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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Oil Bypass Filtration Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Bypass Filtration Evaluation These reports detail the ongoing fleet evaluation of oil bypass filter technologies by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the U. S. Department...

2

PURADYN Oil Bypass Filtration System Evaluation Test Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Infrastructure Department PURADYN OIL BYPASS FILTRATION SYSTEM EVALUATION TEST PLAN October 2002 Reviewed: INEEL Fleet Maintenance Supervisor (Thomas) Date Reviewed:...

3

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Oil Bypass Filtration Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with oil bypass filter systems from PuraDYN Filter Technologies (8 buses) and Refined Global Solutions (3 buses). Six gasoline-equipped INL Tahoes are also equipped with PuraDYN...

4

Evaluation of Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) (Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) Evaluation of Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy-Duty Vehicles James Francfort American Filtration and Separations Society April 2005 Presentation Outline * Background & Objectives * Oil bypass filters - features & reported benefits * INL testing method * puraDYN oil bypass filters * Refined Global Solutions (RGS) oil bypass filters * Testing results & trends * Particulate and ferrography testing * Initial INL Oil Bypass Filter Economics * Potential fleet oil savings * Testing Status Bypass Filter Evaluation - Background * Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program (Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) * Vehicles operated by Idaho National Laboratory's Fleet Operations group * Idaho National Laboratory

5

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Fourth Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ABSTRACT This fourth Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation report details the ongoing fleet evaluation of an oil bypass filter technology by the Idaho National Engineering and...

6

Oil Bypass filter technology evaluation final report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6-01355 6-01355 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Final Report TECHNICAL REPORT Larry Zirker James Francfort Jordan Fielding March 2006 Idaho National Laboratory Operated by Battelle Energy Alliance INL/EXT-06-01355 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Final Report Larry Zirker James Francfort Jordan Fielding March 2006 Idaho National Laboratory Transportation Technology Department Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Under DOE Idaho Operations Office Contract DE-AC07-05ID14517

7

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Second Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INEELEXT-03-00620 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Second Quarterly Report January - March 2003 Larry Zirker...

8

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Fifth Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INEELEXT-04-01618 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Fifth Quarterly Report October - December 2003...

9

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Eighth Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INEELEXT-04-02486 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Eighth Quarterly Report July-September 2004...

10

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Performance Evaluation - First Quarterly...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INEELEXT-03-00129 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Oil Bypass Filter Technology Performance Evaluation First Quarterly Report Larry Zirker James...

11

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Sixth Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INEELEXT-04-02004 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Sixth Quarterly Report January - March 2004...

12

PURADYN Oil Bypass Filtration System Evaluation Test Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

including: * Less dependency on foreign oil * Less oil disposed as waste products * Lower oil disposal costs * Less downtime of equipment * Reduced vehicle maintenance costs *...

13

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Tenth Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INLEXT-05-00381 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Tenth Quarterly Report January-March 2005 TECHNICAL...

14

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Third Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INEELEXT-03-00974 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Third Quarterly Report April-June 2003 Larry Zirker James...

15

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Ninth Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INLEXT-05-00040 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Ninth Quarterly Report October-December 2004 TECHNICAL...

16

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Performance Evaluation - First Quarterly Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the initial activities to evaluate the performance of the oil bypass filter technology being tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight full-size, four-cycle diesel-engine buses used to transport INEEL employees on various routes have been equipped with oil bypass systems from the puraDYN Corporation. Each bus averages about 60,000 miles a year. The evaluation includes an oil analysis regime to monitor the presence of necessary additives in the oil and to detect undesirable contaminants. Very preliminary economic analysis suggests that the oil bypass system can reduce life-cycle costs. As the evaluation continues and oil avoidance costs are quantified, it is estimated that the bypass system economics may prove increasingly favorable, given the anticipated savings in operational costs and in reduced use of oil and waste oil avoidance.

Zirker, L.R.; Francfort, J.E.

2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

17

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation, Fourth Quarterly Report, July--September 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fourth Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation report details the ongoing fleet evaluation of an oil bypass filter technology by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U.S. Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight four-cycle diesel-engine buses used to transport INEEL employees on various routes have been equipped with oil bypass filter systems from the puraDYN Corporation. The bypass filters are reported to have engine oil filtering capability of miles. This represents an avoidance of 21 oil changes, which equates to 740 quarts (185 gallons) of oil not used or disposed of. To validate the extended oil-drain intervals, an oil-analysis regime evaluates the fitness of the oil for continued service by monitoring the presence of necessary additives, undesirable contaminants, and engine-wear metals. For bus 73450, higher values of iron have been reported, but the wear rate ratio (parts per million of iron per thousand miles driven) has remained consistent. In anticipation of also evaluating oil bypass systems on six Chevrolet Tahoe sport utility vehicles, the oil is being sampled on each of the Tahoes to develop a characterization history or baseline for each engine.

James E. Francfort; Larry Zirker

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Ninth Quarterly Report October–December 2004  

SciTech Connect

This Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation quarterly report (October–December 2004) details the ongoing fleet evaluation of oil bypass filter technologies being conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL; formerly Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory) for the U.S. Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program. Eight INL four-cycle diesel-engine buses used to transport INL employees on various routes and six INL Chevrolet Tahoes with gasoline engines are equipped with oil bypass filter systems from the puraDYN Corporation. This quarter, three additional buses were equipped with bypass filters from Refined Global Solutions. Oil bypass filters are reported to have an engine oil filtering capability of less than 1 micron. Both the puraDYN and Refined Global Solutions bypass filters have a heating chamber to remove liquid contaminate from the oil. During the quarter, the eleven diesel engine buses traveled 62,188 miles, and as of January 3, 2005 the buses had accumulated 643,036 total test miles. Two buses had their engine oil changed this quarter. In one bus, the oil was changed due to its degraded quality as determined by a low total base number (<3.0 mg KOH/g). The other bus had high oxidation and nitration numbers (>30.0 Abs/cm). Although a total of six buses have had their oil changed during the last 26 months, by using the oil bypass filters the buses in the evaluation avoided 48 oil changes, which equates to 1,680 quarts (420 gallons) of new oil not consumed and 1,680 quarts of waste oil not generated. Therefore, over 80% of the oil normally required for oil-changes was not used, and, consequently, the evaluation achieved over 80% reduction in the amount of waste oil normally generated. The six Tahoe test vehicles traveled 39,514 miles, and as of January 3, 2005 the Tahoes had accumulated 189,970 total test miles. The Tahoe filter test is in transition. To increase the rate of bypass filter oil flow on the Tahoes, puraDYN provided a larger orifice assembly, and these are being changed out as the Tahoes come in for regular service.

Larry Zirker; James Francfort; Jordan Fielding

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Evaluation of a Combined Cyclone & Gas Filtration System for Particulate Removal in the Gasification Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Wabash gasification facility, owned and operated by sgSolutions LLC, is one of the largest single train solid fuel gasification facilities in the world capable of transforming 2,000 tons per day of petroleum coke or 2,600 tons per day of bituminous coal into synthetic gas for electrical power generation. The Wabash plant utilizes Phillips66 proprietary E-Gas™ Gasification Process to convert solid fuels such as petroleum coke or coal into synthetic gas that is fed to a combined cycle combustion turbine power generation facility. During plant startup in 1995, reliability issues were realized in the gas filtration portion of the gasification process. To address these issues, a slipstream test unit was constructed at the Wabash facility to test various filter designs, materials and process conditions for potential reliability improvement. The char filtration slipstream unit provided a way of testing new materials, maintenance procedures, and process changes without the risk of stopping commercial production in the facility. It also greatly reduced maintenance expenditures associated with full scale testing in the commercial plant. This char filtration slipstream unit was installed with assistance from the United States Department of Energy (built under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-97FT34158) and began initial testing in November of 1997. It has proven to be extremely beneficial in the advancement of the E-Gas™ char removal technology by accurately predicting filter behavior and potential failure mechanisms that would occur in the commercial process. After completing four (4) years of testing various filter types and configurations on numerous gasification feed stocks, a decision was made to investigate the economic and reliability effects of using a particulate removal gas cyclone upstream of the current gas filtration unit. A paper study had indicated that there was a real potential to lower both installed capital and operating costs by implementing a char cyclonefiltration hybrid unit in the E-Gas™ gasification process. These reductions would help to keep the E-Gas™ technology competitive among other coal-fired power generation technologies. The Wabash combined cyclone and gas filtration slipstream test program was developed to provide design information, equipment specification and process control parameters of a hybrid cyclone and candle filter particulate removal system in the E-Gas™ gasification process that would provide the optimum performance and reliability for future commercial use. The test program objectives were as follows: 1. Evaluate the use of various cyclone materials of construction. 2. Establish the optimal cyclone efficiency that provides stable long term gas filter operation. 3. Determine the particle size distribution of the char separated by both the cyclone and candle filters. This will provide insight into cyclone efficiency and potential future plant design. 4. Determine the optimum filter media size requirements for the cyclone-filtration hybrid unit. 5. Determine the appropriate char transfer rates for both the cyclone and filtration portions of the hybrid unit. 6. Develop operating procedures for the cyclone-filtration hybrid unit. 7. Compare the installed capital cost of a scaled-up commercial cyclone-filtration hybrid unit to the current gas filtration design without a cyclone unit, such as currently exists at the Wabash facility.

Rizzo, Jeffrey

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

20

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Eleventh Quarterly Report April- June 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

651 651 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Eleventh Quarterly Report April-June 2005 TECHNICAL REPORT Larry Zirker James Francfort Jordan Fielding September 2005 Idaho National Laboratory Operated by Battelle Energy Alliance INL/EXT-05-00651 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Eleventh Quarterly Report April-June 2005 Larry Zirker James Francfort Jordan Fielding September 2005 Idaho National Laboratory Transportation Technology Department Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Under DOE Idaho Operations Office

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Evaluation of Collector Well Configurations to Model Hydrodynamics in Riverbank Filtration and Groundwater Remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collector well designs are necessary to maximize groundwater uptake and riverbank filtration without negatively impacting an aquifer. Unfortunately, there is a lack of information and research regarding the implementation of collector well design parameters. In the past, collector well installation was too costly, but recent advances in well technology have made collector wells more cost effective. This research will contribute a set of guidelines to optimize riverbank filtration and groundwater remediation. This study models the hydrodynamics surrounding collector well configurations in riverbank filtration and groundwater remediation. Visual Modflow® was utilized to run a variety of numerical models to test four areas: flux along the laterals of a collector well, collector well interactions with a river, collector well yield, and collector well remediation capability. The two design parameters investigated were lateral length (25 m, 50 m, and 100 m) and number of laterals (3 and 4). The lateral flux tests confirm flux increases towards the terminal end of each lateral and pumping rate is the controlling factor in flux amount obtained along the laterals. The analysis of the flux-river interaction shows the main factor in determining flux amount is the initial river geometry, followed by the pumping rate, regional background flow, and collector well design, respectively. The models suggest that the 4-lateral collector well design is more effective than the 3-lateral design and in addition, 100 meter length laterals provide the highest amount of yield with the least amount of drawdown. The remediation tests investigate the application of vertical well equations to evaluate collector well designs in two areas: minimum pumping rate to capture line source of particles and first arrival time of particles. The remediation models show 100 meter length laterals provide both the lowest pumping rate and the highest residence time with the surrounding aquifer for maximum remediation. Ultimately, these models provide basic design guidelines and explain which designs are most effective, depending on the collector well purpose.

De Leon, Tiffany Lucinda

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Oil Bypass Filter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Bypass Filter The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is evaluating oil bypass filter technology for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Vehicle Technologies Office. Eight...

23

Evaluation of an Alternate, Advanced Filtration Media for Radioactive Liquid Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent filter media is typically the most expensive solid low level radioactive waste routinely generated by commercial nuclear plants. This report documents the investigation of innovative dissolvable filtration technology with significant volume and cost reduction potential.

2004-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

24

Evaluation of a Stirling engine heater bypass with the NASA Lewis nodal-analysis performance code  

SciTech Connect

In support of the US Department of Energy's Stirling Engine Highway Vehicle Systems program, the NASA Lewis Research Center investigated whether bypassing the P-40 Stirling engine heater during regenerative cooling would improve the engine thermal efficiency. The investigation was accomplished by using the Lewis nodal-analysis Stirling engine computer model. Bypassing the P-40 Stirling engine heater at full power resulted in a rise in the indicated thermal efficiency from 40.6 to 41.0 percent. For the idealized (some losses not included) heater bypass that was analyzed, this benefit is not considered significant.

Sullivan, T.J.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Quantitative evaluation of air-filtration systems in use at asbestos abatement sites: Research in progress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filtration systems serve as the principal engineering control to remove asbestos particulate from airstreams at abatement projects. However, little quantitative information is available on the integrity of these air-filtration systems in preventing asbestos fiber release into outdoor air or adjacent building areas, potentially exposing occupants. A study is in progress to assess the performance of HEPA filtration systems in use at asbestos abatement projects to determine each systems operating particle-removal efficiency, percent concentration, and decontamination factor. The asbestos-fiber concentration in the inlet and discharge air of each filtration system will be determined by isokinetic air sampling. Each isokinetic air sample collected will be analyzed using transmission electron microscopy. In addition, in-place aerosol performance testing will be conducted according to procedures outlined in ANSI/ASME N510-1980. The test method utilizes a polydispersed dioctyl phthalate aerosol (generated by Laskin nozzles) and a photometric light-scattering mass-concentration detector as the measuring device.

Powers, T.J.; Cain, W.C.; Wilmoth, R.C.; Kominsky, J.R.; Brownlee, J.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation final report documents the feasibility of using oil bypass filters on 17 vehicles in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) fleet during a 3-year test period. Almost 1.3 million test miles were accumulated, with eleven 4-cycle diesel engine buses accumulating 982,548 test miles and six gasoline-engine Chevrolet Tahoes accumulating 303,172 test miles. Two hundred and forty oil samples, taken at each 12,000-mile bus servicing event and at 3,000 miles for the Tahoes, documented the condition of the engine oils for continued service. Twenty-eight variables were normally tested, including the presence of desired additives and undesired wear metals such as iron and chrome, as well as soot, water, glycol, and fuel. Depending on the assumptions employed, the INL found that oil bypass filter systems for diesel engine buses have a positive payback between 72,000 and 144,000 miles. For the Tahoes, the positive payback was between 66,000 and 69,000 miles.

L. R. Zirker; J. E. Francfort; J. J. Fielding

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Evaluation of Flocculation and Filtration Procedures Applied to WSRC Sludge: A Report from B. Yarar, Colorado School of Mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, addresses fundamentals of flocculation processes shedding light on why WSRC researchers have not been able to report the discovery of a successful flocculant and acceptable filtration rates. It also underscores the importance of applying an optimized flocculation-testing regime, which has not been adopted by these researchers. The final part of the report proposes a research scheme which should lead to a successful choice of flocculants, filtration aids (surfactants) and a filtration regime, as well recommendations for work that should be carried out to make up for the deficiencies of the limited WSRC work where a better performance should be the outcome.

Poirier, M.R.

2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

28

Electric air filtration: theory, laboratory studies, hardware development, and field evaluations  

SciTech Connect

We summarize the results of a seven-year research project for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop electric air filters that extend the service life of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters used in the nuclear industry. This project was unique to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and it entailed comprehensive theory, laboratory studies, and hardware development. We present our work in three major areas: (1) theory of and instrumentation for filter test methods, (2) theoretical and laboratory studies of electric air filters, and (3) development and evaluation of eight experimental electric air filters.

Bergman, W.; Biermann, A.; Kuhl, W.; Lum, B.; Bogdanoff, A.; Hebard, H.; Hall, M.; Banks, D.; Mazumder, M.; Johnson, J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Evaluation of a Prototype Surface Flow Bypass for Juvenile Salmon and Steelhead at the Powerhouse of Lower Granite Dam, Snake River, Washington, 1996-2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A surface flow bypass provides a route in the upper water column for naturally, surface-oriented juvenile salmonids to safely migrate through a hydroelectric dam. Surface flow bypasses were recommended in several regional salmon recovery plans as a means to increase passage survival of juvenile salmonids at Columbia and Snake River dams. A prototype surface flow bypass, called the SBC, was retrofit on Lower Granite Dam and evaluated from 1996 to 2000 using biotelemetry and hydroacoustic techniques. In terms of passage efficiency, the best SBC configurations were a surface skimmer (99 m3/s [3,500 cfs], three entrances 5 m wide, 5 m deep and one entrance 5 m wide, 15 m deep) and a single chute (99 m3/s, one entrance 5 m wide, 8.5 m deep). They each passed 62 ? 3% (95% confidence interval) of the total juvenile fish population that entered the section of the dam with the SBC entrances (Turbine Units 4-5). Smooth entrance shape and concentrated surface flow characteristics of these configurations are worth pursuing in designs for future surface flow bypasses. In addition, a guidance wall in the Lower Granite Dam forebay diverted the following percentages of juvenile salmonids away from Turbine Units 1-3 toward other passage routes, including the SBC: run-at-large 79 ? 18%; hatchery steelhead 86%; wild steelhead 65%; and yearling chinook salmon 66%. When used in combination with spill or turbine intake screens, a surface flow bypass with a guidance wall can produce a high level (> 90% of total project passage) of non-turbine passage and provide operational flexibility to fisheries managers and dam operators responsible for enhancing juvenile salmonid survival.

Johnson, Gary E.; Anglea, Steven M.; Adams, Noah S.; Wik, Timothy O.

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

30

Evaluation of Juvenile Fish Bypass and Adult Fish Passage Facilities at Three-Mile Falls Dam; Umatilla River, Oregon, 1989 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on our progress from October 1989 through September 1990 on evaluating juvenile fish bypass and adult fish passage facilities at Three Mile Falls Dam on the Umatilla River. The study is a cooperative effort by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR). Study objectives addressed by ODFW and CTUIR are: (1) ODFW (Report A): Operate and evaluate the juvenile fish bypass system in the West Extension Irrigation District canal at Three Mile Falls Dam; and (2) CTUIR (Report 8): Examine the passage of adult salmonids at Three Mile Falls Dam. The study is part of a program to rehabilitate anadromous fish stocks in the Umatilla River Basin that includes restorations of coho salmon Oncorhynchus Wsutch and chinook salmon 0. tshawytscha and enhancement of summer steelhead 0. mytiss.

Nigro, Anthony A.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Evaluation of an Angled Louver Facility for Guiding Sturgeon to a Downstream Bypass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydroelectric projects may expose downstream moving and migrating fish to injury and mortality during passage through the projects turbines. This report presents the results of a field evaluation of a louver array for guiding juvenile shortnose sturgeon toward a safe route past a water intake.

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

32

2009 ASHRAE 199 The issue of filter bypass has long been a topic of much  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

©2009 ASHRAE 199 ABSTRACT The issue of filter bypass has long been a topic of much interest on filtration efficiency. In this research, an ASHRAE 52.2 compliant test loop was used to study bypass, a test apparatus designed to ASHRAE Standard 52.2-2007 was used. This standard provides a methodology

Siegel, Jeffrey

33

Evaluation of the 183-D Water Filtration Facility for Bat Roosts and Development of a Mitigation Strategy, 100-D Area, Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 183-D Water Filtration Facility is located in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site, north of Richland, Washington. It was used to provide filtered water for cooling the 105-D Reactor and supplying fire-protection and drinking water for all facilities in the 100-D Area. The facility has been inactive since the 1980s and is now scheduled for demolition. Therefore, an evaluation was conducted to determine if any part of the facility was being used as roosting habitat by bats.

Lindsey, C. T.; Gano, K. A.; Lucas, J. G.

2011-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

34

V-162: Apache Struts "ParameterInterceptor" Security Bypass Vulnerabil...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

arbitrary methods, bypassing Struts and OGNL library protections. 2. Any unsanitized String variable exposed by an action and have it evaluated as an OGNL expression to enable...

35

EA-1262: McKay Bypass Canal Extension, Golden, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to extend the McKay Bypass Canal in order to route water from the existing Canal north of the Walnut Creek drainage on the east side of...

36

Polymer flood filtration improvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process of recovery of hydrocarbons from a subterranean formation (wherein an aqueous liquid is injected into an injection well and hydrocarbons are produced from a production well, wherein at least a portion of the aqueous liquid is thickened with an organic polymer, and wherein an aqueous mixture containing the organic polymer is filtered prior to injection of the polymer) is affected by adding an amount of a surfactant to the aqueous mixture containing the polymer prior to filtration and sufficient to improve filterability. Filterability is further enhanced by addition of an ethoxylated alcohol surfactant and/or an alcohol. 6 claims.

Ferrell, H.H.; Conley, D.; Casad, B.M.; Stokke, O.M.

1980-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Oil Bypass Filter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil Bypass Filter to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Oil Bypass Filter on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Oil Bypass Filter on...

38

Health benefits of particle filtration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health benefits of particle filtration Health benefits of particle filtration Title Health benefits of particle filtration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Fisk, William J. Journal Indoor Air Date Published 02/12/2013 Abstract The evidence of health benefits of particle filtration in homes and commercial buildings is reviewed. Prior reviews of papers published before 2000 are summarized. The results of 16 more recent intervention studies are compiled and analyzed. Also reviewed are four studies that modeled health benefits of using filtration to reduce indoor exposures to particles from outdoors. Prior reviews generally concluded that particle filtration is, at best, a source of small improvements in allergy and asthma health effects; however, many early studies had weak designs. A majority of recent intervention studies employed strong designs and more of these studies report statistically significant improvements in health symptoms or objective health outcomes, particularly for subjects with allergies or asthma. The percentage improvement in health outcomes is typically modest, e.g., 7% to 25%. Delivery of filtered air to the breathing zone of sleeping allergic or asthmatic persons may be more consistently effective in improving health than room air filtration. Notable are two studies that report statistically significant improvements, with filtration, in markers that predict future adverse coronary events. From modeling, the largest potential benefits of indoor particle filtration may be reductions in morbidity and mortality from reducing indoor exposures to particles from outdoor air. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

39

Diesel fuel filtration system  

SciTech Connect

The American nuclear utility industry is subject to tight regulations on the quality of diesel fuel that is stored at nuclear generating stations. This fuel is required to supply safety-related emergency diesel generators--the backup power systems associated with the safe shutdown of reactors. One important parameter being regulated is the level of particulate contamination in the diesel fuel. Carbon particulate is a natural byproduct of aging diesel fuel. Carbon particulate precipitates from the fuel`s hydrocarbons, then remains suspended or settles to the bottom of fuel oil storage tanks. If the carbon particulate is not removed, unacceptable levels of particulate contamination will eventually occur. The oil must be discarded or filtered. Having an outside contractor come to the plant to filter the diesel fuel can be costly and time consuming. Time is an even more critical factor if a nuclear plant is in a Limiting Condition of Operation (LCO) situation. A most effective way to reduce both cost and risk is for a utility to build and install its own diesel fuel filtration system. The cost savings associated with designing, fabricating and operating the system inhouse can be significant, and the value of reducing the risk of reactor shutdown because of uncertified diesel fuel may be even higher. This article describes such a fuel filtering system.

Schneider, D. [Wisconsin Fuel and Light, Wausau, WI (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstrated Petroleum Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles James Francfort (PI) Timothy Murphy Larry Zirker Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation * Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program * Performed by Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Fleet Operations * Goal - Support DOE's efforts to reduce petroleum consumption & ensure the energy security of the United States Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation * Objectives - Test the concept of using oil bypass filters to minimize engine oil changes & the generation of waste oils - Demonstration the economics of oil bypass filter systems - Estimate potential engine oil saving from bypass filter technologies that can be achieved by INEEL,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

By-pass valve  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved by-pass valve (1) for use in an automobile exhaust system (Es) comprises an air inlet (7) connected to an air pump (Ap), first and second air outlets (15,23) respectively connected to first and second portions (P1,p2) of a catalytic converter (Cc) and a third outlet (33) through which air is dumped to atmosphere. Air is directed from the inlet to the first outlet when engine temperature is less than a predetermined value and from the inlet to the second outlet when engine temperature reaches the predetermined value. A first and normally closed valve (81) is intermediate the air inlet and the first and second outlets and a second and normally open valve (83) is intermediate the air inlet and the third outlet. The first valve is opened and the second valve closed when engine vacuum exceeds a predetermined level so air flows to either the first or second outlet. The second valve is reopened whenever the outlet to which air is directed is blocked so air is dumped to atmosphere. To accomplish this, the first valve is mounted on the first section (111) of a split shaft (109) and the second valve is mounted on a second shaft section (113). The sections are movable in unison to open the first valve, but the second section is movable relative to the first section when a blockage occurs to reopen the second valve.

Williamson, R.E.

1981-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

42

Characterization of Filtration Scale-Up Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scale-up performance of sintered stainless steel crossflow filter elements planned for use at the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) and at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were characterized in partial fulfillment (see Table S.1) of the requirements of Test Plan TP RPP WTP 509. This test report details the results of experimental activities related only to filter scale-up characterization. These tests were performed under the Simulant Testing Program supporting Phase 1 of the demonstration of the pretreatment leaching processes at PEP. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the tests discussed herein for Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) to address the data needs of Test Specification 24590-WTP-TSP-RT-07-004. Scale-up characterization tests employ high-level waste (HLW) simulants developed under the Test Plan TP-RPP-WTP-469. The experimental activities outlined in TP-RPP-WTP-509 examined specific processes from two broad areas of simulant behavior: 1) leaching performance of the boehmite simulant as a function of suspending phase chemistry and 2) filtration performance of the blended simulant with respect to filter scale-up and fouling. With regard to leaching behavior, the effect of anions on the kinetics of boehmite leaching was examined. Two experiments were conducted: 1) one examined the effect of the aluminate anion on the rate of boehmite dissolution and 2) another determined the effect of secondary anions typical of Hanford tank wastes on the rate of boehmite dissolution. Both experiments provide insight into how compositional variations in the suspending phase impact the effectiveness of the leaching processes. In addition, the aluminate anion studies provide information on the consequences of gibbsite in waste. The latter derives from the expected fast dissolution of gibbsite relative to boehmite. This test report concerns only results of the filtration performance with respect to scale-up. Test results for boehmite dissolution kinetics and filter fouling are reported elsewhere (see Table S.1). The primary goal of scale-up testing was to examine how filter length influenced permeate flux rates. To accomplish this, the existing cells unit filter system, which employs a 2-ft-long, 0.5-in. (inner) diameter sintered stainless steel filter element, was redesigned to accommodate an 8-ft. sintered stainless steel filter element of the same diameter. Testing was then performed to evaluate the filtration performance of waste simulant slurries. Scale-up testing consisted of two separate series of filtration tests: 1) scale-up axial velocity (AV)/transmembrane pressure (TMP) matrix tests and 2) scale-up temperature tests. The AV/TMP matrix tests examined filtration performance of two different waste simulant slurries in the 8-ft. cells unit filter system. Waste simulant slurry formulations for the 8-ft. scale-up test was selected to match simulant slurries for which filtration performance had been characterized on the 2-ft CUF. For the scale-up temperature tests, the filtration performance at three test temperatures (i.e., 25°C, 40°C, and 60°C) was determined to evaluate if filter flux versus temperature correlations developed using the 2-ft filters were also valid for the 8-ft filters.

Daniel, Richard C.; Billing, Justin M.; Luna, Maria L.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Bonebrake, Michael L.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Jagoda, Lynette K.

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

43

Water Filtration Device and Method of Fabrication  

Disclosure Number 200501522 Technology Summary This invention relates to a regenerable water filtration device and the method for fabricating this ...

44

Improved intake air filtration systems  

SciTech Connect

This report comprises the results of a project sponsored by the Pipeline Research Committee of the American Gas Association (Improved Intake Air Filtration Systems). The quality of the inlet air consumed by pipeline gas turbines plays a significant role in the performance, maintenance, and economy of turbine operations. The airborne contaminants may cause degradation of compressor blades and hot gas path components, primarily by erosion, corrosion, and fouling. Machines in the pipeline fleet have a typical average loss of 3.5% in output, chiefly caused by fouling of the gas turbine compressor. It also showed that: Air contamination could be significantly reduced by the use of more efficient air filtration systems, especially through the reduction of the quantity of smaller particles ingested.'' Filters which incorporated electrostatically charged fibers (achieved through the use of triboelectric [TE] effects) offered the most promising means for developing an improvement over paper media. The purpose of this program was to validate the use of new technology for self-cleaning air inlet filtration on gas turbine pumping applications. An approach utilizing triboelectrification of fabric filters was examined by testing to determine the penetration (efficiency), cleanability, pressure drop vs flow, and dust-holding capacity of seven pairs of filter cartridges: six fabric and one paper.

Lawson, C.C. (Lawson (Calvin C.), North Wildwood, NJ (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Use of Laboratory Drag Measurements in Evaluating Hot-Gas Filtration of Char from the Transport Gasifier at the Power Systems Development Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial objective of this study was to better understand the reasons for the substantial increase in filter DP that was observed after the gasifier recycle loop modifications. Beyond this specific objective, a secondary goal was to develop a meaningful method of evaluating the effect of particle size and other particle properties on dustcake drag and filter DP. As mentioned earlier, the effect of particle size on dustcake drag and filter DP can be a very important consideration in the selection and specification of a precleaner cyclone for use upstream of the hot-gas filter. Installing a cyclone ahead of a hot-gas filter will reduce the transient areal loading of dust to the filter, but the beneficial effect of the reduced areal loading may be offset by an increase in drag associated with a finer particle-size distribution. The overall goal of this study was to better understand these tradeoffs and to ultimately develop a procedure that would be useful in analyzing the performance of hot-gas filters and in sizing new hot-gas filters. In addition to the obvious effects of a cyclone on dust loading and particle size, other indirect effects on particulate properties and flow resistance may occur when the cyclone is incorporated into the gasifier recycle loop as was the case at the PSDF. To better understand the importance of these other effects, this study sought to separate the particle-size effect from these other effects by measuring the drag of size-fractionated char samples collected before and after the recycle loop modifications.

Dahlin, R.S.; Landham, E.C.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

46

Sandusky Water Filtration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Filtration Filtration Jump to: navigation, search Name Sandusky Water Filtration Facility Sandusky Water Filtration Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Sandusky Water Filtration Energy Purchaser Sandusky Water Filtration Location Sandusky OH Coordinates 41.45008487°, -82.67055273° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.45008487,"lon":-82.67055273,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

47

Inlet Air Filtration Assessment: Interim Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of inlet air filtration is to capture the largest amount of particulate (solid or liquid) by filter media in the airflow path of the gas turbine. With engines operating at higher temperatures and with downstream components that are more susceptible to problems associated with harmful effects such as fouling, erosion, and corrosion, the need for good inlet air filtration in this newest generation of gas turbines is more important than ever. Recent advances in inlet air filtration have ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

48

Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

treatment in addition to the side stream filtration, mechanical cleaning of the heat exchangers can be reduced and efficiency increased (Wymore, 2003). 7 2 Side Stream...

49

Linear Thermodynamics of Rodlike DNA Filtration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Linear thermodynamics transportation theory is employed to study filtration of rodlike DNA molecules. Using the repeated nanoarray consisting of alternate deep and shallow regions, it is demonstrated that the complex ...

Li, Zirui

50

Filtration of submicrometer particles by pelagic tunicates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Salps are common in oceanic waters and have higher per-individual filtration rates than any other zooplankton filter feeder. Although salps are centimeters in length, feeding via particle capture occurs on a fine, mucous ...

Sutherland, Kelly R.

51

Exhaust gas bypass valve control for thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of controlling engine exhaust flow through at least one of an exhaust bypass and a thermoelectric device via a bypass valve is provided. The method includes: determining a mass flow of exhaust exiting an engine; determining a desired exhaust pressure based on the mass flow of exhaust; comparing the desired exhaust pressure to a determined exhaust pressure; and determining a bypass valve control value based on the comparing, wherein the bypass valve control value is used to control the bypass valve.

Reynolds, Michael G; Yang, Jihui; Meisner, Greogry P.; Stabler, Francis R.; De Bock, Hendrik Pieter (Peter) Jacobus; Anderson, Todd Alan

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

52

Bypass diode for a solar cell  

SciTech Connect

Bypass diodes for solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a bypass diode for a solar cell includes a substrate of the solar cell. A first conductive region is disposed above the substrate, the first conductive region of a first conductivity type. A second conductive region is disposed on the first conductive region, the second conductive region of a second conductivity type opposite the first conductivity type.

Rim, Seung Bum (Palo Alto, CA); Kim, Taeseok (San Jose, CA); Smith, David D. (Campbell, CA); Cousins, Peter J. (Menlo Park, CA)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

53

GPS Data Filtration Method for Drive Cycle Analysis Applications  

SciTech Connect

When employing GPS data acquisition systems to capture vehicle drive-cycle information, a number of errors often appear in the raw data samples, such as sudden signal loss, extraneous or outlying data points, speed drifting, and signal white noise, all of which limit the quality of field data for use in downstream applications. Unaddressed, these errors significantly impact the reliability of source data and limit the effectiveness of traditional drive-cycle analysis approaches and vehicle simulation software. Without reliable speed and time information, the validity of derived metrics for drive cycles, such as acceleration, power, and distance, become questionable. This study explores some of the common sources of error present in raw onboard GPS data and presents a detailed filtering process designed to correct for these issues. Test data from both light and medium/heavy duty applications are examined to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed filtration process across the range of vehicle vocations. Graphical comparisons of raw and filtered cycles are presented, and statistical analyses are performed to determine the effects of the proposed filtration process on raw data. Finally, an evaluation of the overall benefits of data filtration on raw GPS data and present potential areas for continued research is presented.

Duran, A.; Earleywine, M.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Turbine protection system for bypass operation  

SciTech Connect

In a steam turbine installation having a high pressure turbine, a steam generator is described for providing steam to the turbine, at least a lower pressure turbine, a reheater in the steam path between the high and lower pressure turbines, and a steam bypass path for bypassing the turbines, the high pressure turbine having a one-way check valve in its output steam line to prevent bypass steam from entering its output. The improvement described here consists of: (A) a second bypass path for passing steam around the high pressure turbine; (B) the second bypass path including, (i) steam jet compressor means including two input sections and an output section, with one input section being connected to the high pressure turbine output, the other input section being connected to receive steam from the steam generator and the output section being connected to the input of the reheater, (ii) valving means for controlling the steam supply from the steam generator to the steam jet compressor means; and (C) control means responsive to an output condition at the high pressure turbine output for controlling the valving means.

Silvestri, G.J. Jr.

1986-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

55

The weight filtration for real algebraic varieties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the work of Guillen and Navarro Aznar we associate to each real algebraic variety a filtered chain complex, the weight complex, which is well-defined up to filtered quasi-isomorphism, and which induces on Borel-Moore homology with Z/2 coefficients an analog of the weight filtration for complex algebraic varieties.

McCrory, Clint

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

CROSSFLOW FILTRATION: EM-31, WP-2.3.6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the interest of accelerating waste treatment processing, the DOE has funded studies to better understand filtration with the goal of improving filter fluxes in existing crossflow equipment. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed some of those studies, with a focus on start-up techniques, filter cake development, the application of filter aids (cake forming solid precoats), and body feeds (flux enhancing polymers). This paper discusses the progress of those filter studies. Crossflow filtration is a key process step in many operating and planned waste treatment facilities to separate undissolved solids from supernate solutions. This separation technology generally has the advantage of self-cleaning through the action of wall shear stress created by the flow of waste slurry through the filter tubes. However, the ability of filter wall self-cleaning depends on the slurry being filtered. Many of the alkaline radioactive wastes are extremely challenging to filtration, e.g., those containing compounds of aluminum and iron, which have particles whose size and morphology reduce permeability. Unfortunately, low filter flux can be a bottleneck in waste processing facilities such as the Savannah River Integrated Salt Disposition Process and the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. Any improvement to the filtration rate would lead directly to increased throughput of the entire process. To date increased rates are generally realized by either increasing the crossflow filter feed flow rate, limited by pump capacity, or by increasing filter surface area, limited by space and increasing the required pump load. SRNL set up both dead-end and crossflow filter tests to better understand filter performance based on filter media structure, flow conditions, filter cleaning, and several different types of filter aids and body feeds. Using non-radioactive simulated wastes, both chemically and physically similar to the actual radioactive wastes, the authors performed several tests to evaluate methods to improve filter performance. With the proper use of filter flow conditions and filter enhancers, filter flow rates can be increased over rates currently realized today. Experiments that use non-radioactive simulants for actual waste always carry the inherent risk of not eliciting prototypic results; however, they will assist in focusing the scope needed to minimize radioactive testing and thus maximize safety. To that end this investigation has determined: (1) Waste simulant SB6 was found to be more challenging to filtration than a SRS Tank 8F simulant; (2) Higher solids concentration presents a greater challenge to filtration; (3) Filter cake is something that should be properly developed in initial filter operation; (4) Backpulsing is not necessary to maintain a good filter flux with salt wastes; (5) Scouring a filter without cleaning will lead to improved filter performance; (6) The presence of a filter cake can improve the solids separation by an order of magnitude as determined by turbidity; (7) A well developed cake with periodic scouring may allow a good filter flux to be maintained for long periods of time; and (8) Filtrate flux decline is reversible when the concentration of the filtering slurry drops and the filter is scoured.

Duignan, M.; Nash, C.; Poirier, M.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Development of improved methods for locating large areas of bypassed oil in Louisiana. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the project was to develop a predictive method for locating Pockets of bypassed mobile oil and estimating the volume of this resource. A secondary objective of the project was to transfer the learned technology to small independent operators who drill a majority of the domestic wells but lack access to a research staff. Another objective was to develop a format for compiling data on Louisiana reservoirs in a form that can be used by government and industry to evaluate the resource and plan future activities. The format developed will be demonstrated using data compiled in the bypassed oil study for selected reservoirs. The project was being funded over a three-year period and was jointly funded by the DOE and the state of Louisiana. The objectives of the project were accomplished using an interdisciplinary approach which included the disciplines of engineering, geology, and computer science. The work was organized into the following major tasks: Selection of reservoirs for study of bypassed oil potential; development of improved reservoir simulator for bypassed oil prospecting; an interdisciplinary reservoir characterization study of Louisiana reservoirs; active modelling of bypassed oil for three Louisiana reservoirs; and technology transfer activities.

Bourgoyne, A.T. Jr.; Kimbrell, C.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Low Cost Ceramics:Low Cost Ceramics: Applications in Water FiltrationApplications in Water Filtration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Filtration and Building Insulationand Building Insulation Kyle Carlson (U. of IowaKyle Carlson (U. of Iowa ResultsResults II. BuildingII. Building Material/InsulationMaterial/Insulation MotivationMotivation Theory

Petta, Jason

59

Bypass apparatus and method for series connected energy storage devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bypass apparatus and method for series connected energy storage devices. Each of the energy storage devices coupled to a common series connection has an associated bypass unit connected thereto in parallel. A current bypass unit includes a sensor which is coupled in parallel with an associated energy storage device or cell and senses an energy parameter indicative of an energy state of the cell, such as cell voltage. A bypass switch is coupled in parallel with the energy storage cell and operable between a non-activated state and an activated state. The bypass switch, when in the non-activated state, is substantially non-conductive with respect to current passing through the energy storage cell and, when in the activated state, provides a bypass current path for passing current to the series connection so as to bypass the associated cell. A controller controls activation of the bypass switch in response to the voltage of the cell deviating from a pre-established voltage setpoint. The controller may be included within the bypass unit or be disposed on a control platform external to the bypass unit. The bypass switch may, when activated, establish a permanent or a temporary bypass current path.

Rouillard, Jean (Saint-Luc, CA); Comte, Christophe (Montreal, CA); Daigle, Dominik (St-Hyacinthe, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Side Stream Filtration Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program By Pacific Northwest National Laboratory X. Duan, J.L. Williamson, K.L McMordie Stoughton and B.K. Boyd October 2012 FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM i Contact Will Lintner, PE Federal Energy Management Program U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave. SW Washington, DC 20585-0121 Phone: (202) 586-3120 E-mail: william.lintner@ee.doe.gov Cover photo: Cooling Towers. Photo from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ii Acknowledgements The authors of the report would like to thank the following individuals that provided support to

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61

Hoover Dam Bypass Project Phase II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EA-1478 DOE/EA-1478 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Western' s Hoover Dam Bypass Project Phase II (Double-Circuiting a Portion of the Hoover-Mead #5 and #7 230-kV Transmission Lines with the Henderson-Mead #1 230-kV Transmission Line, Clark County, Nevada) Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration 615 S. 43 rd Avenue Phoenix, Arizona 85009 Prepared by: Transcon Environmental 3740 East Southern Avenue, Suite 218 Mesa, Arizona 85206 (480) 807-0095 October 2003 Western Area Power Administration Hoover Dam Bypass Project Phase II page i Environmental Assessment TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................1 1.1 Background..................................................................................................................................1

62

Demand Controlled Filtration in an Industrial Cleanroom  

SciTech Connect

In an industrial cleanroom, significant energy savings were realized by implementing two types of demand controlled filtration (DCF) strategies, one based on particle counts and one on occupancy. With each strategy the speed of the recirculation fan filter units was reduced to save energy. When the control was based on particle counts, the energy use was 60% of the baseline configuration of continuous fan operation. With simple occupancy sensors, the energy usage was 63% of the baseline configuration. During the testing of DCF, no complaints were registered by the operator of the cleanroom concerning processes and products being affected by the DCF implementation.

Faulkner, David; DiBartolomeo, Dennis; Wang, Duo

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A rigid porous filter and filtration method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention involves a porous rigid filter comprising a plurality of concentric filtration elements having internal flow passages and forming external flow passages there between. The present invention also involves a pressure vessel containing the filter for the removal of particulate from high pressure particulate containing gases, and further involves a method for using the filter to remove such particulate. The present filter has the advantage of requiring fewer filter elements due to the high surface area- to-volume ratio provided by the filter, requires a reduced pressure vessel size, and exhibits enhanced mechanical design properties, improved cleaning properties, configuration options, modularity and ease of fabrication.

Chiang, Ta-Kuan; Straub, Douglas, Straub L.; Dennis, Richard A.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

U-246: Tigase XMPP Dialback Protection Bypass Vulnerability | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Tigase XMPP Dialback Protection Bypass Vulnerability 6: Tigase XMPP Dialback Protection Bypass Vulnerability U-246: Tigase XMPP Dialback Protection Bypass Vulnerability August 28, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Tigase XMPP Dialback Protection Bypass Vulnerability PLATFORM: Tigase 5.x ABSTRACT: A vulnerability has been reported in Tigase, which can be exploited by malicious people to bypass certain security restrictions. reference LINKS: XMPP Standards Foundation Secunia Advisory SA50362 tigase.org CVE-2012-4670 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: The vulnerability is caused due to an error within the XMPP protocol implementation, which does not properly verify the "Verify Response" and "Authorization Response" messages. This can be exploited to spoof a domain and bypass the Dialback protection.

65

FACTORS AFFECTING RURAL KENTUCKY PATIENTS HOSPITAL CHOICE AND BYPASS BEHAVIOR.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the underutilization of rural hospitals in Kentucky. The authors study hospital and patient characteristics to determine why and how rural patients bypass… (more)

He, Xiao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Oil Bypass Filter Testing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Reports to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Oil Bypass Filter Testing Reports on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Oil...

67

Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Demonstrated Petroleum Reduction Using Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy and Light Vehicles James Francfort (PI) Timothy...

68

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Oil Bypass Filter Specifications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Test Procedures to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Oil Bypass Filter Specifications and Test Procedures on Facebook Tweet about Advanced...

69

V-237: TYPO3 Security Bypass Vulnerabilities | Department of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SA54717 Security Focus ID 62257 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: 1) Some errors when handling file actions can be exploited to bypass file action permission restrictions and...

70

Heat exchanger bypass system for an absorption refrigeration system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger bypass system for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. The bypass system operates to pass strong solution from the generator around the heat exchanger to the absorber of the absorption refrigeration system when strong solution builds up in the generator above a selected level indicative of solidification of strong solution in the heat exchanger or other such blockage. The bypass system includes a bypass line with a gooseneck located in the generator for controlling flow of strong solution into the bypass line and for preventing refrigerant vapor in the generator from entering the bypass line during normal operation of the refrigeration system. Also, the bypass line includes a trap section filled with liquid for providing a barrier to maintain the normal pressure difference between the generator and the absorber even when the gooseneck of the bypass line is exposed to refrigerant vapor in the generator. Strong solution, which may accumulate in the trap section of the bypass line, is diluted, to prevent solidification, by supplying weak solution to the trap section from a purge system for the absorption refrigeration system.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Using self-aggregating molecules for water filtration.  

Disclosure Number 201303058 Technology Summary ... invention are small peptides that are easy to produce (b) the filtration is highly sensitive to ...

72

Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Media Contacts Can combining economizers with improved filtration save energy and protect equipment in data centers? Title Can combining economizers with...

73

Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form of gibbsite, and its impact on filtration. The initial sample was diluted with a liquid simulant to simulate the receiving concentration of retrieved tank waste into the UFP2 vessel (< 10 wt% undissolved solids). Filtration testing was performed on the dilute waste sample and dewatered to a higher solids concentration. Filtration testing was then performed on the concentrated slurry. Afterwards, the slurry was caustic leached to remove aluminum present in the undissolved solid present in the waste. The leach was planned to simulate leaching conditions in the UFP2 vessel. During the leach, slurry supernate samples were collected to measure the dissolution rate of aluminum in the waste. After the slurry cooled down from the elevated leach temperature, the leach liquor was dewatered from the solids. The remaining slurry was rinsed and dewatered with caustic solutions to remove a majority of the dissolved aluminum from the leached slurry. The concentration of sodium hydroxide in the rinse solutions was high enough to maintain the solubility of the aluminum in the dewatered rinse solutions after dilution of the slurry supernate. Filtration tests were performed on the final slurry to compare to filtration performance before and after caustic leaching.

Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

74

Bypass aware instruction scheduling for register file power reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since register files suffer from some of the highest power densities within processors, designers have investigated several architectural strategies for register file power reduction, including "On Demand RF Read" where the register file is read only ... Keywords: architecture-sensitive compiler, bypass-sensitive, forwarding paths, operation table, power consumption, processor bypasses, register file, reservation table

Sanghyun Park; Aviral Shrivastava; Nikil Dutt; Alex Nicolau; Yunheung Paek; Eugene Earlie

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

T-646: Debian fex authentication bypass | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Debian fex authentication bypass 6: Debian fex authentication bypass T-646: Debian fex authentication bypass June 14, 2011 - 3:45pm Addthis PROBLEM: The vulnerability is caused due to the application not properly verifying the existence of "auth-ID" when uploading files and can be exploited to bypass the authentication mechanism. PLATFORM: Debian fex ABSTRACT: Debian security discovered that fex, a web service for transferring very large, files, is not properly validating authentication IDs. While the service properly validates existing authentication IDs, an attacker who is not specifying any authentication ID at all, can bypass the authentication procedure. reference LINKS: DSA-2259-1 fex Secunia Advisory SA44940 Debian Security Advisory DSA-2259-1 fex-20110610.tar Vulnerability Report: Debian GNU/Linux 6.0

76

T-674: Drupal Secure Password Hashes Module Security Bypass Vulnerability |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

74: Drupal Secure Password Hashes Module Security Bypass 74: Drupal Secure Password Hashes Module Security Bypass Vulnerability T-674: Drupal Secure Password Hashes Module Security Bypass Vulnerability July 22, 2011 - 3:00pm Addthis PROBLEM: Drupal Secure Password Hashes Module Security Bypass Vulnerability PLATFORM: Drupal Secure Password Hashes 6.X-1.0 Drupal Secure Password Hashes 5.X-1.4 ABSTRACT: The Secure Password Hashes module for Drupal is prone to a security-bypass vulnerability. reference LINKS: Drupal Homepage SA-CONTRIB-2011-026 - Secure Password Hashes (phpass) - Multiple Vulnerabilities IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: This module uses the PHPass hashing library to try to store users hashed passwords securely. The module sets a fixed string for the 'pass' column in the {users} database column but does not replace the pass attribute of the account

77

V-237: TYPO3 Security Bypass Vulnerabilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

V-237: TYPO3 Security Bypass Vulnerabilities V-237: TYPO3 Security Bypass Vulnerabilities V-237: TYPO3 Security Bypass Vulnerabilities September 9, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Some vulnerabilities have been reported in TYPO3 PLATFORM: TYPO3 6.x ABSTRACT: TYPO3 comes with the possibility to restrict editors to certain file actions (copy, delete, move etc.) and to restrict these actions to be performed in certain locations REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA54717 Security Focus ID 62257 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: 1) Some errors when handling file actions can be exploited to bypass file action permission restrictions and e.g. create or read arbitrary files within or outside the webroot. 2) An error when validating file names within the file renaming functionality can be exploited to bypass the denied file extensions check

78

Analytical liquid test sample filtration apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid sample filtration apparatus includes: a) a module retaining filter elements; b) a filter clamping and fluid injection apparatus positioned relative to the module to engage a filter element thereon, and includes a pair of first and second opposing engageable members to sealing engage a filter element therebetween; c) an inlet tube connected to an opposing engageable member; d) an outlet tube connected to an opposing engageable member; e) a motor to move the module relative to the filter clamping and injection apparatus to register filter elements on the module to the clamping and injection apparatus; and f) a motor associated with the filter clamping and injection apparatus to move the opposing engageable members into substantial sealing fluid communication relative to a filter element on the module. An apparatus for engaging opposing ends of a filter element includes: a) a member having a recess configured to engage one end of a filter element, including a first fluid passage communicating with the recess to pass fluid between the recess and externally of the member; and b) a second member positioned in opposing juxtaposition relative to the other member, and having a projection sized and shaped to matingly fit within the other member recess, the second member projection including a second recess configured to engage the other end of the filter element, the second member including a second fluid passage communicating with the second recess to pass fluid between the second recess and externally of the second member.

Lohnes, Brent C. (Soda Springs, ID); Turner, Terry D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Clark, Michael L. (Menan, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Analytical liquid test sample filtration apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid sample filtration apparatus includes: (a) a module retaining filter elements; (b) a filter clamping and fluid injection apparatus positioned relative to the module to engage a filter element thereon, and includes a pair of first and second opposing engageable members to engage a filter element there between; (c) an inlet tube connected to an opposing engageable member; (d) an outlet tube connected to an opposing engageable member; (e) a motor to move the module relative to the filter clamping and injection apparatus to register filter elements on the module to the clamping and injection apparatus; and (f) a motor associated with the filter clamping and injection apparatus to move the opposing engageable members into substantial sealing fluid communication relative to a filter element on the module. An apparatus for engaging opposing ends of a filter element includes: (a) a member having a recess configured to engage one end of a filter element, including a first fluid passage communicating with the recess to pass fluid between the recess and externally of the member; and (b) a second member positioned in opposing juxtaposition relative to the other member, and having a projection sized and shaped to matingly fit within the other member recess, the second member projection including a second recess configured to engage the other end of the filter element, the second member including a second fluid passage communicating with the second recess to pass fluid between the second recess and externally of the second member. 8 figs.

Lohnes, B.C.; Turner, T.D.; Klingler, K.M.; Clark, M.L.

1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

80

Sorghum genome sequencing by methylation filtration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorghum bicolor is a close relative of maize and is a staple crop in Africa and much of the developing world because of its superior tolerance of arid growth conditions. We have generated sequence from the hypomethylated portion of the sorghum genome by applying methylation filtration (MF) technology. The evidence suggests that 96 % of the genes have been sequence tagged, with an average coverage of 65 % across their length. Remarkably, this level of gene discovery was accomplished after generating a raw coverage of less than 300 megabases of the 735-megabase genome. MF preferentially captures exons and introns, promoters, microRNAs, and simple sequence repeats, and minimizes interspersed repeats, thus providing a robust view of the functional parts of the genome. The sorghum MF sequence set is beneficial to research on sorghum and is also a powerful resource for comparative genomics among the grasses and across the entire plant kingdom. Thousands of hypothetical gene predictions in rice and Arabidopsis are supported by the sorghum dataset, and genomic similarities highlight evolutionarily conserved regions that will lead to a better understanding of rice and Arabidopsis.

Joseph A. Bedell; Muhammad A. Budiman; Andrew Nunberg; Robert W. Citek; Dan Robbins; Joshua Jones; Elizabeth Flick; Theresa Rohlfing; Jason Fries; Kourtney Bradford; Jennifer Mcmenamy; Michael Smith; Heather Holeman; Bruce A. Roe; Graham Wiley; Ian F. Korf; Pablo D. Rabinowicz; Nathan Lakey; W. Richard Mccombie; Jeffrey A. Jeddeloh; Robert A. Martienssen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Technical Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Towers (photo from Pacific Cooling Towers (photo from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) * Scaling: Scaling is the precipitation of dissolved mineral components that have become saturated in solution, which can lower efficiency of the system. * Fouling: Fouling occurs when suspended particles or biologic growth forms an insulating film on heat transfer surfaces. Common foulants include organic matter, process oils, and silt, which can also lower system performance. * Microbiological Activity: Microbiological activity refers to microorganisms that live and grow in the cooling system that can contribute

82

Technical Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooling Towers (photo from Pacific Cooling Towers (photo from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) * Scaling: Scaling is the precipitation of dissolved mineral components that have become saturated in solution, which can lower efficiency of the system. * Fouling: Fouling occurs when suspended particles or biologic growth forms an insulating film on heat transfer surfaces. Common foulants include organic matter, process oils, and silt, which can also lower system performance. * Microbiological Activity: Microbiological activity refers to microorganisms that live and grow in the cooling system that can contribute

83

Catalytic fabric filtration for simultaneous NO{sub x} and particulate control. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the project proposed was to evaluate the catalyst-coated fabric filter concept for effective control of NO{sub 2} and particulate emissions simultaneously. General goals included demonstrating high removal efficiency of NO{sub x} and particulate matter, acceptable bag and catalyst life, and that process economics show a significant cost savings in comparison to a commercial SCR process and conventional particulate control. Specific goals included the following: reduce NO{sub x} emissions to 60 ppM or less; demonstrate particulate removal efficiency of >99.5%; demonstrate a bag/catalyst life of >1 year; Control ammonia slip to <25 ppM; show that catalytic fabric filtration can achieve a 50% cost savings over conventional fabric filtration and SCR control technology; determine compatibility with S0{sub 2} removal systems; and show that the concept results in a nonhazardous waste product.

Weber, G.F.; Dunham, G.E.; Laudal, D.L.; Ness, S.R.; Schelkoph, G.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Simulation of filtration for suspension transport in porous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the development and application of a novel method for analyzing the filtration of particles transported through a granular porous medium. The proposed analysis considers the deposition of particles ...

Kim, Yun Sung, 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Improved filtration membranes through self-organizing amphiphilic comb copolymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The operating cost of a membrane filtration system is generally determined by two major factors: the permeability of the membrane to water, and the lifetime of the membrane. Both of these are strongly affected by the ...

Asatekin Alexiou, Ayse

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

V-106: Citrix Access Gateway Unspecified Security Bypass Vulnerability |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Citrix Access Gateway Unspecified Security Bypass 6: Citrix Access Gateway Unspecified Security Bypass Vulnerability V-106: Citrix Access Gateway Unspecified Security Bypass Vulnerability March 7, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability has been reported in Citrix Access Gateway PLATFORM: Standard Edition 5.0.x prior to 5.0.4.223524. Versions 4.5.x and 4.6.x are not affected by this vulnerability ABSTRACT: A vulnerability has been reported in Citrix Access Gateway, which can be exploited by malicious people to bypass certain security restrictions. REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA52479 Security Tracker Alert ID 1028255 com/id/1028255 CVE-2013-2263 Citrix Knowledge Center IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: The vulnerability could allow an unauthenticated user to gain access to network resources. IMPACT:

87

V-103: RSA Authentication Agent Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: RSA Authentication Agent Lets Remote Users Bypass 3: RSA Authentication Agent Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication Requirements V-103: RSA Authentication Agent Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication Requirements March 4, 2013 - 12:27am Addthis PROBLEM: RSA Authentication Agent Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication Requirements PLATFORM: RSA Authentication Agent 7.1, 7.1.1 for Microsoft Windows ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in RSA Authentication Agent. REFERENCE LINKS: RSA SecurCare SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028230 CVE-2013-0931 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: On systems configured for Quick PIN Unlock, the system will request a PIN instead of a full Passcode when the session is activated from an active screensaver after the Quick PIN Unlock timeout has expired. RSA Authentication Agent on Windows Vista, Windows 7, Windows 2008, and

88

The Role of Filtration in Maintaining Clean Heat Exchanger Coils  

SciTech Connect

The main purpose of the study was to investigate the role of filtration in maintaining clean heat exchanger coils and overall performance. Combinations of 6 different levels of filtration (MERV 14, 11, 8, 6, 4, and no filter) and 4 different coils (an eight-row lanced-fin coil, HX8L), (an eight-row wavy-fin coil, HX8W), (a four-row lanced-fin coil, HX4L) and (a two-row lanced-fin coil, HX2L) were tested at 4 different air velocities (1.52, 2.03, 2.54,3.05 m/s (300, 400, 500, 600 ft/min)). The fouled conditions were obtained after injection of 600 grams of ASHRAE standard dust upstream of the filter/coil combination. This magnitude of dust is representative of a year of normal operation for an air conditioning system. The air-side pressure drops of the coils and filters and air-side heat transfer coefficients of the coils were determined from the measurements under the clean and fouled conditions. Depending upon the filter and coil test, the coil pressure drops increased in the range of 6%-30% for an air velocity at 2.54 m/s (500 ft/min). The impact was significantly greater for tests performed without a filter. The largest relative effect of fouling on pressure drop occurs for coils with fewer rows and having lanced fins. Coils with a greater number of rows can hold more dust so that a fixed amount of dust has a relatively smaller impact. The impact of fouling on air-side heat transfer coefficients was found to be relatively small. In some cases, heat transfer was actually enhanced due to additional turbulence caused by the presence of dust. The experimental results for pressure drops and heat transfer coefficients were correlated and the correlations were implemented within computer models of prototypical rooftop air conditioners and used to evaluate the impact of fouling on cooling capacity and EER. The equipment cooling capacity is reduced with fouling primarily because of a decrease in air flow due to the increase pressure drop rather than due to changes in h eat transfer coefficient. In most cases, the EER was reduced with fouling primarily due to increased fan power. However, the changes in EER were relatively small, in the range of 1%-9% (10%). For most cases, equipment having low efficiency filters had higher EER after fouling than equipment with high efficiency filters, because the high efficiency filter caused significantly higher pressure drops than the low efficiency filters. The extra filter pressure drop outweighed the reduced coil pressure drop after fouling. The impact of fan efficiency curves was also investigated in the study. The energy penalty associated with high efficiency filters was reduced considerably with higher efficiency fans. There is an energy penalty associated with the use of high efficiency filtration. However, the primary reason for selecting high efficiency filters for a particular application would be improved air quality. For HX8L, the quantity of dust passing through the coil with a MERV4 filter was approximately 30 times the dust passing the coil with a MERV14 filter. Without an upstream filter, the quantity of dust passing through the coil was approximately 60 times the value for a MERV14 filter.

Li Yang; James E. Braun; Eckhard A. Groll

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

89

CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Flow and Crossflow in the Prismatic Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Nuclear Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Very High Temperature Rector (VHTR) had been designated as one of those promising reactors for the Next Generation (IV) Nuclear Plant (NGNP). For a prismatic core VHTR, one of the most crucial design considerations is the bypass flow and crossflow effect. The bypass flow occurs when the coolant flow into gaps between fuel blocks. These gaps are formed as a result of carbon expansion and shrinkage induced by radiations and manufacturing and installation errors. Hot spots may appear in the core if the large portion of the coolant flows into bypass gaps instead of coolant channels in which the cooling efficiency is much higher. A preliminary three dimensional steady-state CFD analysis was performed with commercial code STARCCM+ 6.04 to investigate the bypass flow and crossflow phenomenon in the prismatic VHTR core. The k-? turbulence model was selected because of its robustness and low computational cost with respect to a decent accuracy for varied flow patterns. The wall treatment used in the present work is two-layer all y+ wall treatment to blend the wall laws to estimate the shear stress. Uniform mass flow rate was chose as the inlet condition and the outlet condition was zero gauge pressure outlet. Grid independence study was performed and the results indicated that the discrepancy of the solution due to the mesh density was within 2% of the bypass flow fraction. The computational results showed that the bypass flow fraction was around 12%. Furthermore, the presence of the crossflow gap resulted in a up to 28% reduction of the coolant in the bypass flow gap while mass flow rate of coolant in coolant channels increased by around 5%. The pressure drop at the inlet due to the sudden contraction in area could be around 1kpa while the value was about 180 Pa around the crossflow gap region. The error analysis was also performed to evaluate the accumulated errors from the process of discretization and iteration. It was found that the total error was around 4% and the variation for the bypass flow fraction was within 1%.

Wang, Huhu 1985-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Bypass flow computations on the LOFA transient in a VHTR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bypass flow in the prismatic gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR) is not intentionally designed to occur, but is present in the gaps between graphite blocks. Previous studies of the bypass flow in the core indicated that the cooling provided by flow in the bypass gaps had a significant effect on temperature and flow distributions for normal operating conditions. However, the flow and heat transports in the core are changed significantly after a Loss of Flow Accident (LOFA). This study aims to study the effect and role of the bypass flow after a LOFA in terms of the temperature and flow distributions and for the heat transport out of the core by natural convection of the coolant for a 1/12 symmetric section of the active core which is composed of images and mirror images of two sub-region models. The two sub-region models, 9 x 1/12 and 15 x 1/12 symmetric sectors of the active core, are employed as the CFD flow models using computational grid systems of 70.2 million and 117 million nodes, respectively. It is concluded that the effect of bypass flow is significant for the initial conditions and the beginning of LOFA, but the bypass flow has little effect after a long period of time in the transient computation of natural circulation.

Yu-Hsin Tung; Richard W. Johnson; Yuh-Ming Ferng; Ching-Chang Chieng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Filtration and Leach Testing for REDOX Sludge and S-Saltcake Actual Waste Sample Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste-testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on filtration/leaching tests performed on two of the eight waste composite samples and follow-on parametric tests to support aluminum leaching results from those tests.

Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Geeting, John GH; Hallen, Richard T.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Snow, Lanee A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

92

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Ninth Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Background on prior quarterly reports * Bus mileage and performance status * Used engine-oil disposal costs * Unscheduled oil change * Light-duty vehicle test status Oct 3-Dec 3...

93

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Eighth Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Background on prior quarterly reports * Bus mileage and performance status * Used engine-oil disposal costs * Unscheduled oil change * Light-duty vehicle test status Oct 3-Dec 3...

94

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation - Seventh Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Laboratory-WV National Renewable Energy Laboratory Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves CO, UT, WY Nevada Site Office Nevada Test Site Oak Ridge Institute for...

95

Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Seventh Quarterly Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Laboratory-WV National Renewable Energy Laboratory Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves CO, UT, WY Nevada Site Office Nevada Test Site Oak Ridge Institute for...

96

Photovoltaic-module bypass-diode encapsulation. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and processing techniques necessary to incorporate bypass diodes within the module encapsulant are presented in this annual report. A comprehensive survey of available pad-mounted PN junction and Schottky diodes led to the selection of Semicon PN junction diode cells for this application. Diode junction-to-heat spreader thermal resistance measurements, performed on a variety of mounted diode chip types and sizes, have yielded values which are consistently below 1/sup 0/C per watt, but show some instability when thermally cycled over the temperature range from -40 to 150/sup 0/C. Based on the results of a detailed thermal analysis, which covered the range of bypass currents from 2 to 20 amperes, three representative experimental modules, each incorporating integral bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies of various sizes, were designed and fabricated. Thermal testing of these modules has enabled the formation of a recommended heat spreader plate sizing relationship. The production cost of three encapsulated bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies were compared with similarly rated externally-mounted packaged diodes. An assessment of bypass diode reliability, which relies heavily on rectifying diode failure rate data, leads to the general conclusion that, when proper designed and installed, these devices will improve the overall reliability of a terrestrial array over a 20 year design lifetime.

Not Available

1983-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

97

Deashing of coal liquids by sonically assisted filtration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project seeks to improve the effectiveness and reduce the cost of coal liquefaction by novel applications of sonic and ultrasonic energy. The specific purpose of this project is to develop and improve means for the economical removal of dispersed solid particles of ash, unreacted coal, and spent catalyst from direct and indirect coal liquefaction resids by using sonic or ultrasonic waves. Product streams containing solids are generated in both direct and indirect coal liquefaction processes. Direct coal liquefaction processes generate liquid products which contain solids including coal-originated mineral matter, unreacted coal, and spent dispersed catalyst. The removal of these solids from a product stream is one of the most difficult problems in direct coal liquefaction processes. On this report, results are discussed for sonically assisted crossflow filtration of V-1067 resid, diluted with No. 2 fuel oil, and sonically assisted batch filtrations of solids concentrates from continuous cross-flow filtration experiments.

Slomka, B.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

V-005: ModSecurity Multipart Message Parsing Security Bypass Vulnerability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: ModSecurity Multipart Message Parsing Security Bypass 5: ModSecurity Multipart Message Parsing Security Bypass Vulnerability V-005: ModSecurity Multipart Message Parsing Security Bypass Vulnerability October 18, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: ModSecurity Multipart Message Parsing Security Bypass Vulnerability PLATFORM: Modsecurity Versions prior to 2.70 ABSTRACT: SEC Consult has reported a vulnerability in ModSecurity, which can be exploited by malicious people to bypass certain security restrictions REFERENCE LINKS: SEC Consult Secunia Advisory SA49853 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: The vulnerability is caused due to an error when parsing multipart requests and can be exploited to bypass certain filtering rules. IMPACT: Remote Security Bypass SOLUTION: Update to version 2.70. Addthis Related Articles V-017: Apache Tomcat Security Bypass and Denial of Service Vulnerabilities

99

Feasibility study of new technology for intake air filtration  

SciTech Connect

This report comprises the results of a project sponsored by the Pipeline Research Committee of the American Gas Association (A.G.A). The work was composed of three major efforts: A literature search was performed to establish the state of the art of particle removal from gases, particularly electrostatic precipitation, and to identify the leading vendors of the equipment--considering both experience and technical expertise. Two chosen companies were visited to determine their technical capabilities as they apply to gas turbine inlet air filtration. A representative gas turbine was specified by the A.G.A. as being the equivalent of a GE Model 3002J turbine, with an airflow of 91,200 acfm. A specification based upon that airflow was prepared and submitted to the two vendors. Each vendor prepared a proposal for a filter system compliant with the specification. The proposed air filtration equipment is sufficiently different from existing products that it was judged not beneficial to visit manufacturing facilities. Both vendors are reputable suppliers of air filtration equipment. Compressors fouling is caused by the ingestion of substances which deposit and adhere to blade surfaces, resulting in reduced aerodynamic efficiency and decreased available output. Air contamination could be significantly reduced by the use of more efficient air filtration systems, especially through the reduction of the quantity of smaller particles ingested. The consequent lower loss of output power and decreased cleaning efforts provide lower costs of operation and increased shaft power. This study is intended to provide information relative to the use of new technology for air inlet filtration on gas turbines in gas pipeline pumping applications. 61 figs., 11 tabs.

Lawson, C.C.

1989-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Nutritionally Enhanced Edible Oil and Oilseed ProcessingChapter 9 Filtration Techniques in Vegetable Oil Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nutritionally Enhanced Edible Oil and Oilseed Processing Chapter 9 Filtration Techniques in Vegetable Oil Processing Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 9 Filtration Techniques in Veg

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Blur Filtration Fails to Preserve Privacy for Home-Based Video Conferencing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blur Filtration Fails to Preserve Privacy for Home-Based Video Conferencing CARMAN NEUSTAEDTER, S. and Boyle, M. (2006). Blur Filtration Fails to Preserve Privacy for Home-Based Video Conferencing

Greenberg, Saul

102

Bleaching and Purifying Fats and Oils: Theory and PracticeChapter 6 Filtration and Filters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bleaching and Purifying Fats and Oils: Theory and Practice Chapter 6 Filtration and Filters Processing eChapters Processing Press   Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 Filtration and Filters from ...

103

Thermal Reliability Study of Bypass Diodes in Photovoltaic Modules (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the result of high-temperature durability and thermal cycling testing and analysis for the selected diodes to study the detail of the thermal design and relative long-term reliability of the bypass diodes used to limit the detrimental effects of module hot-spot susceptibility.

Zhang, Z.; Wohlgemuth, J.; Kurtz, S.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Cycling firing method for bypass operation of bridge converters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The bridge converter comprises a number of switching elements and an electronic logic system which regulated the electric power levels by controlling the firing, i.e., the initiation of the conduction period of the switching elements. Cyclic firing of said elements allows the direct current to bypass the alternating current system with high power factor and negligible losses.

Zabar, Zivan (99-72 66th Rd., Apt. 9N, Forest Hills, NY 11375)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Evaluation of A New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with the NCAR Climate Atmospheric Model (CAM3) and ARM Observations Fourth Quarter 2007 ARM Metric Report September 2007 Xiaohong Liu and Steven J. Ghan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Shaocheng Xie, James Boyle, and Stephen A. Klein Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research X. Liu et al., September 2007, DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-012 Summary Mixed-phase clouds are composed of a mixture of cloud droplets and ice crystals. The cloud microphysics in mixed-phase clouds can significantly impact cloud optical depth, cloud radiative forcing,

106

Demonstration of Advanced Filtration Technologies: Developing Energy-rebate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration of Advanced Filtration Technologies: Developing Energy-rebate Demonstration of Advanced Filtration Technologies: Developing Energy-rebate Criteria through Performing Standard Laboratory Tests and Statistical Analyses Title Demonstration of Advanced Filtration Technologies: Developing Energy-rebate Criteria through Performing Standard Laboratory Tests and Statistical Analyses Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-61684 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Xu, Tengfang T., and Duo Wang Call Number LBNL-61684 Abstract Fan-filter unit systems are used for re-circulating clean air in cleanrooms are gaining popularity in California as well as in the rest of the world. Under normal operation, fan-filter units require high power demand, typically ranging from 100 to 300 W per square meter of cleanroom floor area (or approximately 10-30 W/ft2). Operating 7 by 24, they normally consume significant electric energy, while providing required contamination control for cleanrooms in various industries. Previous studies focused on development of a standard test procedure for fan-filter units. This project is to improve the methods, and develop new information to demonstrate the methods can be used to assist the industries to apply more energy-efficient fan-filter units in cleanrooms.

107

Achieving very low mercury levels in refinery wastewater by membrane filtration.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were evaluated for their ability to achieve the world's most stringent Hg discharge criterion (oil refinery's wastewater. The membrane processes were operated at three different pressures to demonstrate the potential for each membrane technology to achieve the targeted effluent mercury concentrations. The presence of mercury in the particulate form in the refinery wastewater makes the use of MF and UF membrane technologies more attractive in achieving very low mercury levels in the treated wastewater. Both NF and RO were also able to meet the target mercury concentration at lower operating pressures (20.7 bar). However, higher operating pressures ({ge}34.5 bar) had a significant effect on NF and RO flux and fouling rates, as well as on permeate quality. SEM images of the membranes showed that pore blockage and narrowing were the dominant fouling mechanisms for the MF membrane while surface coverage was the dominant fouling mechanism for the other membranes. The correlation between mercury concentration and particle size distribution was also investigated to understand mercury removal mechanisms by membrane filtration. The mean particle diameter decreased with filtration from 1.1 {+-} 0.0 {micro}m to 0.74 {+-} 0.2 {micro}m after UF.

Urgun Demirtas, M.; Benda, P.; Gillenwater, P. S.; Negri, M. C.; Xiong, H.; Snyder, S. W. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( ES)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

RTD bypass system elimination at Virgil C. Summer Station  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the resistance temperature detector (RTD) bypass system removal project which was a high dose job, a large capital project and had the potential to be a critical path item. The purpose of this project was to remove the existing direct immersion temperature detection system requiring primary coolant bypass piping, and replace it with the latest in RTD technology. These are well-mounted RTDs, which are more reliable and require much less personnel radiation dose during maintenance. As a result of the project, the source term at V.C. Summer was significantly reduced and dose rates inside the loop cavities were decreased by a factor of seven on average. This has resulted in lower cumulative exposure for reactor coolant pump, steam generator, and general maintenance activities.

Mothena, P.A. (South Carolina Electric and Gas Co. (US))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

U-061: RSA Adaptive Authentication Bugs Let Remote Users Bypass Certain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: RSA Adaptive Authentication Bugs Let Remote Users Bypass 1: RSA Adaptive Authentication Bugs Let Remote Users Bypass Certain Security Controls U-061: RSA Adaptive Authentication Bugs Let Remote Users Bypass Certain Security Controls December 14, 2011 - 8:17am Addthis PROBLEM: RSA Adaptive Authentication Bugs Let Remote Users Bypass Certain Security Controls. PLATFORM: 6.0.2.1 SP1 Patch 2 and SP1 Patch 3 6.0.2.1 SP2 and SP2 Patch 1 6.0.2.1 SP3 ABSTRACT: A remote user may be able to bypass certain security controls. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026420 Security Focus: ESA-2011-036 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: Two vulnerabilities were reported in RSA Adaptive Authentication (On-Premise). A remote user may be able to bypass certain security controls. A remote user can send specially crafted data elements to affect the Device

110

V-057: eXtplorer "ext_find_user()" Authentication Bypass Vulnerability |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

V-057: eXtplorer "ext_find_user()" Authentication Bypass V-057: eXtplorer "ext_find_user()" Authentication Bypass Vulnerability V-057: eXtplorer "ext_find_user()" Authentication Bypass Vulnerability December 28, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis December 28 2012 - 6:00am PROBLEM: eXtplorer "ext_find_user()" Authentication Bypass Vulnerability PLATFORM: eXtplorer 2.x ABSTRACT: A vulnerability has been reported in eXtplorer, which can be exploited by malicious people to bypass certain security restrictions. REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA51636 eXtplorer 2.1.3 Security Release IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: eXtplorer was notified of a problem within the authentication system of eXtplorer Versions 2.1.2, 2.1.1, 2.1.0 and 2.1.0RC5 that have been found to be vulnerable to an authentication bypass bug.

111

U-234: Oracle MySQL User Login Security Bypass Vulnerability | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

234: Oracle MySQL User Login Security Bypass Vulnerability 234: Oracle MySQL User Login Security Bypass Vulnerability U-234: Oracle MySQL User Login Security Bypass Vulnerability August 14, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Oracle MySQL User Login Security Bypass Vulnerability PLATFORM: Version(s): prior to 5.1.63 and 5.5.25 are vulnerable. ABSTRACT: Oracle MySQL is prone to a security bypass vulnerability Attackers can exploit this issue to bypass certain security restrictions. REFERENCE LINKS: http://www.securityfocus.com/bid/53911/discuss CVE-2012-2122 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: Security researchers have released details about a vulnerability in the MySQL server that could allow potential attackers to access MySQL databases without inputting proper authentication credentials.The vulnerability is identified as CVE-2012-2122 and was addressed in MySQL 5.1.63 and 5.5.25 in

112

V-077: Barracuda SSL VPN Bug Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

property (via 'setSysProp.jsp') to bypass access restrictions and gain access to the API functionality. This can be exploited to download configuration files, download database...

113

V-236: MediaWiki CentralAuth Extension Authentication Bypass...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: The vulnerability is caused due to an error when handling auto-logins and can be exploited to bypass the authentication mechanism by...

114

U-247: EMC Cloud Tiering Appliance Flaw Lets Remote Users Bypass...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Configuration Manager Database Authentication Bypass Vulnerability V-120: EMC Smarts Network Configuration Manager Java RMI Access Control Flaw Lets Remote Users Gain Full Control...

115

Inferring Species Trees Directly from Biallelic Genetic Markers: Bypassing Gene Trees in a Full Coalescent Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inferring Species Trees Directly from Biallelic Genetic Markers: Bypassing Gene Trees in a Full the likelihood of a species tree directly from the markers under a finite-sites model of mutation effectively in an algorithm that allows us to bypass the gene trees and compute species tree likelihoods directly from

Rosenberg, Noah

116

V-186: Drupal Login Security Module Security Bypass and Denial of Service  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Drupal Login Security Module Security Bypass and Denial of 6: Drupal Login Security Module Security Bypass and Denial of Service Vulnerability V-186: Drupal Login Security Module Security Bypass and Denial of Service Vulnerability June 26, 2013 - 1:28am Addthis PROBLEM: Drupal Login Security Module Security Bypass and Denial of Service Vulnerability PLATFORM: Login Security 6.x-1.x versions prior to 6.x-1.2. Login Security 7.x-1.x versions prior to 7.x-1.2. ABSTRACT: A security issue and a vulnerability have been reported in the Login Security module for Drupal REFERENCE LINKS: Advisory ID: DRUPAL-SA-CONTRIB-2013-053 Secunia Advisory SA53717 CVE-2013-2197 CVE-2013-2198 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: 1) The security issue is caused due to an unspecified error and can be exploited to bypass the module features. Successful exploitation requires the "soft blocking" feature to be

117

V-040: Apache Tomcat Bug Lets Remote Users Bypass Security Constraints |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Apache Tomcat Bug Lets Remote Users Bypass Security 0: Apache Tomcat Bug Lets Remote Users Bypass Security Constraints V-040: Apache Tomcat Bug Lets Remote Users Bypass Security Constraints December 5, 2012 - 1:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Apache Tomcat Bug Lets Remote Users Bypass Security Constraints PLATFORM: Version(s): 6.0.0 - 6.0.35, 7.0.0 - 7.0.29 ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in Apache Tomcat. REFERENCE LINKS: Apache Tomcat Red Hat Bugzilla - Bug 883634 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027833 CVE-2012-3546 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: When using FORM authentication it was possible to bypass the security constraint checks in the FORM authenticator by appending /j_security_check to the end of the URL if some other component (such as the Single-Sign-On valve) had called request.setUserPrincipal() before the call to

118

T-707: Apache Tomcat AJP Protocol Processing Bug Lets Remote Users Bypass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Apache Tomcat AJP Protocol Processing Bug Lets Remote Users 7: Apache Tomcat AJP Protocol Processing Bug Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication or Obtain Information T-707: Apache Tomcat AJP Protocol Processing Bug Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication or Obtain Information August 31, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Apache Tomcat. A remote user can bypass authentication or obtain potentially sensitive information. PLATFORM: Apache Tomcat 5.5.0 to 5.5.33, 6.0.0 to 6.0.33, 7.0.0 to 7.0.20 ABSTRACT: Apache Tomcat AJP protocol processing bug lets remote users bypass authentication or obtain information. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1025993 CVE-2011-3190 (under review) Apache Tomcat Security Updates IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in Apache Tomcat. A remote user can bypass

119

V-236: MediaWiki CentralAuth Extension Authentication Bypass Vulnerability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: MediaWiki CentralAuth Extension Authentication Bypass 6: MediaWiki CentralAuth Extension Authentication Bypass Vulnerability V-236: MediaWiki CentralAuth Extension Authentication Bypass Vulnerability September 6, 2013 - 4:36am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability has been reported in the CentralAuth extension for MediaWiki, which can be exploited by malicious people to bypass certain security restrictions. PLATFORM: MediaWiki CentralAuth Extension ABSTRACT: A vulnerability has been reported in the CentralAuth extension for MediaWik REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA54723 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: The vulnerability is caused due to an error when handling auto-logins and can be exploited to bypass the authentication mechanism by providing a valid username within the "centralauth_User" cookie. IMPACT:

120

V-052: Drupal Core Access Bypass and Arbitrary PHP Code Execution  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

52: Drupal Core Access Bypass and Arbitrary PHP Code Execution 52: Drupal Core Access Bypass and Arbitrary PHP Code Execution Vulnerabilities V-052: Drupal Core Access Bypass and Arbitrary PHP Code Execution Vulnerabilities December 21, 2012 - 12:15am Addthis PROBLEM: Drupal Core Access Bypass and Arbitrary PHP Code Execution Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: Drupal 6.x versions prior to 6.27 Drupal 7.x versions prior to 7.18 ABSTRACT: Drupal Core Multiple vulnerabilities REFERENCE LINKS: SA-CORE-2012-004 - Drupal core Bugtraq ID: 56993 Secunia Advisory SA51517 CVE-2012-5651 CVE-2012-5652 CVE-2012-5653 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: An attacker can exploit these issues to execute arbitrary PHP code within the context of the web server, bypass certain security restrictions, and perform unauthorized actions; this may aid in launching further attacks.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

V-017: Apache Tomcat Security Bypass and Denial of Service Vulnerabilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Apache Tomcat Security Bypass and Denial of Service 7: Apache Tomcat Security Bypass and Denial of Service Vulnerabilities V-017: Apache Tomcat Security Bypass and Denial of Service Vulnerabilities November 6, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Apache Tomcat Security Bypass and Denial of Service Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: Apache Tomcat 5.x Apache Tomcat 6.x Apache Tomcat 7.x ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in Apache Tomcat REFERENCE LINKS: Apache.org Apache Tomcat Denial of Service Apache Tomcat DIGEST authentication weaknesses Secunia Advisory SA51138 CVE-2012-2733 CVE-2012-3439 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: A weakness and a vulnerability have been reported in Apache Tomcat, which can be exploited by malicious people to bypass certain security restrictions and cause a DoS (Denial of Service). 1) An error within the "parseHeaders()" function

122

Numerical Simulation of Making Hydrogen from Rich Filtration Combustion of Hydrogen Sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Filtration combustion in porous media offers good advantages such as super-adiabatic combustion temperature in making hydrogen from hydrogen sulfur which is extremely toxic and is vastly produced in industry. In order to study the mechanism of making ... Keywords: Filtration combustion, coupled chemistry-hydrodynamics, making hydrogen, computational fluid dynamics

Li Guoneng

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Pre-test CFD Calculations for a Bypass Flow Standard Problem  

SciTech Connect

The bypass flow in a prismatic high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is the flow that occurs between adjacent graphite blocks. Gaps exist between blocks due to variances in their manufacture and installation and because of the expansion and shrinkage of the blocks from heating and irradiation. Although the temperature of fuel compacts and graphite is sensitive to the presence of bypass flow, there is great uncertainty in the level and effects of the bypass flow. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program at the Idaho National Laboratory has undertaken to produce experimental data of isothermal bypass flow between three adjacent graphite blocks. These data are intended to provide validation for computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses of the bypass flow. Such validation data sets are called Standard Problems in the nuclear safety analysis field. Details of the experimental apparatus as well as several pre-test calculations of the bypass flow are provided. Pre-test calculations are useful in examining the nature of the flow and to see if there are any problems associated with the flow and its measurement. The apparatus is designed to be able to provide three different gap widths in the vertical direction (the direction of the normal coolant flow) and two gap widths in the horizontal direction. It is expected that the vertical bypass flow will range from laminar to transitional to turbulent flow for the different gap widths that will be available.

Rich Johnson

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Dehumidification Without Re-heat Using Face and Bypass Dampers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Installations with chill water cooling, needing constant air volume and dehumidification, traditionally use a draw through air handling unit with a cooling coil and a re-heat coil. Dehumidification is achieved by overcooling the discharge air to wring out moisture and then reheating it back to the desired temperature. This method works well but at the added expense of over cooling plus re-heating. A properly controlled Face and Bypass unit can deliver the same air conditions by blending return air and cold deck air with no need for re-heat. This system uses only the amount of cooling energy needed to do the job and no re-heat energy, in some cases as much as 50% less energy than the re-heat method.

Warila, D. T.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

New pathway to bypass the 15O waiting point  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose the sequential reaction process $^{15}$O($p$,$\\gamma)(\\beta^{+}$)$^{16}$O as a new pathway to bypass of the $^{15}$O waiting point. This exotic reaction is found to have a surprisingly high cross section, approximately 10$^{10}$ times higher than the $^{15}$O($p$,$\\beta^{+}$)$^{16}$O. These cross sections were calculated after precise measurements of energies and widths of the proton-unbound $^{16}$F low lying states, obtained using the H($^{15}$O,p)$^{15}$O reaction. The large $(p,\\gamma)(\\beta^{+})$ cross section can be understood to arise from the more efficient feeding of the low energy wing of the ground state resonance by the gamma decay. The implications of the new reaction in novae explosions and X-ray bursts are discussed.

I. Stefan; F. de Oliveira Santos; M. G. Pellegriti; G. Dumitru; J. C. Angélique; M. Angélique; E. Berthoumieux; A. Buta; R. Borcea; A. Coc; J. M. Daugas; T. Davinson; M. Fadil; S. Grévy; J. Kiener; A. Lefebvre-Schuhl; M. Lenhardt; M. Lewitowicz; F. Negoita; D. Pantelica; L. Perrot; O. Roig; M. G. Saint Laurent; I. Ray; O. Sorlin; M. Stanoiu; C. Stodel; V. Tatischeff; J. C. Thomas

2006-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

126

Development of By-Pass Blending Station System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new building blending station system named by-pass blending station (BBS) has been developed to reduce building pump energy consumption in both district heating and cooling systems. Theoretical investigation demonstrated that the BBS can significantly reduce building pump power for a typical cooling system when constant water flow is maintained in the building side. When differential pressure reset is applied in the building side, more pump energy can be saved. The BBS also reduces the pump size and therefore results in lower initial system cost. A case study was also performed and demonstrated 42% of annual chilled water pump energy savings for constant building water flow, and 82% of annual chilled water pump savings for differential pressure resetting at Omaha, Nebraska.

Liu, M.; Barnes, D.; Bunz, K.; Rosenberry, N.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

DECONTAMINATION FACTORS AND FILTRATION FLUX IMPACT TO ARP AT REDUCED MST CONCENTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Tank Farm and Closure Engineering is evaluating changes to the Actinide Removal Process facility operations to decrease the MST concentration from 0.4 g/L to 0.2 g/L and the contact time from 12 hours to between 6 and 8 hours. For this evaluation, SRNL reviewed previous datasets investigating the performance of MST at 0.2 g/L in salt solutions ranging from 4.5 to 7.5 M in sodium concentration. In general, reducing the MST concentration from 0.4 to 0.2 g/L and increasing the ionic strength from 4.5 to 7.5 M in sodium concentration will decrease the measured decontamination factors for plutonium, neptunium, uranium and strontium. The decontamination factors as well as single standard deviation values for each sorbate are reported. These values are applicable within the sorbate and sodium concentrations used in the experimental measurements. Decreasing the MST concentration in the ARP from 0.4 g/L to 0.2 g/L will produce an increase in the filter flux, and could lead to longer operating times between filter cleaning. The increase in flux is a function of a number of operating parameters, and is difficult to quantify. However, it is estimated that the reduction in MST could result in a reduction of filtration time of up to 20%.

Hobbs, D.

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

128

Development of an S-Saltcake Simulant Using Crossflow Filtration as a Validation Technique  

SciTech Connect

In the past several years, cross-flow filtration has been studied extensively in a bench-scale system at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using both actual tank waste from the Hanford site and waste simulants. One challenge when creating a waste simulant is duplicating the filtration behaviour of real waste, in particular when the waste composition is not known with certainty. Using a systematic approach to filtration testing, it has been found that the solid components that dominate the filtration behaviour can be identified. This approach was used to develop a waste simulant for S-Saltcake tank waste. The analysis of filtration data assists in screening solid components when the chemical composition and structure of a metal is not known. This is well-illustrated in this study during the search for the appropriate chromium phase. After the likely components were identified, the solids were combined with a supernate that is representative of the real waste and the filtration performance was verified against real waste data. A secondary benefit of this approach is the construction of a database of filtration performance for various solid species that can be used to quickly develop waste simulants in the future.

Schonewill, Philip P.; Daniel, Richard C.; Russell, Renee L.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Billing, Justin M.; Rapko, Brian M.; Peterson, Reid A.

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

129

The effects of improved residential furnace filtration on airborne particles  

SciTech Connect

Forced air furnaces with distributed ducting systems have always had an air filter, but traditionally the filter quality was only adequate to protect the furnace fan and heat exchanger from debris. In the past several years, there has been an increasing number of more effective particulate filters that are being marketed to reduce airborne particulate or dust. These include upgraded panel filters, passive electrostatic, active electrostatic, and HEPA or near-HEPA variants. Consumers are bewildered by the lack of standardized and comprehensible performance results and need better advice on whether it would be useful for them to upgrade their current furnace filter. In order to help them make these decisions, the whole range of available furnace filters were tested in six occupied houses. The filter efficiency was determined by particulate measurement in the ducting system before and after the filter. Indoor particulates were measured in a bedroom and living room, and outdoor levels were monitored simultaneously. Testing encompassed several weeks in each house, and the results are available in the whole range of particle sizes. The project also looked at the air-cleaning effectiveness of a stand-alone air cleaner and at the ozone production of electrostatic precipitators installed in 20 houses. Test results will be helpful in specifying suitable filtration for houses.

Fugler, D.; Bowser, D.; Kwan, W.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

ALTERNATE HIGH EFFICIENCY PARTICULATE AIR (HEPA) FILTRATION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

In Phase IIA of this project, CeraMem has further developed and scaled up ceramic HEPA filters that are appropriate for use on filtration of vent gas from HLW tanks at DOE sites around the country. This work included procuring recrystallized SiC monoliths, developing membrane and cement materials, and defining a manufacturing process for the production of prototype full sizes HEPA filters. CeraMem has demonstrated that prototype full size filters can be manufactured by producing 9 full size filters that passed DOP aerosol testing at the Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility. One of these filters was supplied to the Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC) for process tests using simulated HLW tank waste. SRTC has reported that the filter was regenerable (with some increase in pressure drop) and that the filter retained its HEPA retention capability. CeraMem has also developed a Regenerable HEPA Filter System (RHFS) design and acceptance test plan that was reviewed by DOE personnel. The design and acceptance test plan form the basis of the system proposal for follow-on work in Phase IIB of this project.

Bruce Bishop; Robert Goldsmith; Karsten Nielsen; Phillip Paquette

2002-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

131

Portable water filtration system for oil well fractionation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The invention comprises a portable, multi-stage filtration system utilized in filtering water for an oil and gas stimulation process commonly known as fracking. Three stages are used, the first being a straining operation reducing the size of particulate matter in the water to about three-eighths of an inch. The second stage is a centrifugal separator, reducing the particle size to about 50 microns. The final stage utilizes a cartridge-type filter giving a final particle size in the water of about 5 microns. In this manner, water which is injected into the well head during the fracking process and which is obtained from readily available sources such as ponds, streams and the like is relatively free of particulate matter which can foul the fracking process. The invention, by virtue of being mounted on a trailer, is portable and thus can be easily moved from site to site. Water flow rates obtained using the invention are between 250 and 300 gallons per minute, sufficient for processing a small to medium sized well.

Seibert, D. L.

1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

132

Movement and Injury Rates for Three Life Stages of Spring Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha : A Comparison of Submerged Orifices and an Overflow Weir for Fish Bypass in a Modular Rotary Drum Fish Screen : Annual Report 1995.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated the effectiveness of 6-in. and 2-in. submerged orifices, and an overflow weir for fish bypass at a rotary drum fish screening facility. A modular drum screen built by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) was installed at PNNL`s Aquatic Ecology research laboratory in Richland, Washington. Fry, subyearlings, and smolts of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawyacha) were introduced into the test system, and their movement and injury rates were monitored. A total of 33 tests (100 fish per test) that lasted from 24 to 48 hr were completed from 1994 through 1995. Passage rate depended on both fish size and bypass configuration. For fry/fingerling spring chinook salmon, there was no difference in passage rate through the three bypass configurations (2-in. orifice, 6-in. orifice, or overflow weir). Subyearlings moved sooner when the 6-in. orifice was used, with more than 50% exiting through the fish bypass in the first 8 hr. Smolts exited quickly and preferred the 6-in. orifice, with over 90% of the smolts exiting through the bypass in less than 2 hr. Passage was slightly slower when a weir was used, with 90% of the smolts exiting in about 4 hr. When the 2-in. orifice was used in the bypass, 90% of the smolts did not exit until after 8 hr. In addition, about 7% of the smolts failed to migrate from the forebay within 24 hr, indicating that smolts were significantly delayed when the 2-in. orifice was used. Few significant injuries were detected for any of the life stages. However, light descaling occurred on about 15% of chinook salmon smolts passing through the 2-in. orifice. Although a single passage through the orifice did not appear to cause significant scale loss or other damage, passing through several screening facilities with 2-in. orifices could cause cumulative injuries.

Abernethy, C. Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.; Mavros, William V.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

V-045: Adobe ColdFusion Lets Local Users Bypass Sandbox Restrictions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Adobe ColdFusion Lets Local Users Bypass Sandbox 5: Adobe ColdFusion Lets Local Users Bypass Sandbox Restrictions V-045: Adobe ColdFusion Lets Local Users Bypass Sandbox Restrictions December 12, 2012 - 2:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Adobe ColdFusion Lets Local Users Bypass Sandbox Restrictions PLATFORM: ColdFusion 10, 9.0.2, 9.0.1 and 9.0 for Windows, Macintosh and UNIX ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in Adobe ColdFusion. REFERENCE LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027853 Adobe Vulnerability identifier: APSB12-26 CVE 2012-5675 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: Adobe has released a security hotfix for ColdFusion 10 and earlier versions for Windows, Macintosh and UNIX. This hotfix resolves a vulnerability which could result in a sandbox permissions violation in a shared hosting environment. Adobe recommends users update their product installation using

134

U-247: EMC Cloud Tiering Appliance Flaw Lets Remote Users Bypass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: EMC Cloud Tiering Appliance Flaw Lets Remote Users Bypass 7: EMC Cloud Tiering Appliance Flaw Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication and Gain Administrative Access U-247: EMC Cloud Tiering Appliance Flaw Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication and Gain Administrative Access August 29, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: EMC Cloud Tiering Appliance Flaw Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication and Gain Administrative Access PLATFORM: EMC Cloud Tiering Appliance (CTA) 7.4 and prior EMC Cloud Tiering Appliance Virtual Edition (CTA/VE) 7.4 and prior EMC Cloud Tiering Appliance (CTA) 9.0 and prior EMC Cloud Tiering Appliance Virtual Edition (CTA/VE) 9.0 and prior ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in EMC Cloud Tiering Appliance. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027448 Bugtraq ID: 55250 EMC.com CVE-2012-2285 IMPACT ASSESSMENT:

135

V-216: Drupal Monster Menus Module Security Bypass and Script Insertion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

216: Drupal Monster Menus Module Security Bypass and Script 216: Drupal Monster Menus Module Security Bypass and Script Insertion Vulnerabilities V-216: Drupal Monster Menus Module Security Bypass and Script Insertion Vulnerabilities August 12, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Two vulnerabilities have been reported in the Monster Menus module for Drupal PLATFORM: Drupal Monster Menus Module 6.x and 7.x ABSTRACT: The vulnerabilities can be exploited by malicious users to bypass certain security restrictions and conduct script insertion attacks. REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA54391 Drupal Security Advisory CVE-2013-4229 CVE-2013-4230 IMPACT ASSES SMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: 1) Input passed via the title when editing page settings is not properly sanitised before being edited the next time. This can be exploited to insert arbitrary HTML and script code, which will be executed in a user's

136

T-594: IBM solidDB Password Hash Authentication Bypass Vulnerability |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

94: IBM solidDB Password Hash Authentication Bypass 94: IBM solidDB Password Hash Authentication Bypass Vulnerability T-594: IBM solidDB Password Hash Authentication Bypass Vulnerability April 4, 2011 - 6:08am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability has been reported in IBM solidDB, which can be exploited by malicious people to bypass certain security restrictions. PLATFORM: IBM solidDB 4.x - IBM solidDB 6.x ABSTRACT: This vulnerability could allow remote attackers to execute arbitrary code on vulnerable installations of IBM solidDB. Authentication is not required to exploit this vulnerability. REFERENCE LINKS: IBM Security Alert Secunia Advisory: SA44030 ZDI Advisory: ZDI-11-115 IBM solidDB Support IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: The specific flaw exists within the solid.exe process which listens by default on TCP ports 1315, 1964 and 2315. The authentication protocol

137

U-188: MySQL User Login Security Bypass and Unspecified Vulnerability |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: MySQL User Login Security Bypass and Unspecified 8: MySQL User Login Security Bypass and Unspecified Vulnerability U-188: MySQL User Login Security Bypass and Unspecified Vulnerability June 12, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A security issue and vulnerability have been reported in MySQL PLATFORM: MySQL 5.x ABSTRACT: An error when verifying authentication attempts can be exploited to bypass the authentication mechanism. Reference LINKS: Original Advisory CVE-2012-2122 Secunia Advisory 49409 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: Successful exploitation of this vulnerability requires MySQL to be built on a system with a library that allows "memcmp()" to return a value outside of the -128 through 127 range (e.g. sse-optimized glibc). NOTE: Vendor binaries are reportedly not affected. The security issue is reported in versions prior to 5.1.63 and 5.5.25.

138

V-197: Adobe ColdFusion 10 WebSockets Security Bypass Vulnerability |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7: Adobe ColdFusion 10 WebSockets Security Bypass Vulnerability 7: Adobe ColdFusion 10 WebSockets Security Bypass Vulnerability V-197: Adobe ColdFusion 10 WebSockets Security Bypass Vulnerability July 11, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability has been reported in Adobe ColdFusion PLATFORM: The vulnerability is reported in version 10 for Windows, Macintosh, and Linux ABSTRACT: The vulnerability is caused due to an unspecified error and can be exploited to invoke public methods on ColdFusion Components (CFC) using WebSockets REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA54024 Adobe Security Bulletin APSB13-19 Stackoverflow.com CVE-2013-3350 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: The hotfix resolves a vulnerability that could permit an attacker to invoke public methods on ColdFusion Components (CFC) using WebSockets IMPACT: Security Bypass

139

V-162: Apache Struts "ParameterInterceptor" Security Bypass Vulnerability |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Apache Struts "ParameterInterceptor" Security Bypass 2: Apache Struts "ParameterInterceptor" Security Bypass Vulnerability V-162: Apache Struts "ParameterInterceptor" Security Bypass Vulnerability May 23, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability has been reported in Apache Struts PLATFORM: The vulnerability is reported in versions prior to 2.3.14.1 ABSTRACT: A vulnerability has been reported in Apache Struts, which can be exploited by malicious people to bypass certain security restrictions. REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA53495 Apache Struts Advisory S2-012 Apache Struts Advisory S2-013 CVE-2013-1965 CVE-2013-1966 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: A request that included a specially crafted request parameter could be used to inject arbitrary OGNL code into the stack, afterward used as request

140

V-077: Barracuda SSL VPN Bug Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Barracuda SSL VPN Bug Lets Remote Users Bypass 7: Barracuda SSL VPN Bug Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication V-077: Barracuda SSL VPN Bug Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication January 25, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Barracuda SSL VPN. PLATFORM: The vulnerability has been verified to exist in Barracuda SSL VPN version 2.2.2.203 ABSTRACT: A remote user can gain administrative access to the target system. REFERENCE LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028039 Barracuda Networks Advisory IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: A remote user can set a specially crafted Java system property (via 'setSysProp.jsp') to bypass access restrictions and gain access to the API functionality. This can be exploited to download configuration files, download database dumps, shutdown the system, and set new administrative

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Design and testing of an experiment to measure self-filtration in particulate suspensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experiment for measuring self-filtration in terms of change in volume fraction downstream of a constriction compared to volume fraction upstream of said constriction was designed and tested. The user has the ability to ...

Flander, Mattias S. (Mattias Simon)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Design of a small-scale continuous linear motion pharmaceutical filtration module  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new small-scale continuous linear motion pharmaceutical filtration prototype was designed, fabricated, and tested. The goal of this unit is to filter an Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) from a mixture of API ...

Wong, Katherine Wing-Shan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Self-healing properties of water filtration membranes containing amphiphilic comb polymer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) and filtration experiments, as well as other characterization techniques. Surface analysis is accomplished via x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Membrane samples are cleaned (in hydrogen peroxide or ...

Devereaux, Caitlin Albright, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Form, function and flow in the plankton : jet propulsion and filtration by pelagic tunicates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trade-offs between filtration rate and swimming performance among several salp species with distinct morphologies and swimming styles were compared. Small-scale particle encounter at the salp filtering apparatus was also ...

Sutherland, Kelly Rakow

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Experimental and Analytic Study on the Core Bypass Flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Core bypass flow has been one of key issues in the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design for securing core thermal margins and achieving target temperatures at the core exit. The bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core occurs through the control element holes and the radial and axial gaps between the graphite blocks for manufacturing and refueling tolerances. These gaps vary with the core life cycles because of the irradiation swelling/shrinkage characteristic of the graphite blocks such as fuel and reflector blocks, which are main components of a core's structure. Thus, the core bypass flow occurs in a complicated multidimensional way. The accurate prediction of this bypass flow and counter-measures to minimize it are thus of major importance in assuring core thermal margins and securing higher core efficiency. Even with this importance, there has not been much effort in quantifying and accurately modeling the effect of the core bypass flow. The main objectives of this project were to generate experimental data for validating the software to be used to calculate the bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core, validate thermofluid analysis tools and their model improvements, and identify and assess measures for reducing the bypass flow. To achieve these objectives, tasks were defined to (1) design and construct experiments to generate validation data for software analysis tools, (2) determine the experimental conditions and define the measurement requirements and techniques, (3) generate and analyze the experimental data, (4) validate and improve the thermofluid analysis tools, and (5) identify measures to control the bypass flow and assess its performance in the experiment.

Richard Schultz

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

A Brief Review of Filtration Studies for Waste Treatment at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document completes the requirements of Milestone 1-2, PNNL Draft Literature Review, discussed in the scope of work outlined in the EM-31 Support Project task plan WP-2.3.6-2010-1. The focus of task WP 2.3.6 is to improve the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) understanding of filtration operations for high-level waste (HLW) to enhance filtration and cleaning efficiencies, thereby increasing process throughput and reducing the sodium demand (through acid neutralization). Developing the processes for fulfilling the cleaning/backpulsing requirements will result in more efficient operations for both the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and the Savannah River Site (SRS), thereby increasing throughput by limiting cleaning cycles. The purpose of this document is to summarize Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL’s) literature review of historical filtration testing at the laboratory and of testing found in peer-reviewed journals. Eventually, the contents of this document will be merged with a literature review by SRS to produce a summary report for DOE of the results of previous filtration testing at the laboratories and the types of testing that still need to be completed to address the questions about improved filtration performance at WTP and SRS. To this end, this report presents 1) a review of the current state of crossflow filtration knowledge available in the peer-reviewed literature, 2) a detailed review of PNNL-related filtration studies specific to the Hanford site, and 3) an overview of current waste filtration models developed by PNNL and suggested avenues for future model development.

Daniel, Richard C.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

V-057: eXtplorer "ext_find_user()" Authentication Bypass Vulnerability |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: eXtplorer "ext_find_user()" Authentication Bypass 7: eXtplorer "ext_find_user()" Authentication Bypass Vulnerability V-057: eXtplorer "ext_find_user()" Authentication Bypass Vulnerability December 28, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: eXtplorer "ext_find_user()" Authentication Bypass Vulnerability PLATFORM: eXtplorer 2.x ABSTRACT: A vulnerability has been reported in eXtplorer, which can be exploited by malicious people to bypass certain security restrictions. REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA51636 eXtplorer 2.1.3 Security Release IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: eXtplorer was notified of a problem within the authentication system of eXtplorer Versions 2.1.2, 2.1.1, 2.1.0 and 2.1.0RC5 that have been found to be vulnerable to an authentication bypass bug. IMPACT: An error within the "ext_find_user()" function in users.php can be

148

Horizontal well taps bypassed Dundee oil in Crystal field, Mich.  

SciTech Connect

The Dundee formation (Middle Devonian) has yielded more oil than any other producing interval in Michigan. The Dundee trend, which forms an east-west band across the central Michigan basin, consists of 137 fields which together have yielded more than 350 million bbl of oil. The first commercial Dundee production was established at Mt. Pleasant field in 1928, and most Dundee fields were discovered and brought on production during the 1930s--40s. Wells in many of the fields had very high initial production (IP) rates. IPs in excess of 1,000 b/d of oil were common, with values as high as 9,000 b/d reported. These high flow rates, combined with a thin (10--30 ft) oil column and a strong water drive, resulted in water coning that left significant volumes of oil unrecovered in some fields. One such field, Crystal field in Montcalm County, is the focus of a US Department of energy (DOE) Class 2 Reservoir Demonstration Project designed to demonstrate that horizontal drilling can recover significant volumes of this bypassed oil. The paper describes the demonstration project, regional setting, and the history of the Crystal field.

Wood, J.R.; Allan, J.R.; Huntoon, J.E.; Pennington, W.D. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States); Harrison, W.B. III [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo, MI (United States); Taylor, E.; Tester, C.J. [Cronus Development Corp., Traverse City, MI (United States)

1996-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

149

Investigation of the filtration processes of coal hydrogenation slurries and suspensions obtained after the extraction of oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of an investigation of the filtration of slurries and their suspensions in hydrogenates under a pressure difference ..delta..P = 0.03 MPa at t = 25 to 120/sup 8/C on various filtration barriers (the ash content of the filtrates did not exceed 0.1%) it was established that the filtration rate of the slurries and their suspensions in hydrogenates is strongly dependent on the type of coal and the hydrogenation conditions and decreases as the content of solid substances and asphaltenes increases. The rate of filtration of the suspensions of the slurries in the hydrogenates is approximately an order of magnitude greater than that of the original slurries; this is due to the sharp drop in the viscosity of the liquid and the aggregation of the small solid particles when the slurry is mixed with the hydrogenate. The rate of filtration for the slurries can be increased by adding auxiliary substances.

Gel'perin, N.I.; Pebalk, V.L.; Shashkova, M.N.; Gorlov, E.G.; Zotova, O.V.

1987-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

150

Cross-flow filtration in physical-chemical treatment of municipal sewage effluents  

SciTech Connect

In separations of solids from liquids by filtration, the motion of liquid is customarily normal to the filtering surface, and solids are left on the filter. In a variation called cross-flow filtration, liquid is pumped parallel to the filtering surface. By this device, thickening of flux-limiting filtercake is slowed, and the original stream is separated into a large volume of filtrate and a concentrated slurry of solids. Results reported here were obtained in cross-flow filtration used as an element in physical-chemical treatment of municipal sewage, mostly with the effluent from primary settling, but in some cases, with clarified activated sludge effluent as feed. Filtrate from passage through fabric tubes (1-inch fire-hose jackets) of primary effluent, treated with iron or aluminum salts, with powdered activated carbon (PAC), or with both hydrolyzable ions and PAC, was generally of quality superior in turbidity, organic carbon and other respects to the effluent from biological secondary treatment. Effects on product quality and flux of pressure, circulation velocity, additive concentration, water recovery, pH and other variables were investigated. Based on production rates obtained, estimates of treatment costs were made.

Mahlman, H.A.; Sisson, W.G.; Kraus, K.A.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.

1976-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Advanced Energy-Efficient Filtration: Fan Filter Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient Fan- Filter Units, Proceedings of SEMI TechnicalFor Evaluating Fan-Filter Unit Performance – Applications inPerformance of Fan-Filter Units, Version 1.2 (2004, public

Xu, Tengfang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Advanced Energy-Efficient Filtration: Fan Filter Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cleanrooms: Energy Efficient Fan- Filter Units, ProceedingsStandard Method For Evaluating Fan-Filter Unit Performance –Energy Performance of Fan-Filter Units, Version 1.2 (2004,

Xu, Tengfang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtrations Testing of Ferrocyanide Tank sludge (Group 8) Actual Waste Composite  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report in a series of eight reports defining characterization, leach, and filtration testing of a wide variety of Hanford tank waste sludges. The information generated from this series is intended to supplement the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project understanding of actual waste behaviors associated with tank waste sludge processing through the pretreatment portion of the WTP. The work described in this report presents information on a high-iron waste form, specifically the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge. Iron hydroxide has been shown to pose technical challenges during filtration processing; the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge represented a good source of the high-iron matrix to test the filtration processing.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

154

Selection of the most advantageous gas turbine air filtration system: Comparative study of actual operating experience  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses relative merits of three types of air filtration systems used by Sui Northern Gas Pipelines Ltd. (Pakistan), on its gas turbine compressor packages. These Filtration systems are: (i) Two stage inertial plus auto oil bath type multi-duty filters by AAF used on Saturn Mark-1 packages manufactured by Solar Turbines Inc. (ii) Three stage high efficiency barrier filters by AAF used on Centaur packages by Solar. (iii) Single stage pulse-jet self-cleaning filter by Donaldson again used on a Centaur package. The selection is primarily based in package performance data collected over a 15 month period analyzing power loss due to fouling effects and related operation and maintenance costs for the three systems. The Company's operating experience indicates that on new installations the pulse clean system offers the best advantage both in terms of filtration costs as well as availability of additional horse power when operating under moderate to severe environmental conditions.

Gilani, S.I.; Mehr, M.Z.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

V-234: EMC RSA Archer GRC Open Redirection Weakness and Security Bypass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: EMC RSA Archer GRC Open Redirection Weakness and Security 4: EMC RSA Archer GRC Open Redirection Weakness and Security Bypass Security Issue V-234: EMC RSA Archer GRC Open Redirection Weakness and Security Bypass Security Issue September 4, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A weakness and a security issue have been reported in EMC RSA Archer GRC PLATFORM: EMC RSA Archer GRC 5.x ABSTRACT: This fixes multiple vulnerabilities, which can be exploited to bypass certain security restrictions and to conduct spoofing attacks REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA54717 SecurityTracker Alert ID 1028971 EMC Identifier: ESA-2013-057 CVE-2013-3276 CVE-2013-3277 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: 1) The application does not properly restrict deactivated users. This can be exploited by deactivated users to login and gain access to otherwise

156

T-536: Cisco ASA Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Deny Service and Bypass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

36: Cisco ASA Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Deny Service and 36: Cisco ASA Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Deny Service and Bypass Security Controls T-536: Cisco ASA Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Deny Service and Bypass Security Controls January 18, 2011 - 2:30pm Addthis PROBLEM: Cisco ASA Multiple Flaws Let Remote Users Deny Service and Bypass Security Controls. PLATFORM: Cisco 5500 Series Adaptive Security Appliances (ASA) ABSTRACT: Cisco ASA 5500 Series Adaptive Security Appliances are affected by multiple vulnerabilities. Affected versions of Cisco ASA Software vary depending on the specific vulnerability. Cisco ASA 5500 Series Adaptive Security Appliances may experience a TCP connection exhaustion condition (no new TCP connections are accepted) that can be triggered through the receipt of specific TCP segments during the

157

EFFECTS OF GRAPHITE SURFACE ROUGHNESS ON BYPASS FLOW COMPUTATIONS FOR AN HTGR  

SciTech Connect

Bypass flow in a prismatic high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) occurs between graphite blocks as they sit side by side in the core. Bypass flow is not intentionally designed to occur in the reactor, but is present because of tolerances in manufacture, imperfect installation and expansion and shrinkage of the blocks from heating and irradiation. It is desired to increase the knowledge of the effects of such flow, which has been estimated to be as much as 20% of the total helium coolant flow. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations can provide estimates of the scale and impacts of bypass flow. Previous CFD calculations have examined the effects of bypass gap width, level and distribution of heat generation and effects of shrinkage. The present contribution examines the effects of graphite surface roughness on the bypass flow for different relative roughness factors on three gap widths. Such calculations should be validated using specific bypass flow measurements. While such experiments are currently underway for the specific reference prismatic HTGR design for the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) program of the U. S. Dept. of Energy, the data are not yet available. To enhance confidence in the present calculations, wall shear stress and heat transfer results for several turbulence models and their associated wall treatments are first compared for flow in a single tube that is representative of a coolant channel in the prismatic HTGR core. The results are compared to published correlations for wall shear stress and Nusselt number in turbulent pipe flow. Turbulence models that perform well are then used to make bypass flow calculations in a symmetric onetwelfth sector of a prismatic block that includes bypass flow. The comparison of shear stress and Nusselt number results with published correlations constitutes a partial validation of the CFD model. Calculations are also compared to ones made previously using a different CFD code. Results indicate that increasing surface roughness increases the maximum fuel and helium temperatures as do increases in gap width. However, maximum coolant temperature variation due to increased gap width is not changed by surface roughness.

Rich Johnson; Yu-Hsin Tung; Hiroyuki Sato

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Variation of Constitutive Model Formulation on Analytical Cake Filtration Scott A. Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Wells Professor of Civil Engineering Portland State University P. O. Box 751 Portland, OR 97207 of porosity of kaolin suspension filtrations described in Wells (1990). Two-Phase Flow Governing Equations Wells, 1999) for fractional cake position where L is the cake length and p is the applied pressure: z L

Wells, Scott A.

159

ALGEBRAS WITHOUT NOETHERIAN FILTRATIONS J. T. STAFFORD AND J. J. ZHANG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALGEBRAS WITHOUT NOETHERIAN FILTRATIONS J. T. STAFFORD AND J. J. ZHANG Abstract. We provide. STAFFORD AND J. J. ZHANG A variant of this theorem also holds if one replaces #16;free of rank x#17; by #16 then s #20; t. #12; 4 J. T. STAFFORD AND J. J. ZHANG Proof. The beginning of the proof is the same in all

Zhang, James

160

ALGEBRAS WITHOUT NOETHERIAN FILTRATIONS J. T. STAFFORD AND J. J. ZHANG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALGEBRAS WITHOUT NOETHERIAN FILTRATIONS J. T. STAFFORD AND J. J. T. STAFFORD AND J. J. ZHANG A variant of this theorem also holds if one replaces ifree of rank; 4 J. T. STAFFORD AND J. J. ZHANG Proof.The beginning of the proof is the same

Zhang, James

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

VOLUME 16, NUMBER 3 HVAC&R RESEARCH MAY 2010 The Effects of Filtration on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VOLUME 16, NUMBER 3 HVAC&R RESEARCH MAY 2010 273 The Effects of Filtration on Pressure Drop and Energy Consumption in Residential HVAC Systems (RP-1299) Brent Stephens Atila Novoselac, PhD Jeffrey A of high-efficiency HVAC filters is a common strategy to control exposure to airborne particulate matter

Siegel, Jeffrey

162

A modeling approach for iron concentration in sand filtration effluent using adaptive neuro-fuzzy model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effluent iron concentration is an important water quality criterion used for the assessment of the performance of rapid sand filters, in addition to other criteria. This study deals with the prediction of effluent iron concentrations by adaptive neuro-fuzzy ... Keywords: ANFIS, Effluent iron concentration, Modeling, Sand filtration

Mehmet Çakmakci; Cumali Kinaci; Mahmut Bayramo?lu; Y?lmaz Yildirim

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Reducing Mortality from Terrorist Releases of Chemical and Biological Agents: I. Filtration for Ventilation Systems in Commercial Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be obtained by sealing the ductwork to prevent air leakage.sealing may also be important for minimizing transport of untreated airair which bypasses the filter is essentially unreduced. Therefore, leak sealing

Thatcher, Tracy L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

U-244: McAfee Email Gateway Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: McAfee Email Gateway Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication 4: McAfee Email Gateway Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication and Conduct Cross-Site Scripting and Directory Traversal Attacks U-244: McAfee Email Gateway Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication and Conduct Cross-Site Scripting and Directory Traversal Attacks August 27, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: McAfee Email Gateway Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication and Conduct Cross-Site Scripting and Directory Traversal Attacks PLATFORM: McAfee Email Gateway (MEG) 7.0.0 and 7.0.1 (MEG 6.7.x is NOT affected.) McAfee Email and Web Security (EWS) 5.6 Patch 3 and earlier McAfee Email and Web Security (EWS) 5.5 Patch 6 and earlier ABSTRACT: Several vulnerabilities were reported in McAfee Email Gateway. reference LINKS: McAfee Security Bulletin ID: SB10026 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027444

165

V-190: ASUS RT-N66U Router AiCloud Security Bypass Security Issue |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: ASUS RT-N66U Router AiCloud Security Bypass Security Issue 0: ASUS RT-N66U Router AiCloud Security Bypass Security Issue V-190: ASUS RT-N66U Router AiCloud Security Bypass Security Issue July 2, 2013 - 12:38am Addthis PROBLEM: ASUS RT-N66U Router AiCloud Security Bypass Security Issue PLATFORM: ASUS RT-N66U Router firmware versions 3.0.0.4.270 and 3.0.0.4.354. ABSTRACT: A security issue in ASUS RT-N66U Router has been reported REFERENCE LINKS: Secunia Advisory SA53931 neohapsis IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: The security issue is caused due to the device not properly restricting access when processing certain HTTPS requests and can be exploited to gain access to otherwise restricted functionality and e.g. disclose the contents of arbitrary files and directories. Successful exploitation requires the AiCloud web service to be enabled.

166

U-244: McAfee Email Gateway Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

44: McAfee Email Gateway Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication 44: McAfee Email Gateway Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication and Conduct Cross-Site Scripting and Directory Traversal Attacks U-244: McAfee Email Gateway Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication and Conduct Cross-Site Scripting and Directory Traversal Attacks August 27, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: McAfee Email Gateway Lets Remote Users Bypass Authentication and Conduct Cross-Site Scripting and Directory Traversal Attacks PLATFORM: McAfee Email Gateway (MEG) 7.0.0 and 7.0.1 (MEG 6.7.x is NOT affected.) McAfee Email and Web Security (EWS) 5.6 Patch 3 and earlier McAfee Email and Web Security (EWS) 5.5 Patch 6 and earlier ABSTRACT: Several vulnerabilities were reported in McAfee Email Gateway. reference LINKS: McAfee Security Bulletin ID: SB10026 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027444

167

Brief paper: Output tracking of continuous bioreactors through recirculation and by-pass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose to regulate the output of an auto-catalytic bioprocess (a biological process associated with a growth of a micro-organism) by means of a recirculation loop and by-pass. We give conditions on the volume of the reactor and the ... Keywords: Continuous bioreactor, Nonlinear control design, Output regulation, Recirculation loop

Jérôme Harmand; Alain Rapaport; Frédéric Mazenc

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

DECONTAMINATION OF PLUTONIUM FOR FLUORIDE AND CHLORIDE DURING OXALATE PRECIPITATION, FILTRATION AND CALCINATION PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect

Due to analytical limitations for the determination of fluoride (F) and chloride (Cl) in a previous anion exchange study, an additional study of the decontamination of Pu from F and Cl by oxalate precipitation, filtration and calcination was performed. Anion product solution from the previous impurity study was precipitated as an oxalate, filtered, and calcined to produce an oxide for analysis by pyrohydrolysis for total Cl and F. Analysis of samples from this experiment achieved the purity specification for Cl and F for the proposed AFS-2 process. Decontamination factors (DF's) for the overall process (including anion exchange) achieved a DF of {approx}5000 for F and a DF of {approx}100 for Cl. Similar experiments where both HF and HCl were spiked into the anion product solution to a {approx}5000 {micro}g /g Pu concentration showed a DF of 5 for F and a DF of 35 for Cl across the combined precipitation-filtration-calcination process steps.

Kyser, E.

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

169

Bypassing the learning curve in permanent seed implants using state-of-the-art technology  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The aim of this study was to demonstrate, based on clinical postplan dose distributions, that technology can be used efficiently to eliminate the learning curve associated with permanent seed implant planning and delivery. Methods and Materials: Dose distributions evaluated 30 days after the implant of the initial 22 consecutive patients treated with permanent seed implants at two institutions were studied. Institution 1 (I1) consisted of a new team, whereas institution 2 (I2) had performed more than 740 preplanned implantations over a 9-year period before the study. Both teams had adopted similar integrated systems based on three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasonography, intraoperative dosimetry, and an automated seed delivery and needle retraction system (FIRST, Nucletron). Procedure time and dose volume histogram parameters such as D90, V100, V150, V200, and others were collected in the operating room and at 30 days postplan. Results: The average target coverage from the intraoperative plan (V100) was 99.4% for I1 and 99.9% for I2. D90, V150, and V200 were 191.4 Gy (196.3 Gy), 75.3% (73.0%), and 37.5% (34.1%) for I1 (I2) respectively. None of these parameters shows a significant difference between institutions. The postplan D90 was 151.2 Gy for I1 and 167.3 Gy for I2, well above the 140 Gy from the Stock et al. analysis, taking into account differences at planning, results in a p value of 0.0676. The procedure time required on average 174.4 min for I1 and 89 min for I2. The time was found to decrease with the increasing number of patients. Conclusion: State-of-the-art technology enables a new brachytherapy team to obtain excellent postplan dose distributions, similar to those achieved by an experienced team with proven long-term clinical results. The cost for bypassing the usual dosimetry learning curve is time, with increasing team experience resulting in shorter treatment times.

Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Radio-oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, PQ (Canada)]. E-mail: beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca; Evans, Dee-Ann Radford [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada); Aubin, Sylviane [Departement de Radio-oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, PQ (Canada); Angyalfi, Steven [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada); Husain, Siraj [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada); Kay, Ian [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada); Martin, Andre-Guy [Departement de Radio-oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, PQ (Canada); Varfalvy, Nicolas [Departement de Radio-oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, PQ (Canada); Vigneault, Eric [Departement de Radio-oncologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, PQ (Canada); Dunscombe, Peter [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (Canada)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Vibratory Shear Enhanced Process Filtration for Processing Decommissioning Wastes at Rancho Seco  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many non-nuclear industries use a vibratory shear enhanced filtration process (VSEP) to separate solids in liquid streams. Unlike other methods, including the application of a precoat of filter media, the VSEP does not generate any secondary waste, making it seem ideally suited for nuclear power plant radwaste systems. This report presents the results of laboratory and pilot scale in-plant testing of VSEP's ability to successfully process radioactive decommissioning waste. Testing at Rancho Seco showed t...

2003-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

171

Somatostatin analogue, octreotide, reduces increased glomerular filtration rate and kidney size in insulin-dependent diabetes  

SciTech Connect

To determine whether treatment with a somatostatin analogue can reduce kidney hyperfiltration and hypertrophy in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, the authors studied 11 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and glomerular hyperfiltration. The patients were assigned randomly to receive continuous subcutaneous infusion of either octreotide, 300 {mu}g/24 h (five patients) or placebo (six patients) for 12 weeks. At baseline, mean glomerular filtration rate and mean total kidney volume were not significantly different in the two groups. However, after 12 weeks of treatment, the mean glomerular filtration rate was significantly lower in the octreotide group than in the placebo group. Furthermore, the mean total kidney volume was significantly lower after treatment in the octreotide group than in the placebo group. Glycemic control did not change significantly in either group. They conclude that subcutaneous infusion of octreotide for 12 weeks reduces increased glomerular filtration rate and kidney size in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus despite the fact that glycemic control remains unchanged.

Serri, O.; Beauregard, H.; Brazeau, P.; Abribat, T.; Lambert, J.; Harris, A.; Vachon, L. (Univ. de Montreal, Quebec (Canada) Sandoz Canada Inc., Dorval, Quebec (Canada))

1991-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

172

Drum Screen Filtration of Cooling Water in Fossil-Fired and Nuclear Power Plants: The Electricite de France (EDF) Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents a summary of the lessons learned from operating the drum screen filtration systems used for the last three decades in Èlectricité de France’s (EDF’s) nuclear and fossil-fired power plants, both in terms of the technological aspects of filtration and with regard to the prevention of clogging risks and the prevention of damage to the living organisms impinged on the drum screens and entrained into the cooling ...

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

173

Pyrolysis Oil Stabilization: Hot-Gas Filtration; Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-333  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hypothesis that was tested in this task was that separation of char, with its associated mineral matter from pyrolysis vapors before condensation, will lead to improved oil quality and stability with respect to storage and transportation. The metric used to evaluate stability in this case was a 10-fold reduction in the rate of increase of viscosity as determined by ASTM D445 (the accelerated aging test). The primary unit operation that was investigated for this purpose was hot-gas filtration. A custom-built heated candle filter system was fabricated by the Pall Corporation and furnished to NREL for this test campaign. This system consisted of a candle filter element in a containment vessel surrounded by heating elements on the external surface of the vessel. The filter element and housing were interfaced to NREL?s existing 0.5 MTD pyrolysis Process Development Unit (PDU). For these tests the pyrolysis reactor of the PDU was operated in the entrained-flow mode. The HGF test stand was installed on a slipstream from the PDU so that both hot-gas filtered oil and bio-oil that was not hot-gas filtered could be collected for purposes of comparison. Two filter elements from Pall were tested: (1) porous stainless steel (PSS) sintered metal powder; (2) sintered ceramic powder. An extremely sophisticated bio-oil condensation and collection system was designed and fabricated at NREL and interfaced to the filter unit.

Baldwin, R.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

(A small-scale study of Rocky Flats uncalcined incinerator ash dissolution and filtrate anion exchange)  

SciTech Connect

Small scale experimentation was conducted with incinerator ash in the nitric/hydrofluoric acid cascade dissolver and the anion exchange systems at Rocky Flats and Los Alamos National Laboratories for the purpose of determining the following: to determine the relationship between calcium fluoride dissolution feed levels and plutonium dissolution yields. To determine the relationship between calcium fluoride feed levels to dissolution, and the performance of anion exchange when processing dissolution filtrate. To determine the effect of carbonaceous materials on the dissolution and anion exchange when recovering plutonium from incinerator ash.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Multifunctional nanocomposites of carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles formed via vacuum filtration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In one aspect, the present invention provides a method of forming a film of nanocomposites of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and platinum (Pt) nanoparticles. In one embodiment, the method includes the steps of (a) providing a first solution that contains a plurality of CNTs, (b) providing a second solution that contains a plurality of Pt nanoparticles, (c) combining the first solution and the second solution to form a third solution, and (d) filtering the third solution through a nanoporous membrane using vacuum filtration to obtain a film of nanocomposites of CNTs and Pt nanoparticles.

Hersam, Mark C; Ostojic, Gordana; Liang, Yu Teng

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

176

PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT OF CROSS-FLOW FILTRATION FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE TREATMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the interest of accelerating waste treatment processing, the DOE has funded studies to better understand filtration with the goal of improving filter fluxes in existing cross-flow equipment. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was included in those studies, with a focus on start-up techniques, filter cake development, the application of filter aids (cake forming solid precoats), and body feeds (flux enhancing polymers). This paper discusses the progress of those filter studies. Cross-flow filtration is a key process step in many operating and planned waste treatment facilities to separate undissolved solids from supernate slurries. This separation technology generally has the advantage of self-cleaning through the action of wall shear stress created by the flow of waste slurry through the filter tubes. However, the ability of filter wall self-cleaning depends on the slurry being filtered. Many of the alkaline radioactive wastes are extremely challenging to filtration, e.g., those containing compounds of aluminum and iron, which have particles whose size and morphology reduce permeability. Unfortunately, low filter flux can be a bottleneck in waste processing facilities such as the Savannah River Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit and the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. Any improvement to the filtration rate would lead directly to increased throughput of the entire process. To date increased rates are generally realized by either increasing the cross-flow filter axial flowrate, limited by pump capacity, or by increasing filter surface area, limited by space and increasing the required pump load. SRNL set up both dead-end and cross-flow filter tests to better understand filter performance based on filter media structure, flow conditions, filter cleaning, and several different types of filter aids and body feeds. Using non-radioactive simulated wastes, both chemically and physically similar to the actual radioactive wastes, the authors performed several tests to demonstrate increases in filter performance. With the proper use of filter flow conditions and filter enhancers, filter flow rates can be increased over rates currently realized today.

Duignan, M.; Nash, C.; Poirier, M.

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

177

Diffusion and filtration properties of self-assembled gold nanocrystal membranes.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Close-packed nanoparticle monolayers have recently been shown to form mechanically robust, free-standing membranes. We report the first measurements of molecular transport through such ultrathin sheets, self-assembled from dodecanethiol-ligated gold nanocrystals. For aqueous solutions we find filtration coefficients 2 orders of magnitude larger than those observed in polymer-based filters, sieving of large solutes, and for smaller solutes a pronounced dependence of rejection on being charged. These results open up new possibilities for controlled delivery and separation of nano-objects.

He, J.; Lin, X.-M.; Chan, H.; Vukovic, L.; Kral, P.; Jaeger, H. M. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); (Univ. of Chicago); (Univ. of Illinois at Chicago)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Results of HWVP transuranic process waste treatment laboratory and pilot-scale filtration tests using specially ground zeolite  

SciTech Connect

Process waste streams from the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) may require treatment for cesium, strontium, and transuranic (TRU) element removal in order to meet criteria for incorporation in grout. The approach planned for cesium and strontium removal is ion exchange using a zeolite exchanger followed by filtration. Filtration using a pneumatic hydropulse filter is planned to remove TRU elements which are associated with process solids and to also remove zeolite bearing the cesium and strontium. The solids removed during filtration are recycled to the melter feed system to be incorporated into the HWVP glass product. Fluor Daniel, Inc., the architect-engineering firm for HWVP, recommended a Pneumatic Hydropulse (PHP) filter manufactured by Mott Metallurgical Corporation for use in the HWVP. The primary waste streams considered for application of zeolite contact and filtration are melter off-gas condensate from the submerged bed scrubber (SBS), and equipment decontamination solutions from the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT). Other waste streams could be treated depending on TRU element and radionuclide content. Laboratory and pilot-scale filtration tests were conducted to provide a preliminary assessment of the adequacy of the recommended filter for application to HWVP waste treatment.

Eakin, D.E.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Single Wall Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Filtration Efficiency Studies Using Laboratory Generated Particles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel offers higher fuel efficiency, but produces higher exhaust particulate matter. Diesel particulate filters are presently the most efficient means to reduce these emissions. These filters typically trap particles in two basic modes: at the beginning of the exposure cycle the particles are captured in the filter holes, and at longer times the particles form a "cake" on which particles are trapped. Eventually the "cake" removed by oxidation and the cycle is repeated. We have investigated the properties and behavior of two commonly used filters: silicon carbide (SiC) and cordierite (DuraTrap® RC) by exposing them to nearly-spherical ammonium sulfate particles. We show that the transition from deep bed filtration to "cake" filtration can easily be identified by recording the change in pressure across the filters as a function of exposure. We investigated performance of these filters as a function of flow rate and particle size. The filters trap small and large particles more efficiently than particles that are ~80 to 200 nm in aerodynamic diameter. A comparison between the experimental data and a simulation using incompressible lattice-Boltzmann model shows very good qualitative agreement, but the model overpredicts the filter’s trapping efficiency.

Yang, Juan; Stewart, Marc; Maupin, Gary D.; Herling, Darrell R.; Zelenyuk, Alla

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Nephelometric determination of the chemical oxygen demand in filtrates after the ultrafiltration purification of used lubricants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regions with developed industry are characterized by a large amount of lubricants in wastewater, and controlling the amount of mineral oil in the water in these regions is of prime importance. One of the methods of purifying used lubricants is ultrafiltration. In most cases, ultrafiltration purification is performed in BTU-0.5/2 tubular units with F-1 Teflon membranes. It is known that, in the case of the ultrafiltration purification of dispersed systems, the part of the dispersed phase with a particle size smaller than the diameter of membrane pores usually penetrates to the filtrate. The formation of the dispersed phase with a smaller size of particles is also possible because oil particles of a larger size are pressed through the membrane due to the wetting of the membrane material with the dispersed phase, which is the case of Teflon membranes. As a result, water produced by the ultrafiltration purification of lubricant-containing wastes contains oil particles 10-100 nm in size, which is comparable to the membrane pores. The amount of these particles can be small, which makes their determination difficult. Moreover, the method of controlling the amount of oil in the filtrate should be rapid, sensitive, and simple enough to allow its application in industrial conditions.

Bykadorov, N.U.; Radchenko, S.S. [Volgograd State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Final report for Grant No. DOE/DE-FG02-98ER14909: Experimental and modeling studies of nanometer aerosol filtration  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective is to perform a fundamental study of filtration of nanoparticles, and to obtain filtration knowledge necessary to design particle collection devices/systems for nanoparticle processing and for preventing nanoparticle emissions into the environment. The research covered a wide area relevant to nanoparticle filtration, under these main topics: (1) nanoparticle filtration and molecular dynamics simulation, (2) nanoparticle virtual impactor, (3) particle transport under low pressure, and (4) development of a high-throughput nanoparticle generator. A number of novel tools and numerical models have been developed under the DOE support.

Pui, David Y.H.; Chen, Da-Ren

2002-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

182

Electrical and thermal finite element modeling of arc faults in photovoltaic bypass diodes.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Arc faults in photovoltaic (PV) modules have caused multiple rooftop fires. The arc generates a high-temperature plasma that ignites surrounding materials and subsequently spreads the fire to the building structure. While there are many possible locations in PV systems and PV modules where arcs could initiate, bypass diodes have been suspected of triggering arc faults in some modules. In order to understand the electrical and thermal phenomena associated with these events, a finite element model of a busbar and diode was created. Thermoelectrical simulations found Joule and internal diode heating from normal operation would not normally cause bypass diode or solder failures. However, if corrosion increased the contact resistance in the solder connection between the busbar and the diode leads, enough voltage potentially would be established to arc across micron-scale electrode gaps. Lastly, an analytical arc radiation model based on observed data was employed to predicted polymer ignition times. The model predicted polymer materials in the adjacent area of the diode and junction box ignite in less than 0.1 seconds.

Bower, Ward Isaac; Quintana, Michael A.; Johnson, Jay

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion steam control and bypass system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two sets of hinged control doors for regulating motive steam flow from an evaporator to a condenser alternatively through a set of turbine blades in a steam bypass around the turbine blades. The evaporator has a toroidal shaped casing situated about the turbine's vertical axis of rotation and an outlet opening therein for discharging motive steam into an annular steam flow path defined between the turbine's radially inner and outer casing structures. The turbine blades extend across the steam flow path intermediate the evaporator and condenser. The first set of control doors is arranged to prevent steam access to the upstream side of the turbine blades and the second set of control doors acts as a bypass around the blades so as to maintain equilibrium between the evaporator and condenser during non-rotation of the turbine. The first set of control doors preferably extend, when closed, between the evaporator casing and the turbine's outer casing and, when open, extend away from the axis of rotation. The second set of control doors preferably constitute a portion of the turbine's outer casing downstream from the blades when closed and extend, when open, toward the axis of rotation. The first and second sets of control doors are normally held in the open and closed positions respectively by locking pins which may be retracted upon detecting an abnormal operating condition respectively to permit their closing and opening and provide steam flow from the evaporator to the condenser.

Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA); Jennings, Stephen J. (Radnor Township, Delaware County, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Apparatus for dusting off gas by filtration and aspiration cleaning of filter, and application to combustion gases  

SciTech Connect

Method and apparatus for dusting off gases by filtration and cleaning of filter by aspiration and application thereof to combustion gases are disclosed. This invention relates to the filtration of dust loaded gases, and, in particular, combustion gases in the hot state. It consists of passing gases to be dusted off from top to bottom over a bed of pulverulent material, in particular, a sand bed and cleaning the upper layer of said bed by aspiration of dusts deposited thereon. This invention is particularly adapted for dusting off combustion gases from boilers or thermal power stations or gases to be supplied to gas turbines.

Merry, J.

1982-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

185

Industrial Membrane Filtration and Short-bed Fractal Separation Systems for Separating Monomers from Heterogeneous Plant Material  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large-scale displacement of petroleum will come from low-cost cellulosic feedstocks such as straw and corn stover crop residues. This project has taken a step toward making this projection a reality by reducing capital and energy costs, the two largest cost factors associated with converting cellulosic biomass to chemicals and fuels. The technology exists for using acid or enzyme hydrolysis processes to convert biomass feedstock (i.e., waste cellulose such as straw, corn stover, and wood) into their base monomeric sugar building blocks, which can, in turn, be processed into chemicals and fuels using a number of innovative fermentation technologies. However, while these processes are technically possible, practical and economic barriers make these processes only marginally feasible or not feasible at all. These barriers are due in part to the complexity and large fixed and recurring capital costs of unit operations including filtration, chromatographic separation, and ion exchange. This project was designed to help remove these barriers by developing and implementing new purification and separation technologies that will reduce the capital costs of the purification and chromatographic separation units by 50% to 70%. The technologies fundamental to these improvements are: (a) highly efficient clarification and purification systems that use screening and membrane filtration to eliminate suspended solids and colloidal material from feed streams and (b) fractal technology based chromatographic separation and ion exchange systems that can substitute for conventional systems but at much smaller size and cost. A non-hazardous ''raw sugar beet juice'' stream (75 to 100 gal/min) was used for prototype testing of these technologies. This raw beet juice stream from the Amalgamated Sugar LLC plant in Twin Falls, Idaho contained abrasive materials and membrane foulants. Its characteristics were representative of an industrial-scale heterogeneous plant extract/hydrolysis stream, and therefore was an ideal model system for developing new separation equipment. Subsequent testing used both synthetic acid hydrolysate and corn stover derived weak acid hydrolysate (NREL produced). A two-phased approach was used for the research and development described in this project. The first level of study involved testing the new concepts at the bench level. The bench-scale evaluations provided fundamental understanding of the processes, building and testing small prototype systems, and determining the efficiency of the novel processes. The second level of study, macro-level, required building larger systems that directly simulated industrial operations and provided validation of performance to minimize financial risk during commercialization. The project goals and scope included: (1) Development of low-capital alternatives to conventional crop-based purification/separation processes; and (2) Development of each process to the point that transition to commercial operation is low risk. The project reporting period was January 2001 to December 2004. This included a one year extension of the project (without additional funding).

Kearney, M; Kochergin, V; Hess, R; Foust, T; Herbst, R; Mann, N

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Simulated Waste for Leaching and Filtration Studies--Laboratory Preparation Procedure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the simulant preparation procedure for producing multi-component simulants for leaching and filtration studies, including development and comparison activities in accordance with the test plan( ) prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-WTP-TSP-RT-06-006, Rev 0 (Smith 2006). A fundamental premise is that this approach would allow blending of the different components to simulate a wide variety of feeds to be treated in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). For example, a given feed from the planned feed vector could be selected, and the appropriate components would then be blended to achieve a representation of that particular feed. Using the blending of component simulants allows the representation of a much broader spectrum of potential feeds to the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP).

Smith, Harry D.; Russell, Renee L.; Peterson, Reid A.

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

187

Membrane filtration waste treatment technology comes of age in battery manufacturing plants  

SciTech Connect

A new waste treatment system from MEMTEK Corporation incorporates membrane filtration, and makes possible the effective treatment of waste streams containing a number of toxic heavy metals. Using this membrane technology, MEMTEK is capable of treating the wastewater in battery manufacturing plants to meet even the strictest limits imposed by local regulatory agencies and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Lead and zinc in the treated effluent are typically below 0.1 ppm. The typical battery manufacturing processes introduce metals, primarily lead, into plant effluents, especially from formation, battery wash, and laundry operation. Due to the high usage of acid in the plant, the wastewater is also usually of a low pH, typically 2 or less. The dissolved and particulate contaminants in this effluent must be removed to very low levels before the water can be released to the sewer or the environment. The waste treatment process is described.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Development of Simulation System for Hot Gas Filtration by Ceramic Candle Filters on High Temperature and/or High Pressure Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Hot gas filtration from industrial processes offers various advantages in terms of improvement of process efficiencies, heat recovery and protection of plant installation. Especially hot gas filtration is an essential technology for pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC).

Park, S.J.; Lim, J.H.; Kim, S.D.; Choi, H.K.; Park, H,S.; Park, Y.O.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

189

Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements and Analysis of Bypass Data for a Scaled 6mm Gap  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the fluid dynamics experiments in the MIR (Matched Index of-Refraction) flow system at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions of the momentum equations, scalar mixing, and turbulence models for the flow ratios between coolant channels and bypass gaps in the interstitial regions of typical prismatic standard fuel element (SFE) or upper reflector block geometries of typical Modular High-temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (MHTGR) in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties. The experiments will use optical techniques, primarily particle image velocimetry (PIV) in the INL Matched Index of Refraction (MIR) flow system.

J.R. Wolf; T.E. Conder; R.R. Schultz

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Printed on recycled paperPERFORMANCE OF A COMBINED SOLAR DESICCANT FILTRATION AIR-CONDITIONING SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A solar desiccant filtration system and conventional system were compared by simulating their performance over a cooling season using TRNSYS and Typic,aI Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data for a r,a.nge of system p‘arameters. The desiccant dehumidifier was modeled as a heat ‘and m,ass exe hanger with moisture and temperature effectivenesses based on the equilibrium intersection point. The activated carbon filter was modeled as a reduction of required ventilation tlow rate to m,aintain acceptable contamirmnt levels in the space. Several locations were investigated. The desiccant isotherm shape was varied from a moderate Brunauer Type I to silica gel (line,%) and the solar collector a-ea wxs varied from 0 to 4,000 ft2 to see its effect on the savings per season. The isotherm shape ‘and location had little effect on the resulting savings. The savings were between $2,800 and!S4,800 per season depending on the amount of collector carea. 1.

S. M. Burley; M. E. Arden; R. Campbell-howe; B. Wilkins-crowder; T. B. Jekel; J. W. Mitchell; S. A. Klein; W. A. Beckman

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Morphology of Nano and Micro Fiber Structures in Ultrafine Particles Filtration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selected procedures permitting to prepare homogeneous nanofibre structures of the desired morphology by employing a suitable combination of variables during the electrospinning process are presented. A comparison (at the same pressure drop) was made of filtration capabilities of planar polyurethane nanostructures formed exclusively by nanofibres, space polycarbonate nanostructures having bead spacers, structures formed by a combination of polymethyl methacrylate micro- and nanofibres and polypropylene meltblown microstructures, through which ultrafine particles of ammonium sulphate 20-400 nm in size were filtered. The structures studied were described using a new digital image analysis technique based on black and white images obtained by scanning electron microscopy. More voluminous structures modified with distance microspheres and having a greater thickness and mass per square area of the material, i.e. structures possessing better mechanical properties, demanded so much in nanostructures, enable preparation of filters having approximately the same free volume fraction as flat nanofibre filters but an increased effective fibre surface area, changed pore size morphology and, consequently, a higher filter quality.

Kimmer, Dusan; Vincent, Ivo; Fenyk, Jan; Petras, David [SPUR a.s., T. Bati 299, 764 22 Zlin (Czech Republic); Zatloukal, Martin; Sambaer, Wannes [Centre of Polymer Systems, Polymer Centre, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, nam. T. G. Masaryka 5555, 760 01 Zlin (Czech Republic); Zdimal, Vladimir [Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals of the AS CR, v.v.i., Rozvojova 135, 165 02 Praha 6 (Czech Republic)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Examination of pulverized waste recycled glass as filter media in slow sand filtration. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to investigate the pulverization of waste recycled glass to produce glass sand for slow sand filters. Pulverization experiments were performed using a fail mill pulverizer. The glass sand product from the pulverizer meets the size distribution requirements of ASTM-C-33 without size distribution adjustment. The size distribution must be adjusted to meet the grain size distribution requirements of the Ten States Standards and the USEPA for filter media used in slow sand filters. Pulverized glass that meet slow sand filter media specifications is an effective alternative to silica sand as a filter media for slow sand filtration. Three pilot plant slow sand filters with glass sand filter media were compared to a fourth filter containing silica sand filter media. Over an 8 month period of continuous operation, the performance of the glass sand filter media was as good or better than the silica sands, with removals of 56% to 96% for turbidity; 99.78% to 100.0% for coliform bacteria; 99.995% to 99.997% for giardia cysts; 99.92% and 99.97% for cryptosporidium oocysts. Based on a cost-benefit analysis, converting waste glass into filter media may be economically advantageous for recycling facilities.

Piccirillo, J.B.; Letterman, R.D.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Combined cycle electric power plant with a steam turbine having a sliding pressure main bypass and control valve system  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle electric power plant includes two gas turbines, a steam turbine, and a digital control system with an operator analog or manual backup. Each of the gas turbines has an exhaust heat recovery steam generator connected to a common header from which the steam is supplied by one or both of the steam generators for operating the steam turbine. The control system is of the sliding pressure type and maintains a predetermined steam pressure as a function of steam flow according to a predetermined characterization depending on the number of steam generators in service to limit the maximum steam velocity through the steam generators, and reduce the probability of water carryover into the steam turbine. Such control is always maintained by the bypass valve. The turbine control valve responds to the speed/load demand only, except when the bypass valve is closed and the rate of steam generation is insufficient to maintain a predetermined pressure flow relationship.

Uram, R.

1980-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

194

The influence of zeta potential and yield stress on the filtration characteristics of a magnesium hydroxide simulant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the UK, irradiated fuels from Magnox reactors are often stored in water-filled ponds under alkaline conditions, so as to minimise corrosion of fuel cladding. This is important to prevent or reduce leakage of soluble fission products and actinides to the pond water. A variety of intermediate level wastes derived from Magnox materials are stored at power stations. Under these alkaline conditions, various species of magnesium are formed, of which magnesium hydroxide is the dominant material. The particle-fluid interactions are significant for the design and operation of facilities for hydraulic retrieval, filtration, dewatering and ion exchange treatment of fuel storage pond water and stored wet Magnox wastes. Here we describe a study of particulate properties and filtration characteristics of oxide particle simulants under laboratory conditions. Cake and medium resistance data were correlated across a range of pH conditions with electro-acoustic zeta potential and shear yield stress measurements, as a function of particle volume fractions. The influence of zeta potential on filtration properties arises directly from the interaction of particles within the sediment cake. (authors)

Biggs, Simon; Nabi, Rafiq; Poole, Colin [Leeds University/Nexia Solutions URA in Particle Science and Technology, Institute of Particle Science and Engineering, School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, The University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Patel, Ashok [British Nuclear Group, Reactor Sites, Berkeley Centre, Berkeley, Gloucestershire, GL13 9PB (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Comparison of soy protein concentrates produced by membrane filtration and acid precipitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recovery of proteins using ultrafiltration (UF) process is an attractive alternative compared to conventional acid precipitation method. The mild processing condition, which leads to less protein denaturation, may be one of major virtues of this method. This research was directed to identify such assumptions of the products. Three soy protein concentrates were obtained in this study. Full-fat soybean flour and hexane-defatted soybean flour were dispersed into distilled water (1:8) at 60?C, respectively. A series of operations including pH adjustment (8.0), agitation (250 rpm, 30 min), sonication (40 dB, 20 min), homogenization (3 min), and centrifugation (3,000 x g, 15 min) were followed. For the membrane processing, the ultrafiltration cartridge used molecular weight cut-off 100,000 daltons. Acid-precipitated protein (at pH 4.5) was produced from hexane-defatted soybean flour following the identical procedures as above. Protein content of the membrane-processed product from full-fat soybean flour was 63.5% and that of the acid precipitated product was 71.9%. All samples were comparable in their functional properties. Nitrogen solubility at pH 7.0 was exhibited better in the protein produced by membrane filtration than the protein produced by acid precipitation due to protein denaturation. Also the membrane-processed soy protein showed good heat coagulation, emulsifying stability, and foaming stability. Amino acid patterns were similar to the typical one of soy proteins. However, relatively low lysine, threonine and valine contents in the acid-precipitated protein were noteworthy. The sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) patterns were almost comparable among samples. In appearance, the acid-precipitated protein was light and slightly greenish tint.

Kim, Hyun Jung

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Integrated reservoir characterization of a Tulare steamflood finds bypassed oil - South Belridge Field, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

Reservoir quality and producibility are directly related to the characteristics of the depositional lithofacies. Electric log gamma ray/resistivity profiles were used to define facies trends within the Tulare steamflood at South Belridge. Channel and non-channel facies profiles are distinctive across the lease with the channel sands having the better quality reservoir and greater net pay values. Sidewall core permeabilities were averaged over the main producing Tulare intervals with the channels averaging 2000-3000 millidarcies and non-channels 200-500 millidarcies. This supports the lithofacies trend and net pay maps. Although the approach is qualitative, it illustrates the dramatic permeability contrast between the channel and non-channel lithofacies. Temperature maps using downhole temperature surveys and flowline temperatures indicate channel facies temperatures up to 300[degrees] with the non-channel facies having 90[degrees] to 100[degrees] temperatures (near ambient). Higher temperatures also relate to higher average daily production rates for channel associated wells. Channel wells averaged greater than 30 BOPD while non-channel wells averaged 10 BOPD or less. New and replacement well nations have been high graded resulting in favorable production responses. Integration of the lithofacies, permeability and temperature data plus ongoing preventive production optimization work has led to a more efficient Tulare steamflood and identification of bypassed oil on the King-Ellis lease in the South Belridge Field.

Walter, D.R.; Wylie, A.S. Jr.; Broussard, K.A. (Santa Fe Energy Resources, Bakersfield, CA (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Locating and producing bypassed oil: A U.S. DOE project update  

SciTech Connect

Tidelands Oil Production Co. is conducting a Class 3 near-term waterflood project supported partially by the US Dept. of Energy (USDOE) titled Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management. The project takes place across Fault Blocks 4 and 5 of the Wilmington field, Long Beach, California. The objective of this U.S. DOE demonstration project is to increase waterflood reserves in slope and basin clastic reservoirs through improved methods of identifying sands containing oil bypassed by a waterflood and exploiting this oil by recompleting existing idle wells. Specific objectives include identifying sands containing high remaining-oil saturation by use of a multiple acoustic cased-hole logging tool, determining geophysical parameters for interpretation of the acoustic data, demonstrating and gaining experience with a short-radius lateral recompletion, optimizing standard and steam recompletion techniques, generating a three-dimensional (3D) geologic model, and transferring the developed technologies and methods to other operators of slope and basin clastic reservoirs. The paper discusses results to date on characterization, reservoir engineering, deterministic modeling, multiple acoustic logging, and recompletions.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Pilot-scale production of dicesium hexachloroplutonate (Cs/sub 2/PuCl/sub 6/) and filtrate recovery  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Plant is introducing the use of dicesium hexachloroplutonate (DCHP) into the Molten Salt Extraction Process (MSE). DCHP (Cs/sub 2/PuCl/sub 6/) extracts americium from molten plutonium metal into a molten calcium chloride matrix. The DCHP is produced by precipitating plutonium (IV) from hydrochloric acid with cesium chloride. Before production of the DCHP began, we performed a pilot-scale test to determine yields, track impurities, and test filtrate recovery for the proposed process. In the course of this study, we determined that impure plutonium oxide (0.80 g/g) dissolved in concentrated HCl is an acceptable source of plutonium for the DCHP. We also determined that dissolved oxide and chloride anion exchange eluate can be mixed for DCHP preparation. We found that DCHP yields average 92-95% at 8M total chloride and are independent of sparging rate and time. Furthermore, we found that drying at 150/degree/C for 5 hr gives <0.1% water in the DCHP only if it is preceeded by extensive air drying. Finally, we proved the efficiency of chloride anion exchange for the recovery of above-discard plutonium from the filtrate. 11 refs., 1 fig., 11 tabs.

Muscatello, A.C.; Stevens, J.R.; Killion, M.E.; Valdez, J.D.; Ames, R.L.

1989-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY MEASUREMENTS IN A REPRESENTATIVE GAS-COOLED PRISMATIC REACTOR CORE MODEL: FLOW IN THE COOLANT CHANNELS AND INTERSTITIAL BYPASS GAPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Core bypass flow is one of the key issues with the prismatic Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor, and it refers to the coolant that navigates through the interstitial, non-cooling passages between the graphite fuel blocks instead of traveling through the designated coolant channels. To determine the bypass flow, a double scale representative model was manufactured and installed in the Matched Index-of-Refraction flow facility; after which, stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was employed to measure the flow field within. PIV images were analyzed to produce vector maps, and flow rates were calculated by numerically integrating over the velocity field. It was found that the bypass flow varied between 6.9-15.8% for channel Reynolds numbers of 1,746 and 4,618. The results were compared to computational fluid dynamic (CFD) pre-test simulations. When compared to these pretest calculations, the CFD analysis appeared to under predict the flow through the gap.

Thomas E. Conder; Richard Skifton; Ralph Budwig

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Bypass Flow Computations using a One-Twelfth Symmetric Sector For Normal Operation in a 350 MWth VHTR  

SciTech Connect

Significant uncertainty exists about the effects of bypass flow in a prismatic gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Bypass flow is the flow in the gaps between prismatic graphite blocks in the core. The gaps are present because of variations in their construction, imperfect installation and expansion and shrinkage from thermal heating and neutron fluence. Calculations are performed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for flow of the helium coolant in the gap and coolant channels along with conjugate heat generation and heat transfer in the fuel compacts and graphite. A commercial CFD code is used for all of the computations. A one-twelfth sector of a standard hexagonal block column is used for the CFD model because of its symmetry. Various scenarios are computed by varying the gap width from zero to 5 mm, varying the total heat generation rate to examine average and peak radial generation rates and variation of the graphite block geometry to account for the effects of shrinkage caused by irradiation. The calculations are for a 350 MWth prismatic reactor. It is shown that the effect of increasing gap width, while maintaining the same total mass flow rate, causes increased maximum fuel temperature while providing significant cooling to the near-gap region. The maximum outlet coolant temperature variation is increased by the presence of gap flow and also by an increase in total heat generation with a gap present. The effect of block shrinkage is actually to decrease maximum fuel temperature compared to a similar reference case.

Richard W. Johnson; Hiroyuki Sato

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Removal of arsenic and other contaminants from storm run-off water by flotation, filtration, adsorption and ion exchange. Technical report, September-November 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of removing soluble arsenic (+5) from storm runoff water by dissolved air flotation (Supracell), dissolved air flotation and sand filtration combination (Sandfloat), granular carbon adsorption, and ion exchange processes was experimentally demonstrated. The best pretreatment unit was Sandfloat clarifier consisting of both flotation and filtration. Sandfloat clarifier consistently removed over 90% of arsenic, turbidity, and color, and over 50% of chemical oxygen demand and oil and grease. Using a Sandfloat or a Supracell for pretreatment, and then using either carbon adsorption or ion exchange for second-stage treatment, the soluble arsenic in the storm water can be totally removed.

Krofta, M.; Wang, L.K.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile Â… Thermal Bypass Air Barriers in the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Imagine Homes of San Antonio, Texas, worked Imagine Homes of San Antonio, Texas, worked with Building America team partner IBACOS to improve the continuity of the air barrier along the thermal enclosure by using spray foam insulation in the walls and attic. Building America research teams effectively demonstrated the importance of thermal bypass air barriers, which led to their inclusion in ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 specifications in 2006 and then to inclusion in the 2009 IECC. This is a great example of effective research driving a complete market transformation process for a critical high-performance home innovation. Air sealing of the home's thermal enclosure has been required by the energy code for many years. However, in years past, the provisions were somewhat vague and only required that critical areas of potential air leakage (e.g., joints,

203

Evaluation of Alternative Control for Prevention and or Mitigation of HEPA Filter Failure Accidents at Tank Farm Facilities  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates the adequacy and benefit of use of HEPA filter differential pressure limiting setpoints to initiate exhauster shut down as an alternative safety control for postulated accidents that might result in filtration failure and subsequent unfiltered release from Tank Farm primary tank ventilators.

GUSTAVSON, R.D.

2000-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

204

Accumulation of Cd by the marine sponge Halichondria panicea pallas: Effects upon filtration rate and its relevance for biomonitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The marine demosponge Halichondria panicea Pallas, is a cosmopolitan species occurring in coastal waters with varied conditions of light, current, salinity and turbidity. H. panicea has a leuconoid structure and is composed of siliceous spicules and spongin fibers. Sponges are important members of many shallow water marine benthic communities, but comparatively little is known of their trace metal biology. Sponge architecture is constructed around a system of water canals and the physiology of the sponge is largely dependent on the currents of water flowing through their bodies. The volume of water pumped by a sponge is remarkable, ca. 100-1200 ml h[sup [minus]1] g[sup [minus]1]. This large volume of water passing through the body of a sponge means that most cells are in direct contact with the external medium. Many sponges are able to accumulate trace metals and are highly tolerant of such pollutants. This has led to the proposal that a [open quotes]sponge watch[close quotes] program be initiated supplementary to the existing [open quotes]mussel watch[close quotes] program. In view of the large volume of water passing through the bodies of sponges such as H. panicea, the suitability of this species as a biomonitoring organism was further investigated. This study describes the accumulation strategy of the demosponge H. panicea exposed to dissolved cadmium (Cd) and the effect of Cd upon sponge filtration rate.

Olesen, T.M.E.; Weeks, J.M. (Odense Univ. (Denmark))

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Pine Pyrolysis Vapor Phase Upgrading Over ZSM-5 Catalyst: Effect of Temperature, Hot Gas Filtration, and Hydrogen Donor Molecule on the Rate of Deactivation of Catalyst  

SciTech Connect

The conversion of primary vapors from pine pyrolysis over a ZSM-5 catalyst was characterized using a micro-reactor coupled to a molecular beam mass spectrometer (MBMS) to allow on-line measurement of the upgraded vapors. This micro-reacor-MBMS system was used to investigate the effects of hot gas filtration, temperature and hydrogen donor molecules on the rate of deactivation of the UPV2 catalyst. Our results show that the life of catalyst is significantly improved by using better filtration. Temperature had an effect on both product distribution and catalyst deactivation. The hydrogen donor molecules (HDM) used in this study show better reduction in catalyst deactivation rates at high temperatures.

Mukarakate, C.; Zhang, X.; Nimlos, M.; Robichaud, D.; Donohoe, B.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Monitoring and Evaluation of the Prototype Surface Collector at Bonneville First Powerhouse in 2000: Synthesis of Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes research done to evaluate the Prototype Surface Collector at Bonneville Dam, Powerhouse I, on the Columbia River. The surface collector is being evaluated as a means for bringing downstream migrating salmon and steelhead through the powerhouse while avoiding the turbines. The report describes evaluations conducted by PNNL, National Marine Fisheries Service, and various contractors using radio telemetry, hydroacoustics, and computational fluid dynamics models. The evaluation will provide information to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for their 2001 decision on whether to use surface flow bypass or extended-length submersible bar screens for long-term smolt passage at Bonneville Dam.

Carlson, Thomas J

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met National Marine Fisheries Service criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. In addition, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2002, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Marine Fisheries Service. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to increase safe juvenile fish passage. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris should be improved at some sites.

Carter, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. Annual report, May 1, 1995--April 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and economics success of producing oil from abandoned or nearly abandoned fields in the Dundee Formation of Central Michigan using horizontal drilling technology. The project is a cooperative venture between Michigan Technological University (MTU), Western Michigan University (WMU), and Terra Energy (now Cronus Development Co.). During the fall of 1995, the demonstration well for this project, the TOW No. 1-3 well in Crystal Field, Montcalm County, Michigan, was completed in the Dundee Formation and for the first three months of operation produced 50 bbl/day oil with no water cut. Because surface facilities were inadequate to handle full production, the well was produced for 12 hrs/day and shut in for 12 hrs/day. In January, 1996, new surface Facilities were completed and production was raised to 100 bbl/day. Daily production has varied from about 75 to 100 BOPD since that time. To date, the well has produced over 10, 000 bbls. The water cut remains at 0% and pressure has been maintained at 1445 psi by an active water drive. If expectations are met, the well will pay out in less than 1 year and continue on production for at least 5 years. Cronus Development Co. is tentatively planning to drill three more horizontal wells in the Dundee in Crystal Field. Thus, the play concept we chose to test, that bypassed attic oil remained in the Dundee reservoir between wells that had been produced at excessively high flow rates and had coned water during primary production, appears to be correct, and the TOW No. 1-3 HD-1 well is now a scientific, and appears soon to become an economic, success.

Wood, J.R.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

209

Household ceramic water filter evaluation using three simple low-cost methods : membrane filtration, 3M Petrifilm and hydrogen sulfide bacteria in northern region, Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Drinking water continues to be a major source of waterborne diseases and death in the world because many points of water collection remain unsafe. This thesis reports high level of fecal contamination found in rivers and ...

Mattelet, Claire (Claire Eliane H. Y.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Evaluation of commercially available geothermal drilling fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review of geothermal drilling in the United States has revealed that serious problems are being encountered with corrosion and degradation of drilling fluids in high temperature wells. The best high temperature drilling fluids that could be formulated from commercially available materials were obtained from the five largest mud companies. These included samples of 9 and 18 lb/gal water muds and 18 lb/gal oil muds. Over 4,000 tests were conducted on these muds to evaluate their performance at high temperature. This included testing at temperatures to 550/sup 0/F and pressures to 15,000 psi. These tests revealed that most of the water muds had high viscosity, high filtration rates and poor corrosivity characteristics at temperatures above 350/sup 0/F. Although the oil muds performed better than water muds at high temperatures, some problems were encountered with viscosity at temperatures above 450/sup 0/F and with filtration at temperatures above 500/sup 0/F. Generally the corrosivity characteristics of the oil muds were much better than those of the water muds. Overall, oil muds have better temperature stability than water muds but their use is often limited because of problems with surface pollution, contamination of water zones and reservoir damage. Biodegradable oil mud systems would overcome some of these limitations.

Remont, L.J.; Rehm, W.A.; McDonald, W.J.; Maurer, W.C.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Application of pulse spark discharges for scale prevention and continuous filtration methods in coal-fired power plant Oct. 1, 2008 Â… Sept. 30, 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Drexel University Drexel University Y. Cho, A. Fridman, and A. Starikovskii Oct. 28, 2008 Application of pulse spark discharges for scale prevention and continuous filtration methods in coal-fired power plant U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Energy Technology Laboratory New Scale-Prevention Technology Use electrical pulse spark discharges in water to precipitate dissolved mineral ions. Remove them using a self-cleaning filter from cooling water. Specific objectives of the proposed work 1. Determine whether the spark discharge can promote the precipitation of mineral ions in cooling water. 2. Determine whether the proposed technology can increase the COC through a continuous precipitation of calcium ions

212

A Crystallographic Study of the Role of Sequence Context in Thymine Glycol Bypass by a Replicative DNA Polymerase Serendipitously Sheds Light on the Exonuclease Complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thymine glycol (Tg) is the most common oxidation product of thymine and is known to be a strong block to replicative DNA polymerases. A previously solved structure of the bacteriophage RB69 DNA polymerase (RB69 gp43) in complex with Tg in the sequence context 5'-G-Tg-G shed light on how Tg blocks primer elongation: The protruding methyl group of the oxidized thymine displaces the adjacent 5'-G, which can no longer serve as a template for primer elongation [Aller, P., Rould, M. A., Hogg, M, Wallace, S. S. and Doublie S. (2007). A structural rationale for stalling of a replicative DNA polymerase at the most common oxidative thymine lesion, thymine glycol. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 104, 814-818.]. Several studies showed that in the sequence context 5'-C-Tg-purine, Tg is more likely to be bypassed by Klenow fragment, an A-family DNA polymerase. We set out to investigate the role of sequence context in Tg bypass in a B-family polymerase and to solve the crystal structures of the bacteriophage RB69 DNA polymerase in complex with Tg-containing DNA in the three remaining sequence contexts: 5'-A-Tg-G, 5'-T-Tg-G, and 5'-C-Tg-G. A combination of several factors - including the associated exonuclease activity, the nature of the 3' and 5' bases surrounding Tg, and the cis-trans interconversion of Tg - influences Tg bypass. We also visualized for the first time the structure of a well-ordered exonuclease complex, allowing us to identify and confirm the role of key residues (Phe123, Met256, and Tyr257) in strand separation and in the stabilization of the primer strand in the exonuclease site.

Aller, Pierre; Duclos, Stéphanie; Wallace, Susan S.; Doublié, Sylvie (Vermont)

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

213

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation (Devonian) of the Michigan Basin using horizontal drains. Final report, April 28, 1994--December 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Total hydrocarbon production in the Michigan Basin has surpassed 1 billion barrels (Bbbls) and total unrecovered reserves are estimated at 1--2 BBbls. However, hydrocarbon production in Michigan has fallen from 35 MMbbls/yr in 1979 to about 10 MMbbls/yr in 1996. In an effort to slow this decline, a field demonstration project designed around using a horizontal well to recover bypassed oil was designed and carried out at Crystal Field in Montcalm County, MI. The project had two goals: to test the viability of using horizontal wells to recover bypassed oil from the Dundee Formation, and to characterize additional Dundee reservoirs (29) that are look alikes to the Crystal Field. As much as 85 percent of the oil known to exist in the Dundee Formation in the Michigan Basin remains in the ground as bypassed oil. Early production techniques in the 137 fields were poor, and the Dundee was at risk of being abandoned, leaving millions of barrels of oil behind. Crystal Field in Montcalm County, Michigan is a good example of a worn out field. Crystal Field was once a prolific producer which had been reduced to a handful of wells, the best of which produced only 5 barrels per day. The demonstration well drilled as a result of this project, however, has brought new life to the Crystal Field. Horizontal drilling is one of the most promising technologies available for oil production. The new well was completed successfully in October of 1995 and has been producing 100 barrels of oil per day, 20 times better than the best conventional well in the field.

Wood, J.R.; Pennington, W.D.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Yakima and Touchet River Basins Phase II Fish Screen Evaluation, 2006-2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2006, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated 27 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima and Touchet river basins. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performs these evaluations for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to determine whether the fish screening devices meet those National Marine Fisheries (NMFS) criteria for juvenile fish screen design, that promote safe and timely passage of juvenile salmonids. The NMFS criteria against which the sites were evaluated are as follows: (1) a uniform flow distribution over the screen surface to minimize approach velocity; (2) approach velocities less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s protects the smallest salmonids from impingement; (3) sweep velocities that are greater than approach velocities to minimize delay of out-migrating juveniles and minimize sediment deposition near the screens; (4) a bypass flow greater than or equal to the maximum flow velocity vector resultant upstream of the screens to also minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; (5) a gradual and efficient acceleration of flow from the upstream end of the site into the bypass entrance to minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; and (6) screen submergence between 65% and 85% for drum screen sites. In addition, the silt and debris accumulation next to the screens should be kept to a minimum to prevent excessive wear on screens, seals and cleaning mechanisms. Evaluations consist of measuring velocities in front of the screens, using an underwater camera to assess the condition and environment in front of the screens, and noting the general condition and operation of the sites. Results of the evaluations in 2006 include the following: (1) Most approach velocities met the NMFS criterion of less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s. Of the sites evaluated, 31% exceeded the criterion at least once. Thirty-three percent of flat-plate screens had problems compared to 25% of drum screens. (2) Woody debris and gravel deposited during high river levels were a problem at several sites. In some cases, it was difficult to determine the bypass pipe was plugged until several weeks had passed. Slow bypass flow caused by both the obstructions and high river levels may have discouraged fish from entering the bypass, but once they were in the bypass, they may have had no safe exit. Perhaps some tool or technique can be devised that would help identify whether slow bypass flow is caused by pipe blockage or by high river levels. (3) Bypass velocities generally were greater than sweep velocities, but sweep velocities often did not increase toward the bypass. The latter condition could slow migration of fish through the facility. (4) Screen and seal materials generally were in good condition. (5) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (6) Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) generally operated and maintained fish screen facilities in a way that provided safe passage for juvenile fish. (7) Efforts with WDFW to find optimal louver settings at Naches-Selah were partly successful. The number of spots with excessive approach velocities was decreased, but we were unable to adjust the site to bring all approach values below 0.4 ft/s. (8) In some instances, irrigators responsible for specific maintenance at their sites (e.g., debris removal) did not perform their tasks in a way that provided optimum operation of the fish screen facility. Enforcement personnel proved effective at reminding irrigation districts of their responsibilities to maintain the sites for fish protection as well as irrigation. (9) We recommend placing datasheets providing up-to-date operating criteria and design flows in each site's logbox. The datasheet should include bypass design flows and a table showing depths of water over the weir and corresponding bypass flow. A similar datasheet relating canal gage readings and canal discharge in cubic feet per second would help identify times when the canal is taking mo

Chamness, Mickie; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Program Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation: Background and Methods Evaluation: Background and Methods Definition of evaluation: the process of determining the worth or merit of something; if "something" is a program, then it's "program evaluation." Other types of evaluation include: product evaluation (most widely practiced, e.g., Consumer Reports); personnel evaluation; research evaluation; policy studies; art, movie, play, and book reviews. Program evaluation is NOT the same as research although they share many characteristics--Both: Start with questions Use similar methods Provide similar information Program evaluation focuses on decisions. Research focuses on answering questions about phenomena to discover new knowledge and test theories/hypotheses. Research is aimed at truth. Evaluation is aimed at

216

Movement of Fall Chinook Salmon Fry Oncorhynchus Tshawytscha : A Comparison of Approach Angles for Fish Bypass in a Modular Rotary Drum Fish Screen.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed tests to determine whether a significant difference in fish passage existed between a 6-ft screening facility built perpendicularly to canal flow and an identical screening facility with the screen mounted at a 45-degree angle to the approach channel. A modular drum screen built by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife was installed at PNNL`s Aquatic Ecology research laboratory in Richland, Washington. Fall chinook salmon fry were introduced into the test system, and their movements were monitored. A total of 14 tests (400 fish per test) that lasted 20 hours were completed during April and May, 1996. There was no significant difference in fish passage rate through the two approach configurations. Attraction flow to the bypass across the face of the screen was more evident for the angled approach, although this did not appear to play a significant role in attracting fish to the bypass. Approach velocities at the face of the screen did not exceed the 0.4 fps criteria for either approach configuration and posed not threat to fish. No fish passed over, around, or through the drum screen during any test.

Neitzel, D.A.; Blanton, S.L.; Abernethy, C. Scott; Daly, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate juvenile salmon passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004 to inform decisions about long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway and spill passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. PNNL used fixed-location hydroacoustic sampling across the entire project, especially at the sluiceway and spillway, using multiple split-beam transducers at selected locations. At the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish. The fish data were interpreted and integrated with hydraulic data from a CFD model and in-field ADCP measurements. Two sluiceway operations were compared: West only (SL 1) vs. West+East (SL 1 + SL 18). Based on our findings, we concluded that The Dalles Dam sluiceway has the potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. This potential could be tapped with hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway. We recommended the following: (1) six rather than three sluice gates should be opened to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. (2) The turbine units below open sluice gates should be operated as a standard fish operations procedure. (3) In 2005, the Corps and fisheries agencies should consider operating sluice gates in one or more of the following combinations of six gates: (a) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 18-1, 18-2, 18-3 (repeat 2004 operation), (b) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, or (c) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 2-1, 2-2, 2-3. The following elements for surface flow bypasses which should be considered during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: (1) form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than {approx}7% of total project discharge), (2) create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration < 1 m/s/m), (3) make water velocities at an entrance high enough (> 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, (4) adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, and (5) consider installing a forebay wall to increase fish availability to the surface flow bypass.

Johnson, Gary E.; Hanks, Michael E.; Khan, Fenton; Cook, Chris B.; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate juvenile salmon passage at The Dalles Dam in 2004 to inform decisions about long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway and spill passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. PNNL used fixed-location hydroacoustic sampling across the entire project, especially at the sluiceway and spillway, using multiple split-beam transducers at selected locations. At the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish. The fish data were interpreted and integrated with hydraulic data from a CFD model and in-field ADCP measurements. Two sluiceway operations were compared: West only (SL 1) vs. West+East (SL 1 + SL 18). Based on our findings, we concluded that The Dalles Dam sluiceway has the potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. This potential could be tapped with hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway. We recommended the following: (1) six rather than three sluice gates should be opened to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. (2) The turbine units below open sluice gates should be operated as a standard fish operations procedure. (3) In 2005, the Corps and fisheries agencies should consider operating sluice gates in one or more of the following combinations of six gates: (a) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 18-1, 18-2, 18-3 (repeat 2004 operation), (b) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 11-1, 11-2, 11-3, or (c) SL 1-1, 1-2, 1-3 and SL 2-1, 2-2, 2-3. The following elements for surface flow bypasses which should be considered during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: (1) form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than {approx}7% of total project discharge), (2) create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, (4) adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, and (5) consider installing a forebay wall to increase fish availability to the surface flow bypass.

Johnson, Gary E.; Hanks, Michael E.; Khan, Fenton; Cook, Chris B.; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Predicting target vessel location on robot-assisted coronary artery bypass graft using CT to ultrasound registration  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Although robot-assisted coronary artery bypass grafting (RA-CABG) has gained more acceptance worldwide, its success still depends on the surgeon's experience and expertise, and the conversion rate to full sternotomy is in the order of 15%-25%. One of the reasons for conversion is poor pre-operative planning, which is based solely on pre-operative computed tomography (CT) images. In this paper, the authors propose a technique to estimate the global peri-operative displacement of the heart and to predict the intra-operative target vessel location, validated via both an in vitro and a clinical study. Methods: As the peri-operative heart migration during RA-CABG has never been reported in the literatures, a simple in vitro validation study was conducted using a heart phantom. To mimic the clinical workflow, a pre-operative CT as well as peri-operative ultrasound images at three different stages in the procedure (Stage{sub 0}--following intubation; Stage{sub 1}--following lung deflation; and Stage{sub 2}--following thoracic insufflation) were acquired during the experiment. Following image acquisition, a rigid-body registration using iterative closest point algorithm with the robust estimator was employed to map the pre-operative stage to each of the peri-operative ones, to estimate the heart migration and predict the peri-operative target vessel location. Moreover, a clinical validation of this technique was conducted using offline patient data, where a Monte Carlo simulation was used to overcome the limitations arising due to the invisibility of the target vessel in the peri-operative ultrasound images. Results: For the in vitro study, the computed target registration error (TRE) at Stage{sub 0}, Stage{sub 1}, and Stage{sub 2} was 2.1, 3.3, and 2.6 mm, respectively. According to the offline clinical validation study, the maximum TRE at the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery was 4.1 mm at Stage{sub 0}, 5.1 mm at Stage{sub 1}, and 3.4 mm at Stage{sub 2}. Conclusions: The authors proposed a method to measure and validate peri-operative shifts of the heart during RA-CABG. In vitro and clinical validation studies were conducted and yielded a TRE in the order of 5 mm for all cases. As the desired clinical accuracy imposed by this procedure is on the order of one intercostal space (10-15 mm), our technique suits the clinical requirements. The authors therefore believe this technique has the potential to improve the pre-operative planning by updating peri-operative migration patterns of the heart and, consequently, will lead to reduced conversion to conventional open thoracic procedures.

Cho, Daniel S.; Linte, Cristian; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Bainbridge, Daniel; Wedlake, Chris; Moore, John; Barron, John; Patel, Rajni; Peters, Terry [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute and Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, University of Western Ontario, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute and Biomedical Imaging Resource, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario N6A 5A5 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Computer Science, University of Western Ontario, Ontario N6A 5B7 (Canada); Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario N6A 5A5 (Canada); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program, University of Western Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); and Canadian Surgical Technologies and Advanced Robotics, London, Ontario N6A 5A5 (Canada)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 1997 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated 19 Phase II screen sites in the Yakima River Basin at least three times each between April 30 and August 22, 1997. The sites were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide fish a safe, efficient return to the river. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypass met current NMFS criteria and promoted timely fish bypass, if fish were protected from injury due to impingement, entrainment, and predation, and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. A bi-directional flow meter and underwater video system were essential in completing the investigation. In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites were acceptable by NMFS standards. High approach velocities and slow bypass flow were the most common problems noted. Although velocities often fluctuated from one sampling location to the next, average sweep and approach velocities were very good. In general, fish should not be impinged or experience delays in returning to the river under normal operating conditions. Most screens were properly sealed to prevent fish entrainment and injury, although potential problems were identified at several screen sites. Three sites had gap openings from the forebay to the aftbay, allowing fish to be entrained. Other sites had spaces larger than 3/32 inch where small fish could become trapped. Some drum screens had flat spots but these were not been confirmed as underwater gaps, primarily because of siltation. On rare occasions, seals were intact, but cracked or turned under. Submergence levels at the drum screen sites exceeded 85% for one third of our evaluations. Eight of 12 drum screen sites experienced high water levels during at least one evaluation. Only one operating site's submergence was measured at less than 65% submergence. Two flat plate screen sites were completely overtopped with water during one evaluation each. Although 1997 was an extreme high-water year, these overtopping events point out that some screens do not completely protect fish under the full range of potential operating conditions. Water depths at the outfall pipe were acceptable at all but four sites. Generally, water depths were low near the end of the irrigation season due to low river flows. Rock removal around the outfall pipe or pipe extension would improve the situation. We gauged the potential for predation by qualitatively measuring the types and amount of cover provided for predators in front of the screens and by recording random observations of fish large enough to be considered predators in the forebay. Predation was more likely to occur at drum screen sites than at flat plate screen sites. Drum sites provide more predator hiding places because greater amounts of woody debris accumulate under the drums and against the concrete walls that divide one screen bay from the next. Four sites had both woody debris and large fish present. These four sites were considered most likely to experience juvenile salmonid loss to predation. Periodic removal of woody debris from underneath the curvature of drum screens would decrease the likelihood of predation at these sites. Screens were generally well maintained. Automated cleaning brushes functioned properly, chains and other moving parts were well greased, and inoperative and algae-covered drum screens were eventually repaired and cleaned. However, removal of sediment build-up and accumulated woody debris are areas where improvement should be considered. Maintenance checks should include observation of bypass outfalls on a regular basis, as conditions at the end of the bypass pipe are likely to change seasonally, especially in streams with high gradients or unstable gravel. Post-season evaluations were conducted at 11 sites in November to try and confirm seal and drum screen defects, and locations of excessive sedimentation. This proved effective in several cases, but the winterization process eliminated some of the evidence. Severa

Blanton, S.; Neitzel, C.; Abernethy, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2002 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2002, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met National Marine Fisheries Service criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. In addition, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2002, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Marine Fisheries Service. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to increase safe juvenile fish passage. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris should be improved at some sites.

Carter, J.; McMichael, G.; Chamness, M. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Assessment and evaluation of ceramic filter cleaning techniques: Task Order 19  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to assess and evaluate the effectiveness, appropriateness and economics of ceramic barrier filter cleaning techniques used for high-temperature and high-pressure particulate filtration. Three potential filter cleaning techniques were evaluated. These techniques include, conventional on-line pulse driven reverse gas filter cleaning, off-line reverse gas filter cleaning and a novel rapid pulse driven filter cleaning. These three ceramic filter cleaning techniques are either presently employed, or being considered for use, in the filtration of coal derived gas streams (combustion or gasification) under high-temperature high-pressure conditions. This study was divided into six subtasks: first principle analysis of ceramic barrier filter cleaning mechanisms; operational values for parameters identified with the filter cleaning mechanisms; evaluation and identification of potential ceramic filter cleaning techniques; development of conceptual designs for ceramic barrier filter systems and ceramic barrier filter cleaning systems for two DOE specified power plants; evaluation of ceramic barrier filter system cleaning techniques; and final report and presentation. Within individual sections of this report critical design and operational issues were evaluated and key findings were identified.

Chen, H.; Zaharchuk, R.; Harbaugh, L.B.; Klett, M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2004, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 25 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2004, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (4) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites. (5) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve passage conditions for juvenile fish. For example, Taylor has had problems meeting bypass flow and submergence operating criteria since the main river channel shifted away from the site 2 years ago, and Fruitvale consistently has had problems meeting bypass flow criteria when the water is low. (6) Continued problems at Gleed point to design flaws. This site should be considered for redesign or replacement.

Vucelick, Jessica; McMichael, Geoffrey; Chamness, Mickie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Evaluation of the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) flowsheet for decontamination of high-activity-level water at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the Submerged Demineralizer System (SDS) flowsheet for decontamination of the high-activity-level water at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Nuclear Power Station was evaluated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a study that included filtration tests, ion exchange column tests, and ion exchange distribution tests. The contaminated waters, the SDS flowsheet, and the experiments made are described. The experimental results were used to predict the SDS performance and to indicate potential improvements.

Campbell, D.O., Collins, E.D., King, L.J., Knauer, J.B.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Design and evaluation of the ReKon : an integrated detection and assessment perimeter system.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kontek Industries (Kannapolis, NC) and their subsidiary, Stonewater Control Systems (Kannapolis, NC), have entered into a cooperative research and development agreement with Sandia to jointly develop and evaluate an integrated perimeter security system solution, one that couples access delay with detection and assessment. This novel perimeter solution was designed to be configurable for use at facilities ranging from high-security military sites to commercial power plants, to petro/chemical facilities of various kinds. A prototype section of the perimeter has been produced and installed at the Sandia Test and Evaluation Center in Albuquerque, NM. This prototype system integrated fiber optic break sensors, active infrared sensors, fence disturbance sensors, video motion detection, and ground sensors. This report documents the design, testing, and performance evaluation of the developed ReKon system. The ability of the system to properly detect pedestrian or vehicle attempts to bypass, breach, or otherwise defeat the system is characterized, as well as the Nuisance Alarm Rate.

Dabling, Jeffrey Glenn; Andersen, Jason Jann; McLaughlin, James O. [Stonewater Control Systems, Inc., Kannapolis, NC

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Structural and Functional Analysis of Sulfolobus solfataricus Y-Family DNA Polymerase Dpo4-Catalyzed Bypass of the Malondialdehyde?Deoxyguanosine Adduct  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oxidative stress can induce the formation of reactive electrophiles, such as DNA peroxidation products, e.g., base propenals, and lipid peroxidation products, e.g., malondialdehyde. Base propenals and malondialdehyde react with DNA to form adducts, including 3-(2'-deoxy-{beta}-d-erythro-pentofuranosyl)pyrimido[1,2-{alpha}]purin-10(3H)-one (M{sub 1}dG). When paired opposite cytosine in duplex DNA at physiological pH, M{sub 1}dG undergoes ring opening to form N{sup 2}-(3-oxo-1-propenyl)-dG (N{sup 2}-OPdG). Previous work has shown that M{sub 1}dG is mutagenic in bacteria and mammalian cells and that its mutagenicity in Escherichia coli is dependent on induction of the SOS response, indicating a role for translesion DNA polymerases in the bypass of M{sub 1}dG. To probe the mechanism by which translesion polymerases bypass M{sub 1}dG, kinetic and structural studies were conducted with a model Y-family DNA polymerase, Dpo4 from Sulfolobus solfataricus. The level of steady-state incorporation of dNTPs opposite M{sub 1}dG was reduced 260-2900-fold and exhibited a preference for dATP incorporation. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the full-length extension products revealed a spectrum of products arising principally by incorporation of dC or dA opposite M{sub 1}dG followed by partial or full-length extension. A greater proportion of -1 deletions were observed when dT was positioned 5' of M{sub 1}dG. Two crystal structures were determined, including a 'type II' frameshift deletion complex and another complex with Dpo4 bound to a dC-M{sub 1}dG pair located in the postinsertion context. Importantly, M{sub 1}dG was in the ring-closed state in both structures, and in the structure with dC opposite M{sub 1}dG, the dC residue moved out of the Dpo4 active site, into the minor groove. The results are consistent with the reported mutagenicity of M{sub 1}dG and illustrate how the lesion may affect replication events.

Eoff, Robert L.; Stafford, Jennifer B.; Szekely, Jozsef; Rizzo, Carmelo J.; Egli, Martin; Guengerich, F. Peter; Marnett, Lawrence J.; (Vanderbilt)

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

227

Hysterosalpingography using a flat panel unit: Evaluation and optimization of ovarian radiation dose  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of the present study was the evaluation and optimization of radiation dose to the ovaries (D) in hysterosalpingography (HSG). Methods: The study included a phantom study and a clinical one. In the phantom study, we evaluated imaging results for different geometrical setups and irradiation conditions. In the clinical study, 34 women were assigned into three different fluoroscopy modes and D was estimated with direct cervical TLD measurements. Results: In the phantom study, we used a source-to-image-distance (SID) of 110 cm and a field diagonal of 48 cm, and thus decreased air KERMA rate (KR) by 19% and 70%, respectively, for beam filtration: 4 mm Al and 0.9 mm Cu (Low dose). The least radiation exposure was accomplished by using the 3.75 pps fluoroscopy mode in conjunction with beam filtration: Low dose. In the clinical study, D normalized to 50 s of fluoroscopy time with a 3.75 pps fluoroscopy mode reached a value of 0.45 {+-} 0.04 mGy. Observers' evaluation of diagnostic image quality did not significantly differ for the three different modes of acquisition that were compared. Conclusions: Digital spot radiographs could be omitted in modern flat panel systems during HSG. Fluoroscopy image acquisitions in a modern flat panel unit at 3.75 pps and a beam filtration of 4 mm Al and 0.9 mm Cu demonstrate acceptable image quality with an average D equal to 0.45 mGy. This value is lower compared to the studied literature. For these reasons, the proposed method may be recommended for routine HSG examination in order to limit radiation exposure to the ovaries.

Messaris, Gerasimos A. T.; Abatzis, Ilias; Kagadis, George C.; Samartzis, Alexandros P.; Athanasopoulou, Panagiota; Christeas, Nikolaos; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Karnabatidis, Dimitrios; Nikiforidis, George C. [Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital of Patras, GR 265 04 Rion (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, GR 265 04 Rion (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital of Patras, GR 265 04 Rion, Greece and Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, GR 265 04 Rion (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, 'EVANGELISMOS' General Hospital, 45-47 Ypsilantou Street, GR 106 76 Athens (Greece); Philips Hellas, 44 Kifisias Avenue, GR 151 25 Marousi (Greece); Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Patras, GR 265 04 Rion (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital of Patras, GR 265 04 Rion, Greece and Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine, University of Patras, GR 265 04 Rion (Greece)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Nondestructive evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Research reported in the thrust area of nondestructive evaluation includes: advanced 3-D imaging technologies; new techniques in laser ultrasonic testing; infrared computed tomography for thermal NDE of materials, structures, sources, and processes; automated defect detection for large laser optics; multistatic micropower impulse radar imaging for nondestructive evaluation; and multi-modal NDE for AVLIS pod shielding components.

Martz, H.E.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Performance Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Performance Evaluation Subcommittee of the Technical Committee on Computer Architecture sponsored a workshop at Argonne National Laboratories in October 1971. This issue is in part a result of that workshop.

R. R. Shirley

1972-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Recovery of bypassed oil in the Dundee Formation using horizontal drains. Annual report, April 1994--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

Crystal Field in Montcalm County, MI, was selected as a field trial site for this project. Analysis of production data for Crystal Field suggests that an additional 200,000 bbls of oil can be produced using one strategically located horizontal well. Total addition production from the Crystal Field could be as much as 6--8 MMBO. Application of the technology developed in this project to other Dundee fields in the area has the potential to increase Dundee production in Michigan by 35%, adding 80--100 MMBO to ultimate recovery. This project will demonstrate through a field trial that horizontal wells can be substantially increase oil production in older reservoirs that are at or near their economic limit. To maximize the potential of the horizontal well and to ensure that a comprehensive evaluation can be made, extensive reservoir characterization will be performed. In addition to the proposed field trial at Crystal Field, 29 additional Dundee fields in a seven-county area have been selected for study in the reservoir characterization portion of this project.

Wood, J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Modeling prismatic HTGRs with U.S. N.R.C advanced gas reactor evaluator (AGREE)  

SciTech Connect

A core fluids and heat transfer model has been developed for the prismatic high temperature gas reactor in support of the US NRC Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) evaluation model. The core fluids modeling relies on a subchannel approach in which the primary coolant flow path through the core region and vertical in-core and ex-core gaps can be modeled as individual subchannels. These subchannels are connected together to represent a three dimensional reactor. An initial validation calculation for the core fluids model has been performed using data available in literature for bypass flow. The predicted bypass flow was within 2.6% of the value reported in the literature. The core level heat transfer model is based on a triangular finite volume method, where the base triangle is one sixth of the prismatic block. In order to improve the spatial accuracy at this level, a triangular refinement method was also implemented. The fuel compact temperature is calculated by a cylindrical conduction model which is implicitly coupled to the triangular core level model. The preliminary verification of the model was performed by comparing AGREE to a finite element code COMSOL by analyzing the MHTGR core heat transfer. Further verification and validation is currently an ongoing effort. (authors)

Seker, V.; Drzewiecki, T.; Downar, T. [Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Kelly, J. M. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

A Fisheries Evaluation of the Dryden Fish Screening Facility : Annual Report 1994.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effectivness was evaluated of the Dryden Fish Screening Facility in the Wenatchee Reclamation District Canal near Dryden in north central Washington State. In situ tests were conducted by releasing groups of hatchery reared salmonids of different ages and sizes. Spring chinook salmon smolts (110-165 mm) were not injured or descaled in passing through the canal forebay. Smolts were not delayed as they migrated in the canal. Most fish released at the canal headworks exited the screening facility in <4 h, with >99% of the test fish captured in the fish bypass in <24 h. Steelhead subyearlings 65-125 mm were not injured or descaled in traveling through the bypass flume and fish return pipe. Average time for steelhead subyearlings to travel through thebypass structure was 70 seconds. Small rainbow trout fry 23-27mm could pass through the 0.125-in. profile bar screen openings and were entrained in the irrigation canal; about 38% was lost to the canal within 48 h of release. Some fry stayed in the forebay and did not migrate during the tests. Wild chinook fry 36-42mm were also entrained. Estimated 34% of emergent wild chinook salmon fry passed through the profile bar screens and were entrained in the canal. Approach velocity at the Dryden screens was {ge}0.4 ft/s; low velocities through the first two screen panels indicated that vertical louvers installed behind each screen panel to balance flow were not totally effective.

Mueller, Robert P.; Abernethy, C.Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Water nano-filtration device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water filter includes a porous support characterized by a mean porosity in the range of 20 to 50% and a mean pore size of 2 to 5 .mu.m; and a carbon filter medium membrane disposed thereon which is characterized by a mean particle size of no more than 50 .mu.m and a mean pore size of no more than 7.2 .mu.m.

Judkins, Roddie R. (Knoxville, TN)

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

234

Myocardial infarction determined by technetium-99m pyrophosphate single-photon tomography complicating elective coronary artery bypass grafting for angina pectoris  

SciTech Connect

The incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) complicating coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) has previously been based on concordance of electrocardiographic, enzymatic and scintigraphic criteria. Technetium-99m pyrophosphate (Tc-PPi) single-photon emission computed tomography now enables detection of AMI with high sensitivity and specificity. Using this technique, perioperative AMI was detected in 12 of 58 patients (21%) undergoing successful elective CABG for stable angina pectoris. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to compare the predictive value of preoperative (New York Heart Association class, left ventricular ejection fraction and use of beta blockers) and intraoperative (number of grafts constructed, use of internal mammary anastomoses, use of sequential saphenous vein grafts, smallest grafted distal vessel lumen caliber and aortic cross-clamp time) variables. Preoperative New York Association class (p = 0.04) and smallest grafted distal vessel lumen caliber (p = 0.03) were significant multivariate predictors of perioperative AMI. Only 1 perioperative patient with AMI (and 1 pyrophosphate-negative patient) developed new Q waves. Serum creatine kinase-MB was higher in patients with AMI by repeated measures analysis of variance (p = 0.0003). Five AMIs occurred in myocardial segments revascularized using sequential saphenous vein grafts, and 7 in segments perfused by significantly stenosed epicardial vessels with distal lumen diameter and perfusion territory considered too small to warrant CABG. At 6-month follow-up, the mean left ventricular ejection fraction increased from 0.61 to 0.65 in Tc-PPI-negative patients (p = 0.01), but not in perioperative patients with AMI.

Burns, R.J.; Gladstone, P.J.; Tremblay, P.C.; Feindel, C.M.; Salter, D.R.; Lipton, I.H.; Ogilvie, R.R.; David, T.E.

1989-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Biological Evaluation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biological Evaluation Biological Evaluation for the Proposed United States Army Military Training Activities on the Savannah River Site Department of the Army - Fort Gordon Range Control - Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization, and Security Location: Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, SC., Savannah River Site Contact Person: Donald S. McLean, 706-840-5522 / 706-791-2422 Submitted by Fort Gordon Range Control Training Facility Coordinator (DPTMS) Prepared By: ___________________________________________________________________ Donald S. McLean, Training Facility Coordinator Fort Gordon Georgia Date: 2 Table of Contents Summary, Page 4 Introduction, Page 6 Project Description, Page 6 Purpose and Need for Proposed Action, Page 7

236

Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Evaluation of Microwave Steam Bags for the Decontamination of Filtering Facepiece Respirators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reusing filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) has been suggested as a strategy to conserve available supplies for home and healthcare environments during an influenza pandemic. For reuse to be possible, used FFRs must be decontaminated before redonning to reduce the risk of virus transmission; however, there are no approved methods for FFR decontamination. An effective method must reduce the microbial threat, maintain the function of the FFR, and present no residual chemical hazard. The method should be readily available, inexpensive and easily implemented by healthcare workers and the general public. Many of the general decontamination protocols used in healthcare and home settings are unable to address all of the desired qualities of an efficient FFR decontamination protocol. The goal of this study is to evaluate the use of two commercially available steam bags, marketed to the public for disinfecting infant feeding equipment, for FFR decontamination. The FFRs were decontaminated with microwave generated steam following the manufacturers ’ instructions then evaluated for water absorption and filtration efficiency for up to three steam exposures. Water absorption of the FFR was found to be model specific as FFRs constructed with hydrophilic materials absorbed more water. The steam had little effect on FFR performance as filtration efficiency of the treated FFRs remained above 95%. The decontamination efficacy of the steam bag was assessed using bacteriophage MS2 as a surrogate for a pathogenic virus. The tested steam bags were found to be 99.9 % effective for inactivating MS2 on FFRs; however, more research is required to

Edward M. Fisher; Jessica L. Williams; Ronald E. Shaffer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Evaluation Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Teacher Logs Teacher Logs Teacher logs are to be collected 'pre' and 'post' program for the purpose of exploring changes in teaching practice that may have resulted from participation in the summer institute. Pre-Program: Identify teachers who will be asked to complete teacher logs plus 2-3 alternates. Telephone these teachers and include the following information: Teacher logs are a relatively new form of evaluating programs. We are using them to help us improve our program and to assess the extent to which the program affects teaching and learning. They have been selected randomly from teacher-participants of the [Name of Program] to help us evaluate our program. Several teachers in this and other programs are being asked to complete logs to assess the overall effectiveness of XX programs nationwide.

239

Cyber Security Evaluations Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oversight Home Sub Offices Security Evaluations Cyber Security Evaluations Emergency Management Oversight Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations Mission &...

240

Evaluation of a precipitation-ion exchange process for treatment of laundry waste  

SciTech Connect

Bench-scale pilot plant studies were conducted to evaluate chemical coagulation and ion exchange for decontamination of 2724-W laundry wastewater. Chemical coagulation is accomplished at pH 11 to avoid complexant problems and assure good transuranic radionuclide removals. Clinoptilolite is used to remove cesium and strontium. Results of the pilot plant studies are summarized as follows: Decontamination factors of 70 (strontium) and more than 100 (cesium) were achieved by chemical coagulation and ion exchange. Decontamination factors exceeding 90 were measured for europium by coagulation with a combination of ferric chloride, magnesium chloride, and calcium chloride added to the wastewater at pH 11. Coagulation with these three agents in the wastewater at pH 11 was more effective for turbidity removal than coagulation with lime. Addition of up to 1.7 lb of clinoptilolite fines per 1000 gallons of wastewater during coagulation did not substantially increase strontium and cesium removal. Filtration without chemical coagulation reduced suspended solids by only 25%. About 70% of the suspended solids remaining in the filtered wastewater were removed in the zeolite column causing plugging which could not be easily dislodged by backwashing. Plugging of the ion exchange columns by previously clarified wastewater required short periods of limited backwashing to relieve the plug. The plugging is due to CaCO/sub 3/ and is not expected to be a severe problem in a full-scale plant with brief detention times between filtration and ion exchange. A high pressure surface wash should be included in the columns to break up crust or plugs at the surface of the zeolite. Centrifugation of iron sludges for 2 min at 2000 g reduced the sludge volume to about 1% of the total wastewater volume. Wet iron sludges from the sludge storage tank were readily dewatered by vacuum filtration. 14 tables, 9 figures.

Mercer, B.W.; Ames, L.L.

1977-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam Sluiceway, 2005  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate fish passage at The Dalles Dam powerhouse in 2005. The goal of the study was to provide information on smolt passage that will inform decisions on long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. The study addressed one of the main programs dedicated to improving juvenile salmonid survival at The Dalles Dam: Surface Flow Bypass. The study objectives (see below) were met using a combination of hydroacoustic and hydraulic data. The study incorporated fixed-location hydroacoustic methods across the entire powerhouse, with especially intense sampling using multiple split-beam transducers at all sluiceway portals. We did not sample fish passage at the spillway in 2005. In the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish movements. The fish data were interpreted with hydraulic data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Fish passage data were collected in the framework of an “experiment” using a randomized block design (3-day treatments; two treatments) to compare two sluiceway operational configurations: Sluice 2+5 and Sluice 2+19 (six gates open for each configuration). Total project outflow was 76% of the 10-year average for spring and 71% of the 10-year average for summer. Based on these findings, we make the following recommendations: 1) The sluice should be operated 24 h/d from April until November. 2) Open six rather than three sluice gates to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. 3) Open the three gates above the western-most operating main turbine unit and the three gates at MU 8 where turbine passage rates are relatively high. 4) Operate the turbine units below open sluice gates as a standard fish operations procedure. 5) Develop hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway to tap the potential of The Dalles Dam sluiceway to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. 6) Consider the following elements for surface flow bypasses during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: Form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than ~7% of total project discharge) at both west and east ends of the dam; Create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration < 1 m/s per meter); Make water velocities at an entrance high enough (> 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, e.g., 10,000 cfs or so; Adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, i.e., test a Removable Sluiceway Weir. 7)The Dalles Dam sluiceway has potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. We recommend tapping this potential with enhancements to the sluiceway.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Hydroacoustic Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Passage at The Dalles Dam Sluiceway, 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District engaged the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate fish passage at The Dalles Dam powerhouse in 2005. The goal of the study was to provide information on smolt passage that will inform decisions on long-term measures and operations to enhance sluiceway passage and reduce turbine passage to improve smolt survival at the dam. The study addressed one of the main programs dedicated to improving juvenile salmonid survival at The Dalles Dam: Surface Flow Bypass. The study objectives (see below) were met using a combination of hydroacoustic and hydraulic data. The study incorporated fixed-location hydroacoustic methods across the entire powerhouse, with especially intense sampling using multiple split-beam transducers at all sluiceway portals. We did not sample fish passage at the spillway in 2005. In the sluiceway nearfield, we used an acoustic camera to track fish movements. The fish data were interpreted with hydraulic data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Fish passage data were collected in the framework of an “experiment” using a randomized block design (3-day treatments; two treatments) to compare two sluiceway operational configurations: Sluice 2+5 and Sluice 2+19 (six gates open for each configuration). Total project outflow was 76% of the 10-year average for spring and 71% of the 10-year average for summer. Based on these findings, we make the following recommendations: 1) The sluice should be operated 24 h/d from April until November. 2) Open six rather than three sluice gates to take advantage of the maximum hydraulic capacity of the sluiceway. 3) Open the three gates above the western-most operating main turbine unit and the three gates at MU 8 where turbine passage rates are relatively high. 4) Operate the turbine units below open sluice gates as a standard fish operations procedure. 5) Develop hydraulic and entrance enhancements to the sluiceway to tap the potential of The Dalles Dam sluiceway to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. 6) Consider the following elements for surface flow bypasses during design of any sluiceway enhancements at The Dalles Dam: Form an extensive surface flow bypass flow net (surface bypass discharge greater than ~7% of total project discharge) at both west and east ends of the dam; Create a gradual increase in water velocity approaching the surface flow bypass (ideally, acceleration 3 m/s) to entrain the subject juvenile fishes, e.g., 10,000 cfs or so; Adapt the shape and orientation of the surface entrance(s) to fit site-specific features, i.e., test a Removable Sluiceway Weir. 7)The Dalles Dam sluiceway has potential to be highly efficient and effective at passing juvenile salmonids. We recommend tapping this potential with enhancements to the sluiceway.

Johnson, Gary E.; Khan, Fenton; Hedgepeth, J; Mueller, Robert P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Skalski, John R.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Plug Detector Bypass Breaker Guard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed wherein the apparatus is a container having an inner chamber, an inlet, an outlet, a breaker assembly having at least one blade within the inner chamber of the container and a motor for driving the blade. Material is supplied to the inner chamber of the container through the inlet of the container and the breaker assembly is operated to reduce any clumped material into unclumped material which is then dispensed from the container through the outlet of the container.

Horton, J.R.; Dearstone, R.L.

2000-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

244

Plug Detector Bypass Breaker Guard  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus wherein the apparatus is a container having an inner chamber, an inlet, an outlet, a breaker assembly having at least one blade within the inner chamber of the container and a motor for driving the blade. Material is supplied to the inner chamber of the container through the inlet of the container and the breaker assembly is operated to reduce any clumped material into unclumped material which is then dispensed from the container through the outlet of the container.

Horton, Joel Richard (Maryville, TN); Dearstone, Robert Link (Powell, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Thermoelectric Materials Evaluation Program. Annual technical report for fiscal year 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optimization was initiated with respect to performance, operating temperatures, and thermoelectric properties of an N-type material based on rare earth (neodymium and gadolinium) selenide technology. Effort was expanded to experimentally describe the chemical, electrical and physical behavior of P-type thermoelectric material over a range of temperatures. Emphasis was changed in P-type material research from basic properties to sublimation suppression by wrapping, and to the understanding of contact resistance problems at the hot end. Analytical performance calculations were made as an aid in couple development. In the area of module development an evaluation of the reduction of bypass-heat loss was made and module M-22R was placed on test. Parts were fabricated for M23R. Data on long term operating characteristics, ingradient compatibility, and reliability of elements and couples was obtained.

Hinderman, J.D.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Materials Science Evaluation Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Materials Science Evaluation Portal. Materials Science Evaluation Portal. Subject Areas. Modeling; Nondestructive; ...

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

247

Evaluating Benchmark . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To reduce the simulation time to a tractable amount or due to compilation (or other related) problems, computer architects often simulate only a subset of the benchmarks in a benchmark suite. However, if the architect chooses a subset of benchmarks that is not representative, the subsequent simulation results will, at best, be misleading or, at worst, yield incorrect conclusions. To address this problem, computer architects have recently proposed several statistically-based approaches to subset a benchmark suite. While some of these approaches are well-grounded statistically, what has not yet been thoroughly evaluated is the: 1) Absolute accuracy, 2) Relative accuracy across a range of processor and memory subsystem enhancements, and 3) Representativeness and coverage of each approach for a range of subset sizes. Specifically, this paper evaluates statistically-based subsetting approaches based on principal components analysis (PCA) and the Plackett and Burman (P&B) design, in addition to prevailing approaches such as integer vs. floating-point, core vs. memory-bound, by language, and at random. Our results show that the two statistically-based approaches, PCA and P&B, have the best absolute and relative accuracy for CPI and energy-delay product (EDP), produce subsets that are the most representative, and choose benchmark and input set pairs that are most well-distributed across the benchmark space. To achieve a 5 % absolute CPI and EDP error, across a wide range of configurations, PCA and P&B typically need about 17 benchmark and input set pairs, while the other five approaches often choose more than 30 benchmark and input set pairs.

Joshua J. Yi; Resit Sendag; Lieven Eeckhout; Ajay Joshi; David J. Lilja; Lizy K. John

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Nondestructive evaluations  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) thrust area which supports initiatives that advance inspection science and technology. The goal of the NDE thrust area is to provide cutting-edge technologies that have promise of inspection tools three to five years in the future. In selecting projects, the thrust area anticipates the needs of existing and future Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) programs. NDE provides materials characterization inspections, finished parts, and complex objects to find flaws and fabrication defects and to determine their physical and chemical characteristics. NDE also encompasses process monitoring and control sensors and the monitoring of in-service damage. For concurrent engineering, NDE becomes a frontline technology and strongly impacts issues of certification and of life prediction and extension. In FY-92, in addition to supporting LLNL programs and the activities of nuclear weapons contractors, NDE has initiated several projects with government agencies and private industries to study aging infrastructures and to advance manufacturing processes. Examples of these projects are (1) the Aging Airplanes Inspection Program for the Federal Aviation Administration, (2) Signal Processing of Acoustic Signatures of Heart Valves for Shiley, Inc.; and (3) Turbine Blade Inspection for the Air Force, jointly with Southwest Research Institute and Garrett. In FY-92, the primary contributions of the NDE thrust area, described in this report were in fieldable chemical sensor systems, computed tomography, and laser generation and detection of ultrasonic energy.

Kulkarni, S.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Cyber Security Evaluations - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oversight Program Home Office of Security and Cyber Evaluations Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Guidance Documents Security and Cyber Evaluations ...

250

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima and Touchet River Basins, 2005-2006 Annual Reports.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2005, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated 25 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima and Touchet river basins. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performs these evaluations for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to determine whether the fish screening devices meet National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. Evaluations consist of measuring velocities in front of the screens, using an underwater camera to look at the condition and environment in front of the screens, and noting the general condition and operation of the sites. Results of the evaluations in 2005 include the following: (1) Most approach velocities met the NMFS criterion of less than or equal to 0.4 fps. Less than 13% of all approach measurements exceeded the criterion, and these occurred at 10 of the sites. Flat-plate screens had more problems than drum screens with high approach velocities. (2) Bypass velocities generally were greater than sweep velocities, but sweep velocities often did not increase toward the bypass. The latter condition could slow migration of fish through the facility. (3) Screen and seal materials generally were in good condition. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (5) Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) generally operate and maintain fish screen facilities in a way that provides safe passage for juvenile fish. (6) In some instances, irrigators responsible for specific maintenance at their sites (e.g., debris removal) are not performing their tasks in a way that provides optimum operation of the fish screen facility. New ways need to be found to encourage them to maintain their facilities properly. (7) We recommend placing datasheets providing up-to-date operating criteria and design flows in each sites logbox. The datasheet should include bypass design flows and a table showing depths of water over the weir and corresponding bypass flow. This information is available at some of the sites but may be outdated. These data are used to determine if the site is running within design criteria. (8) Modifying use of debris control plates at Gleed helped minimize the extreme fluctuations in flow, but approach velocities are still too high. Other ways to reduce the approach velocities need to be tried, possibly including redesign of the site. (9) Alternatives to a screen site at Taylor should be considered. A lot of effort was spent trying to increase water to the site, but it still was unable to operate within NMFS criteria for most of the year and may be a hazard to juvenile salmonids. We conclude that the conditions at most of the Phase II fish screen facilities we evaluated in 2005 would be expected to provide safe passage for juvenile fish. For those sites where conditions are not always optimum for safe fish passage, PNNL researchers will try to coordinate with the WDFW and USBR in 2006 to find solutions to the problems. Some of those problems are consistently high approach velocities at specific sites, including Congdon, Naches-Selah, Union Gap, and Yakima-Tieton. We would like to be able to monitor changes in velocities as soon as operations and maintenance personnel adjust the louvers or porosity boards at these sites. This will give them immediate feedback on the results of their modifications and allow additional adjustments as necessary until the conditions meet NMFS criteria. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has performed evaluations at many of these sites over the past 8 years, providing information WDFW and USBR personnel can use to perform their operations and maintenance more effectively. Consequently, overall effectiveness of the screens facilities has improved over time.

Chamness, Mickie; Abernethy, C.; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn (PNNL)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Evaluation of saponite and saponite/sepiolite fluids for geothermal drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rheology and other properties of drilling fluids containing saponite and a saponite-sepiolite mixture as the main vicosifier have been systematically evaluated in the temperature range of 300-600{degree}F under appropriate confining pressures up to 16,000 psi. Saponite represents the magnesium analog of the clay mineral montmorillonite, which is the main constituent in conventional bentonite-based fluids. The fluid with 6% saponite exhibits a prominent viscosity enhancement at temperatures above 250{degree}F. This viscosity enhancement is easily controlled by salts and hydroxides of Na and K. The addition of Na-polyacrylates (low- and high-molecular weight polymers) eliminates the viscosity anomaly of pure saponite fluids. These polymers also increase the filtration control of saponite. The anomalous viscosity enhancement of saponite is significantly reduced by the addition of sepiolite (a clay mineral with a fibrous morphology). 12 refs., 31 figs., 26 tabs.

Guven, N.; Panfil, D.J.; Carney, L.L. (Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (USA). Dept. of Geosciences)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G.; Chamness, M. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Synthesis of Sensor Fish Data for Assessment of Fish Passage Conditions at Turbines, Spillways, and Bypass Facilities – Phase 1: The Dalles Dam Spillway Case Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the characterization of spillway passage conditions at The Dalles Dam in 2006 and the effort to complete a comprehensive database for data sets from The Dalles Dam spillway Sensor Fish and balloon-tagged live fish experiments. Through The Dalles Dam spillway case study, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated the database as an efficient means for accessing and retrieving system-wide data for the U.S Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).

Deng, Zhiqun; Serkowski, John A.; Fu, Tao; Carlson, Thomas J.; Richmond, Marshall C.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtration Testing for Bismuth Phosphate Sludge (Group 1) and Bismuth Phosphate Saltcake (Group 2) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.() The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual waste-testing program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—bismuth phosphate sludge (Group 1) and bismuth phosphate saltcake (Group 2)—are the subjects of this report. The Group 1 waste was anticipated to be high in phosphorus and was implicitly assumed to be present as BiPO4 (however, results presented here indicate that the phosphate in Group 1 is actually present as amorphous iron(III) phosphate). The Group 2 waste was also anticipated to be high in phosphorus, but because of the relatively low bismuth content and higher aluminum content, it was anticipated that the Group 2 waste would contain a mixture of gibbsite, sodium phosphate, and aluminum phosphate. Thus, the focus of the Group 1 testing was on determining the behavior of P removal during caustic leaching, and the focus of the Group 2 testing was on the removal of both P and Al. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

255

Evaluation of Mercury Emissions from Coal-Fired Facilities with SCR and FGD Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), is evaluating the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP)--wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber--fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL is determining mercury speciation and removal at 10 coal-fired facilities. The principal purpose of this work is to develop a better understanding of the potential mercury removal ''co-benefits'' achieved by NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} control technologies. It is expected that these data will provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. Ultimately, this insight could help to design and operate SCR and FGD systems to maximize mercury removal. The objectives are (1) to evaluate the effect of SCR on mercury capture in the ESP-FGD and SDA-FF combinations at coal-fired power plants, (2) evaluate the effect of SCR catalyst degradation on mercury capture; (3) evaluate the effect of low load operation on mercury capture in an SCR-FGD system, and (4) collect data that could provide the basis for fundamental scientific insights into the nature of mercury chemistry in flue gas, the catalytic effect of SCR systems on mercury speciation and the efficacy of different FGD technologies for mercury capture. This document, the ninth in a series of topical reports, describes the results and analysis of mercury sampling performed on Unit 1 at Plant 7, a 566 MW unit burning a bituminous coal containing 3.6% sulfur. The unit is equipped with a SCR, ESP, and wet FGD to control NO{sub x}, particulate, and SO{sub 2} emissions, respectively. Four sampling tests were performed in August 2004 during ozone season with the SCR operating; flue gas mercury speciation and concentrations were determined at the SCR inlet, SCR outlet, air heater outlet (ESP inlet), ESP outlet (FGD inlet), and at the stack (FGD outlet) using the Ontario Hydro method. Three sampling tests were also performed in November 2004 during non-ozone season with the SCR bypassed; flue gas mercury speciation and concentrations were determined at the ESP outlet (FGD inlet), and at the stack (FGD outlet). Process samples for material balances were collected during the flue gas measurements. The results show that, at the point where the flue gas enters the FGD, a greater percentage of the mercury was in the oxidized form when the SCR was operating compared to when the SCR was bypassed (97% vs 91%). This higher level of oxidation resulted in higher mercury removals in the FGD because the FGD removed 90-94% of the oxidized mercury in both cases. Total coal-to-stack mercury removal was 86% with the SCR operating, and 73% with the SCR bypassed. The average mercury mass balance closure was 81% during the ozone season tests and 87% during the non-ozone season tests.

J. A. Withum; S. C. Tseng; J. E. Locke

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screens Evaluations, 2006 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated Gardena Farms, Little Walla Walla, and Garden City/Lowden II Phase II fish screen facilities and provided underwater videography beneath a leaking rubber dam in the Walla Walla River basin in 2006. Evaluations of the fish screen facilities took place in early May 2006, when juvenile salmonids are generally outmigrating. At the Gardena Farms site, extended high river levels caused accumulations of debris and sediment in the forebay. This debris covered parts of the bottom drum seals, which could lead to early deterioration of the seals and drum screen. Approach velocities were excessive at the upstream corners of most of the drums, leading to 14% of the total approach velocities exceeding 0.4 feet per second (ft/s). Consequently, the approach velocities did not meet National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) design criteria guidelines for juvenile fish screens. The Little Walla Walla site was found to be in good condition, with all approach, sweep, and bypass velocities within NMFS criteria. Sediment buildup was minor and did not affect the effectiveness of the screens. At Garden City/Lowden II, 94% of approach velocities met NMFS criteria of 0.4 ft/s at any time. Sweep velocities increased toward the fish ladder. The air-burst mechanism appears to keep large debris off the screens, although it does not prevent algae and periphyton from growing on the screen face, especially near the bottom of the screens. In August 2006, the Gardena Farm Irrigation District personnel requested that we look for a leak beneath the inflatable rubber dam at the Garden City/Lowden II site that was preventing water movement through the fish ladder. Using our underwater video equipment, we were able to find a gap in the sheet piling beneath the dam. Erosion of the riverbed was occurring around this gap, allowing water and cobbles to move beneath the dam. The construction engineers and irrigation district staff were able to use the video footage to resolve the problem within a couple weeks. We had hoped to also evaluate the effectiveness of modifications to louvers behind the Nursery Bridge screens when flows were higher than 350 cubic feet per second, (cfs) but were unable to do so. Based on the one measurement made in early 2006 after the modified louvers were set, it appears the modified louvers may help reduce approach velocities. The auxiliary supply water system gates also control water through the screens. Evaluating the effect of different combinations of gate and louver positions on approach velocities through the screens may help identify optimum settings for both at different river discharges.

Chamness, Mickie; Abernethy, Scott; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Nondestructive Evaluation: Nondestructive Evaluation for Material Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for material characterization conducted on Alloy 600 samples that have undergone changes in material properties due to simulated operating conditions, including heat treatment, three-point bending load, cracking, and repair. The overall objective was to evaluate the feasibility of using eddy current and ultrasonic data fusion techniques to conduct NDE for material characterization by relying on a set of fabricated Alloy 600 samples.

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

258

Evaluating underbalanced perforating conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an evaluation model which also predicts effects on the wireline gun system and allows formations to be aggressively perforated with optimum safe underbalanced pressure. Closed chamber techniques can be added to accurately evaluate completion efficiency.

Manohar, M.M.; Morris, C.W.; Hill, D.D. (Schlumberger Well Services (US)); Brunner, S.R. (Chevron USA Inc. (US))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Evaluating Transformer Losses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper outlines how to determine what transformer losses cost and how to evaluate transformer bids to optimize the investment.

Grun, R. L. Jr.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

ABET Program Evaluator (PEV)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volunteer Training Module. March 2013. 1. Your Professional Partner for Career Advancement. ABET Program Evaluator. (PEV). Online Training Module.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Evaluation of systems usability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivation -- Development of complex system interfaces can benefit, in addition to the traditional safety focused evaluation, also from a usability approach to evaluation of system performance. But as the users, the information system, and the ... Keywords: activity theory, complex systems, joint cognitive systems, usability evaluation

Paula Savioja; Leena Norros; Leena Salo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Assist in the recovery of bypassed oil from reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico. Quarterly status report (final), July 1--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is to assist the recovery of non contacted oil from known reservoirs on the Outer Continental Shelf in the Gulf of Mexico. Mature offshore reservoirs, declining oil reserves, declining production, and other natural forces are accelerating the abandonment of offshore oil resources and production platforms. As these offshore wells are plugged and the platforms are abandoned, an enormous volume of remaining oil will be permanently abandoned. Significant quantities of this oil could be recovered using advanced technologies now available if the resource can be identified. This project will proceed under three broad phases: (1) Analysis -- TORIS level data will be collected on the major fields located in the piercement salt dome province of the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf. Representative reservoirs will be studied in detail in order to evaluate undeveloped and attic oil reserve potential. These detailed investigations will be used to calibrate the TORIS level predictive models. The recovery potential of advanced secondary and enhanced oil recovery processes and the exploitation of undeveloped and attic oil zones for salt dome reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico will be assessed. (2) Supporting Research -- Supporting research will focus on the modification of public domain reservoir simulation models to accurately simulate the conditions encountered in the piercement salt dome province of the Gulf of Mexico. Laboratory research will focus on the development of fluid relationships that will be used in the simulation of miscible and immiscible processes in the project area. (3) Technology Transfer -- A significant effort is planned to transfer the results of this project to potential users of the technology. Technology transfer activities will also provide feedback channels that will help keep the analysis and supporting research focused on the most important problems associated with this project.

Schenewerk, P.A.

1994-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future November - December 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

264

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future February 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

265

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future September - October 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

266

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM-0707 ARM-0707 Report on the ARM Climate Research Facility EXPANSION WORKSHOP October 31 - November 1, 2007 Reston, Virginia Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE AC05 76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 DOE/SC-ARM-0707 iii Executive Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to provide the infrastructure needed to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere. Designated as a national user facility the ACRF

267

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research January 1 - March 31, 2008, DOE/SC-ARM/P-08-007 iii Contents 1. Data Availability ................................................................................................................................... 1 2. Site Visit Requests, Archive Accounts, and Research Computer Accounts ......................................... 2 3. Safety ....................................................................................................................................................

268

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Comparison of Meteorological Measurements from Sparse and Dense Surface Observation Networks in the U.S. Southern Great Plains February 2008 J.W. Monroe Climate Research Section, Environmental Science Division/Argonne National Laboratory Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies/University of Oklahoma M.T. Ritsche, M. Franklin Climate Research Section, Environmental Science Division/Argonne National Laboratory, K.E. Kehoe Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies/University of Oklahoma Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S.

269

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Atmospheric Properties from the 2006 Niamey Deployment and Climate Simulation with a Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model Second Quarter 2008 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Report M. Jensen/Brookhaven National Laboratory K. Johnson/Brookhaven National Laboratory J. Mather/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory D. Randall/Colorado State University March 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S.

270

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

impact is greatest. The thickness and extent of subtropical low clouds is dependent on tight couplings between surface fluxes of heat and moisture, radiative cooling,...

271

Membrane Technologies for Lifelong Oil Filtration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update describes work to date on a novel technique to extend the life of power transformers. A hollow fiber unit is used to remove moisture and oxygen continuously from the oil of an operational transformer. Moisture and oxygen are two key aging factors of oil and paper in a power transformer. Thus it is imperative to keep these low at all times. By maintaining moisture and oxygen at low levels at all times, the aging of both oil and paper will be retarded.To date work has ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

272

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 RACORO Science and Operations Plan December 2008 Dr. Andrew M. Vogelmann, Principal Investigator* RACORO Steering Committee (RSC): Andrew Vogelmann - Brookhaven National Laboratory Greg McFarquhar - University of Illinois John Ogren and Graham Feingold - NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory Dave Turner - University of Wisconsin-Madison Jennifer Comstock and Chuck Long - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) Technical Operations Office Beat Schmid and Jason Tomlinson - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Haf Jonsson - Naval Postgraduate School *Brookhaven National Laboratory Bldg 490-D Upton, NY 11973 Tel: (631)-344-4421, Fax: (631) 344-2060

273

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future August 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

274

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6.1 6.1 Retrieving Temperature and Moisture Profiles from AERI Radiance Observations: AERIPROF Value-Added Product Technical Description Revision 1 W.F. Feltz D.D. Turner H.B. Howell W.L. Smith R.O. Knuteson H.M. Woolf J. Comstock C. Sivaraman R. Mahon T.Halter April 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

275

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future December 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored b y the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their em ployees, makes any warranty, express or i mplied, or assu mes

276

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 The Status of the ACRF Millimeter Wave Cloud Radars (MMCRs), the Path Forward for Future MMCR Upgrades, the Concept of 3D Volume Imaging Radar and the UAV Radar P. Kollias, M. Miller Brookhaven National Laboratory K. Widener, R. Marchand, T. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory December 2005 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

277

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future June 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

278

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 ISDAC Flight Planning Document S.J. Ghan G. McFarquhar A. Korolev P. Liu W. Strapp H. Verlinde M. Wolde April 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

279

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future November 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

280

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Science Overview Document Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) April 2008 November 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor an agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future October 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

282

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DR Cook, January 2011, DOE/SC-ARM/TR-052 iii Contents 1.0 General Overview ................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Contacts ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.1 Mentor .......................................................................................................................................... 1 2.2 Instrument Developer ................................................................................................................... 2 3.0 Deployment Locations and History ...................................................................................................... 2

283

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future September 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

284

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Atmospheric Properties from the 2006 Niamey Deployment and Climate Simulation with a Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model First Quarter 2008 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Report J. Mather/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory D. Randall/Colorado State University December 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

285

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Atmospheric Properties from the 2006 Niamey Deployment and Climate Simulation with a Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model Third Quarter 2008 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Report J. Mather/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory D. Randall/Colorado State University C. Flynn/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory June 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

286

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Investigation of the Downwelling LW Differences Between the Niamey AMF Main and Supplementary Sites C.N. Long/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA P. Gotseff/National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO E.G. Dutton/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO April 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

287

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 ARM Value-Added Product (VAP) Monthly Status Report ARM Translator Team J. Comstock C. Flynn M. Jensen C. Long S. McFarlane D. Turner S. Xie October 1, 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

288

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

84 84 UC-400 Annual Report 1999 Computing and Information Sciences R. A. Bair, Deputy Director and the Staff of the Computing and Information Sciences Directorate June 2000 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-76RLO 1830 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor Battelle Memorial Institute, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

289

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Time Series of Aerosol Column Optical Depth at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Fourth Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report C. Flynn, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory A.S. Koontz, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory J.H. Mather, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory September 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

290

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Cloud Occurrence Frequency at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Third Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report M. Jensen, Brookhaven National Laboratory K. Johnson, Brookhaven National Laboratory J.H. Mather, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory June 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

291

Indestructible Ultra-filtration: Ceramic HEPA Filters  

High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters are widely used commercial products to remove airborne particulates from a gas stream in a gas process ...

292

Magnetic Filtration Process, Magnetic Filtering Material, and ...  

Description Produced water or wastewater from coal-methane facilities and other industries contains a complex mixture of contaminants, such as ...

293

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and S. C. Smith ... 2-1 Kinetics of Bacterial Reduction of Goethite by Shewanella putrefaciens Strain CN32 C. Liu, S. Kota, J. M. Zachara, J. K. Fredrickson, and C....

294

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish Laboratory Studies of the Effects Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas of Pressure...

295

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

deployment to Germany that could address this problem, and the upcoming AMF deployment to Storm Peak in 20102011 may also prove useful. Ultimately, a site would likely need to be...

296

CAESIUM-137 LABELLED ALGAE FOR FILTRATION STUDIES  

SciTech Connect

ABS>A method is described whereby the green algae Chlorella and Scenedesmus were cultured in a growth medium containing Cs/sup 137/. These radioactive algae were used as a suspension in water passing through a column of filter sand. The distributions of the algal cells retained in the filter were measured with a scintillation counter mounted externally to the column. Calibrations of the shielded scintillation counter for the amount of activity per algal cell and for the geometry of the filter column are described. (auth)

Ives, K.J.

1960-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that is poorly observed, but important for climate studies. Therefore, significant fundamental advances that are pertinent to reducing uncertainties in the radiation...

298

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of whether the local conditions are dominated by a dust event. Specifically the data files includes the following fields in comma-separated ASCII format: * total scattering...

299

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the...

300

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SC-ARMTR-082 1 1. Introduction This report documents key aspects of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) data quality assurance program as...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by the ARM Sunset Committee, which is chaired by the ARM Chief Scientist. This aging system has experienced maintenance and performance conditions that are too expensive...

302

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- ECO-00646 AMFAAF Deployment to China FY 2009 and EWO 12358, Design Data System Infrastructure for China Taihu Site, are open to communicate information related to this...

303

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOESC-ARMP-08-004.1 11 Committee, which is chaired by the ARM Chief Scientist. This aging system has experienced maintenance and performance conditions that are too expensive...

304

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Atmosphere (CASA) consortium, and this concept is being assessed to determine utility to ARM and ACRF science objectives. There is a good analysis data set available to...

305

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 1 - December 31, 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research October 1 - December 31, 2008,...

306

Magnetic Filtration Process, Magnetic Filtering Material, and ...  

them unattractive to coal-methane operations. Desalination, ion exchange, and osmosis techniques incur increased energy costs due to high temperature and high

307

New Filtration Material Could Make Petroleum Refining ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Creating premium fuel requires a refinery to boil the mixture at precise ... The new MOF, however, could allow refineries to sidestep this problem by ...

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

308

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by BATTELLE for the UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under Contract DE-AC06-76RLO 1830 Printed in the United States of America Available...

309

Thermophilic Biotrickling Filtration of Ethanol Vapors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

helps control erosion, conserve moisture and reduce weed growth. It can be organic (compost, leaf mold

310

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 ARM Mobile Facility Deployment in China 2008 (AMF-China) Science Plan April 2008 Zhanqing Li, Principal Investigator* and AMF-China Ad-hoc Science Committee: Zhanqing Li, Hongbin...

311

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-2 Accessing the EMSL... 1-2 Mission of the Environmental Dynamics and Simulation Directorate ... 1-4 2....

312

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 A Year of Radiation Measurements at the North Slope of Alaska Second Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report S.A. McFarlane/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Y. Shi/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory C.N. Long/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory April 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

313

Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screen Evaluations; Nursery Bridge Fishway and Garden City/Lowden II Sites, 2003 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the fish screens at the Nursery Bridge Fishway and the newly constructed Garden City/Lowden II site west of Walla Walla, Washington, in the Walla Walla River Basin during spring and summer 2003. Both fish screen facilities were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide for safe fish passage. At the Nursery Bridge Fishway, the screens were evaluated specifically to determine whether the louvers that aid in controlling water flow from behind the screens could be adjusted so that the screens would meet fish protection criteria. Data were collected to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries) (formerly National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage before and after changing the louver settings. Rock weirs downstream of the dam were also evaluated to determine whether they might impede upstream migration of juvenile salmonids during low flow conditions. At the Garden City/Lowden II site, data were collected to establish a baseline for operating conditions and to determine whether any changes in the baffle settings were needed.

Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Final Vitrification Melter Evaluation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste-Incidental-to-Reprocessing Evaluation Waste-Incidental-to-Reprocessing Evaluation for the West Valley Demonstration Project Vitrification Melter February 2012 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy West Valley, New York This page is intentionally blank. WASTE-INCIDENTAL-TO-REPROCESSING EVALUATION FOR THE WVDP VITRIFICATION MELTER CONTENTS Revision 0 i NOTATION (Acronyms, Abbreviations, and Units).................................................. v 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Purpose. ................................................................................................................. 2 1.2 Scope and Technical Basis ....................................................................................... 2

315

Evaluation Project 4492  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LaboratoriesNew Mexico (SNLNM) proposes to perform machining work at the Kansas City Plant (KCP) in Kansas City, Missouri to evaluate parts that have undergone testing....

316

Emergency Management Evaluations - Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emergency Management Evaluations Reports 2010 Independent Oversight Review of Emergency Management at the Pantex Site Office and Pantex Plant, November 2010 Independent Oversight...

317

EVALUATION OF SUPPLEMENTAL PRE-TREATMENT DEVELOPMENT REQUIREMENTS TO MEET TRL 6 ROTARY MICROFILTRATION  

SciTech Connect

In spring 2011, the Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) for the Supplemental Treatment Project (RPP-PLAN-49827, Rev. 0), Technology Maturation Plan for the Treatment Project (T4S01) was developed. This plan contains all identified actions required to reach technical maturity for a field-deployable waste feed pretreatment system. The supplemental pretreatment system has a filtration and a Cs-removal component. Subsequent to issuance of the TMP, rotary microfiltration (RMF) has been identified as the prime filtration technology for this application. The prime Cs-removal technology is small column ion exchange (ScIX) using spherical resorcinol formaldehyde (sRF) as the exchange resin. During fiscal year 2011 (FY2011) some of the tasks identified in the TMP have been completed. As of September 2011, the conceptual design package has been submitted to DOE as part of the critical decision (CD-1) process. This document describes the remaining tasks identified in the TMP to reach technical maturity and evaluates the validity of the proposed tests to fill the gaps as previously identified in the TMP. The potential vulnerabilities are presented and the completed list of criteria for the DOE guide DOE G 413.3-4 different technology readiness levels are added in an attachment. This evaluation has been conducted from a technology development perspective - all programmatic and manufacturing aspects were excluded from this exercise. Compliance with the DOE G 413.3-4 programmatic and manufacturing requirements will be addressed directly by the Treatment Project during the course of engineering design. The results of this evaluation show that completion of the proposed development tasks in the TMP are sufficient to reach TRL 6 from a technological point of view. The tasks involve actual waste tests using the current baseline configuration (2nd generation disks, 40 psi differential pressure, 30 C feed temperature) and three different simulants - the PEP, an AP-Farm and an S-saltcake. Based on FY2011 dollars used in the TMP, these tests will have ROM costs of $950K and require up to 10 months to complete. Completion of the simulant testing will satisfy the TRL 5 and TRL 6 criteria that are related to system testing with materials that represent the full range of properties in a relevant environment.

HUBER HJ

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

318

Spanish Question Answering Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. This paper reports the most significant issues related to the launching of a Monolingual Spanish Question Answering evaluation track at the Cross Language Evaluation Forum (CLEF 2003). It introduces some questions about multilingualism and describes the methodology for test suite production, task, judgment of answers as well as the results obtained by the participant systems. 1

Anselmo Peñas; Felisa Verdejo; Jesús Herrera

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Evaluation of the Storms Pool Improved Waterflood Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review of the performance of the Storms Pool Improved Waterflood Project has been completed. This project was designed to evaluate the efficiency of polymer flooding in a reservoir which had been extensively waterflooded. The project was conducted in a 100-acre pattern in the Waltersburg sandstone of the Storms Pool Field, located in White County, Illinois. This field is typical of many old oil fields in the Illinois Basin. A total of 703,000 barrels of biopolymer-thickened water was injected, which represents about 23% of the pore volume. The project was terminated early, as expenses were greatly exceeding revenues. The project resulted in little or no incremental oil production. The lack of response is attributed mainly to the conditions in which the polymer was injected. The project indicates that the injection of a polymer which acts dominantly to increase viscosity has little potential for increasing oil recovery under the conditions where a waterflood has been successful, the mobility ratio is favorable, and when initiated in the latter stages of the flood. The movable oil saturation is thought to have been lower than anticipated by the operators. Biodegradation of the polymer probably occurred, as evidenced by the lack of polymer in offset wells and in back-produced injection water. The lack of data collected and/or reported prevented a thorough analysis of the project. Field equipment and procedures appeared adequate for the mixing, filtration, and injection of polymer made up in river water. Some problems occurred during those periods of the year when the river water contained a large amount of dispersed fines. The use of a river water is questioned due to the problems of removing dispersed fines and to the increased protection required to prevent biodegradation of the biopolymer. 26 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

Norton, D.K.; Dauben, D.L.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

ASI Supplier Evaluation Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Vendor Evaluation Record 11_0203 1 of 4 5 Vendor Evaluation Record 11_0203 1 of 4 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Vendor Evaluation Record Document Number: ADMF-015 Rev. 11_0203 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ADMP-002, Vendor Selection and Management Process Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A ADMF-015 Vendor Evaluation Record 11_0203 2 of 4 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_1016 Added section for vendors that will not be used due to non-conformance of material delivered. 08_1110 Removed section for vendors that will not be used due to non-conformance of material delivered. Do Not Use section will be placed on ADMF-016, Vendor List.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Evaluation Project 4492  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NNSA-B-10-0412 Sandia National LaboratoriesNew Mexico (SNLNM) proposes to support the Bio-Response Operational Testing and Evaluation (BOTE) project. The BOTE project would...

322

Evaluating Our Instruction: Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

you put in; and as the grandest mill in the world will not extract wheat flour from peascod, so pagesEvaluating Our Instruction: Surveys Mathematics may be compared to a mill of exquisite workmanship

Maryland at College Park, University of

323

Kirkpatrick's Learning Evaluation Model  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

One of the core principles of training evaluation is the model based on four sequential levels that was developed by Donald Kirkpatrick. The levels, 1) Reaction, 2) Learning, 3) Behavior, and 4)...

324

Evaluation of Emerging Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to inspect and assess the condition of transmission assets has become vital as components age beyond their design margin. New and emerging inspection and sensing technologies may help meet this need.To provide members with objective information about emerging inspection technologies, EPRI’s Overhead Transmission program conducts an ongoing series of evaluations of promising inspection systems. The evaluations include laboratory and field testing and documentation of ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

325

Evaluated Nuclear Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter describes the current status of evaluated nuclear data for nuclear technology applications. We start with evaluation procedures for neutron-induced reactions focusing on incident energies from the thermal energy up to 20 MeV, though higher energies are also mentioned. This is followed by examining the status of evaluated neutron data for actinides that play dominant role in most of the applications, followed by coolants/moderators, structural materials and fission products. We then discuss neutron covariance data that characterize uncertainties and correlations. We explain how modern nuclear evaluated data libraries are validated against an extensive set of integral benchmark experiments. Afterwards, we briefly examine other data of importance for nuclear technology, including fission yields, thermal neutron scattering and decay data. A description of three major evaluated nuclear data libraries is provided, including the latest version of the US library ENDF/B-VII.0, European JEFF-3.1 and Japanese JENDL-3.3. A brief introduction is made to current web retrieval systems that allow easy access to a vast amount of up-to-date evaluated nuclear data for nuclear technology applications.

Oblozinsky, P.; Oblozinsky,P.; Herman,M.; Mughabghab,S.F.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Multiple Bypass: Interposition Agents for Distributed Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interposition agents are a well-known device for attaching legacy applications to distributed systems. However, agents are difficult to build and are often large, monolithic pieces of software which are suited only to limited applications or systems. ... Keywords: distributed system, interposition agent, remote execution

Douglas Thain; Miron Livny

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

MODULAR CONSTRUCTION SYSTEM EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to respond to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Direction Letter (TDL) 02-003 (Waisley 2001), which directs Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC (BSC) to complete a design study to recommend repository design options to support receipt and/or emplacement of any or all of the following: commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), high-level radioactive waste (HLW), DOE-managed spent nuclear fuel (DSNF) (including naval spent nuclear fuel [SNF]), and immobilized plutonium (if available), as soon as practicable, but no later than 2010. From the possible design options, a recommended approach will be determined for further evaluation to support the preliminary design of the repository. This study integrates the results of the repository Design Evolution Study (Rowe 2002) with supporting studies concerning national transportation options (BSC 2002b) and Nevada transportation options (Gehner 2002). The repository Design Evolution Study documents the processes used to reevaluate the design, construction, operation, and cost of the repository in response to TDL 02-003 (Waisley 2001), and to determine possible repository conceptual design options. The transportation studies evaluate the national and Nevada transportation options that support the repository conceptual design options. An evaluation methodology was established, based on Program-level requirements developed for the study in reference BSC 2001a, to allow the repository and system design options to be evaluated on a consistent basis. The transportation options and the design components were integrated into system design implementation options, which were evaluated using receipt and emplacement scenarios. The scenarios tested the ability of the design concept to adapt to changes in funding, waste receipt rate, and Nevada rail transportation availability. The results of the evaluation (in terms of system throughput, cost, and schedule) were then compared to the Program-level requirements, and recommendations for design alternatives, requirements changes, or further evaluation were developed.

S. Gillespie

2002-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

328

Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of the passage of decontaminated salt solution from the ITP filters into tank 50H for interim storage  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the nuclear criticality safety associated with the decontaminated salt solution after passing through the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) filters, through the stripper columns and into Tank 50H for interim storage until transfer to the Saltstone facility. The criticality safety basis for the ITP process is documented. Criticality safety in the ITP filtrate has been analyzed under normal and process upset conditions. This report evaluates the potential for criticality due to the precipitation or crystallization of fissionable material from solution and an ITP process filter failure in which insoluble material carryover from salt dissolution is present. It is concluded that no single inadvertent error will cause criticality and that the process will remain subcritical under normal and credible abnormal conditions.

Hobbs, D.T.; Davis, J.R.

1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

329

EVALUATION OF ALTERNATIVE FILTER MEDIA FOR THE ROTARY MICROFILTER  

SciTech Connect

SRS is currently developing and testing several processes to treat high level radioactive liquid waste. These processes include the Integrated Salt Disposition Process (ISDP), the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), and the Small Column Ion Exchange Process (SCIX). Each of these processes has a solid-liquid separation process that limits its throughput. SRNL researchers identified and tested the rotary microfilter as a technology to increase solid-liquid separation throughput. The testing showed significant improvement in filter flux with the rotary microfilter over the baseline crossflow filter (i.e., 2.5-6.5X during scoping tests, as much as 10X in actual waste tests, and approximately 3X in pilot-scale tests). SRNL received funding from DOE EM-21, and subsequently DOE EM-31 to develop the rotary microfilter for high level radioactive service. The work has included upgrading the rotary microfilter for radioactive service, testing with simulated SRS waste streams, and testing it with simulated Hanford waste streams. While the filtration rate is better than that obtained during testing of crossflow filters, the authors believe the rotary microfilter throughput can be improved by using a better filter membrane. The rotary microfilter membrane is made of stainless steel (Pall PMM050). Previous testing, funded by DOE EM-21, showed that asymmetric filters composed of a ceramic membrane on top of a stainless steel support produced higher filter flux than 100% stainless steel symmetric filters in crossflow filter tests. In that testing, the Pall Accusep and Graver filters produced 13-21% larger filter flux than the baseline 0.1 {micro}m Mott filter. While the improvement in flux is not as dramatic as the improvement of the rotary filter over a crossflow filter, a 13-21% increase could reduce the lifetime of a 30 year process by 4-6 years, with significant cost savings. Subsequent rotary filter testing showed the Pall PMM050 stainless steel filter membrane produced higher flux than the Mott filter media in bench-scale and pilot-scale testing. The Accusep and Graver filter media were not evaluated in that testing, because they are not available as flat sheets. The Accusep filter was developed at ORNL and licensed to Pall Corporation. This filter has a stainless steel support structure with a zirconium oxide ceramic membrane. The pore size is 0.1 {micro}m absolute. The Graver filter has a stainless steel support structure with a titanium dioxide ceramic membrane. The pore size is 0.07 {micro}m absolute. SRNL and ORNL are working together to develop filter media similar to the Accusep and Graver media, and to test them in a bench-scale filtration apparatus to attempt to improve the throughput of the rotary microfilter. This report describes the effort.

Poirier, M.; Herman, D.; Bhave, R.

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

330

ASCE Avionic System Configuration Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ASCE - Avionic System Configuration Evaluation A novel approach to the problems associated with the development of total avionics systems design and evaluation is described. The ASCE framework provides a general, interactive aid for comparing and evaluating ...

Joe Clema; Stephen Zissos

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Exercise Evaluation Forms  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous Materials Hazardous Materials Exercise Evaluation Forms Prepared for the Department of Energy Office of Transportation and Emergency Management 02B00215-09.p65 This page intentionally left blank table of contents Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) planning tools planning tools Hazar Hazar Hazar Hazar Hazardous Materials dous Materials dous Materials dous Materials dous Materials Ex Ex Ex Ex Exer er er er ercise Ev cise Ev cise Ev cise Ev cise Evaluation Forms aluation Forms aluation Forms aluation Forms aluation Forms Objective 1: Initial Notification of Response Agencies and Response Personnel ........................................................ 3 Objective 2: Direction and Control .............................................................. 5 Objective 3: Incident Assessment ................................................................ 6

332

Biosand filtration of high turbidity water : modified filter design and safe filtrate storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unsafe drinking water is a major cause of water-related diseases that predominantly affect people living in developing countries. The most prevalent water-related disease is diarrhea, estimated to kill 1.8 million children ...

Collin, Clair

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Cogeneration project evaluation manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a guide for evaluating and implementing cogeneration projects in North Carolina. It emphasizes economic assessment and describes cogeneration technologies and legal guidelines. Included are hypothetical projects to illustrate tax and cash flow calculations and a discussion of cogeneration/utility system interconnection. In addition, the manual contains utility rate schedules and regulations, sources of financing, equipment information, and consulting assistance.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

INEEL/EXT-97-  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that the oil bypass system can reduce life-cycle costs. As the evaluation continues and oil avoidance costs are quantified, it is estimated that the bypass system economics may...

335

Evaluation of extractant-coated ferromagnetic microparticles for the recovery of hazardous metals from waste solution.  

SciTech Connect

A magnetically assisted chemical separation (MACS) process was developed earlier at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This compact process was designed for the separation of transuranics (TRU) and radionuclides from the liquid waste streams that exist at many DOE sites, with an overall reduction in waste volume requiring disposal. The MACS process combines the selectivity afforded by solvent extractant/ion exchange materials with magnetic separation to provide an efficient chemical separation. Recently, the MACS process has been evaluated with acidic organophosphorus extractants for hazardous metal recovery from waste solutions. Moreover, process scale-up design issues have been addressed with respect to particle filtration and recovery. Two acidic organophosphorus compounds have been investigated for hazardous metal recovery, bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) phosphinic acid (Cyanex{reg_sign} 272) and bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl) dithiophosphinic acid (Cyanex{reg_sign} 301). Coated onto magnetic microparticles, these extractants demonstrated superior recovery of hazardous metals from solution, relative to what was expected on the basis of results from solvent extraction experiments. The results illustrate the diverse applications of MACS technology for dilute waste streams. Preliminary process scale-up experiments with a high-gradient magnetic separator at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have revealed that very low microparticle loss rates are possible.

Kaminski, M. D.

1998-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

336

TIPSTER Text Summarization Evaluation Conference ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... obtained by contacting the Retrieval Group Manager. The TIPSTER SUMMAC Summarization Evaluation Final Report.

337

Provenance Store Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Requirements for the provenance store and access API are developed. Existing RDF stores and APIs are evaluated against the requirements and performance benchmarks. The team’s conclusion is to use MySQL as a database backend, with a possible move to Oracle in the near-term future. Both Jena and Sesame’s APIs will be supported, but new code will use the Jena API

Paulson, Patrick R.; Gibson, Tara D.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Stephan, Eric G.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Evaluation of Condensate Polishers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of high-temperature tests was conducted to evaluate the potential for steam generator corrosion due to the release of resins or soluble impurity chemicals from full-flow condensate polishers. Three soluble impurities--sodium hydroxide, sodium silicate, and sulfuric acid--were tested, and resin ingress was simulated. Sulfate-induced intergranular attack of nickel alloy tubing, as well as instances of wastagelike attack, was observed.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Evaluating Rail Transit Criticism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report evaluates criticism of rail transit systems. It examines claims that rail transit is ineffective at increasing public transit ridership and improving transportation system performance, that rail transit investments are not cost effective, and that transit is an outdated form of transportation. It finds that critics often misrepresent issues and use biased and inaccurate analysis. This is a companion to the report Rail Transit in

Todd Litman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Case tool evaluation system  

SciTech Connect

An automated system that uses an analytical approach to evaluate Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tools is currently being developed. this system is referred to as the CASE Tool Evaluation System. The following general criteria will be used: overall tool functionality; tool stability; cost; interfaces with other software; customization; ease of use; output produced; hardware and operating system needs; documentation; training and vendor support; repository interface; methodologies; and vendor stability. in Phase 1 CASE tools will be eliminated that do not meet certain must-have'' characteristics specified by the user. Phase 2 will further reduce the size of the tool list by retaining those tools that possess desirable, but not absolutely necessary'' characteristics, also specified by the user. Phase 3 will employ the Analytic Hierarchy Process, developed by Dr. Thomas L. Saaty, to rank the tools. Users will be able to supply tools of their own choosing, in addition to tools that are generated via normal use of the system. All three phases will interact with a database that stores objective information about CASE tools. The use of the Analytic Hierarchy process (AHP) distinguishes this method of CASE tool evaluation from others. As used in this system, the AHP is a method of breaking down the complex, unstructured problem of selecting a CASE tool into its component evaluation criteria and candidate tools. These criteria and tools are arranged into a hierarchical order. Each criterion and tool is assigned a subjective numerical value (by experts or users or both). These values are then synthesized to determine which have the highest priority. The result will be a ranked list of CASE tools tailored to the needs and desires of the user.

Green, P.L.; Andreae, P.V.; Pennewell, W.J.; Clinard, L.A.; Thomas, B. Jr.; Tarrant, P.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Field Evaluation of Windows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Windows Evaluation of Windows Last Updated: 10/20/2009 Various tools can be used to evaluate windows in the field. Unless a new window still has the NFRC label attached to it, it is nearly impossible to determine by sight what the thermal and optical performance of a window is. These tools can provide information, such as low-e coating, gap width and gas fill, that can be used to approximate the performance of a window. Solar gain and Low-e detector This device can be used to determine if a low-e coating is present in the window, what type of coating it is, and where it is located. The type of low-e coating will indicate the amount of solar gain that is admitted through the coating. Readings can be "low", "medium" or "high". The device will also indicate on which glass surface the low-e coating is in relation to the position of the device. Limitations: Only works on glass of 1/8" (3 mm) or thinner. Cost: around $350 from EDTM.com

342

Energy-efficient buildings program evaluations. Volume 2: Evaluation summaries  

SciTech Connect

This document presents summaries of code and utility building program evaluations reviewed as the basis for the information presented in Energy-Efficient Buildings Program Evaluations, Volume 1: Findings and Recommendations, DOE/EE/OBT-11569, Vol. 1. The main purpose of this volume is to summarize information from prior evaluations of similar programs that may be useful background for designing and conducting an evaluation of the BSGP. Another purpose is to summarize an extensive set of relevant evaluations and provide a resource for program designers, mangers, and evaluators.

Lee, A.D.; Mayi, D.; Edgemon, S.D.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Evaluating Employee Training | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluating Employee Training Evaluating Employee Training August 15, 2013 - 1:39pm Addthis Level 1 Course Evaluation Update Evaluating training activities is more important than...

344

Renewable Energy Evaluation Tools  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RENEWABLE ENERGY RENEWABLE ENERGY EVALUATION TOOLS Andy Walker, PhD PE Principal Engineer, NREL Renewable Energy Round Table May 2, 2012 2 TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT AND SCREENING TOOLS WE USE IN OUR PROJECTS Campus/Base Assessments INFRASTRUCTURE BUILDINGS ASSESSMENT RENEWABLE SUPPLY SIDE VEHICLES & TOOLS Campus/Base Assessments INFRASTRUCTURE BUILDINGS ASSESSMENT RENEWABLE SUPPLY SIDE VEHICLES & TOOLS 9 9 Renewable Energy Technologies Photovoltaics Daylighting Biomass Heat/Power Concentrating Solar Heat/Power Solar Vent Air Preheat Solar Water Heating Wind Power Ground Source Heat Pump Landfill Gas 10 10 Renewable Energy Resources Geographical Information System (GIS) Datasets * NREL Datasets (http://www.nrel.gov/gis/) - solar radiation 10x10 km grid

345

ORISE: Process and Program Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process and Program Evaluation Process and Program Evaluation As an integral part of producing effective health and safety programs, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) conducts scientific-based process and program evaluation to provide government agencies and organizations with the tools to improve the health of workers and the general public. Whether the goal is to change awareness, attitudes, beliefs, behaviors, policies or systems, ORISE helps determine the right evaluation methods based on specific needs and resources, including: Formative evaluations to assess the problem, target audience needs and guide successful process implementation Assessments to identify unmet needs in programs, organizations or communities Audience evaluations to learn about targeted populations

346

Cost-sensitive classifier evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluating classifier performance in a cost-sensitive setting is straightforward if the operating conditions (misclassification costs and class distributions) are fixed and known. When this is not the case, evaluation requires a method of visualizing ...

Robert C. Holte; Chris Drummond

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Evaluation of the 17 June 1997 Criticality Accident at Arzamas-16  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On June 17, 1997, a critically accident occurred at Arzamas-16, which resulted in the death (within three days) of A. N. Zakharov, a Russian scientist with 20 years' experience conducting multiassembly experiments. In this case, the multiplying assembly was a fast metal system consisting of a {sup 235}U (90% enriched) core and a copper reflector. According to the Russian press, ''Zakharov misjudged the degree of criticality of the breeding system and committed several gross violations of regulations.'' As we see it, there were three major causes of this accident. First, the experiment was flawed by Zakharov's misreading of the appropriate size of the assembly, which he took from a notebook that described the old experiment he was attempting to repeat. Second, he disregarded the appropriate procedures and safety regulations. Third, these two mistakes were compounded by an improperly set audible alarm system and Zakharov's unsafe use of the table. We also discuss our reconstruction of the accident based on information given by the Russians to US scientists and information culled from Russian newspaper and magazine articles. We also describe our thoughts on the behavior of the assembly following the accident and the radiation dose level Zakharov may have received. These levels match values we have lately obtained from translations of Russian news articles. This accident clearly points out the penalty for weak administrative control of work with multiplying systems. Criticality experimentation requires formality of operation. The experimenter, his peers, and a trained safety person need to document that they understand the experiment and how it will be conducted. Knowing that the experiment was successfully run several decades ago does not justify bypassing a safety evaluation.

Morris Klein

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Evaluating Incentives for Solar Heating ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. t ~ Ii '.:)' NBSIR 76-1127(IE') Evaluating Incentives for Solar Heating Rosalie T. Ruegg Building Economics Section ...

2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

349

Evaluating learning algorithms and classifiers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyse 18 evaluation methods for learning algorithms and classifiers, and show how to categorise these methods with the help of an evaluation method taxonomy based on several criteria. We also define a formal framework that make it possible to describe ... Keywords: classification, classifiers, evaluation methods, learning algorithms, supervised learning, taxonomy

Niklas Lavesson; Paul Davidsson

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Control of the Accumulation of Non-Process Elements in Pulp Mills with Bleach Filtrate Reuse: A Chemical Equilibrium Approach to Predicting the Partitioning of Metals in Pulp Mill and Bleach Plant Streams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project was to develop fundamental, experimentally based methods for predicting the solubility or organic and inorganic matter and their interactions in recycled effluent from kraft pulp mills and bleach plants. This included: characterizing the capacity of wood pulp and dissolved organic matter to bind metal ions, developing a thermodynamic database of properties needed to describe the solubility of inorganic matter in pulp mill streams, incorporation of the database into equilibrium calculation software for predicting the solubility of the metals of interest, and evaluating its capability to predict the distribution of the metals between pulp fibers, inorganic precipitates, and solution.

Frederick, W.J. Jr.; Rudie, A.W.; Schmidl, G.W.; Sinquefield, S.A.; Rorrer, G.L.; Laver, M.L.; Yantasee, W.; Ming, D.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Evaluation Report: IG-0776  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department's Unclassified Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2007 DOE/IG-0776 September 2007 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 18, 2007 MEMOKANDLIM FOR THq SECRETARY . r FROM: , A F , ~ $ & M / ~ I Gregory riednian lnspcctor General SUBJECT: -- INFORMATIOH: Evaluation Report on "The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2007" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy expects to spend about $300 million in Fiscal Year (FY) 2007 to protect its investment in information technology resources. These protective act~vities are critical to ensuring that systenis and data remain secure and available, especially in light of the increasingly sophisticated probes and attacks on Departmental infonnation technology resources. Experts note that successful attacks on Federal systems have

352

Evaluation Report: IG-0738  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program-2006 DOE/IG-0738 September 2006 Department of Energy Wash~ngton, DC 2 0 5 8 5 MEMORANDUM FOR FROM: lnspector General S1JBJ ECT: INFORMATlON: Evaluation Report on "The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2006" BACKGROUND To help accomplish its strategic goals in the areas of defense, energy, science and the environment, the Department utilizes numerous interconnected computer networks and individual systems. Virtually all of the Department's systems are increasingly subjected to sophisticated attacks designed to circumvent security measures, trick unsuspecting users into divulging sensitive information or propagate harmful programs. A strong

353

Evaluated teletherapy source library  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The Evaluated Teletherapy Source Library (ETSL) is a system of hardware and software that provides for maintenance of a library of useful phase space descriptions (PSDs) of teletherapy sources used in radiation therapy for cancer treatment. The PSDs are designed to be used by PEREGRINE, the all-particle Monte Carlo dose calculation system. ETSL also stores other relevant information such as monitor unit factors (MUFs) for use with the PSDs, results of PEREGRINE calculations using the PSDs, clinical calibration measurements, and geometry descriptions sufficient for calculational purposes. Not all of this information is directly needed by PEREGRINE. It also is capable of acting as a repository for the Monte Carlo simulation history files from which the generic PSDs are derived.

Cox, Lawrence J. (Los Alamos, NM); Schach Von Wittenau, Alexis E. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Standardized radiological dose evaluations  

SciTech Connect

Following the end of the Cold War, the mission of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site changed from production of nuclear weapons to cleanup. Authorization baseis documents for the facilities, primarily the Final Safety Analysis Reports, are being replaced with new ones in which accident scenarios are sorted into coarse bins of consequence and frequency, similar to the approach of DOE-STD-3011-94. Because this binning does not require high precision, a standardized approach for radiological dose evaluations is taken for all the facilities at the site. This is done through a standard calculation ``template`` for use by all safety analysts preparing the new documents. This report describes this template and its use.

Peterson, V.L.; Stahlnecker, E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Effect of evaluators' cognitive style on heuristic evaluation: Field dependent and field independent evaluators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heuristic evaluation is a widely used usability evaluation method [Rosenbaum et al., 2000. A toolkit for strategic usability: results from workshops, panels, and surveys. In: Little, R., Nigay, L. (Eds.), In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2000 Conference, New ... Keywords: Cognitive style, Field dependency, Heuristic evaluation

Chen Ling; Gavriel Salvendy

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Evaluating Steam Trap Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory tests were conducted on several types of steam traps at Holston Defense Corporation in Kingsport, Tennessee. Data from these tests, which determined their relative efficiencies, were used in performing economic analyses to determine their equivalent uniform annual cost (EUAC). The comparison was made using a computer program written for the Apple II computer to evaluate overall steam trap economics. This program calculates the EUAC for any steam trap based on 12 input variables including capital, maintenance and steam costs, interest rate and trap life. After determinIng the EUAC, the program will perform sensitivity analyses on any of the twelve variables. (This computer program is available from the author.) This study shows that inverted bucket traps have lower EUAC's under more conditions than other types of traps. Also, this study shows that live steam loss is the heaviest contributor to the annual operating cost of any steam trap and that maintenance frequency and repair cost are also more important than a trap's first cost.

Fuller, N. Y.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Composite Load Model Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The WECC load modeling task force has dedicated its effort in the past few years to develop a composite load model that can represent behaviors of different end-user components. The modeling structure of the composite load model is recommended by the WECC load modeling task force. GE Energy has implemented this composite load model with a new function CMPLDW in its power system simulation software package, PSLF. For the last several years, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has taken the lead and collaborated with GE Energy to develop the new composite load model. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and BPA joint force and conducted the evaluation of the CMPLDW and test its parameter settings to make sure that: • the model initializes properly, • all the parameter settings are functioning, and • the simulation results are as expected. The PNNL effort focused on testing the CMPLDW in a 4-bus system. An exhaustive testing on each parameter setting has been performed to guarantee each setting works. This report is a summary of the PNNL testing results and conclusions.

Lu, Ning; Qiao, Hong (Amy)

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

358

Evaluation of Co-precipitation Processes for the Synthesis of Mixed-Oxide Fuel Feedstock Materials  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this report is the evaluation of various co-precipitation processes for use in the synthesis of mixed oxide feedstock powders for the Ceramic Fuels Technology Area within the Fuels Cycle R&D (FCR&D) Program's Advanced Fuels Campaign. The evaluation will include a comparison with standard mechanical mixing of dry powders and as well as other co-conversion methods. The end result will be the down selection of a preferred sequence of co-precipitation process for the preparation of nuclear fuel feedstock materials to be used for comparison with other feedstock preparation methods. A review of the literature was done to identify potential nitrate-to-oxide co-conversion processes which have been applied to mixtures of uranium and plutonium to achieve recycle fuel homogeneity. Recent studies have begun to study the options for co-converting all of the plutonium and neptunium recovered from used nuclear fuels, together with appropriate portions of recovered uranium to produce the desired mixed oxide recycle fuel. The addition of recycled uranium will help reduce the safeguard attractiveness level and improve proliferation resistance of the recycled fuel. The inclusion of neptunium is primarily driven by its chemical similarity to plutonium, thus enabling a simple quick path to recycle. For recycle fuel to thermal-spectrum light water reactors (LWRs), the uranium concentration can be {approx}90% (wt.), and for fast spectrum reactors, the uranium concentration can typically exceed 70% (wt.). However, some of the co-conversion/recycle fuel fabrication processes being developed utilize a two-step process to reach the desired uranium concentration. In these processes, a 50-50 'master-mix' MOX powder is produced by the co-conversion process, and the uranium concentration is adjusted to the desired level for MOX fuel recycle by powder blending (milling) the 'master-mix' with depleted uranium oxide. In general, parameters that must be controlled for co-precipitation processes include (1) feed solution concentration adjustment, (2) precipitant concentration and addition methods, (3) pH, temperature, mixing method and time, (4) valence adjustment, (5) solid precipitate separation from the filtrate 'mother liquor,' generally by means of centrifugation or filtration, and (6) temperatures and times for drying, calcination, and reduction of the MOX product powder. Also a recovery step is necessary because of low, but finite solubility of the U/TRU metals in the mother liquor. The recovery step usually involves destruction of the residual precipitant and disposal of by-product wastes. Direct denitrations of U/TRU require fewer steps, but must utilize various methods to enable production of MOX with product characteristics that are acceptable for recycle fuel fabrication. The three co-precipitation processes considered for evaluation are (1) the ammonia co-precipitation process being developed in Russia, (2) the oxalate co-precipitation process, being developed in France, and (3) the ammonium-uranyl-plutonyl-carbonate (AUPuC) process being developed in Germany. Two direct denitration processes are presented for comparison: (1) the 'Microwave Heating (MH)' automated multi-batch process developed in Japan and (2) the 'Modified Direct Denitration (MDD)' continuous process being developed in the USA. Brief comparative descriptions of the U/TRU co-conversion processes are described. More complete details are provided in the references.

Collins, Emory D [ORNL; Voit, Stewart L [ORNL; Vedder, Raymond James [ORNL

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

EVALUATION OF MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL-FIRED FACILITIES WITH SCR AND FGD SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CONSOL Energy Inc., Research & Development (CONSOL), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), evaluated the effects of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on mercury (Hg) capture in coal-fired plants equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP)-wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) combination or a spray dyer absorber-fabric filter (SDA-FF) combination. In this program CONSOL determined mercury speciation and removal at 10 bituminous coal-fired facilities; at four of these facilities, additional tests were performed on units without SCR, or with the existing SCR bypassed. This project final report summarizes the results and discusses the findings of the body of work as a whole. Eleven Topical Reports were issued (prior to this report) that describe in great detail the sampling results at each of the ten power plants individually. The results showed that the SCR-FGD combination removed a substantial fraction of mercury from flue gas. The coal-to-stack mercury removals ranged from 65% to 97% for the units with SCR and from 53% to 87% for the units without SCR. There was no indication that any type of FGD system was more effective at mercury removal than others. The coal-to-stack mercury removal and the removal in the wet scrubber were both negatively correlated with the elemental mercury content of the flue gas and positively correlated with the scrubber liquid chloride concentration. The coal chlorine content was not a statistically significant factor in either case. Mercury removal in the ESP was positively correlated with the fly ash carbon content and negatively correlated with the flue gas temperature. At most of the units, a substantial fraction (>35%) of the flue gas mercury was in the elemental form at the boiler economizer outlet. After passing through the SCR-air heater combination very little of the total mercury (<10%) remained in the elemental form in the flue gas; this was true for all SCR catalyst types and sources. Although chlorine has been suggested as a factor affecting the mercury speciation in flue gas, coal chlorine was not a statistically significant factor affecting mercury speciation at the economizer exit or at the air heater exit. The only statistically significant factors were the coal ash CaO content and the fly ash carbon content; the fraction of mercury in the elemental form at the economizer exit was positively correlated with both factors. In a direct comparison at four SCR-equipped units vs. similar units at the same sites without SCR (or with the SCR bypassed), the elemental mercury fractions (measured at the ESP outlet) were lower, and the coal-to-stack mercury removals were higher, when the SCR was present and operating. The average coal-to-stack mercury removal at the four units without an operating SCR was 72%, whereas the average removal at the same sites with operating SCRs was 88%. The unit mercury mass balance (a gauge of the overall quality of the tests) at all of the units ranged from 81% to 113%, which were within our QA/QC criterion of 80-120%.

J.A. Withum

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

Evaluating the technical performance and social acceptability of keg-shaped ceramic water filters in Northern Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Kosim Water Keg (KWK) is a new ceramic water filter designed have faster filtration rates and integrate better with consumers' water habits. The design seals together two ceramic pot filters (CPFs) to form a keg shape. ...

Cummings, Joanna (Joanna Katherine)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Screening Risk Evaluation methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Screening Risk Evaluation (SRE) Guidance document is a set of guidelines provided for the uniform implementation of SREs performed on D&D facilities. These guidelines are designed specifically for the completion of the second (semi-quantitative screening) phase of the D&D Risk-Based Process. The SRE Guidance produces screening risk scores reflecting levels of risk through the use of risk ranking indices. Five types of possible risk are calculated from the SRE: current releases, worker exposures, future releases, physical hazards, and criticality. The Current Release Index (CRI) calculates the risk to human health and the environment from ongoing or probable releases within a one year time period. The Worker Exposure Index (WEI) calculates the risk to workers, occupants, and visitors in D&D facilities of contaminant exposure. The Future Release Index (FRI) calculates the risk of future releases of contaminants, after one year, to human health and the environment. The Physical Hazards Index (PHI) calculates the risk-to human health due to factors other than that of contaminants. The index of Criticality is approached as a modifying factor to the entire SRE, due to the fact that criticality issues are strictly regulated under DOE. Screening risk results will be tabulated in matrix form and Total Risk will be calculated (weighted equation) to produce a score on which to base early action recommendations. Other recommendations from the screening risk scores will be made based either on individual index scores or from reweighted Total Risk calculations. All recommendations based on the SRE will be made based on a combination of screening risk scores, decision drivers, and other considerations, determined on a project by project basis. The SRE is the first and most important step in the overall D&D project level decision making process.

Hopper, K.M. [Midwest Technical, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation by Susan H. Holte In this paper, the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting (OIAF) of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluates the projections published in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), (1) by comparing the projections from the Annual Energy Outlook 1982 through the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 with actual historical values. A set of major consumption, production, net import, price, economic, and carbon dioxide emissions variables are included in the evaluation, updating similar papers from previous years. These evaluations also present the reasons and rationales for significant differences. The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has been providing an

363

Hawaii-Okinawa Building Evaluations  

SciTech Connect

NREL conducted energy evaluations at the Itoman City Hall building in Itoman, Okinawa Prefecture, Japan, and the Hawaii State Capitol building in Honolulu, Hawaii. This report summarizes the findings from the evaluations, including the best practices identified at each site and opportunities for improving energy efficiency and renewable energy. The findings from this evaluation are intended to inform energy efficient building design, energy efficiency technology, and management protocols for buildings in subtropical climates.

Metzger, I.; Salasovich, J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan for NREL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AND MEASUREMENT PLAN FOR EVALUATING CONTRACTOR PERFORMANCE AT THE NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY 1.0 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION and MEASUREMENT PLAN The Performance Evaluation...

365

Security and Cyber Evaluations - Guidance Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance Documents Security and Cyber Evaluations Security Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide, April 2008 Cyber Security Evaluations Appraisal Process Guide, April 2008 Security...

366

Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide This Energy Efficiency Program Impact Evaluation Guide describes and provides guidance...

367

Response Robot Evaluation Exercise (#6)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in a series of DHS/NIST response robot evaluation exercises will be hosted at the emergency responder training facility known as Disaster City in ...

2013-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

368

Commercial Building Technology Evaluation Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flow 4 Proposed Program Elements Building Technologies Program 2 2 commercialbuildings.energy.gov ver ew Program Overview * Program Objective: - Evaluate emerging and underutilized...

369

Compliance Evaluation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

as the Saltstone PA, is acceptable. Compliance Evaluation More Documents & Publications DOE Order 435.1 Performance Assessment Savannah River Site 2009 Performance Assessment for...

370

Process Evaluations | Superconducting Magnet Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process Evaluations Process Assessment Form Operational Control Form Environmental Mgmt. Program Training Module Process Description AM-522-EAO (pdf) OCF (pdf) EMP (pdf) AM-ENV-FS1...

371

ORISE: Process and Program Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process and Program Evaluation As an integral part of producing effective health and safety programs, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) conducts...

372

Demonstration and Evaluation of U  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of U.S. Postal Service Electric Carrier Route Vehicles Southern California Edison Electric Vehicle Technical Center An ISO 9001 Certified Facility Project Sponsor...

373

Formalising Evaluation in Information Retrieval  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arafat,S. van Rijsbergen,K. Jose,J. Proceedings of the CoLIS 5 Workshop on Evaluating User Studies in Information Access

Arafat, S.

374

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation - Table 1. Forecast Evaluations:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Average Absolute Percent Errors from AEO Forecast Evaluations: Average Absolute Percent Errors from AEO Forecast Evaluations: 1996 to 2000 Average Absolute Percent Error Average Absolute Percent Error Average Absolute Percent Error Average Absolute Percent Error Average Absolute Percent Error Variable 1996 Evaluation: AEO82 to AEO93 1997 Evaluation: AEO82 to AEO97 1998 Evaluation: AEO82 to AEO98 1999 Evaluation: AEO82 to AEO99 2000 Evaluation: AEO82 to AEO2000 Consumption Total Energy Consumption 1.8 1.6 1.7 1.7 1.8 Total Petroleum Consumption 3.2 2.8 2.9 2.8 2.9 Total Natural Gas Consumption 6.0 5.8 5.7 5.6 5.6 Total Coal Consumption 2.9 2.7 3.0 3.2 3.3 Total Electricity Sales 1.8 1.6 1.7 1.8 2.0 Production Crude Oil Production 5.1 4.2 4.3 4.5 4.5

375

107TH CONGRESS 1ST SESSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of benefits and feasibility of oil bypass filtration technology. Sec. 164. Gas flare study. Sec. 165. Subtitle B--Oil and Gas Sec. 2421. Petroleum-oil technology. Sec. 2422. Gas. Subtitle C--Ultra-Deepwater and Unconventional Drilling Sec. 2441. Short title. Sec. 2442. Definitions. Sec. 2443. Ultra-deepwater program. Sec

376

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Title of Paper Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Title of Paper Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation by Susan H. Holte OIAF has been providing an evaluation of the forecasts in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) annually since 1996. Each year, the forecast evaluation expands on that of the prior year by adding the most recent AEO and the most recent historical year of data. However, the underlying reasons for deviations between the projections and realized history tend to be the same from one evaluation to the next. The most significant conclusions are: Natural gas has generally been the fuel with the least accurate forecasts of consumption, production, and prices. Natural gas was the last fossil fuel to be deregulated following the strong regulation of energy markets in the 1970s and early 1980s. Even after deregulation, the behavior

377

Training Evaluations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluations Evaluations Training Evaluations The Office of Learning and Workforce Development (HC-20) is working to find ways to measure the effectiveness and efficiency of our training solutions. This effort is to ensure that DOE is in compliance with 2009 OPM regulations, which require that agencies evaluate their training programs annually to determine their effectiveness (5 CFR 410.202). Our goal is to demonstrate the contribution of training to agency mission effectiveness, increase partnership with our key stakeholders and show clear connections between effective funding usage and agency outcomes. In order to accomplish this we have created a comprehensive strategy and standards for evaluating training that will demonstrate alignment between the learning experience

378

Guidelines for the Monitoring, Evaluation, Reporting, Verification...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation, Reporting, Verification, and Certification of Forestry Projects for Climate Change Mitigation Title Guidelines for the Monitoring, Evaluation, Reporting,...

379

Petrophysical evaluation of subterranean formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems are provided for evaluating petrophysical properties of subterranean formations and comprehensively evaluating hydrate presence through a combination of computer-implemented log modeling and analysis. Certain embodiments include the steps of running a number of logging tools in a wellbore to obtain a variety of wellbore data and logs, and evaluating and modeling the log data to ascertain various petrophysical properties. Examples of suitable logging techniques that may be used in combination with the present invention include, but are not limited to, sonic logs, electrical resistivity logs, gamma ray logs, neutron porosity logs, density logs, NRM logs, or any combination or subset thereof.

Klein, James D; Schoderbek, David A; Mailloux, Jason M

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

380

ORNL Weatherization Program Evaluation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ORNL Weatherization Program Evaluation ORNL Weatherization Program Evaluation (Redirected from Weatherization Program Evaluation) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Weatherization Program Evaluation Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Topics: Policies/deployment programs Website: weatherization.ornl.gov/WeatherizationProgramEvaluations.htm References: Weatherization Program Evaluation [1] Logo: Weatherization Program Evaluation Oak Ridge National Laboratory provides weatherization program evaluations as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program. This evaluation program is also available to international organizations. This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Oak Ridge National Laboratory provides weatherization program evaluations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

NIST OpenHaRT'13 Evaluation: Overview and Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Evaluation Workshop Omni Shoreham Hotel, Washington DC ... Manage the evaluations – Provide evaluation utilities and infrastructure for ...

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

382

Open Government Plan Self Evaluation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Government Plan Self Evaluation Government Plan Self Evaluation Page 1 of 3 NAME OF AGENCY: Department of Energy NAME OF EVALUATOR: TheAnne Gordon DIRECTIONS The enclosed list of 30 criteria is drawn directly from the text of the Open Government Directive. Please return this form to the White House Open Government team at opengov@ostp.gov by 5 pm on Friday, April 23 rd . To complete the self- evaluation form, please indicate a response to each of the criteria as follows: Red (R) - plan does not satisfy the requirement Yellow (Y) - plan partially satisfies the requirement Green (G) - plan fully satisfies the requirement N/A - not applicable because agency does not engage in that activity or area Please include any explanatory comments on the last page. Optional: If you wish, please provide the page range for the relevant section of the plan that is the basis for your

383

Liquefaction Evaluations at DOE Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LIQUEFACTION EVALUATIONS AT LIQUEFACTION EVALUATIONS AT DOE SITES M. Lewis, M. McHood, R. Williams, B. Gutierrez October 25, 2011 Agenda  Background  Purpose and Objective  Liquefaction Methods  Site Evaluations  Aging  Conclusions 2 Background 3 Liquefaction at DOE Sites Background  Liquefaction evaluations are required at all DOE sites  Methods have evolved over the years, but there is currently only one consensus methodology;  Youd et al., 2001  Two other methods have emerged in the last few years;  Cetin et al., 2004  Idriss & Boulanger, 2008 4 Background  Youd et al., was the result of two workshops (NCEER/NSF) held in the late 1990s, culminating in a NCEER report and a ASCE publication in 2001. The method is widely used.  Cetin et al., was the result of several doctoral

384

Model Selection in Summary Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A difficulty in the design of automated text summarization algorithms is in the objective evaluation. Viewing summarization as a tradeoff between length and information content, we introduce a technique based on ...

Perez-Breva, Luis

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Uncertainty, information and project evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a practical method for project evaluation using techniques of financial economics which were developed originally for valuing stock options and other financial assets. It is based on the formulation and ...

Jacoby, Henry D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Evaluation of the Fish Passage Effectiveness of the Bonneville I Prototype Surface Collector using Three-Dimensional Ultrasonic Fish Tracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes tests conducted at Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River in the spring of 2000 using three-dimensional acoustic telemetry and computational fluid dynamics hydraulic modeling to observe the response of outmigrating juvenile steelhead and yearling chinook to a prototype surface collector installed at the Powerhouse. The study described in this report was one of several conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to prepare a decision document on which of two bypass methods: surface flow bypass or extended-length submersible bar screens to use to help smolts pass around Bonneville dams without going through the turbines.

Faber, Derrek M.; Weiland, Mark A.; Moursund, Robert; Carlson, Thomas J.; Adams, Noah; Rhondorf, D.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Evaluation Evaluation Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation by Esmeralda Sanchez The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has been providing an evaluation of the forecasts in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) annually since 1996. Each year, the forecast evaluation expands on that of the prior year by adding the most recent AEO and the most recent historical year of data. However, the underlying reasons for deviations between the projections and realized history tend to be the same from one evaluation to the next. The most significant conclusions are: Over the last two decades, there have been many significant changes in laws, policies, and regulations that could not have been anticipated and were not assumed in the projections prior to their implementation. Many of these actions have had significant impacts on energy supply, demand, and prices; however, the impacts were not incorporated in the AEO projections until their enactment or effective dates in accordance with EIA's requirement to remain policy neutral and include only current laws and regulations in the AEO reference case projections.

388

Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy?s (DOEs) Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation (AVTE) project was to provide test and evaluation services for advanced technology vehicles, to establish a performance baseline, to determine vehicle reliability, and to evaluate vehicle operating costs in fleet operations. Vehicles tested include light and medium-duty vehicles in conventional, hybrid, and all-electric configurations using conventional and alternative fuels, including hydrogen in internal combustion engines. Vehicles were tested on closed tracks and chassis dynamometers, as well as operated on public roads, in fleet operations, and over prescribed routes. All testing was controlled by procedures developed specifically to support such testing. Testing and evaluations were conducted in the following phases: ? Development of test procedures, which established testing procedures; ? Baseline performance testing, which established a performance baseline; ? Accelerated reliability testing, which determined vehicle reliability; ? Fleet testing, used to evaluate vehicle economics in fleet operation, and ? End of test performance evaluation. Test results are reported by two means and posted by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to their website: quarterly progress reports, used to document work in progress; and final test reports. This final report documents work conducted for the entirety of the contract by the Clarity Group, Inc., doing business as ECOtality North America (ECOtality). The contract was performed from 1 October 2005 through 31 March 2013. There were 113 light-duty on-road (95), off-road (3) and low speed (15) vehicles tested.

Garetson, Thomas

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

ORNL Weatherization Program Evaluation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ORNL Weatherization Program Evaluation ORNL Weatherization Program Evaluation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Weatherization Program Evaluation Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Topics: Policies/deployment programs Website: weatherization.ornl.gov/WeatherizationProgramEvaluations.htm References: Weatherization Program Evaluation [1] Logo: Weatherization Program Evaluation Oak Ridge National Laboratory provides weatherization program evaluations as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Weatherization Assistance Program. This evaluation program is also available to international organizations. This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Oak Ridge National Laboratory provides weatherization program evaluations

390

NETL: Predictive Modeling and Evaluation - Evaluation of the Emission,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Arsenic, and Fine Particulate Matter from Coal Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region Evaluation of the Emission, Transport, and Deposition of Mercury, Arsenic, and Fine Particulate Matter from Coal Based Power Plants in the Ohio River Valley Region Ohio University, in collaboration with CONSOL Energy, Advanced Technology Systems, Inc (ATS) and Atmospheric Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) as subcontractors will evaluate the impact of emissions from coal-fired power plants in the Ohio River Valley region as they relate to the transport and deposition of mercury, arsenic, and associated fine particulate matter. This evaluation will involve two interrelated areas of effort: regional-scale modeling analysis and ambient air monitoring. The scope of work for the modeling analysis will include (1) development of updated inventories of mercury and arsenic emissions from coal plants and other important sources in the modeled domain; (2) adapting an existing 3-D atmospheric chemical transport model to incorporate recent advancements in the understanding of mercury transformations in the atmosphere; (3) analyses of the flux of Hg0, RGM, arsenic, and fine particulate matter in the different sectors of the study region to identify key transport mechanisms; (4) comparison of cross correlations between species from the model results to observations in order to evaluate characteristics of specific air masses associated with long-range transport from a specified source region; and (5) evaluation of the sensitivity of these correlations to emissions from regions along the transport path. This will be accomplished by multiple model runs with emissions simulations switched on and off from the various source regions.

391

Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methods. Direct solution via LU factorization is the widely used scheme. Flueck and Chiang 18 presented an iterative solution using GMRES with a physics-based preconditioner...

392

Annual Energy Outlook Evaluation, 2005  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Outlook Evaluation, 2005 1 Outlook Evaluation, 2005 1 Annual Energy Outlook Evaluation, 2005 * Then Energy Information Administration (EIA) produces projections of energy supply and demand each year in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). The projections in the AEO are not statements of what will happen but of what might happen, given the assumptions and methodologies used. The projections are business-as-usual trend projections, given known technology, technological and demographic trends, and current laws and regulations. Thus, they provide a policy-neutral reference case that can be used to analyze policy initiatives. EIA does not propose or advocate future legislative and regulatory changes. All laws are assumed to remain as currently enacted; however, the impacts of emerging regulatory changes,

393

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by by Esmeralda Sanchez The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has been providing an evaluation of the forecasts in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) annually since 1996. Each year, the forecast evaluation expands on that of the prior year by adding the most recent AEO and the most recent historical year of data. However, the underlying reasons for deviations between the projections and realized history tend to be the same from one evaluation to the next. The most significant conclusions are: * Over the last two decades, there have been many significant changes in laws, policies, and regulations that could not have been anticipated and were not assumed in the projections prior to their implementation. Many of these actions have had significant impacts on energy supply, demand, and prices; however, the

394

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by Esmeralda Sánchez The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has produced an annual evaluation of the accuracy of the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) since 1996. Each year, the forecast evaluation expands on the prior year by adding the projections from the most recent AEO and the most recent historical year of data. The Forecast Evaluation examines the accuracy of AEO forecasts dating back to AEO82 by calculating the average absolute forecast errors for each of the major variables for AEO82 through AEO2003. The average absolute forecast error, which for the purpose of this report will also be referred to simply as "average error" or "forecast error", is computed as the simple mean, or average, of all the absolute values of the percent errors,

395

FY08 VPP Program Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) is a recognized third-party certification of worker safety and health program excellence, based on industry best practices that focus on management leadership and employee involvement, as well as other safety and health program elements. This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) VPP Program Evaluation is the FY-2008 report of the PNNL VPP Steering Committee regarding the status of VPP at PNNL. It is an update of the previous annual report dated January, 2007 and was completed in January 2008. An annual evaluation of the status of VPP is required of all sites that participate in the DOE-VPP. This report provides a detailed summary of the PNNL VPP Steering Committee’s evaluation of program performance and documents both strengths and improvement opportunities related to the various aspects of the VPP model.

Dossett, Sharon D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Evaluation of waste crate counter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel nondestructive measurement system has been developed to perform combined gamma-ray, passive neutron, and active neutron analyses of radioactive waste packaged in large crates. The system will be used to examine low level and transuranic waste at the Waste Receiving and Processing facility at Westinghouse-Hanford Corp. Prior to delivery of the system, an extensive evaluation of its performance characteristics will be conducted. The evaluation is to include an assessment of the mechanical properties of the system, gamma-ray attenuation correction algorithms, instrument response as a function of source positions, performance of the high resolution gamma-ray detector for ``hot spot`` and isotopic analyses, active and passive neutron counter response, instrument sensitivity, matrix effects, and packaging effects. This report will discuss the findings of the evaluation program, to date, and indicate future directions for the program.

Wachter, J.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Nuclear Materials Measurement and Accountability; Bieri, J.M. [Pajarito Scientific Corp., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Shaw, S.W. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

PAE Evaluation Portfolio Peer Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report from the Peer Review Panel Report from the Peer Review Panel on activities within the Planning, Analysis and Evaluation Unit Office of Planning, Budget and Analysis Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Team Members: Kathryn Newcomer, The George Washington University (Chair) Irwin Feller, The Pennsylvania State University (Retired) Stephanie Shipman, Government Accountability Office Kathleen Sedlak O'Brien, Environmental Protection Agency Faith Lambert, EERE Final Report February 1, 2008 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) within the U.S. Department of Energy asked a panel of experts with relevant knowledge to review the evaluation activities of the Planning, Analysis and Evaluation Unit (PAE) within EERE's Office of Planning, Budget and

398

TEC Meeting Evaluations Summary -- Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TEC Meeting Evaluation Summary TEC Meeting Evaluation Summary San Antonio, Texas February 6-7, 2008 Attendee Affiliation: TEC Member Organizations: 19 (38%) State, Tribal or Local Official: 21 (42%) U.S. Department of Energy: 2 (4%) DOE Contractor: 3 (6%) Other (e.g., AULG, DOT): 5 (10%) Assessment of Agenda Topics: DOE Program Updates: 42% very useful 58% somewhat useful Plenary I - Tribal Cultural Discussion: 40% very useful 36% somewhat useful 14% not useful 10% didn't attend Plenary II - Evaluation of Shortline Railroads 56% very useful 38% somewhat useful 6% not useful Plenary III - Addressing Risk Perception 74% very useful 16% somewhat useful 6% not useful 4% didn't attend Assessment of Topic Group Sessions Tribal: 23% very useful

399

RCS program evaluation plan options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Residential Conservation Service (RCS) Program evaluation plan is designed to provide an ongoing evaluation during the RCS Program's active period as well as a measurement of the RCS Program's cumulative effect after the program's termination. The study options described include utility case studies, random survey sampling, directed survey sampling, and remote data collection. Survey techniques are described and appropriate questions are suggested. Several sample selection criteria are included as background for a DOE policy decision on this issue. Present and anticipated data sources are listed and discussed. Statistical data analysis plans include a preliminary determination of required sample sizes.

Stovall, T.K.; Bayne, C.K.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003: Nursery Bridge Fishway and Garden City-Lowden II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated the fish screens at the Nursery Bridge Fishway and at the newly constructed Garden City-Lowden II site west of Walla Walla, Washington in the Walla Walla River Basin during the spring and summer of 2003. Both fish screen facilities were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide for safe fish passage. At the Nursery Bridge Fishway, the screens were evaluated specifically to determine whether the louvers that aid in controlling water flow from behind the screens could be adjusted so that the screens would meet fish protection criteria. Data were collected to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries ((NOAA Fisheries), formerly National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage before and after changing the louver settings. Rock weirs downstream of the dam were also evaluated to determine whether they might impede upstream migration of juvenile salmonids during low flow conditions. At the Garden City-Lowden II site, data were collected to establish a baseline for operating conditions and to determine whether any changes in the baffle settings were needed. Based on the results of our studies in 2003, we concluded: Nursery Bridge Site: (1) 68% of the initial velocity measurements on the west screen exceeded the NOAA Fisheries criteria of 0.4 ft/s for approach velocity; (2) A simple adjustment of the existing louvers was not sufficient to fix the problem; (3) The sediment and debris load in the river upstream of the screens exceeded the design criteria for the site, which had frequent breakdowns in the screen cleaning systems; and (4) The rock weirs downstream of the dam would not be expected to impede upstream movement of juvenile fish during low flow conditions. Garden City-Lowden II: (1) The flat inclined-plate screen design appeared to be efficiently protecting juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement and migration delay; (2) Approach velocities met the NMFS criteria of less than 0.4 ft/s in June, and no change in baffle settings was needed; (3) Sweep velocities were generally lower than approach velocities and did not increase toward the downstream end of the site; and (4) The automated cleaning system at the Garden City-Lowden II site works adequately when sediment loads are low, though its effectiveness at cleaning the screens decreases as sediment and debris loads and algal growth increase.

Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Evaluation of a Fish Passage Site in the Walla Walla River Basin, 2009 Annual Report : September 2008 - August 2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2009, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated the Touchet Consolidated Facility to determine if it is designed, constructed, operated, and maintained to effectively provide juvenile salmonids with safe passage past the diversion and back to the Touchet River. Completed in 2008, the Touchet Consolidated Facility combined two irrigation diversions with an existing intake for the Touchet Acclimation Facility. The consolidated facility includes a separate fish screen and intake for each user, a pool and chute fishway, and an adult fish trap. The fish screens portions of the facility were evaluated on April 20, 2009, using underwater videography, acoustic Doppler velocimeter measurements, and visual observations while water was diverted to the acclimation facility alone and again as water was diverted to the irrigation system and pond together. The facility is in good condition and is well maintained, although water velocities within the site do not meet the criteria set by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). Approach velocities above 0.4 ft/s at the upstream end of the facility and decreases in sweep velocity toward the bypass are likely caused by the proximity of the upstream screen to the spill over stoplogs that control flow at the upstream end of the forebay. We recommend working with Touchet Acclimation Facility staff to try different configurations and heights of forebay stoplogs while PNNL staff measure water velocities, allowing real-time monitoring of changes in approach and sweep velocities resulting from the configuration changes. It may be possible to bring approach and sweep velocities more in line with the NMFS criteria for juvenile fish screens. We also recommend evaluating the facility later in the year when river levels are low and the irrigation district is the only water user. During the site visit, it was noted that the upstream end of the fishway has relatively closely spaced louvers that point downstream. During higher river levels such as on April 20, the orientation of the louvers causes a headloss of up to 1 ft or more. Fish must maneuver through this hydraulic jump and between the louvers. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife is considering alternatives to this configuration; if needed, we would be available to offer technical assistance.

Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

402

Evaluate Status of Pacific Lamprey in the Clearwater River Drainage, Idaho : Annual Report 2000.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent decline of Pacific lamprey Lampetra tridentata adult migrants to the Snake River drainage has focused attention on the species. Adult returns in 1995-1999 were more than ten magnitudes less than returns in the early 1960's. Human activities in the Snake River and Clearwater River drainages have altered ecosystem habitat in the last 100 years and likely the productive potential of Pacific lamprey habitat. Logging, stream impoundment, road construction, grazing, mining, and community development have dominated habitat alteration in the Clearwater River system and Snake River corridor. Hydroelectric projects in the Snake River corridor impact juvenile Pacific lamprey outmigrants and returning adults. Juvenile lamprey outmigrants potentially pass through turbines, turbine bypass and collection systems, and spillway structures at lower Snake River hydroelectric dams. Clearwater River drainage hydroelectric facilities including the Pacific Power and Light Dam on the Clearwater River in Lewiston, Idaho, impacted Pacific lamprey populations, however, the degree of impact is unknown (1920's-early 1970's). Hydroelectric dam construction (Harpster Dam) on the South Fork of the Clearwater River resulted in obstructed salmonid passage in the mid-1900's. Habitat alterations in the Snake River basin and Clearwater River drainage have had numerous negative effects on salmon Oncorhynchus spp. and steelhead trout O. mykiss populations (wild fish), but the magnitude of impacts on lamprey productivity and survival is unknown. Thorough understanding of Pacific lamprey habitat use and life history processes is needed to facilitate management and restoration of the species. Through Bonneville Power Administration support, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game began investigation into the status of Pacific lamprey populations in Idaho's Clearwater River drainage in 2000. Trapping, electrofishing, and spawning ground redd surveys were used to determine where Pacific lamprey persist in the South Fork of the Clearwater River drainage. Habitat surveys evaluating juvenile habitat use were primarily conducted in the Red River subbasin. Red River subbasin resource manipulations have resulted in elevated stream sediment, stream destabilization, riparian canopy reduction, and water temperature extremes. A total of 262 juvenile Pacific lamprey were captured during the 2000 field season. Sampling in the Red River drainage yielded the largest number of Pacific lamprey juveniles. Preliminary findings indicate Pacific lamprey juveniles, while present, are not numerous or widely distributed. Age of juveniles captured was determined using length frequency.

Cochnauer, Tim; Claire, Christopher

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease April...

404

Evaluation Methods for Rail Transit Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation Methodsfor Rail Transit Projects Robert AEvaluation Methods for Rail Transit Projects Robert A.pie EVALUATION METHODS FOR RAIL TRANSIT PROJECTS ROBERT

Johnston, Robert A.; DeLuchi, Mark A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs JudyEvaluation of evolving residential electricity tariffs Judyjdonadee@andrew.cmu.edu Abstract Residential customers in

Lai, Judy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

TEPP - Exercise Evaluation Forms | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forms Hazardous Materials Exercise Evaluation Forms Exercise Evaluation Forms More Documents & Publications TEPP - Spent Nuclear Fuel Radiography Device Soil DensityMoisture Gauge...

407

NREL: Fleet Test and Evaluation - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Fleet Test & Evaluation Vehicles and Fuels Research Fleet Test and Evaluation Search More Search...

408

Speeding Up Zeolite Evaluation for Carbon Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Speeding Up Zeolite Evaluation for Carbon Capture Speeding Up Zeolite Evaluation for Carbon Capture Zeolite.png Schematic of an important class of porous materials known as...

409

Building Energy-Efficiency Evaluation & Labeling Technologies...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency Evaluation & Labeling Technologies in China Building Energy-Efficiency Evaluation & Labeling Technologies in China Information on the function, basis, and value of...

410

Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome to the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations The Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations, within the Office of Enforcement and Oversight, is...

411

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis Papers > Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Analysis Papers > Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation Release Date: February 2005 Next Release Date: February 2006 Printer-friendly version Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation* Table 1.Comparison of Absolute Percent Errors for Present and Current AEO Forecast Evaluations Printer Friendly Version Average Absolute Percent Error Variable AEO82 to AEO99 AEO82 to AEO2000 AEO82 to AEO2001 AEO82 to AEO2002 AEO82 to AEO2003 AEO82 to AEO2004 Consumption Total Energy Consumption 1.9 2.0 2.1 2.1 2.1 2.1 Total Petroleum Consumption 2.9 3.0 3.1 3.1 3.0 2.9 Total Natural Gas Consumption 7.3 7.1 7.1 6.7 6.4 6.5 Total Coal Consumption 3.1 3.3 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 Total Electricity Sales 1.9 2.0 2.3 2.3 2.3 2.4 Production Crude Oil Production 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.6 4.7

412

INLAND PORT TRANSPORTATION EVALUATION GUIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INLAND PORT TRANSPORTATION EVALUATION GUIDE by Robert Harrison, Center for Transportation Research Transportation Institute, The Texas A&M University System; and Jolanda Prozzi, Center for Transportation Research, The University of Texas at Austin CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH Bureau of Engineering Research

Texas at Austin, University of

413

Taiwan Power TCSC Evaluation Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates the use of Thyristor Controlled Series Compensation (TCSC) and conventional series compensation to more evenly distribute power flows on the Taiwan Power Company's (TPC) 345-kV Center-North interface and improve system dampings. This study concludes that the proposed compensation scheme would significantly improve the interface's performance capability.

1997-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

414

Performance evaluation with temporal rewards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today many formalisms exist for specifying complex Markov chains. In contrast, formalisms for specifying rewards, enabling the analysis of long-run average performance properties, have remained quite primitive. Basically, they only support the analysis ... Keywords: Markov chains, path-based reward variables, performance evaluation, reward functions, temporal logic

Jeroen P. M. Voeten

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

INEEL/EXT-97-  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Fourth Quarterly Report July-September 2003 TECHNICAL REPORT Larry...

416

INEEL/EXT-97-  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

620 U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Second Quarterly Report January - March 2003 Larry Zirker James Francfort...

417

A Filtration-Oriented Modeling Tool for Stochastic Programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applications in finance, energy, and other capital-intensive areas have used ... according to how new information affects the decisions available. ..... encourages good systems analysis practices like encapsulation and reuse, ...... situation can emerge when regulations only come into effect under certain market conditions, ...

418

Iterative methods for solving the pressure problem at multiphase filtration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applied problems of oil and gas recovery are studied numerically using the mathematical models of multiphase fluid flows in porous media. The basic model includes the continuity equations and the Darcy laws for each phase, as well as the algebraic expression for the sum of saturations. Primary computational algorithms are implemented for such problems using the pressure equation. In this paper, we highlight the basic properties of the pressure problem and discuss the necessity of their fulfillment at the discrete level. The resulting elliptic problem for the pressure equation is characterized by a non-selfadjoint operator. Possibilities of approximate solving the elliptic problem are considered using the iterative methods. Special attention is given to the numerical algorithms for calculating the pressure on parallel computers.

Vabishchevich, P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Gross Wash Project in Washers of Red Mud Filtration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Alumina and Bauxite. Presentation Title, Gross Wash Project in Washers of ...

420

Hydraulic pump with in-ground filtration and monitoring capability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydraulically operated pump is described for in-ground filtering and monitoring of wells or other fluid sources, including a hollow cylindrical pump housing with an inlet and an outlet, filtering devices positioned in the inlet and the outlet, a piston that fits slidably within the pump housing, and an optical cell in fluid communication with the pump housing. A conduit within the piston allows fluid communication between the exterior and one end of the piston. A pair of O-rings form a seal between the inside of the pump housing and the exterior of the piston. A flow valve positioned within the piston inside the conduit allows fluid to flow in a single direction. In operation, fluid enters the pump housing through the inlet, flows through the conduit and towards an end of the pump housing. The piston then makes a downward stroke closing the valve, thus forcing the fluid out from the pump housing into the optical cell, which then takes spectrophotometric measurements of the fluid. A spring helps return the piston back to its starting position, so that a new supply of fluid may enter the pump housing and the downward stroke can begin again. The pump may be used independently of the optical cell, as a sample pump to transport a sample fluid from a source to a container for later analysis.

Hopkins, C.D.; Livingston, R.R.; Toole, W.R. Jr.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Transformer Life Extension: Membrane Technologies for Lifelong Oil Filtration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moisture and oxygen are two key factors aging oil and paper in a power transformer; therefore, they must be kept low. An on-line system using a hollow fiber membrane unit removes moisture and oxygen continuously from the oil of an operational transformer. This technical update describes previous work using hollow fiber membranes and vacuum, and details novel techniques applied to extend power transformer life.The project team designed, built, commissioned, and partially aged two models ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

422

Structural Oil Pan With Integrated Oil Filtration And Cooling System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oil pan for an internal combustion engine includes a body defining a reservoir for collecting engine coolant. The reservoir has a bottom and side walls extending upwardly from the bottom to present a flanged lip through which the oil pan may be mounted to the engine. An oil cooler assembly is housed within the body of the oil pan for cooling lubricant received from the engine. The body includes an oil inlet passage formed integrally therewith for receiving lubricant from the engine and delivering lubricant to the oil cooler. In addition, the body also includes an oil pick up passage formed integrally therewith for providing fluid communication between the reservoir and the engine through the flanged lip.

Freese, V, Charles Edwin (Westland, MI)

2000-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

423

Effect of Electromagnetic Fields on the Filtration of Aluminium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical Modeling of Centrifugally Cast HSS Rolls · Numerical Simulation of Electro-magnetic Turbulent Inhibitor Technology in a Tundish · Optimizing the ...

424

Advanced Energy-Efficient Filtration: Fan Filter Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8 5.3.1 FFU Electric Power and Airflowacross the unit. Total electric power demand. 5.2.1 Test5.3 Results 5.3.1 FFU Electric Power and Airflow Speed

Xu, Tengfang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Effect of Electromagnetic Fields on the Filtration of Liquid Aluminum ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Shahin Akbarnejad, Knut Marthinsen, Jon Arne Bakken, Ragnhild Elizabeth Aune ... aluminum alloy (A356) by the support of various magnetic field strengths (up to ... The obtained results were compared with reference gravity experiments.

426

Analysis of model parameters for a polymer filtration simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine a simulation model for polymer extrusion filters and determine its sensitivity to filter parameters. The simulator is a three-dimensional, time-dependent discretization of a coupled system of nonlinear partial differential equations used to ...

N. Brackett-Rozinsky; S. Mondal; K. R. Fowler; E. W. Jenkins

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Advanced Compact Filter: ( ACF) An Efficient and Flexible Filtration ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the key components of a new technology (ACF) developed and industrialized by Rio Tinto Alcan (RTA) which provides a flexible, efficient ...

428

Program on Technology Innovation: Carbon Nanotube Water Filtration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon nanotubes--tiny cylinders of rolled-up graphite sheets with diameters in the range of 1--3 nanometers--have been enjoying an iconic status among nanoscience researchers for a long time. However, despite their spectacular properties, commercial applications of carbon nanotubes have been few. Now, a new commercial technology is exploiting one of the most remarkable properties of this carbon nanotube molecule: the ability of the tiny carbon nanotube pore to transport water at an extremely fast rate, ...

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

429

Air cooled turbine component having an internal filtration system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A centrifugal particle separator is provided for removing particles such as microscopic dirt or dust particles from the compressed cooling air prior to reaching and cooling the turbine blades or turbine vanes of a turbine engine. The centrifugal particle separator structure has a substantially cylindrical body with an inlet arranged on a periphery of the substantially cylindrical body. Cooling air enters centrifugal particle separator through the separator inlet port having a linear velocity. When the cooling air impinges the substantially cylindrical body, the linear velocity is transformed into a rotational velocity, separating microscopic particles from the cooling air. Microscopic dust particles exit the centrifugal particle separator through a conical outlet and returned to a working medium.

Beeck, Alexander R. (Orlando, FL)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Absolute Glovebox Ventilation Filtration System with Unique Filter Replacement Feature  

SciTech Connect

A glovebox ventilation system was designed for a new plutonium-238 processing facility that provided 1) downdraft ventilation, 2) a leak tight seal around the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters, and 3) a method for changing the filters internally without risk of contaminating the laboratory.

Freeman, S. S.; Slusher, W. A.

1975-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) evaluation. Volume 1: Process evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted this study for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Super Efficient Refrigerator Program (SERP) Evaluation. This report documents the SERP formation and implementation process, and identifies preliminary program administration and implementation issues. The findings are based primarily on interviews with those familiar with the program, such as utilities, appliance manufacturers, and SERP administrators. These interviews occurred primarily between March and April 1995, when SERP was in the early stages of program implementation. A forthcoming report will estimate the preliminary impacts of SERP within the industry and marketplace. Both studies were funded by DOE at the request of SERP Inc., which sought a third-party evaluation of its program.

Sandahl, L.J.; Ledbetter, M.R.; Chin, R.I.; Lewis, K.S.; Norling, J.M.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Nondestructive Evaluation: Indication Characterization, Evaluation, and Disposition Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operating experience of in-service inspections (ISIs) of nuclear power plants includes cases in which human error or inadequate implementation of examination plans resulted in issues with the application of qualified nondestructive evaluation (NDE) procedures. These issues can result in degraded NDE performance. The operating experience for the basis of the initial report centered principally on ultrasonic testing (UT) examination of dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) in reactor piping systems. The more ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

433

Nondestructive Evaluation: Nondestructive Evaluation and Measurement of Residual Stress  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for residual stress measurements conducted on Alloy 600 samples that have undergone changes in material properties resulting from simulated operating conditions, including heat treatment, three-point bending load, cracking, and repair. The overall objective was to identify suitable NDE techniques that would augment the existing and proven surface residual stress measurements by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and extend the measurem...

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Slap Fingerprint Segmentation Evaluation 2004 API ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

API Specification. Overview. The Slap Fingerprint Segmentation Evaluation 2004 will investigate the accuracy of fingerprint ...

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

435

Usability evaluation of selected web portals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents results of the usability evaluation performed according to the methodology of fuzzy usability evaluation that was presented in the previous research of the authors. As a result of a particular evaluation, a usability score is obtained. ... Keywords: information systems, usability, usability evaluation, web portal

Miloslav Hub; Michal Zatloukal

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Evaluation of Contemporary Design of Reinforced Concrete ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Evaluation of Contemporary Design of Reinforced Concrete Lateral Resisting Systems Using Current Performance ...

2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

437

NIST Prototypes Framework for Evaluating Sustainability ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Prototypes Framework for Evaluating Sustainability Standards. ... Whatever the drivers, businesses are boosting their sustainability efforts. ...

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

438

New Program Evaluates Labs for Emergency ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New Program Evaluates Labs for Emergency Communications Tests. For Immediate Release: March 24, 2009. ...

2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

439

Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations - Guidance Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidance Documents Guidance Documents Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office Protocols Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Protocol for the Development and Maintenance of Criteria and Review Approach Documents, July 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Protocol for High Hazard Nuclear Facility Project Oversight, November 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Protocol for Required Reading, June 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Protocol for Small Team Oversight Activities, June 2012 (Rev. 1) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Qualification Standard for the Site Lead Program, May 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Protocol for Site Leads, May 2011

440

Specific test and evaluation plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made to the 241-AX-B Valve Pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP). Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities), Factory Acceptance Tests (FATs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Acceptance Tests (CATs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). It should be noted that POTPs are not required for testing of the transfer line addition. The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation.

Hays, W.H.

1998-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bypass filtration evaluation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ``waste,`` but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity.

Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.; Otis, M.D. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Waste Management Technology Div.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Methodology for flammable gas evaluations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are 177 radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. The waste generates flammable gases. The waste releases gas continuously, but in some tanks the waste has shown a tendency to trap these flammable gases. When enough gas is trapped in a tank`s waste matrix, it may be released in a way that renders part or all of the tank atmosphere flammable for a period of time. Tanks must be evaluated against previously defined criteria to determine whether they can present a flammable gas hazard. This document presents the methodology for evaluating tanks in two areas of concern in the tank headspace:steady-state flammable-gas concentration resulting from continuous release, and concentration resulting from an episodic gas release.

Hopkins, J.D., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

443

Nondestructive Evaluation: Training Course Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the final steps in the technology transfer process is personnel training. Training personnel in fundamental, and advanced nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods and techniques is a major theme of the Nuclear NDE Program. Training is an essential part of NDE technology transfer and application, and it is an important element in maintaining the quality and supply of the NDE workforce serving the nuclear power industry. This has increasing importance with the aging workforce, the dawn of the nuclear...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

444

BWR Fuel Deposit Sample Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

River Bend Nuclear Power Station, a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant, experienced fuel defects during Cycle 11. The failed fuel pins were identified during the subsequent refueling outage. To assist analysis of the fuel failure root cause, crud flake deposit samples were collected for analyses. Results on the morphology and distribution of chemical elements in four tenacious crud flakes that are associated with the fuel failures are reported in EPRI report 1009733, BWR Fuel Deposit Sample Evaluation–Riv...

2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

445

Emergency response robot evaluation exercise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 60 robot test methods are being developed by a team led by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) with the sponsorship of U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS). These test methods are being specified and standardized ... Keywords: HRI, capability, emergency response, evaluation, human-robot interaction, measure, metrics, mobility, performance, power, radio communications, repetition, robot, sensor, standard, task, test, test method, test suite, trial

Adam Jacoff; Hui-Min Huang; Ann Virts; Anthony Downs; Raymond Sheh

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Nondestructive Evaluation: Training Program Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the final steps in the technology transfer process is personnel training. Training personnel in fundamental, and advanced nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods and techniques is a major theme of the Nuclear NDE Program. Training is an essential part of NDE technology transfer and application, and it is an important element in maintaining the quality and supply of the NDE workforce serving the nuclear power industry. This has increasing importance with the aging workforce, the dawn of the nuclear...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

447

Session: Test and Evaluation (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of this presentation is: (1) provide test and evaluation of PV cells/modules/systems to TPP participants, other PV industry, labs, and universities in support of technology optimization efforts sponsored by DOE's Solar Program and the SAI; (2) support commercial and emerging technology development; (3) provide component and system performance data to improve and validate system performance models; (4) provide T and E support for reliability activities; and (5) priority is placed on TPP's and other solicitations.

Marion, B.; Hanley, C.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Annual Energy Outlook Forecast Evaluation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by Esmeralda Sanchez by Esmeralda Sanchez Errata -(7/14/04) The Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting has produced an annual evaluation of the accuracy of the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) since 1996. Each year, the forecast evaluation expands on the prior year by adding the projections from the most recent AEO and the most recent historical year of data. The Forecast Evaluation examines the accuracy of AEO forecasts dating back to AEO82 by calculating the average absolute forecast errors for each of the major variables for AEO82 through AEO2003. The average absolute forecast error, which for the purpose of this report will also be referred to simply as "average error" or "forecast error", is computed as the simple mean, or average, of all the absolute values of the percent errors, expressed as the percentage difference between the Reference Case projection and actual historic value, shown for every AEO and for each year in the forecast horizon (for a given variable). The historical data are typically taken from the Annual Energy Review (AER). The last column of Table 1 provides a summary of the most recent average absolute forecast errors. The calculation of the forecast error is shown in more detail in Tables 2 through 18. Because data for coal prices to electric generating plants were not available from the AER, data from the Monthly Energy Review (MER), July 2003 were used.

449

Infrasound Sensor Models and Evaluations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has continued to evaluate the performance of infrasound sensors that are candidates for use by the International Monitoring System (IMS) for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization. The performance criteria against which these sensors are assessed are specified in ``Operational Manual for Infra-sound Monitoring and the International Exchange of Infrasound Data''. This presentation includes the results of efforts concerning two of these sensors: (1) Chaparral Physics Model 5; and (2) CEA MB2000. Sandia is working with Chaparral Physics in order to improve the capability of the Model 5 (a prototype sensor) to be calibrated and evaluated. With the assistance of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Sandia is also conducting tests to evaluate the performance of the CEA MB2000. Sensor models based on theoretical transfer functions and manufacturer specifications for these two devices have been developed. This presentation will feature the results of coherence-based data analysis of signals from a huddle test, utilizing several sensors of both types, in order to verify the sensor performance.

KROMER,RICHARD P.; MCDONALD,TIMOTHY S.

2000-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

450

Solar Two Performance Evaluation Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar Two is a 10-MWe prototype central-receiver plant east of Barstow, California. Solar Two, which is sponsored by a consortium of utilities and industry in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy, began regular electricity production in February 1997. The objective of Solar Two's performance evaluation activity is to understand the plant's performance and to use the evaluation information for the following purposes: optimize plant performance, extrapolate Solar Two's performance to general performance of molten-salt central-receiver technology, and recommend revisions to predictive models and engineering design methods for Solar Two and future-generation molten-salt central-receiver technology. The primary aspect of the performance evaluation is the lost-electricity analysis. This analysis compares the actual generation with the generation predicted by the Solar Two model. (SOLERGY, a computer program designed by Sandia National Laboratories to simulate the operation and power output of a solar central-receiver power plant is the code used to model Solar Two.) The difference between the predicted and the actual generation (i.e., the lost electricity) is broken down into the different efficiency and availability categories responsible for the loss. Having the losses broken down by system and in terms of electricity is useful for understanding and improving the plant's performance; it provides a tool for determining the best operating procedures for plant performance and the allocation of operation and maintenance resources for the best performance payback.

Mary Jane Hale

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

The multifamily building evaluation project  

SciTech Connect

In 1991 the New York State Energy Office embarked on a comprehensive multi-year study of multifamily housing in New York City. The principal objective of the evaluation was to determine the degree to which new windows and boiler/burner retrofits installed in 22 multifamily buildings located in the New York City region save energy and whether the savings persist over a minimum of two years. Window and boiler retrofits were selected because they are popular measures and are frequently implemented with assistance from government and utility energy programs. Approaches prospectively, energy consumption monitoring and a series of on-site inspections helped explain why energy savings exceeded or fell short of expectations. In 1993, the scope of the evaluation expanded to include the monitoring of domestic hot water (DHW) consumption in order to better understand the sizing of combined heating/DHW boilers and water consumption patterns. The evaluation was one of ten proposals selected from over 100 candidates in a nationwide competition for a US Department of Energy Building Efficiency Program Grant. The Energy Office managed the project, analyzed the data and prepared the reports, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory served as technical advisor, and EME Group (New York City) installed meters and dataloggers, collected data, and inspected the retrofits. The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority collaborated with the Energy Office on the DHW monitoring component. Results did not always follow predictable patterns. Some buildings far exceeded energy saving estimates while others experienced an increase in consumption. Persistence patterns were mixed. Some buildings showed a steady decline in energy savings while others demonstrated a continual improvement. A clear advantage of the research design was a frequent ability to explain results.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Evaluating High Efficiency Motor Retrofit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the petrochemical and refining Industries, and most manufacturing plants, the reliable operation of AC motors always has been crucial to the continuous operation of the process. Now, the cost of operating these motors has also become a significant factor. Engineers Involved In motor specification can help lower plant operating costs and reduce electrical energy consumption dramatically by a relatively simple technique: retrofit of existing, standard-efficiency motors with new, high efficiency models. This article demonstrates strong reasons for motor retrofit, and explains step-by step how process and manufacturing engineering personnel can fully evaluate a retrofit decision.

Evans, T. A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

Hood, Donald W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Concurrent ultrasonic weld evaluation system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for concurrent, non-destructive evaluation of partially completed welds for use in conjunction with an automated welder. The system utilizes real time, automated ultrasonic inspection of a welding operation as the welds are being made by providing a transducer which follows a short distance behind the welding head. Reflected ultrasonic signals are analyzed utilizing computer based digital pattern recognition techniques to discriminate between good and flawed welds on a pass by pass basis. The system also distinguishes between types of weld flaws.

Hood, D.W.; Johnson, J.A.; Smartt, H.B.

1985-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

455

Evaluation of Retrofit Delivery Packages  

SciTech Connect

Residential energy retrofit activities are a critical component of efforts to increase energy efficiency in the U.S. building stock; however, retrofits account for a small percentage of aggregate energy savings at relatively high per unit costs. This report by Building America research team, Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), describes barriers to widespread retrofits and evaluates opportunities to improve delivery of home retrofit measures by identifying economies of scale in marketing, energy assessments, and bulk purchasing through pilot programs in portions of Sonoma, Los Angeles, and San Joaquin Counties, CA. These targeted communities show potential and have revealed key strategies for program design, as outlined in the report.

Berman, M.; Smith, P.; Porse, E.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Specific test and evaluation plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made to the 241-AN-A Valve Pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a ``lower tier`` document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP) This STEP encompasses all testing activities required to demonstrate compliance to the project design criteria as it relates to the modifications of the AN-A valve pit. The Project Design Specifications (PDS) identify the specific testing activities required for the Project. Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities), Factory Acceptance Tests (FATs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Acceptance Tests (CATs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). It should be noted that POTPs are not required for testing of the modifications to the 241-AN-A Valve Pit. The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation.

Hays, W.H.

1997-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

457

DWPF MATERIALS EVALUATION SUMMARY REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To better ensure the reliability of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) remote canyon process equipment, a materials evaluation program was performed as part of the overall startup test program. Specific test programs included FA-04 ('Process Vessels Erosion/Corrosion Studies') and FA-05 (melter inspection). At the conclusion of field testing, Test Results Reports were issued to cover the various test phases. While these reports completed the startup test requirements, DWPF-Engineering agreed to compile a more detailed report which would include essentially all of the materials testing programs performed at DWPF. The scope of the materials evaouation programs included selected equipment from the Salt Process Cell (SPC), Chemical Process Cell (CPC), Melt Cell, Canister Decon Cell (CDC), and supporting facilities. The program consisted of performing pre-service baseline inspections (work completed in 1992) and follow-up inspections after completion of the DWPF cold chemical runs. Process equipment inspected included: process vessels, pumps, agitators, coils, jumpers, and melter top head components. Various NDE (non-destructive examination) techniques were used during the inspection program, including: ultrasonic testing (UT), visual (direct or video probe), radiography, penetrant testing (PT), and dimensional analyses. Finally, coupon racks were placed in selected tanks in 1992 for subsequent removal and corrosion evaluation after chemical runs.