown (DOE FETC) efforts in the areas of fossil fuels and clean coal technology (CCT) have included involvement with both conventional and advanced process coal conversion by-products. In 1993, DOE submitted a Report to Congress on "Barriers to the Increased Utilization of Coal Combustion Desulfurization Byproducts by Governmental and Commercial Sectors" that provided an outline of activities to remove the barriers identified in the report. DOE charged itself with participation in this process, and the work proposed in this document facilitates DOE's response to its own recommendations for action. The work reflects DOE's commitment to the coal combustion by-product (CCB) industry, to the advancement of clean coal technology, and to cooperation with other government agencies. Information from DOE projects and commercial endeavors in fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) and coal gasification is the focus of this task. The primary goal is to provide an easily accessible compilation of characterization information on the by-products from these processes to government agencies and industry to facilitate sound regulatory and management decisions. Additional written documentation will facilitate the preparation of an updated final version of background information collected for DOE in preparation of the Report to Congress on barriers to CCB utilization.

  11. Simplest AB-Thermonuclear Space Propulsion and Electric Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The author applies, develops and researches mini-sized Micro- AB Thermonuclear Reactors for space propulsion and space power systems. These small engines directly convert the high speed charged particles produced in the thermonuclear reactor into vehicle thrust or vehicle electricity with maximum efficiency. The simplest AB-thermonuclear propulsion offered allows spaceships to reach speeds of 20,000 50,000 km/s (1/6 of light speed) for fuel ratio 0.1 and produces a huge amount of useful electric energy. Offered propulsion system permits flight to any planet of our Solar system in short time and to the nearest non-Sun stars by E-being or intellectual robots during a single human life period. Key words: AB-propulsion, thermonuclear propulsion, space propulsion, thermonuclear power system.

  12. Investigations of Magnetic Overlayers at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, J G; Yu, S; Butterfield, M T

    2009-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic overlayers of Fe and Co have been investigated with X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism in X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XMCD-ABS) and Photoelectron Spectroscopy (PES), including Spin-Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy (SRPES), at Beamline 4 at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Particular emphasis was placed upon the interrogation of the 2p levels of the Fe.

  13. ab initio infrared: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ab initio infrared First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Microsolvation of HN2 + in Argon:...

  14. A cell-laden microfluidic hydrogel{{ Yibo Ling,ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirci, Utkan

    A cell-laden microfluidic hydrogel{{ Yibo Ling,ab Jamie Rubin,c Yuting Deng,d Catherine Huang The encapsulation of mammalian cells within the bulk material of microfluidic channels may be beneficial a technique for fabricating microfluidic channels from cell-laden agarose hydrogels. Using standard soft

  15. Ab initio theory of phase transitions and thermoelasticity of minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oganov, Artem R.

    Ab initio theory of phase transitions and thermoelasticity of minerals ARTEM R. OGANOV* , JOHN P transitions, equations of state, elasticity and thermoelastic properties of the Earth-forming minerals minerals at the extreme conditions of the Earth's interior. One can accurately predict the structures

  16. Ab Frhjahr 2009 startet hier der Bau von sechs Offshore-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vollmer, Heribert

    Ent- wicklung der Offshore-Wind- energie besondere Bedeutung zu. Derzeit laufen in der AusAb Frühjahr 2009 startet hier der Bau von sechs Offshore- Windenergieanlagen (OWEA) vom Typ Wind- parks sind etwa die Erweite- rung des Pilotprojektes alpha ventus, der Park Borkum West (45

  17. Ab Initio Study of Vibrational Dephasing of Electronic Excitations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ab Initio Study of Vibrational Dephasing of Electronic Excitations in Semiconducting Carbon Engineering, UniVersity of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan Received May 7, 2007; Revised Manuscript Received August 1, 2007 ABSTRACT Phonon-induced dephasing of electronic transitions

  18. Quantitative verification of ab initio self-consistent laser theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, A. Douglas

    ­1564 (1998). 6. O. Painter, R. K. Lee, A. Scherer, A. Yariv, J. D. O'Brien, P. D. Dapkus, and I. Kim, "TwoQuantitative verification of ab initio self-consistent laser theory Li Ge,1 Robert J. Tandy,1 A¨ureci, A. D. Stone, and B. Collier, "Self-consistent multimode lasing theory for complex or random lasing

  19. Engineering Science AB: Electrical Rev. June 2013 1/3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    to Calculus 2 AM 21a ­ Mathematical Methods in the Sciences 1 (or Math 21a or 23a) AM 21b ­ Mathematical Engineering Electives Students choosing to Concentrate in Electrical and Computer EngineeringEngineering Science ­ AB: Electrical Rev. June 2013 1/3 Plan of Study for the Electrical

  20. ATMOSPHERIC CHARACTERIZATION OF THE HOT JUPITER KEPLER-13Ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shporer, Avi

    Kepler-13Ab (= KOI-13.01) is a unique transiting hot Jupiter. It is one of very few known short-period planets orbiting a hot A-type star, making it one of the hottest planets currently known. The availability of Kepler ...

  1. Lithium Insertion In Silicon Nanowires: An ab Initio Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Lithium Insertion In Silicon Nanowires: An ab Initio Study Qianfan Zhang, Wenxing Zhang, Wenhui Wan, and § School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China ABSTRACT The ultrahigh specific lithium ion opportunities for energy storage. However, a systematic theoretical study on lithium insertion in SiNWs remains

  2. Light trapping in photonic crystals Ken Xingze Wang,ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Light trapping in photonic crystals Ken Xingze Wang,ab Zongfu Yu,bc Victor Liu,bd Aaswath Raman,b Yi Cuief and Shanhui Fan*b We consider light trapping in photonic crystals in the weak material-integrated absorption enhancement by light trapping is proportional to the photonic density of states. The tight bound

  3. Spectral jitter modeling and estimation Miltiadis Vasilakis a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stylianou, Yannis

    Spectral jitter modeling and estimation Miltiadis Vasilakis a,b, *, Yannis Stylianou a modulation is referred to as jitter. During sustained vowel phonation, both modulations can be defined amplitude and the glottal pitch period, for shimmer and jitter, respectively.1 Since an unperturbed quasi

  4. Nitrogen Contamination in Elastic Neutron Scattering Songxue Chi,ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynn, Jeffrey W.

    Nitrogen Contamination in Elastic Neutron Scattering Songxue Chi,ab Jeffrey W. Lynn,a* Ying Chen a neutron scattering measurement is a contribution to the background, especially in inelastic measurements of having N2 in the sample environment system during elastic neutron scattering measurements on a single

  5. Heat transfer in proteinwater interfaces Anders Lervik,ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjelstrup, Signe

    Heat transfer in protein­water interfaces Anders Lervik,ab Fernando Bresme,*ac Signe Kjelstrup of the heat diffusion equation we compute the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the proteins by about 4 nm.4 It is expected that the energy transfer between these sites may involve the concerted

  6. BNL-68198-AB COMPILATION OF INVENTORIES OF INDUSTRIAL EMISSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BNL-68198-AB COMPILATION OF INVENTORIES OF INDUSTRIAL EMISSIONS Carmen M. Benkovitz Atmospheric-5000 March 2001 To be presented at the International Workshop on Emissions ofChemical Species and Aerosols perspectives accurate inventories of emissions of the trace species at the appropriate spatial, temporal

  7. AB-INITIO STUDY OF STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entel, P.

    AB-INITIO STUDY OF STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICAL PROPERTIES OF CRYSTALLINE ICE W. A. ADEAGBO , A. ZAYAK, Germany (Received March 18, 2004) Abstract We investigated the structural and dynamical properties structures (Whalley and Bertie, 1967; Prask and Trevino, 1972). Later lattice dynamics was used to study more

  8. The Implementation of California AB 32 and its Impact on Wholesale Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, Jim B

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AB 32 and its Impact on Wholesale Electricity Markets JamesAB 32 and its Impact on Wholesale Electricity Markets Jamesand performance of the wholesale electricity market. One key

  9. An Ab Initio Model of Electron Transport in Hematite (a-Fe2O3...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Ab Initio Model of Electron Transport in Hematite (a-Fe2O3) Basal Planes. An Ab Initio Model of Electron Transport in Hematite (a-Fe2O3) Basal Planes. Abstract: Transport of...

  10. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 092102 (2011) Melting temperature of tungsten from two ab initio approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfè, Dario

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 092102 (2011) Melting temperature of tungsten from two ab initio approaches L the melting temperature of tungsten by two ab initio approaches. The first approach can be divided into two

  11. AB Proton NMR Analysis for 2,3dibromothiophene Frank Rioux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    AB Proton NMR Analysis for 2,3dibromothiophene Frank Rioux CSB|SJU The purpose proton nmr spectrum. The nuclear magnetic energy operator for the AB system is given below. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^A B

  12. Ab-initio calculations on two-electron ions in strongly coupled plasma environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharyya, S; Mukherjee, T K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the controversy between the interpretations of recent measurements on dense aluminum plasma created with Linac coherent light sources (LCLS) X-ray free electron laser (FEL) and Orion laser has been addressed. In both kind of experiments, helium-like and hydrogen-like spectral lines are used for plasma diagnostics . However, there exist no precise theoretical calculations for He-like ions within dense plasma environment. The strong need for an accurate theoretical estimates for spectral properties of He-like ions in strongly coupled plasma environment leads us to perform ab initio calculations in the framework of Rayleigh-Ritz variation principle in Hylleraas coordinates where ion-sphere potential is used. An approach to resolve the long-drawn problem of numerical instability for evaluating two-electron integrals with extended basis inside a finite domain is presented here. The present values of electron densities corresponding to disappearance of different spectral lines obtained within the fram...

  13. TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James T. Cobb, Jr.

    2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal-laden wastes can be stabilized and solidified using advanced clean coal technology by-products (CCTBs)--fluid bed combustor ash and spray drier solids. These utility-generated treatment chemicals are available for purchase through brokers, and commercial applications of this process are being practiced by treaters of metal-laden hazardous waste. A complex of regulations governs this industry, and sensitivities to this complex has discouraged public documentation of treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with CCTBs. This report provides a comprehensive public documentation of laboratory studies that show the efficacy of the stabilization and solidification of metal-laden hazardous wastes--such as lead-contaminated soils and sandblast residues--through treatment with CCTBs. It then describes the extensive efforts that were made to obtain the permits allowing a commercial hazardous waste treater to utilize CCTBs as treatment chemicals and to install the equipment required to do so. It concludes with the effect of this lengthy process on the ability of the treatment company to realize the practical, physical outcome of this effort, leading to premature termination of the project.

  14. Electrolysis byproduct D2O provides a third way to mitigate CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenewerk, William Ernest [self, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid atomic power deployment may be possible without using fast breeder reactors or making undue demands on uranium resource. Using by-product D2O and thorium-U233 in CANDU and RBMK piles may circumvent need for either fast breeder reactors or seawater uranium. Atmospheric CO2 is presently increasing 2.25%/year in proportion to 2.25%/year exponential fossil fuel consumption increase. Roughly 1/3 anthropologic CO2 is removed by various CO2 sinks. CO2 removal is modelled as being proportional to 45-year-earlier CO2 amount above 280 ppm-C Water electrolysis produces roughly 0.1 kg-D20/kWe-y. Material balance assumes each electrolysis stage increases D2O bottoms concentration times 3. Except for first two electrolysis stages, all water from hydrogen consumption is returned to electrolysis. The unique characteristic of this process is the ability to economically burn all deuterium-enriched H2 in vehicles. Condensate from vehicles returns to appropriate electrolysis stage. Fuel cell condensate originally from reformed natural gas may augment second-sage feed. Atomic power expansion is 5%/year, giving 55000 GWe by 2100. World primary energy increases 2.25%/y, exceeding 4000 EJ/y by 2100. CO2 maximum is roughly 600 ppm-C around year 2085. CO2 declines back below 300 ppm-C by 2145 if the 45-year-delay seawater sink remains effective.

  15. FGD Additives to Segregate and Sequester Mercury in Solid Byproducts - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Searcy, K; Bltyhe, G M; Steen, W A

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Many mercury control strategies for U.S. coal-fired power generating plants involve co-benefit capture of oxidized mercury from flue gases treated by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. For these processes to be effective at overall mercury control, the captured mercury must not be re-emitted to the atmosphere or into surface or ground water. The project sought to identify scrubber additives and FGD operating conditions under which mercury re-emissions would decrease and mercury would remain in the liquor and be blown down from the system in the chloride purge stream. After exiting the FGD system, mercury would react with precipitating agents to form stable solid byproducts and would be removed in a dewatering step. The FGD gypsum solids, free of most of the mercury, could then be disposed or processed for reuse as wallboard or in other beneficial reuse. The project comprised extensive bench-scale FGD scrubber tests in Phases I and II. During Phase II, the approaches developed at the bench scale were tested at the pilot scale. Laboratory wastewater treatment tests measured the performance of precipitating agents in removing mercury from the chloride purge stream. Finally, the economic viability of the approaches tested was evaluated.

  16. PRCTICAS CURSO "FRONTERAS EN CIENCIA DE MATERIALES" 2012 Grupos A/B (6 alumnos)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :30-13:30. "Simulaciones mediante modelos ab initio". Silvia Gallego Grupo E (4 alumnos): Martes 24: 9

  17. CENPES/EB-AB-G&E/AEDC Corporativo Advanced Control System Industrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    problems Initial situation Final situation #12;CENPES/EB-AB-G&E/AEDC Corporativo New control strategy Compressor #12;CENPES/EB-AB-G&E/AEDC Corporativo New operating point of the propane compressor Greater control in a Natural Gas Plant Control strategy problems #12;CENPES/EB-AB-G&E/AEDC Corporativo Regulatory

  18. Mutations that Reduce Aggregation of the Alzheimer's Ab42 Peptide: an Unbiased Search for the Sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hecht, Michael H.

    to green fluorescent protein (GFP) form insoluble aggregates in which GFP is inactive. Cells expressing constructed and screened libraries of Ab42­GFP fusions in which the sequence of Ab42 was mutated randomly. Cells expressing GFP fusions to soluble (non- aggregating) variants of Ab42 exhibit green fluorescence

  19. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Topical report, April 1, 1996--April 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.P.; Brackebusch, F.; Carpenter, J. [and others

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report represents the Final Technical Progress Report for Phase II of the overall program for a cooperative research agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy - MORGANTOWN Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC). Under the agreement, SIUC will develop and demonstrate technologies for the handling, transport, and placement in abandoned underground coal mines of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products, such as fly ash, scrubber sludge, fluidized bed combustion by-products, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground placement. The overall program is divided into three (3) phases. Phase II of the program is primarily concerned with developing and testing the hardware for the actual underground placement demonstrations. Two technologies have been identified and hardware procured for full-scale demonstrations: (1) hydraulic placement, where coal combustion by-products (CCBs) will be placed underground as a past-like mixture containing about 70 to 75 percent solids; and (2) pneumatic placement, where CCBs will be placed underground as a relatively dry material using compressed air. 42 refs., 36 figs., 36 tabs.

  20. Mineralogical and physical considerations related to the separation and recovery of constituents from aluminum smelter by-products and wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plumpton, A.J.; Wilhelmy, J.F.; Blackburn, D.; Caouette, J.L. [Centre de Recherches Minerales, Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several by-products and waste products of aluminum smelting were characterized mineralogically and physically, in order to evaluate the potential for their decontamination or separation and recovery into valuable products using mineral processing techniques. The test samples were selected from among Bayer process red mud, bath-alumina mixture, cleaned anode butts, anode recycle residues, spent potlining, saltcake and fluorogypsum. Several of these materials were shown to be composed either of highly liberated, potentially separable mineral phases, or of locked minerals which could be partially liberated by grinding to smaller but practical particle sizes. An analysis of specific physical properties of the liberated constituent mineral phases was accompanied by preliminary experimental evaluation of their separability. An assessment was made of potential mineral processing techniques including size and form differentiation, gravitational and magnetic field separation, flotation, separation based on surface charging phenomena or work function, and pneumatic tabling. The results confirmed the suitability of low-cost physical separation techniques for the treatment of some by-products and wastes. This paper presents results of a preliminary evaluation of two smelter products. The conference paper will analyze and discuss in more detail the potential for the mineral processing of these and other smelter by-products and wastes.

  1. Economic Evaluation of By-Product Power/Co-Generation Systems for Industrial Plants with Fluidized-Bed Coal Burning Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesko, J. E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic analysis of the construction and operation of by-product electric power and steam/power cogeneration systems in coal fired fluidized-bed steam cycles, located at individual industrial sites analyzed by the author, is being presented...

  2. Ab initio calculations of light-ion fusion reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hupin, G.; Quaglioni, S.; Navratil, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-414, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, L-414, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The exact treatment of nuclei starting from the constituent nucleons and the fundamental interactions among them has been a long-standing goal in nuclear physics. Above all nuclear scattering and reactions, which require the solution of the many-body quantum-mechanical problem in the continuum, represent an extraordinary theoretical as well as computational challenge for ab initio approaches. The ab initio No-Core Shell Model/Resonating-Group Method (NCSM/RGM) complements a microscopic cluster technique with the use of realistic interactions, and a microscopic and consistent description of the nucleon clusters. This approach is capable of describing simultaneously both bound and scattering states in light nuclei. Recent applications to light nuclei scattering and fusion reactions relevant to energy production in stars and Earth based fusion facilities, such as the deuterium-{sup 3}He fusion, are presented. Progress toward the inclusion of the three nucleon force into the formalism is outlined.

  3. Effect of industrial by-products containing electron acceptors on mitigating methane emission during rice cultivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Muhammad Aslam [Department of Environmental Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202 (Bangladesh); Lee, Chang Hoon [Functional Cereal Crop Research Division, National Institute of Crop Science, RDA, 1085, Naey-dong, Milyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Yoon [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School (Brain Korea 21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Pil Joo [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School (Brain Korea 21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: pjkim@gnu.ac.kr

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three industrial by-products (fly ash, phosphogypsum and blast furnace slag), were evaluated for their potential re-use as soil amendments to reduce methane (CH{sub 4}) emission resulting from rice cultivation. In laboratory incubations, CH{sub 4} production rates from anoxic soil slurries were significantly reduced at amendment levels of 0.5%, 1%, 2% and 5% (wt wt{sup -1}), while observed CO{sub 2} production rates were enhanced. The level of suppression in methane production was the highest for phosphogypsum, followed by blast slag and then fly ash. In the greenhouse experiment, CH{sub 4} emission rates from the rice planted potted soils significantly decreased with the increasing levels (2-20 Mg ha{sup -1}) of the selected amendments applied, while rice yield simultaneously increased compared to the control treatment. At 10 Mg ha{sup -1} application level of the amendments, total seasonal CH{sub 4} emissions were reduced by 20%, 27% and 25%, while rice grain yields were increased by 17%, 15% and 23% over the control with fly ash, phosphogypsum, and blast slag amendments, respectively. The suppression of CH{sub 4} production rates as well as total seasonal CH{sub 4} flux could be due to the increased concentrations of active iron, free iron, manganese oxides, and sulfate in the amended soil, which acted as electron acceptors and controlled methanogens' activity by limiting substrates availability. Among the amendments, blast furnace slag and fly ash contributed mainly to improve the soil nutrients balance and increased the soil pH level towards neutral point, but soil acidity was developed with phosphogypsum application. Conclusively, blast slag among the selected amendments would be a suitable soil amendment for reducing CH{sub 4} emissions as well as sustaining rice productivity.

  4. Ab Initio Nuclear Structure and Reaction Calculations for Rare Isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draayer, Jerry P [Louisiana State University

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a novel ab initio symmetry-adapted no-core shell model (SA-NCSM), which has opened the intermediate-mass region for ab initio investigations, thereby providing an opportunity for first-principle symmetry-guided applications to nuclear structure and reactions for nuclear isotopes from the lightest p-shell systems to intermediate-mass nuclei. This includes short-lived proton-rich nuclei on the path of X-ray burst nucleosynthesis and rare neutron-rich isotopes to be produced by the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). We have provided ab initio descriptions of high accuracy for low-lying (including collectivity-driven) states of isotopes of Li, He, Be, C, O, Ne, Mg, Al, and Si, and studied related strong- and weak-interaction driven reactions that are important, in astrophysics, for further understanding stellar evolution, X-ray bursts and triggering of s, p, and rp processes, and in applied physics, for electron and neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments as well as for fusion ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  5. California's AB 1493: Trendsetting or Setting Ourselves up to Fail?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002 UCLA Law Symposium on AB 1493, Edited Panelist Commentary

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Greenhouse SOURCE: Bluewater Network Coalition for Clean AirSUPPORT: (Verified 6/28/02): Bluewater Network (co-source),This bill's sponsor, Bluewater Network, references a report

  6. Absorption: an update In the Netherlands, a residential ab-is being incorporated now. As a conse-cepts prove to be economically viable, ab-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    . As a conse- cepts prove to be economically viable, ab- sorption heat pump isunder development quence Aachen. Computer models for the design research and development work on ab- tele Absorption Heat Pump and Performance of systems and the results indicate that we a High Temperature-Boost Absorption Heat Pump

  7. Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of Coal Combustion By-Product Disposal and Utilizaton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher; Mei Xin; Mae Sexauer Gustin; Rob Jung

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) conducted a multiyear study to evaluate the impact of mercury and other air toxic elements (ATEs) on the management of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). The ATEs evaluated in this project were arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, and selenium. The study included laboratory tasks to develop measurement techniques for mercury and ATE releases, sample characterization, and release experiments. A field task was also performed to measure mercury releases at a field site. Samples of fly ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials were collected preferentially from full-scale coal-fired power plants operating both without and with mercury control technologies in place. In some cases, samples from pilot- and bench-scale emission control tests were included in the laboratory studies. Several sets of 'paired' baseline and test fly ash and FGD materials collected during full-scale mercury emission control tests were also included in laboratory evaluations. Samples from mercury emission control tests all contained activated carbon (AC) and some also incorporated a sorbent-enhancing agent (EA). Laboratory release experiments focused on measuring releases of mercury under conditions designed to simulate CCB exposure to water, ambient-temperature air, elevated temperatures, and microbes in both wet and dry conditions. Results of laboratory evaluations indicated that: (1) Mercury and sometimes selenium are collected with AC used for mercury emission control and, therefore, present at higher concentrations than samples collected without mercury emission controls present. (2) Mercury is stable on CCBs collected from systems both without and with mercury emission controls present under most conditions tested, with the exception of vapor-phase releases of mercury exposed to elevated temperatures. (3) The presence of carbon either from added AC or from unburned coal can result in mercury being sorbed onto the CCB when exposed to ambient-temperature air. The environmental performance of the mercury captured on AC used as a sorbent for mercury emission control technologies indicated that current CCB management options will continue to be sufficiently protective of the environment, with the potential exception of exposure to elevated temperatures. The environmental performance of the other ATEs investigated indicated that current management options will be appropriate to the CCBs produced using AC in mercury emission controls.

  8. ADVANCED BYPRODUCT RECOVERY: DIRECT CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF SO2 TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Weber

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arthur D. Little, Inc., together with its commercialization partner, Engelhard Corporation, and its university partner Tufts, investigated a single-step process for direct, catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide from regenerable flue gas desulfurization processes to the more valuable elemental sulfur by-product. This development built on recently demonstrated SO{sub 2}-reduction catalyst performance at Tufts University on a DOE-sponsored program and is, in principle, applicable to processing of regenerator off-gases from all regenerable SO{sub 2}-control processes. In this program, laboratory-scale catalyst optimization work at Tufts was combined with supported catalyst formulation work at Engelhard, bench-scale supported catalyst testing at Arthur D. Little and market assessments, also by Arthur D. Little. Objectives included identification and performance evaluation of a catalyst which is robust and flexible with regard to choice of reducing gas. The catalyst formulation was improved significantly over the course of this work owing to the identification of a number of underlying phenomena that tended to reduce catalyst selectivity. The most promising catalysts discovered in the bench-scale tests at Tufts were transformed into monolith-supported catalysts at Engelhard. These catalyst samples were tested at larger scale at Arthur D. Little, where the laboratory-scale results were confirmed, namely that the catalysts do effectively reduce sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur when operated under appropriate levels of conversion and in conditions that do not contain too much water or hydrogen. Ways to overcome those limitations were suggested by the laboratory results. Nonetheless, at the end of Phase I, the catalysts did not exhibit the very stringent levels of activity or selectivity that would have permitted ready scale-up to pilot or commercial operation. Therefore, we chose not to pursue Phase II of this work which would have included further bench-scale testing, scale-up, pilot-scale (0.5 MW{sub e}) testing at conditions representative of various regenerable SO{sub 2}-control systems, preparation of a commercial process design, and development of a utility-scale demonstration plan.

  9. AFCI Transmutation Fuel Processes and By-Products Planning: Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric L. Shaber

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program are to reduce high-level waste volume, reduce long-lived and radiotoxic elements, and reclaim valuable energy content of spent nuclear fuel. The AFCI chartered the Fuel Development Working Group (FDWG) to develop advanced fuels in support of the AFCI goals. The FDWG organized a phased strategy of fuel development that is designed to match the needs of the AFCI program: Phase 1 - High-burnup fuels for light-water reactors (LWRs) and tri-isotopic (TRISO) fuel for gas-cooled reactors Phase 2 – Mixed oxide fuels with minor actinides for LWRs, Am transmutation targets for LWRs, inert matrix fuels for LWRs, and TRISO fuel containing Pu and other transuranium for gas-cooled reactors Phase 3 – Fertile free or low-fertile metal, ceramic, ceramic dispersed in a metal matrix (CERMET), and ceramics dispersed in a ceramic matrix (CERCER) that would be used primarily in fast reactors. Development of advanced fuels requires the fabrication, assembly, and irradiation of prototypic fuel under bounding reactor conditions. At specialized national laboratory facilities small quantities of actinides are being fabricated into such fuel for irradiation tests. Fabrication of demonstration quantities of selected fuels for qualification testing is needed but not currently feasible, because existing manual glovebox fabrication approaches result in significant radiation exposures when larger quantities of actinides are involved. The earliest demonstration test fuels needed in the AFCI program are expected to be variants of commercial mixed oxide fuel for use in an LWR as lead test assemblies. Manufacture of such test assemblies will require isolated fabrication lines at a facility not currently available in the U.S. Such facilities are now being planned as part of an Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF). Adequate planning for and specification of actinide fuel fabrication facilities capable of producing transmutation fuels dictates the need for detailed process flows, mass balances, batch size data, and radiological dose estimates. Full definition of the materials that will need to be handled in the facility as feed material inputs, in-process fuel, scrap recycle, scrap requiring recovery, and by-product wastes is required. The feed material for demonstrating transmutation fuel fabrication will need to come from the separations of actinides from spent nuclear fuel processed in the same AFCF.

  10. Land application uses of dry FGD by-products. [Quarterly] report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick, W.A.; Beeghly, J.H.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Reclamation of mine-sites with acid overburden requires the use of alkaline amendments and represents a potential high-volume use of alkaline dry flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by products. In a greenhouse study, 25-cm columns of acid mine spoil were amended with two FGD by-products; lime injection multistage burners (LIMB) fly ash or pressurized fluidized bed (PFBC) fly ash at rates of 0, 4, 8, 16, and 32% by weight (0, 40, 80, 160, and 320 tons/acre). Amended spoil was covered with 20 cm of acid topsoil amended with the corresponding FGD by-product to pH 7. Column leachate pH increased with FGD amendment rate while leachate Fe, Mn, and Zn decreased, Leachate Ca, S, and Mg decreased with LIMB amendment rate and increased with PFBC amendment. Leachate concentrations of regulated metals were decreased or unaffected by FGD amendment except for Se which was increased by PFBC. Spoil pH was increased up to 8.9 by PFBC, and up to 9.2 by LIMB amendment. Spoil pH also increased with depth with FGD amendments of 16 and 32%, Yield of fescue was increased by FGD amendment of 4 to 8%. Plant tissue content of most elements was unaffected by FGD amendment rate, and no toxicity symptoms were observed. Plant Ca and Mg were increased by LIMB and PFBC respectively, while plant S, Mn and Sr were decreased. Plant Ca and B was increased by LIMB, and plant Mg and S by PFBC amendment. These results indicate dry FGD by-products are effective in ameliorating acid, spoils and have a low potential for creating adverse environmental impacts.

  11. Technical support for the Ohio Clean Coal Technology Program. Volume 2, Baseline of knowledge concerning process modification opportunities, research needs, by-product market potential, and regulatory requirements: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1989-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LR1 and comprises two volumes. Volume 1 presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume 2 consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

  12. Model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rauf, Shahid; Balakrishna, Ajit; Chen Zhigang; Collins, Ken [Applied Materials, Inc., 974 E. Arques Avenue, Sunnyvale, California 94085 (United States)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-dimensional fluid plasma model for a transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source is described. Ferrites are used in this device to improve the electromagnetic coupling between the primary coils carrying radio frequency (rf) current and a secondary plasma loop. Appropriate components of the Maxwell equations are solved to determine the electromagnetic fields and electron power deposition in the model. The effect of gas flow on species transport is also considered. The model is applied to 1 Torr Ar/NH{sub 3} plasma in this article. Rf electric field lines form a loop in the vacuum chamber and generate a plasma ring. Due to rapid dissociation of NH{sub 3}, NH{sub x}{sup +} ions are more prevalent near the gas inlet and Ar{sup +} ions are the dominant ions farther downstream. NH{sub 3} and its by-products rapidly dissociate into small fragments as the gas flows through the plasma. With increasing source power, NH{sub 3} dissociates more readily and NH{sub x}{sup +} ions are more tightly confined near the gas inlet. Gas flow rate significantly influences the plasma characteristics. With increasing gas flow rate, NH{sub 3} dissociation occurs farther from the gas inlet in regions with higher electron density. Consequently, more NH{sub 4}{sup +} ions are produced and dissociation by-products have higher concentrations near the outlet.

  13. Ab Initio study of neutron drops with chiral Hamiltonians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. D. Potter; S. Fischer; P. Maris; J. P. Vary; S. Binder; A. Calci; J. Langhammer; R. Roth

    2014-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report ab initio calculations for neutron drops in a 10 MeV external harmonic-oscillator trap using chiral nucleon-nucleon plus three-nucleon interactions. We present total binding energies, internal energies, radii and odd-even energy differences for neutron numbers N = 2 - 18 using the no-core shell model with and without importance truncation. Furthermore, we present total binding energies for N = 8, 16, 20, 28, 40, 50 obtained in a coupled-cluster approach. Comparisons with Green's Function Monte Carlo results, where available, using Argonne v8' with three-nucleon interactions reveal important dependences on the chosen Hamiltonian.

  14. Accelerating Ab Initio Nuclear Physics Calculations with GPUs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugh Potter; Dossay Oryspayev; Pieter Maris; Masha Sosonkina; James Vary; Sven Binder; Angelo Calci; Joachim Langhammer; Robert Roth; Ümit Çatalyürek; Erik Saule

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes some applications of GPU acceleration in ab initio nuclear structure calculations. Specifically, we discuss GPU acceleration of the software package MFDn, a parallel nuclear structure eigensolver. We modify the matrix construction stage to run partly on the GPU. On the Titan supercomputer at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility, this produces a speedup of approximately 2.2x - 2.7x for the matrix construction stage and 1.2x - 1.4x for the entire run.

  15. AB 1007 Full Fuel Cycle Analysis (FFCA) Peer Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, D; Armstrong, D; Campbell, C; Lamont, A; Gallegos, G; Stewart, J; Upadhye, R

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    LLNL is a participant of California's Advanced Energy Pathways (AEP) team funded by DOE (NETL). At the AEP technical review meeting on November 9, 2006. The AB 1007 FFCA team (Appendix A) requested LLNL participate in a peer review of the FFCA reports. The primary contact at the CEC was McKinley Addy. The following reports/presentations were received by LLNL: (1) Full Fuel Cycle Energy and Emissions Assumptions dated September 2006, TIAX; (2) Full Fuel cycle Assessment-Well to Tank Energy Inputs, Emissions, and Water Impacts dated December 2006, TIAX; and (3) Full Fuel Cycle Analysis Assessment dated October 12, 2006, TIAX.

  16. Ab initio investigation of intermolecular interactions in solid benzene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Bludsky; M. Rubes; P. Soldan

    2008-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational strategy for the evaluation of the crystal lattice constants and cohesive energy of the weakly bound molecular solids is proposed. The strategy is based on the high level ab initio coupled-cluster determination of the pairwise additive contribution to the interaction energy. The zero-point-energy correction and non-additive contributions to the interaction energy are treated using density functional methods. The experimental crystal lattice constants of the solid benzene are reproduced, and the value of 480 meV/molecule is calculated for its cohesive energy.

  17. AB SCIEX-Advion BioSystems Commercialize ORNL Tech | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at ORNL. AB SCIEX partnered with Advion BioSystems, Inc., a frontrunner in microfluidic systems, which recently launched a liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA) sample...

  18. Feasibility of Detecting Byproducts of Chemical Weapons Manufacturing in Environmental Media: A Preliminary Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, L; Reynolds, J G; Koester, C; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S; Love, A H; Viani, B E

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative information on the environmental transport and fate of organophosphorus nerve agents has been limited to studies conducted at high concentration representative of acute doses (Munroe et al. 1999). Nerve agents have relatively rapidly degradation rates at acute levels, and first order degradation pathways and half-lives have been characterized. However, similar knowledge is lacking in the open literature on the long-term environmental persistence of nerve agents, their manufacturing precursors and byproducts, and their degradation products, particularly at sub-acute or chronic health levels. Although many recent publications reflect low-level detection methods for chemical weapons signature compounds extracted from a variety of different media (e.g. D'Agostino et al., 2001; Kataoka et al., 2001), little of this work answers questions regarding their adsorptive character and chemical persistence. However, these questions are a central theme to both the detection of illegal chemical weapons manufacturing, as well as determining long-term cleanup needs and health risks associated with potential terrorist acts using such agents. Adsorption onto environmental surfaces can enhance the persistence of organophosphorus compounds, particularly with strong chelators like phosphonic acids. In particular, organophosphorus compound adsorption can lead to irreversible binding (e.g. Aubin and Smith, 1992), and current methods of chemical extraction and solid-state detection are challenged to detect them. This may be particularly true if the adsorbed compound is of a low initial concentration because it may be that the most preferred adsorption sites form the strongest bonds. This is particularly true in mixed media having various adsorption domains that adsorb at different rates (e.g. Weber and Huang, 1996). For high enough initial concentrations, sorption sites become saturated and solvent extraction has a relatively high efficiency. It is no surprise that many CW fate studies can report findings using traditional extraction or solid-state methods of detection, since release concentration exceed the capacity of environmental media to adsorb or degrade them. This report documents a test using solid-state {sup 31}P-NMR and GC/MS methods to delineate two adsorbed phosphonates on a uniform silica gel substrate at different concentrations. The test sought to determine the sensitivity of {sup 31}P-NMR detection, delineate adsorption character of the phosphonates, quantify their extraction efficiency using different solvents, and test the phosphonate mobility and photodegradability under short-term idealized conditions. The results show that solid-state detection at the experimental conditions can detect individual phosphonate species down to the 100 ppm level. Sensitivity could be further increased using larger samples and longer collection times. Solvent extraction of the phosphonates from the silica gel showed that a chlorinated solvent (methylene chloride) produced poor recovery for phosphonic acids from the silica gel, whereas methanol used as a solvent achieved high extraction efficiency. The phosphonates used showed strong aqueous mobility in a silica gel column experiment, with a small but significant amount left adsorbed to the substrate. A 96 hour photo-degradation experiment showed no degradation of the compounds.

  19. Ab Initio Thermodynamic Model for Magnesium Carbonates and Hydrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaka, Anne M.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An ab initio thermodynamic framework for predicting properties of hydrated magnesium carbonate minerals has been developed using density-functional theory linked to macroscopic thermodynamics through the experimental chemical potentials for MgO, water, and CO2. Including semiempirical dispersion via the Grimme method and small corrections to the generalized gradient approximation of Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof for the heat of formation yields a model with quantitative agreement for the benchmark minerals brucite, magnesite, nesquehonite, and hydromagnesite. The model shows how small differences in experimental conditions determine whether nesquehonite, hydromagnesite, or magnesite is the result of laboratory synthesis from carbonation of brucite, and what transformations are expected to occur on geological time scales. Because of the reliance on parameter-free first principles methods, the model is reliably extensible to experimental conditions not readily accessible to experiment and to any mineral composition for which the structure is known or can be hypothesized, including structures containing defects, substitutions, or transitional structures during solid state transformations induced by temperature changes or processes such as water, CO2, or O2 diffusion. Demonstrated applications of the ab initio thermodynamic framework include an independent means to evaluate differences in thermodynamic data for lansfordite, predicting the properties of Mg analogs of Ca-based hydrated carbonates monohydrocalcite and ikaite which have not been observed in nature, and an estimation of the thermodynamics of barringtonite from the stoichiometry and a single experimental observation.

  20. LOW-COST, HIGH-PERFORMANCE MATERIALS USING ILLINOIS COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    conventional and clean coal technologies. This project was primarily directed toward developing concrete, mineralogical, and microstructural properties. A clean coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SO2 control technologies. Based on these properties, two sources of both conventional and clean coal ashes were selected

  1. Data:3657969b-2db9-41c3-ab35-ab5b4f2cc0ec | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5-ab5b4f2cc0ec No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information...

  2. Cheap Artificial AB-Mountains, Extraction of Water and Energy from Atmosphere and Change of Regional Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2008-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Author suggests and researches a new revolutionary method for changing the climates of entire countries or portions thereof, obtaining huge amounts of cheap water and energy from the atmosphere. In this paper is presented the idea of cheap artificial inflatable mountains, which may cardinally change the climate of a large region or country. Additional benefits: The potential of tapping large amounts of fresh water and energy. The mountains are inflatable semi-cylindrical constructions from thin film (gas bags) having heights of up to 3 - 5 km. They are located perpendicular to the main wind direction. Encountering these artificial mountains, humid air (wind) rises to crest altitude, is cooled and produces rain (or rain clouds). Many natural mountains are sources of rivers, and other forms of water and power production - and artificial mountains may provide these services for entire nations in the future. The film of these gasbags is supported at altitude by small additional atmospheric overpressure and may be connected to the ground by thin cables. The author has shown (in previous works about the AB-Dome) that this closed AB-Dome allows full control of the weather inside the Dome (the day is always fine, the rain is only at night, no strong winds) and influence to given region. This is a realistic and cheap method of economical irrigation, getting energy and virtual weather control on Earth at the current time.

  3. Optimization of Jatropha Oil Extraction and Its By-Product Utilization by Pyrolysis Method 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kongkasawan, Jinjuta 1987-

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    and biodiesel. Biofuels are derived from biomass feedstock and usually blend with gasoline or diesel fuel, but they can also be used directly on the engines (EIA, 2011b). One can categorize the biofuels by their source and type. Biofuels may be obtained from... of Jatropha Seed and Oil .................................................................8! 2.2.2. Potential of Jatropha Oils for Biofuels Production ........................................12! 2.2 Mechanical Extraction...

  4. Adaptation of hybrid five-phase ABS algorithms for experimental validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -lock braking, Hybrid control systems, Limit cycle analysis, Experimental validation, Quarter-car. 1Adaptation of hybrid five-phase ABS algorithms for experimental validation Mathieu Gerard WilliamAnti-lock Braking System (ABS) is the most important active safety system for passenger cars, but unfortunately

  5. ab-initio molecular dynamics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ab-initio molecular dynamics First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Ab-Initio Molecular...

  6. ab initio molecular-dynamics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ab initio molecular-dynamics First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Ab-Initio Molecular...

  7. Data Mining Approach to Ab-Initio Prediction of Crystal Structure Dane Morgan, Gerbrand Ceder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    Data Mining Approach to Ab-Initio Prediction of Crystal Structure Dane Morgan, Gerbrand Ceder of possible structures for new alloys. Here we describe ongoing work on a novel method (Data Mining of Quantum Calculations, or DMQC) that applies data mining techniques to existing ab initio data in order to increase

  8. Input Substitution and Business Energy Consumption: Evidence from ABS Energy Survey Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Input Substitution and Business Energy Consumption: Evidence from ABS Energy Survey Data Kay Cao applies the system of equations approach to energy consumption modelling using the ABS 2008-09 Energy of equations, energy consumption modelling, elasticity of substitution JEL codes: C51, D24 * Please do

  9. ab-initio nuclear structure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ab-initio nuclear structure First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Nuclear Structure - "ab...

  10. Assessing the Thermoelectric Properties of Sintered Compounds via High-Throughput Ab-Initio Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    Assessing the Thermoelectric Properties of Sintered Compounds via High-Throughput Ab Database have been considered as nanograined, sintered-powder thermoelectrics with the high-throughput ab the electronic band gap and the carrier effective mass, and that the probability of having large thermoelectric

  11. Engine with hydraulic fuel injection and ABS circuit using a single high pressure pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bartley, Bradley E. (Manito, IL); Blass, James R. (Bloomington, IL); Gibson, Dennis H. (Chillicothe, IL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An engine system comprises a hydraulically actuated fuel injection system and an ABS circuit connected via a fluid flow passage that provides hydraulic fluid to both the fuel injection system and to the ABS circuit. The hydraulically actuated system includes a high pressure pump. The fluid control passage is in fluid communication with an outlet from the high pressure pump.

  12. Detection of tritium sorption on four soil materials Yanguo Teng a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Qinhong "Max"

    Detection of tritium sorption on four soil materials Yanguo Teng a,b , Rui Zuo a,b,*, Jinsheng Wang December 2010 Keywords: Tritium Adsorption Distribution coefficient water/solid ratio pH Humic substances, it is important to understand the sorption behavior of tritium on soils. In this study, batch tests were carried

  13. Diode laser welding of ABS: Experiments and process modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilie, Mariana; Mattei, Simone; Cicala, Eugen; Stoica, Virgil; 10.1016/j.optlastec.2008.10.005

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The laser beam weldability of acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene (ABS) plates is determined by combining both experimental and theoretical aspects. In modeling the process, an optical model is used to determine how the laser beam is attenuated by the first material and to obtain the laser beam profile at the interface. Using this information as the input data to a thermal model, the evolution of the temperature field within the two components can be estimated. The thermal model is based on the first principles of heat transfer and utilizes the temperature variation laws of material properties. Corroborating the numerical results with the experimental results, some important insights concerning the fundamental phenomena that govern the process could be extracted. This approach proved to be an efficient tool in determining the weldability of polimeric materials and assures a significant reduction of time and costs with the experimental exploration.

  14. Ab initio study of helium behavior in titanium tritides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, J. H.; Dai, Yunya; Yang, Li; Peng, SM; Fan, K. M.; Long, XG; Zhou, X. S.; Zu, Xiaotao; Gao, Fei

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ab initio calculations based on density functional theory have been performed to investigate the relative stability of titanium tritides and the helium behavior in stable titanium tritides. The results show that the ?-phase TiT1.5 without two tritium along the [100] direction (TiT1.5[100]) is more stable than other possible structures. The stability of titanium tritides decrease with the increased generation of helium in TiT1.5[100]. In addition, helium generated by tritium decay prefers locating at a tetrahedral site, and favorably migrates between two neighbor vacant tetrahedral sites through an intermediate octahedral site in titanium tritides, with a migration energy of 0.23 eV. Furthermore, helium is easily accumulated on a (100) plane in ?-phase TiT1.5[100].

  15. Non-stoichiometric AB5 alloys for metal hydride electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, James J. (Bellport, NY); Adzic, Gordana D. (Setauket, NY); Johnson, John R. (Calverton, NY); Vogt, Thomas (Cold Spring Harbor, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a non-stoichiometric alloy comprising a composition having the formula AB.sub.5+X an atomic ratio wherein A is selected from the group consisting of the rare earth metals, yttrium, mischmetal, or a combination thereof; B is nickel and tin, or nickel and tin and at least a third element selected from the group consisting of the elements in group IVA of the periodic table, aluminum, manganese, iron, cobalt, copper, antimony or a combination thereof; X is greater than 0 and less than or equal to about 2.0; and wherein at least one substituted A site is occupied by at least one of the B elements. An electrode incorporating said alloy and an electrochemical cell incorporating said electrode are also described.

  16. A Review on Ab Initio Approaches for Multielectron Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishikawa, Kenichi L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In parallel with the evolution of femtosecond and attosecond laser as well as free-electron laser technology, a variety of theoretical methods have been developed to describe the behavior of atoms, molecules, clusters, and solids under the action of those laser pulses. Here we review major ab initio wave-function-based numerical approaches to simulate multielectron dynamics in atoms and molecules driven by intense long-wavelength and/or ultrashort short-wavelength laser pulses. Direct solution of the time-dependent Schr\\"odinger equation (TDSE), though its applicability is limited to He, ${\\rm H}_2$, and Li, can provide an exact description and has been greatly contributing to the understanding of dynamical electron-electron correlation. Multiconfiguration self-consistent-field (MCSCF) approach offers a flexible framework from which a variety of methods can be derived to treat both atoms and molecules, with possibility to systematically control the accuracy. The equations of motion of configuration interactio...

  17. Local Structure Analysis in $Ab$ $Initio$ Liquid Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santra, Biswajit; Martelli, Fausto; Car, Roberto

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of density functional theory, the inclusion of exact exchange and non-local van der Waals/dispersion (vdW) interactions is crucial for predicting a microscopic structure of ambient liquid water that quantitatively agrees with experiment. In this work, we have used the local structure index (LSI) order parameter to analyze the local structure in such highly accurate $ab$ $initio$ liquid water. At ambient conditions, the LSI probability distribution, P($I$), was unimodal with most water molecules characterized by more disordered high-density-like local environments. With thermal excitations removed, the resultant bimodal P($I$) in the inherent potential energy surface (IPES) exhibited a 3:1 ratio between high- and low-density-like molecules, with the latter forming small connected clusters amid the predominant population. By considering the spatial correlations and hydrogen bond network topologies $among$ water molecules with the same LSI identities, we demonstrate that the signatures of th...

  18. Radiation source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the relativistic electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target.

  19. 1D lanthanide halide crystals inserted into single-walled carbon nanotubes Cigang Xu,a Jeremy Sloan,ab Gareth Brown,ab Sam Bailey,a V. Clifford Williams,a Steffi Friedrichs,a Karl S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    ,ab Gareth Brown,ab Sam Bailey,a V. Clifford Williams,a Steffi Friedrichs,a Karl S. Coleman,a Emmanuel). Images were acquired digitally on a Gatan model 794 (1 k 3

  20. Modification of the EIC hydrogen sulfide abatement process to produce valuable by-products. Final report, May 4, 1981-May 4, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Offenhartz, P. O'D.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program of analytical and experimental studies has been carried out to develop modifications of the CUPROSUL process for the desulfurization of geothermal steam. The objective of the program was to devise practical means to manipulate the chemistry of the process so that the consumption of raw materials could be controlled and a variety of valuable by-products could be produced. The process had been demonstrated, at one-tenth commercial scale, for steam of the Geysers' average composition in a configuration which resulted in essentially complete oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. The ability to control the extent of oxidation would increase process flexibility and extend its range of applicability to steams of widely varying composition. Preliminary market surveys of raw materials required for the process and by-products which could be produced indicated that controlling the oxidation of sulfides to produce elemental sulfur would probably be the preferred process option. Use of lime to treat sulfate-containing purge streams to produce by-product gypsum and ammonia for recycle or sale could also be justified for certain steam compositions. Recovery of ammonium sulfate alone from the purge stream would not normally be justified unless corecovery of other valuable by-products, such as boric acid, was possible at incremental cost. It was found that ferric sulfate was a highly effective, selective oxidant for the controlled oxidation of copper sulfide solids to produce elemental sulfur for sale and copper sulfate for recycle.

  1. Mass-related inversion symmetry breaking and phonon self-energy renormalization in isotopically labeled AB-stacked bilayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araujo, Paulo Antonio Trinidade

    A mass-related symmetry breaking in isotopically labeled bilayer graphene (2LG) was investigated during in-situ electrochemical charging of AB stacked (AB-2LG) and turbostratic (t-2LG) layers. The overlap of the two ...

  2. E85, Flex-Fuel Vehicles, and AB 1493 Integrating biofuels into California's vehicular greenhouse gas regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    E85, Flex-Fuel Vehicles, and AB 1493 Integrating biofuels into California's vehicular greenhouse.................................................................................................. 5 1.1.3 CALIFORNIA CLEAN FUELS PROGRAM ....................................... 6 1.1.5 AB 1007: THE ALTERNATIVE FUELS PLAN

  3. RELATIVE ECONOMIC INCENTIVES FOR HYDROGEN FROM NUCLEAR, RENEWABLE, AND FOSSIL ENERGY SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorensek, M; Charles W. Forsberg, C

    2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The specific hydrogen market determines the value of hydrogen from different sources. Each hydrogen production technology has its own distinct characteristics. For example, steam reforming of natural gas produces only hydrogen. In contrast, nuclear and solar hydrogen production facilities produce hydrogen together with oxygen as a by-product or co-product. For a user who needs both oxygen and hydrogen, the value of hydrogen from nuclear and solar plants is higher than that from a fossil plant because 'free' oxygen is produced as a by-product. Six factors that impact the relative economics of fossil, nuclear, and solar hydrogen production to the customer are identified: oxygen by-product, avoidance of carbon dioxide emissions, hydrogen transport costs, storage costs, availability of low-cost heat, and institutional factors. These factors imply that different hydrogen production technologies will be competitive in different markets and that the first markets for nuclear and solar hydrogen will be those markets in which they have a unique competitive advantage. These secondary economic factors are described and quantified in terms of dollars per kilogram of hydrogen.

  4. Emergence of rotational bands in ab initio no-core configuration interaction calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Caprio; P. Maris; J. P. Vary; R. Smith

    2015-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Rotational bands have been observed to emerge in ab initio no-core configuration interaction (NCCI) calculations for p-shell nuclei, as evidenced by rotational patterns for excitation energies, electromagnetic moments, and electromagnetic transitions. We investigate the ab initio emergence of nuclear rotation in the Be isotopes, focusing on 9Be for illustration, and make use of basis extrapolation methods to obtain ab initio predictions of rotational band parameters for comparison with experiment. We find robust signatures for rotational motion, which reproduce both qualitative and quantitative features of the experimentally observed bands.

  5. Ab initio studies of niobium defects in uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiang, S; Huang, H; Hsiung, L

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium (U), with the addition of small amount of niobium (Nb), is stainless. The Nb is fully miscible with the high temperature phase of U and tends to segregate upon cooling below 647 C. The starting point of segregation is the configuration of Nb substitutional or interstitial defects. Using density-functional-theory based ab initio calculations, the authors find that the formation energy of a single vacancy is 1.08 eV, that of Nb substitution is 0.59 eV, that of Nb interstitial at octahedral site is 1.58 eV, and that of Nb interstitial at tetrahedral site is 2.35 eV; all with reference to a reservoir of {gamma} phase U and pure Nb. The formation energy of Nb defects correlates with the local perturbation of electron distribution; higher formation energy to larger perturbation. Based on this study, Nb atoms thermodynamically prefer to occupy substitutional sites in {gamma} phase U, and they prefer to be in individual substitutional defects than clusters.

  6. Local Structure Analysis in $Ab$ $Initio$ Liquid Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biswajit Santra; Robert A. DiStasio Jr.; Fausto Martelli; Roberto Car

    2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of density functional theory, the inclusion of exact exchange and non-local van der Waals/dispersion (vdW) interactions is crucial for predicting a microscopic structure of ambient liquid water that quantitatively agrees with experiment. In this work, we have used the local structure index (LSI) order parameter to analyze the local structure in such highly accurate $ab$ $initio$ liquid water. At ambient conditions, the LSI probability distribution, P($I$), was unimodal with most water molecules characterized by more disordered high-density-like local environments. With thermal excitations removed, the resultant bimodal P($I$) in the inherent potential energy surface (IPES) exhibited a 3:1 ratio between high- and low-density-like molecules, with the latter forming small connected clusters amid the predominant population. By considering the spatial correlations and hydrogen bond network topologies $among$ water molecules with the same LSI identities, we demonstrate that the signatures of the experimentally observed low- (LDA) and high-density (HDA) amorphous phases of ice are present in the IPES of ambient liquid water. Analysis of the LSI autocorrelation function uncovered a persistence time of $\\sim$ 4 ps---a finding consistent with the fact that natural thermal fluctuations are responsible for transitions between these distinct yet transient local aqueous environments in ambient liquid water.

  7. ab initio many-body: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lower side of, but consistent with, the latest evaluation. The core temperature of the Sun canAb initio many-body calculation of the 7 Be(p,)8 B radiative capture Petr...

  8. ab prib ida-euroopa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the magnetic field of its plasma cable. For creating this plasma cable the AB-Space Engine spends only some kg of hydrogen. Alexander Bolonkin 2008-03-02 2 -Ammonia Borane...

  9. Molecular modeling of hydrate-clathrates via ab initio, cell potential, and dynamic methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Brian, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High level ab initio quantum mechanical calculations were used to determine the intermolecular potential energy surface between argon and water, corrected for many- body interactions, to predict monovariant and invariant ...

  10. Docket No. EERE- 2008-BT-STD-0005, RIN 1904-AB57 Ex partecommunicatio...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Documents & Publications Docket No. EERE-2008-BT-STD-0005. RIN 1904-AB57 Ex parte communication Memorandum Ex Parte Communications, Docket Number EERE-2008-BT-STD-0005, RIN...

  11. Publisher's Note: "Ab initio potential energy surfaces for NH,,3 -...-NH,,3 -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publisher's Note: "Ab initio potential energy surfaces for NH,,3 - ...-NH,,3 - ... with analytical of Chemistry, University of Silesia, Szkolna 9, 40-006 Katowice, Poland Received 21 December 2009; published

  12. Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Fourth quarterly technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation are conducting Phase 1 of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an on-going DOE-sponsored, University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicate that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. The performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams.

  13. Treatability study on the use of by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan for the stabilization of hazardous and radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalb, P.D.; Milian, L.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Environmental and Waste Technology Center; Yim, S.P. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst. (Korea, Republic of); Dyer, R.S.; Michaud, W.R. [Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Republic of Kazakhstan generates significant quantities of excess elemental sulfur from the production and refining of petroleum reserves. In addition, the country also produces hazardous, and radioactive wastes which require treatment/stabilization. In an effort to find secondary uses for the elemental sulfur, and simultaneously produce a material which could be used to encapsulate, and reduce the dispersion of harmful contaminants into the environment, BNL evaluated the use of the sulfur polymer cement (SPC) produced from by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan. This thermoplastic binder material forms a durable waste form with low leaching properties and is compatible with a wide range of waste types. Several hundred kilograms of Kazakhstan sulfur were shipped to the US and converted to SPC (by reaction with 5 wt% organic modifiers) for use in this study. A phosphogypsum sand waste generated in Kazakhstan during the purification of phosphate fertilizer was selected for treatment. Waste loadings of 40 wt% were easily achieved. Waste form performance testing included compressive strength, water immersion, and Accelerated Leach Testing.

  14. Treatability study on the use of by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan for the stabilization of hazardous and radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yim, Sung Paal; Kalb, P.D.; Milian, L.W.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Republic of Kazakhstan generates significant quantities of excess sulfur from the production and refining of petroleum reserves. In addition, the country also produces hazardous, and radioactive wastes which require treatment/stabilization. In an effort to find secondary uses for the elemental sulfur, and simultaneously produce a material which could be used to encapsulate, and reduce the dispersion of harmful contaminants into the environment, BNL evaluated the use of the sulfur polymer cement (SPC) produced from by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan. This thermoplastic binder material forms a durable waste form with low leaching properties and is compatible with a wide range of waste types. Several hundred kilograms of Kazakhstan sulfur were shipped to the U.S. and converted to SPC (by reaction with 5 wt% organic modifiers) for use in this study. A phosphogypsum sand waste generated in Kazakhstan during the purification of phosphate fertilizer was selected for treatment. Waste loading of 40 wt% were easily achieved. Waste form performance testing included compressive strength, water immersion, and Accelerated Leach Testing. 14 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Using HEM surveys to evaluate disposal of by-product water from CBNG development in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, B.A.; Sams, J.I.; Smith, B.D. (USGS, Denver, CO); Harbert, W.P.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production of methane from thick, extensive coal beds in the Powder River Basin ofWyoming has created water management issues. Since development began in 1997, more than 650 billion liters of water have been produced from approximately 22,000 wells. Infiltration impoundments are used widely to dispose of by-product water from coal bed natural gas (CBNG) production, but their hydrogeologic effects are poorly understood. Helicopter electromagnetic surveys (HEM) were completed in July 2003 and July 2004 to characterize the hydrogeology of an alluvial aquifer along the Powder River. The aquifer is receiving CBNG produced water discharge from infiltration impoundments. HEM data were subjected to Occam’s inversion algorithms to determine the aquifer bulk conductivity, which was then correlated to water salinity using site-specific sampling results. The HEM data provided high-resolution images of salinity levels in the aquifer, a result not attainable using traditional sampling methods. Interpretation of these images reveals clearly the produced water influence on aquifer water quality. Potential shortfalls to this method occur where there is no significant contrast in aquifer salinity and infiltrating produced water salinity and where there might be significant changes in aquifer lithology. Despite these limitations, airborne geophysical methods can provide a broadscale (watershed-scale) tool to evaluate CBNG water disposal, especially in areas where field-based investigations are logistically prohibitive. This research has implications for design and location strategies of future CBNG water surface disposal facilities within the Powder River Basin.

  16. The Canada-France Deep Fields III: Photometric Redshift Distribution to I(AB) ~ 24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Brodwin; S. J. Lilly; C. Porciani; H. J. McCracken; O. Le Fevre; S. Foucaud; D. Crampton; Y. Mellier

    2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute accurate redshift distributions to I(AB) = 24 and R(AB) = 24.5 using photometric redshifts estimated from six-band UBVRIZ photometry in the Canada-France Deep Fields-Photometric Redshift Survey (CFDF-PRS). Our photometric redshift algorithm is calibrated using hundreds of CFRS spectroscopic redshifts in the same fields. The dispersion in redshift is \\sigma/(1+z) \\la 0.04 to the CFRS depth of I(AB) = 22.5, rising to \\sigma/(1+z) \\la 0.06 at our nominal magnitude and redshift limits of I(AB) = 24 and z \\le 1.3, respectively. We describe a new method to compute N(z) that incorporates the full redshift likelihood functions in a Bayesian iterative analysis and we demonstrate in extensive Monte Carlo simulations that it is superior to distributions calculated using simple maximum likelihood redshifts. The field-to-field differences in the redshift distributions, while not unexpected theoretically, are substantial even on 30' scales. We provide I(AB) and R(AB) redshift distributions, median redshifts, and parametrized fits of our results in various magnitude ranges, accounting for both random and systematic errors in the analysis.

  17. Electrolytes for power sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolytes are disclosed for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids. 7 figures.

  18. Electrolytes for power sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doddapaneni, Narayan (Albuquerque, NM); Ingersoll, David (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolytes for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids.

  19. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The final report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during length of the project. The goal of this project was to integrate coal into a refinery in order to produce coal-based jet fuel, with the major goal to examine the products other than jet fuel. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal-based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. The main goal of Task 1 was the production of coal-based jet fuel and other products that would need to be utilized in other fuels or for non-fuel sources, using known refining technology. The gasoline, diesel fuel, and fuel oil were tested in other aspects of the project. Light cycle oil (LCO) and refined chemical oil (RCO) were blended, hydrotreated to removed sulfur, and hydrogenated, then fractionated in the original production of jet fuel. Two main approaches, taken during the project period, varied where the fractionation took place, in order to preserve the life of catalysts used, which includes (1) fractionation of the hydrotreated blend to remove sulfur and nitrogen, followed by a hydrogenation step of the lighter fraction, and (2) fractionation of the LCO and RCO before any hydrotreatment. Task 2 involved assessment of the impact of refinery integration of JP-900 production on gasoline and diesel fuel. Fuel properties, ignition characteristics and engine combustion of model fuels and fuel samples from pilot-scale production runs were characterized. The model fuels used to represent the coal-based fuel streams were blended into full-boiling range fuels to simulate the mixing of fuel streams within the refinery to create potential 'finished' fuels. The representative compounds of the coal-based gasoline were cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane, and for the coal-base diesel fuel they were fluorine and phenanthrene. Both the octane number (ON) of the coal-based gasoline and the cetane number (CN) of the coal-based diesel were low, relative to commercial fuels ({approx}60 ON for coal-based gasoline and {approx}20 CN for coal-based diesel fuel). Therefore, the allowable range of blending levels was studied where the blend would achieve acceptable performance. However, in both cases of the coal-based fuels, their ignition characteristics may make them ideal fuels for advanced combustion strategies where lower ON and CN are desirable. Task 3 was designed to develop new approaches for producing ultra clean fuels and value-added chemicals from refinery streams involving coal as a part of the feedstock. It consisted of the following three parts: (1) desulfurization and denitrogenation which involves both new adsorption approach for selective removal of nitrogen and sulfur and new catalysts for more effective hydrotreating and the combination of adsorption denitrogenation with hydrodesulfurization; (2) saturation of two-ring aromatics that included new design of sulfur resistant noble-metal catalysts for hydrogenation of naphthalene and tetralin in middle distillate fuels, and (3) value-added chemicals from naphthalene and biphenyl, which aimed at developing value-added organic chemicals from refinery streams such as 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 4,4{prime}-dimethylbiphenyl as precursors to advanced polymer materials. Major advances were achieved in this project in designing the catalysts and sorbent materials, and in developing fundamental understanding. The objective of Task 4 was to evaluate the effect of introducing coal into an existing petroleum refinery on the fuel oil product, specifically trace element emissions. Activities performed to accomplish this objective included analyzing two petroleum-based commercial heavy fuel oils (i.e., No. 6 fuel oils) as baseline fuels and three co-processed fuel oils, characterizing the atomization performance of a No. 6 fuel oil, measuring the combustion performance and emissions of the five fuels, specifically major, minor, and trace elements when fired in a watertube boiler designed for natural gas/fuel oil, and determining the boiler performance when firing the five fuels. Two

  20. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL Sealed Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Sealed Source Contamination Incident October 13, 2011 #12;2 Cesium (Cs-137) Source Failure On September 28th @ ~1600 contamination event discovered · Two Radiological Contamination was from a Cs-137 (265 micro-curie) "sealed source" used to test area radiation monitors. · Source

  1. Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation are conducting Phase 1 of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an on-going DOE-sponsored, University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicate that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. The performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams. The principal objective of the Phase 1 program is to identify and evaluate the performance of a catalyst which is robust and flexible with regard to choice of reducing gas. In order to achieve this goal, the authors have planned a structured program including: Market/process/cost/evaluation; Lab-scale catalyst preparation/optimization studies; Lab-scale, bulk/supported catalyst kinetic studies; Bench-scale catalyst/process studies; and Utility review. Progress is reported from all three organizations.

  2. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S.; Ghafoori, N.; Paul, B.; Sevim, H.; Thomasson, E.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary environmental risk assessment on the FGD by-products to be placed underground is virtually complete. The initial mixes for pneumatic and hydraulic placement have been selected and are being subject to TCLP, ASTM, and modified SLP shake tests as well as ASTM column leaching. Results of these analyses show that the individual coal combustion residues, and the residues mixes, are non-hazardous in character. Based on available information, including well logs obtained from Peabody Coal Company, a detailed study of the geology of the placement site was completed. The study shows that the disposal site in the abandoned underground mine workings at depths of between 325 and 375 feet are well below potable groundwater resources. This, coupled with the benign nature of the residues and residues mixtures, should alleviate any concern that the underground placement will have adverse effects on groundwater resources. Seven convergence stations were installed in the proposed underground placement area of the Peabody Coal Company No. 10 mine. Several sets of convergence data were obtained from the stations. A study of materials handling and transportation of coal combustion residues from the electric power plant to the injection site has been made. The study evaluated the economics of the transportation of coal combustion residues by pneumatic trucks, by pressure differential rail cars, and by SEEC, Inc. collapsible intermodal containers (CICs) for different annual handling rates and transport distances. The preliminary physico-chemical characteristics and engineering properties of various FBC fly ash-spent bed mixes have been determined, and long-term studies of these properties are continuing.

  3. Powder River Basin coalbed methane: The USGS role in investigating this ultimate clean coal by-product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Ochs, A.M.; Stanton, R.W.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past few decades, the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin has supplied the Nation with comparatively clean low ash and low sulfur coal. However, within the past few years, coalbed methane from the same Fort Union coal has become an important energy by-product. The recently completed US Geological Survey coal resource assessment of the Fort Union coal beds and zones in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains (Fort Union Coal Assessment Team, 1999) has added useful information to coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin has rapidly accelerated in the past three years. During this time more than 800 wells have been drilled and recent operator forecasts projected more than 5,000 additional wells to be drilled over the next few years. Development of shallow (less than 1,000 ft. deep) Fort Union coal-bed methane is confined to Campbell and Sheridan Counties, Wyoming, and Big Horn County, Montana. The purpose of this paper is to report on the US Geological Survey's role on a cooperative coalbed methane project with the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Wyoming Reservoir Management Group and several gas operators. This paper will also discuss the methodology that the USGS and the BLM will be utilizing for analysis and evaluation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Powder River Basin. The USGS and BLM need additional information of coalbed methane reservoirs to accomplish their respective resource evaluation and management missions.

  4. Speciation of chromium in feed coals and ash byproducts from Canadian power plants burning subbituminous and bituminous coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fariborz Goodarzi; Frank E. Huggins [Geological Survey of Canada-Calgary Division, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chromium species in the feed coals and ash byproducts from seven Canadian coal-fired power plants were examined using Cr X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy. Chromium in the Canadian feed coals is always found as Cr{sup 3+} but generally has a dual occurrence, as Cr{sup 3+} is distributed to varying degrees between the clay mineral illite and a poorly crystallized chromium oxyhydroxide phase associated with the organic fraction. In two subbituminous feed coals from Alberta, chromium is present largely as Cr{sup 3+}/illite, whereas in two other such coals, it is present predominantly as CrOOH. Chromium in a low-sulfur bituminous feed coal from Alberta is found mostly as Cr{sup 3+}/illite, whereas for feed coals from Nova Scotia with high sulfur contents, chromium is distributed between both Cr{sup 3+}/illite and CrOOH. Very little chromium was found in the limestone used in a fluidized-bed combustor. The chromium species in most bottom ash samples from all seven combustion units is predominantly, if not entirely, Cr{sup 3+} associated with aluminosilicate phases. Chromium speciation for subbituminous electrostatic precipitator fly ash is mostly Cr{sup 3+}, but in some cases, it is slightly lessand varies by sampling location at the plant. Chromium in fly ash from the combustion of bituminous feed coals is predominantlyCr{sup 3+}. A unique species of chromium found in one feed coal and an unrelated fly ash is metallic chromium, similar to that in stainless steel. The occurrence of this form of chromium in these materials indicates contamination from machinery, such as the coal milling machine or possibly wearing down of stainless steel parts by the coal or ash. The observation of this unexpected contamination demonstrates the power and usefulness of X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy for speciation determination. 35 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, January--March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S. [and others

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 30, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC 30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground residues placement. Previous quarterly Technical Progress Reports have set forth the specific objectives of the program, as well as the management plan and the test plan for the overall program, and a discussion of these will not be repeated here. Rather, this report, will set forth the technical progress made during the period January 1 through March 31, 1995. The demonstration of the SEEC, Inc. technology for the transporting of coal combustion residues was completed with the unloading and final disposition of the three Collapsible Intermodal Containers (CIC). The loading and transport by rail of the three CIC`s was quire successful; however some difficulties were encountered in the unloading of the containers. A full topical report on the entire SEEC demonstration is being prepared. As a result of the demonstration some modifications of the SEEC concept may be undertaken. Also during the quarter the location of the injection wells at the Peabody No. 10 mine demonstration site were selected. Peabody Coal Company has developed the specifications for the wells and sought bids for the actual drilling. It is expected that the wells will be drilled early in May.

  6. AB-Net Method of Protection from Projectiles (city, military base, battle-front, etc.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The author suggests a low cost special AB-Net from artificial fiber, which may protect cities and important objects from rockets, artillery and mortar shells, projectiles, bullets, and strategic weapons. The idea is as follows: The offered AB-Net joins an incoming projectile to a small braking parachute and this incoming projectile loses speed by air braking after a drag distance of 50 - 150 meters. A following interception net after the first may serve to collect the slowed projectiles and their fragments or bomblets so that they do not reach the aimpoint. The author offers the design of AB-Net, a developed theory of snagging with a small braking parachute by AB-Net; and sample computations. These nets may be used for defense of a town, city, military base, battle-front line, road (from terrorists), or any important objects or installations (for example nuclear electric station, government buildings, etc.). Computed projects are: Net to counter small rockets (for example, from Qassam), net to counter artillery projectile (caliber 76 mm), net to counter bullets (caliber 7.6 mm). The offered method is cheaper by thousands of times than protection of a city by current anti-rocket systems. Discussion and results are at the end of the article. Key words: Protection from missile and projectile weapons, mortar, rocket, AB-Net, Qassam defense, incoming defense, armor.

  7. A VUV Photoionization and Ab Initio Determination of the Ionization Energy of a Gas Phase Sugar (Deoxyribose).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Debashree

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electronic structure calculations of vertical and adiabatic ionization energies. Ab initio molecular dynamics (dynamics snapshots along the reaction coordinate. Keywords: sugars, synchrotron radiation, electronic structure calculations,

  8. An ab initio-based Er–He interatomic potential in hcp Er

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Li; ye, Yeting; Fan, K. M.; Shen, Huahai; Peng, Shuming; Long, XG; Zhou, X. S.; Zu, Xiaotao; Gao, Fei

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an empirical erbium-helium (Er-He) potential by fitting to the results calculated from ab initio method. Based on the electronic hybridization between Er and He atoms, an s-band model, along with a repulsive pair potential, has been derived to describe the Er-He interaction. The atomic configurations and the formation energies of single He defects, small He interstitial clusters (Hen) and He-vacancy (HenV ) clusters obtained by ab initio calculations are used as the fitting database. The binding energies and relative stabilities of the HnVm clusters are studied by the present potential and compared with the ab initio calculations. The Er-He potential is also applied to study the migration of He in hcp-Er at different temperatures, and He clustering is found to occur at 600 K in hcp Er crystal, which may be due to the anisotropic migration behavior of He interstitials.

  9. Projection of needs for gamma radiation sources and other radioisotopes and assessment of alternatives for providing radiation sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, W.A.; Jensen, G.A.; Clark, L.L.; Eakin, D.E.; Jarrett, J.H.; Katayama, Y.B.; McKee, R.W.; Morgan, L.G.; Nealey, S.M.; Platt, A.M.; Tingey, G.L.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed the projected uses and demands for a variety of nuclear byproducts. Because the major large-scale near-term demand is for gamma irradiation sources, this report concentrates on the needs for gamma sources and evaluates the options for providing the needed material. Projections of possible growth in the irradiation treatment industry indicate that there will be a need for 180 to 320 MCi of /sup 60/Co (including /sup 137/Cs equivalent) in service in the year 2000. The largest current and projected use of gamma irradiation is for the sterilization of medical devices and disposable medical supplies. Currently, 40% of US disposable medical products are treated by irradiation, and within 10 years it is expected that 90% will be treated in this manner. Irradiation treatment of food for destruction of pathogens or parasites, disinfestation, or extension of allowable storage periods is estimated to require an active inventory of 75 MCi of /sup 60/Co-equivalent gamma source in about a decade. 90 refs., 7 figs., 25 tabs.

  10. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    in self-compacting concrete is expected to provide significant economic benefits to quarries, coal-compacting slurry has been gaining increasing acceptance (2). However, such flowable slurry typically has

  11. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    slurry(Controlled Low Strength Materials, CLSM) through an initial laboratory evaluation followed advantage of available alkalies in wood ash to activate the Class C coal ash for enhanced performance. Three

  12. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    application is discussed. A typical and very successful high- volume application of coal ash is in controlled low-strength materials (CLSM) or flowable slurry. Reviews of the state-of-the-art information on CLSM rate of CCPs. Keywords: admixtures, CLSM concrete, compaction, durability, flowable slurry, fly ash

  13. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ) and flowable slurry (Controlled Low Strength Materials, CLSM) through an initial laboratory evaluation followed in wood ash to activate coal ash. Based on the results of lab manufacturing of CLSM and concrete mixtures

  14. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    , ready- mixed concrete, and low-strength flowable concrete and slurry. The major topics included are; freezing and thawing durability; strength; sulfate resistance. #12;2 INTRODUCTION Coal is the most widely amounts of coal combustion products (CCPs), which include fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas

  15. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    mineral addition to coal, and spraying coal to minimize dusting due to coal handling, transportation be used in clean-coal applications for the removal of sulfur dioxide emissions from flue gas. Since also be used in flowable slurry with or without crushed limestone fine sand. RECOMMENDATIONS

  16. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    evaluation of dredged material from Newark harbor............................ 7 Soil stabilization utilizing environment in a cost effective way while producing necessary chemicals such as lime. Lime is one of the most purchasing fabric filter bag collectors are emission regulations, capital cost and operating cost [1

  17. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    after combustion of coal in conventional and advanced clean-coal technology combustors. These include and advanced clean-coal technology combustors. Although 560 million tonnes (Mt) of fly ash, bottom ash use either pulverized-coal-fired furnaces, cyclone furnaces, or advanced clean-coal technology

  18. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    technologies. A clean-coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SOxand NOxcontrol technologies, and FBC that obtained from clean-coal technology, are not utilized in cast-concrete masonry products (bricks, blocks conventional and clean-coal technologies. Fifteen high-sulfur coal ash samples were obtained from eight

  19. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    clean-coal technologies such as SO2 Control Systems, NOx Control Technology, Fluidized Bed Combustion Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute, 5776 Coal Drive, Suite 200, Carterville, IL 62918-sulfur coal. Ponded ash is usually a mixture of fly ash and bottom ash or boiler slag. Concrete was made

  20. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    is defined as the ash derived from thermal power plants using clean-coal technologies such as SO2 Control of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 784, Milwaukee, WI 53201. 4 Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute Systems, NOx Control Technology, Fluidized Bed Combustion, and Gasification Combined Cycle for reducing

  1. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    combustion of coal in conventional and advanced clean-coal technology combustors. These include fly ash clean-coal technology combustors. Although 560 million tonnes (Mt) of fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler furnaces, or advanced clean-coal technology furnaces. The ash collected from pulverized-coal-fired furnaces

  2. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    and Objectives This testing work will evaluate use of high-carbon fly ash in non-air entrained concrete in the concrete mixture. The testing work for this project will involve laboratory testing of mechanical varied types for concrete construction applications. Specific objectives for this testing work

  3. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    of New York is approximately 28% composed of leaves, grass, yard, food, and other organic waste. New York) of MSW generated per year were landfilled, 14.0% were combusted, and 31% were recycled or composted). Recycling of MSW increased 9% and composting of MSW increased 5% from 1990 to 2003, totaling 7

  4. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ash or CFAs. Based on these properties, a number of constructive use options such as #12;pollution by saw mills, pulp mills, and the wood-products industry, by burning a combination of wood products control [3], land application [9,10,11], construction materials [13,14], have been reported. However, most

  5. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    on "Management & Use of Coal Combustion Products (CCPS)" held in San Antonio, TX, January 2001. Department concrete mixtures were produced for and at the production plant of an architectural precast concrete. Majority of the foundry sand generated in Wisconsin and elsewhere are landfilled at high disposal costs

  6. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    that over 80,000 tons of gypsum wallboard is disposed each year in Wisconsin from new construction.I. has recently established a technology of using a gypsum-containing cementitious material from coal gypsum wallboard, Class C fly ash, and cement will be used as a cementitious material; and, the mixture

  7. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    International Conference onFly Ash Disposal and Utilization,onJanuary 20-22, 1998, New Delhi, India. COAL ASH and Applied Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - MILWAUKEE #12;COAL ASH GENERATIONANDUTILIZATION: A REVIEW and utilization of coal ash in many parts of the world. The utilization potential for coal ash generated from

  8. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ;2 INTRODUCTION Fly ash and bottom ash are generated due to combustion of coal in electric power plants. The annual production of fly ash and bottom ash by coal-burning power plants in the United States/bronze foundries, etc. Currently, large volumes of fly ash, bottom ash, and used foundry sand are disposed

  9. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    the ability of future generations to meet their own requirements (13). As a business model, this means is ecologically unfriendly: it consumes much energy and natural resources, and emits a number of undesirable air AND ECO-EFFICIENCY The definition of "sustainability", following the World Commission on Environment

  10. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Institute of Mexico Symposium "World of Concrete - Mexico", Guadalajara, Mexico, June 4-7, 1997. Department;-4- low interconnectivity, these pores are relatively impermeable to water. However, water removal from

  11. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    suitable for highway construction applications. 1.0 INTRODUCTION Scrapped tires are produced in the U. At the present time, landfilling is the major technique for scrap tire disposal in the country. Scrap tires used as economic advantages. Scrap tires are primarily composed of natural rubber, steel, synthetic rubber

  12. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    their tanks to meet minimum design standards, (2) test their tanks for leaks and provide controls for spills hydrocarbons (RFWI and UM 1993; API 1989). These hydrocarbons can be categorized as: gasoline and light, and mobile in the subsurface environment [API 1989]. Oxygenated compounds (oxygenates), such as alcohols

  13. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. INTRODUCTION Increasing cost of construction has-situ concrete strength can reduce construction time and cost by efficient movement of forms. Furthermore it also Milwaukee, WI 53201 Synopsis: The maturity method computes maturity of the concrete as an index to predict

  14. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    is expected to provide significant economic benefits to quarries, coal-fired power plants, and concrete

  15. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Abstract: Several new coal-fired combustion system modifications have been designed to improve the quality/or ammonia removal. These new processes have been demonstrated at various Wisconsin Electric coal fired Electric Power Company (WE) has developed three new coal ash beneficiation processes for carbon and

  16. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    . The carbonation reaction of the CLSM would also have the potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions at a coal-fired gas. This mixed gas was used to simulate a typical flue gas generated from the combustion of coal

  17. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    in this country is mostly generated by coal-fired electric power plants. These plants produce huge amounts of ash (slag) produced from coal-fired power plants increases yearly along with the development and huge demand. Naik* ABSTRACT China has one of the largest coal mining industries in the world. Electricity

  18. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    subbituminous and lignite coals. It is anticipated that increased number of coal- fired plants will utilize subbituminous and lignite coals to reduce sulfur-related emissions. Some correlation exists between chemical

  19. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -product of combustion from wood-fired boilers, at a typical paper mills and other wood burning facilities. Approximately %) of wood ash and coal fly ash; (3) non-air- entrained structural-grade concrete (up to 60 MPa 28-day compressive strength) with wood ash or its blends with coal fly ash (up to 40 %) as partial replacement

  20. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -19 REP-443 November 2001 Final Technical Report Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute For Project

  1. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    with the combination of Class C fly ash and clean coal ash. Two percent to four percent sodium sulfate anhydrite

  2. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -28 REP-482 November 2002 Final Technical Report Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute For Project

  3. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ", Portland Cement Association Skokie, IL, pp. 1-10. 11. Burnham, J. C., Bennet, G. F., and Logan, T. J., 1990

  4. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -Milwaukee, P.O. Box 784, Milwaukee, WI 53201 d Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute * Director UWM products containing clean coal ash compared to conventional coal ash. Utilization of clean coal ash is much products that utilize clean coal ash. With increasing federal regulations on power plant emissions, finding

  5. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ­ Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI and Ronald H. Carty Director Illinois Clean Coal Institute Carterville, IL ABSTRACT, Naik and Singh [16] summarized various applications of fly ash generated from conventional and clean coal technologies. Uses of coal combustion by- products can be categorized into three classes: high-volum

  6. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -Products Utilization E-mail: ymchun@uwm.edu and F. D. Botha Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute 5776 Coal, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, USA. 4 Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute

  7. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    .4 April 2000 A Mid-Year Project Management Report Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute for Project for evaluation. Clean coal fly ash was obtained from Southern Illinois University and a wet collected Class F fly and Quarters Cumulative$ Cumulative Project Budget Total Illinois Clean Coal Institute Award $ 86,095 Estimated

  8. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    to establish and demonstrate technical benefits of porous, low-strength concrete that uses large amounts of non in construction materials. Porous concrete mixtures do not require air entrainment for freezing and thawing resistance. Therefore, high-carbon ash could be used in such concretes. Porous concrete mixtures were first

  9. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MILWAUKEE #12;DOE F 4600.6 (10-94) Replaces EIA-459F All Other. A market survey was developed as part of the activities of the first quarter of the project. This survey

  10. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    of Engineering and Applied Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MILWAUKEE #12;DOE F 4600.6 (10-94) Replaces EIA residuals concrete of comparable workability and strength with a reference concrete. A market survey producers and affiliated members of the National and state ready-mixed concrete associations. The survey

  11. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    generated at mill and inert solids rejected during chemical recovery processes become part of the primary residual. The water clarified by the primary treatment is passed on to the secondary treatment. Secondary dioxide and water while consuming oxygen. Secondary residual is mainly microbial biomass (called also

  12. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    ). In some cases, ash generated at mill and inert solids rejected during chemical recovery processes become on to the secondary treatment. Secondary treatment is usually a biological process in which micro-organisms convert soluble organic matter to carbon dioxide and water while consuming oxygen. Secondary residual is mainly

  13. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    generated by the mill and inert #12;solids rejected during chemical recovery processes become part of the primary residual. The water clarified by the primary treatment is passed on to the secondary treatment. The secondary treatment is usually a biological process in which micro-organisms convert soluble organic matter

  14. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    generated at mill and inert solids rejected during chemical recovery processes become part of the primary residual. The water clarified by the primary treatment is passed on to the secondary treatment. Secondary dioxide and water while consuming oxygen. Secondary residual is mainly microbial biomass (also called

  15. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    solids rejected during chemical recovery processes become part of the primary residual. The water clarified by the primary treatment is passed on to the secondary treatment. Secondary treatment is usually consuming oxygen. Secondary residual is mainly microbial biomass (also called biosolids) grown during

  16. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Report No. 321 August 1997-15 Department of Civil Engineering and Mechanics College of Engineering and sand to produce concrete. The United States consumes approximately 90 million tons of Portland cement annually. The manufacture of cement is quite energy intensive. It requires approximately 3000 kJ of energy

  17. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    PRACTICE By Rudolph N. Kraus, Tarun R. Naik, and Yoon-moon Chun Report No. CBU-2006-12 REP-611 April 2006 to be mined, cement continues to be manufactured or imported, and energy is consumed in the processing briefly describes the uses of coal ash, wood ash, and used foundry sand, in concrete. Typically, one

  18. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Monosi, Giacomo Moriconi, and Tarun R. Naik Report No. CBU-2007-11 REP-632 June 2007 Presented of paper mill sludge: as a secondary raw material to produce blended cements, as a very fine sand addition energy for internal use. Such combustion fumes carry fly ashes which are collected and available as a new

  19. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    -QUALITY CONCRETE (HQC)CONSTRUCTION By Tarun R.Naik Report No.CBU REP-318 May 1997 Presented andpublished with proper use of form oil to allow migration of released air pockets. Sand content should be increased]. External vibrators consume greater amounts of energy and are less effective compared to internal vibrators

  20. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    from a SO2 control technology (dry desulphuring process), and Project II deals with RCC pavement (RCCP

  1. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    control technology (dry desulphuring process), and Project II deals with RCC pavement (RCCP) containing 30

  2. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    #12;ACI member Bruce W. Ramme, P.E., Manager- Environmental Land Quality, Wisconsin Electric Power Materials, 230 Soil Cement, 232 Fly Ash and Natural Pozzolans, and 555 Recycled Materials. He is a member of ASCE, NSPE, and other professional organizations. Haifang Wen is a Transportation Engineer at Bloom

  3. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    , calcium carbonate, and/or titanium dioxide) and the biomass from biological treatment of wastewater. Fiber wastewater-treatment residuals; wood fibers. #12;Naik, Chun, & Kraus Flowable Slurry Made With Class C Fly include wastewater-treatment residuals (also called sludge), fiber reclaim, and screening rejects

  4. By-Products Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    cementitious material content exhibited higher autogenous shrinkage and lower drying shrinkage compared, specifications containing recommendations on the use of dosage rate of shrinkage-reducing admixtures and amount on Sustainable Development. He was Chairman of the ASCE Technical Committee on Emerging Materials (1995- 2000

  5. AB 2188: Implementation of the California Solar Rights Act at the Local Level

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is intended to provide guidance for implementing the Solar Permitting Efficiency Act (AB 2188), which was enacted in California in 2015, in substantial conformance with the California Solar Permitting Guidebook. This document also includes a stand-alone model ordinance that complies with the requirements of the Solar Rights Act, as amended. The sections of this document are organized to first provide the reader with the statutory requirements of AB 2188 and the existing requirements of the Solar Rights Act, followed by the recommendations from the California Solar Permitting Guidebook for substantial conformance with regard to the permitting requirements for local permitting processes.

  6. UNDERGROUNG PLACEMENT OF COAL PROCESSING WASTE AND COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS BASED PASTE BACKFILL FOR ENHANCED MINING ECONOMICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y.P. Chugh; D. Biswas; D. Deb

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has successfully demonstrated that the extraction ratio in a room-and-pillar panel at an Illinois mine can be increased from the current value of approximately 56% to about 64%, with backfilling done from the surface upon completion of all mining activities. This was achieved without significant ground control problems due to the increased extraction ratio. The mined-out areas were backfilled from the surface with gob, coal combustion by-products (CCBs), and fine coal processing waste (FCPW)-based paste backfill containing 65%-70% solids to minimize short-term and long-term surface deformations risk. This concept has the potential to increase mine productivity, reduce mining costs, manage large volumes of CCBs beneficially, and improve the miner's health, safety, and environment. Two injection holes were drilled over the demonstration panel to inject the paste backfill. Backfilling was started on August 11, 1999 through the first borehole. About 9,293 tons of paste backfill were injected through this borehole with a maximum flow distance of 300-ft underground. On September 27, 2000, backfilling operation was resumed through the second borehole with a mixture of F ash and FBC ash. A high-speed auger mixer (new technology) was used to mix solids with water. About 6,000 tons of paste backfill were injected underground through this hole. Underground backfilling using the ''Groutnet'' flow model was simulated. Studies indicate that grout flow over 300-foot distance is possible. Approximately 13,000 tons of grout may be pumped through a single hole. The effect of backfilling on the stability of the mine workings was analyzed using SIUPANEL.3D computer program and further verified using finite element analysis techniques. Stiffness of the backfill mix is most critical for enhancing the stability of mine workings. Mine openings do not have to be completely backfilled to enhance their stability. Backfill height of about 50% of the seam height is adequate to minimize surface deformations. Freeman United Coal Company performed engineering economic evaluation studies for commercialization. They found that the costs for underground management at the Crown III mine would be slightly higher than surface management at this time. The developed technologies have commercial potential but each site must be analyzed on its merit. The Company maintains significant interest in commercializing the technology.

  7. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN KAZAKHASTAN: USING OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION BY-PRODUCT SULFUR FOR COST-EFFECTIVE SECONDARY END-USE PRODUCTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KALB, P.D.; VAGIN, S.; BEALL, P.W.; LEVINTOV, B.L.

    2004-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Republic of Kazakhstan is continuing to develop its extensive petroleum reserves in the Tengiz region of the northeastern part of the Caspian Sea. Large quantities of by-product sulfur are being produced as a result of the removal of hydrogen sulfide from the oil and gas produced in the region. Lack of local markets and economic considerations limit the traditional outlets for by-product sulfur and the buildup of excess sulfur is a becoming a potential economic and environmental liability. Thus, new applications for re-use of by-product sulfur that will benefit regional economies including construction, paving and waste treatment are being developed. One promising application involves the cleanup and treatment of mercury at a Kazakhstan chemical plant. During 19 years of operation at the Pavlodar Khimprom chlor-alkali production facility, over 900 tons of mercury was lost to the soil surrounding and beneath the buildings. The Institute of Metallurgy and Ore Benefication (Almaty) is leading a team to develop and demonstrate a vacuum-assisted thermal process to extract the mercury from the soil and concentrate it as pure, elemental mercury, which will then be treated using the Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process. The use of locally produced sulfur will recycle a low-value industrial by-product to treat hazardous waste and render it safe for return to the environment, thereby helping to solve two problems at once. SPSS chemically stabilizes mercury to mercuric sulfide, which has a low vapor pressure and low solubility, and then physically encapsulates the material in a durable, monolithic solid sulfur polymer matrix. Thus, mercury is placed in a solid form very much like stable cinnabar, the form in which it is found in nature. Previous research and development has shown that the process can successfully encapsulate up to 33 wt% mercury in the solid form, while still meeting very strict regulatory standards for leachable mercury (0.025 mg/l in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure). The research and development to deploy Kazakhstan recycled sulfur for secondary applications described in this paper is being conducted with support from the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) and the U.S. Department of Energy Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (DOE IPP).

  8. Glyoxal photodissociation. II. An ab initio direct classical trajectory study of C2H2O2\\COH2CO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Glyoxal photodissociation. II. An ab initio direct classical trajectory study of C2H2O2\\CO¿H2CO2CO CO channel has been investigated by ab initio classical trajectory calculations using Becke vector. The CO product was produced with a broad rotational distribution but with almost no vibration

  9. Energy of the quasi-free electron in argon, krypton and xenon Xianbo Shi a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    Energy of the quasi-free electron in argon, krypton and xenon Xianbo Shi a,b , Luxi Li a,b , C. M ionization of the dopant, and (iii) the kinetic energy of the quasi-free electron. The polarization terms are determined by a standard statistical mechanical treatment. However, the kinetic energy of the quasi-free

  10. Fully ab initio atomization energy of benzene via Weizmann-2 theory Srinivasan Parthiban and Jan M. L. Martina)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jan M.L.

    Fully ab initio atomization energy of benzene via Weizmann-2 theory Srinivasan Parthiban and Jan M at absolute zero, (TAE0) of benzene, C6H6, was computed fully ab initio by means of W2h theory as 1306.6 kcal for systems the size of benzene, chemically accurate molecular atomization energies can be obtained from fully

  11. Ab initio molecular-dynamics study of the structural, vibrational, and electronic properties of glassy GeSe 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drabold, David

    Ab initio molecular-dynamics study of the structural, vibrational, and electronic properties We present results of an ab initio molecular-dynamics study of glassy GeSe2 using a 216 atom model static structure factors, and ring structures. The total static structure factor and first sharp

  12. DC source assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Jeremy B; Newson, Steve

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Embodiments of DC source assemblies of power inverter systems of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicle having an electrically grounded chassis are provided. An embodiment of a DC source assembly comprises a housing, a DC source disposed within the housing, a first terminal, and a second terminal. The DC source also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first terminal. The DC source assembly further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the second terminal.

  13. The control of mercury vapor using biotrickling filters Ligy Philip a,b,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The control of mercury vapor using biotrickling filters Ligy Philip a,b,1 , Marc A. Deshusses b mechanisms existed. Sulfur oxidizing bacteria biotrickling filters were the most effective in controlling phase bioreactor; Mercury control; Combustion gases 1. Introduction Mercury (Hg) is a hazardous chemical

  14. Method for the separation of high impact polystyrene (HIPS) and acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jody, Bassam J. (Chicago, IL); Arman, Bayram (Amherst, NY); Karvelas, Dimitrios E. (Downers Grove, IL); Pomykala, Jr., Joseph A. (Crest Hill, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method is provided for separating acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and high impact polystyrene (HIPS) plastics from each other. The ABS and HIPS plastics are shredded to provide a selected particle size. The shredded particles of the ABS and HIPS plastics are applied to a solution having a solution density in a predefined range between 1.055 gm/cm.sup.3 and 1.07 gm/cm.sup.3, a predefined surface tension in a range between 22 dynes/cm to 40 dynes/cm and a pH in the range of 1.77 and 2.05. In accordance with a feature of the invention, the novel method is provided for separating ABS and HIPS, two solid thermoplastics which have similar densities by selectively modifying the effective density of the HIPS using a binary solution with the appropriate properties, such as pH, density and surface tension, such as a solution of acetic acid and water or a quaternary solution having the appropriate density, surface tension, and pH.

  15. G8-kompatibler Mathe-Bachelor ab WS 2014 Gero Friesecke, Christian Kredler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemper, Gregor

    G8-kompatibler Mathe-Bachelor ab WS 2014 Gero Friesecke, Christian Kredler Mitarbeiterversammlung-Uni (1 = keine, 5 = massiv) alle G9 G8 #12;Massnahmen f¨ur Studienanfang WS 2014 Anpassung an G8 (neues ehem. Studierende #12;Anpassung an G8 Prinzip: 'Minimal change' Prop¨adeutikum 'Diskrete Mathematik' (1

  16. Dynamic adaptations in ab-initio nuclear physics calculations on multicore computer architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sosonkina, Masha

    Dynamic adaptations in ab-initio nuclear physics calculations on multicore computer architectures of an application. This is especially true in modern multi-user cluster environments where users can run many high-performance to the dynamically changing system conditions, to prevent drastic performance loss. In this paper, the parallel

  17. Stereo Matching and 3D Visualization for Gamma-Ray Cargo Inspection Zhigang Zhu*ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zhigang

    Stereo Matching and 3D Visualization for Gamma-Ray Cargo Inspection Zhigang Zhu*ab , Yu-Chi Hubc visualization issues are studied for a linear pushbroom stereo model built for 3D gamma-ray (or x-ray) cargo results are presented for real gamma-ray images of a 3D cargo container and the objects inside. The 3D

  18. Care and Feeding of mAb104 cells To thaw cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Kristen W.

    antibody stock). Also can add 0.1% sodium azide. (Discard cells that will be sick at this point). To Freeze. Spin down cells in sterile conical tubes. 5 min at 1 K. Aspirate supernatant. 3. Resuspend cells in 1Care and Feeding of mAb104 cells To thaw cells: 1. Thaw bullet quickly (in hand or water bath

  19. AB 758 COMPREHENSIVE ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR EXISTING RESIDENTIAL AND NONRESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Energy Efficiency in Existing Buildings (AB 549 Report), the Energy Commission made a series in California homes and small commercial buildings (estimated at close to 420,000 units in 2010) is 30 to 50 the resources necessary to enforce health and safety codes and energy efficiency standards because the revenue

  20. Using online simulation in Holonic Manufacturing Systems Olivier Cardin a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Using online simulation in Holonic Manufacturing Systems Olivier Cardin a,b , Pierre Castagna a) 228092025 ; Fax : +33 (0) 228092021 Abstract This paper deals with the use of online simulation on Holonic. In the PROSA reference architecture, staff holons were chosen to welcome the simulation models and the observer

  1. Distillation Absorption 2010 A.B. de Haan, H. Kooijman and A. Grak (Editors)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucia, Angelo

    .al. The focus of this study is the stripping column. Table 1 gives some typical design results for the strippingDistillation Absorption 2010 A.B. de Haan, H. Kooijman and A. Górak (Editors) All rights reserved by authors as per DA2010 copyright notice ENERGY EFFICIENT SYNTHESIS AND DESIGN FOR CARBON CAPTURE Angelo

  2. Distillation Absorption 2010 A.B. de Haan, H. Kooijman and A. Grak (Editors)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    is a viable option in present case. Keywords: Distillation, Energy saving, Dividing wall column, Thermal challenge is to design distillation systems that at the same time are sustainable and economically feasibleDistillation Absorption 2010 A.B. de Haan, H. Kooijman and A. Górak (Editors) All rights reserved

  3. LATTICE POLYMER AUTOMATA Steen RASMUSSEN a;b and Joshua R. SMITH b;c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Hugh

    LATTICE POLYMER AUTOMATA Steen RASMUSSEN a;b and Joshua R. SMITH b;c a TSA­DO/SA MS M997 and CNLS Pecos Trail Santa Fe, NM 87505 U.S.A. c Physics and Media Group MIT Media Laboratory, 20 Ames Street

  4. Ab Initio Studies of Vacancy-Defected Fullerenes and Single-Walled Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yan Alexander

    over the world have been attracted to the research field of fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. Such nanoAb Initio Studies of Vacancy-Defected Fullerenes and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes LEI VINCENT LIU,1 WEI QUAN TIAN,2 YAN ALEXANDER WANG1 1 Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia

  5. UdTU Assignment 4A+B -Case: DCAMM Ph.D. course "Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UdTU Assignment 4A+B - Case: DCAMM Ph.D. course "Wind Turbine Dynamics and Aeroelasticity" Morten+B - Case: DCAMM Ph.D. course "Wind Turbine Dynamics and Aeroelasticity" Department: Wind Energy Division and material 8 1.3.2 Assessment methods 10 1.3.3 Possible improvements 10 1.4 Pre-test of students 11 1

  6. Ab Initio Study of Phonon-Induced Dephasing of Electronic Excitations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ab Initio Study of Phonon-Induced Dephasing of Electronic Excitations in Narrow Graphene Vibrational dephasing of the lowest energy electronic excitations in the perfect (16,16) graphene nanoribbon discovery came in 2004 with the isolation of single sheets of graphite, or graphene, by mechanical

  7. Carbon monoxide-assisted growth of carbon nanotubes Y.H. Tang a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yufeng

    Carbon monoxide-assisted growth of carbon nanotubes Y.H. Tang a,b , Y.F. Zheng a , C.S. Lee a , N of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China b Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada N6A 5B7 Received 17 February 2001 Abstract Carbon monoxide

  8. Ab initio treatment of electron correlations in polymers: Lithium hydride chain and beryllium hydride polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkenheuer, Uwe

    Ab initio treatment of electron correlations in polymers: Lithium hydride chain and berylliumH and beryllium hydride Be2H4 . First, employing a Wannier-function-based approach, the systems are studiedH and the beryllium hydride polymer Be2H4 . As a simple, but due to its ionic character, non- trivial model polymer

  9. The sodium tail of the Moon M. Matta a,b,*, S. Smith a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendillo, Michael

    The sodium tail of the Moon M. Matta a,b,*, S. Smith a,1 , J. Baumgardner a,1 , J. Wilson a,1 , C was discovered soon after the 1998 Leonid meteor shower (Smith et al., 1999). On 19 November 1998, an all

  10. Diode Laser Welding of ABS: Experiments and Process Modelling , E.CICALA1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Diode Laser Welding of ABS: Experiments and Process Modelling M.ILIE1,3 , E.CICALA1,2 , D.GREVEY2 for Welding and Material Testing, 30, Mihai Viteazul Bv, 300222 Timisoara, Romania Abstract In the present.ilie@mec.upt.ro, milie@isim.ro Keywords: Laser welding; Semitransparent Polymers; Numerical simulation; Experimental

  11. Microfluidic capture and release of bacteria in a conical nanopore array Peng Guo,ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    Microfluidic capture and release of bacteria in a conical nanopore array Peng Guo,ab Eric W. Hall a microfluidic device. As an example, we demonstrate that cyanobacteria can be captured, one bacterium per pore, in a conical nanoporous membrane (CNM) integrated into a microfluidic chip. This study, to our knowledge

  12. Graphenesponges as high-performance low-cost anodes for microbial fuel Xing Xie,ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Graphene­sponges as high-performance low-cost anodes for microbial fuel cells Xing Xie,ab Guihua Yu February 2012 DOI: 10.1039/c2ee03583a A high-performance microbial fuel cell (MFC) anode was con- structed. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) harness the metabolism of exoelec- trogens, microorganisms that mediate

  13. Vegetation patterns along a rainfall gradient Ehud Meron a,b,*, Erez Gilad b,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meron, Ehud

    Hardenberg c , Moshe Shachak d , Yair Zarmi a,b a Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, BIDR author. Address: Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, BIDR, Ben-Gurion University, Sede in Africa, Australia, Asia and South America [5]. The bands may consist of trees, shrubs and perennial grass

  14. Ab-Initio Quantum Dynamics Calculation of Hydrogen Interaction with Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    hydrogen economy [7], infrastructures have to be built. Development of efficient processes for hydro- gen, from an economics point-of- view, the transition to an economy based on hydrogen (energy) couldAb-Initio Quantum Dynamics Calculation of Hydrogen Interaction with Surfaces --Exploiting

  15. Ab Initio Description of High-Temperature Superconductivity in Dense Molecular Hydrogen P. Cudazzo,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, E.K.U.

    Ab Initio Description of High-Temperature Superconductivity in Dense Molecular Hydrogen P. Cudazzo-principles study of the electron-phonon interaction and the prediction of the superconducting critical temperature superconductivity: mainly, a rich and complex Fermi surface and strongly coupled phonon modes driving the intra

  16. Ab initio studies of magnetic properties of cobalt and tetracobalt nitride Co4N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ab initio studies of magnetic properties of cobalt and tetracobalt nitride Co4N S. F. Matara) , A of perovskite structure Co4N nitride have been in- vestigated within density functional theory using both pseudo versus volume show that the ground state is ferromagnetic in both materials. HCP-Co is found to be more

  17. Augmenting CT Cardiac Roadmaps with Segmented Streaming Qi Duan a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augmenting CT Cardiac Roadmaps with Segmented Streaming Ultrasound Qi Duan a,b , Guy Shechter Static X-ray computed tomography (CT) volumes are often used as anatomic roadmaps during catheter. Augmenting these static CT roadmaps with segmented myocardial borders extracted from live ultrasound (US

  18. Visually-based temporal distortion in dyslexia Alan Johnston a,b,*, Aurelio Bruno a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Alan

    Visually-based temporal distortion in dyslexia Alan Johnston a,b,*, Aurelio Bruno a , Junji history: Received 11 March 2008 Received in revised form 18 April 2008 Keywords: Time Dyslexia evidence for anomalous cortico-thalamic circuits in dyslexia. Crown Copyright Ã? 2008 Published by Elsevier

  19. A self-powered electrochromic device driven by a nanogenerator Xiaohong Yang,ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    A self-powered electrochromic device driven by a nanogenerator Xiaohong Yang,ab Guang Zhu,a Sihong September 2012 DOI: 10.1039/c2ee23194h Electrochromic (EC) devices are capable of reversibly changing.3% was obtained, with electrochromic response time (ERT) and coloration efficiency (CE) of 10 seconds and 58.7 cm2

  20. Displaced helium and carbon in the Hawaiian plume Albrecht W. Hofmann a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farnetani, Cinzia G.

    Displaced helium and carbon in the Hawaiian plume Albrecht W. Hofmann a,b, , Cinzia G. Farnetani c 2011 Available online 1 November 2011 Editor: Y. Ricard Keywords: mantle plumes Hawaii helium vertically due to its low density and viscosity and is thus displaced from the plume center. Helium

  1. Dynamic cell behavior on shape memory polymer substrates Kevin A. Davis a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Dynamic cell behavior on shape memory polymer substrates Kevin A. Davis a,b , Kelly A. Burke b: Cell culture Shape memory Thermally responsive material Surface topography a b s t r a c t Cell culture-responsive cell culture system that uses shape memory polymer (SMP) substrates that are programmed to change

  2. The Rubber Hand Illusion: Two's a company, but three's a crowd A. Folegatti a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The Rubber Hand Illusion: Two's a company, but three's a crowd A. Folegatti a,b, , A. Farnè a o Article history: Received 24 May 2011 Available online xxxx Keywords: Rubber Hand Illusion, it is often assumed that the Rubber Hand Illusion (RHI) is constrained by a structural body model so that one

  3. A direct ab inifio dynamics approach for calculating thermal rate constants using variational transition state theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Thanh N.

    of a focusing technique to minimize the number of electronic structure calculations, while still preservingA direct ab inifio dynamics approach for calculating thermal rate constants using variational dynamics, " for calculations of thermal rate constants and related properties from first principles

  4. Endophytic fungi as biocontrol agents of Theobroma cacao pathogens Luis C. Mejia a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, A. Elizabeth

    Endophytic fungi as biocontrol agents of Theobroma cacao pathogens Luis C. Meji´a a,b , Enith I; accepted 18 January 2008 Available online 31 January 2008 Abstract Fungal endophytes isolated from healthy endophytic morphospecies, 40% (21/52), 65% (28/43) and 27% percent (4/15) showed in vitro antagonism against

  5. Anomaly detection in monitoring sensor data for preventive maintenance Julien Rabatel a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Anomaly detection in monitoring sensor data for preventive maintenance Julien Rabatel a,b, , Sandra Preventive maintenance a b s t r a c t Today, many industrial companies must face problems raised to make predictive maintenance to prevent a serious breakdown. In addition, the corrective maintenance

  6. Mechanism of alkane dehydrogenation catalyzed by acidic zeolites: Ab initio transition path sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dellago, Christoph

    The dehydrogenation of propane over acidic chabazite has been studied using ab initio density-functional simulations products, the underlying reaction kinetics can be studied by measuring the products distribution. A correct on dehydrogenation and cracking of alkanes including propane, n-butane, n-pentane, and n-hexane catalyzed by zeolites

  7. Intelligent Market-Making in Artificial Financial A.B. Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    Intelligent Market-Making in Artificial Financial Markets by Sanmay Das A.B. Computer Science Harvard College, 2001 Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Computer Science

  8. Optical properties of doped polycarbonate layers A.B. Djurisic a,*, W.L. Guo a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optical properties of doped polycarbonate layers A.B. Djurisic a,*, W.L. Guo a , E.H. Li a , L Abstract Optical properties of polycarbonate layers doped with triphenylamine and chlorotricarbonyl diimine or to enhance photogeneration. Doping polycarbonate (PC) with triphenylamine is known to enhance hole transport

  9. ECE 230A/B AP/EDM (Grad) MS Comprehensive Exam FA10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    ECE 230A/B ­ AP/EDM (Grad) MS Comprehensive Exam FA10 Problem 1 For the 1-D Ga (everything else unchanged). (d) Replace the Si base with a uniform SiGe base of bandgap 0.1 eV smaller than that of Si (everything else unchanged). #12;

  10. R. Jonk $ Department of Geology and Petro-leum Geology, University of Aberdeen, AB24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    Kingdom) and a geological con- sultant for various oil companies. His research focused primarilyAUTHORS R. Jonk $ Department of Geology and Petro- leum Geology, University of Aberdeen, AB24 3UE, Texas 77060; rene.jonk@exxonmobil.com Rene Jonk received his M.Sc. degree in structural geology from

  11. A review of recent advances in ab initio protein folding by the Folding@home project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A review of recent advances in ab initio protein folding by the Folding@home project William Ito molecular simulations of protein folding. Thanks to engineering innovations like a Graphical Processing Unit power, allowing it to simulate longer and more complex protein folding mechanisms than ever before

  12. A microfluidic microbial fuel cell fabricated by soft lithography Fang Qian a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A microfluidic microbial fuel cell fabricated by soft lithography Fang Qian a,b, , Zhen He c microfluidic microbial fuel cell (MFC) platform built by soft-lithography tech- niques. The MFC design includes a unique sub-5 lL polydimethylsiloxane soft chamber featuring carbon cloth electrodes and microfluidic

  13. Author's personal copy Failure of Ab(1-40) amyloid fibrils under tensile loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehler, Markus J.

    Author's personal copy Failure of Ab(1-40) amyloid fibrils under tensile loading Raffaella November 2010 Accepted 26 November 2010 Available online 6 February 2011 Keywords: Amyloid fibril Mechanical properties Failure Length scale Elasticity Nanomechanics a b s t r a c t Amyloid fibrils

  14. Advancing beyond current generation dye-sensitized solar cells Thomas W. Hamann,ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advancing beyond current generation dye-sensitized solar cells Thomas W. Hamann,ab Rebecca A The most efficient dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have had essentially the same configuration on the fabrication and character- ization of new architectures for dye-sensitized solar cells. He now holds

  15. Oxygen chemisorption on Au nanoparticles A. Franceschetti a,b,*, S.J. Pennycook b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Oxygen chemisorption on Au nanoparticles A. Franceschetti a,b,*, S.J. Pennycook b , S.T. Pantelides; in final form 11 March 2003 Abstract Oxygen molecules do not adsorb on flat gold surfaces at room temperature, but recent experimental results have demonstrated adsorption of oxygen on small, negatively

  16. Microfluidic arrays for logarithmically perfused embryonic stem cell Lily Kim,ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voldman, Joel

    Microfluidic arrays for logarithmically perfused embryonic stem cell culture Lily Kim,ab Michael D published as an Advance Article on the web 19th January 2006 DOI: 10.1039/b511718f We present a microfluidic there has been increasing interest in culturing cells in perfused microfluidic environments. In conventional

  17. Biogenic emissions from Citrus species in California Silvano Fares a,b,*, Drew R. Gentner c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Biogenic emissions from Citrus species in California Silvano Fares a,b,*, Drew R. Gentner c , Jeong May 2011 Accepted 26 May 2011 Keywords: BVOC emissions OVOC Terpene Basal emission rate Citrus a b such as the Central Valley of California. Moreover, the BVOC emissions from Citrus species have not been characterized

  18. Cyclic strain hardening of nanocrystalline nickel B. Moser a,b,*, T. Hanlon a,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suresh, Subra

    Cyclic strain hardening of nanocrystalline nickel B. Moser a,b,*, T. Hanlon a,c , K.S. Kumar d , S strain hardening and frequency-dependent fatigue life in electrodeposited nanocrystalline Ni subjected. All rights reserved. Keywords: Nanocrystalline materials; Nickel; Low cycle fatigue; Fracture; Cyclic

  19. The evolution of a disparity decision in human visual cortex Benoit R. Cottereau a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The evolution of a disparity decision in human visual cortex Benoit R. Cottereau a,b, , Justin M, France b CNRS, CerCo, Toulouse, France c School of Psychology and Neuroscience, St Mary's Quad, South, Building 01-420, Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e

  20. Ab initio screening of metal sorbents for elemental mercury capture in syngas streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    Ab initio screening of metal sorbents for elemental mercury capture in syngas streams Anubhav Jain to produce a combustible syngas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas. Power plants incorporating prior to combustion, i.e. in the pre-combustion syngas mixture rather than the flue gas; as such

  1. Free energy analysis of vesicle-to-bicelle transformation Wataru Shinoda,*ab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Steven O.

    Free energy analysis of vesicle-to-bicelle transformation Wataru Shinoda,*ab Takenobu Nakamuraab a series of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we evaluate the free energy profile for the transformation of a small vesicle to a disk-like structure called a bicelle. This free energy is found

  2. Modified epoxy coatings on mild steel: Tribology and surface energy Witold Brostow a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    Modified epoxy coatings on mild steel: Tribology and surface energy Witold Brostow a,b , Madhuri 30, 30 ­ 059 Cracow, Poland a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 19 December 2009 Received coatings Mild steel Dynamic friction Wear Surface energy a b s t r a c t A commercial epoxy diglycidylether

  3. Ab initio lattice dynamics and structural stability of MgO Artem R. Oganova)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oganov, Artem R.

    Ab initio lattice dynamics and structural stability of MgO Artem R. Oganova) Department of Earth GPa. The B2-structured phase is dynamically unstable below 110 GPa, but becomes dynamically stable-functional perturbation theory, we have studied lattice dynamics, dielectric and thermodynamic properties, and P

  4. Wild division algebras over Laurent series elds A.B. Zheglov 1 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wild division algebras over Laurent series #12;elds A.B. Zheglov 1 2 Abstract A decomposition theorem for wild division algebras over a Laurent series #12;eld with arbitrary residue #12;eld.1 Introduction In this paper we prove a decomposition theorem for wild division algebras over a Laurent series

  5. Ab initio prediction of GaN ,,1010... and ,,110... anomalous surface relaxation John E. Jaffe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandey, Ravi

    Ab initio prediction of GaN ,,101¯0... and ,,110... anomalous surface relaxation John E. Jaffe Received 22 September 1995 The results of a study of the surface relaxation of GaN in the framework is minimized the Ga-N surface bonds show a very small rotation angle of about 6° accompanied by a reduction

  6. Thermochemistry of Aluminum Species for Combustion Modeling from Ab Initio Molecular Orbital Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swihart, Mark T.

    Thermochemistry of Aluminum Species for Combustion Modeling from Ab Initio Molecular Orbital initio methods for computational thermochemistry have been applied to aluminum compounds expected to be present during combustion of aluminum particles. The computed enthalpies of formation at 298.15 K agree

  7. Water softening using microbial desalination cell technology Kristen S. Brastad a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    infrastructure such as pipes, water heaters, bath tubs, kitchen appliances, and sinks [3,4]. Water softeningWater softening using microbial desalination cell technology Kristen S. Brastad a,b , Zhen He a T S A microbial desalination cell (MDC) is used to soften the hard water. The MDC achieves more than 90% removal

  8. Multireference Ab Initio Study of the Ground and Low-Lying Excited States of Cr(CO)2 and Cr(CO)3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihee, Hyotcherl

    Multireference Ab Initio Study of the Ground and Low-Lying Excited States of Cr(CO)2 and Cr(CO)3 chromium carbonyls, Cr(CO)2 and Cr(CO)3, using multiconfigurational ab initio perturbation theory. Unlike of the ground states of Cr(CO)2 and Cr(CO)3. From multireference ab initio calculations considering the full

  9. Dynamic radioactive particle source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

  10. Hydrogen is a clean fuel. When used in fuel cells, the only byproducts are water and heat.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    outside seoul. · in the United states, the state of Ohio utility, First Energy, purchased a 1 MW, polymer's oil and gas supplies. · Fuel cells have more than double the energy-efficien- cy of internal can provide energy at all scales, ranging from micro power sources for small consumer devices to multi

  11. SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION -

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on Energy and Water Development U.S. House of Representatives The Honorable Lamar Alexander Ranking Member SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION - SEE FEDERAL ACQUISITION...

  12. SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION -

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    on Energy and Water Development U.S. House of Representatives The Honorable Lamar Alexander SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION - SEE FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (FAR)...

  13. SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION - SEE FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (FAR) 2.101 AND 3.104 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 (enter date here, centered revised template...

  14. Publications | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research at the APS. It is the official source for listing APS-related journal articles, conference proceedings and papers, dissertations, books, book chapters, technical reports,...

  15. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  16. Lithium ion sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Prabir K.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HIFAN 1866 Lithium ion sources by Prabir K. Roy, Wayne G.No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Lithium ion sources Prabir K. RoyUSA Abstract A 10.9 cm diameter lithium alumino-silicate ion

  17. Neutron sources and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, D.L. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rush, J.J. [ed.] [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

  18. Photonic crystal light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Bur, James A. (Corrales, NM)

    2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

  19. Piezotube borehole seismic source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daley, Tom M; Solbau, Ray D; Majer, Ernest L

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A piezoelectric borehole source capable of permanent or semipermanent insertion into a well for uninterrupted well operations is described. The source itself comprises a series of piezoelectric rings mounted to an insulative mandrel internally sized to fit over a section of well tubing, the rings encased in a protective housing and electrically connected to a power source. Providing an AC voltage to the rings will cause expansion and contraction sufficient to create a sonic pulse. The piezoelectric borehole source fits into a standard well, and allows for uninterrupted pass-through of production tubing, and other tubing and electrical cables. Testing using the source may be done at any time, even concurrent with well operations, during standard production.

  20. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, John B. (Lansing, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  1. Ab-initio Gorkov-Green's function calculations of open-shell nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Soma; C. Barbieri; T. Duguet

    2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from a new ab-initio method that uses the self-consistent Gorkov Green's function theory to address truly open-shell systems. The formalism has been recently worked out up to second order and is implemented here in nuclei for the first time on the basis of realistic nuclear forces. We find good convergence of the results with respect to the basis size in Ca44 and Ni74 and discuss quantities of experimental interest including ground-state energies, pairing gaps and particle addition/removal spectroscopy. These results demonstrate that the Gorkov method is a valid alternative to multireference approaches for tackling degenerate or near degenerate quantum systems. In particular, it increases the number of mid-mass nuclei accessible in an ab-initio fashion from a few tens to a few hundreds.

  2. Ab Initio Many-Body Calculations Of Nucleon-Nucleus Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaglioni, S; Navratil, P

    2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a new ab initio many-body approach capable of describing simultaneously both bound and scattering states in light nuclei, by combining the resonating-group method with the use of realistic interactions, and a microscopic and consistent description of the nucleon clusters. This approach preserves translational symmetry and Pauli principle. We outline technical details and present phase shift results for neutron scattering on {sup 3}H, {sup 4}He and {sup 10}Be and proton scattering on {sup 3,4}He, using realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials. Our A = 4 scattering results are compared to earlier ab initio calculations. We find that the CD-Bonn NN potential in particular provides an excellent description of nucleon-{sup 4}He S-wave phase shifts. We demonstrate that a proper treatment of the coupling to the n-{sup 10}Be continuum is successful in explaining the parity-inverted ground state in {sup 11}Be.

  3. Ab-initio molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water by Quantum Monte Carlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Zen; Ye Luo; Guglielmo Mazzola; Leonardo Guidoni; Sandro Sorella

    2015-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Although liquid water is ubiquitous in chemical reactions at roots of life and climate on the earth, the prediction of its properties by high-level ab initio molecular dynamics simulations still represents a formidable task for quantum chemistry. In this article we present a room temperature simulation of liquid water based on the potential energy surface obtained by a many-body wave function through quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. The simulated properties are in good agreement with recent neutron scattering and X-ray experiments, particularly concerning the position of the oxygen-oxygen peak in the radial distribution function, at variance of previous Density Functional Theory attempts. Given the excellent performances of QMC on large scale supercomputers, this work opens new perspectives for predictive and reliable ab-initio simulations of complex chemical systems.

  4. Ab initio electronic structure calculation of the redox potentials of bacteriochlorophyll and bacteriopheophytin in solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, L.Y.; Friesner, R.A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1995-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We have carried out self-consistent reaction field (SCRF) calculations on the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) and bacteriopheophytin (BPh) molecules at the Hartree-Fock level using the ab initio electronic structure code PSGVB together with an accurate numerical Poisson-Boltzmann solver. These are by far the largest ab initio SCRF computations carried out to date. We calculate redox potentials of these molecules in DMF solution for several geometries and compare the results with experiments of Fajer and co-workers. While the absolute redox energies are substantially in error, due to neglect of electron correlation, the relative redox energies agree qualitatively with the experimental findings. Treatment of solvation is crucial in predicting the proper ordering of the BChl and BPh redox energies. These results have implications for calculation of redox energies of the chromophores in the photosynthetic reaction center. 23 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Operator evolution for ab initio electric dipole transitions of 4He

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micah D. Schuster; Sofia Quaglioni; Calvin W. Johnson; Eric D. Jurgenson; Petr Navratil

    2015-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A goal of nuclear theory is to make quantitative predictions of low-energy nuclear observables starting from accurate microscopic internucleon forces. A major element of such an effort is applying unitary transformations to soften the nuclear Hamiltonian and hence accelerate the convergence of ab initio calculations as a function of the model space size. The consistent simultaneous transformation of external operators, however, has been overlooked in applications of the theory, particularly for nonscalar transitions. We study the evolution of the electric dipole operator in the framework of the similarity renormalization group method and apply the renormalized matrix elements to the calculation of the 4He total photoabsorption cross section and electric dipole polarizability. All observables are calculated within the ab initio no-core shell model. We find that, although seemingly small, the effects of evolved operators on the photoabsorption cross section are comparable in magnitude to the correction produced by including the chiral three-nucleon force and cannot be neglected.

  6. Ab-initio molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water by Quantum Monte Carlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Zen; Ye Luo; Guglielmo Mazzola; Leonardo Guidoni; Sandro Sorella

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite liquid water is ubiquitous in chemical reactions at roots of life and climate on earth, the prediction of its properties by high-level ab initio molecular dynamics simulations still represents a formidable task for quantum chemistry. In this article we present a room temperature simulation of liquid water based on the potential energy surface obtained by a many-body wave function through quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. The simulated properties are in excellent agreement with recent neutron scattering and X-ray experiments, particularly concerning the position of the oxygen-oxygen peak in the radial distribution function, at variance of previous Density Functional Theory attempts. Given the excellent performances of QMC on large scale supercomputers, this work opens new perspectives for predictive and reliable ab-initio simulations of complex chemical systems.

  7. Bridging a gap between continuum-QCD and ab initio predictions of hadron observables

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Binosi, Daniele; Chang, Lei; Papavassiliou, Joannis; Roberts, Craig D.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within contemporary hadron physics there are two common methods for determining the momentum- dependence of the interaction between quarks: the top-down approach, which works toward an ab initio computation of the interaction via direct analysis of the gauge-sector gap equations; and the bottom-up scheme, which aims to infer the interaction by fitting data within a well-defined truncation of those equations in the matter sector that are relevant to bound-state properties. We unite these two approaches by demonstrating that the renormalisation-group-invariant running-interaction predicted by contemporary analyses of QCD’s gauge sector coincides with that required in order to describe ground-state hadron observablesmore »using a nonperturbative truncation of QCD’s Dyson–Schwinger equations in the matter sector. This bridges a gap that had lain between nonperturbative continuum-QCD and the ab initio prediction of bound-state properties.« less

  8. Ab-initio calculation of the ${}^6Li$ binding energy with the Hybrid Multideterminant scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Puddu

    2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform an ab-initio calculation for the binding energy of ${}^6Li$ using the CD-Bonn 2000 NN potential renormalized with the Lee-Suzuki method. The many-body approach to the problem is the Hybrid Multideterminant method. The results indicate a binding energy of about $31 MeV$, within a few hundreds KeV uncertainty. The center of mass diagnostics are also discussed.

  9. Proceedings of Office of Surface Mining Coal Combustion By-product Government/Regulatory Panel: University of Kentucky international ash utilization symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vories, K.C. (ed.)

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Short papers are given on: the Coal Combustion Program (C2P2) (J. Glenn); regional environmental concerns with disposal of coal combustion wastes at mines (T. FitzGerald); power plant waste mine filling - an environmental perspective (L.G. Evans); utility industry perspective regarding coal combustion product management and regulation (J. Roewer); coal combustion products opportunities for beneficial use (D.C. Goss); state perspective on mine placement of coal combustion by-products (G.E. Conrad); Texas regulations provide for beneficial use of coal combustion ash (S.S. Ferguson); and the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act - a response to concerns about placement of CCBs at coal mine sites (K.C. Vories). The questions and answers are also included.

  10. COOL YOUNG STARS IN THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE: {beta} PICTORIS AND AB DORADUS MOVING GROUP CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlieder, Joshua E.; Simon, Michal [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Lepine, Sebastien, E-mail: michal.simon@stonybrook.edu, E-mail: schlieder@mpia-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: lepine@amnh.org [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of our continuing effort to identify new, low-mass members of nearby, young moving groups (NYMGs), we present a list of young, low-mass candidates in the northern hemisphere. We used our proven proper-motion selection procedure and ROSAT X-ray and GALEX-UV activity indicators to identify 204 young stars as candidate members of the {beta} Pictoris and AB Doradus NYMGs. Definitive membership assignment of a given candidate will require a measurement of its radial velocity and distance. We present a simple system of indices to characterize the young candidates and help prioritize follow-up observations. New group members identified in this candidate list will be high priority targets for (1) exoplanet direct imaging searches, (2) the study of post-T-Tauri astrophysics, (3) understanding recent local star formation, and (4) the study of local galactic kinematics. Information available now allows us to identify eight likely new members in the list. Two of these, a late-K and an early-M dwarf, we find to be likely members of the {beta} Pic group. The other six stars are likely members of the AB Dor moving group. These include an M dwarf triple system, and three very cool objects that may be young brown dwarfs, making them the lowest-mass, isolated objects proposed in the AB Dor moving group to date.

  11. LIKELY MEMBERS OF THE {beta} PICTORIS AND AB DORADUS MOVING GROUPS IN THE NORTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlieder, Joshua E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lepine, Sebastien [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Simon, Michal, E-mail: schlieder@mpia-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: michal.simon@stonybrook.edu, E-mail: lepine@amnh.org [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first results from follow-up of targets in the northern hemisphere {beta} Pictoris and AB Doradus moving group candidate list of Schlieder et al. We obtained high-resolution, near-infrared spectra of 27 candidate members to measure their radial velocities and confirm consistent group kinematics. We identify 15 candidates with consistent predicted and measured radial velocities, perform analyses of their six-dimensional (UVWXYZ) Galactic kinematics, and compare to known group member distributions. Based on these analyses, we propose that seven {beta} Pic and eight AB Dor candidates are likely new group members. Four of the likely new {beta} Pic stars are binaries, one a double-lined spectroscopic system. Three of the proposed AB Dor stars are binaries. Counting all binary components, we propose 22 likely members of these young, moving groups. The majority of the proposed members are M2 to M5 dwarfs, the earliest being of type K2. We also present preliminary parameters for the two new spectroscopic binaries identified in the data, the proposed {beta} Pic member and a rejected {beta} Pic candidate. Our candidate selection and follow-up has thus far identified more than 40 low-mass, likely members of these two moving groups. These stars provide a new sample of nearby, young targets for studies of local star formation, disks and exoplanets via direct imaging, and astrophysics in the low-mass regime.

  12. Accelerating ab initio path integral molecular dynamics with multilevel sampling of potential surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua Y. Geng

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A multilevel approach to sample the potential energy surface in a path integral formalism is proposed. The purpose is to reduce the required number of ab initio evaluations of energy and forces in ab initio path integral molecular dynamics (AI-PIMD) simulation, without compromising the overall accuracy. To validate the method, the internal energy and free energy of an Einstein crystal are calculated and compared with the analytical solutions. As a preliminary application, we assess the performance of the method in a realistic model, the FCC phase of dense atomic hydrogen, in which the calculated result shows that the acceleration rate is about 3 to 4 fold for a two-level implementation, and can be increased to 10 times if extrapolation is used. With only 16 beads used for the ab initio potential sampling, this method gives a well converged internal energy. The residual error in pressure is just about 3 GPa, whereas it is about 20 GPa for a plain AI-PIMD calculation with the same number of beads. The vibrational free energy of the FCC phase of dense hydrogen at 300 K is also calculated with an AI-PIMD thermodynamic integration method, which gives a result of about 0.51 eV/proton at a density of $r_{s}=0.912$.

  13. Microfabricated diffusion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oborny, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

  14. Data:853095d3-77db-4317-95ab-2d1611b26079 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ab-2d1611b26079 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information...

  15. Ab initio investigation of phase stability of Y2Ti2O7 and Y2Zr2O7...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the defect-cotunnite state under high pressure. Citation: Xiao HY, F Gao, and WJ Weber.2009."Ab initio investigation of phase stability of Y2Ti2O7 and Y2Zr2O7 under high...

  16. Spectroscopic and ab initio studies on the conformations and vibrational spectra of selected cyclic and bicyclic molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A. H.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure, potential energy functions and vibrational spectra of several cyclic and bicyclic molecules have been investigated using several spectroscopic techniques and high-level ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Laser...

  17. A multi-scale analysis of the crystallization of amorphous germanium telluride using ab initio simulations and classical crystallization theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anantram, M. P.

    simulations and classical crystallization theory Jie Liu, Xu Xu, Lucien Brush, and M. P. Anantram Citation telluride using ab initio simulations and classical crystallization theory Jie Liu,1 Xu Xu,1 Lucien Brush,2

  18. AB 811 enables you to tailor a program that makes sense for your community and constituents. You determine the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Fellow Local Government Officials: Imagine a program that: Helps your residents and businesses cut and Highways Code to include "energy improve- ments" on private property as public benefits. Through AB 811

  19. Integrin 3 regions controlling binding of murine mAb 7E3: Implications for the mechanism of integrin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Springer, Timothy A.

    Ab 7E3, protects against ischemic complications of percutaneous coronary interventions by inhibiting the ischemic complications associated with percutaneous coronary interventions (6). Previous studies of 7E3

  20. The influence of terrestrial processes on meteorite magnetic records Tomas Kohout a,b,*, Gunther Kletetschka b,c,d

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kletetschka, Gunther

    The influence of terrestrial processes on meteorite magnetic records Tomas Kohout a,b,*, Gunther-mail address: kohout@natur.cuni.cz (T. Kohout). URL: http://www.volny.cz/tomkohout/meteo/. www

  1. Exploring kinetics and thermodynamics in fast-ion conductors and hydrogen-storage materials using ab-initio molecular dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Brandon C. (Brandon Christopher)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the interplay between various kinetic processes and thermodynamic factors in three materials--silver iodide (AgI), cesium hydrogen sulfate (CsHSO4), and sodium alanate (NaAlH4)-using ab-initio molecular ...

  2. A reservoir engineering and economic evaluation of waterflood infill drilling in the Johnson J.L. "AB" unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yadavalli, Sameer Kumar

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A RESERVOIR ENGINEERING AND ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF WATERFLOOD INFILL DRILLING IN THE JOHNSON J. L. "AB" UNIT A Thesis by SAMEER KUMAR YADA VALLI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A RESERVOIR ENGINEERING AND ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF WATERFLOOD INFILL DRILLING IN THE JOHNSON J. L. "AB" UNIT A Thesis by SAMEER KUMAR YADAVALLI Approved...

  3. ION SOURCES FOR CYCLOTRONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These utilize lasers, plasma focus, sparks, and ex­ plodingextractor voltage A plasma focus device has been used byf n a s Fig. 22: The plasma focus high charge state source

  4. A surface ionization source 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzatu, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main part of the work described herein is the development and testing of a surface ionization source for use on a collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy apparatus. A description of the previously existing fast beam apparatus is given...

  5. A surface ionization source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzatu, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main part of the work described herein is the development and testing of a surface ionization source for use on a collinear fast beam laser spectroscopy apparatus. A description of the previously existing fast beam apparatus is given...

  6. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviole

  7. Galactic Superluminal Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. A. Harmon

    1998-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of X-ray sources was clearly established with the discovery of highly relativistic radio jets from the galactic sources GRS 1915+105 and GRO J1655-40. Both of these objects have given us a broader view of black holes and the formation of jets, yet they also show the complexity of the accretion environment near relativistic objects. The fast apparent motion of the jets, their luminosity and variability, their high energy spectrum, and approximate scaling to the behavior of active galactic nuclei, certainly warrant the description "microquasar". I present a review of the observational data on these sources, and discuss where we stand on a physical picture of GRS 1915+105 and GRO J1655-40 as taken from multi-wavelength studies. I also point out other galactic sources which share some of the properties of the microquasars, and what to look for as a high energy "signature" in future observations.

  8. Computerized Energy Information Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, D.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many computerized files of energy- and energy conservation-related information are currently available through commercial and governmental sources such as Lockheed Information Systems, System Development Corporation, and DOE/RECON. Private...

  9. Magnetron sputtering source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, WA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA); Grabner, R. Fred (Brentwood, CA); Ramsey, Philip B. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal.

  10. Magnetron sputtering source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.; Grabner, R.F.; Ramsey, P.B.

    1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal. 12 figs.

  11. Field emission electron source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  12. National Synchrotron Light Source

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    BNL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tour of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), hosted by Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, Stephen Dierker. The NSLS is one of the world's most widely used scientific research facilities, hosting more than 2,500 guest researchers each year. The NSLS provides intense beams of infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray light for basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, medicine, geophysics, environmental, and materials sciences.

  13. Unexpected effects of gene deletion on mercury interactions with the methylation-deficient mutant hgcAB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Hui [ORNL] [ORNL; Hurt, Jr., Richard Ashley [ORNL; Johs, Alexander [ORNL] [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL] [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL] [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL] [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL] [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hgcA and hgcB gene pair is essential for mercury (Hg) methylation by certain anaerobic bacteria,1 but little is known about how deletion of hgcAB affects cell surface interactions and intracellular uptake of Hg. Here, we compare hgcAB mutants with the wild-type (WT) strains of both Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 and observe differences in Hg redox transformations, adsorption, and uptake in laboratory incubation studies. In both strains, deletion of hgcAB increased the reduction of Hg(II) but decreased the oxidation of Hg(0) under anaerobic conditions. The measured cellular thiol content in hgcAB mutants was lower than the WT, accounting for decreased adsorption and uptake of Hg. Despite the lack of methylation activity, Hg uptake by the hgcAB continued, albeit at a slower rate than the WT. These findings demonstrate that deletion of the hgcAB gene not only eliminates Hg methylation but also alters cell physiology, resulting in changes to Hg redox reactions, sorption, and uptake by cells.

  14. OUTLINE OF DATA SOURCES, MAY 1933 LANDAREAS OCEAN AREAS SOURCES OF DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : French North Africa ERYP~ Libya Rio de Oro and Cape Juby Asia: China India and Burma Indo China A,B B

  15. Data:8e135e2e-69ab-4c77-92ea-c3949d02ab26 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    customers where the customer has installed and in regular use approved electric space heating and cooling equipment of 100 percent of the home's space heating and cooling. Source...

  16. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  17. COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Nancy J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rasmussen, R.A. (1976). Combustion as a source of nitrousx control for stationary combustion sources. Prog. Energy,CA, March 3-4, 1977 COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

  18. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mofjeld, and A.J. Venturato, Puget Sound Tsunami Sources -Pub. Co. , 2006, pp 205-217 Puget Sound Tsunami Sources -Military Dept. , 2002, 25 pp Puget Sound Tsunami Sources -

  19. Dual source heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX); Pietsch, Joseph A. (Dallas, TX)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

  20. INEEL Source Water Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehlke, Gerald

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 mi2 and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL’s drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey’s Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a thick vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL’s Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL’s 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-I, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEEL’s public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

  1. OLED area illumination source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foust, Donald Franklin (Scotia, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Nealon, William Francis (Gloversville, NY); Bortscheller, Jacob Charles (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

  2. Data:7f3bcced-77bc-437b-a02a-b2a712ab561b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lines, for outdoor lighting. Source or reference: https:docs.google.comviewer?av&pidsites&srcidcnJ2cmVhLmNvbXxycnZyZWF8Z3g6NWNiMWFkNmUyNzRkODFh Source Parent: http:...

  3. Ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of silicon nanocrystals doped with shallow donors (Li, P)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurova, N. V., E-mail: kurova_natasha@mail.ru; Burdov, V. A. [Lobachevskii Nizhni Novgorod State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of Si nanocrystals doped with shallow donors (Li, P) are reported. It is shown that phosphorus introduces much more significant distortions into the electronic structure of the nanocrystal than lithium, which is due to the stronger central cell potential of the phosphorus ion. It is found that the Li-induced splitting of the ground state in the conduction band of the nanocrystal into the singlet, doublet, and triplet retains its inverse structure typical for bulk silicon.

  4. An ab initio molecular orbital study of metal nitrosyl bond angles in iron complexes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawkins, Tommy Wayne

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the berding process. Negligible transfer of charge, as determined by total charge population, between sntal and ligsnd is observed as in the (FeN0) case. The cyanide ligands appear to equally share a de- 6 ficit of about one charge unit. At the linear Fe...I An ab initio molecular orbital study of the series [Fe(NO)CN)4] (N = 1, 2, 3) and [Fe(NO)Z(CN)ZN)] is made with emphasis on the effect of iron nitrosyl bond angle on electronic structure. In the [FeNO} 6 1- case, [Fe(NO)(CN)4] , there is a potential...

  5. Continuous measurement of blast furnace burden profile at SSAB Tunnplat AB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virtala, J.; Edberg, N.; Hallin, M. (SSAB Tunnplat AB, Lulea (Sweden). Ironmaking Division)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique profile meter system is installed on Blast Furnace No. 2 in SSAB - Swedish Steel AB, Lulea, Sweden. This system measures the charge material burden profile across the furnace top diameter before and after each charge. The system generates real-time data, which is graphically presented by the system on a monitor and includes burden descent speed, layer thickness of the coke and ore (corrected for descent), ore to coke ratio, and burden skewing. The system is described along with operational results.

  6. Ab initio studies of ionization potentials of hydrated hydroxide and hydronium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles W. Swartz; Xifan Wu

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The ionization potential distributions of hydrated hydroxide and hydronium are computed with many-body approach for electron excitations with configurations generated by {\\it ab initio} molecular dynamics. The experimental features are well reproduced and found to be closely related to the molecular excitations. In the stable configurations, the ionization potential is mainly perturbed by water molecules within the first solvation shell. On the other hand, electron excitation is delocalized on both proton receiving and donating complex during proton transfer, which shifts the excitation energies and broadens the spectra for both hydrated ions.

  7. An ab initio molecular orbital study of metal nitrosyl bond angles in iron complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawkins, Tommy Wayne

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I An ab initio molecular orbital study of the series [Fe(NO)CN)4] (N = 1, 2, 3) and [Fe(NO)Z(CN)ZN)] is made with emphasis on the effect of iron nitrosyl bond angle on electronic structure. In the [FeNO} 6 1- case, [Fe(NO)(CN)4] , there is a potential... barrier to bending of the nitrosyl which is consistent with existing models of transition metal 7 2- nitrosyl bonding. The [FeNO} complex, [Fe(NO) (CN)4] shows no sigrdficant barrier to moderate nitrosyl bending (up to an Fe-N-0 angle of 130 '), while...

  8. Hydrogen Funding and the AB 118 Investment Plan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D e e&Funding and the AB 118 Investment

  9. Residues from coal conversion and utilization: Advanced mineralogical characterization and disposed byproduct diagenesis. [Semiannual report, 1 Mar 1999--31 Aug 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory J. McCarthy; Dean G. Grier

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the project is to learn more about the phenomenon of coal conversion byproduct (CCB) diagenesis, first described by this group and co-workers at UND EERC seven years ago. CCB diagenesis is a change in the mineralogy that occurs after some CCBs are disposed in a landfill or utilized for a civil engineering application. Regulatory environmental tests and civil engineering tests are typically performed on as-generated CCBs, or on CCBs hydrated and cured for relatively short periods such as 7 or 28 days. One would like to know whether the results of these short-term tests will be valid years later. A change in mineralogy means a gain, loss or chemical redistribution of major, minor and trace elements, and alteration of physical properties. To attain this goal, two objectives were defined: (1) to develop improved methodology for quantitating mineralogy of these complex crystalline phase assemblages, and (2) to investigate the phenomenon of CCB diagenesis further by studying materials recovered from disposal landfills or civil engineering works. Objective 1--Hydrated CCBs are chemically and mineralogically complex, which makes quantitative mineralogy determination by conventional X-ray diffraction unusable or unreliable. The whole-pattern Rietveld quantitative X-ray diffraction (RQXRD) method, however, can overcome many of the problems and seems well suited to improve reliability. Two tasks were defined in the proposal: Task 1--Completion by October 1997. Prepare a reference set of CCBs for use in developing Rietveld QXRD. The reference materials will come primarily from in-house samples of advanced coal technology byproducts. The work will include SEM/EMPA characterization at UND EERC. Task 2--Completion by October 1997. Develop protocols for Rietveld QXRD analysis of CCBs. Make CCB structure data and protocols available on a Website. Determine levels of sensitivity, precision, and accuracy. Objective 2--Five types of CCBs disposed in landfills were studied between 1989 and 1994. Diagenesis was observed in three of the five materials. To obtain a more generic understanding of CCB diagenesis, additional materials and different environmental settings need to be studied. Task 3--Completion by end of project. Apply RQXRD protocols developed in Task 2 to core samples of utilized or disposed CCBs from at least five additional sites. Use results to gain a better understanding of CCB diagenesis.

  10. Residues from coal conversion and utilization: Advanced mineralogical characterization and disposed byproduct diagenesis. [Semiannual report, 1 Sep 1998--28 Feb 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory J. McCarthy; Dean G. Grier

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the project is to learn more about the phenomenon of coal conversion byproduct (CCB) diagenesis, first described by the group and co-workers at UND EERC seven years ago. CCB diagenesis is a change in the mineralogy that occurs after some CCBs are disposed in a landfill or utilized for a civil engineering application. Regulatory environmental tests and civil engineering tests are typically performed on as-generated CCBs, or on CCBs hydrated and cured for relatively short periods such as 7 or 28 days. One would like to know whether the results of these short-term tests will be valid years later. A change in mineralogy means a gain, loss or chemical redistribution of major, minor and trace elements, and alteration of physical properties. To attain this goal, two objectives were defined: (1) to develop improved methodology for quantitating mineralogy of these complex crystalline phase assemblages, and (2) to investigate the phenomenon of CCB diagenesis further by studying materials recovered from disposal landfills or civil engineering works. Objective 1--Hydrated CCBs are chemically and mineralogically complex, which makes quantitative mineralogy determination by conventional X-ray diffraction unusable or unreliable. The whole-pattern Rietveld quantitative X-ray diffraction (RQXRD) method, however, can overcome many of the problems and seems well suited to improve reliability. Two tasks were defined in the proposal: Task 1--Completion by October 1997. Prepare a reference set of CCBs for use in developing Rietveld QXRD. The reference materials will come primarily from in-house samples of advanced coal technology byproducts. The work will include SEM/EMPA characterization at UND EERC. Task 2--Completion by October 1997. Develop protocols for Rietveld QXRD analysis of CCBs. Make CCB structure data and protocols available on a Website. Determine levels of sensitivity, precision, and accuracy. Objective 2--Five types of CCBs disposed in landfills were studied between 1989 and 1994. Diagenesis was observed in three of the five materials. To obtain a more generic understanding of CCB diagenesis, additional materials and different environmental settings need to be studied. Task 3--Completion by end of project. Apply RQXRD protocols developed in Task 2 to core samples of utilized or disposed CCBs from at least five additional sites. Use results to gain a better understanding of CCB diagenesis.

  11. Oil palm vegetation liquor: a new source of phenolic bioactives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sambandan, T. G.

    Waste from agricultural products represents a disposal liability, which needs to be addressed. Palm oil is the most widely traded edible oil globally, and its production generates 85 million tons of aqueous by-products ...

  12. Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1991-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) interim policy and to provide guidance for sealed radioactive source accountability. The directive does not cancel any directives. Extended by DOE N 5400.10 to 12-24-93 & Extended by DOE N 5400.12 to 12-24-94.

  13. Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1994-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This Notice extends DOE N 5400.9, Sealed Radioactive Source Accountability, of 12-24-91, until 12-24-95, unless sooner superseded or rescinded. The contents of DOE N 5400.9 will be updated and incorporated in the revised DOE O 5480.11, Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers.

  14. Funding Source Agricultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Funding Source General Research Agricultural Experiment Station Instruction Public Service,145,610$ 3,716,162DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE $ 1,799,873 $ 8,322,303 $ 30,128,910 $ 0$ 85,000$ 2,127 $ 0$ 4,920,977$ 0US DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE / HATCH $ 0 $ 0 $ 4,920,977 $ 15,348,823FOUNDATION

  15. Selective ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P{sup +} from PH{sub 3}. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P{sup +}, As{sup +}, and B{sup +} without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices. 6 figs.

  16. Selective ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P.sup.+ from PH.sub.3. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P.sup.+, AS.sup.+, and B.sup.+ without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices.

  17. Detecting Illicit Radioactive Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, Joseph C.; Coursey, Bert; Carter, Michael

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Specialized instruments have been developed to detect the presence of illicit radioactive sources that may be used by terrorists in radiation dispersal devices, so-called ''dirty bombs'' or improvised nuclear devices. This article discusses developments in devices to detect and measure radiation.

  18. Low-altitude remote sensing dataset of DEM and RGB mosaic for AB corridor on July 13 2013 and L2 corridor on July 21 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Baptiste Dafflon

    Low-altitude remote sensing dataset including DEM and RGB mosaic for AB (July 13 2013) and L2 corridor (July 21 2013)

  19. $^4{\\rm He}$+$n$+$n$ continuum within an ab initio framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolina Romero-Redondo; Sofia Quaglioni; Petr Navrátil; Guillaume Hupin

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The low-lying continuum spectrum of the $^6{\\rm He}$ nucleus is investigated for the first time within an ab initio framework that encompasses the $^4{\\rm He}$+$n$+$n$ three-cluster dynamics characterizing its lowest decay channel. This is achieved through an extension of the no-core-shell model combined with the resonating-group method, in which energy-independent non-local interactions among three nuclear fragments can be calculated microscopically starting from realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions and consistent ab initio many-body wave functions of the clusters. The three-cluster Schr\\"odinger equation is solved with three-body scattering boundary conditions by means of the hyperspherical-harmonic method on a Lagrange mesh. Using a soft similarity-renormalization-group evolved chiral nucleon-nucleon potential, we find the known $J^\\pi = 2^+$ resonance as well as a result consistent with a new low-lying second $2^+$ resonance recently observed at GANIL at $2.6$ MeV above the $^6$He ground state. We also find resonances in the $2^-$, $1^+$ and $0^-$ channels, while no low-lying resonances are present in the $0^+$ and $1^-$ channels.

  20. SN 2013ab : A normal type IIP supernova in NGC 5669

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bose, Subhash; Misra, Kuntal; Pumo, Maria Letizia; Zampieri, Luca; Sand, David; Kumar, Brijesh; Pastorello, Andrea; Sutaria, Firoza; Maccarone, Thomas J; Kumar, Brajesh; Graham, M L; Howell, D Andy; Ochner, Paolo; Chandola, H C; Pandey, Shashi B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present densely-sampled ultraviolet/optical photometric and low-resolution optical spectroscopic observations of the type IIP supernova 2013ab in the nearby ($\\sim$24 Mpc) galaxy NGC 5669, from 2 to 190d after explosion. Continuous photometric observations, with the cadence of typically a day to one week, were acquired with the 1-2m class telescopes in the LCOGT network, ARIES telescopes in India and various other telescopes around the globe. The light curve and spectra suggest that the SN is a normal type IIP event with a plateau duration of $ \\sim80 $ days with mid plateau absolute visual magnitude of -16.7, although with a steeper decline during the plateau (0.92 mag 100 d$ ^{-1} $ in $ V $ band) relative to other archetypal SNe of similar brightness. The velocity profile of SN 2013ab shows striking resemblance with those of SNe 1999em and 2012aw. Following the Rabinak & Waxman (2011) prescription, the initial temperature evolution of the SN emission allows us to estimate the progenitor radius to be...

  1. Embedding parameters in ab initio theory to develop approximations based on molecular similarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanha, Matteus; Kaul, Shiva; Cappiello, Alexander; Gordon, Geoffrey J; Yaron, David J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A means to take advantage of molecular similarity to lower the computational cost of electronic structure theory is explored, in which parameters are embedded into a low-cost, low-level (LL) ab initio model and adjusted to obtain agreement with results from a higher-level (HL) ab initio model. A parametrized LL (pLL) model is created by multiplying selected matrix elements of the Hamiltonian operators by scaling factors that depend on element types. Various schemes for applying the scaling factors are compared, along with the impact of making the scaling factors linear functions of variables related to bond lengths, atomic charges, and bond orders. The models are trained on ethane and ethylene, substituted with -NH2, -OH and -F, and tested on substituted propane, propylene and t-butane. Training and test datasets are created by distorting the molecular geometries and applying uniform electric fields. The fitted properties include changes in total energy arising from geometric distortions or applied fields, an...

  2. Embedding parameters in ab initio theory to develop well-controlled approximations based on molecular similarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanha, Matteus; Cappiello, Alex; Gordon, Geoffrey J; Yaron, David J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A means to take advantage of molecular similarity to lower the computational cost of electronic structure theory is proposed, in which parameters are embedded into a low-cost, low-level (LL) ab initio theory and adjusted to obtain agreement with a higher level (HL) ab initio theory. This approach is explored by training such a model on data for ethane and testing the resulting model on methane, propane and butane. The electronic distribution of the molecules is varied by placing them in strong electrostatic environments consisting of random charges placed on the corners of a cube. The results find that parameters embedded in HF/STO-3G theory can be adjusted to obtain agreement, to within about 2 kcal/mol, with results of HF/6-31G theory. Obtaining this level of agreement requires the use of parameters that are functions of the bond lengths, atomic charges, and bond orders within the molecules. The argument is made that this approach provides a well-controlled means to take advantage of molecular similarity in...

  3. ACID EVAPORATION OF ULTIMA GOLD TM AB LIQUID SCINTILLATION COCKTAIL RESIDUE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyser, E.; Fondeur, F.; Crump, S.

    2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior analyses of samples from the F/H Lab solutions showed the presence of diisopropylnapthalene (DIN), a major component of Ultima Gold{trademark} AB liquid scintillation cocktail (LSC). These solutions are processed through H-Canyon Tank 10.5 and ultimately through the 17.8E evaporator. Similar solutions originated in SRNL streams sent to the same H Canyon tanks. This study examined whether the presence of these organics poses a process-significant hazard for the evaporator. Evaporation and calorimetry testing of surrogate samples containing 2000 ppm of Ultima Gold{trademark} AB LSC in 8 M nitric acid have been completed. These experiments showed that although reactions between nitric acid and the organic components do occur, they do not appear to pose a significant hazard for runaway reactions or generation of energetic compounds in canyon evaporators. The amount of off-gas generated was relatively modest and appeared to be well within the venting capacity of the H-Canyon evaporators. A significant fraction of the organic components likely survives the evaporation process primarily as non-volatile components that are not expected to represent any new process concerns during downstream operations such as neutralization. Laboratory Waste solutions containing minor amounts of DIN can be safely received, stored, transferred, and processed through the canyon waste evaporator.

  4. Deviational simulation of phonon transport in graphene ribbons with ab initio scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landon, Colin D.; Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a deviational Monte Carlo method for solving the Boltzmann-Peierls equation with ab initio 3-phonon scattering, for temporally and spatially dependent thermal transport problems in arbitrary geometries. Phonon dispersion relations and transition rates for graphene are obtained from density functional theory calculations. The ab initio scattering operator is simulated by an energy-conserving stochastic algorithm embedded within a deviational, low-variance Monte Carlo formulation. The deviational formulation ensures that simulations are computationally feasible for arbitrarily small temperature differences, while the stochastic treatment of the scattering operator is both efficient and exhibits no timestep error. The proposed method, in which geometry and phonon-boundary scattering are explicitly treated, is extensively validated by comparison to analytical results, previous numerical solutions and experiments. It is subsequently used to generate solutions for heat transport in graphene ribbons of various geometries and evaluate the validity of some common approximations found in the literature. Our results show that modeling transport in long ribbons of finite width using the homogeneous Boltzmann equation and approximating phonon-boundary scattering using an additional homogeneous scattering rate introduces an error on the order of 10% at room temperature, with the maximum deviation reaching 30% in the middle of the transition regime.

  5. Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of SO{sub 2} to elemental sulfur. First quarterly technical progress report, [October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benedek, K. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation will be conducting Phase I of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. this catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria or zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an ongoing DOE-sponsored University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicates that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. the performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams.

  6. High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines - Phase I: Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project proposes to use pneumatically or hydraulically emplaced dry-flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products to backfill the adits left by highwall mining. Backfilling highwall mine adits with dry-FGD materials is technically attractive. The use of an active highwall mine would allow the dry-FGD material to be brought in using the same transportation network used to move the coal out, eliminating the need to recreated the transportation infrastructure, thereby saving costs. Activities during the period included the negotiations leading to the final cooperative agreement for the project and the implementation of the necessary instruments at the University of Kentucky to administer the project. Early in the negotiations, a final agreement on a task structure was reached and a milestone plan was filed. A review was initiated of the original laboratory plan as presented in the proposal, and tentative modifications were developed. Selection of a mine site was made early; the Pleasant Valley mine in Greenup County was chosen. Several visits were made to the mine site to begin work on the hydrologic monitoring plan. The investigation of the types of permits needed to conduct the project was initiated. Considerations concerning the acceptance and implementation of technologies led to the choice of circulating fluidized bed ash as the primary material for the study. Finally, the membership of a Technical Advisory Committee for the study was assembled.

  7. DISCOVERY OF A YOUNG L DWARF BINARY, SDSS J224953.47+004404.6AB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allers, K. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837 (United States); Liu, Michael C.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Cushing, Michael C., E-mail: k.allers@bucknell.ed [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report discovery of a young 0.''32 L dwarf binary, SDSS J2249+0044AB, found as the result of a Keck laser guide star adaptive optics imaging survey of young field brown dwarfs. Weak K I, Na I, and FeH features as well as strong VO absorption in the integrated-light J-band spectrum indicate a low surface gravity and hence young age for the system. From spatially resolved K-band spectra we determine spectral types of L3 {+-} 0.5 and L5 {+-} 1 for components A and B, respectively. SDSS J2249+0044A is spectrally very similar to G196-3B, an L3 companion to a young M2.5 field dwarf. Thus, we adopt 100 Myr (the age estimate of the G196-3 system) as the age of SDSS J2249+0044AB, but ages of 12-790 Myr are possible. By comparing our photometry to the absolute magnitudes of G196-3B, we estimate a distance to SDSS J2249+0044AB of 54 {+-} 16 pc and infer a projected separation of 17 {+-} 5 AU for the binary. Comparison of the luminosities to evolutionary models at an age of 100 Myr yields masses of 0.029 {+-} 0.006 and 0.022{sup +0.006}{sub -0.009} M{sub sun} for SDSS J2249+0044A and B, respectively. Over the possible ages of the system (12-790 Myr), the mass of SDSS J2249+0044A could range from 0.011 to 0.070 M{sub sun} and the mass of SDSS J2249+0044B could range from 0.009 to 0.065 M{sub sun}. Evolutionary models predict that either component could be burning deuterium, which could result in a mass ratio as low as 0.4, or alternatively, a reversal in the luminosities of the binary. We find a likely proper motion companion, GSC 00568-01752, which lies 48.''9 away (a projected separation of 2600 AU) and has Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Two Micron All Sky Survey colors consistent with an early M dwarf. We calculate a photometric distance to GSC 00568-01752 of 53 {+-} 15 pc, in good agreement with our distance estimate for SDSS J2249+0044AB. The space motion of SDSS J2249+0044AB shows no obvious coincidence with known young moving groups, though radial velocity and parallax measurements are necessary to refine our analysis. The unusually red near-IR colors, young age, and low masses of the binary make it an important template for studying planetary-mass objects found by direct imaging surveys.

  8. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  9. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Larson, Ronald A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Goodrich, Lorenzo D. (Shelley, ID); Hall, Harold J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stoddard, Billy D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Davis, Sean G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kaser, Timothy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Conrad, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

  10. The Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, A.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national user facility currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), is a third-generation synchrotron light source designed to produce extremely bright beams of synchrotron radiation in the energy range from a few eV to 10 keV. The design is based on a 1--1.9-GeV electron storage ring (optimized at 1.5 GeV), and utilizes special magnets, known as undulators and wigglers (collectively referred to as insertion devices), to generate the radiation. The facility is scheduled to begin operating in April 1993. In this paper we describe the progress in the design, construction, and commissioning of the accelerator systems, insertion devices, and beamlines. Companion presentations at this conference give more detail of specific components in the ALS, and describe the activities towards establishing an exciting user program. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Evaluated teletherapy source library

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cox, Lawrence J. (Los Alamos, NM); Schach Von Wittenau, Alexis E. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Evaluated Teletherapy Source Library (ETSL) is a system of hardware and software that provides for maintenance of a library of useful phase space descriptions (PSDs) of teletherapy sources used in radiation therapy for cancer treatment. The PSDs are designed to be used by PEREGRINE, the all-particle Monte Carlo dose calculation system. ETSL also stores other relevant information such as monitor unit factors (MUFs) for use with the PSDs, results of PEREGRINE calculations using the PSDs, clinical calibration measurements, and geometry descriptions sufficient for calculational purposes. Not all of this information is directly needed by PEREGRINE. It also is capable of acting as a repository for the Monte Carlo simulation history files from which the generic PSDs are derived.

  12. Spallation-neutron sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michaudon, A.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Of particular interest for neutron-physics studies are spallation-neutron sources (SNSs) using intense proton beams with energies in the GeV range. Some SNSs already provide average fluxes of thermal and cold neutrons comparable with those of high-flux reactors. Most SNSs are pulsed with high peak fluxes that can be used with the powerful time-of-flight (TOF) method. Also, SNSs could be developed to much higher performance.

  13. High current ion source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); MacGill, Robert A. (645 Kern St., Richmond, CA 94805); Galvin, James E. (2 Commodore Dr. #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion source utilizing a cathode and anode for producing an electric arc therebetween. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma leaves the generation region and expands through another regon. The density profile of the plasma may be flattened using a magnetic field formed within a vacuum chamber. Ions are extracted from the plasma to produce a high current broad on beam.

  14. The European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peggs, S; Eshraqi, M; Hahn, H; Jansson, A; Lindroos, M; Ponton, A; Rathsman, K; Trahern, G; Bousso, S; Calaga, R; Devanz, G; Duperrier, R D; Eguia, J; Gammino, S; Moller, S P; Oyon, C; Ruber, R.J.M.Y.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a 5 MW, 2.5 GeV long pulse proton linac, to be built and commissioned in Lund, Sweden. The Accelerator Design Update (ADU) project phase is under way, to be completed at the end of 2012 by the delivery of a Technical Design Report. Improvements to the 2003 ESS design will be summarised, and the latest design activities will be presented.

  15. Capillary discharge source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bender, III, Howard Albert

    2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Debris generation from an EUV electric discharge plasma source device can be significantly reduced or essentially eliminated by encasing the electrodes with dielectric or electrically insulating material so that the electrodes are shielded from the plasma, and additionally by providing a path for the radiation to exit wherein the electrodes are not exposed to the area where the radiation is collected. The device includes: (a) a body, which is made of an electrically insulating material, that defines a capillary bore that has a proximal end and a distal end and that defines at least one radiation exit; (b) a first electrode that defines a first channel that has a first inlet end that is connected to a source of gas and a first outlet end that is in communication with the capillary bore, wherein the first electrode is positioned at the distal end of the capillary bore; (c) a second electrode that defines a second channel that has a second inlet end that is in communication with the capillary bore and an outlet end, wherein the second electrode is positioned at the proximal end of the capillary bore; and (d) a source of electric potential that is connected across the first and second electrodes, wherein radiation generated within the capillary bore is emitted through the at least one radiation exit and wherein the first electrode and second electrode are shielded from the emitted radiation.

  16. Open-Source GIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL; Burk, Thomas E [University of Minnesota; Lime, Steve [Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The components making up an Open Source GIS are explained in this chapter. A map server (Sect. 30.1) can broadly be defined as a software platform for dynamically generating spatially referenced digital map products. The University of Minnesota MapServer (UMN Map Server) is one such system. Its basic features are visualization, overlay, and query. Section 30.2 names and explains many of the geospatial open source libraries, such as GDAL and OGR. The other libraries are FDO, JTS, GEOS, JCS, MetaCRS, and GPSBabel. The application examples include derived GIS-software and data format conversions. Quantum GIS, its origin and its applications explained in detail in Sect. 30.3. The features include a rich GUI, attribute tables, vector symbols, labeling, editing functions, projections, georeferencing, GPS support, analysis, and Web Map Server functionality. Future developments will address mobile applications, 3-D, and multithreading. The origins of PostgreSQL are outlined and PostGIS discussed in detail in Sect. 30.4. It extends PostgreSQL by implementing the Simple Feature standard. Section 30.5 details the most important open source licenses such as the GPL, the LGPL, the MIT License, and the BSD License, as well as the role of the Creative Commons.

  17. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HULBERT,S.L.; WILLIAMS,G.P.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron radiation is a very bright, broadband, polarized, pulsed source of light extending from the infrared to the x-ray region. It is an extremely important source of Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation. Brightness is defined as flux per unit area per unit solid angle and is normally a more important quantity than flux alone particularly in throughput limited applications which include those in which monochromators are used. It is well known from classical theory of electricity and magnetism that accelerating charges emit electromagnetic radiation. In the case of synchrotron radiation, relativistic electrons are accelerated in a circular orbit and emit electromagnetic radiation in a broad spectral range. The visible portion of this spectrum was first observed on April 24, 1947 at General Electric's Schenectady facility by Floyd Haber, a machinist working with the synchrotron team, although the first theoretical predictions were by Lienard in the latter part of the 1800's. An excellent early history with references was presented by Blewett and a history covering the development of the utilization of synchrotron radiation was presented by Hartman. Synchrotron radiation covers the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the infrared region through the visible, ultraviolet, and into the x-ray region up to energies of many 10's of kilovolts. If the charged particles are of low mass, such as electrons, and if they are traveling relativistically, the emitted radiation is very intense and highly collimated, with opening angles of the order of 1 milliradian. In electron storage rings there are three possible sources of synchrotron radiation; dipole (bending) magnets; wigglers, which act like a sequence of bending magnets with alternating polarities; and undulators, which are also multi-period alternating magnet systems but in which the beam deflections are small resulting in coherent interference of the emitted light.

  18. The European Spallation Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindroos M.; Calaga R.; Bousson S.; Danared H.; Devanz G. et al

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003 the joint European effort to design a European Spallation Source (ESS) resulted in a set of reports, and in May 2009 Lund was agreed to be the ESS site. The ESS Scandinavia office has since then worked on setting all the necessary legal and organizational matters in place so that the Design Update and construction can be started in January 2011, in collaboration with European partners. The Design Update phase is expected to end in 2012, to be followed by a construction phase, with first neutrons expected in 2018-2019.

  19. Compact ion accelerator source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schenkel, Thomas; Persaud, Arun; Kapadia, Rehan; Javey, Ali

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion source includes a conductive substrate, the substrate including a plurality of conductive nanostructures with free-standing tips formed on the substrate. A conductive catalytic coating is formed on the nanostructures and substrate for dissociation of a molecular species into an atomic species, the molecular species being brought in contact with the catalytic coating. A target electrode placed apart from the substrate, the target electrode being biased relative to the substrate with a first bias voltage to ionize the atomic species in proximity to the free-standing tips and attract the ionized atomic species from the substrate in the direction of the target electrode.

  20. Sources Sought Announcement

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMay 20102 | NationalThis SOURCES SOUGHT

  1. Plasma Sources Sci. Technol.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum38 (1996) A213-A225. Printed in the UK4Sources

  2. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection

  3. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection

  4. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection32.1

  5. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection32.1

  6. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection32.150.1

  7. Source Selection Guide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmartOverview - 2015 Source Selection32.150.1

  8. Photon Source Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoid NanosheetsStudying thePhotoinducedPhoton Source

  9. Energy Sources: Renewable Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |inHVAC | DepartmentSource |  Why Hydrogen? * Fossil

  10. Comparison of ab Initio and Empirical Potentials for H-Atom Association with Diamond Pascal de Sainte Claire, Kihyung Song, and William L. Hase*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, Donald W.

    -21 density functional theory,22,23 and ab initio24-27 electronic structure calculations have been used of the reaction path.6-9 A molecular dynamics (i.e., classical trajectory) calculation of an elementary rate determined from the ab initio calculations.24-27 These properties, as well as transition-state structures

  11. Quantum fluctuations and isotope effects in ab initio descriptions of water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu Wang; Michele Ceriotti; Thomas E. Markland

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear quantum effects, such as zero-point energy and tunneling, cause significant changes to the structure and dynamics of hydrogen bonded systems such as liquid water. However, due to the current inability to simulate liquid water using an exact description of its electronic structure, the interplay between nuclear and electronic quantum effects remains unclear. Here we use simulations that incorporate the quantum mechanical nature of both the nuclei and electrons to provide a fully ab initio determination of the particle quantum kinetic energies, free energy change upon exchanging hydrogen for deuterium and the isotope fractionation ratio in water. These properties, which selectively probe the quantum nature of the nuclear degrees of freedom, allow us to make direct comparison to recent experiments and elucidate how electronic exchange and correlation and nuclear quantum fluctuations determine the structure of the hydrogen bond in water.

  12. Modern Ab Initio Approaches and Applications in Few-Nucleon Physics with A \\ge 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfried Leidemann; Giuseppina Orlandini

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an overview of the evolution of ab initio methods for few-nucleon systems with A \\ge 4, tracing the progress made that today allows precision calculations for these systems. First a succinct description of the diverse approaches is given. In order to identify analogies and differences the methods are grouped according to different formulations of the quantum mechanical many-body problem. Various significant applications from the past and present are described. We discuss the results with emphasis on the developments following the original implementations of the approaches. In particular we highlight benchmark results which represent important milestones towards setting an ever growing standard for theoretical calculations. This is relevant for meaningful comparisons with experimental data. Such comparisons may reveal whether a specific force model is appropriate for the description of nuclear dynamics.

  13. Quantum mechanical ab-initio simulation of the electron screening effect in metal deuteride crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huke, A; Chun, S M; Biller, A; Heide, P

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In antecedent experiments the electron screening energies of the d+d reactions in metallic environments have been determined to be enhanced by an order of magnitude in comparison to the case of gaseous deuterium targets. The analytical models describing averaged material properties have not been able to explain the experimental results so far. Therefore, a first effort has been undertaken to simulate the dynamics of reacting deuterons in a metallic lattice by means of an ab-initio Hartree-Fock calculation of the total electrostatic force between the lattice and the successively approaching deuterons via path integration. The calculations have been performed for Li and Ta, clearly showing a migration of electrons from host metallic to the deuterium atoms. However, in order to avoid more of the necessary simplifications in the model the utilization of a massive parallel supercomputer would be required.

  14. Quantum mechanical ab-initio simulation of the electron screening effect in metal deuteride crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Huke; K. Czerski; S. M. Chun; A. Biller; P. Heide

    2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In antecedent experiments the electron screening energies of the d+d reactions in metallic environments have been determined to be enhanced by an order of magnitude in comparison to the case of gaseous deuterium targets. The analytical models describing averaged material properties have not been able to explain the experimental results so far. Therefore, a first effort has been undertaken to simulate the dynamics of reacting deuterons in a metallic lattice by means of an ab-initio Hartree-Fock calculation of the total electrostatic force between the lattice and the successively approaching deuterons via path integration. The calculations have been performed for Li and Ta, clearly showing a migration of electrons from host metallic to the deuterium atoms. However, in order to avoid more of the necessary simplifications in the model the utilization of a massive parallel supercomputer would be required.

  15. Ab-Initio Step- and Kink-Formation Energies on Pb(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FEIBELMAN,PETER J.

    2000-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Ab-initio formation energies for (100)- and (111)-microfacet steps on Pb(111) are in satisfactory agreement with measured values, given that these values are known only as well as the Pb(111) surface energy; the calculated step-energy ratio, 1.29, is within {approximately}8% of experiment. In contrast, calculated kink-formation energies, 41 and 60 meV for the two step types, are 40--50% below published experimental values derived from STM images. The discrepancy results from interpreting the images with a step-stiffness vs. kink-energy relation appropriate to (100) but not (111) surfaces. Good agreement is found when the step-stiffness data are reinterpreted, taking proper account of the trigonal symmetry of Pb(111).

  16. Electronic states of lithium passivated germanium nanowires: An ab-initio study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trejo, A.; Carvajal, E.; Vázquez-Medina, R.; Cruz-Irisson, M. [Instituto Politécnico Nacional, ESIME-Culhuacan, Av. Santa Ana 1000, 04430 D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the electronic and structural properties of germanium nanowires (GeNWs) was performed using the ab-initio Density Functional Theory within the generalized gradient approximation where electron-ion interactions are described by ultrasoft pseudopotentials. To study the effects of the lithium in the surface of the GeNWs we compare the electronic band structures of Hydrogen passivated GeNWs with those of partial and totally Li passivated GeNWs. The nanowires were constructed in the [001], [111] and [110] directions, using the supercell model to create different wire diameters. The results show that in the case of partial Li passivation there are localized orbitals near the valence band maximum, which would create a p-doped-kind of state. The total Li passivation created metallic states for all the wires.

  17. An ab initio approach to free-energy reconstruction using logarithmic mean force dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Makoto, E-mail: nakamura@cphys.s.kanazawa-u.ac.jp; Obata, Masao [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Morishita, Tetsuya [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan)] [Nanosystem Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba 305-8568 (Japan); Oda, Tatsuki, E-mail: oda@cphys.s.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan) [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Institute of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an ab initio approach for evaluating a free energy profile along a reaction coordinate by combining logarithmic mean force dynamics (LogMFD) and first-principles molecular dynamics. The mean force, which is the derivative of the free energy with respect to the reaction coordinate, is estimated using density functional theory (DFT) in the present approach, which is expected to provide an accurate free energy profile along the reaction coordinate. We apply this new method, first-principles LogMFD (FP-LogMFD), to a glycine dipeptide molecule and reconstruct one- and two-dimensional free energy profiles in the framework of DFT. The resultant free energy profile is compared with that obtained by the thermodynamic integration method and by the previous LogMFD calculation using an empirical force-field, showing that FP-LogMFD is a promising method to calculate free energy without empirical force-fields.

  18. Quantum fluctuations and isotope effects in ab initio descriptions of water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lu; Markland, Thomas E., E-mail: tmarkland@stanford.edu [Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, 333 Campus Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Ceriotti, Michele, E-mail: michele.ceriotti@epfl.ch [Laboratory of Computational Science and Modeling, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Isotope substitution is extensively used to investigate the microscopic behavior of hydrogen bonded systems such as liquid water. The changes in structure and stability of these systems upon isotope substitution arise entirely from the quantum mechanical nature of the nuclei. Here, we provide a fully ab initio determination of the isotope exchange free energy and fractionation ratio of hydrogen and deuterium in water treating exactly nuclear quantum effects and explicitly modeling the quantum nature of the electrons. This allows us to assess how quantum effects in water manifest as isotope effects, and unravel how the interplay between electronic exchange and correlation and nuclear quantum fluctuations determine the structure of the hydrogen bond in water.

  19. Lattice thermal conductivity of UO{sub 2} using ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyoungchul [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); High-Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136–791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moo Hwan [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kaviany, Massoud, E-mail: kaviany@umich.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We applied the non-equilibrium ab-initio molecular dynamics and predict the lattice thermal conductivity of the pristine uranium dioxide for up to 2000?K. We also use the equilibrium classical molecular dynamics and heat-current autocorrelation decay theory to decompose the lattice thermal conductivity into acoustic and optical components. The predicted optical phonon transport is temperature independent and small, while the acoustic component follows the Slack relation and is in good agreement with the limited single-crystal experimental results. Considering the phonon grain-boundary and pore scatterings, the effective lattice thermal conductivity is reduced, and we show it is in general agreement with the sintered-powder experimental results. The charge and photon thermal conductivities are also addressed, and we find small roles for electron, surface polaron, and photon in the defect-free structures and for temperatures below 1500?K.

  20. Ab initio molecular dynamics study of manganese porphine hydration and interaction with nitric oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Leung; Craig J. Medforth

    2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors use ab initio molecular dynamics and the density functional theory+U (DFT+U) method to compute the hydration environment of the manganese ion in manganese (II) and manganese (III) porphines (MnP) dispersed in liquid water. These are intended as simple models for more complex water soluble porphyrins, which have important physiological and electrochemical applications. The manganese ion in Mn(II)P exhibits significant out-of-porphine plane displacement and binds strongly to a single H2O molecule in liquid water. The Mn in Mn(III)P is on average coplanar with the porphine plane and forms a stable complex with two H2O molecules. The residence times of these water molecules exceed 15 ps. The DFT+U method correctly predicts that water displaces NO from Mn(III)P-NO, but yields an ambiguous spin state for the MnP(II)-NO complex.