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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

By-product disposal from MSW incinerator flue gas cleaning systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste incineration has been found to be an effective method of achieving significant volume reduction of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) while at the same time allowing for energy recovery in the form of steam or electricity. Concern over potential air pollution from incinerators in the form of acid gases, heavy metals and dioxins has led to the application of Spray Dryer Absorption (SDA) flue gas cleaning systems to control these emissions. SDA has demonstrated high efficiencies in converting these air pollutants into a dry by-product for disposal. This has, in turn, led to concerns over potential secondary pollution from the disposal of these by-products. This paper presents a description of the SDA process and reviews disposal options for the SDA product. Product characteristics are given and results of leaching studies are presented. Comparisons between EPA's and TEP and TCLP procedures are presented. Results of dioxin measurements from the by-product are given.

Donnelly, J.R. (Joy Manufacturing Co., Los Angeles, CA (US)); Jons, E. (A/S Niro Atomizer, Copenhagen (DK))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Plastic Products Weights in MSW by Category, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Plastic Products Weights in Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) by Category, 2005 (Thousand Tons) ... with energy recovery, discards to landfill, and other disposal.

3

MSW to hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

LLNL and Texaco are cooperatively developing a physical and chemical treatment method for the preparation and conversion of municipal solid waste (MSW) to hydrogen by gasification and purification. The laboratory focus will be on pretreatment of MSW waste in order to prepare a slurry of suitable viscosity and heating value to allow efficient and economical gasification and hydrogen production. Initial pretreatment approaches include (1) hydrothermal processing at saturated conditions around 300 C with or without chemical/pH modification and (2) mild dry pyrolysis with subsequent incorporation into an appropriate slurry. Initial experiments will be performed with newspaper, a major constituent of MSW, prior to actual work with progressively more representative MSW samples. Overall system modeling with special attention to energy efficiency and waste water handling of the pretreatment process will provide overall guidance to critical scale-up parameters. Incorporation of additional feed stock elements (e.g., heavy oil) will be evaluated subject to the heating value, viscosity, and economics of the MSW optimal slurry for hydrogen production. Ultimate scale-up of the optimized process will provide sufficient material for demonstration in the Texaco pilot facility; additional long term objectives include more detailed economic analysis of the process as a function of technical parameters and development of a measure/control system to ensure slagging ash for variable MSW feed stocks. Details of the overall project plan and initial experimental and modeling results are presented.

Pasternak, A.D.; Richardson, J.H.; Rogers, R.S.; Thorsness, C.B.; Wallman, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Richter, G.N.; Wolfenbarger, J.K. [Texaco Inc., Montebello, CA (United States). Montebello Research Lab.

1994-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

4

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production of Mixed Alcohols  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). However, biomass is not always available in sufficient quantity at a price compatible with fuels production. Municipal solid waste (MSW) on the other hand is readily available in large quantities in some communities and is considered a partially renewable feedstock. Furthermore, MSW may be available for little or no cost. This report provides a techno-economic analysis of the production of mixed alcohols from MSW and compares it to the costs for a wood based plant. In this analysis, MSW is processed into refuse derived fuel (RDF) and then gasified in a plant co-located with a landfill. The resulting syngas is then catalytically converted to mixed alcohols. At a scale of 2000 metric tons per day of RDF, and using current technology, the minimum ethanol selling price at a 10% rate of return is approximately $1.85/gallon ethanol (early 2008 $). However, favorable economics are dependent upon the toxicity characteristics of the waste streams and that a market exists for the by-product scrap metal recovered from the RDF process.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Valkenburg, Corinne

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

BSW and MSW Student Handbook 2011-2012 Page 1 BSW and MSW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BSW and MSW Student Handbook 2011-2012 Page 1 2011-2012 BSW and MSW Student Handbook www-4720 #12;BSW and MSW Student Handbook 2011-2012 Page 2 #12;BSW and MSW Student Handbook 2011-2012 Page 3................................................................. 9 The BSW and MSW Student Handbook............... 11 Accreditationand

Peterson, Blake R.

6

MSW Biogenic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MSW Biogenic MSW Biogenic Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

7

Saving Tons at the Register  

SciTech Connect

Duct losses have a significant effect on the efficiency of delivering space cooling to U.S. homes. This effect is especially dramatic during peak demand periods where half of the cooling equipment's output can be wasted. Improving the efficiency of a duct system can save energy, but can also allow for downsizing of cooling equipment without sacrificing comfort conditions. Comfort, and hence occupant acceptability, is determined not only by steady-state temperatures, but by how long it takes to pull down the temperature during cooling start-up, such as when the occupants come home on a hot summer afternoon. Thus the delivered tons of cooling at the register during start-up conditions are critical to customer acceptance of equipment downsizing strategies. We have developed a simulation technique which takes into account such things as weather, heat-transfer (including hot attic conditions), airflow, duct tightness, duct location and insulation, and cooling equipment performance to determine the net tons of cooling delivered to occupied space. Capacity at the register has been developed as an improvement over equipment tonnage as a system sizing measure. We use this concept to demonstrate that improved ducts and better system installation is as important as equipment size, with analysis of pull-down capability as a proxy for comfort. The simulations indicate that an improved system installation including tight ducts can eliminate the need for almost a ton of rated equipment capacity in a typical new 2,000 square foot house in Sacramento, California. Our results have also shown that a good duct system can reduce capacity requirements and still provide equivalent cooling at start-up and at peak conditions.

Brown, Karl; Seigel, Jeff; Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

MSW GASIFICATION UNDERSTANDING THE CHALLENGES Stephen Goff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MSW GASIFICATION ­ UNDERSTANDING THE CHALLENGES Stephen Goff Jeffrey Hahn Hanwei Zhang Shashank evaluating emerging gasification technologies and is committed to identifying and developing the most high reliability. This corrosion and fouling will also exist in gasification processes

Columbia University

9

How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? - FAQ - U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Other FAQs about Conversion & Equivalents. How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? How do I compare heating fuels?

10

Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success...

11

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as sodium bicarbonate, soda ash, trona, or nahcalite (ICF Northwest, 1988). By-products generated

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

12

U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry  

SciTech Connect

The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil pri

Downing, Mark [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Stokes, Bryce [Navarro Research & Engineering; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-lime fly ash in blended cements with minimum (less than 20%) portland cement in the blend. Keywords: Fly 232, Fly Ash and Natural Pozzolans. #12;4 INTRODUCTION Coal is the most widely used source of energy ash. In 1992, total coal ash production in the world was estimated to be 600 million tons, of which

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

14

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report investigated the potential of using municipal solid waste (MSW) to make synthesis gas (syngas) suitable for production of liquid fuels. Issues examined include: • MSW physical and chemical properties affecting its suitability as a gasifier feedstock and for liquid fuels synthesis • expected process scale required for favorable economics • the availability of MSW in quantities sufficient to meet process scale requirements • the state-of-the-art of MSW gasification technology.

Valkenburg, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Thompson, Becky L.; Gerber, Mark A.; Jones, Susanne B.; Stevens, Don J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Ton père et autre débris ; suivi de Entretien.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ce mémoire en création littéraire est constitué de deux parties. La première, Ton père et autres débris, est un récit composé de vingt-quatre tableaux divisés… (more)

Grenier, Jacques

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

KCP relocates 18-ton machine | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

relocates 18-ton machine | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response...

17

Tons of Heavy Metals in Mill Creek Sediments Heather Freeman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with industries. Paper, woolen, flour, and cotton mills, starch factories, slaughterhouses, distilleriesTons of Heavy Metals in Mill Creek Sediments Heather Freeman 8/30/99 Geology Department Advisors: Dr. Kees DeJong Dr. Barry Manyard Dr. David Nash #12;Tons of heavy metals in Mill Creek sediments

Maynard, J. Barry

18

Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

'Billion-Ton' Study 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting Opportunities for Growth in Bioenergy Resources Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting Opportunities for Growth in Bioenergy Resources August 10, 2011 - 3:41pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy today released a report - 2011 U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry - detailing U.S. biomass feedstock potential nationwide. The report examines the nation's capacity to produce a billion dry tons of biomass resources annually for energy uses without impacting other vital U.S. farm and forest products, such as food, feed, and fiber crops. The study provides industry, policymakers, and the agricultural community with county-level data and includes analyses of

19

Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor July 9, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE, (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Mark McKenna, WCH, (509) 372-9032 media@wch-rcc.com RICHLAND, Wash. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors have disposed of 15 million tons of contaminated material at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) since the facility began operations in 1996. Removing contaminated material and providing for its safe disposal prevents contaminants from reaching the groundwater and the Columbia River. ERDF receives contaminated soil, demolition debris, and solid waste from

20

Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

report supports the conclusion of the original 2005 Billion-Ton Study with added in-depth production and costs analyses and sustainability studies. The 2011 report uses more...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was produced by Wisconsin Electric's coal-fired power plants. The criteria for selecting these mixtures was to utilize minimal cost materials, such as coal combustion by-products (fly ash, bottom ash, etc of sufficient strength to withstand handling, transfer and long term exposure. The final phase (4) was designed

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

22

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigation. Two additional ash samples were prepared by blending these selected conventional and clean coalCenter for By-Products Utilization HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R #12;1 HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Shiw S. Singh, and Bruce

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

23

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST by blending these selected conventional and clean coal ashes. Using these sixdifferent ash samples, eleven of 0 and60 percent by high-sulfurcoal ashes (Class F and clean-coal ashes) andcoal ash blends (Class F

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

24

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST CONCRETE PRODUCTS Authors: Tarun R. Naik, Director investigation. Two additional ash samples were prepared by blending these selected conventional and clean coal

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

25

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as the coal ash derived from SOx control technology. Up to 80% of CCA was blended with ground portland cement: blended cement, clean coal ash, sulfate resistance, time of setting #12;3 Zichao Wu is Structural EngineerCenter for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN COAL ASH AS SETTING TIME REGULATOR IN PORTLAND

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

26

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and clean-coal ashes) andcoal ash blends (Class F plus clean-coal ash blends) in the range of 0 to 60Center for By-Products Utilization CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASSF FLY ASHCOAL AND CLEAN-COAL,and Bruce W. Ramme CBU-1996-08 REP-283 July 1996 Presented andPublished at the American Coal Ash Association

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

27

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Test results indicated that all the blends with coal ash had lower expansion than the control mixtureCenter for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MILWAUKEE #12;USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

28

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mixtures were developed using blends of wood FA and Class C coal FA. Two levels of blended ash of concrete. Blending of wood FA with Class C coal FA improved performance of wood FA to a significant extentCenter for By-Products Utilization GREENER CONCRETE FROM WOOD FLY ASH AND COAL FLY ASH By Tarun R

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

29

Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products: Phase 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility industry currently generates about 20 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products annually, and the quantity is expected to increase as utilities institute further controls to comply with Clean Air Act requirements. This report presents the results of the second phase of a large-scale study of beneficial land-use applications of these by-products.

1998-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

30

GIGO: Spreadsheet-based simulation for MSW systems  

SciTech Connect

GIGO, a spreadsheet-based model of municipal solid waste (MSW) management systems is described. The model is intended for general system-level simulation consisting of linked detailed facility, process and cost models that can also be used independently to simulate components of a solid-waste-management system. The model requires no special programming skills beyond knowledge of the use of a common spreadsheet. The model is flexible, easy to use and modify, and is in the public domain. Model formulation and implementation are described.

Anex, R.P.; Lund, J.R.; Tchobanoglous, G. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Lawver, R.A. [California Integrated Waste Management Board, Sacramento, CA (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF SRS 70 TON CASK  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this work was to perform the thermal calculations to evaluate the Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel assembly temperatures inside the SRS 70-Ton Cask loaded with various bundle powers. MTR fuel consists of HFBR, MURR, MIT, and NIST. The MURR fuel was used to develop a bounding case since it is the fuel with the highest heat load. The results will be provided for technical input for the SRS 70 Ton Cask Onsite Safety Assessment. The calculation results show that for the SRS 70 ton dry cask with 2750 watts total heat source with a maximum bundle heat of 670 watts and 9 bundles of MURR bounding fuel, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are below about 263 C. Maximum top surface temperature of the plastic cover is about 112 C, much lower than its melting temperature 260 C. For 12 bundles of MURR bounding fuel with 2750 watts total heat and a maximum fuel bundle of 482 watts, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are bounded by the 9 bundle case. The component temperatures of the cask were calculated by a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics approach. The modeling calculations were performed by considering daily-averaged solar heat flux.

Lee, S.; Jordan, J.; Hensel, S.

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

32

Dilution Refrigeration of Multi-Ton Cold Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dilution refrigeration is the only means to provide continuous cooling at temperatures below 250 mK. Future experiments featuring multi-ton cold masses require a new generation of dilution refrigeration systems, capable of providing a heat sink below 10 mK at cooling powers which exceed the performance of present systems considerably. This thesis presents some advances towards dilution refrigeration of multi-ton masses in this temperature range. A new method using numerical simulation to predict the cooling power of a dilution refrigerator of a given design has been developed in the framework of this thesis project. This method does not only allow to take into account the differences between an actual and an ideal continuous heat exchanger, but also to quantify the impact of an additional heat load on an intermediate section of the dilute stream. In addition, transient behavior can be simulated. The numerical model has been experimentally verified with a dilution refrigeration system which has been designed, ...

Wikus, P; CERN. Geneva

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products: Phase 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility industry currently generates about 25 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products annually in the United States -- a quantity that is expected to increase as utilities apply new controls to comply with Clean Air Act Amendments. This report presents results of the third and final phase of a large-scale study of beneficial land-use applications for these by-products.

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

34

DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly...

35

DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for Civilian Reactors January 23, 2002 Washington, DC DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for...

36

Concept design and optimization of MSW management system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The maximum recovery of recyclables from municipal solid waste (MSW) using material recovery facility (MRF) technologies is determined. Two waste streams at Spangdahlem AB, Germany are analyzed; stationary container wastes and commingled recyclables. Three schemes are considered, one for each waste stream, and one for both. Multi-criteria decision making is the methodology. The criteria are recovery and annual benefit minus cost (B-C). Recovery is determined using the recovery factor transfer function of Diaz et al. (1982). Each technology, or unit operation, in a sequence is independent because particle size distribution of each waste component is considered. B-C is based on revenue from sold recyclables, tipping fees saved by not landfilling separated waste, and manual labor and amortized equipment costs. Six unit operations are considered: eddy current separator (ECS), magnet, air classifier, screen, manual sort, and shredder. Sequences one to six operations long are considered. Three heuristics eliminate 42,179 of 55,986 potential sequences as infeasible. The result is domination by a MRF to process both wastes and a tradeoff between 35.7% recovery of the total at an annual B-C of $0.95 million and recovery of 35.6% at an annual B-C of $1.02 million. Hand sort recovers the most, and is economical.

Palmer, J.R.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Acceptance test report for the Westinghouse 100 ton hydraulic trailer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SY-101 Equipment Removal System 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer was designed and built by KAMP Systems, Inc. Performance of the Acceptance Test Procedure at KAMP`s facility in Ontario, California (termed Phase 1 in this report) was interrupted by discrepancies noted with the main hydraulic cylinder. The main cylinder was removed and sent to REMCO for repair while the trailer was sent to Lampson`s facility in Pasco, Washington. The Acceptance Test Procedure was modified and performance resumed at Lampson (termed Phase 2 in this report) after receipt of the repaired cylinder. At the successful conclusion of Phase 2 testing the trailer was accepted as meeting all the performance criteria specified.

Barrett, R.A.

1995-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

38

Transportation system benefits of early deployment of a 75-ton multipurpose canister system  

SciTech Connect

In 1993 the US Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) began developing two multipurpose canister (MPC) systems to provide a standardized method for interim storage and transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at commercial nuclear power plants. One is a 75-ton concept with an estimated payload of about 6 metric tons (t) of SNF, and the other is a 125-ton concept with an estimated payload of nearly 11 t of SNF. These payloads are two to three times the payloads of the largest currently certified US rail transport casks, the IF-300. Although is it recognized that a fully developed 125-ton MPC system is likely to provide a greater cost benefit, and radiation exposure benefit than the lower-capacity 75-ton MPC, the authors of this paper suggest that development and deployment of the 75-ton MPC prior to developing and deploying a 125-ton MPC is a desirable strategy. Reasons that support this are discussed in this paper.

Wankerl, M.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schmid, S.P. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Application guide for 25-ton solar system (unitized)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Arkla has developed a unitary solar system for air conditioning, heating and service hot water loads in commercial buildings of up to 25 tons cooling requirement. A semi-exploded view shows the basic elements of the Arkla system. These elements, listed below, are described in individual sections of the guide in sufficient detail to enable a competent designer to duplicate the Arkla unitary system in a site built system. The elements are: (1) collectors with summary procedure guide; (2) storage/receiver; (3) pumps/piping/valves; (4) controls; (5) chiller; (6) cooling tower; (7) gas boiler back-up; (8) central air handling unit; and (9) service and DHW. Any successful solar HVAC system requires careful analysis of the integration of the elements. This is particularly true due to the large year-round variation in the temperature of the solar HW available. Several items of this nature are discussed in the element sections. Consequently, the designer should review this entire guide before proceeding to individual elements particularly A and B. This guide presumes that the monthly (and design) hot water loads have been determined for the heating, cooling, and service-DHW water Btu requirements. In addition to these normal calculations, an hourly profile for a typical day each month should be made. The hourly profile is necessary to maximize the solar fraction for a given amount of collector surface in conjunction with the size of the storage system; that is, the coincidence, or lack of, sunshine to the instantaneous demands.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Characterization of Arsenic Contamination on Rust from Ton Containers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The speciation and spatial distribution of arsenic on rusted steel surfaces affects both measurement and removal approaches. The chemistry of arsenic residing in the rust of ton containers that held the chemical warfare agents bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (sulfur mustard) and 2-chlorovinyldichloroarsine (Lewisite) is of particular interest, because while the agents have been decontaminated, residual arsenic could pose a health or environmental risk. The chemistry and distribution of arsenic in rust samples was probed using imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX). Arsenic in the +3 and or +5 oxidation state is homogeneously distributed at the very top-most layer of the rust samples, and is intimately associated with iron. Sputter depth profiling followed by SIMS and XPS shows As at a depth of several nm, in some cases in a reduced form. The SEM/EDX experiments show that As is present at a depth of several microns, but is inhomogeneously distributed; most locations contained oxidized As at concentrations of a few percent, however several locations showed very high As in a metallic form. These results indicate that the rust material must be removed if the steel containers are to be cleared of arsenic.

Gary S. Groenewold; Recep Avci; Robert V. Fox; Muhammedin Deliorman; Jayson Suo; Laura Kellerman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Waste/By-Product Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN Ruth Cox DOE/DOD Workshop January 13, 2011 January 13, 2011 Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association The Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association FCHEA ƒ Trade Association for the industry ƒ Member driven - Market focused ƒ Developers, suppliers, customers, nonprofits, government Ad ƒ Advocacy ƒ Safety and standardization ƒ Education ƒ Strategic Alliances Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association O M b Our Members 5 W t /B d t H d Waste/By-product Hydrogen Overview Overview ƒ Growing populations, rising standards of living, and increased urbanization leads to a escalating volume of waste leads to a escalating volume of waste. ƒ Huge volumes of waste are collected in dumps, creating a major environmental issue. ƒ ƒ Wastewater treatment plants generate noxious gasses that are released in Wastewater treatment plants generate noxious gasses that are released in

42

A Study on the Integrated MSW Management Technologies of Work Zone in the Hydropower Station of Yangtze Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the hydropower exploitation of Yangtze basin in China is booming, thousands of workers work and live in the construction encampment, which results in more and more serious MSW pollution. In order to control environment pollution and protect the health ... Keywords: Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), Yangtze Basin, Integrated Waste Management, Pollution Control, Work Zone of Hydropower Station, Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP)

Han Zhiyong; Liu Dan; Li Qibin; Xie Guangwu; Lang Jian; Zhang Luliang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of uranium mill tailings. The project had originally planned to ship 2 million tons of tailings with Recovery Act funds. Now, Recovery Act workers are surpassing that goal. Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds More Documents & Publications EIS-0355: Record of Decision EIS-0355: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0355: Final Environmental Impact Statement

44

Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) October 8, 2013 - 2:22pm Addthis Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Project Type New Installation Replacement New Installation Condenser Type Air Source Water Source Air Source Existing Capacity * ton - Existing Cooling Efficiency * EER - Existing Heating Efficiency * COP - Existing IPLV Efficiency * IPLV - New Capacity ton 10 tons New Cooling Efficiency EER 10.1 EER New Heating Efficiency COP 3.2 COP New IPLV Efficiency IPLV 10.4 IPLV Energy Cost $ per kWh $0.06 per kWh

45

Economical Recovery of By-products in the Mining Industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Industrial Technologies, Mining Industry of the Future Program, works with the mining industry to further the industry's advances toward environmental and economic goals. Two of these goals are (1) responsible emission and by-product management and (2) low-cost and efficient production (DOE 1998). DOE formed an alliance with the National Mining Association (NMA) to strengthen the basis for research projects conducted to benefit the mining industry. NMA and industry representatives actively participate in this alliance by evaluating project proposals and by recommending research project selection to DOE. Similarly, the National Research Council (NRC) has recently and independently recommended research and technology development opportunities in the mining industry (NRC 2001). The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Colorado School of Mines engineers conducted one such project for DOE regarding by -product recovery from mining process residue. The results of this project include this report on mining industry process residue and waste with opportunity for by-product recovery. The U.S. mineral processing industry produces over 30,000,000 metric tons per year of process residue and waste that may contain hazardous species as well as valuable by-products. This study evaluates the copper, lead, and zinc commodity sectors which generate between 23,300,000 and 24,000,000 metric tons per year. The distribution of residual elements in process residues and wastes varies over wide ranges* because of variations in the original ore content as it is extracted from the earth's crust. In the earth's crust, the elements of interest to mining fall into two general geochemical classifications, lithophiles and chalcophiles** (Cox 1997). Groups of elements are almost always present together in a given geochemical classification, but the relative amounts of each element are unique to a particular ore body. This paper generally describes copper, lead, and zinc mining operations and their associated process wastes and residues. This description can serve as a basis for identifying those process residues and waste that contain both impurities and products which currently cannot be economically recovered. This information could be used to develop a market-based approach to by-product recovery by evaluating potential revenue generated from the sale of by-products along with innovative recovery techniques.

Berry, J.B.

2001-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

46

Table 7.1 Coal Overview, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 7.1 Coal Overview, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons) Year: Production 1: Waste Coal Supplied 2: Trade: Stock Change 4,5: Losses and

47

NATURAL GAS REBURNING TECHNOLOGY FOR NOx REDUCTION FROM MSW COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATURAL GAS REBURNING TECHNOLOGY FOR NOx REDUCTION FROM MSW COMBUSTION SYSTEMS ABSTRACf CRAIG A series, injection of up to 15% (HHV basis) natural gas reduced NOx by 50-70% while maintain ing, Illinois DAVID G. LINZ Gas Research Institute Chicago, Illinois ducing NOx emISSIons from municipal solid

Columbia University

48

NATURAL GAS REBURNING TECHNOLOGY FOR NOx REDUCTION FROM MSW COMBUSTION SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATURAL GAS REBURNING TECHNOLOGY FOR NOx REDUCTION FROM MSW COMBUSTION SYSTEMS Discussion by CRAIG's increased turbulent mixing is on the CO profile and what the incremental NOx reduction experienced was from that this alone would contribute to a significant reduction in the NO", generated. The authors are careful

Columbia University

49

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons, signifying the Bush Administration's ongoing commitment to nonproliferation. Nine metric tons of plutonium is enough material to make over 1,000 nuclear weapons. The Secretary made today's announcement while speaking before the International Atomic Energy Agency's annual general conference.

50

6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site June 18, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler, Moab Federal Project Director (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan, S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager (970) 257-2145 (Grand Junction, CO) - Today, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced that 6 million tons of uranium mill tailings have been shipped from Moab, Utah, under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project to an engineered disposal cell near Crescent Junction, Utah. The shipments mark continued progress toward relocating the 16-million-ton uranium mill tailings pile away from the Colorado River. "The federal budget continues to be stretched thin, and I am proud this

51

6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site June 18, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler, Moab Federal Project Director (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan, S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager (970) 257-2145 (Grand Junction, CO) - Today, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced that 6 million tons of uranium mill tailings have been shipped from Moab, Utah, under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project to an engineered disposal cell near Crescent Junction, Utah. The shipments mark continued progress toward relocating the 16-million-ton uranium mill tailings pile away from the Colorado River. "The federal budget continues to be stretched thin, and I am proud this

52

Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project Accomplishes Milestone While Doing it Safely Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project Accomplishes Milestone While Doing it Safely February 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler, Moab Federal Project Director, (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan, S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager, (970) 257-2145 Grand Junction, CO- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reached another milestone today for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, having shipped 5 million tons of tailings from the massive pile located in Moab, Utah, to the engineered disposal cell near Crescent Junction, Utah. The pile comprised an estimated 16 million tons total when DOE's Remedial

53

Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone July 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Matt McCormick, manager of the Richland Operations Office, commends a large group of Hanford workers for the 15-million-ton milestone at a public event at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. Matt McCormick, manager of the Richland Operations Office, commends a large group of Hanford workers for the 15-million-ton milestone at a public event at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. RICHLAND, Wash. - EM's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) - a massive landfill for low-level radioactive and hazardous waste at the Hanford site - has achieved a major cleanup milestone. Since beginning operations in 1996, workers supporting the Richland

54

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons, signifying the Bush Administration's ongoing commitment to nonproliferation. Nine metric tons of plutonium is enough material to make over 1,000 nuclear weapons. The Secretary made today's announcement while speaking before the International Atomic Energy Agency's annual general conference.

55

Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation August 11, 2011 - 3:59pm Addthis Total potential biomass resources by county in the contiguous U.S. from the baseline scenario of the Update (Figure 6.4, page 159) | Map from Billion-Ton Update Total potential biomass resources by county in the contiguous U.S. from the baseline scenario of the Update (Figure 6.4, page 159) | Map from Billion-Ton Update Paul Bryan Biomass Program Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? With continued developments in biorefinery capacity and technology, the feedstock resources identified in the report could produce about 85 billion gallons of biofuels -- enough to replace approximately 30 percent

56

Environmental Monitoring of Abandoned Mined Land Revegetated Using Dry FGD By-Products and Yard Waste Compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility industry currently generates about 25 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products annually in the United States. Utilities expect this quantity to increase as they apply new controls to comply with Clean Air Act Amendments. This report presents the results of a field-scale study of beneficial land-use applications of these by-products in surface mine reclamation.

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

57

Oxygen-enriched coincineration of MSW and sewage sludge: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal regulations banning ocean dumping of sewage sludge coupled with stricter regulations on the disposal of sewage sludge in landfills have forced municipalities, especially those in the northeast United States, to consider alternate methods for disposal of this solid waste. Coincineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) and sludge has proven to be economically attractive for both Europe and Japan, but has not yet proven to be a viable sludge disposal technology in the United States because of a history of operational problems in existing facilities. The most prevalent problem in coincinerating MSW and a dewatered sewage sludge (15 to 25% solids) is incomplete sludge combustion. Incomplete sludge combustion is primarily a function of sludge particle size, occurring when the surface of the sludge particle dries and hardens, while the inner mass is unaffected. This phenomenon is commonly referred to in the industry as the {open_quotes}hamburger effect.{close_quotes} In an effort to promote technology development in this area, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. teamed with the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate a new process being developed for the disposal of a dewatered sewage sludge, {open_quotes}Oxygen-Enriched Coincineration of MSW and Sewage Sludge.{close_quotes} This report provides a comprehensive summary of the pilot demonstration test program for oxygen-enriched coincineration of MSW and sewage sludge. This report describes the pilot test facility, instrumentation, and methods of data collection and data analyses; describes how the tests were executed; and discusses the test results. Recommendations for the future development of this technology in the current marketplace are also provided.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of uranium mill tailings. The project had originally planned to ship 2 million tons of tailings with Recovery Act funds. Now, Recovery Act workers are surpass- ing that goal. "Although shipping 2 million tons was the original Recovery Act goal, we are planning to exceed this goal by shipping about 300,000 tons more using savings resulting from efficiencies we've gained in our first 2 years of moving tailings," Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler said. The project is using $108 million from the Recovery Act to move the tailings from the banks of the Colorado River by rail to a permanent

59

Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone June 20, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis At Tuesday's Grand County Council meeting in Utah, Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler, center, moves a piece from a plaque representing Moab’s uranium mill tailings pile to a plaque representing the disposal cell in recognition of the site achieving a milestone by shipping 6 million tons of the tailings. Grand County Council Chair Gene Ciarus is on the left and Grand County Council Vice Chair Lynn Jackson is on the right. At Tuesday's Grand County Council meeting in Utah, Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler, center, moves a piece from a plaque representing Moab's uranium mill tailings pile to a plaque representing the disposal

60

DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile November 7, 2005 - 12:38pm Addthis Will Be Redirected to Naval Reactors, Down-blended or Used for Space Programs WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove up to 200 metric tons (MT) of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU), in the coming decades, from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons and prepare this material for other uses. Secretary Bodman made this announcement while addressing the 2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference in Washington, DC.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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61

A Concept for a Scalable 2 kTon Liquid Argon TPC Detector for Astroparticle Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-module configuration and to its large liquid nitrogen consumption (~1 liquid m3 /hour), the 300-ton geometry purity (UHP) liquefied noble gas and for coping with the engineering and safety issues related

McDonald, Kirk

62

DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 November 5, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) storage project in Mississippi has become the fifth worldwide to reach the important milestone of more than 1 million tons injected. As a result, it is helping to both further carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a mitigation strategy for global climate change and move forward G-8 recommendations for launching 20 projects of this type internationally by 2010. The project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE), is located at the Cranfield site in Southwestern Mississippi. It is led by the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration

63

Turning Waste into By-Product  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies how a firm can create and capture value by converting a waste stream into a useful and saleable by-product (i.e., implementing by-product synergy (BPS)). We show that BPS creates an operational synergy between two products that are ... Keywords: by-product synergy, environment, operations management, sustainability

Deishin Lee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin February 27, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. DOE's Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), led by Battelle of Columbus, Ohio, began injecting the CO2 this week in the Michigan Basin near Gaylord, Mich., in a deep saline formation, the Silurian-age Bass Island dolomite. The MRCSP is one of seven partnerships

65

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products Current Regulations Governing Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products Products Current Regulations Governing Coal Combustion By-Products - Database of State Regulations Database of State Regulations Affecting Disposal and Utilization of Coal Combustion By-Products A Summary Provided by the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the American Coal Ash Association Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBs) are generated when coal is used to generate electricity and power industrial processes. Tens of millions of tons of these materials are produced each year. Many uses of these byproducts are possible, but currently most of them wind up in landfills. Previous work at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) identified regulatory issues as one factor preventing more widespread reuse of CCBs. CCBs are generally regulated by state authorities, and the various states have developed widely differing rules. This web site was developed as one way to help CCB generators, users, and regulators share information across state boundaries.

66

Greenhouse gas emissions from MSW incineration in China: Impacts of waste characteristics and energy recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted during municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is complex because both contributions and savings of GHGs exist in the process. To identify the critical factors influencing GHG emissions from MSWI in China, a GHG accounting model was established and applied to six Chinese cities located in different regions. The results showed that MSWI in most of the cities was the source of GHGs, with emissions of 25-207 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. Within all process stages, the emission of fossil CO{sub 2} from the combustion of MSW was the main contributor (111-254 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw), while the substitution of electricity reduced the GHG emissions by 150-247 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. By affecting the fossil carbon content and the lower heating value of the waste, the contents of plastic and food waste in the MSW were the critical factors influencing GHG emissions of MSWI. Decreasing food waste content in MSW by half will significantly reduce the GHG emissions from MSWI, and such a reduction will convert MSWI in Urumqi and Tianjin from GHG sources to GHG sinks. Comparison of the GHG emissions in the six Chinese cities with those in European countries revealed that higher energy recovery efficiency in Europe induced much greater reductions in GHG emissions. Recovering the excess heat after generation of electricity would be a good measure to convert MSWI in all the six cities evaluated herein into sinks of GHGs.

Yang Na [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Hua, E-mail: zhanghua_tj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Chen Miao; Shao Liming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); He Pinjing, E-mail: xhpjk@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

NETL: News Release - DOE Regional Partnerships Find Up To 3.5 Billion Tons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2007 7, 2007 DOE Regional Partnerships Find More Than 3,500 Billion Tons of Possible CO2 Storage Capacity Atlas Details Stationary Sources and Geologic Reservoirs in U.S. and Canada WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships have identified the powerplant and other stationary sources of more than 3.8 billion tons a year of the greenhouse gas CO2 in the United States and Canada and companion candidate storage capacity for more than 3,500 billion tons. The results are detailed in the new Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada which became available online today. MORE INFO Link to NETL's Carbon Sequestration Atlas web page Link to the Interactive Carbon Sequestration Atlas Learn more about DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program

68

NETL: News Release - DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 27, 2009 February 27, 2009 DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of Carbon Dioxide in Michigan Basin Project Expected to Advance National Carbon Sequestration Program, Create Jobs Washington, DC-Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. MORE INFO Learn more about DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program DOE's Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), led by Battelle of Columbus, Ohio, began injecting the CO2 this week in the

69

NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More Than One Ton of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Removes More Than One Ton of Removes More Than One Ton of Food | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More ... NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More Than One Ton of Food Posted By Office of Public Affairs Contributing to DOE/NNSA's efforts to support the Office of Personnel

70

Heavy metals and toxic organic pollutants in MSW-composts: Research results on phytoavailability, bioavailability, fate, etc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper is a review and interpretation of research which has been conducted to determine the fate, transport, and potential effects of heavy metals and toxic organic compounds in Municipal Solid Waste (MSW)-composts and sewage sludges. Evaluation of research findings identified a number of pathways by which these contaminants can be transferred from MSW-compost or compost-amended soils to humans, livestock, or wildlife. The pathways consider direct ingestion of compost or compost-amended soil by livestock and children, plant uptake by food or feed crops, and exposure to dust, vapor, and water to which metals and organics have migrated.

Ryan, J.A.; Chaney, R.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Estimation of residual MSW heating value as a function of waste component recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recycling of packaging wastes may be compatible with incineration within integrated waste management systems. To study this, a mathematical model is presented to calculate the fraction composition of residual municipal solid waste (MSW) only as a function of the MSW fraction composition at source and recycling fractions of the different waste materials. The application of the model to the Lisbon region yielded results showing that the residual waste fraction composition depends both on the packaging wastes fraction at source and on the ratio between that fraction and the fraction of the same material, packaging and non-packaging, at source. This behaviour determines the variation of the residual waste LHV. For 100% of paper packaging recycling, LHV reduces 4.2% whereas this reduction is of 14.4% for 100% of packaging plastics recycling. For 100% of food waste recovery, LHV increases 36.8% due to the moisture fraction reduction of the residual waste. Additionally the results evidence that the negative impact of recycling paper and plastic packaging on the LHV may be compensated by recycling food waste and glass and metal packaging. This makes packaging materials recycling and food waste recovery compatible strategies with incineration within integrated waste management systems.

Magrinho, Alexandre [Mechanical Engineering Department, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal, Campus IPS, Estefanilha, Setubal (Portugal); Semiao, Viriato [Mechanical Engineering Department, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)], E-mail: ViriatoSemiao@ist.utl.pt

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products : Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers Since 1993, Federal Regulations have treated the four major large-volume CUB's -- fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts -- as solid wastes that do not warrant regulation as hazardous wastes under Subtitle C of RCRA, as long as these CUBÂ’s were not co-managed with other waste materials. On May 22, 2000, EPA published a final Regulatory Determination [PDF-320KB] that retained the hazardous waste exemption for coal utilization by-products. EPA has concluded that fossil fuel combustion wastes do not warrant regulation as hazardous under Subtitle C of RCRA and is retaining the hazardous waste exemption for these wastes. However, the Agency has determined that national non-hazardous waste regulations under RCRA Subtitle D are needed for coal combustion wastes disposed in surface impoundments and landfills and used as minefilling. EPA also concluded beneficial uses of these wastes, other than for minefilling, pose no significant risk and no additional national regulations are needed. This determination affects more than 110 million tons of fossil fuel combustion wastes that are generated each year, virtually all from burning coal.

73

UTILIZATION OF LOW NOx COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect

Low NO{sub x} combustion practices are critical for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from power plants. These low NO{sub x} combustion practices, however, generate high residual carbon contents in the fly ash produced. These high carbon contents threaten utilization of this combustion by-product. This research has successfully developed a separation technology to render fly ash into useful, quality-controlled materials. This technology offers great flexibility and has been shown to be applicable to all of the fly ashes tested (more than 10). The separated materials can be utilized in traditional fly ash applications, such as cement and concrete, as well as in nontraditional applications such as plastic fillers, metal matrix composites, refractories, and carbon adsorbents. Technologies to use beneficiated fly ash in these applications are being successfully developed. In the future, we will continue to refine the separation and utilization technologies to expand the utilization of fly ash. The disposal of more than 31 million tons of fly ash per year is an important environmental issue. With continued development, it will be possible to increase economic, energy and environmental benefits by re-directing more of this fly ash into useful materials.

J.Y. Hwang; X. Huang; M.G. McKimpson; R.E. Tieder; A.M. Hein; J.M. Gillis; D.C. Popko; K.L. Paxton; Z. Li; X. Liu; X. Song; R.I. Kramer

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

The Arabidopsis TRM1TON1 Interaction Reveals a Recruitment Network Common to Plant Cortical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

microtubules via its C-terminal TON1 interaction motif. Interestingly, three motifs of TRMs are found in CAP350, a human centrosomal protein interacting with FOP, and the C-terminal M2 motif of CAP350 is responsible., 2006). CAP350 has also been proposed to specifically stabilize Golgi-associated microtubules

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

75

Photo of the Week: An Incredible Journey -- Transporting a 50-ton Magnet |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Incredible Journey -- Transporting a 50-ton An Incredible Journey -- Transporting a 50-ton Magnet Photo of the Week: An Incredible Journey -- Transporting a 50-ton Magnet July 11, 2013 - 4:38pm Addthis The Muon g-2 (pronounced gee minus two) is an experiment that will use the Fermilab accelerator complex to create an intense beam of muons -- a type of subatomic particle -- traveling at the speed of light. The experiment is picking up after a previous muon experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, which concluded in 2001. In this photo, the massive electromagnet is beginning its 3,200-mile journey from the woods of Long Island to the plains near Chicago, where scientists at Fermilab will refill its storage ring with muons created at Fermilab’s Antiproton Source. The 50-foot-diameter ring is made of steel, aluminum and superconducting wire. It will travel down the East Coast, around the tip of Florida, and up the Mississippi River to Fermilab in Illinois. Transporting the 50-ton device by truck requires meticulous precision -- just a tilt or a twist of a few degrees could leave the internal wiring irreparably damaged.

76

2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for EU aviation NOTE It is understood that in the context of this text the term "biofuel(s) use in aviation" categorically implies "sustainably produced biofuel(s)" according to the EU legislation. June 2011 #12;2 This technical paper was drafted

77

Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of the Environment is responsible for regulating fugitive air emissions from the transportation of coal combustion by-products and the permissible beneficial uses of these by...

78

WATER AND BY-PRODUCT ISSUES IN THE ELECTRIC-UTILITY INDUSTRY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Power Conference in conjunction with 2 and Power Conference in conjunction with 2 nd Joint U.S.-People's Republic of China Conference on Clean Energy, November 17-19, 2003, Washington, DC A DOE R&D RESPONSE TO EMERGING COAL BY-PRODUCT AND WATER ISSUES IN THE ELECTRIC-UTILITY INDUSTRY Thomas J. Feeley, III Technology Manager U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh, PA ABSTRACT While the regulation and control of air emissions will continue to be of primary concern to the electric-utility industry over the next several decades, other environmental-related issues may also impact the operation of existing and new coal-based power systems. Coal by-products are one such issue. Coal-fired power plants generate nearly 118 million tons of fly ash, flue gas

79

The utilization of flue gas desulfurization waste by-products in construction brick  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Millions of tons of waste by-products from Texas coal burning plants are produced each year. Two common byproducts are the fuel ashes and calcium sulfate (gypsum). Fuel ashes result from the burning of coal. Gypsum is a byproduct of the air purification system, called Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD). Abatement of these waste products is a growing concern, not only for the industry, but the environment as well. It is possible to produce a gypsum brick unit that can meet the engineering properties required by the Americans Society of Testing Materials (ASTM) standards by using these by-products. This can be accomplished at a cost less than the least expensive common fired clay brick that is used in construction operations. The gypsum brick can be manufactured using established methods that are currently in operation.

Berryman, Charles Wayne

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

NETL: News Release - DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2009 5, 2009 DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 Project Helping Further CCS Technology and Meeting G-8 Goals for Deployment Washington, D.C. -A large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) storage project in Mississippi has become the fifth worldwide to reach the important milestone of more than 1 million tons injected. As a result, it is helping to both further carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a mitigation strategy for global climate change and move forward G-8 recommendations for launching 20 projects of this type internationally by 2010. MORE INFO Learn more about DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Link to SECARB web site The project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE), is located at the Cranfield site in Southwestern

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments September 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Underscoring the Obama Administration's efforts to double energy productivity by 2030 and help businesses save money and energy, the Energy Department today recognized more than 120 manufacturers that are making smart investments to save on energy costs, cut greenhouse gas emissions and improve their bottom lines. Through the Department's Better Buildings, Better Plants Program (Better Plants), over 1,750 plants across the United States have saved about $1 billion in energy costs and

82

Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of soil and debris disposed of from D, H Reactor Areas Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of soil and debris disposed of from D, H Reactor Areas January 11, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Dieter Bohrmann, Ecology (509) 372-7954, Dieter.Bohrmann@ecy.wa.gov Emerald Laija, EPA (509) 376-4919, Laija.Emerald@epamail.epa.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - Department of Energy (DOE) contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, recently cleaned up 77 waste sites at Hanford to meet two Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones before the end of 2011. The waste sites were located in the D and H Reactor Areas at Hanford along

83

Great Plains Coal Gasification Project will make 17. 5 tons/day of methanol  

SciTech Connect

The Great Plains Coal Gasification Project will make 17.5 tons/day of methanol in addition to 125 million cu ft/day of pipeline-quality substitute natural gas (SNG), making the facility the first commercial producer of methanol-from-coal in the United States, according to the consortium building the $1.5 billion facility in Beulah, North Dakota. As originally conceived, the plant would have used 17 tons/day of purchased methanol to clean the raw-gas product stream of impurities, primarily sulfur. But based on the cost of transporting methanol to the plant site and storing it for use, the consortium decided it was more economical to produce its own methanol from lignite. The construction started in July 1980, and the facility is to come on stream in 1984.

Not Available

1980-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

84

Review of corrosion in 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A literature review was conducted to determine the type, extent and severity of corrosion found in the 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders. Also discussed in this review is corrosion found in the valves and plugs used in the cylinders. Corrosion of the cylinders is a gradual process which occurs slowly over time. Understanding corrosion of the cylinders is an important concern for long term storage of the UF{sub 6} in the cylinder yards, as well as the final disposition of the depleted UF{sub 6} tails inventory in the future. The following conclusions are made from the literature review: (1) The general external corrosion rate of the cylinders is about 1 to 2 mils per year (1 mil = 0.001{double_prime}). The highest general external corrosion rate was over 5 mpy on the 48G type cylinders. (2) General internal corrosion from the depleted UF{sub 6} is negligible under normal storage conditions. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/saddle interface from the retention of water in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/skirt interface on the older skirted cylinders due to the lack of water drainage in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur on cylinders that have been in ground contact. Crevice corrosion and galvanic corrosion can occur where the stainless steel I.D. nameplates are attached to the cylinder. The packing nuts on the bronze one-inch valves used in the cylinders are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Mechanical damage from routine handling can lead to a breach in a cylinder with subsequent accelerated corrosion of the mild steel due to attack from HF and other UF{sub 6} hydrolysis by-products.

Lykins, M.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Analysis of the SN1987A two-stage explosion hypothesis with account for the MSW neutrino flavour conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detection of 5 events by the Liquid Scintillation Detector (LSD) on February, 23, 1987 was interpreted in the literature as the detection of neutrinos from the first stage of the two-stage supernova collapse. We pose rigid constraints on the properties of the first stage of the collapse, taking into account neutrino flavour conversion due to the MSW-effect and general properties of supernova neutrino emission. The constraints depend on the unknown neutrino mass hierarchy and mixing angle \\theta_{13}.

Oleg Lychkovskiy

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

86

Thermodynamic analysis on heavy metals partitioning impacted by moisture during the MSW incineration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Partitioning of HMs affected by moisture was investigated by thermodynamic analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increase in moisture and in temperature was opposite impact on HMs contribution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The extent of temperature decreased by increase in moisture determines the impact. - Abstract: A thermodynamic calculation was carried out to predict the behavior and speciation of heavy metals (HMs), Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cd, during municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration with the different moisture levels. The calculation was based on the minimization of the total Gibbs free energy of the multi-components and multi-phases closed system reaching chemical equilibrium. The calculation also indicated the reaction directions and tendencies of HMs components. The impacts of chlorine additives (No PVC, 1%PVC, and 5%PVC) and moisture on the behavior of HMs were investigated at different temperature levels in the system (750 Degree-Sign C, 950 Degree-Sign C, and 1150 Degree-Sign C). Furthermore, because the incineration temperature falls down with the increase in moisture in waste, the co-influence of moisture and temperature in combusting MSW on the HMs was also studied with the given chlorine (as 1%PVC + 0.5%NaCl). The results showed that in the non-chlorine system, the impact of the moisture on Pb, Zn, and Cu was not significant, and the ratio of compound transformation was less than 10%, except the Cd compounds at 950 Degree-Sign C and 1150 Degree-Sign C. In the system with low chlorine (as 1%PVC) at constant temperature, the chlorides of HMs (Cd, Pb, Zn, and Cu) transferred to oxides, and when the content of chlorine rose up (as 5%PVC), the ratio of the chlorides of HMs (Cd, Pb, Zn, and Cu) transferring to oxides fell down noticeably. When the moisture varied together with the temperature, the Zn and Cu compounds transferred from chlorides to oxides with increase in moisture as well as decrease in temperature. At the temperature of 700-1000 Degree-Sign C, the impact of temperature on Pb and Cd was little and the moisture was the main factor; while at the temperature of 1000-1200 Degree-Sign C, the impact of increase in moisture and decrease in temperature on Pb and Cd was almost equal and reversed.

Zhang Yanguo; Li Qinghai; Jia Jinyan [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Meng Aihong, E-mail: mengah@tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Environmental Science and Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

LANNDD -A line of liquid argon TPC detectors scalable in mass from 200 Tons to 100 KTons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to its large liquid nitrogen consumption (~1 liquid m3/hour), the 300-ton geometry and construction required for a detector based on an ultra high purity (UHP) liquefied noble gas and for coping

McDonald, Kirk

88

By-products from DU Storage (Fluorine and Empty Cylinders)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

By-products from DU Storage By-products from DU Storage (Fluorine and Empty Cylinders) Potential applications involving by-products from DUF6 storage include fluorine applications...

89

Questions and Answers - How many atoms would it take to create a ton?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

there in the world? there in the world? Previous Question (How many atoms are there in the world?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Could you please explain density?) Could you please explain density? How many atoms would it take to create a ton? There's a lot more to this question than first appears. There are many types of atoms and each of them has its own mass, so the answer varies depending on which atom you are talking about. Since even a tiny bit of matter has many atoms, it has become customary to use the unit "mole" to signify a standard number of atoms, namely, it is Avogadro's number which (almost) equals 6*1023, or 600,000 billion billon. If you look up the periodic table of elements, one of the numbers usually listed is the atomic mass which is the mass (in grams) of one mole of those atoms. Let's use

90

Dynamic performance testing of prototype 3 ton air-cooled carrier absorption chiller  

SciTech Connect

The performance of a prototype 3 ton cooling capacity air-cooled lithium bromide/water absorption chiller was tested using an absorption chiller test facility which was modified to expand its testing capabilities to include air-cooled chillers in addition to water-cooled chillers. Temperatures of the three externally supplied fluid loops: hot water, chilled water, and cooling air, were varied in order to determine the effects this would have on the two principal measures of chiller performance: cooling capacity and thermal coefficient of performance (COP). A number of interrelated factors were identified as contributing to less than expected performance. For comparison, experimental correlations of other investigators for this and other similar absorption chillers are presented. These have been plotted as both contour and three-dimensional performance maps in order to more clearly show the functional dependence of the chiller performance on the fluid loop temperatures.

Borst, R.R.; Wood, B.D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Background studies for a ton-scale argon dark matter detector (ArDM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ArDM project aims at operating a large noble liquid detector to search for direct evidence of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMP) as Dark Matter in the universe. Background sources relevant to ton-scale liquid and gaseous argon detectors, such as neutrons from detector components, muon-induced neutrons and neutrons caused by radioactivity of rock, as well as the internal $^{39}Ar$ background, are studied with simulations. These background radiations are addressed with the design of an appropriate shielding as well as with different background rejection potentialities. Among them the project relies on event topology recognition, event localization, density ionization discrimination and pulse shape discrimination. Background rates, energy spectra, characteristics of the background-induced nuclear recoils in liquid argon, as well as the shielding performance and rejection performance of the detector are described.

L. Kaufmann; A. Rubbia

2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

92

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Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland)" Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland) Jump to:...

93

Changes related to "Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland)" ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland)" Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland) Jump to:...

94

Investigations on catalyzed steam gasification of biomass. Appendix A. Feasibility study of methane production via catalytic gasification of 2000 tons of wood per day  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study has been made of the economic feasibility of producing substitute natural gas (SNG) from wood via catalytic gasification with steam. The plant design in this study was developed from information on gasifier operation supplied by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The plant is designed to process 2000 tons per day of dry wood to SNG. Plant production is 21.6 MM scfd of SNG with a HHV of 956 Btu per scf. All process and support facilities necessary to convert wood to SNG are included. The plant location is Newport, Oregon. The capital cost for the plant is $95,115,000 - September, 1980 basis. Gas production costs which allow for return on capital have been calculated for various wood prices for both utility and private investor financing. For utility financing, the gas production costs are respectively $5.09, $5.56, $6.50, and $8.34 per MM Btu for wood costs of $5, $10, $20, and $40 per dry ton delivered to the plant at a moisture content of 49.50 wt %. For private investor financing, the corresponding product costs are $6.62, $7.11, $8.10, and $10.06 per MM Btu. The cost calculated by the utility financing method includes a return on equity of 15% and an interest rate of 10% on the debt. The private investor financing method, which is 100% equity financing, incorporates a discounted cash flow (DCF) return on equity of 12%. The thermal efficiency without taking an energy credit for by-product char is 58.3%.

Mudge, L.K.; Weber, S.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

ADVANCED GASIFICATION BY-PRODUCT UTILIZATION  

SciTech Connect

The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported for the period September 1, 2003 to August 31, 2004. This contract is with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involves the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers.

Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Ari Geertsema; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu; Harold Schobert

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the recent passing of new legislation designed to permanently cap and reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities, it is more important than ever to develop and improve upon methods of controlling mercury emissions. One promising technique is carbon sorbent injection into the flue gas of the coal-fired power plant. Currently, this technology is very expensive as costly commercially activated carbons are used as sorbents. There is also a significant lack of understanding of the interaction between mercury vapor and the carbon sorbent, which adds to the difficulty of predicting the amount of sorbent needed for specific plant configurations. Due to its inherent porosity and adsorption properties as well as on-site availability, carbons derived from gasifiers are potential mercury sorbent candidates. Furthermore, because of the increasing restricted use of landfilling, the coal industry is very interested in finding uses for these materials as an alternative to the current disposal practice. The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported for the period September 1, 2004 to August 31, 2005. This contract is with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involves the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers.

Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Ari Geertsema; Frank Huggins; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Brandie M. Markley; Harold Schobert

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the passing of legislation designed to permanently cap and reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities, it is more important than ever to develop and improve upon methods of controlling mercury emissions. One promising technique is carbon sorbent injection into the flue gas of the coal-fired power plant. Currently, this technology is very expensive as costly commercially activated carbons are used as sorbents. There is also a significant lack of understanding of the interaction between mercury vapor and the carbon sorbent, which adds to the difficulty of predicting the amount of sorbent needed for specific plant configurations. Due to its inherent porosity and adsorption properties as well as on-site availability, carbons derived from gasifiers are potential mercury sorbent candidates. Furthermore, because of the increasing restricted use of landfilling, the coal industry is very interested in finding uses for these materials as an alternative to the current disposal practice. The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported. This contract was with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involved the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, assessment of the potential for leaching of Hg captured by the carbons, analysis of the slags for cement applications, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers. The objectives of this collaborative effort between the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute, and industry collaborators supplying gasifier char samples were to investigate the potential use of gasifier slag carbons as a source of low cost sorbent for Hg and NOX capture from combustion flue gas, concrete applications, polymer fillers and as a source of activated carbons. Primary objectives were to determine the relationship of surface area, pore size, pore size distribution, and mineral content on Hg storage of gasifier carbons and to define the site of Hg capture. The ability of gasifier slag carbon to capture NOX and the effect of NOX on Hg adsorption were goals. Secondary goals were the determination of the potential for use of the slags for cement and filler applications. Since gasifier chars have already gone through a devolatilization process in a reducing atmosphere in the gasifier, they only required to be activated to be used as activated carbons. Therefore, the principal objective of the work at PSU was to characterize and utilize gasification slag carbons for the production of activated carbons and other carbon fillers. Tests for the Hg and NOX adsorption potential of these activated gasifier carbons were performed at the CAER. During the course of this project, gasifier slag samples chemically and physically characterized at UK were supplied to PSU who also characterized the samples for sorption characteristics and independently tested for Hg-capture. At the CAER as-received slags were tested for Hg and NOX adsorption. The most promising of these were activated chemically. The PSU group applied thermal and steam activation to a representative group of the gasifier slag samples separated by particle sizes. The activated samples were tested at UK for Hg-sorption and NOX capture and the most promising Hg adsorbers were tested for Hg capture in a simulated flue gas. Both UK and PSU tested the use of the gasifier slag samples as fillers. The CAER analyzed the slags for possible use in cement applications

Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Brock Marrs; Ari Geertsema; Frank Huggins; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Brandie M. Markley; Zhe Lu; Harold Schobert

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

Utah Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Utah Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

99

West Virginia Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

100

Kansas Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kansas Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Kentucky Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kentucky Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

102

Mississippi Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

103

West Virginia Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

104

Federal Gulf Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Federal Gulf Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

105

Alabama Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alabama Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

106

North Dakota Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Dakota Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

107

Pennsylvania Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

108

Florida Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Florida Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

109

California Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

110

United States Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

111

Alaska Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alaska Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

112

Colorado Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

113

Texas Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

114

Oklahoma Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oklahoma Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

115

North Dakota Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Dakota Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

116

Wyoming Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wyoming Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

117

Florida Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Florida Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

118

Michigan Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

119

United States Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

120

Federal Gulf Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Federal Gulf Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

South Dakota Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South Dakota Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

122

Texas Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

123

CCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW landfill disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) regulations, it produces energy and does not emit fossil carbonCCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW in waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities. In other countries, the predominant disposal option for wood

Florida, University of

124

Methodology for Estimating ton-Miles of Goods Movements for U.S. Freight Mulitimodal Network System  

SciTech Connect

Ton-miles is a commonly used measure of freight transportation output. Estimation of ton-miles in the U.S. transportation system requires freight flow data at disaggregated level (either by link flow, path flows or origin-destination flows between small geographic areas). However, the sheer magnitude of the freight data system as well as industrial confidentiality concerns in Census survey, limit the freight data which is made available to the public. Through the years, the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been working in the development of comprehensive national and regional freight databases and network flow models. One of the main products of this effort is the Freight Analysis Framework (FAF), a public database released by the ORNL. FAF provides to the general public a multidimensional matrix of freight flows (weight and dollar value) on the U.S. transportation system between states, major metropolitan areas, and remainder of states. Recently, the CTA research team has developed a methodology to estimate ton-miles by mode of transportation between the 2007 FAF regions. This paper describes the data disaggregation methodology. The method relies on the estimation of disaggregation factors that are related to measures of production, attractiveness and average shipments distances by mode service. Production and attractiveness of counties are captured by the total employment payroll. Likely mileages for shipments between counties are calculated by using a geographic database, i.e. the CTA multimodal network system. Results of validation experiments demonstrate the validity of the method. Moreover, 2007 FAF ton-miles estimates are consistent with the major freight data programs for rail and water movements.

Oliveira Neto, Francisco Moraes [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL; Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of CCB materials. The two technologies for the underground placement that were to be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry CCB products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of CCB products with about 70% solids. The period covered by this report is the second quarter of Phase 3 of the overall program. During this period over 8,000 tons of CCB mixtures was injected using the hydraulic paste technology. This amount of material virtually filled the underground opening around the injection well, and was deemed sufficient to demonstrate fully the hydraulic injection technology. By the end of this quarter about 2,000 tons of fly ash had been placed underground using the pneumatic placement technology. While the rate of injection of about 50 tons per hour met design criteria, problems were experienced in the delivery of fly ash to the pneumatic demonstration site. The source of the fly ash, the Archer Daniels Midland Company power plant at Decatur, Illinois is some distance from the demonstration site, and often sufficient tanker trucks are not available to haul enough fly ash to fully load the injection equipment. Further, on some occasions fly ash from the plant was not available. The injection well was plugged three times during the demonstration. This typically occurred due to cementation of the FBC ash in contact with water. After considerable deliberations and in consultation with the technical project officer, it was decided to stop further injection of CCB`s underground using the developed pneumatic technology.

Chugh, Y.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Utah Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Utah Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

127

Ohio Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ohio Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

128

Ohio Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ohio Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

129

Center for By-Products Utilization Sustainable Concrete with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Products Utilization Geopolymer Concrete (GPC) · Proposed by Devidovits (1994) is an upcoming technology-friendly and sustainable. #12;Center for By-Products Utilization Geopolymer Concrete (cont'd) · Industrial byCenter for By-Products Utilization Sustainable Concrete with Industrial and Post-Consumer By

Saldin, Dilano

130

Utilization Potential of Advanced SO2 Control By Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using results of literature surveys and preliminary market assessments, this report evaluates potential applications for advanced SO2 control by-products. Investigators formed their evaluations by comparing the marketability of these by-products with that of coal ash and wet scrubber sludge.

1987-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

131

Conceptual design study on incorporating a 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit into an operating total energy system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a conceptual design study on incorporating a pyrolysis unit into an existing total energy plant are presented. The objectives of this study were to examine the institutional, technical and economic factors affecting the incorporation of a 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit into the Indian Creek Total Energy Plant. The Indian Creek total energy plant is described. Results of the conceptual design are presented. A survey of the availability of waste materials and a review of health and safety ordinances are included. The technical aspects of the pyrolysis system are discussed, including the results of the review of facilities requirements for the pyrolysis unit, the analysis of necessary system modification, and an estimate of the useful energy contribution by the pyrolysis unit. Results of the life-cycle cost analysis of the pyrolysis unit are presented. The major conclusions are that: there appears to be no institutional or technical barriers to constructing a waste pyrolysis unit at the Indian Creek Total Energy Plant; pyrolysis gas can be consumed in the engines and the boilers by utilizing venturi mixing devices; the engines can consume only 5% of the output of the 25-ton/day pyrolysis unit; Therefore, consumption of pyrolysis gas will be controlled by boiler energy demand patterns; a waste pyrolysis unit is not cost effective at the current natural gas price of $0.90/10/sup 6/ Btu; and pyrolysis is economically attractive at natural gas prices above $3.00/10/sup 6/ Btu.

None

1976-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

132

Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Page Edit with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland) This is the approved revision of this page, as well...

133

Wastes and by-products - alternatives for agricultural use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Top address a growing national problem with generation of wastes and by-products, TVA has been involved for several years with developing and commercializing environmentally responsible practices for eliminating, minimizing, or utilizing various wastes/by-products. In many cases, reducing waste generation is impractical, but the wastes/by-products can be converted into other environmentally sound products. In some instances, conversion of safe, value-added agricultural products in the best or only practical alternative. TVA is currently involved with a diversity of projects converting wastes/by-products into safe, economical, and agriculturally beneficial products. Environmental improvement projects have involved poultry litter, cellulosic wastes, used battery acid, ammonium sulfate fines, lead smelting effluents, deep-welled sulfuric acid/ammonium bisulfate solutions, wood ash, waste magnesium ammonium sulfate slurry from recording tape production, and ammunition plant waste sodium nitrate/ammonium nitrate streams.

Boles, J.L.; Craft, D.J.; Parker, B.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

coAl utilizAtion By-Product Processing PlAnt (withdrAwn) Project Description The University of Kentucky Research Foundation (UKRF) of Lexington, Kentucky, in partnership...

135

Solar Neutrino Rates, Spectrum, and its Moments : an MSW Analysis in the Light of Super-Kamiokande Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We re-examine MSW solutions of the solar neutrino problem in a two flavor scenario taking (a) the results on total rates and the electron energy spectrum from the 1117-day SuperKamiokande (SK) data and (b) those on total rates from the Chlorine and Gallium experiments. We find that the SMA solution gives the best fit to the total rates data from the different experiments. One new feature of our analysis is the use of the moments of the SK electron spectrum in a $\\chi^2$ analysis. The best-fit to the moments is broadly in agreement with that obtained from a direct fit to the spectrum data and prefers a $\\Delta m^2$ comparable to the SMA fit to the rates but the required mixing angle is larger. In the combined rate and spectrum analysis, apart from varying the normalization of the $^8$B flux as a free parameter and determining its best-fit value we also obtain the best-fit parameters when correlations between the rates and the spectrum data are included and the normalization of the $^8$B flux held fixed at its SSM value. We observe that the correlations between the rates and spectrum data are important and the goodness of fit worsens when these are included. In either case, the best-fit lies in the LMA region.

Srubabati Goswami; Debasish Majumdar; Amitava Raychaudhuri

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

136

Methods and results for stress analyses on 14-ton, thin-wall depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium enrichment operations at the three US gaseous diffusion plants produce depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) as a residential product. At the present time, the inventory of DUF{sub 6} in this country is more than half a million tons. The inventory of DUF{sub 6} is contained in metal storage cylinders, most of which are located at the gaseous diffusion plants. The principal objective of the project is to ensure the integrity of the cylinders to prevent causing an environmental hazard by releasing the contents of the cylinders into the atmosphere. Another objective is to maintain the cylinders in such a manner that the DUF{sub 6} may eventually be converted to a less hazardous material for final disposition. An important task in the DUF{sub 6} cylinders management project is determining how much corrosion of the walls can be tolerated before the cylinders are in danger of being damaged during routine handling and shipping operations. Another task is determining how to handle cylinders that have already been damaged in a manner that will minimize the chance that a breach will occur or that the size of an existing breach will be significantly increased. A number of finite element stress analysis (FESA) calculations have been done to analyze the stresses for three conditions: (1) while the cylinder is being lifted, (2) when a cylinder is resting on two cylinders under it in the customary two-tier stacking array, and (3) when a cylinder is resting on tis chocks on the ground. Various documents describe some of the results and discuss some of the methods whereby they have been obtained. The objective of the present report is to document as many of the FESA cases done at Oak Ridge for 14-ton thin-wall cylinders as possible, giving results and a description of the calculations in some detail.

Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Chung, C.K.; Frazier, J.L.; Kelley, D.K.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Remediation of Abandoned Mines Using Coal Combustion By-Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remediation of Abandoned Mines Using Coal Combustion By-Products Sowmya Bulusu1 ; Ahmet H. Aydilek that occurs when pyrite that is present in abandoned coal mines comes in contact with oxygen and water, which subject headings: Remedial action; Acid mine water; Mines; Coals; Recycling; Maryland; Fly ash

Aydilek, Ahmet

138

Orimulsion Combustion By-Products: Chemical Composition and Leaching Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Orimulsion (R) is a synthetic fuel derived by mixing heavy bitumen with water to produce an emulsion that can be burned as a primary fuel in electric utility boilers. It can be used for generation of electricity in modified oil-fired utility boilers. This report presents the results of a study on by-products generated from the combustion of Orimulsion.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

139

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

SciTech Connect

China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target for energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and binding target has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift in China's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energy development. The 20% energy intensity target also translates into an annual reduction of over 1.5 billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making the Chinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in the world today. While it is still too early to tell whether China will achieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend in energy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options toward meeting the 20% target using a detailed end-use energy model.

Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Fridley, David

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Chemical reactions of UF{sub 6} with water on ingress to damaged model 48X 10 ton cylinder  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemistry studies of the effects of water flooding in Model 48X 10-ton UF{sub 6} storage cylinders, as a result of impact fractures, were conducted to support the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) review of the Paducah Tiger Overpack for transportation of those cylinders. The objectives of the study were to determine the maximum amount of water that could be admitted to the interior of such a damaged cylinder, the resulting geometries and chemical compositions from reactions of water with the UF{sub 6} contents of the cylinder, and the end-state water moderated and reflected configurations for input to nuclear criticality safety analyses. The case identified for analysis was the flooding of the inside of a cylinder, submerged horizontally in 3 ft of water. The flooding was driven by an initial pressure drop of 13 psig, through an assumed fracture (1/32 in. wide {times} 1/2 in. deep {times} 18 in. long) in the barrel of the cylinder. During the initial addition of water, transient back pressures occur from the effects of the heats of reaction and solution at the water/UF{sub 6} interface, with some chugging as more water is added to alternately coot the reaction surface and then heat it again as the added water reacts with more UF{sub 6}.

Rothman, A.B.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Rapid Batch Characterization of Coal Utilization By-Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batch Characterization Batch Characterization of Coal Utilization By-Products Peter A. Hesbach 1 *, Alexander S. P. Abel 2 Ann G. Kim 3 , and Steven C. Lamey 4 1 U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 USA; 2 NETL Site Support Contractor, Parsons, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, Morgantown, WV 26505 USA; 3 U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Post-Doctoral Fellow, 626 Cochrans Mill Road, P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 USA; 4 retired, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV USA (* author for correspondence, phone: 304-285-4443, fax: 304-285-4487, e-mail: peter.hesbach@netl.doe.gov) KEYWORDS: leaching methods, ash characterization, coal utilization by-products

142

Mineral Sequestration Utilizing Industrial By-Products, Residues, and Minerals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. Fauth and Yee Soong J. Fauth and Yee Soong U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh PA, 15236-0940 Mineral Sequestration Workshop National Energy Technology Laboratory August 8, 2001 Mineral Sequestration Utilizing Industrial By-Products, Residues, and Minerals Mineral Sequestration Workshop, U.S. Department of Energy, NETL, August 8, 2001 Overview * Introduction - Objective - Goals - NETL Facilities * Effect of Solution Chemistry on Carbonation Efficiency - Buffered Solution + NaCl - Buffered Solution + MEA * Effect of Pretreatment on Carbonation Efficiency - Thermal Treatments - Chemical Treatments * Carbonation Reaction with Ultramafic Minerals - Serpentine - Olivine Mineral Sequestration Workshop, U.S. Department of Energy, NETL, August 8, 2001 Overview * Carbonation Reaction with Industrial By-products

143

By Thomas S. Jones Manganese (Mn) is essential to iron and silicomanganese increased about 7%. consisted of, in tons, natural battery-grade ore,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

about 7%. consisted of, in tons, natural battery-grade ore, steel production by virtue of its sulfur aluminum alloys and is used in oxide form in dry cell batteries. The overall level and nature of manganese consumption in batteries was denoted by the expansion on schedule of domestic capacity for production

Torgersen, Christian

144

MSW RESEARCH SEQUENCE BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The books and articles listed below cover many areas of research relevant to social work. All of the books on this list should be either in the UMD library or on order. If you identify other books that prove useful to you, please let Denny Falk know so they can be added to the bibliography. American Psychological Association 2001. Publication Manual of the APA (5th Edition). APA: Washington, DC.

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Reconsidering Municipal Solid Waste as a Renewable Energy Feedstock For many years, opposition to the use of municipal solid waste (MSW) as an energy resource has been nearly universal among  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used in that year,2 depending on conversion efficiency.3 Alternatively, Fulcrum BioEnergy estimates reaction.22 · Gasification -- MSW is heated in a chamber with a small amount of oxygen present for conversion into renewable fuels or other biobased products.23 Gasification is economically viable at a small

Columbia University

146

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products : In-House R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

research within its Office of Science and Technology. Research pertaining to IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products (CUB) is conducted within the By-Product Utilization Team of...

147

Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasability of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are both strongly committed to expanding the role of biomass as an energy source. In particular, they support biomass fuels and products as a way to reduce the need for oil and gas imports; to support the growth of agriculture, forestry, and rural economies; and to foster major new domestic industries--biorefineries--making a variety of fuels, chemicals, and other products. As part of this effort, the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory Committee, a panel established by the Congress to guide the future direction of federally funded biomass R&D, envisioned a 30 percent replacement of the current U.S. petroleum consumption with biofuels by 2030. Biomass--all plant and plant-derived materials including animal manure, not just starch, sugar, oil crops already used for food and energy--has great potential to provide renewable energy for America's future. Biomass recently surpassed hydropower as the largest domestic source of renewable energy and currently provides over 3 percent of the total energy consumption in the United States. In addition to the many benefits common to renewable energy, biomass is particularly attractive because it is the only current renewable source of liquid transportation fuel. This, of course, makes it invaluable in reducing oil imports--one of our most pressing energy needs. A key question, however, is how large a role could biomass play in responding to the nation's energy demands. Assuming that economic and financial policies and advances in conversion technologies make biomass fuels and products more economically viable, could the biorefinery industry be large enough to have a significant impact on energy supply and oil imports? Any and all contributions are certainly needed, but would the biomass potential be sufficiently large to justify the necessary capital replacements in the fuels and automobile sectors? The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30 percent or more of the country's present petroleum consumption--the goal set by the Advisory Committee in their vision for biomass technologies. Accomplishing this goal would require approximately 1 billion dry tons of biomass feedstock per year.

Perlack, R.D.

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasability of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are both strongly committed to expanding the role of biomass as an energy source. In particular, they support biomass fuels and products as a way to reduce the need for oil and gas imports; to support the growth of agriculture, forestry, and rural economies; and to foster major new domestic industries--biorefineries--making a variety of fuels, chemicals, and other products. As part of this effort, the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory Committee, a panel established by the Congress to guide the future direction of federally funded biomass R&D, envisioned a 30 percent replacement of the current U.S. petroleum consumption with biofuels by 2030. Biomass--all plant and plant-derived materials including animal manure, not just starch, sugar, oil crops already used for food and energy--has great potential to provide renewable energy for America's future. Biomass recently surpassed hydropower as the largest domestic source of renewable energy and currently provides over 3 percent of the total energy consumption in the United States. In addition to the many benefits common to renewable energy, biomass is particularly attractive because it is the only current renewable source of liquid transportation fuel. This, of course, makes it invaluable in reducing oil imports--one of our most pressing energy needs. A key question, however, is how large a role could biomass play in responding to the nation's energy demands. Assuming that economic and financial policies and advances in conversion technologies make biomass fuels and products more economically viable, could the biorefinery industry be large enough to have a significant impact on energy supply and oil imports? Any and all contributions are certainly needed, but would the biomass potential be sufficiently large to justify the necessary capital replacements in the fuels and automobile sectors? The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30 percent or more of the country's present petroleum consumption--the goal set by the Advisory Committee in their vision for biomass technologies. Accomplishing this goal would require approximately 1 billion dry tons of biomass feedstock per year.

Perlack, R.D.

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Solar Grade Silicon from Agricultural By-products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this project, Mayaterials developed a low cost, low energy and low temperature method of purifying rice hull ash to high purity (5-6Ns) and converting it by carbothermal reduction to solar grade quality silicon (Sipv) using a self-designed and built electric arc furnace (EAF). Outside evaluation of our process by an independent engineering firm confirms that our technology greatly lowers estimated operating expenses (OPEX) to $5/kg and capital expenses (CAPEX) to $24/kg for Sipv production, which is well below best-in-class plants using a Siemens process approach (OPEX of 14/kg and CAPEX of $87/kg, respectively). The primary limiting factor in the widespread use of photovoltaic (PV) cells is the high cost of manufacturing, compared to more traditional sources to reach 6 g Sipv/watt (with averages closer to 8+g/watt). In 2008, the spot price of Sipv rose to $450/kg. While prices have since dropped to a more reasonable $25/kg; this low price level is not sustainable, meaning the longer-term price will likely return to $35/kg. The 6-8 g Si/watt implies that the Sipv used in a module will cost $0.21-0.28/watt for the best producers (45% of the cost of a traditional solar panel), a major improvement from the cost/wafer driven by the $50/kg Si costs of early 2011, but still a major hindrance in fulfilling DOE goal of lowering the cost of solar energy below $1/watt. The solar cell industry has grown by 40% yearly for the past eight years, increasing the demand for Sipv. As such, future solar silicon price spikes are expected in the next few years. Although industry has invested billions of dollars to meet this ever-increasing demand, the technology to produce Sipv remains largely unchanged requiring the energy intensive, and chlorine dependent Siemens process or variations thereof. While huge improvements have been made, current state-of-the-art industrial plant still use 65 kWh/kg of silicon purified. Our technology offers a key distinction to other technologies as it starts one step upstream from all other Sipv production efforts. Our process starts by producing high purity SiO2/C feedstocks from which Sipv can be produced in a single, chlorine free, final EAF step. Specifically, our unique technology, and the resultant SiO2/C product can serve as high purity feedstocks to existing metallurgical silicon (Simet) producers, allowing them to generate Sipv with existing US manufacturing infrastructure, reducing the overall capital and commissioning schedule. Our low energy, low CAPEX and OPEX process purifies the silica and carbon present in rice hull ash (RHA) at low temperatures (< 200C) to produce high purity (5-6 Ns) feedstock for production of Sipv using furnaces similar to those used to produce Simet. During the course of this project we partnered with Wadham Energy LP (Wadham), who burns 220k ton of rice hulls (RH)/yr generating 200 GWh of electricity/yr and >30k ton/yr RHA. The power generation step produces much more energy (42 kWh/kg of final silicon produced) than required to purify the RHA (5 kWh/kg of Sipv, compared to 65 kWh/kg noted above. Biogenic silica offers three very important foundations for producing high purity silicon. First, wastes from silica accumulating plants, such as rice, corn, many grasses, algae and grains, contain very reactive, amorphous silica from which impurities are easily removed. Second, plants take up only a limited set of, and minimal quantities of the heavy metals present in nature, meaning fewer minerals must be removed. Third, biomass combustion generates a product with intrinsic residual carbon, mixed at nanometer length scales with the SiO2. RHA is 80-90 wt% high surface area (20 m2/g), amorphous SiO2 with some simple mineral content mixed intimately with 5-15 wt% carbon. The mineral content is easily removed by low cost, acid washes using Mayaterials IP, leading to purified rice hull ash (RHAclean) at up to 6N purity. This highly reactive silica is partially extracted from RHAclean at 200 C in an environmentally benign process to adjust SiO2:C ratios to those needed in EA

Richard M. Laine

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

150

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products - Utilization Projects -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of North Dakota, EERC - Table of Contents University of North Dakota, EERC - Table of Contents Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Stabilizing Feedlots Using Coal Ash Environmental Evaluation for Utilization of Ash in Soil Stabilization Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Background CAEEC is a cooperation among industry, government, and the research community to work together to solve CCB- related problems and promote the environmentally safe, technically sound, and economically viable utilization and disposal of CCBs. Objectives To improve the technical and economic aspects of coal combustion by-product (CCB) management. Description CARRC tasks fall into three general categories: Member-prioritized research tasks, Technical and administrative tasks, and Special projects that support CARRC objectives and strengthen and increase the availability of sound technical data for CARRC use.

151

Characteristics of ashes from different locations at the MSW incinerator equipped with various air pollution control devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of ashes from different locations at a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) equipped with a water spray tower (WST) as a cooling system, and a spray dryer adsorber (SDA), a bag filter (BF) and a selective catalytic reactor (SCR) as air pollution control devices (APCD) was investigated to provide the basic data for further treatment of ashes. A commercial MSWI with a capacity of 100 tons per day was selected. Ash was sampled from different locations during the normal operation of the MSWI and was analyzed to obtain chemical composition, basicity, metal contents and leaching behavior of heavy metals. Basicity and pH of ash showed a broad range between 0.08-9.07 and 3.5-12.3, respectively. Some major inorganics in ash were identified and could affect the basicity. This could be one of the factors to determine further treatment means. Partitioning of hazardous heavy metals such as Pb, Cu, Cr, Hg and Cd was investigated. Large portions of Hg and Cd were emitted from the furnace while over 90% of Pb, Cu and Cr remained in bottom ash. However 54% of Hg was captured by WST and 41% by SDA/BF and 3.6% was emitted through the stack, while 81.5% of Cd was captured by SDA/BF. From the analysis data of various metal contents in ash and leach analysis, such capturing of metal was confirmed and some heavy metals found to be easily released from ash. Based on the overall characteristics of ash in different locations at the MSWI during the investigation, some considerations and suggestions for determining the appropriate treatment methods of ash were made as conclusions.

Song, Geum-Ju; Kim, Ki-Heon; Seo, Yong-Chil; Kim, Sam-Cwan

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11002: Number of Cars Equivalent to 100 Metric Tons of Avoided Greenhouse Gases per Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

02 Date: January 5, 2011 02 Date: January 5, 2011 Title: Number of Cars Equivalent to 100 Metric Tons of Avoided Greenhouse Gases per Year Originator: Andrea Chew & Tien Nguyen Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: January 25, 2011 A conventional mid-size gasoline car emits 0.45 kg of greenhouse gases (GHG) per mile. 1 One hundred (100) metric tons (t) of GHG per year are equivalent to emissions from 17 conventional gasoline cars. Item: The GHG emissions cited above are from an analysis record prepared by the Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies and Vehicle Technologies Programs on life-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases and petroleum use for several light-duty vehicles. 1 For cars that are between 1 and 5 years old, the average mileage is approximately 13,000,

153

Investigations on catalyzed steam gasification of biomass: feasibility study of methanol production via catalytic gasification of 200 tons of wood per day  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a result of an additional study made of the economic feasibility of producing fuel grade methanol from wood via catalytic gasification with steam. The report has as its basis the original 2000 tons of wood per day study generated from process development unit testing performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The goal of this additional work was to determine the feasibility of a smaller scale plant one tenth the size of the original or 200 tons of dry wood feed per day. Plant production based on this wood feed is 100 tons per day of methanol with a HHV of 9784 Btu per pound. All process and support facilities necessary to convert wood to methanol are included in this study. The plant location is Newport, Oregon. The capital cost for the plant is $34,830,000 - September 1980 basis. Methanol production costs which allow for return on capital have been calculated for various wood prices for both utility and private investor financing. These wood costs include delivery to the plant. For utility financing, the methanol production costs are, respectively, $1.20, $1.23, $1.30, and $1.44 per gallon for wood costs of $5, $10, $20, and $40 per dry ton. For private investor financing, the corresponding product costs are $1.60, $1.63, $1.70, and $1.84 per gallon for the corresponding wood costs. The costs calculated by the utility financing method include a return on equity of 15% and an interest rate of 10% on the debt. The private investor financing method, which is 100% equity financing, incorporates a discounted cash flow (DCF) return on equity of 12%. The thermal efficiency of the plant is 52.0%.

Mudge, L.K.; Weber, S.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Investigations on catalyzed steam gasification of biomass. Appendix B: feasibility study of methanol production via catalytic gasification of 2000 tons of wood per day  

SciTech Connect

A study has been made of the economic feasibility of producing fuel grade methanol from wood via catalytic gasification with steam. The plant design in this study was developed from information on gasifier operation supplied by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), operated by Battelle. PNL obtained this information from laboratory and process development unit testing. The plant is designed to process 2000 tons per day of dry wood to methanol. Plant production is 997 tons per day of methanol with a HHV of 9784 Btu per pound. All process and support facilities necessary to convert wood to methanol are included in this study. The plant location is Newport, Oregon. The capital cost for the plant is $120,830,000 - September 1980 basis. Methanol production costs which allow for return on capital have been calculated for various wood prices for both utility and private investor financing. These wood costs include delivery to the plant. For utility financing, the methanol production costs are respectively $.45, $.48, $.55, and $.69 per gallon for wood costs of $5, $10, $20, and $40 per dry ton. For private investor financing, the corresponding product costs are $.59, $.62, $.69, and $.83 per gallon for the corresponding wood costs. Both calculation methods include a return on equity capital in the costs. The thermal efficiency of the plant is 52.9%.

Mudge, L.K.; Weber, S.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Solar Grade Silicon from Agricultural By-products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this project, Mayaterials developed a low cost, low energy and low temperature method of purifying rice hull ash to high purity (5-6Ns) and converting it by carbothermal reduction to solar grade quality silicon (Sipv) using a self-designed and built electric arc furnace (EAF). Outside evaluation of our process by an independent engineering firm confirms that our technology greatly lowers estimated operating expenses (OPEX) to $5/kg and capital expenses (CAPEX) to $24/kg for Sipv production, which is well below best-in-class plants using a Siemens process approach (OPEX of 14/kg and CAPEX of $87/kg, respectively). The primary limiting factor in the widespread use of photovoltaic (PV) cells is the high cost of manufacturing, compared to more traditional sources to reach 6 g Sipv/watt (with averages closer to 8+g/watt). In 2008, the spot price of Sipv rose to $450/kg. While prices have since dropped to a more reasonable $25/kg; this low price level is not sustainable, meaning the longer-term price will likely return to $35/kg. The 6-8 g Si/watt implies that the Sipv used in a module will cost $0.21-0.28/watt for the best producers (45% of the cost of a traditional solar panel), a major improvement from the cost/wafer driven by the $50/kg Si costs of early 2011, but still a major hindrance in fulfilling DOE goal of lowering the cost of solar energy below $1/watt. The solar cell industry has grown by 40% yearly for the past eight years, increasing the demand for Sipv. As such, future solar silicon price spikes are expected in the next few years. Although industry has invested billions of dollars to meet this ever-increasing demand, the technology to produce Sipv remains largely unchanged requiring the energy intensive, and chlorine dependent Siemens process or variations thereof. While huge improvements have been made, current state-of-the-art industrial plant still use 65 kWh/kg of silicon purified. Our technology offers a key distinction to other technologies as it starts one step upstream from all other Sipv production efforts. Our process starts by producing high purity SiO2/C feedstocks from which Sipv can be produced in a single, chlorine free, final EAF step. Specifically, our unique technology, and the resultant SiO2/C product can serve as high purity feedstocks to existing metallurgical silicon (Simet) producers, allowing them to generate Sipv with existing US manufacturing infrastructure, reducing the overall capital and commissioning schedule. Our low energy, low CAPEX and OPEX process purifies the silica and carbon present in rice hull ash (RHA) at low temperatures (30k ton/yr RHA. The power generation step produces much more energy (42 kWh/kg of final silicon produced) than required to purify the RHA (5 kWh/kg of Sipv, compared to 65 kWh/kg noted above. Biogenic silica offers three very important foundations for producing high purity silicon. First, wastes from silica accumulating plants, such as rice, corn, many grasses, algae and grains, contain very reactive, amorphous silica from which impurities are easily removed. Second, plants take up only a limited set of, and minimal quantities of the heavy metals present in nature, meaning fewer minerals must be removed. Third, biomass combustion generates a product with intrinsic residual carbon, mixed at nanometer length scales with the SiO2. RHA is 80-90 wt% high surface area (20 m2/g), amorphous SiO2 with some simple mineral content mixed intimately with 5-15 wt% carbon. The mineral content is easily removed by low cost, acid washes using Mayaterials IP, leading to purified rice hull ash (RHAclean) at up to 6N purity. This highly reactive silica is partially extracted from RHAclean at 200 C in an environmentally benign process to adjust SiO2:C ratios to those needed in EA

Richard M. Laine

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

156

A nuclear criticality safety assessment of the loss of moderation control in 2 1/2 and 10-ton cylinders containing enriched UF sub 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Moderation control for maintaining nuclear criticality safety in 2-1/2-ton, 10-ton, and 14-ton cylinders containing enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) has been used safely within the nuclear industry for over thirty years, and is dependent on cylinder integrity and containment. This assessment evaluates the loss of moderation control by the breaching of containment and entry of water into the cylinders. The first objective of this study was to estimate the required amounts of water entering these large UF{sub 6} cylinders to react with, and to moderate the uranium compounds sufficiently to cause criticality. Hypothetical accident situations were modeled as a uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) slab above a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder, and a UO{sub 2} sphere centered within a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder. These situations were investigated by computational analyses utilizing the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Computer Code. The results were used to estimate both the masses of water required for criticality, and the limiting masses of water that could be considered safe. The second objective of the assessment was to calculate the time available for emergency control actions before a criticality would occur, i.e., a safetime,'' for various sources of water and different size openings in a breached cylinder. In the situations considered, except the case for a fire hose, the safetime appears adequate for emergency control actions. The assessment shows that current practices for handling moderation controlled cylinders of low enriched UF{sub 6}, along with the continuation of established personnel training programs, ensure nuclear criticality safety for routine and emergency operations. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Newvahner, R.L. (Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, OH (United States)); Pryor, W.A. (PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

1991-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

157

Investigations on catalyzed steam gasification of biomass: feasibility study of methane production via catalytic gasification of 200 tons of wood per day  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a result of an additional study made of the economic feasibility of producing substitute natural gas (SNG) from wood via catalytic gasification with steam. The report has as its basis the original 2000 tons of wood per day study generated from process development unit testing performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of this additional work was to determine the feasibility of a smaller scale plant one-tenth the size of the original or 200 tons of dry wood feed per day. Plant production based on this wood feed is 2.16 MM Scfd of SNG with a HHV of 956 Btu per Scf. All process and support facilities necessary to convert wood to SNG are included in this study. The plant location is Newport, Oregon. The capital cost for the plant is $26,680,000 - September 1980 basis. Gas production costs which allow for return on capital have been calculated for various wood prices for both utility and private investor financing. These wood prices represent the cost of unchipped wood delivered to the plant site. For utility financing, the gas production costs are, respectively, $14.34, $14.83, $15.86, and $17.84 per MM Btu for wood costs of $5, $10, $20, and $40 per dry ton. For private investor financing, the corresponding product costs are $18.76, $19.26, $20.28, and $22.31 per MM Btu for the corresponding wood costs. The costs calculated by the utility financing method includes a return on equity of 15% and an interest rate of 10% on the debt. The private investor financing method, which is 100% equity financing, incorporates a discounted cash flow (DCF) return on equity of 12%. The thermal efficiency without taking an energy credit for char is 57.4%.

Mudge, L.K.; Weber, S.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Authorized Limits for the Release of a 25 Ton Locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This document contains process knowledge and radiological data and analysis to support approval for release of the 25-ton locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD) Facility, located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The 25-ton locomotive is a small, one-of-a-kind locomotive used to move railcars in support of the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application project. This locomotive was identified as having significant historical value by the Nevada State Railroad Museum in Boulder City, Nevada, where it will be used as a display piece. A substantial effort to characterize the radiological conditions of the locomotive was undertaken by the NTS Management and Operations Contractor, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). During this characterization process, seven small areas on the locomotive had contamination levels that exceeded the NTS release criteria (limits consistent with U.S. Department of Energy [DOE] Order DOE O 5400.5, “Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment”). The decision was made to perform radiological decontamination of these known accessible impacted areas to further the release process. On February 9, 2010, NSTec personnel completed decontamination of these seven areas to within the NTS release criteria. Although all accessible areas of the locomotive had been successfully decontaminated to within NTS release criteria, it was plausible that inaccessible areas of the locomotive (i.e., those areas on the locomotive where it was not possible to perform radiological surveys) could potentially have contamination above unrestricted release limits. To access the majority of these inaccessible areas, the locomotive would have to be disassembled. A complete disassembly for a full radiological survey could have permanently destroyed parts and would have ruined the historical value of the locomotive. Complete disassembly would also add an unreasonable financial burden for the contractor. A decision was reached between the NTS regulator and NSTec, opting for alternative authorized limits from DOE Headquarters. In doing so, NSTec personnel performed a dose model using the DOE-approved modeling code RESRAD-BUILD v3.5 to evaluate scenarios. The parameters used in the dose model were conservative. NSTec’s Radiological Engineering Calculation, REC-2010-001, “Public Dose Estimate from the EMAD 25 Ton Locomotive,” concluded that the four scenarios evaluated were below the 25-millirem per year limit, the “likely” dose scenarios met the “few millirem in a year” criteria, and that the EMAD 25-ton locomotive met the radiological requirements to be released with residual radioactivity to the public.

Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

159

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project: Arizona State University. Prototype carrier 10 ton air-cooled solar absorption chiller. Final evaluation report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A prototype air-cooled 10 ton solar absorption chiller was disassembled and inspected after having been field-tested for three consecutive cooling seasons. Included in the inspection were some flow visualization experiments which revealed some problems in the absorber header design. The objectives of this evaluation project were to determine possible causes for the frequent crystallization and generally below-design performance of the chiller during the testing period. The major conclusions reached were that a combination of leaks and of poor (50%) flow distribution in the absorber could account for most of the chiller's poor performance.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Compatibility of Admix and Synthetic Liner Materials With Clean Coal Technology By-Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When designing effective liner systems for clean coal technology by-products, utilities need information on the liner materials most suitable for each type of waste by-product. This study has developed data on twenty admix and synthetic liner types for seven different by-product combinations.

1991-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Scale-up of mild gasification to be a process development unit mildgas 24 ton/day PDU design report. Final report, November 1991--July 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From November 1991 to April 1996, Kerr McGee Coal Corporation (K-M Coal) led a project to develop the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) Mild Gasification (MILDGAS) process for near-term commercialization. The specific objectives of the program were to: design, construct, and operate a 24-tons/day adiabatic process development unit (PDU) to obtain process performance data suitable for further design scale-up; obtain large batches of coal-derived co-products for industrial evaluation; prepare a detailed design of a demonstration unit; and develop technical and economic plans for commercialization of the MILDGAS process. The project team for the PDU development program consisted of: K-M Coal, IGT, Bechtel Corporation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC), General Motors (GM), Pellet Technology Corporation (PTC), LTV Steel, Armco Steel, Reilly Industries, and Auto Research.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Guidelines for the Beneficial Use of Advanced SO2 Control By-Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This design guide describes the use of the by-products produced from advanced SO2 control processes as construction materials in high-volume applications such as road base stabilization, structural fills, manufactured aggregates, soil amendments, and concrete applications. The engineering data, major design parameters, standard specifications, and construction procedures in the report should help utility by-product managers and power plant managers incorporate these applications in their by-product manag...

1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

163

Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New sulfur dioxide removal technologies produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products that contain sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. The scarcity of landfill disposal sites for such flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products has led to a long-term study on possible large-volume beneficial applications. To date, FGD by-products have been successfully used in agriculture, construction, and strip mine reclamation.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

164

NETL: CCPI - Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant - Project Brief PDF-78KB University of Kentucky Research Foundation, Ghent, Kentucky PROJECT FACT SHEET Advanced...

165

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN KAZAKHASTAN: USING OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION BY-PRODUCT SULFUR FOR COST-EFFECTIVE SECONDARY END-USE PRODUCTS.  

SciTech Connect

The Republic of Kazakhstan is continuing to develop its extensive petroleum reserves in the Tengiz region of the northeastern part of the Caspian Sea. Large quantities of by-product sulfur are being produced as a result of the removal of hydrogen sulfide from the oil and gas produced in the region. Lack of local markets and economic considerations limit the traditional outlets for by-product sulfur and the buildup of excess sulfur is a becoming a potential economic and environmental liability. Thus, new applications for re-use of by-product sulfur that will benefit regional economies including construction, paving and waste treatment are being developed. One promising application involves the cleanup and treatment of mercury at a Kazakhstan chemical plant. During 19 years of operation at the Pavlodar Khimprom chlor-alkali production facility, over 900 tons of mercury was lost to the soil surrounding and beneath the buildings. The Institute of Metallurgy and Ore Benefication (Almaty) is leading a team to develop and demonstrate a vacuum-assisted thermal process to extract the mercury from the soil and concentrate it as pure, elemental mercury, which will then be treated using the Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process. The use of locally produced sulfur will recycle a low-value industrial by-product to treat hazardous waste and render it safe for return to the environment, thereby helping to solve two problems at once. SPSS chemically stabilizes mercury to mercuric sulfide, which has a low vapor pressure and low solubility, and then physically encapsulates the material in a durable, monolithic solid sulfur polymer matrix. Thus, mercury is placed in a solid form very much like stable cinnabar, the form in which it is found in nature. Previous research and development has shown that the process can successfully encapsulate up to 33 wt% mercury in the solid form, while still meeting very strict regulatory standards for leachable mercury (0.025 mg/l in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure). The research and development to deploy Kazakhstan recycled sulfur for secondary applications described in this paper is being conducted with support from the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) and the U.S. Department of Energy Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (DOE IPP).

KALB, P.D.; VAGIN, S.; BEALL, P.W.; LEVINTOV, B.L.

2004-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

166

LOW-COST, HIGH-PERFORMANCE MATERIALS USING ILLINOIS COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be manufactured having cement replacement with Illinois coal ashes and their blends in the range of 0 to 60LOW-COST, HIGH-PERFORMANCE MATERIALS USING ILLINOIS COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS Investigators technology for high-volume applications of Illinois coal combustion by-products generated by using both

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

167

Oil Combustion By-Products: Chemical Characteristics, Management Practices, and Groundwater Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study of combustion by-products generated and collected at oil-fired utility power plants. The study was conducted by EPRI in order to assemble and evaluate information on the chemical characteristics, management practices, and groundwater effects associated with the combustion by-products.

1998-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

168

Saving Tons at the Register  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brown, and Max H. Sherman Conference Name Proceedings of the 1998 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Effciency in Buildings, Pacific Grove, CA Volume 1 Pagination 367-383 Publisher...

169

CRITICAL NATIONAL NEED IDEA:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... power generation 0.8-1.1MW per ton of MSW), high internal power consumption (about 500 ... of traditional fossil fuels like coal and fuel oil when ...

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

170

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to design, construct, and operate an ash beneficiation facility that will generate several products from coal combustion ash stored in a utility ash pond. The site selected is LG&E's Ghent Station located in Carroll County, Kentucky. The specific site under consideration is the lower ash pond at Ghent, a closed landfill encompassing over 100 acres. Coring activities revealed that the pond contains over 7 million tons of ash, including over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. These potential products are primarily concentrated in the lower end of the pond adjacent to the outlet. A representative bulk sample was excavated for conducting laboratory-scale process testing while a composite 150 ton sample was also excavated for demonstration-scale testing at the Ghent site. A mobile demonstration plant with a design feed rate of 2.5 tph was constructed and hauled to the Ghent site to evaluate unit processes (i.e. primary classification, froth flotation, spiral concentration, secondary classification, etc.) on a continuous basis to determine appropriate scale-up data. Unit processes were configured into four different flowsheets and operated at a feed rate of 2.5 tph to verify continuous operating performance and generate bulk (1 to 2 tons) products for product testing. Cementitious products were evaluated for performance in mortar and concrete as well as cement manufacture process addition. All relevant data from the four flowsheets was compiled to compare product yields and quality while preliminary flowsheet designs were generated to determine throughputs, equipment size specifications and capital cost summaries. A detailed market study was completed to evaluate the potential markets for cementitious products. Results of the study revealed that the Ghent local fly ash market is currently oversupplied by more than 500,000 tpy and distant markets (i.e. Florida) are oversupplied as well. While the total US demand for ultrafine pozzolan is currently equal to demand, there is no reason to expect a significant increase in demand. Despite the technical merits identified in the pilot plant work with regard to beneficiating the entire pond ash stream, market developments in the Ohio River Valley area during 2006-2007 were not conducive to demonstrating the project at the scale proposed in the Cooperative Agreement. As a result, Cemex withdrew from the project in 2006 citing unfavorable local market conditions in the foreseeable future at the demonstration site. During the Budget Period 1 extensions provided by the DOE, CAER has contacted several other companies, including cement producers and ash marketing concerns for private cost share. Based on the prevailing demand-supply situation, these companies had expressed interest only in limited product lines, rather than the entire ash beneficiation product stream. Although CAER had generated interest in the technology, a financial commitment to proceed to Budget Period 2 could not be obtained from private companies. Furthermore, the prospects of any decisions being reached within a reasonable time frame were dim. Thus, CAER concurred with the DOE to conclude the project at the end of Budget Period 1, March 31, 2007. The activities presented in this report were carried out during the Cooperative Agreement period 08 November 2004 through 31 March 2007.

Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

171

IGCC and PFBC By-Products: Generation, Characteristics, and Management Practices  

SciTech Connect

The following report is a compilation of data on by-products/wastes from clean coal technologies, specifically integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC). DOE had two objectives in providing this information to EPA: (1) to familiarize EPA with the DOE CCT program, CCT by-products, and the associated efforts by DOE contractors in the area of CCT by-product management and (2) to provide information that will facilitate EPA's effort by complementing similar reports from industry groups, including CIBO (Council of Industrial Boiler Owners) and EEI USWAG (Edison Electric Institute Utility Solid Waste Activities Group). The EERC cooperated and coordinated with DOE CCT contractors and industry groups to provide the most accurate and complete data on IGCC and PFBC by-products, although these technologies are only now being demonstrated on the commercial scale through the DOE CCT program.

Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Coal Combustion and Organic By-Product Blends as Soil Substitutes / Amendments for Horticulture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a field assessment of the use of blends of coal combustion by-products with biosolids in horticultural applications such as potting mixes for ornamentals and turf production.

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

173

Low-Volume Wastes With High-Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: P4 Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, utilities have comanaged some or all of their low-volume wastes with their high-volume by-products in disposal facilities. This report presents the results of a field study of comanagement of coal combustion by-products at a utility-owned dry landfill in the midwestern United States. The findings from this research provide technical information for use in an ongoing study of comanagement by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

1998-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

Comanagement of Coal Combustion By-Products and Low-Volume Wastes: A Midwestern Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An insufficient database on the environmental effects of comanagement of power plant by-products and wastes could hamper regulatory decisions regarding this practice. This report presents an environmental assessment of comanagement of high-volume coal combustion by-products with low-volume wastes at a steam electric power plant in the midwestern United States. It complements a similar assessment at a southeastern site.

1992-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

175

Organic and Inorganic Hazardous Waste Stabilization Using Coal Combustion By-Product Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a laboratory investigation of four clean-coal by-products to stabilize organic and inorganic constituents of hazardous waste stream materials. The wastes included API separator sludge, metal oxide-hydroxide waste, metal plating sludge, and creosote-contaminated soil. Overall, the investigation showed that the high alkalinity of the by-products may cost-effectively stabilize the acidic components of hazardous waste.

1994-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

176

OpenEI - MSW Biogenic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/51 Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls License

177

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to design, construct, and operate an ash beneficiation facility that will generate several products from coal combustion ash stored in a utility ash pond. The site selected is LG&E's Ghent Station located in Carroll County, Kentucky. The specific site under consideration is the lower ash pond at Ghent, a closed landfill encompassing over 100 acres. Coring activities revealed that the pond contains over 7 million tons of ash, including over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon and 1.8 million tons of fine (ash market is currently oversupplied by more than 500,000 tpy and distant markets (i.e. Florida) are oversupplied as well. While the total US demand for ultrafine pozzolan is currently equal to demand, there is no reason to expect a significant increase in demand. Despite the technical merits identified in the pilot plant work with regard to beneficiating the entire pond ash stream, market developments in the Ohio River Valley area during 2006-2007 were not conducive to demonstrating the project at the scale proposed in the Cooperative Agreement. As a result, Cemex withdrew from the project in 2006 citing unfavorable local market conditions in the foreseeable future at the demonstration site. During the Budget Period 1 extensions provided by the DOE, CAER has contacted several other companies, including cement producers and ash marketing concerns for private cost share. Based on the prevailing demand-supply situation, these companies had expressed interest only in limited product lines, rather than the entire ash beneficiation product stream. Although CAER had generated interest in the technology, a financial commitment to proceed to Budget Period 2 could not be obtained from private companies. Furthermore, the prospects of any decisions being reached within a reasonable time frame were dim. Thus, CAER concurred with the DOE to conclude the project at the end of Budget Period 1, March 31, 2007. The activities presented in this report were carried out during the Cooperative Agreement period 08 November 2004 through 31 March 2007.

Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

ADVANCED MULTI-PRODUCT COAL UTILIZATION BY-PRODUCT PROCESSING PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes the examination of the feedstocks for the beneficiation plant. The ash, as produced by the plant, and that stored in the lower pond were examined. The ash produced by the plant was found to be highly variable as the plant consumes high and low sulfur bituminous coal, in Units 1 and 2 and a mixture of subbituminous and bituminous coal in Units 3 and 4. The ash produced reflected this consisting of an iron-rich ({approx}24%, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), aluminum rich ({approx}29% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and high calcium (6%-7%, CaO) ash, respectively. The LOI of the ash typically was in the range of 5.5% to 6.5%, but individual samples ranged from 1% to almost 9%. The lower pond at Ghent is a substantial body, covering more than 100 acres, with a volume that exceeds 200 million cubic feet. The sedimentation, stratigraphy and resource assessment of the in place ash was investigated with vibracoring and three-dimensional, computer-modeling techniques. Thirteen cores to depths reaching nearly 40 feet, were retrieved, logged in the field and transported to the lab for a series of analyses for particle size, loss on ignition, petrography, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence. Collected data were processed using ArcViewGIS, Rockware, and Microsoft Excel to create three-dimensional, layered iso-grade maps, as well as stratigraphic columns and profiles, and reserve estimations. The ash in the pond was projected to exceed 7 million tons and contain over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon, and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. The size, quality and consistency of the ponded material suggests that it is the better feedstock for the beneficiation plant.

Robert Jewell; Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

SO2907, A Putative TonB-dependent Receptor, Is Involved in Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 utilizes soluble and insoluble ferric ions as terminal electron acceptors during anaerobic respiration. The components of respiratory metabolism are localized in the membrane fractions which include the outer membrane and cytoplasmic membrane. Many of the biological components that interact with the various iron forms are proposed to be localized in these membrane fractions. To identify the iron-binding proteins acting either as an iron transporter or as a terminal iron reductase, we used metal-catalyzed oxidation reactions. This system catalyzed the oxidation of amino acids in close proximity to the iron binding site. The carbonyl groups formed from this oxidation can then be labeled with fluoresceinamine (FLNH2). The peptide harboring the FLNH2 can then be proteolytically digested, purified by HPLC and then identified by MALDI-TOF tandem MS. A predominant peptide was identified to be part of SO2907 that encodes a putative TonB-dependent receptor. Compared to wild type (wt), the so2097 gene deletion (?SO2907) mutant has impaired ability to reduce soluble Fe(III), but retains the same ability to respire oxygen or fumarate as the wt. The ?SO2907 mutant was also impacted in reduction of insoluble iron. Iron binding assays using isothermal titration calorimetry and fluorescence tryptophan quenching demonstrated that a truncated form of heterologous-expressed SO2907 that contains the Fe(III) binding site, is capable of binding soluble Fe(III) forms with Kd of approximate 50 ?M. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the physiological role of SO2907 in Fe(III) reduction by MR-1.

Qian, Yufeng; Shi, Liang; Tien, Ming

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

180

Land application uses for dry FGD by-products, Phase 1 report  

SciTech Connect

The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. It is highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. The results indicated the chemical composition of the FGD by-product materials were dominated by Ca, S, Al, and Si. Many of the elements regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency reside primarily in the fly ash. Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD by-product materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Land Application of Coal Combustion By-Products: Use in Agriculture and Land Reclamation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land application of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) can prove beneficial for a number of reasons. The data presented in this survey provide a basis for optimizing the rates and timing of CCBP applications, selecting proper target soils and crops, and minimizing adverse effects on soil properties, plant responses, and groundwater quality.

1997-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

182

Utilization of Coal Combustion By-Products in Agriculture and Land Reclamation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A four-year (1994-98) project on using blends of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) and biosolids in agriculture, horticulture, and land reclamation was undertaken to assess agronomic value, environmental safety, and potential economic use of these materials.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Biofuels and their By–Products: Global Economic and Environmental Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The biofuel industry has been rapidly growing around the world in recent years. Several papers have used general equilibrium models and addressed the economy-wide and environmental consequences of producing biofuels at a large scale. They mainly argue that since biofuels are mostly produced from agricultural sources, their effects are largely felt in agricultural markets with major land use and environmental consequences. In this paper, we argue that virtually all of these studies have overstated the impact of liquid biofuels on agricultural markets due to the fact that they have ignored the role of by-products resulting from the production of biofuels. Feed by-products of the biofuel industry, such as Dried Distillers Grains with Solubles (DDGS) and biodiesel by-products (BDBP) such as soy and rapeseed meals, can be used in the livestock industry as substitutes for grains and oilseed meals used in this industry. Hence, their presence mitigates the price impacts of biofuel production on the livestock and food industries. The importance of incorporating by-products of biofuel production in economic models is well recognized by some partial equilibrium analyses of biofuel production. However, to date, this issue has not been tackled by those conducting CGE analysis of biofuels programs. Accordingly,

Farzad Taheripour; Thomas W. Hertel; Wallace E. Tyner; Jayson F. Beckman; Dileep K. Birur; Farzad Taheripour

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes an investigation of the secondary classification characteristics of the ash feedstock excavated from the lower ash pond at Ghent Station. The market study for the products of the processing plant (Subtask 1.6), conducted by Cemex, is reported herein. The study incorporated simplifying assumptions and focused only on pozzolan and ultra fine fly ash (UFFA). It found that the market for pozzolan in the Ghent area was oversupplied, with resultant poor pricing structure. Reachable export markets for the Ghent pozzolan market were mostly locally served with the exception of Florida. It was concluded that a beneficiated material for that market may be at a long term disadvantage. The market for the UFFA was more complex as this material would compete with other beneficiated ash and potential metakaolin and silica fume as well. The study concluded that this market represented about 100,000 tons of sales per year and, although lucrative, represented a widely dispersed niche market.

Andrew Jackura; John Groppo; Thomas Robl

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

Business Plan for Utilization of Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBP) -- Biosolids Blends in Horticultural Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a marketing plan for coal combustion by-products (CCBP)-biosolids blends which summarizes the business opportunity (potential demand for CCBP-biosolids blends) and defines conditions necessary to seize and execute the opportunity identified. The plan places a hypothetical business in a specific location (Austell, GA) to make the cost-profit analysis as realistic as possible. It should be remembered, however, that the marketing plan for a business venture is not "the business." This h...

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

186

Coal Combustion and Organic By-Products Blends as Soil Substitutes/Amendments for Horticulture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data from greenhouse and field experiments evaluating the utilization of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) as (i) components of potting mixes to grow ornamentals in a greenhouse, (ii) components of topsoil to grow sod in a greenhouse on plastic, and (iii) components of topsoil to produce sod in the field. The experimental mixes included bottom and fly-ash mixed with biosolids. Two greenhouse experiments involving Evolvus and Pansy test plants and a greenhouse experiment to grow sod ...

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

187

Production of manufactured aggregates from flue gas desulfurization by-products  

SciTech Connect

CONSOL R and D has developed a disk pelletization process to produce manufactured aggregates from the by-products of various technologies designed to reduce sulfur emissions produced from coal utilization. Aggregates have been produced from the by-products of the Coolside and LIMB sorbent injection, the fluidized-bed combustion (FBC), spray dryer absorption (SDA), and lime and limestone wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes. The aggregates produced meet the general specifications for use as road aggregate in road construction and for use as lightweight aggregate in concrete masonry units. Small field demonstrations with 1200 lb to 5000 lb of manufactured aggregates were conducted using aggregates produced from FBC ash and lime wet FGD sludge in road construction and using aggregates made from SDA ash and lime wet FGD sludge to manufacture concrete blocks. The aggregates for this work were produced with a bench-scale (200--400 lb batch) unit. In 1999, CONSOL R and D constructed and operated a 500 lb/hr integrated, continuous pilot plant. A variety of aggregate products were produced from lime wet FGD sludge. The pilot plant test successfully demonstrated the continuous, integrated operation of the process. The pilot plant demonstration was a major step toward commercialization of manufactured aggregate production from FGD by-products. In this paper, progress made in the production of aggregates from dry FGD (Coolside, LIMB, SDA) and FBC by-products, and lime wet FGD sludge is discussed. The discussion covers bench-scale and pilot plant aggregate production and aggregate field demonstrations.

Wu, M.M.; McCoy, D.C.; Fenger, M.L.; Scandrol, R.O.; Winschel, R.A.; Withum, J.A.; Statnick, R.M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Occupational Hygiene Aspects of Sulfur Hexafluoride Decomposition By-Products: Workshop Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is an inert gas that is present in many different types of electrical utility equipment. While the environmental concerns about this gas have been widely addressed, worker exposure aspects of SF6 decomposition by-products have not been fully explored. To address this knowledge gap, EPRI conducted a workshop on March 12, 2013, in Charlotte, North Carolina. This workshop was designed to 1) address the perspectives of occupational hygiene and engineering ...

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

189

Long-Term Column Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products  

SciTech Connect

An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. The stability of mercury and any co-captured elements in the by-products could have a large economic impact if it reduced by-product sales or increasing their disposal costs. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed continuous leaching of a select subset of the available sample pairs using four leachants: water (pH=5.7), dilute sulfuric acid (pH=1.2), dilute acetic acid (pH=2.9), and sodium carbonate (pH=11.1). This report describes results obtained for mercury, arsenic, and selenium during the 5-month leaching experiments.

Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.; White, Fredrick; Rohar, P.C.; Kim, A.G

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Optimization of Jatropha Oil Extraction and Its By-Product Utilization by Pyrolysis Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the price of fossil fuel has increased, petroleum resources have been restricted and the environmental effects have been of great concern. Biofuel has been considered to be a good solution because it is a clean, non-pollutant and a renewable energy. Biodiesel is one alternative energy that plays a major role in the energy industry. So, the development of biofuel process is more interesting. Jatropha curcas L. is considered as an alternative energy source in order to help solve the energy crisis. The purpose of this research is to investigate the optimum condition of Jatropha seed extraction via a screw press and its by-product utilization by a pyrolysis method for achieving the maximum mass conversion and energy recovery. In this study, Jatropha seeds were first extracted by a screw press with different discharge aperture sizes, namely, number 4 (4.0 mm), 8 (7.0 mm), and 10 (10.5 mm). The by-product obtained from a screw press was then performed pyrolysis runs at the operating temperatures of 400, 500, and 600 degrees C. Results revealed that the optimum condition was achieved when using discharge aperture number 8 (7.0 mm) for a screw press and performing the pyrolysis of the by- product at 500 degrees C. The mass conversion efficiency of 35.8% refined oil, 21.8% bio-char, 14.6% bio-oil, and 11.7% syn-gas were obtained. Therefore, the utilization of by-product using a pyrolysis can enhance the effectiveness of Jatropha oil extraction with only 16% mass losses occurred. In addition, the gross heating values of the products were observed as 39.6 MJ/kg for the refined oil, 35.1 MJ/kg for the bio-oil, 27.5 MJ/kg for the bio-char, and 2.1 MJ/kg for the syn-gas. Due to a high mass conversion efficiency and energy content of Jatropha products, Jatropha has the potential to serve as an alternative energy source.

Kongkasawan, Jinjuta 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Potential for by-product recovery in geothermal energy operations issue paper  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document identifies and discusses the significant issues raised by the idea of recovering useful by-products from wastes (primarily spent brine) generated during geothermal power production. The physical availability of numerous valuable materials in geothermal brines has captured the interest of geothermal resource developers and other parties ever since their presence was known. The prospects for utilizing huge volumes of highly-saline geothermal brines for electricity generation in the Imperial Valley of California have served to maintain this interest in both private sector and government circles.

None

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This sixteenth quarterly report describes work done during the sixteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced Clean Coal Technology by-products  

SciTech Connect

This eleventh quarterly report describes work done during the eleventh three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ``Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing and giving presentations, and making and responding to two outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini; Wiles Elder

1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

194

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This seventeenth quarterly report describes work done during the seventeenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, submitting a manuscript and making and responding to one outside contact.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Electricity from coal and utilization of coal combustion by-products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most electricity in the world is conventionally generated using coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear energy, or hydropower. Due to environmental concerns, there is a growing interest in alternative energy sources for heat and electricity production. The major by-products obtained from coal combustion are fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials. The solid wastes produced in coal-fired power plants create problems for both power-generating industries and environmentalists. The coal fly ash and bottom ash samples may be used as cementitious materials.

Demirbas, A. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

NETL: Hg Control – The Effects on By-products: What Do We Know and Where  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hg Control – The Effects on By-products: Hg Control – The Effects on By-products: What Do We Know and Where Do We Go? Table of Contents Foreword Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Introductions Field Demonstrations Laboratory Studies Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

197

Feasibility of producing jet fuel from GPGP (Great Plains Gasification Plant) by-products  

SciTech Connect

The Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota, is in close proximity to several Air Force bases along our northern tier. This plant is producing over 137 million cubic feet per day high-Btu SNG from North Dakota lignite. In addition, the plant generates three liquid streams, naphtha, crude phenol, and tar oil. The naphtha may be directly marketable because of its low boiling point and high aromatic content. The other two streams, totalling about 4300 barrels per day, are available as potential sources of aviation jet fuel for the Air Force. The overall objective of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing aviation turbine fuel from the by-product streams of GPGP. These streams, as well as fractions thereof, will be characterized and subsequently processed over a wide range of process conditions. The resulting turbine fuel products will be analyzed to determine their chemical and physical characteristics as compared to petroleum-based fuels to meet the military specification requirements. A second objective is to assess the conversion of the by-product streams into a new, higher-density aviation fuel. Since no performance specifications currently exist for a high-density jet fuel, reaction products and intermediates will only be characterized to indicate the feasibility of producing such a fuel. This report describes results on feedstock characterization. 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Willson, W.G.; Knudson, C.L.; Rindt, J.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Feasibility of producing jet fuel from GPGP (Great Plains Gasification Plant) by-products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota, is in close proximity to several Air Force bases along our northern tier. This plant is producing over 137 million cubic feet per day of high-Btu Natural Gas from North Dakota lignite. In addition, the plant generates three liquid streams, naphtha, crude phenol, and tar oil. The naphtha may be directly marketable because of its low boiling point and high aromatic content. The other two streams, totalling about 4300 barrels per day, are available as potential sources of aviation fuel jet fuel for the Air Force. The overall objective of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing aviation turbine fuel from the by-product streams of GPGP. These streams, as well as fractions, thereof, will be characterized and subsequently processed over a wide range of process conditions. The resulting turbine fuel products will be analyzed to determine their chemical and physical characteristics as compared to petroleum-based fuels to meet the military specification requirements. A second objective is to assess the conversion of the by-product streams into a new, higher-density aviation fuel. Since no performance specifications currently exist for a high-density jet fuel, reaction products and intermediates will only be characterized to indicate the feasibility of producing such a fuel. This report discusses the suitability of the tar oil stream. 5 refs., 20 figs., 15 tabs.

Willson, W.G.; Knudson, C.L.; Rindt, J.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

CHARACTERIZATION OF COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS FOR THE RE-EVOLUTION OF MERCURY INTO ECOSYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

There is concern that mercury (Hg) in coal combustion by-products might be emitted into the environment during processing to other products or after the disposal/landfill of these by-products. This perception may limit the opportunities to use coal combustion by-products in recycle/reuse applications and may result in additional, costly disposal regulations. In this program, CONSOL conducted a comprehensive sampling and analytical program to include ash, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludge, and coal combustion by-products. This work is necessary to help identify potential problems and solutions important to energy production from fossil fuels. The program objective was to evaluate the potential for mercury emissions by leaching or volatilization, to determine if mercury enters the water surrounding an active FGD disposal site and an active fly ash slurry impoundment site, and to provide data that will allow a scientific assessment of the issue. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test results showed that mercury did not leach from coal, bottom ash, fly ash, spray dryer/fabric filter ash or forced oxidation gypsum (FOG) in amounts leading to concentrations greater than the detection limit of the TCLP method (1.0 ng/mL). Mercury was detected at very low concentrations in acidic leachates from all of the fixated and more than half of the unfixated FGD sludge samples, and one of the synthetic aggregate samples. Mercury was not detected in leachates from any sample when deionized water (DI water) was the leaching solution. Mercury did not leach from electrostatic precipitator (ESP) fly ash samples collected during activated carbon injection for mercury control in amounts greater than the detection limit of the TCLP method (1.0 ng/mL). Volatilization tests could not detect mercury loss from fly ash, spray dryer/fabric filter ash, unfixated FGD sludge, or forced oxidation gypsum; the mercury concentration of these samples all increased, possibly due to absorption from ambient surroundings. Mercury loss of 18-26% was detected after 3 and 6 months at 100 F and 140 F from samples of the fixated FGD sludge. Water samples were collected from existing ground water monitoring wells around an active FGD disposal site (8 wells) and an active fly ash slurry impoundment (14 wells). These were wells that the plants have installed to comply with ground water monitoring requirements of their permits. Mercury was not detected in any of the water samples collected from monitoring wells at either site. A literature review concluded that coal combustion byproducts can be disposed of in properly designed landfills that minimize the potentially negative impacts of water intrusion that carries dissolved organic matter (DOM). Dissolved organic matter and sulfate-reducing bacteria can promote the transformation of elemental or oxidized mercury into methyl mercury. The landfill should be properly designed and capped with clays or similar materials to minimize the wet-dry cycles that promote the release of methylmercury.

J.A. Withum; J.E. Locke; S.C. Tseng

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production  

SciTech Connect

The work conducted in this project is an extension of the developments itemized in DE-FG-36-04GO14236. This program is designed to help the development of a biorefinery based around a raw sugar mill, which in Louisiana is an underutilized asset. Some technical questions were answered regarding the addition of a biomass to ethanol facility to existing sugar mills. The focus of this work is on developing technology to produce ethanol and valuable by-products from bagasse. Three major areas are addressed, feedstock storage, potential by-products and the technology for producing ethanol from dilute ammonia pre-treated bagasse. Sugar mills normally store bagasse in a simple pile. During the off season there is a natural degradation of the bagasse, due to the composting action of microorganisms in the pile. This has serious implications if bagasse must be stored to operate a bagasse/biorefinery for a 300+ day operating cycle. Deterioration of the fermentables in bagasse was found to be 6.5% per month, on pile storage. This indicates that long term storage of adequate amounts of bagasse for year-round operation is probably not feasible. Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of succinic acid production were such that it could not compete with current commercial practice. To allow recovery of commercial amounts of ethanol from bagasse fermentation, research was conducted on high solids loading fermentations (using S. cerevisiae) with commercial cellulase on pretreated material. A combination of SHF/SSF treatment with fed-batch operation allowed fermentation at 30% solids loading. Supplementation of the fermentation with a small amount of black-strap molasses had results beyond expectation. There was an enhancement of conversion as well as production of ethanol levels above 6.0% w/w, which is required both for efficient distillation as well as contaminant repression. The focus of fermentation development was only on converting the cellulose to ethanol, as this yeast is not capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose (from hemicellulose). In anticipation of the future development of such an organism, we screened the commercially available xylanases to find the optimum mix for conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose. A different mixture than the spezyme/novozyme mix used in our fermentation research was found to be more efficient at converting both cellulose and hemicellulose. Efforts were made to select a mutant of Pichia stipitis for ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol. New mutation technology was developed, but an appropriate mutant has not yet been isolated. The ability to convert to stillage from biomass fermentations were determined to be suitable for anaerobic degradation and methane production. An economic model of a current sugar factory was developed in order to provide a baseline for the cost/benefit analysis of adding cellulosic ethanol production.

Donal F. Day

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Joint Test Plan to Identify the Gaseous By-Products of CH3I Loading on AgZ  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this test plan is to describe research to determine the gaseous by-products of the adsorption of CH3I on hydrogen reduced silver exchanged mordenite (AgZ).

R. T. Jubin; N. R. Soelberg; D. M. Strachan; T. M. Nenoff; B. B. Spencer

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Utilization of by-products from alkaline hydroxide preservation of whole broiler carcasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alkaline hydroxides can be used as a preservation method for on-farm storage of broiler mortalities. This method creates two by-products: alkaline preserved whole broiler carcasses, which can be rendered into an Alkaline Poultry By-Product Meal (APBPM) and residual alkaline effluent, which can be used as a soil amendment. In experiment 1 APBPM was added to a broiler diet and evaluated for apparent metabolizable energy (AME). In experiment 2 AME was used to formulate balanced diets with 0 to 5% APBPM. Effects on broiler performance, organ morphology, tibia sheer strength and moisture content were evaluated in both experiments. Experiment 1 determined that the optimum additive concentration for the APBPM was 5%. The AME trials showed no significant difference between the control group and treatment group (5% APBPM) when comparing body weight and feed consumption, however a significant difference was observed when comparing excreta moisture. Experiment 2 evaluated the parameters of feed consumption, feed conversion, and body weight when fed an APBPM. The feed conversion for the 5% treatment in trial 1 was significantly lower compared to control, 1%, and 3% treatment groups. Feed consumption per bird for trial 1 was significantly higher in the control, 1%, and 3% treatment groups compared to the 5% treatment group. The percentage of organ weight was larger in treatment groups compared to control groups indicating an enlargement of organ weight as a percentage of body weight. The residual alkaline effluent was applied to coastal bermudagrass plots in amounts of 0 to 9354 L/ha with four replications per treatment each year for 1999 and 2000. Dry matter yield, nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) uptakes were evaluated. In 1999 maximum yields were at the 5612 L/ha rate but there was no yield response to effluent rate in 2000. Effluent rate had only small effects on N and P uptake since all treatments were balanced for these nutrients. The potassium uptakes showed a significant increase as the effluent rate increased. The residual KOH effluent can be applied to Coastal bermudagrasses as a source of K as well as N and P.

Niemeyer, Truitt Preston

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Land application uses of dry FGD by-products. [Quarterly report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report contains three separate monthly reports on the progress to use flue gas desulfurization by-products for the land reclamation of an abandoned mine site in Ohio. Data are included on the chemical composition of the residues, the cost of the project, as well as scheduling difficulties and efforts to allay the fears of public officials as to the safety of the project. The use of by-products to repair a landslide on State Route 541 is briefly discussed.

Dick, W.A.; Beeghly, J.H.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal-laden wastes can be stabilized and solidified using advanced clean coal technology by-products (CCTBs)--fluid bed combustor ash and spray drier solids. These utility-generated treatment chemicals are available for purchase through brokers, and commercial applications of this process are being practiced by treaters of metal-laden hazardous waste. A complex of regulations governs this industry, and sensitivities to this complex has discouraged public documentation of treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with CCTBs. This report provides a comprehensive public documentation of laboratory studies that show the efficacy of the stabilization and solidification of metal-laden hazardous wastes--such as lead-contaminated soils and sandblast residues--through treatment with CCTBs. It then describes the extensive efforts that were made to obtain the permits allowing a commercial hazardous waste treater to utilize CCTBs as treatment chemicals and to install the equipment required to do so. It concludes with the effect of this lengthy process on the ability of the treatment company to realize the practical, physical outcome of this effort, leading to premature termination of the project.

James T. Cobb, Jr.

2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

205

Feasibility Analysis of Steam Reforming of Biodiesel by-product Glycerol to Make Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crude glycerol is the major byproduct from biodiesel industry. In general, for every 100 pounds of biodiesel produced, approximately 10 pounds of crude glycerol are produced as a by-product. As the biodiesel industry rapidly expands in the U.S., the market is being flooded with this low quality waste glycerol. Due to its high impurities, it is expensive to purify and use in food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetics industries. Biodiesel producers should seek an alternative method which is economically and environmentally friendly. This research contains reforming process to covert waste glycerol from a biodiesel industry into sellable hydrogen. This process consists of 850oC reformer, 350oC and 210oC shift reactors for water gas shift reaction, flash tanks, and a separator. It is considered to be the least expensive method. At 850oC and 1 atm pressure, glycerol reacts with superheated steam to produce gaseous mixture of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane. Reformer is a batch process where only 68% of waste glycerol is converted into gaseous mixture. The excess glycerol is recycled back as a feedstock. Water gas shift (WGS) reaction, further convert carbon monoxide into hydrogen and carbon dioxide which is further subjected to separation process to isolate hydrogen from CO2 and any other impurities. The final product stream consists of 68% of hydrogen, and 27% of CO2 based on molar flow rate.

Joshi, Manoj

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

206

Strontium Isotope Study of Coal Untilization By-products Interacting with Environmental Waters  

SciTech Connect

Sequential leaching experiments on coal utilization by-products (CUB) were coupled with chemical and strontium (Sr) isotopic analyses to better understand the influence of coal type and combustion processes on CUB properties and the release of elements during interaction with environmental waters during disposal. Class C fly ash tended to release the highest quantity of minor and trace elements—including alkaline earth elements, sodium, chromium, copper, manganese, lead, titanium, and zinc—during sequential extraction, with bottom ash yielding the lowest. Strontium isotope ratios ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) in bulk-CUB samples (total dissolution of CUB) are generally higher in class F ash than in class C ash. Bulk-CUB ratios appear to be controlled by the geologic source of the mineral matter in the feed coal, and by Sr added during desulfurization treatments. Leachates of the CUB generally have Sr isotope ratios that are different than the bulk value, demonstrating that Sr was not isotopically homogenized during combustion. Variations in the Sr isotopic composition of CUB leachates were correlated with mobility of several major and trace elements; the data suggest that arsenic and lead are held in phases that contain the more radiogenic (high-{sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) component. A changing Sr isotope ratio of CUB-interacting waters in a disposal environment could forecast the release of certain strongly bound elements of environmental concern. This study lays the groundwork for the application of Sr isotopes as an environmental tracer for CUB–water interaction.

Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J; Stewart, Brian W; Capo, Rosemary C; Chapman, Elizabeth C; Schroeder, Karl T; Brubaker, Tonya M

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Effect of industrial by-products containing electron acceptors on mitigating methane emission during rice cultivation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three industrial by-products (fly ash, phosphogypsum and blast furnace slag), were evaluated for their potential re-use as soil amendments to reduce methane (CH{sub 4}) emission resulting from rice cultivation. In laboratory incubations, CH{sub 4} production rates from anoxic soil slurries were significantly reduced at amendment levels of 0.5%, 1%, 2% and 5% (wt wt{sup -1}), while observed CO{sub 2} production rates were enhanced. The level of suppression in methane production was the highest for phosphogypsum, followed by blast slag and then fly ash. In the greenhouse experiment, CH{sub 4} emission rates from the rice planted potted soils significantly decreased with the increasing levels (2-20 Mg ha{sup -1}) of the selected amendments applied, while rice yield simultaneously increased compared to the control treatment. At 10 Mg ha{sup -1} application level of the amendments, total seasonal CH{sub 4} emissions were reduced by 20%, 27% and 25%, while rice grain yields were increased by 17%, 15% and 23% over the control with fly ash, phosphogypsum, and blast slag amendments, respectively. The suppression of CH{sub 4} production rates as well as total seasonal CH{sub 4} flux could be due to the increased concentrations of active iron, free iron, manganese oxides, and sulfate in the amended soil, which acted as electron acceptors and controlled methanogens' activity by limiting substrates availability. Among the amendments, blast furnace slag and fly ash contributed mainly to improve the soil nutrients balance and increased the soil pH level towards neutral point, but soil acidity was developed with phosphogypsum application. Conclusively, blast slag among the selected amendments would be a suitable soil amendment for reducing CH{sub 4} emissions as well as sustaining rice productivity.

Ali, Muhammad Aslam [Department of Environmental Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202 (Bangladesh); Lee, Chang Hoon [Functional Cereal Crop Research Division, National Institute of Crop Science, RDA, 1085, Naey-dong, Milyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Yoon [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School (Brain Korea 21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Pil Joo [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School (Brain Korea 21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: pjkim@gnu.ac.kr

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of succinic acid production were such that it could not compete with current commercial practice. To allow recovery of commercial amounts of ethanol from bagasse fermentation, research was conducted on high solids loading fermentations (using S. cerevisiae) with commercial cellulase on pretreated material. A combination of SHF/SSF treatment with fed-batch operation allowed fermentation at 30% solids loading. Supplementation of the fermentation with a small amount of black-strap molasses had results beyond expectation. There was an enhancement of conversion as well as production of ethanol levels above 6.0% w/w, which is required both for efficient distillation as well as contaminant repression. The focus of fermentation development was only on converting the cellulose to ethanol, as this yeast is not capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose (from hemicellulose). In anticipation of the future development of such an organism, we screened the commercially available xylanases to find the optimum mix for conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose. A different mixture than the spezyme/novozyme mix used in our fermentation research was found to be more efficient at converting both cellulose and hemicellulose. Efforts were made to select a mutant of Pichia stipitis for ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol. New mutation technology was developed, but an appropriate mutant has not yet been isolated. The ability to convert to stillage from biomass fermentations were determined to be suitable for anaerobic degradation and methane production. An economic model of a current sugar factory was developed in order to provide a baseline for the cost/benefit analysis of adding cellulosic ethanol production.

Donal F. Day

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes with High-Volume By-Products: CY Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents an investigation into the effects of comanagement of low-volume wastes with high-volume coal combustion by-products at the CY site. This is one of 14 sites investigated by EPRI to provide background information to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the 2000 Regulatory Determination on comanagement under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

210

Proceedings: Tenth International Ash Use Symposium, Volume 2: Ash Use R&D and Clean Coal By-Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topics discussed at the tenth symposium on coal ash use included fundamental ash use research, product marketing, applied research, ash management and the environment, and commercial applications. Intense international research interest continues in coal ash use due to the prospects of avoiding disposal costs and generating revenue from by-product sales.

1993-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

211

Utilizing the heat content of gas-to-liquids by-product streams for commercial power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Gas-to-liquids (GTL) processes produce a large fraction of by-products whose disposal or handling ordinarily becomes a cost rather than benefit. As an alternative strategy to market stranded gas reserves, GTL provides middle distillates to an unsaturated global market and offers opportunities to generate power for commercial purposes from waste by-product streams, which normally are associated with increased expenses incurred from additional handling cost. The key concept investigated in this work is the possibility of integrating the GTL process with power generation using conventional waste by-product steam streams. Simulation of the integrated process was conducted with the aim of identifying the critical operating conditions for successful integration of the GTL and power generation processes. About 500 MW of electric power can be generated from 70% of the exit steam streams, with around 20 to 25% steam plant thermal efficiency. A detailed economic analysis on the LNG, stand-alone GTL, and Integrated GTL Power-Generation plants indicates that the integrated system is more profitable than the other options considered. Justifying the technology and economics involved in the use of the by-product streams to generate power could increase the net revenue and overall profitability of GTL projects. This technology may be transferable to GTL projects in the world, wherever a market for generated power exists.

Adegoke, Adesola Ayodeji

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Management of dry gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The objective is to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of coal combustion by-products. The two technologies for the underground placement that will be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry coal combustion by-products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of combustion by-products with about 70% solids. Phase 2 of the overall program began April 1, 1996. The principal objective of Phase 2 is to develop and fabricate the equipment for both the pneumatic and hydraulic placement technologies, and to conduct a limited, small-scale shakedown test of the pneumatic and hydraulic placement equipment. The shakedown test originally was to take place on the surface, in trenches dug for the tests. However, after a thorough study it was decided, with the concurrence of DOE-METC, to drill additional injection wells and conduct the shakedown tests underground. This will allow a more thorough test of the placement equipment.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, was provided by Sørum et al. (1997). Calculations were performed in order to simulate the conditions, it was decided to perform simulations covering the temperature range: [950 ­ 1600 K], while the cooling of the trace elements, thermochemical data from GFE-DBASE, Version 2.0, were transformed to FactSage format

214

IDENTIFICATIONANDASSESSMENTOFAVAILABLE TECHNOLOGIESFORMATERIALSANDENERGYRECOVERY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and net electrical energy production per ton of MSW (wet basis) from a plasma arc gasification facility ............................................ 155 2.2.1 Gasification Environmental Issues. ................................................ 46 Figure 113. Direct cofiring with upstream thermal gasification

Columbia University

215

Laboratory Characterization of Advanced SO2 Control By-Products: Dry Sodium and Calcium In-Duct Injection Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extensive laboratory investigation indicates that the physical and chemical characterization and engineering properties of dry sodium and calcium in-duct injection wastes differ, as do the refuse and by-product management options associated with them. Utilities can use this report on the chemical, physical, engineering, and leachate properties of dry sodium and calcium in-duct injection wastes to better plan for and manage future waste disposal and/or use.

1990-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

216

Mixtures of a Coal Combustion By-Product and Composted Yard Wastes for Use as Soil Substitutes and Amendments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under certain conditions, the physical and chemical properties of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs) can be conducive to plant growth. As one means of increasing use rates, EPRI and several utilities have studied CCBP applications as a soil amendment and soil substitute when mixed with varying proportions of yard waste compost, sand, and soil. This report presents the results of green-house studies on the use of CCBP mixtures in growing shrubs, trees, and ground cover plants.

1996-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

217

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Topical report, April 1, 1996--April 30, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report represents the Final Technical Progress Report for Phase II of the overall program for a cooperative research agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy - MORGANTOWN Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC). Under the agreement, SIUC will develop and demonstrate technologies for the handling, transport, and placement in abandoned underground coal mines of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products, such as fly ash, scrubber sludge, fluidized bed combustion by-products, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground placement. The overall program is divided into three (3) phases. Phase II of the program is primarily concerned with developing and testing the hardware for the actual underground placement demonstrations. Two technologies have been identified and hardware procured for full-scale demonstrations: (1) hydraulic placement, where coal combustion by-products (CCBs) will be placed underground as a past-like mixture containing about 70 to 75 percent solids; and (2) pneumatic placement, where CCBs will be placed underground as a relatively dry material using compressed air. 42 refs., 36 figs., 36 tabs.

Chugh, Y.P.; Brackebusch, F.; Carpenter, J. [and others

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Performance Evaluation of a 4.5 kW (1.3 Refrigeration Tons) Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide/Water Solar Powered (Hot-Water-Fired) Absorption Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the summer months, air-conditioning (cooling) is the single largest use of electricity in both residential and commercial buildings with the major impact on peak electric demand. Improved air-conditioning technology has by far the greatest potential impact on the electric industry compared to any other technology that uses electricity. Thermally activated absorption air-conditioning (absorption chillers) can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. This innovative absorption technology is based on integrated rotating heat exchangers to enhance heat and mass transfer resulting in a potential reduction of size, cost, and weight of the "next generation" absorption units. Rotartica Absorption Chiller (RAC) is a 4.5 kW (1.3 refrigeration tons or RT) air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)/water unit powered by hot water generated using the solar energy and/or waste heat. Typically LiBr/water absorption chillers are water-cooled units which use a cooling tower to reject heat. Cooling towers require a large amount of space, increase start-up and maintenance costs. However, RAC is an air-cooled absorption chiller (no cooling tower). The purpose of this evaluation is to verify RAC performance by comparing the Coefficient of Performance (COP or ratio of cooling capacity to energy input) and the cooling capacity results with those of the manufacturer. The performance of the RAC was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a controlled environment at various hot and chilled water flow rates, air handler flow rates, and ambient temperatures. Temperature probes, mass flow meters, rotational speed measuring device, pressure transducers, and a web camera mounted inside the unit were used to monitor the RAC via a web control-based data acquisition system using Automated Logic Controller (ALC). Results showed a COP and cooling capacity of approximately 0.58 and 3.7 kW respectively at 35 C (95 F) design condition for ambient temperature with 40 C (104 F) cooling water temperature. This is in close agreement with the manufacturer data of 0.60 for COP and 3.9 kW for cooling capacity. This study resulted in a complete performance map of RAC which will be used to evaluate the potential benefits of rotating heat exchangers in making the "next-generation" absorption chillers more compact and cost effective without any significant degradation in the performance. In addition, the feasibility of using rotating heat exchangers in other applications will be evaluated.

Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL; Linkous, Randall Lee [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? - FAQ - U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Conversion Calculators. Metric and Other Physical Conversion Factors. Last reviewed: September 13, 2013. Other FAQs about Coal.

220

How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? - FAQ - U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Conversion Calculators. Metric and Other Physical Conversion Factors. Last reviewed: September 13, 2013. Other FAQs about Prices.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Two (2) 175 Ton (350 Tons total) Chiller Geothermal Heat Pumps...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pump system is fully automated. The details of its optimized sequence of operation in all weather and building load conditions will be documented and shared. - Data Collection: The...

222

How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? - FAQ - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Financial market analysis and financial data for major energy companies ... What are the sources of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by type of fuel ...

223

Assessment of municipal solid waste for energy production in the western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste (MSW) represents both a significant problem and an abundant resource for the production of energy. The residential, institutional, and industrial sectors of this country generate about 250 million tons of MSW each year. In this report, the authors have compiled data on the status of MSW in the 13-state western region, including economic and environmental issues. The report is designed to assist the members of the Western Regional Biomass Energy Program Ad Hoc Resource Committee in determining the potential for using MSW to produce energy in the region. 51 refs., 7 figs., 18 tabs.

Goodman, B.J.; Texeira, R.H.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

boilers at pulp mills, steam power plants, and other thermal power generating facilities. Since wood distribution, unit weight, cement pozzolanic activity, water requirement, and autoclave expansion. Properties. Results of particle size distribution are reported in Table 2. As-received moisture content of wood fly

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

225

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information about fundamentals and processes on composting and anaerobic digestion, and compiling an overview the biological, chemical, physical, and thermodynamic fundamentals. KEYWORDS Composting; anaerobic digestion, anaerobic digesters, and composting facilities (Palmisano and Barlaz, 1996). In this paper, landfills

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

226

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and durability of concrete made with high volume fly ash blended cements", Fly Ash, Silica Fume, Slag blast furnace slag, fly ash, and silica fume. These mineral additives not only yield concrete additives are: reduced early strength, increased water demand of concrete mixtures, and reduced freezing

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

227

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, pipes, and structures for confinements of solid and liquid wastes containing hazardous materials, etc, and special care in mixing, handling, and placing. It is now well established that a very dense homogeneous-quality concrete (HQC), roller compacted concrete, high-volume fly ash concrete, fiber-reinforced concrete

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

228

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Such structures include bridge decks, pavements, ocean piers, offshore platforms, pipes, and structures, special chemical admixtures, and special care in mixing, handling, placing, and early curing. Ultra-performance concrete, high-durability concrete (HDC), roller compacted concrete, high-volume fly ash concrete, fiber

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

229

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigation. Two additional ash samples were prepared by blending these selected conventional and clean-coal large amounts of conventional or clean-coal ashes, as well as the blended ashes. #12;4 Based) and coal ash blends (Class F plus clean-coal ash blends) up to 60 percent. On the basis of results obtained

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

230

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.I. has recently established a technology of using a gypsum-containing cementitious material from coal of the cement in concrete mixtures could be replaced with the gypsum wallboard-Class C fly ash blend

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

231

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal FA. Two levels of blended ash of approximately 25% and 35% were used. The effect of source of wood FA was noticeably different on the performance of concrete. Blending of wood FA with Class C coal FA-grade concrete can be made using wood FA and/or its blends with Class C coal FA as a replacement of cement

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

232

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, it was concluded that durable structural-grade concrete could be manufactured using 50% blend of wood and coal fly ash as a replacement of cement. #12;Keywords: Coal fly ash, compressive strength, concrete, density

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

233

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Management & Use of Coal Combustion Products (CCPs), Tampa, Florida, Jan. 27-30, 2003. Department of Civil-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 784, Milwaukee, WI 53201 d Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute * Director UWM concrete mixtures can be made with up to blends of 20% ponded-ash and 5% Class F fly ash. #12;Introduction

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

234

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is defined as the ash derived from thermal power plants using clean-coal technologies such as SO2 Control SOx and NOx. FGD material is generally obtained by combustion of high-sulfur coal. Ponded ash incorporate up to 22 % FGD material and a blend of 34 % FGD material and 6 % coarse Class F ash; (2) FGD

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

235

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compressive strength) with wood ash or its blends with coal fly ash (up to 40 %) as partial replacement of cement; and (4) good quality bricks/blocks/paving stones with wood ash or its blends with coal fly ash-entrained structural-grade concrete up to 28-day compressive strength of 50 MPa with wood or its blends (up to 40

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

236

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2000 Presented and published at the CANMET/ACI International Seminar on High-Volume Fly Ash Blended, in USA, coal fly ashes are the most commonly used in the manufacture of cement-based materials to improve

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

237

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigation. Two additional ash samples were prepared by blending these selected conventional and clean-coal large amounts of conventional or clean-coal ashes, as well as the blended ashes. Based on the results blends (Class F plus clean-coal ash blends) up to 60 percent. On the basis of results obtained

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

238

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the UWM-CBU. His research interests include the use of coal fly ash, coal bottom ash, and used foundry such as portland cement, ASTM Class C fly ash, ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS), blends of cement

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

239

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MPa. Future research efforts should be directed towards use of high-lime fly ash in blended cements with minimum (less than 20%) portland cement in the blend. Keywords: Fly ash; concrete; strength; freezing 232, Fly Ash and Natural Pozzolans. #12;4 INTRODUCTION Coal is the most widely used source of energy

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

240

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Class C fly ash in blended cements with minimum (less than 10 %) portland cement in the blend. Keywords; freezing and thawing durability; strength; sulfate resistance. #12;2 INTRODUCTION Coal is the most widely amounts of coal combustion products (CCPs), which include fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for rapid identification of buried utilities, blended coal ash, and non-spec./off-spec. aggregates and fly

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

242

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

clay bricks. Based upon previous test data collected from other sources of coal ash, wood ash, and combined coal and wood ash, the Prince Albert ash could be used as a partial replacement of aggregates and of the Prince Albert ash in manufacturing Blended Cements. Soil stabilization or site remediation is another

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

243

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% and 45%), and two mixtures with blends of Class F fly ash and clean-coal ash (34% clean-coal ash with 17-grade concrete. Mixtures containing 44% clean-coal ash, blended with 17% Class F fly ash, also met specified CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Rafat Siddique

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

244

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modifications in the project milestone plan may be desirable. The primary task completed for the fourth quarter

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

245

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysisofrecursivestochastic algorithms IEEE Trona. Aulo. Control AC-22 551-75 MscKay D J and Miller K D 1990Analyea of

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

246

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of sorbent used. This process uses a sodium-based sorbent such as sodium bicarbonate, soda ash, trona

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

247

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, preparación de NaOH Carbonatos y sulfatos Extracción del carbonato de sodio de la trona Preparación de

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

248

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

installed at a boiler was composed of a circulating fluidized bed boiler. The boiler was designed to operate AFBC BOILER Introduction This project was conducted for the developme

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

249

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experimental data to investigate phosphogypsume use in light brick by Artificial Neural Networks 589 M

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

250

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of setting. Samadi et al.13 studied the influence of phosphogypsum (PG) on the times of setting and soundness of Phosphogypsum in Concrete. Cement and Concrete Research, Vol. 29, No. 9, pp. 1419-1425, 1999. 14. Brooks, J. J

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

251

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and final times of setting. #12;5 Samadi et al. [8] studied the influence of phosphogypsum (PG) on the times, 1996, pp. 56-62. 8. Samadi, M. M., Hadad, R. H., and Akour, A. M., "Potential Use of Phosphogypsum

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

252

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-burning power plant. As a developing country, China's economic growth is expected to continue rapidly in this country is mostly generated by coal-fired electric power plants. These plants produce huge amounts of ash (slag) produced from coal-fired power plants increases yearly along with the development and huge demand

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

253

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characteristics of foundry sands derived from nine common core binder systems using TCLP test method. The test investigated leaching potential of foundry waste material using both the TCLP and AFS test techniques characteristics of fly ash, spray dryer material, and bottom ash/slag. The TCLP leach data, except for barium

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

254

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and regeneration. To date our faculty has led research funded by the NIH, NSF, HHMI, the VA and many private

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

255

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of foundry sands derived from nine common core binder systems using TCLP test method. The test data showed potential of foundry waste material using both the TCLP and AFS test techniques. For comparison, leach tests of fly ash, spray dryer material, and bottom ash/slag. The TCLP leach data, except for barium, showed

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

256

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characteristics of foundry sands derived from nine common core binder systems using TCLP test method. The test) investigated leaching potential of foundry waste material using both the TCLP and AFS test techniques) evaluated leachate characteristics of fly ash, spray dryer material, and bottom ash/slag. The TCLP leach

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

257

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaluated leachate characteristics of foundry sands derived from nine common core binder systems using TCLP. Traeger27 investigated leaching potential of foundry waste material using both the TCLP and AFS test/slag. The TCLP leach data, except for barium, showed elemental concentration at or below their corresponding DWS

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

258

DOE/NETL's R&D Response to Emerging Coal By-Product and Water Issues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D Response to Emerging R&D Response to Emerging Coal By-Product and Water Issues Clean Coal and Power Conference in conjunction with 2 nd Joint U.S.-People's Republic of China Conference on Clean Energy Washington, DC November 17-19, 2003 Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory Feeley_CC&P Conf. 11/03 Electric Power Using Coal Clean Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Production Environmental Control V21 Next Generation Carbon Sequestration Exploration & Production Refining & Delivery Alternative Fuels Exploration & Production Pipelines & Storage Fuel Cells Combustion Turbines NETL Plays Key Role in Fossil Energy Supply, Delivery, and Use Technologies Future Fuels Photo of hydrogen fueled car: Warren Gretz, NREL Feeley_CC&P Conf. 11/03 Innovations for Existing Plants Program

259

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Annual report, October 1994--September 1995  

SciTech Connect

On September 30, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy-Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues (CCBs) in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground CCB placement. This report describes progress in the following areas: environmental characterization, mix development and geotechnical characterization, material handling and system economics, underground placement, and field demonstration.

Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S. [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Rehabilitation of semi-arid coal mine spoil bank soils with mine residues and farm organic by-products  

SciTech Connect

A method of rehabilitating coal mine soils was studied under the conditions of a semi-arid climate, lack of topsoil but availability of farm by-products in NE Spain. The objectives of the research were to assess a new method in order to achieve a suitable substrate for the establishment of native vegetation, to evaluate environmental impacts associated with the reclamation process, and to determine the time necessary to integrate the treated area into the surrounding environment. Eight plots (10 x 35 m{sup 2}) were established in September 1997. Substrate combinations of two types of mine spoil (coal dust and coarse-sized material), two levels of pig slurry (39 and 94 Mg ha{sup -1}dry-wt), and cereal straw (0 and 15 Mg ha{sup -1}) were applied. Monitoring of select physical and chemical soil properties and vegetation characteristics was performed from 1997 until 2005. The bulk density and the saturated hydraulic conductivity measured did not limit plant development and water availability. Initial substrate salinity (1.37 S m{sup -1}) decreased with time and in the long term did not limit plant colonization to salinity-adapted species. Initial nitrate concentration was 298 mg kg{sup -1}, but was reduced significantly to acceptable values in 3 years (55 mg kg{sup -1}) and the measured pH (7.6) was maintained at the level of initial spoil values. Vegetation cover reached up to 90%. In the treated area, spontaneous vegetation cover (15 to 70%) colonized the nonsown areas widely. In the medium term, vegetation cover tended to be higher in plots with a thicker layer of coal dust material and the higher slurry rate. Soil rehabilitation and environmental reintegration, taking into account soil and vegetation indicators, was possible in the studied area with low cost inputs using residual materials from mining activities and animal husbandry by-products.

Salazar, M.; Bosch-Serra, A.; Estudillos, G.; Poch, R.M. [University of Lleida, Lleida (Spain). Dept. of Environmental & Soil Science

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The use of gypsum and a coal desulfurization by-product to ameliorate subsoil acidity for alfalfa growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acid soils limit the growth of aluminum-(Al) sensitive crops such as alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). Management of acid subsoils can be difficult due to physical and economic constraints. Field experiments were conducted at two locations to evaluate the effectiveness of surface-applied gypsum and a flue gas desulfurization by-product for reducing the toxic effects of acid subsoils on alfalfa. The materials were applied at rates of 0, 5, 10, and 15 Mg ha-1. In addition, a glasshouse experiment was conducted that used 0, 5, and 10 Mg ha-1 of gypsum only. Field studies were concluded 41 and 45 months after treatment application at the two locations. No effect of material on alfalfa yield or tissue mineral concentration was observed. Also, rate did not affect yield. However, there were differences in plant tissue mineral concentration in several harvests that were related to rate. Soil was sampled periodically to 120 cm and indicated movement of Ca and S into the soil profile to depths of 60 and 120 cm, respectively. Subsoil pHH2O and pHCaCl2 were not affected by treatment. Extractable and exchangeable Al were not reduced by movement of Ca and S into the soil. In the glasshouse study, alfalfa yields and root growth were not affected by gypsum rate. As gypsum rate increased, plant tissue S increased, but K and Mg decreased. Alfalfa roots did not grow below 60 cm, even though there was indication of material movement to 90 cm in the soil. Although sulfur moved to 75 cm, no effect on soil Al was observed. Leachate collected from the bottoms of columns indicated that soil cations were leached as a result of gypsum application. Gypsum and the flue gas desulfurization by-product did not significantly affect the acid soils used in these studies or improve alfalfa growth.

Chessman, Dennis John

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels standard requires 36 billion gallons of renewable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels standard requires 36 billion gallons of renewable fuels be used annually by 2022, which allows continued

263

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes with High-Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: HA Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Typically, utilities comanage some or all of their low-volume wastes with their high-volume by-products in disposal facilities. This report presents the results of a field study of comanagement of coal combustion by-products at a utility-owned impoundment in the midwestern United States (HA site). The findings from this research provided technical information for use in a study of comanagement practices by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

, 3 2006 Most of a WTE plant is dedicated to emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEATING NETWORK 467 km of double pipe 130,000 inhabit.supplied 34 Mm3 heated vol. 12,338 connected in Tchobanoglous Handbook onx (106 million tons of MSW x 62 Nm3/ton - collected landfill gas as per Berenyi

Columbia University

265

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October--December 1994  

SciTech Connect

On September 30, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative agreement entitled ``Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines`` (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground residues placement. The major event during the quarter was the demonstration of the SEEC, Inc. technology for loading and transporting coal combustion residues in the SEEC developed Collapsible Intermodal Containers (CIC). The demonstration was held on November 17, 1994, at the Illinois Power Company Baldwin power plant, and was attended by about eighty (80) invited guest. Also during the quarter meetings were held with Peabody Coal Company officials to finalize the area in the Peabody No. 10 mine to be used for the placement of coal combustion residues. Work under the Materials Handling and Systems Economics area continued, particularly in refining the costs and systems configuration and in economic evaluation of various systems using equipment leasing rather than equipment purchases. Likewise, work progressed on residues characterization, with some preparations being made for long-term testing.

Chugh, Y.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S.; Ghafoori, N.; Paul, B.; Sevim, H.; Thomasson, E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Treatability study on the use of by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan for the stabilization of hazardous and radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect

The Republic of Kazakhstan generates significant quantities of excess sulfur from the production and refining of petroleum reserves. In addition, the country also produces hazardous, and radioactive wastes which require treatment/stabilization. In an effort to find secondary uses for the elemental sulfur, and simultaneously produce a material which could be used to encapsulate, and reduce the dispersion of harmful contaminants into the environment, BNL evaluated the use of the sulfur polymer cement (SPC) produced from by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan. This thermoplastic binder material forms a durable waste form with low leaching properties and is compatible with a wide range of waste types. Several hundred kilograms of Kazakhstan sulfur were shipped to the U.S. and converted to SPC (by reaction with 5 wt% organic modifiers) for use in this study. A phosphogypsum sand waste generated in Kazakhstan during the purification of phosphate fertilizer was selected for treatment. Waste loading of 40 wt% were easily achieved. Waste form performance testing included compressive strength, water immersion, and Accelerated Leach Testing. 14 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Yim, Sung Paal; Kalb, P.D.; Milian, L.W.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Treatability study on the use of by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan for the stabilization of hazardous and radioactive wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Republic of Kazakhstan generates significant quantities of excess elemental sulfur from the production and refining of petroleum reserves. In addition, the country also produces hazardous, and radioactive wastes which require treatment/stabilization. In an effort to find secondary uses for the elemental sulfur, and simultaneously produce a material which could be used to encapsulate, and reduce the dispersion of harmful contaminants into the environment, BNL evaluated the use of the sulfur polymer cement (SPC) produced from by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan. This thermoplastic binder material forms a durable waste form with low leaching properties and is compatible with a wide range of waste types. Several hundred kilograms of Kazakhstan sulfur were shipped to the US and converted to SPC (by reaction with 5 wt% organic modifiers) for use in this study. A phosphogypsum sand waste generated in Kazakhstan during the purification of phosphate fertilizer was selected for treatment. Waste loadings of 40 wt% were easily achieved. Waste form performance testing included compressive strength, water immersion, and Accelerated Leach Testing.

Kalb, P.D.; Milian, L.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Environmental and Waste Technology Center; Yim, S.P. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst. (Korea, Republic of); Dyer, R.S.; Michaud, W.R. [Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary environmental risk assessment on the FGD by-products to be placed underground is virtually complete. The initial mixes for pneumatic and hydraulic placement have been selected and are being subject to TCLP, ASTM, and modified SLP shake tests as well as ASTM column leaching. Results of these analyses show that the individual coal combustion residues, and the residues mixes, are non-hazardous in character. Based on available information, including well logs obtained from Peabody Coal Company, a detailed study of the geology of the placement site was completed. The study shows that the disposal site in the abandoned underground mine workings at depths of between 325 and 375 feet are well below potable groundwater resources. This, coupled with the benign nature of the residues and residues mixtures, should alleviate any concern that the underground placement will have adverse effects on groundwater resources. Seven convergence stations were installed in the proposed underground placement area of the Peabody Coal Company No. 10 mine. Several sets of convergence data were obtained from the stations. A study of materials handling and transportation of coal combustion residues from the electric power plant to the injection site has been made. The study evaluated the economics of the transportation of coal combustion residues by pneumatic trucks, by pressure differential rail cars, and by SEEC, Inc. collapsible intermodal containers (CICs) for different annual handling rates and transport distances. The preliminary physico-chemical characteristics and engineering properties of various FBC fly ash-spent bed mixes have been determined, and long-term studies of these properties are continuing.

Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S.; Ghafoori, N.; Paul, B.; Sevim, H.; Thomasson, E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1995--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

On September 30, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy-Morgantown Energy Technology Center and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground residues placement. Previous quarterly Technical Progress Reports have set forth the specific objectives of the program, and a discussion of these is not repeated here. Rather, this report discusses the technical progress made during the period April 1 - June 30, 1995. A final topical report on the SEEC, Inc. demonstration of its technology for the transporting of coal combustion residues was completed during the quarter, although final printing of the report was accomplished early in July, 1995. The SEEC technology involves the use of Collapsible Intermodal Containers (CIC`s) developed by SEEC, and the transportation of such containers - filled with fly ash or other coal combustion residues - on rail coal cars or other transportation means. Copies of the final topical report, entitled {open_quotes}The Development and Testing of Collapsible Intermodal Containers for the Handling and Transport of Coal Combustion Residues{close_quotes} were furnished to the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The Rapid Aging Test colums were placed in operation during the quarter. This test is to determine the long-term reaction of both the pneumatic and hydraulic mixtures to brine as a leaching material, and simulates the conditions that will be encountered in the actual underground placement of the coal combustion residues mixtures. The tests will continue for about one year.

Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes With High-Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: LS Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power industry has historically comanaged low-volume wastes with high-volume by-products as a cost-effective means of disposal. This report documents an investigation into the effects of comanagement of low-volume wastes with high-volume coal combustion by-products at the LS site. This is one of 14 sites investigated by EPRI to provide background information to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the 2000 Regulatory Determination on comanagement under the Resource Conservation and ...

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

271

Analysis of Markets for Coal Combustion By-Products Use in Agriculture and Land Reclamation: Summary Report of Four Regional Marketi ng Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sites for the disposal of coal combustion by-products (CCBP) are becoming more difficult to acquire, license, and develop. Since CCBP production may increase in the foreseeable future, reducing the reliance on disposal makes economic and environmental sense. This report summarizes the findings of four regional marketing studies, which examined barriers--both economic and regulatory-- to the land application of CCBP.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Modification of the EIC hydrogen sulfide abatement process to produce valuable by-products. Final report, May 4, 1981-May 4, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program of analytical and experimental studies has been carried out to develop modifications of the CUPROSUL process for the desulfurization of geothermal steam. The objective of the program was to devise practical means to manipulate the chemistry of the process so that the consumption of raw materials could be controlled and a variety of valuable by-products could be produced. The process had been demonstrated, at one-tenth commercial scale, for steam of the Geysers' average composition in a configuration which resulted in essentially complete oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. The ability to control the extent of oxidation would increase process flexibility and extend its range of applicability to steams of widely varying composition. Preliminary market surveys of raw materials required for the process and by-products which could be produced indicated that controlling the oxidation of sulfides to produce elemental sulfur would probably be the preferred process option. Use of lime to treat sulfate-containing purge streams to produce by-product gypsum and ammonia for recycle or sale could also be justified for certain steam compositions. Recovery of ammonium sulfate alone from the purge stream would not normally be justified unless corecovery of other valuable by-products, such as boric acid, was possible at incremental cost. It was found that ferric sulfate was a highly effective, selective oxidant for the controlled oxidation of copper sulfide solids to produce elemental sulfur for sale and copper sulfate for recycle.

Offenhartz, P. O'D.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, March 30, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Progress is described on the use of by-products form clean coal technologies for the treatment of hazardous wastes. During the third quarter of Phase 2, work continued on evaluating Phase 1 samples (including evaluation of a seventh waste), conducting scholarly work, preparing for field work, preparing and delivering presentations, and making additional outside contacts.

Cobb, J.T. Jr.; Neufeld, R.D.; Blachere, J.R. [and others

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes with High-Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: FC Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities typically comanage some or all of their low-volume wastes with high-volume by-products in disposal facilities. This report presents the results of a field study of comanagement practices at an impoundment at a power plant located in the south-central United States. The findings from this research provided technical information for use in a study of comanagement practices by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

2002-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

275

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes with High Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: AP Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power companies typically comanage some or all of their low-volume wastes with high-volume by-products in disposal facilities. This report presents the results of a field study of comanagement practices at an impoundment at a power plant located in the southwestern United States. The findings from this research provided technical information for use in a study of comanagement practices by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

276

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes With High-Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: CL Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a field study of comanagement of coal combustion by-products at a utility disposal impoundment in the southeastern United States. The study was part of a multiyear effort by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in cooperation with the Utility Solid Waste Activities Group (USWAG) and individual utility companies, to characterize utility comanagement practices and collect and analyze a comprehensive set of data pertinent to the environmental effects of those pra...

1997-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

277

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes with High-Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: MO Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents an investigation into the effects of comanagement of low-volume wastes with high-volume coal combustion by-products at the MO site. The MO site is one of 14 investigated by EPRI to provide background information to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the 2000 Regulatory Determination on comanagement under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

278

Numerical Simulation of Macrosegregation in 570-ton Low-alloyed ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

P-18: Phosphorus Partitioning During EAF Refining of DRI Based Steel · P-1: Mechanisms of Calcium Oxide Dissolution in CaO-Al2O3-SiO2-based Slags.

279

Coolerado 5 Ton RTU Performance: Western Cooling Challenge Results (Revised)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Western Cooling Efficiency Center (WCEC) developed a set of criteria for test conditions, minimum energy, and water use performance for prototype cooling equipment and identified these conditions as indicative of western state climates.

Kozubal, E.; Slayzak, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, Wash. – EM’s Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) — a massive landfill for low-level radioactive and hazardous waste at the Hanford site — has achieved a major cleanup milestone.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

KCP relocates 18-ton machine | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

8 a.m. and by lunchtime that day, it was in place at the NSC. The machine will undergo laser alignment and build test parts around mid-June. It will be ready for production again...

282

Linear Extrusion 400 Tons/Day Dry Solids Pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept that uses rocket engine experience to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to current state-of-the-art systems. The PWR gasifier concept uses a compact and highly efficient (>50%) dry solids pump that has excellent availability (>99.5%). PWR is currently developing this dry solids pump under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative agreement. The conceptual design on two dry solids pumps were completed under this agreement and one pump concept was selected for preliminary design. A preliminary design review (PDR) of the selected pump was presented on September 20, 2007 to PWR management and numerous technical specialists. Feedback from the PDR review team has been factored into the design and a Delta-PDR was held on April 9, 2008.

Kenneth Sprouse; David Matthews

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

OFFICE WASTE DATA 2010 Recyclable Materials 1680 tons / 62%  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is used to stabilise temperatures within conventional Energy from Waste incineration plants as well waste from high temperature incineration (Clinical waste) to incineration with energy recovery (Offensive and hygiene waste). Benefits include: Lower CO2 emissions. Energy recovered in process. Direct

Gannarelli, Ché

284

308 BILLION TON-HOURS OF REFUSE POWER EXPERIENCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the special tarrif al ready granted by the utility to its large energy users. The output data are grouped

Columbia University

285

Bioenergy Technologies Office: U.S. Billion-Ton Update  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Update on AddThis.com... Publications Key Publications Newsletter Project Fact Sheets Biomass Basics Multimedia Webinars Databases Analytical Tools Glossary Student & Educator...

286

Technical support for the Ohio Clean Coal Technology Program. Volume 2, Baseline of knowledge concerning process modification opportunities, research needs, by-product market potential, and regulatory requirements: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LR1 and comprises two volumes. Volume 1 presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume 2 consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1989-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

287

Barriers to the increased utilization of coal combustion/desulfurization by-products by government & commercial sectors - update 1998,7/99,3268845  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BARRIERS TO THE INCREASED UTILIZATION BARRIERS TO THE INCREASED UTILIZATION OF COAL COMBUSTION/DESULFURIZATION BY-PRODUCTS BY GOVERNMENT AND COMMERCIAL SECTORS - UPDATE 1998 EERC Topical Report DE-FC21-93MC-30097--79 Submitted by: Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett Everett A. Sondreal Edward N. Steadman Kurt E. Eylands Bruce A. Dockter Energy & Environmental Research Center PO Box 9018 Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 99-EERC-07-08 July 1999 i TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv LIST OF TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v ACKNOWLEDGMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii TERMINOLOGY AND DEFINITIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

288

Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, September 1995--December 1995  

SciTech Connect

This fifth quarterly report describes work done during the fifth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh`s project on the {open_quotes}Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.{close_quotes} Participating with the university on this project is Mill Service, Inc. This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focussed upon completing laboratory evaluation of samples produced during Phase 1, preparing reports and presentations, and seeking environmental approvals and variances to permits that will allow the field work to proceed. The compressive strength of prepared concretes is described.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

hare1MSW02.ps - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algorithm does not work. If this is the case, simply add the semi-inner product to a standard ..... userinfo(2, 'LLLPoly', "Using Gram-Schmitd on row "||i||" of "||dim);.

290

hare2MSW02.ps - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research is part of the MITACS Symbolic Analysis Project and is based ... in the event that the decimal expansion of a number is known to greater accuracy.

291

gregMSW02.ps - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We can always increase the precision to overcome the ill-conditioning, but a ..... The memory space complexity of the standard methods is O(Nn). oating point ...

292

edgardo2MSW02.ps - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regarding what "type" of information request is targeted by this project, our idea is to ... Move away from the concept of a help facility and implement the function ...

293

ogilvieMSW02.ps - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

classical mechanical system, a lagrangian is the di erence of kinetic energy and ... The algebraic manipulations to simplify the kinetic energy and to employ the ...

294

Comparison between MSW Ash and RDF Ash from Incineration Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the unwashed incineration ash were tested and analyzed for TCLP (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure of auxiliary air. The flue gases are PEER-REVIEW 963 #12;eventually led through air pollution control system to prevent visible flue gas emissions due to higher moisture content. TCLP ANALYSIS Samples of fly ash

Columbia University

295

"EMM Region","PC","IGCC","PC","Conv. CT","Adv. CT","Conv. CC","Adv. CC","Adv. CC w/CCS","Fuel Cell","Nuclear","Biomass","MSW","On-shore Wind","Off-shore Wind","Solar Thermal","Solar PV"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Regional cost adjustments for technologies modeled by NEMS by Electric Market Modul (EMM) region 10,11" Regional cost adjustments for technologies modeled by NEMS by Electric Market Modul (EMM) region 10,11" "EMM Region","PC","IGCC","PC","Conv. CT","Adv. CT","Conv. CC","Adv. CC","Adv. CC w/CCS","Fuel Cell","Nuclear","Biomass","MSW","On-shore Wind","Off-shore Wind","Solar Thermal","Solar PV" ,,,"w/CCS" "1 (ERCT)",0.91,0.92,0.92,0.93,0.95,0.91,0.92,0.9,0.96,0.96,0.93,0.93,0.95,0.92,0.86,0.87 "2 (FRCC)",0.92,0.93,0.94,0.93,0.93,0.91,0.92,0.92,0.97,0.97,0.94,0.94,"N/A","N/A",0.89,0.9 "3 (MROE)",1.01,1.01,0.99,0.99,1.01,0.99,0.99,0.97,0.99,1.01,0.99,0.98,0.99,0.97,"N/A",0.96

296

Economic Evaluation of By-Product Power/Co-Generation Systems for Industrial Plants with Fluidized-Bed Coal Burning Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic analysis of the construction and operation of by-product electric power and steam/power cogeneration systems in coal fired fluidized-bed steam cycles, located at individual industrial sites analyzed by the author, is being presented. The plants analyzed employ fluidized bed boilers for generation of steam for process and building/heating/cooling demands, in conjunction with electric power co-generation. Results of the analysis are presented, using life cycle costs and investment payback periods, pinpointing the areas, type and magnitude of costs which should be considered in the selection of combustors or systems. Capital and operating costs, and recognized technical and economic barriers are also presented and their effects indicated. Life cycle cost of each of the alternatives analyzed are compared and the expected payback periods for the different size FBC plants and for different annual average production levels are discussed.

Mesko, J. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly technical progress report, [October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ``Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines`` program is one of the largest programs ever undertaken by the Mining Engineering Department of Southern Illinois university, both in terms of complexity and in terms of funding. Total funding over the expected four-year extent of the program, including both Department of Energy, matching Southern Illinois University funds, and contributed funds, this program exceeds three million dollars. The number of cooperating organizations adds to the management complexity of the program. It was believed, therefore, that sound management plan and management base is essential for the efficient and effective conduct of the program. This first quarter period (i.e., October 1--December 31, 1993) was developed to establishing the management base, developing a sound management plan, developing a test plan, and developing sound fiscal management and control. Actual technical operations, such as residue sample acquisition, residue analyses, groundwater sample acquisition and analyses, and material handling studies will get underway early in the next quarter (i.e., January 1--March 31, 1994). Some early results of residue analyses and groundwater analyses should be available by the end of the second quarter. These results will be reported in the next Technical Progress Report.

Thomasson, E.M.; Chugh, Y.P.; Esling, S.; Honaker, R.; Paul, B.; Sevin, H.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines - Phase I: Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993  

SciTech Connect

This project proposes to use pneumatically or hydraulically emplaced dry-flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products to backfill the adits left by highwall mining. Backfilling highwall mine adits with dry-FGD materials is technically attractive. The use of an active highwall mine would allow the dry-FGD material to be brought in using the same transportation network used to move the coal out, eliminating the need to recreated the transportation infrastructure, thereby saving costs. Activities during the period included the negotiations leading to the final cooperative agreement for the project and the implementation of the necessary instruments at the University of Kentucky to administer the project. Early in the negotiations, a final agreement on a task structure was reached and a milestone plan was filed. A review was initiated of the original laboratory plan as presented in the proposal, and tentative modifications were developed. Selection of a mine site was made early; the Pleasant Valley mine in Greenup County was chosen. Several visits were made to the mine site to begin work on the hydrologic monitoring plan. The investigation of the types of permits needed to conduct the project was initiated. Considerations concerning the acceptance and implementation of technologies led to the choice of circulating fluidized bed ash as the primary material for the study. Finally, the membership of a Technical Advisory Committee for the study was assembled.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Municipal solid waste management: A bibliography of US Department of Energy contractor report through 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy contractors continue to conduct research targeting the productive and responsible use of the more than 516,000 metric tons (567,000 tons) of municipal solid waste (MSW) that is generated each day in the United States. It is becoming more and more prudent to improve current methods of MSW management and to continue to search for additional cost-effective, energy-efficient means to manage our MSW resource. This bibliography provides information about technical reports on energy from municipal waste that were prepared under grants or contracts from the US DOE. The reports listed focus on energy from municipal waste technologies and energy conservation in wastewater treatment.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 1, Report text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides data for use in evaluating the proven technologies and combinations of technologies that might be considered for managing municipal solid waste (MSW). It covers five major methods for MSW management in common use today: Landfilling; Mass combustion for energy recovery; Production of refuse-derived fuel (RDF); Collection/separation of recyclables; and Composting. It also provides information on three MSW management technologies that are not widely used at present: Anaerobic digestion; Cofiring of MSW with coal; and Gasification/pyrolysis. To the extent possible with available reliable data, the report presents information for each proven MSW technology on: Net energy balances; Environmental releases; and Economics. In addition to data about individual operations, the report presents net energy balances and inventories of environmental releases from selected combined MSW management strategies that use two or more separate operations. The scope of the report extends from the waste`s origin (defined as the point at which the waste is set out for collection), through transportation and processing operations, to its final disposition (e.g., recycling and remanufacturing, combustion, or landfilling operations). Data for all operations are presented on a consistent basis: one (1) ton of municipal (i.e., residential, commercial, and institutional) waste at the collection point. Selection of an MSW management plan may be influenced by many factors, in addition to the technical performance and economics of each option.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides data for use in evaluating the proven technologies and combinations of technologies that might be considered for managing municipal solid waste (MSW). It covers five major methods for MSW management in common use today: Landfilling; Mass combustion for energy recovery; Production of refuse-derived fuel (RDF); Collection/separation of recyclables; and Composting. It also provides information on three MSW management technologies that are not widely used at present: Anaerobic digestion; Cofiring of MSW with coal; and Gasification/pyrolysis. To the extent possible with available reliable data, the report presents information for each proven MSW technology on: Net energy balances; Environmental releases; and Economics. In addition to data about individual operations, the report presents net energy balances and inventories of environmental releases from selected combined MSW management strategies that use two or more separate operations. The scope of the report extends from the waste's origin (defined as the point at which the waste is set out for collection), through transportation and processing operations, to its final disposition (e.g., recycling and remanufacturing, combustion, or landfilling operations). Data for all operations are presented on a consistent basis: one (1) ton of municipal (i.e., residential, commercial, and institutional) waste at the collection point. Selection of an MSW management plan may be influenced by many factors, in addition to the technical performance and economics of each option.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 18-20, 2009, Chantilly, Virginia, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with 100ml/min of purge gas at 825o C). Two main steps of thermal degradation have been observed. The first the optimal operating regime for MSW gasification, a series of tests covering a range of temperatures (280) was landfilled and more than 31 million tons (12.4% of total) of materials were combusted with energy recovery[1

Columbia University

303

High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by- products in underground mines: Phase 1, Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect

The kinetics study which is investigating hydration reactions of the ADM by-product (Subtask 2.2) was continued this quarter. This study further aided in gaining information on mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions during hydration of the ADM materials. The information is of importance for a comprehensive understanding of the factors that control strength and long-term stability during aging of FGD materials. The decision was made by Addington, Inc., DOE, and the University of Kentucky that the originally selected mine site for the emplacement demonstration must be changed, mainly for safety reasons. Mine selection will be a priority for the next quarter (Jul--Sep, 1995). Another activity during this reporting period was related to Subtask 4.3, the selection and testing of the transport system for the FGD material. A laboratory-scale pneumatic emplacement test unit (ETU) for dry FGD materials was built at the CAER to generate data so that a final selection of the field demonstration technology can be made. A dry pneumatic system was chosen for laboratory testing because the equipment and expertise available at the CAER matched this sort of technology best. While the design of the laboratory system was based on shotcrete technology, the physical properties of the emplaced FGD material is expected to be similar for other transport techniques, either pneumatic or hydraulic. In other words, the selection of a dry pneumatic transport system for laboratory testing does not necessarily imply that a scaled-up version will be used for the field demonstration. The ETU is a convenient means of producing samples for subsequent chemical and physical testing by a representative emplacement technology. Ultimately, the field demonstration technology will be chosen based on the laboratory data and the suitability of locally available equipment.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Environmental analysis of biomass-ethanol facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report analyzes the environmental regulatory requirements for several process configurations of a biomass-to-ethanol facility. It also evaluates the impact of two feedstocks (municipal solid waste [MSW] and agricultural residues) and three facility sizes (1000, 2000, and 3000 dry tons per day [dtpd]) on the environmental requirements. The basic biomass ethanol process has five major steps: (1) Milling, (2) Pretreatment, (3) Cofermentation, (4) Enzyme production, (5) Product recovery. Each step could have environmental impacts and thus be subject to regulation. Facilities that process 2000 dtpd of MSW or agricultural residues would produce 69 and 79 million gallons of ethanol, respectively.

Corbus, D.; Putsche, V.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Design and economics of a lignite-to-SNG (substitute natural gas) facility using Lurgi gasifiers with in-line conversion of by-product liquids to methane. Topical report (Final), December 1985-November 1986  

SciTech Connect

A first-pass conceptual design and screening cost estimate was prepared for a hypothetical plant to convert lignite to methane using Lurgi dry-bottom gasifiers and employing a black box reactor to convert by-product liquids in the gas phase to methane. Results were compared to those from conventional and modified Lurgi-plant designs. The in-line conversion plant can potentially reduce the cost of gas from a Lurgi plant by about 20%. Due to reduced capital investment, over $200 million could be invested in the reactor before the cost of gas from the in-line conversion plant is as high as that of a Lurgi plant.

Smelser, S.C.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

NETL: Coal Utilization By-Products (CUB)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Coal Utilization Byproducts Innovations for Existing Plants Solid Waste (Coal Utilization...

307

Bioelectrochemical Treatment of Gaseous By-products  

monoxide, and can reduce the overall cost of industrial operations. ... use the device for electricity production, the anode is in electrical communic ...

308

Municipal solid waste management in Beijing City  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of municipal solid waste (MSW) management in Beijing City. Beijing, the capital of China, has a land area of approximately 1368.32 km{sup 2} with an urban population of about 13.33 million in 2006. Over the past three decades, MSW generation in Beijing City has increased tremendously from 1.04 million tons in 1978 to 4.134 million tons in 2006. The average generation rate of MSW in 2006 was 0.85 kg/capita/day. Food waste comprised 63.39%, followed by paper (11.07%), plastics (12.7%) and dust (5.78%). While all other wastes including tiles, textiles, glass, metals and wood accounted for less than 3%. Currently, 90% of MSW generated in Beijing is landfilled, 8% is incinerated and 2% is composted. Source separation collection, as a waste reduction method, has been carried out in a total of 2255 demonstration residential and commercial areas (covering about 4.7 million people) up to the end of 2007. Demonstration districts should be promoted over a wider range instead of demonstration communities. The capacity of transfer stations and treatment plants is an urgent problem as these sites are seriously overloaded. These problems should first be solved by constructing more sites and converting to new treatment technologies. Improvements in legislation, public education and the management of waste pickers are problematic issues which need to be addressed.

Li Zhenshan [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, No. 5, Yi Heyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Key Laboratory for Environmental and Urban Sciences, Shenzhen Graduate School, Peking University, Shenzhen 518055 (China)], E-mail: lizhenshan@pku.edu.cn; Yang Lei [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, No. 5, Yi Heyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Qu XiaoYan [Key Laboratory for Environmental and Urban Sciences, Shenzhen Graduate School, Peking University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Sui Yumei [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, No. 5, Yi Heyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids. Volume 6. Preliminary analysis of upgrading alternatives for the Great Plains liquid by-production streams. Interim report, March 1987-February 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest have developed seven cases for upgrading by-product liquids from the Great Plains Coal Gasification plant to jet fuels, and in several of the cases, saleable chemicals in addition to jet fuels. The analysis shows that the various grades of jet fuel can be produced from the Great Plains tar oil, but not economically. However the phenolic and naptha streams do have the potential to significantly increase (on the order of $10-15 million/year) the net revenues at Great Plains by producing chemicals, especially cresylic acid, cresol, and xylenol. The amount of these chemicals, which can be marketed, is a concern, but profits can be generated even when oxygenated chemical sales are limited to 10% of the U.S. market. Another concern is that while commercial processes exist to extract phenolic mixtures, these processes have not been demonstrated with the Great Plains phenolic stream.

Fleming, B.A.; Fox, J.D.; Furlong, M.W.; Masin, J.G.; Sault, L.P.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

The estimation of N{sub 2}O emissions from municipal solid waste incineration facilities: The Korea case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The greenhouse gases (GHGs) generated in municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration are carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). In South Korea case, the total of GHGs from the waste incineration facilities has been increasing at an annual rate 10%. In these view, waste incineration facilities should consider to reduce GHG emissions. This study is designed to estimate the N{sub 2}O emission factors from MSW incineration plants, and calculate the N{sub 2}O emissions based on these factors. The three MSW incinerators examined in this study were either stoker or both stoker and rotary kiln facilities. The N{sub 2}O concentrations from the MSW incinerators were measured using gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD) equipment. The average of the N{sub 2}O emission factors for the M01 plant, M02 plant, and M03 plant are 71, 75, and 153 g-N{sub 2}O/ton-waste, respectively. These results showed a significant difference from the default values of the intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC), while approaching those values derived in Japan and Germany. Furthermore, comparing the results of this study to the Korea Energy Economics Institute (KEEI) (2007) data on waste incineration, N{sub 2}O emissions from MSW incineration comprised 19% of the total N{sub 2}O emissions.

Park, Sangwon; Choi, Jun-Ho [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinwon, E-mail: jwpark@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Municipal spotlight: Working together in Northern Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Northern Virginia region is one of the nation`s liveliest centers of commerce as measured by job creation, new business formation, residential and commercial construction, and retail sales. The region also has one of the most advanced integrated waste management programs. In 1994, more than 1.6 million tons of municipal solid (MSW) were generated in the Northern Virginia region. Of that amount, 1 million tons were recovered as energy and more than 500,000 tons were landfilled. Additionally, more than 500,000 tons were recycled. The jurisdictions in this region have built an extensive network of solid waste management programs that are handled on the local government level, through cooperative programs, and through implementation of unique interjurisdictional agreements. These programs are arranged in the following hierarchy: source reduction, composting, recycling, energy recovery, and landfilling. This article provides a description of how this hierarchy is implemented in the region.

Arner, R.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

PV-TONS: A photovoltaic technology ontology system for the design of PV-systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of climate change, the increasing demand for energy and the diminishing fossil fuel resources have resulted in the development and use of a large number of renewable energy technologies in building development. These technologies are generating ... Keywords: Climate change, Ontology, PV-system, Renewable energy, Semantic Web

F. H. Abanda; J. H. M. Tah; D. Duce

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Table 7.3 Coal Consumption by Sector, 1949-2011 (Short Tons)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1954. 35,229,270 [7] 33,847,730 : 33,847,730 : 85,620,000 [8] 98,248,000 : 98,248,000 : 183,868,000 : 18,614,000 : 118,384,671 : na : 118,384,671 : ...

314

Table 7.1 Coal Overview, 1949-2011 (Short Tons)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1954. 420,789,000 : na : 205,000: 33,892,000-33,687,000-10,922,816 [r] 8,081,145 [r] 389,943,671 : 1955. 490,838,000 : na : 337,000: ...

315

Table 7.9 Coal Prices, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Short Ton)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1954. 4.54 [4] 27.82 [4,r] [4] [4] 2.43 : 14.89 [r] 8.76 : 53.67 [r] 4.81 : 29.47 [r] 1955. 4.51 [4] 27.17 [4,r] [4] [4] 2.38 : 14.34 [r] 8.00 : 48.19 ...

316

Table 7.8 Coke Overview, 1949-2011 (Thousand Short Tons)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1954. 59,662: 116: 388-272: 269: 59,121: 1955. 75,302: 126: 531-405-1,248: 76,145: 1956. 74,483: 131: 656-525: 634: 73,324: 1957. 75,951: 118: ...

317

Table 7.2 Coal Production, 1949-2011 (Short Tons)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1954. 391,706,000 [2] [2] 29,083,000 : 305,964,000 : 114,825,000 : 395,413,000 : 25,376,000 : 420,789,000 : 1955. 464,633,000 [2] [2] 26,205,000 : ...

318

Delivering tons to the register: Energy efficient design and operation of residential cooling systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and sealing the attic. Introduction Residential central airsealing, refrigerant charge addition, and correction of reduced airsealing the attic and insulating the roof) is a practical way to improve air

Siegel, Jeffrey; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Delivering Tons to the Register: Energy Efficient Design and Operation of Residential Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................................................. 125 4.5. Parameter Estimation Procedure ................................................................................................. 166 5.6. Parameter Estimation Procedure.................................. 119 4.3. Pressure-enthalpy diagram for the refrigeration cycle

320

Saving Tons at the Register Iain Walker, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

years. Does not remediate contaminated media. Cryogenic Barrier (In-situ process - material disposal than 1X10-6 cm/sec. Does not remediate contaminated media. Chemical Solidification/ Stabilization (In-situ, but does not include buildings and structures. The liquid media includes groundwater, surface water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Table 7.2 Coal Production, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas. Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. ... 1 Beginning in 2001, includes a small amount of refuse recovery.

322

DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in nuclear reactors. The decision follows an exhaustive Administration review of non-proliferation programs, including alternative technologies to dispose of surplus plutonium to...

323

U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Underscoring the Obama Administration's efforts to double energy productivity by 2030 and help businesses save money and energy, the Energy Department today recognized more...

324

The BosTon College Chronicle april 12, 2007-vol. 15 no. 15  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 1999; Hoinka and Castro 2003), Saudi Arabia (Ackermann and Cox 1982; Blake et al. 1983; Smith 1986a peak. Because of the dryness of the land, a large fraction of the incoming solar radiation is available on local weather. A good example is the `west- coast trough' over Australia. The coastal areas of Western

Huang, Jianyu

325

Table 7.9 Coal Prices, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Short Ton)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

R=Revised. E=Estimate. 2 See "Nominal Dollars" in Glossary. Note: Prices are free-on-board (F.O.B.) rail/barge prices, which are the F.O.B. prices of coal at the point

326

Table 7.7 Coal Mining Productivity, 1949-2011 (Short Tons per ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

dividing total production by total labor hours worked by all mine employees except office workers; beginning in ... 1978 and Coal—Pennsylvania Anthracite 1977; ...

327

Table 7.7 Coal Mining Productivity, 1949-2011 (Short Tons per ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

anthracite, were originally ... in 1998, the calculation also includes office workers. R=Revised. P=Preliminary. NA=Not available. 2 Beginning in 2001, ...

328

Table 11.3 Methane Emissions, 1980-2009 (Million Metric Tons ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Climate Change's Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (2006 and revised 1996 guidelines)—see http://www.ipcc-nggip.iges.or.jp/public/gl/invs6.html; ...

329

Table 11.3 Methane Emissions, 1980-2009 (Million Metric Tons ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Burning: Total 5: 1980. 3.06: 4.42: NA: 0.28: 0.45: 8.20: 10.52: 0.52: 11.04: 5.47: 2.87: 0.48: 0.04: 8.86: ... 4 Consumption of coal, petroleum, natural gas, and ...

330

Hybrid 240 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 18  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This eighteenth quarterly status report for the Hybrid Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) project, DOE Award DE-FC04-02AL68080 presents the project status at the end of March 2007, and covers activities in the eighteenth project quarter, January 2007 – March 2007.

Tim Richter

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Hybrid 320 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 13  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This thirteenth quarterly status report for the Hybrid Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) project, DOE Award DE-FC04-02AL68080 presents the project status at the end of December 2005, and covers activities in the thirteenth project quarter, October 2005 ? December 2005.

Tim Richter

2006-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

332

Table 11.3 Methane Emissions, 1980-2009 (Million Metric Tons of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook › Annual Energy Outlook ... 1984 forward, industrial and domestic wastewater. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration ...

333

Table 7.8 Coke Overview, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook › Annual Energy Outlook ... 1984: 30.4.6: 1.0-.5.2: 29.7: 1985: 28.4.6: 1.1-.5-1.2: 29.1: 1986: 24.9.3: 1.0-.7-.5: 24.7: 1987:

334

Table 7.8 Coke Overview, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Net imports equal imports minus exports. Minus sign indicates exports are greater than imports. Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to ...

335

Mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash from a MSW fluidized-bed incinerator  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an investigation of the mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash sampled from a municipal solid waste fluidized-bed incinerator, subject to 18 months of dynamic leaching in a large percolation column experiment. A particular focus is on the redox behaviour of Cr(VI) in relation to metal aluminium Al{sup 0}, as chromium may represent an environmental or health hazard. The leaching behaviour and interaction between Cr(VI) and Al{sup 0} are interpreted on the basis of mineralogical evolutions observed over the 18-month period and of saturation indices calculated with the geochemical code PhreeqC and reviewed thermodynamic data. Results of mineralogical analyses show in particular the alteration of mineral phases during leaching (e.g. quartz and metal aluminium grains), while geochemical calculations suggest equilibria of percolating fluids with respect to specific mineral phases (e.g. monohydrocalcite and aluminium hydroxide). The combination of leaching data on a large scale and mineralogical analyses document the coupled leaching behaviour of aluminium and chromium, with chromium appearing in the pore fluids in its hexavalent and mobile state once metal aluminium is no longer available for chromium reduction.

Bodenan, F., E-mail: f.bodenan@brgm.f [BRGM - French Geological Survey, Environment and Processes Division, BP 36009, 3 Av. C. Guillemin, 45060 Orleans Cedex (France); Guyonnet, D.; Piantone, P.; Blanc, P. [BRGM - French Geological Survey, Environment and Processes Division, BP 36009, 3 Av. C. Guillemin, 45060 Orleans Cedex (France)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Transforming Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) into Fuel via the Gasification/Pyrolysis Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pyrolysis oil and bio-liquids derived thereof. Fast pyrolysis oils can be obtained from biomass in yields up] Bridgwater, A.; Czernik, S.; Diebold, J.; Meier, D.; Oasmaa, A.; Peacocke, C,. Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass, I.A. Production of a Bio-Gasoline by Ugrading Biomass Flash Pyrolysis Liquids via Hydrogen

Columbia University

337

Formation of deposits on the surfaces of superheaters and economisers of MSW incinerator plants  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composition of deposits depends on the temperature profile and boiler geometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mineralogy of deposits defines critical and uncritical zones in the boiler. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical zones in boilers can be characterised by a classification systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific measures to enhance energy efficiency can be defined. - Abstract: Mineralogical and chemical investigations of deposits from superheaters and economisers from a MSWI plant in Mannheim, Germany, lead to a classification system which provides information about the most critical parameters leading to fouling and corrosion. With the help of this classification system parameters like the geometry of boilers and the waste input can be changed in order to prolong run times between revisions and enhance energy efficiency of MSWI plants.

Reichelt, J. [IBR, Obergrombacher Strasse 29, D-76646 Bruchsal (Germany); Pfrang-Stotz, G., E-mail: Gudrun.Pfrang-Stotz@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), ITC, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bergfeldt, B.; Seifert, H. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), ITC, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Knapp, P. [MVV O and M GmbH, Muellheizkraftwerk Mannheim, Otto-Hahn-Strasse 1, D-68169 Mannheim (Germany)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

The environmental comparison of landfilling vs. incineration of MSW accounting for waste diversion  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residential waste diversion initiatives are more successful with organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using a incineration to manage part of the waste is better environmentally. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incineration leads to more power plant emission offsets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Landfilling all of the waste would be preferred financially. - Abstract: This study evaluates the environmental performance and discounted costs of the incineration and landfilling of municipal solid waste that is ready for the final disposal while accounting for existing waste diversion initiatives, using the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. Parameters such as changing waste generation quantities, diversion rates and waste composition were also considered. Two scenarios were assessed in this study on how to treat the waste that remains after diversion. The first scenario is the status quo, where the entire residual waste was landfilled whereas in the second scenario approximately 50% of the residual waste was incinerated while the remainder is landfilled. Electricity was produced in each scenario. Data from the City of Toronto was used to undertake this study. Results showed that the waste diversion initiatives were more effective in reducing the organic portion of the waste, in turn, reducing the net electricity production of the landfill while increasing the net electricity production of the incinerator. Therefore, the scenario that incorporated incineration performed better environmentally and contributed overall to a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions because of the displacement of power plant emissions; however, at a noticeably higher cost. Although landfilling proves to be the better financial option, it is for the shorter term. The landfill option would require the need of a replacement landfill much sooner. The financial and environmental effects of this expenditure have yet to be considered.

Assamoi, Bernadette [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E5 (Canada); Lawryshyn, Yuri, E-mail: yuri.lawryshyn@utoronto.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E5 (Canada)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

The effect of very low energy solar neutrinos on the MSW mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study some implications on standard matter oscillations of solar neutrinos induced by a background of extremely low energy thermal neutrinos trapped inside the Sun by means of coherent refractive interactions. Possible experimental tests are envisaged and current data on solar neutrinos detected at Earth are briefly discussed.

S. Esposito

2003-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

340

STATUS OF INCINERATION AND GENERATION OF ENERGY FROM THERMAL PROCESSING OF MSW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as of September 1979 . Information on the reason for closure and current method of disposal is included for each emission standards by various states has resulted in a significant number of closures since the Fenton report. However, actual information on closures was merely speculation and con sequently to obtain

Columbia University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Atmospheric fluidized bed combustion of municipal solid waste: test program results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air classified municipal solid waste (MSW) was fired in an atmospheric fluidized bed combustor at low excess air to simulate boiler conditions. The 7 ft/sup 2/ combustor at Combustion Power Company's energy laboratory in Menlo Park, CA, incorporates water tubes for heat extraction and recycles elutriated particles to the bed. System operation was stable while firing processed MSW for the duration of a 300-h test. Low excess air, low exhaust gas emissions, and constant bed temperature demonstrated feasibility of steam generation from fluidized bed combustion of MSW. During the 300-h test, combustion efficiency averaged 99%. Excess air was typically 44% while an average bed temperature of 1400/sup 0/F and an average superficial gas velocity of 4.6 fps were maintained. Typical exhaust emission levels were 30 ppM SO/sub 2/, 160 ppM NO/sub x/, 200 ppM CO, and 25 ppM hydrocarbons. No agglomeration of bed material or detrimental change in fluidization properties was experienced. A conceptual design study of a full scale plant to be located at Stanford University was based on process conditions from the 300-h test. The plant would produce 250,000 lb/hr steam at the maximum firing rate of 1000 tons per day (TPD) processed MSW. The average 800 TPD firing rate would utilize approximately 1200 TPD raw MSW from surrounding communities. The Stanford Solid Waste energy Program was aimed at development of a MSW-fired fluidized bed boiler and cogeneration plant to supply most of the energy needs of Stanford University.

Preuit, L C; Wilson, K B

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Renewable Energy 32 (2007) 12431257 Methane generation in landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 Abstract Methane gas is a by-product of landfilling municipal solid wastes (MSW). Most tonnes of methane annually, 70% of which is used to generate heat and/or electricity. The landfill gas. All rights reserved. Keywords: Landfill gas; Renewable energy; Municipal solid waste; Biogas; Methane

Columbia University

343

Utilization of biocatalysts in cellulose waste minimization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the principal component of biomass and, therefore, a major source of waste that is either buried or burned. Examples of biomass waste include agricultural crop residues, forestry products, and municipal wastes. Recycling of this waste is important for energy conservation as well as waste minimization and there is some probability that in the future biomass could become a major energy source and replace fossil fuels that are currently used for fuels and chemicals production. It has been estimated that in the United States, between 100-450 million dry tons of agricultural waste are produced annually, approximately 6 million dry tons of animal waste, and of the 190 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated annually, approximately two-thirds is cellulosic in nature and over one-third is paper waste. Interestingly, more than 70% of MSW is landfilled or burned, however landfill space is becoming increasingly scarce. On a smaller scale, important cellulosic products such as cellulose acetate also present waste problems; an estimated 43 thousand tons of cellulose ester waste are generated annually in the United States. Biocatalysts could be used in cellulose waste minimization and this chapter describes their characteristics and potential in bioconversion and bioremediation processes.

Woodward, J.; Evans, B.R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Municipal solid-waste management in Istanbul  

SciTech Connect

Istanbul, with a population of around 13 million people, is located between Europe and Asia and is the biggest city in Turkey. Metropolitan Istanbul produces about 14,000 tons of solid waste per day. The aim of this study was to assess the situation of municipal solid-waste (MSW) management in Istanbul. This was achieved by reviewing the quantity and composition of waste produced in Istanbul. Current requirements and challenges in relation to the optimization of Istanbul's MSW collection and management system are also discussed, and several suggestions for solving the problems identified are presented. The recovery of solid waste from the landfills, as well as the amounts of landfill-generated biogas and electricity, were evaluated. In recent years, MSW management in Istanbul has improved because of strong governance and institutional involvement. However, efforts directed toward applied research are still required to enable better waste management. These efforts will greatly support decision making on the part of municipal authorities. There remains a great need to reduce the volume of MSW in Istanbul.

Kanat, Gurdal, E-mail: gkanat@gmail.co [Yildiz Teknik Universitesi Cevre Muh Bolumu, 34220 Davutpasa-Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Municipal solid waste management: A bibliography of US Department of Energy contractor reports through 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US Department of Energy contractors continue to conduct research targeting the productive and responsible use of the more than 536,000 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) that is generated each day in the United States. It is becoming more and more prudent to improve current methods of MSW management and to continue to search for additional cost-effective, energy-efficient means to manage our MSW resource. This bibliography is an updated version of Municipal Waste to Energy: An Annotated Bibliography of US Department of Energy Contractor Reports, by Caroline Brooks, published in 1987. Like its predecessor, this bibliography provides information about technical reports on energy from municipal waste that were prepared under grants or contracts from the US Department of Energy. The reports listed focus on energy from municipal waste technologies and energy conservation in wastewater treatment. The bibliography contains three indexes -- an author index, a subject index, and a title index. The reports are listed alphabetically in the subject areas and may appear under more than one subject. All of the reports cited in the original MSW bibliography are also included in this update. The number of copies of each report originally published varied according to anticipated public demand. However, all reports are available in either microfiche or hard copy form and may be ordered from the National Technical Information Service (NTIS), US Department of Commerce, Springfield, VA 22161. Explicit information on ordering reports is included in Appendix A.

Shepherd, P.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Life cycle assessment of solid waste management options for Eskisehir, Turkey  

SciTech Connect

Life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology was used to determine the optimum municipal solid waste (MSW) management strategy for Eskisehir city. Eskisehir is one of the developing cities of Turkey where a total of approximately 750 tons/day of waste is generated. An effective MSW management system is needed in this city since the generated MSW is dumped in an unregulated dumping site that has no liner, no biogas capture, etc. Therefore, five different scenarios were developed as alternatives to the current waste management system. Collection and transportation of waste, a material recovery facility (MRF), recycling, composting, incineration and landfilling processes were considered in these scenarios. SimaPro7 libraries were used to obtain background data for the life cycle inventory. One ton of municipal solid waste of Eskisehir was selected as the functional unit. The alternative scenarios were compared through the CML 2000 method and these comparisons were carried out from the abiotic depletion, global warming, human toxicity, acidification, eutrophication and photochemical ozone depletion points of view. According to the comparisons and sensitivity analysis, composting scenario, S3, is the more environmentally preferable alternative. In this study waste management alternatives were investigated only on an environmental point of view. For that reason, it might be supported with other decision-making tools that consider the economic and social effects of solid waste management.

Banar, Mufide [Anadolu University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Environmental Engineering, Iki Eylul Campus, 26555 Eskisehir (Turkey)], E-mail: mbanar@anadolu.edu.tr; Cokaygil, Zerrin; Ozkan, Aysun [Anadolu University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Environmental Engineering, Iki Eylul Campus, 26555 Eskisehir (Turkey)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids. Volume 7. GPGP jet-fuels production program. Evaluation of technical uncertainties for producing jet fuels from liquid by-products of the Great Plains gasification plant. Interim report, 2 October 1987-30 September 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September 1986, the Fuels Branch of the Aero Propulsion Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, began an investigation of the potential of jet-fuel production from the liquid by-product streams produced by the gasification of lignite at the Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota. Funding was provided by the Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to administer the experimental portion of this effort. This document reports the results of the effort by Burns and Roe Services Corporation/Science Applications International Corporation (BRSC/SAIC) to analyze GPGP operations and develop correlations for the liquid by-products and plant operating factors such as coal feed rate and coal characteristics.

Fraser, M.D.; Rossi, R.J.; Wan, E.I.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Biogas Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells Dennis Papadias and Shabbir Ahmed Argonne National Laboratory Presented at the Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Golden, CO June 11-13, 2012 Biogas is the product of anaerobic decomposition of organic waste Municipal solid wastes (MSW)  For every 1 million tons of MSW: - 432,000 cubic feet per day of landfill gas (LFG) for a period of 20 years - 1 MW of electricity 1 Sewage sludge/waste water (WWTP or ADG)  A typical WWTP processes 100 gallons per day (GD) for every person served - 1 cubic foot of digester gas can be produced per 100 gallons of wastewater  100 kW of electricity 1 can be generated from 4.5 MGD of waste water Agricultural waste (i.e. dairy waste)  About 70-100 ft 3 /day of digester gas is produced

349

Microsoft Word - Oneida Appendix D-FEA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

30 TPD MSW power generation Hong, Kong 58 TPD MSW power generation GentingSri Layang Malaysia 60 TPD MSW (WDF) 6.9 MWt P.N.G. 40 TPD MSW syngas Chung Gung Municipality Taiwan 30...

350

Utah Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

351

Maryland Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

352

Federal Gulf Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

353

Toxic combustion by-products: Generation, separation, cleansing, containment  

SciTech Connect

Focus of this paper is on diagnosis, control, and containment of potentially toxic combustion byproducts when mixed wastes are treated at elevated temperatures. Such byproducts fall into several categories: acid gases, particulates, metals, organics. Radionuclides are treated as a subset of metals, while organics are divided into two subclasses: products of incomplete combustion, and principal organic hazardous constituents. An extended flue gas cleaning system is described which can be used to contain potentially toxic organic emissions and recycle the hazrdous materials for further treatment; it uses oxygen rather than air to reduce total quantities of emissions, improve efficiency of oxidation, and minimize NOx emissions. Flue gas recycling is used for cooling and for containing all potentially toxic emissions. Three thermal treatment unit operations are used in series for more effective process control; three emission separation and containment unit operations are also used in series in the toxic emission containment system. Real time diagnostic hardware/software are used. Provision is made for automatic storage, separation of hazardous materials, commodity regeneration, and recycling of potentially harmful constituents. The greenhouse gas CO2 is recovered and not emitted to the atmosphere.

Kephart, W.; Eger, K. [Foster-Wheeler Environmental Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Angelo, F. [Resource Energy Corp., Fort Smith, AR (United States); Clemens, M.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

Texas Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

355

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products: Consortium Byproducts Recycling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) The mission of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing. The overall goals of CBRC are to: Increase the overall national rate of byproduct use by to ~ 50 % by 2010 Increase the number of “allowable” byproduct uses under state regulations by ~ 25% Double of the current rate of FGD byproduct use CBRC is a unique partnership that integrates the electric power industry, State and Federal regulatory agencies, and academia to form a strong, cohesive consortium to guide the national and regional research priorities of the CBRC. CBRC is managed by the West Virginia Water Research Institute at West Virginia University and is administered by regional centers at the University of Kentucky (Eastern Region), Southern Illinois University (Midwest Region) and the University of North Dakota (Western Region). Primary funding for CBRC is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL).

356

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products - Utilization Projects...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of North Dakota, EERC - Table of Contents Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Stabilizing Feedlots Using Coal Ash Environmental Evaluation for Utilization of Ash in...

357

California Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

358

Bioelectrochemical Treatment of Gaseous By-products - Energy ...  

Electricity or hydrogen can be reused for hydrotreatment processes; Operates by renewable means; Applications and Industries. Treatment of sulfide-containing gas streams;

359

Ohio Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

360

Kentucky Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Virginia Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

362

Montana Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

9,977.7: 10.2: 132.0: 3.8: 0.1: 25 - 30 | 109: 2.5: 977.5: 2.8: 25.6: 473.4: 12.4 | 111: 1.7: 5,715.9: 5.8: 163.4: 0.0: 0.0: 30 - 40 | 169: 3.9: 1,909.6: 5.5: 31.7 ...

363

Modeling the Gas By-products of Metalorganic Chemical Vapor ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fiber then proceeds through an inert gas seal, inlet cross, hot-wall reactor, ... The effluent flows through a burn box (heated to greater than 500°C) before ... involve transport-kinetic modeling that describes the fluid flow, heat transfer, and  ...

364

BUILDING MATERIALS MADE FROM FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect

Flue gas desulphurization (FGD) materials are produced in abundant quantities by coal burning utilities. Due to environmental restrains, flue gases must be ''cleaned'' prior to release to the atmosphere. They are two general methods to ''scrub'' flue gas: wet and dry. The choice of scrubbing material is often defined by the type of coal being burned, i.e. its composition. Scrubbing is traditionally carried out using a slurry of calcium containing material (slaked lime or calcium carbonate) that is made to contact exiting flue gas as either a spay injected into the gas or in a bubble tower. The calcium combined with the SO{sub 2} in the gas to form insoluble precipitates. Some plants have been using dry injection of these same materials or their own Class C fly ash to scrub. In either case the end product contains primarily hannebachite (CaSO{sub 3} {center_dot} 1/2H{sub 2}O) with smaller amounts of gypsum (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O). These materials have little commercial use. Experiments were carried out that were meant to explore the feasibility of using blends of hannebachite and fly ash mixed with concentrated sodium hydroxide to make masonry products. The results suggest that some of these mixtures could be used in place of conventional Portland cement based products such as retaining wall bricks and pavers.

Michael W. Grutzeck; Maria DiCola; Paul Brenner

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

365

Oklahoma Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

435: 1.3: 2,305.6: 4.7: 15.0: 2,192.3: 14.3 | 3,091: 6.6: 109,645.5: 6.5: 99.2: 844.8: 0.8: 20 - 25 | 202: 0.6: 1,366.0: 2.8: 19.2: 1,362.4: 19.2 | 1,990: 4.2: 90,699 ...

366

Enhancement of IGCC through clean by-product fuel coproduction  

SciTech Connect

The major objective of this paper is to first design a base case IGCC plant that is representative of a base-loaded power plant, and then to identify and to quantify the potential benefits of a spare gasifier and fuel-grade methanol coproduction as additions to the base case plant. This is significantly different than previous methanol coproduction IGCC studies which have assumed cyclic operation with undersized coal gasification capacity. The proposed IGCC plant will be at FPL's Martin Site, located near the eastern shore of Lake Okeechobee, Florida. The major components of the proposed IGCC plant are: dry-feed (Shell) or slurry-feed (Dow) gasifiers, GE advanced gas turbine (Model MS7001F), methanol plant based on liquid Phase Methanol (LPMeOH*) process.

Schmoe, L.A. (Bechtel Power Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (United States)); Tam, S.S. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)); Walters, A.B. (Florida Power and Light Co., West Palm Beach, FL (US)); Weber, W. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Colorado Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

368

Alabama Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

369

Alaska Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

241.1: 38,664.1: 299.6 | 76: 7.9: 36,064.3: 1.2: 1,437.3: 1,483.0: 59.1: 400 - 800 | 317: 23.8: 49,215.7: 23.5: 444.3: 89,095.1: 804.4 | 103: 10.6: 89,914.4: 2.9 ...

370

Louisiana Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

241: 1.6: 221,990.6: 15.6: 2,995.6: 4,411.0: 59.5: 800 - 1600 | 24: 0.1: 6,083.9: 7.9: 795.9: 10,437.8: 1,365.5 | 101: 0.7: 173,440.8: 12.2: 5,595.9: 5,537.4: 178.7 ...

371

Tennessee Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

241.1: 81.6: 1.2: 1.5: 0.0 | 172: 97.2: 462.5: 44.4: 8.3: 2.1: 0.0: 15 - 20 | 5: 0.9: 28.3: 9.6: 16.9: 0.0: 0.0 | 1: 0.6: 35.3: 3.4: 96.8: 0.4: 1.1: 20 - 25 | 0: 0.0 ...

372

Michigan Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

373

Best use of our animal by-products  

SciTech Connect

The economic situation of the renderer is such that the average product price is below the rate of inflation in operating cost, caused by the slump in the price of tallow due to competition from other oils and fats. Improvement in certain areas is suggested and when the quality and consistency of meal that customers require is provided, there should be no problem regarding sales and no fear of serious competition.

Bibby, R.E.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Pennsylvania Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

375

North Dakota Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

376

Chemical production from industrial by-product gases: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for conservation of natural gas is studied and the technical and economic feasibility and the implementation of ventures to produce such chemicals using carbon monoxide and hydrogen from byproduct gases are determined. A survey was performed of potential chemical products and byproduct gas sources. Byproduct gases from the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries were selected for detailed study. Gas sampling, preliminary design, market surveys, and economic analyses were performed for specific sources in the selected industries. The study showed that production of methanol or ammonia from byproduct gas at the sites studied in the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries is technically feasible but not economically viable under current conditions. Several other applications are identified as having the potential for better economics. The survey performed identified a need for an improved method of recovering carbon monoxide from dilute gases. A modest experimental program was directed toward the development of a permselective membrane to fulfill that need. A practical membrane was not developed but further investigation along the same lines is recommended. (MCW)

Lyke, S.E.; Moore, R.H.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

FGD By-Product Disposal Manual, Fourth Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual presents an objective, systematic methodology for evaluating potential flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludge disposal sites and design approaches. A completely updated edition, the manual provides new information and references on existing industry disposal practices, regulatory constraints and trends, FGD sludge properties, and waste management system costs.

1995-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

378

Mississippi Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

379

Missouri Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

380

Wyoming Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

South Dakota Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

382

Federal Pacific Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

383

Arkansas Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

384

Nebraska Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

385

New York Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

386

West Virginia Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

387

Nevada Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

388

Arizona Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well (bbl/Day) Annual Gas ...

389

New Mexico Distribution of Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Wells Gas Wells; Prod. Rate Bracket (BOE/Day) | | | | # of Oil Wells % of Oil Wells Annual Oil Prod. (Mbbl) % of Oil Prod. Oil Rate per Well ...

390

Rapid Batch Characterization of Coal Utilization By-Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

21 provided a leaching method and compared its use with results from the EPA-EP, the TCLP, and an ASTM procedure, concluding that leaching tests should be matched to field...

391

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Energy Conservation Center, Japan The World Bank, 2001.Energy Efficiency In Buildings. Washington DC:World Bank The

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Hybrid 320 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 11, DOE/AL68080-TSR11  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This eleventh quarterly status report for the Hybrid Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) project, DOE Award DE-FC04-02AL68080 presents the project status at the end of June 2005, and covers activities in the eleventh project quarter, April 2005-June 2005.

Tim Richter

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

393

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

boiler boiler stove district heating heat pump conditionerSmall cogen Stove District heating Heat pump Centralized AC

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Hybrid 320 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 7, DOE/AL68080-TSR07  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis and results show hybrid system weight and efficiency affect productivity and fuel usage. Analysis shows equivalent hybrid benefits for adjacent size classes of mine truck. Preparations are ongoing for full power test. The battery cycling test protocol was modified.

Lembit Salasoo

2004-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

395

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal, oil and oil product, crude oil, other Coal, oiland oil product, crude oil, other Steam, diesel, electricityDomestic Internation al Crude oil, oil products, NG, other

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Advanced Hybrid Propulsion and Energy Management System for High Efficiency, Off Highway, 240 Ton Class, Diesel Electric Haul Trucks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to reduce the fuel consumption of off-highway vehicles, specifically large tonnage mine haul trucks. A hybrid energy storage and management system will be added to a conventional diesel-electric truck that will allow capture of braking energy normally dissipated in grid resistors as heat. The captured energy will be used during acceleration and motoring, reducing the diesel engine load, thus conserving fuel. The project will work towards a system validation of the hybrid system by first selecting an energy storage subsystem and energy management subsystem. Laboratory testing at a subscale level will evaluate these selections and then a full-scale laboratory test will be performed. After the subsystems have been proven at the full-scale lab, equipment will be mounted on a mine haul truck and integrated with the vehicle systems. The integrated hybrid components will be exercised to show functionality, capability, and fuel economy impacts in a mine setting.

Richter, Tim; Slezak, Lee; Johnson, Chris; Young, Henry; Funcannon, Dan

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Y. , 2003. China’s Sustainable Energy Future, Scenarios ofZhu,Y. , 2003. China’s Sustainable Energy Scenarios in 2020,and to move toward a sustainable energy future. Maintaining

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

O R N L/Sub-80/24706/ 1 Phase II Brayton/Rankine 10-Ton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biocombustiveis, Table 3'2' http://www.anp.eov.br/conheca/anuarig-2008.asjl ^ tl4l p. C. Vasconcellos, L- Rfru

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

399

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

space heating, space conditioning, water heating, lighting,broken out into space heating, air conditioning, appliances,Conditioning Appliances Cooking Lighting Other Uses Space

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Analyses of sweep-up, ejecta, and fallback material from the 4250 metric ton high explosive test ''MISTY PICTURE'  

SciTech Connect

The MISTY PICTURE surface burst was detonated at the White Sands Missle range in May of 1987. The Los Alamos National Laboratory dust characterization program was expanded to help correlate and interrelate aspects of the overall MISTY PICTURE dust and ejecta characterization program. Pre-shot sampling of the test bed included composite samples from 15 to 75 m distance from Surface Ground Zero (SGZ) representing depths down to 2.5 m, interval samples from 15 to 25 m from SGZ representing depths down to 3m, and samples of surface material (top 0.5 cm) out to distances of 190 m from SGZ. Sweep-up samples were collected in GREG/SNOB gages located within the DPR. All samples were dry-sieved between 8.0 mm and 0.045 mm (16 size fractures); selected samples were analyzed for fines by a contrifugal settling technique. The size distributions were analyzed using spectral decomposition based upon a sequential fragmentation model. Results suggest that the same particle size subpopulations are present in the ejecta, fallout, and sweep-up samples as are present in the pre-shot test bed. The particle size distribution in post-shot environments apparently can be modelled taking into account heterogeneities in the pre-shot test bed and dominant wind direction during and following the shot. 13 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Wohletz, K.H.; Raymond, R. Jr.; Rawson, G.; Mazzola, T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Hybrid 240 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 19, DOE/AL68080-TSR19  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This nineteenth quarterly status report for the Hybrid Off Highway Vehicle (OHV) project, DOE Award DE-FC04-02AL68080 presents the project status at the end of June 2007, and covers activities in the nineteenth project quarter, April 2007 – June 2007.

Tim Richter

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

402

Helium-Based Soundwave Chiller: Trillium: A Helium-Based Sonic Chiller- Tons of Freezing with 0 GWP Refrigerants  

SciTech Connect

BEETIT Project: Penn State is designing a freezer that substitutes the use of sound waves and environmentally benign refrigerant for synthetic refrigerants found in conventional freezers. Called a thermoacoustic chiller, the technology is based on the fact that the pressure oscillations in a sound wave result in temperature changes. Areas of higher pressure raise temperatures and areas of low pressure decrease temperatures. By carefully arranging a series of heat exchangers in a sound field, the chiller is able to isolate the hot and cold regions of the sound waves. Penn State’s chiller uses helium gas to replace synthetic refrigerants. Because helium does not burn, explode or combine with other chemicals, it is an environmentally-friendly alternative to other polluting refrigerants. Penn State is working to apply this technology on a large scale.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

target to • +1% in coal fired plant efficiency • -1% in T&Dincludes increasing coal-fired power plant efficiency by 1

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

considering that energy consumption has grown more rapidlyof China’s energy consumption by major international2. Recent Trends in Energy Consumption in China Between 1980

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pilot Project with the Steel Industry in Shandong Province,scenario and the iron and steel industry could achieve anand iron & steel) and other industries could provide a

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Final Technical Report for DUSEL Research and Development on Sub-Kelvin Germanium Detectors for Ton Scale Dark Matter Search  

SciTech Connect

We have supported one graduate student and a small percentage of fabrication staff on $135k per year for three years plus one no cost extension year on this DUSEL R&D grant. � There were three themes within our research program: (1) how to improve the radial sensitivity for single sided phonon readout with four equal area sensors of which three form a central circle and fourth a surrounding ring; (2) how to instrument double sided phonon readouts which will give us better surface event rejection and increased fiducial volume for future CDMS style detectors; and (3) can we manufacture much larger Ge detectors using six inch diameter material which is not suitable for standard gamma ray spectroscopy.

Prof. Blas Cabrera

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

407

Effect of CNG start-gasoline run on emissions from a 3/4 ton pick-up truck  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes experiments to determine the effect on exhaust emissions of starting on compressed natural gas (CNG) and then switching to gasoline once the catalyst reaches operating temperature. Carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and detailed exhaust hydrocarbon speciation data were obtained for dedicated CNG, then unleaded gasoline, and finally CNG start-gasoline run using the Federal Test Procedure at 24{degree}C and at -7{degree}C. The result was a reduction in emissions from the gasoline baseline, especially at -7{degree}C. It was estimated that CNG start - gasoline run resulted in a 71 percent reduction in potential ozone formation per mile. 3 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

Springer, K.J.; Smith, L.R.; Dickinson, A.G.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Effect of CNG start - gasoline run on emissions from a 3/4 ton pick-up truck  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes experiments to determine the effect on exhaust emissions of starting on compressed natural gas (CNG) and then switching to gasoline once the catalyst reaches operating temperature. Carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, and detailed exhaust hydrocarbon speciation data were obtained for dedicated CNG, then unleaded gasoline, and finally CNG start - gasoline run using the Federal Test Procedure at 24{degree}C and at -7{degree}C. The results was a reductiopn in emissions from the gasoline baseline, especially at -7{degree}C. It was estimated that CNG start - gasoline run resulted in a 71 percent reduction in potential ozone formation per mile. 3 refs., 6 figs., 11 tabs.

Springer, K.J.; Smith, L.R.; Dickinson, A.G.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Materials management in an internationally safeguarded fuels reprocessing plant. [1500 and 210 metric tons heavy metal per year  

SciTech Connect

The second volume describes the requirements and functions of materials measurement and accounting systems (MMAS) and conceptual designs for an MMAS incorporating both conventional and near-real-time (dynamic) measurement and accounting techniques. Effectiveness evaluations, based on recently developed modeling, simulation, and analysis procedures, show that conventional accountability can meet IAEA goal quantities and detection times in these reference facilities only for low-enriched uranium. Dynamic materials accounting may meet IAEA goals for detecting the abrupt (1-3 weeks) diversion of 8 kg of plutonium. Current materials accounting techniques probably cannot meet the 1-y protracted-diversion goal of 8 kg for plutonium.

Hakkila, E.A.; Cobb, D.D.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Kern, E.A.; Markin, J.T.; Shipley, J.P.; Barnes, J.W.; Scheinman, L.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intercity Trucks Coal, oil, coke, other Freight water localmetal min prod petroleum, coke, & nuke smelting & rolling ofElectricity heat Coal and coke Coal Electr icity heat

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Landfill Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Get Feedback Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.epa.gov/lmop/publications-tools/handbook.html Cost: Free References: Project Development Handbook[1] The handbook describes the process of implementing a waste-to-energy landfill gas project. Overview "Approximately 250 million tons of solid waste was generated in the United States in 2008 with 54 percent deposited in municipal solid waste (MSW)

412

Oil palm vegetation liquor: a new source of phenolic bioactives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste from agricultural products represents a disposal liability, which needs to be addressed. Palm oil is the most widely traded edible oil globally, and its production generates 85 million tons of aqueous by-products ...

Sambandan, T. G.

413

MHD origin of density fluctuations deep within the Sun and their influence on neutrino oscillation parameters in LMA MSW scenario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze helioseismic waves near the solar equator in the presence of magnetic fields deep within the solar radiative zone. We find that reasonable magnetic fields can significantly alter the shapes of the wave profiles for helioseismic g modes. They can do so because the existence of density gradients allows g modes to resonantly excite Alfven waves, causing mode energy to be funneled along magnetic field lines, away from the solar equatorial plane. The resulting waveforms show comparatively sharp spikes in the density profiles at radii where these resonances take place. Such matter density waves with known spatial structure are substituted as a matter density noise into the 2 x 2 Schroedinger equation for {nu}{sub e,{mu}} neutrinos oscillating within the Sun. Then we reexamine the sensitivity of solar neutrino oscillations to noise in the solar interior using the best current estimates of neutrino properties. Our results show that the measurement of neutrino properties at KamLAND provides new information about fluctuations in the solar environment on scales to which standard helioseismology constraints are largely insensitive. We also show how the determination of neutrino oscillation parameters from a combined fit of KamLAND and solar data depends strongly on the magnitude of solar density fluctuations.

Semikoz, V.B.; Dzhalilov, N.S. [Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation, Russian Academy of Sciences (IZMIRAN), Troitsk, Moscow oblast, 142092 (Russian Federation); Burgess, C.P. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Rashba, T.I.; Valle, J.W.F. [AHEP Group, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, C.S.I.C., Universidad de Valencia, Edificio Institutos de Paterna, Valencia (Spain)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Proceedings of the 17th Biennial Waste Processing Conference A NEW APPROACH TO CONDUCTING MSW COMPOSITION STUDIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on a ring sorter, whichis a round metal conveyor where materialslike glass, metal and/or plasticsare sorted customers for compost. They use the soil as a replacementforpeat mossintriplemixsoilblendsproduced

Columbia University

415

EA-1841: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Taylor Biomass  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Taylor Biomass 41: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Taylor Biomass Montgomery Project in the Town of Montgomery, Orange County, New York EA-1841: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Taylor Biomass Montgomery Project in the Town of Montgomery, Orange County, New York Summary Taylor Biomass, LLC (Taylor) submitted an application to DOE for a Federal loan guarantee to support the construction and startup of a biomass gasification-to energy facility at a 95-acre recycling facility in the Town of Montgomery, Orange County, NY. The Project would involve the construction of a Post-Collection Separation Facility, a Gasification System and a Combined Cycle Gas Turbine Power Island. The Post-Collection Separation Facility would accept 950 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW), construction and demolition debris, and 100 tons of

416

An environmental assessment of recovering methane from municipal solid waste by anaerobic digestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of an experimental process which produces synthetic natural gas (SNG) or biogas by anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste (MSW) is evaluated. This technology, if implemented, would be utilized in lieu of incineration or directly landfilling waste. An environmental assessment describing the principal impacts associated with operating the MSW anaerobic digestion process is presented. Variations in process configurations provide for SNG or electricity production and digester residue incineration, composting, or landfilling. Four process configuration are compared to the conventional solid waste disposal alternative of mass burn incineration and landfilling. Emissions are characterized, effluents quantified, and landfill areas predicted. The quantity of SNG and electricity recovered, and aluminum and ferrous metals recycled is predicted along with the emissions and effluents avoided by recovering energy and recycling metals. Air emissions are the primary on-site concern with the anaerobic digestion process. However, when compared to mass burn incineration, the projected particulate emissions for the anaerobic digestion process range from 2.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 2.6 {times} {sup 10{minus}5} pounds per ton of waste vs. 3.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} pounds per ton for mass burn. SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and PCCD emissions have a similar relationship.

O'Leary, P.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Hydrogen production from municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have modified a Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) hydrothermal pretreatment pilot plant for batch operation and blowdown of the treated batch to low pressure. We have also assembled a slurry shearing pilot plant for particle size reduction. Waste paper and a mixture of waste paper/polyethylene plastic have been run in the pilot plant with a treatment temperature of 275{degrees}C. The pilot-plant products have been used for laboratory studies at LLNL. The hydrothermal/shearing pilot plants have produced acceptable slurries for gasification tests from a waste paper feedstock. Work is currently underway with combined paper/plastic feedstocks. When the assembly of the Research Gasification Unit at Texaco (feed capacity approximately 3/4-ton/day) is complete (4th quarter of FY96), gasification test runs will commence. Laboratory work on slurry samples during FY96 has provided correlations between slurry viscosity and hydrothermal treatment temperature, degree of shearing, and the presence of surfactants and admixed plastics. To date, pumpable slurries obtained from an MSW surrogate mixture of treated paper and plastic have shown heating values in the range 13-15 MJ/kg. Our process modeling has quantified the relationship between slurry heating value and hydrogen yield. LLNL has also performed a preliminary cost analysis of the process with the slurry heating value and the MSW tipping fee as parameters. This analysis has shown that the overall process with a 15 MJ/kg slurry gasifier feed can compete with coal-derived hydrogen with the assumption that the tipping fee is of the order $50/ton.

Wallman, P.H.; Richardson, J.H.; Thorsness, C.B. [and others

1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

418

Municipal solid waste management in Lahore City District, Pakistan  

SciTech Connect

This study deals with generation, composition, collection, transportation, and disposal, as well as the present cost of the waste management on the basis of 60% collection of the total waste and the cost of proposed improved system of management on the basis of 100% waste collection using the IWM-2 LCI model. A GIS map of Data Ganj Bakhsh Town (DGBT) of Lahore City District showing communal storage facilities is also provided. DGBT has a population of 1,624,169 living in 232,024 dwellings. The total waste generated per year is 500,000 tons, or 0.84/kg/cap/day. Presently 60% of the MSW is collected and disposed in open dumps, while 40% is not collected and lies along roadsides, streets railway lines, depressions, vacant plots, drains, storm drains and open sewers. In DGBT, 129 containers of 5-m{sup 3} capacity, 120 containers of 10-m{sup 3} capacity and 380 skips of 2.5-m{sup 3} capacity are placed for waste collection. The overall collection and disposal cost of the MSW of DGBT is $3,177,900/yr, which is $10.29/ton. Modeling was conducted using the IWM-2 model for improved collection and disposal on the basis of 100% service, compared to the current 60% service. The modelled cost is $8.3/per ton, which is 20% less than the present cost, but the overall cost of 100% collection and disposal increases to $4,155,737/yr.

Batool, Syeda Adila [Department of Space Science, Punjab University, Lahore (Pakistan)], E-mail: aadila_batool@yahoo.com; Muhammad Nawaz Ch [College of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan)], E-mail: muhammadnawazchaudhry@yahoo.com

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

NETL: Gasifipedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifier: Commercial Gasifiers: Gasifiers for Special Applications Biomass and Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Gasification The gasification of biomass and municipal solid waste (MSW)...

420

ENERGY ANALYSIS PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) energy recovery, andrecovery and energy generation from waste, End Use EnergyMunicipal Solid Waste Three MSW energy recovery systems were

Various, Various,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada, was the site for a 12-kiloton-ton nuclear test  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NV/13609-53 NV/13609-53 Development of a Groundwater Management Model for the Project Shoal Area prepared by Gregg Lamorey, Scott Bassett, Rina Schumer, Douglas P. Boyle, Greg Pohll, and Jenny Chapman submitted to Nevada Site Office National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy Las Vegas, Nevada September 2006 Publication No. 45223 Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof or its contractors or subcontractors. Available for sale to the public, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce

422

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE FIELD OF THORIUM CHEMISTRY AND METALLURGY. VOLUME III. COST ESTIMATE FOR 1,000 TON YR. THORIUM METAL PRODUCTION PLANT. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The described plant will produce reactor grade Th at a price of 07 per pound. The plant operation is based on the preparation of electrolytic cell feed by fused salt chlorination techniques and converting the feed to high quality metal by high temperature electrolysis. (D.E.B.)

Wyatt, J.L.

1956-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

423

future science group 133ISSN 1758-300410.4155/CMT.12.11 2012 Future Science Ltd Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a ubiquitous byprod-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- monly known as waste-to-energy (WTE). This method reduces the land requirement for waste disposal of waste-to-energy in reducing GHG emissions Munish K Chandel1 , Gabriel Kwok2 , Robert B Jackson*1 or electricity (waste-to-energy [WTE]) could reduce net GHG emissions in the USA compared with combusting methane

Jackson, Robert B.

424

ORGANIZATIONAL, INTERFACE AND FINANCIAL BARRIERS TO THE COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNITY ENERGY SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Policy Evaluation Criteria. Organizational Barriers to MSW Ener.gy Organizational Barriers to Wind Energy

Schladale, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first twelve months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

426

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the second six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts and examination of carbon material, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking. Investigation of coal extraction as a method to produce RCO continues; the reactor modifications to filter the products hot and to do multi-stage extraction improve extraction yields from {approx}50 % to {approx}70%. Carbon characterization of co-cokes for use as various carbon artifacts continues.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre' Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2006-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

427

REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

428

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The final report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during length of the project. The goal of this project was to integrate coal into a refinery in order to produce coal-based jet fuel, with the major goal to examine the products other than jet fuel. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal-based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. The main goal of Task 1 was the production of coal-based jet fuel and other products that would need to be utilized in other fuels or for non-fuel sources, using known refining technology. The gasoline, diesel fuel, and fuel oil were tested in other aspects of the project. Light cycle oil (LCO) and refined chemical oil (RCO) were blended, hydrotreated to removed sulfur, and hydrogenated, then fractionated in the original production of jet fuel. Two main approaches, taken during the project period, varied where the fractionation took place, in order to preserve the life of catalysts used, which includes (1) fractionation of the hydrotreated blend to remove sulfur and nitrogen, followed by a hydrogenation step of the lighter fraction, and (2) fractionation of the LCO and RCO before any hydrotreatment. Task 2 involved assessment of the impact of refinery integration of JP-900 production on gasoline and diesel fuel. Fuel properties, ignition characteristics and engine combustion of model fuels and fuel samples from pilot-scale production runs were characterized. The model fuels used to represent the coal-based fuel streams were blended into full-boiling range fuels to simulate the mixing of fuel streams within the refinery to create potential 'finished' fuels. The representative compounds of the coal-based gasoline were cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane, and for the coal-base diesel fuel they were fluorine and phenanthrene. Both the octane number (ON) of the coal-based gasoline and the cetane number (CN) of the coal-based diesel were low, relative to commercial fuels ({approx}60 ON for coal-based gasoline and {approx}20 CN for coal-based diesel fuel). Therefore, the allowable range of blending levels was studied where the blend would achieve acceptable performance. However, in both cases of the coal-based fuels, their ignition characteristics may make them ideal fuels for advanced combustion strategies where lower ON and CN are desirable. Task 3 was designed to develop new approaches for producing ultra clean fuels and value-added chemicals from refinery streams involving coal as a part of the feedstock. It consisted of the following three parts: (1) desulfurization and denitrogenation which involves both new adsorption approach for selective removal of nitrogen and sulfur and new catalysts for more effective hydrotreating and the combination of adsorption denitrogenation with hydrodesulfurization; (2) saturation of two-ring aromatics that included new design of sulfur resistant noble-metal catalysts for hydrogenation of naphthalene and tetralin in middle distillate fuels, and (3) value-added chemicals from naphthalene and biphenyl, which aimed at developing value-added organic chemicals from refinery streams such as 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 4,4{prime}-dimethylbiphenyl as precursors to advanced polymer materials. Major advances were achieved in this project in designing the catalysts and sorbent materials, and in developing fundamental understanding. The objective of Task 4 was to evaluate the effect of introducing coal into an existing petroleum refinery on the fuel oil product, specifically trace element emissions. Activities performed to accomplish this objective included analyzing two petroleum-based commercial heavy fuel oils (i.e., No. 6 fuel oils) as baseline fuels and three co-processed fuel oils, characterizing the atomization performance of a No. 6 fuel oil, measuring the combustion performance and emissions of the five fuels, specifically major, minor, and trace elements when fired in a watertube boiler designed for natural gas/fuel oil, and determining the boiler performance when firing the five fuels. Two

Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2005-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

430

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible uses. Methods to reduce metal content are being evaluated.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

431

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil are reported. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2005-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

432

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the no cost extension period of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts for a third round of testing, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Hydrotreating and hydrogenation of the product has been completed, and due to removal of material before processing, yield of the jet fuel fraction has decreased relative to an increase in the gasoline fraction. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates that the coal derived material has more trace metals related to coal than petroleum, as seen in previous runs. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. The co-coking of the runs with the new coal have begun, with the coke yield similar to previous runs, but the gas yield is lower and the liquid yield is higher. Characterization of the products continues. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2007-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

433

Production of Apatites and Calcium Phosphate from Fish By-Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Green Technologies for Materials Manufacturing and Processing III.

434

Modeling Hydrogen Sulfide Adsorption by Activated Carbon made from Anaerobic Digestion By-product.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biogas, produced from anaerobic digestion of cattle manure, is an attractive alternative energy source as it is rich in methane. However, it is necessary to… (more)

Ho, Natalie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Sustainable Concrete with Industrial and Post-Consumer By-Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with recycled-aggregates and fly ash shows no deleterious effect on the durability of reinforced concrete that the addition of residual solids in concrete enhances its durability properties in freezing and thawing(1), 91-100. Sonebi, M. (2004), "Medium strength self-compacting concrete containing fly ash: modeling

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

436

DURABILITY EVALUATION AND PRODUCTION OF MANUFACTURED AGGREGATES FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect

Under the cooperative agreement with DOE, the Research and Development Department of CONSOL Energy (CONSOL R&D), teamed with Universal Aggregates, LLC, to conduct a systematic study of the durability of aggregates manufactured using a variety of flue gas desulfurization (FGD), fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) and fly ash specimens with different chemical and physical properties and under different freeze/thaw, wet/dry and long-term natural weathering conditions. The objectives of the study are to establish the relationships among the durability and characteristics of FGD material, FBC ash and fly ash, and to identify the causes of durability problems, and, ultimately, to increase the utilization of FGD material, FBC ash and fly ash as a construction material. Manufactured aggregates made from FGD material, FBC ash and fly ash, and products made from those manufactured aggregates were used in the study. The project is divided into the following activities: sample collection and characterization; characterization and preparation of manufactured aggregates; determination of durability characteristics of manufactured aggregates; preparation and determination of durability characteristics of manufactured aggregate products; and data evaluation and reporting.

M. M. Wu

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Conversion of high carbon refinery by-products. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the project is to demonstrate that a partial oxidation system, which utilizes a transport reactor, is a viable means of converting refinery wastes, byproducts, and other low value materials into valuable products. The primary product would be a high quality fuel gas, which could also be used as a source of hydrogen. The concept involves subjecting the hydrocarbon feed to pyrolysis and steam gasification in a circulating bed of solids. Carbon residue formed during pyrolysis, as well as metals in the feed, are captured by the circulating solids which are returned to the bottom of the transport reactor. Air or oxygen is introduced in this lower zone and sufficient carbon is burned, sub-stoichiometrically, to provide the necessary heat for the endothermic pyrolysis and gasification reactions. The hot solids and gases leaving this zone pass upward to contact the feed material and continue the partial oxidation process. Studies were conducted in the Transport Reactor Test Unit (TRTU) to pyrolyze naphtha with untreated as well as potassium-impregnated spent FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracker) catalyst as the circulating medium over a temperature range of 1,400 to 1,600 F. The results from these studies are presented and discussed here. Studies were also performed in the Bench Scale Reactor Unit (BRU) in an effort to develop suitable catalyst formulations and to study the steam reforming of methane and propane in support of the experiments conducted in the TRTU. The results from these studies are also presented here. A Cold Flow Simulator (CFS) was designed and built to investigate the flow problems experienced in the TRTU.

O`Donnell, J.; Katta, S.; Henningsen, G.; Lin, Y.Y.

1996-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

438

Characterization of Soil Amended with the By-Product of Corn Stover Fermentation  

SciTech Connect

Corn stover is a potential biofuel; however, removing this stover from the land may increase the risk of erosion and reduce soil organic matter.

Johnson,J.M.F; Reicosky, D; Sharratt, M; Lindstrom,M; Voorhees, W; Carpenter-Boggs,L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Cytogenetic effects of shale-derived oils and related by-products in mice  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cytogenetic effects of exposure to crude shale oil by either skin painting or intraperitoneal injectional and transplacental exposure of embryos to water derived from surface retort processing of shale oil were analyzed. Exposure to crude shale oils from two sources, Paraho and Occidental, by skin painting had essesntially no effect on the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in bone marrow cells. Intraperitoneal injection of the Paraho crude shale oil increased the frequency of chromosome damage in bone marrow cells at all three doses tested (0.5 ml, 1.0 ml, and 2.0 ml/kg). Metaphase analysis of cells from embryos at day 12 gestation from females that had been exposed to 1% Paraho retort water ad libitum from day 1 of gestation indicated that clastogenic compounds present in this water can cross the placenta and induce chromosomal damage in embryonic cells.

Meyne, J.; Deaven, L.L.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Production of precipitated calcium carbonate from industrial by-product slags (Slag2PCC)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a commercial carbonate product by mineral carbonation could allow for higher process costs than what the CO2 a commercial calcium carbonate product should contain as little impurities as possible. Solution temperatureC Carbonation at 30 ºC (XCa = 68 %) Thickener Condenser Acetic acid 5.2 kg Gel residue 1.1 kg NaOH, 2.6 kg

Zevenhoven, Ron

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Algal Biofilm Production and Harvesting System for Wastewater Treatment with Biofuels By-Products.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Excess nitrogen and phosphorus in discharged wastewaters can lead to downstream eutrophication, ecosystem damage, and impaired water quality that may affect human health. Chemical-based… (more)

Christenson, Logan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Dynamic Scheduling of a Production/Inventory System with By-Products and Random Yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by semiconductor wafer fabrication, we consider a scheduling problem for a single-server multiclass queue. A single workstation fabricates semiconductor wafers according to a variety of different processes, where ...

Ou, Jihong

443

1 DISTILLERS BY-PRODUCTS AND CORN STOVER AS FUELS FOR ETHANOL PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Dry-grind ethanol plants have the potential to reduce their operating costs and improve their net energy balances by using biomass as the source of process heat and electricity. We utilized ASPEN PLUS software to model various technology bundles of equipment, fuels and operating activities that are capable of supplying energy and satisfying emissions requirements for dry-grind ethanol plants of 50 and 100 million gallons per year capacity using corn stover, distillers dried grains and solubles (DDGS), or a mixture of corn stover and “syrup ” (the solubles portion of DDGS). In addition to their own requirements, plants producing 50 and 100 million gallons of ethanol are capable of supplying 5-7 or 10-14 MegaWatts of electricity to the grid, respectively. Economic analysis showed favorable rates of return for biomass alternatives compared to conventional plants using natural gas and purchased electricity over a range of conditions. The mixture of corn stover and syrup provided the highest rates of return in general. Factors favoring biomass included a higher premium for low carbon footprint ethanol, higher natural gas prices, lower DDGS prices, lower ethanol

Douglas G. Tiffany; R. Vance Morey; Matt De Kam; Douglas G. Tiffany; R. Vance Morey; Matt De Kam

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Speciation and Attenuation of Arsenic and Selenium at Coal Combustion By-Product Management Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to evaluate the impact of key constituents captured from power plant air streams (principally arsenic and selenium) on the disposal and utilization of coal combustion products (CCPs). Specific objectives of the project were: (1) to develop a comprehensive database of field leachate concentrations at a wide range of CCP management sites, including speciation of arsenic and selenium, and low-detection limit analyses for mercury; (2) to perform detailed evaluations of the release and attenuation of arsenic species at three CCP sites; and (3) to perform detailed evaluations of the release and attenuation of selenium species at three CCP sites. Each of these objectives was accomplished using a combination of field sampling and laboratory analysis and experimentation. All of the methods used and results obtained are contained in this report. For ease of use, the report is subdivided into three parts. Volume 1 contains methods and results for the field leachate characterization. Volume 2 contains methods and results for arsenic adsorption. Volume 3 contains methods and results for selenium adsorption.

K. Ladwig

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Enrichment of By-Product Materials from Steel Pickling Acid Regeneration Plants (TRP 9942)  

SciTech Connect

A new process for manufacturing an enriched, iron-based product (strontium hexaferrite) in existing steel pickling acid regeneration facilities was evaluated. Process enhancements and equipment additions were made to an existing acid regeneration plant to develop and demonstrate (via pilot scale testing and partial-capacity production trials) the viability of a patented method to produce strontium-based compounds that, when mixed with steel pickling acid and roasted, would result in a strontium hexaferrite powder precursor which could then be subjected to further heat treatment in an atmosphere that promotes rapid, relatively low-temperature formation of discrete strontium hexaferrite magnetic domains yielding an enriched iron-based product, strontium hexaferrite, that can be used in manufacturing hard ferrite magnets.

Lu Swan, Delta Ferrites LLC

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes an investigation of the secondary classification characteristics of the ash feedstock excavated from the lower ash pond at Ghent Station.

John Groppo; Thomas Robl

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

447

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. Phase 1 was completed successfully, but the project did not continue on to Phase 2 due to withdrawal of CEMEX from the project. Attempts at replacing CEMEX were not successful. Problematic to the continuation of the project was its location in the Ohio Valley which is oversupplied and has low prices for fly ash and the change in CEMEX priorities due to merger and acquisitions. Thus, CAER concurred with the DOE to conclude the project at the end of Budget Period 1, March 31, 2007.

Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

Design manual for management of solid by-products from advanced coal technologies  

SciTech Connect

Developing coal conversion technologies face major obstacles in byproduct management. This project has developed several management strategies based on field trials of small-scale landfills in an earlier phase of the project, as well as on published/unpublished sources detailing regulatory issues, current industry practice, and reuse opportunities. Field testing, which forms the basis for several of the disposal alternatives presented in this design manual, was limited to byproducts from Ca-based dry SO{sub 2} control technologies, circulating fluidized bed combustion ash, and bubbling bed fluidized bed combustion ash. Data on byproducts from other advanced coal technologies and on reuse opportunities are drawn from other sources (citations following Chapter 3). Field results from the 5 test cases examined under this project, together with results from other ongoing research, provide a basis for predictive modeling of long-term performance of some advanced coal byproducts on exposure to ambient environment. This manual is intended to provide a reference database and development plan for designing, permitting, and operating facilities where advanced coal technology byproducts are managed.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Tokamak reactor for treating fertile material or waste nuclear by-products  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed is a tokamak reactor. The reactor includes a first toroidal chamber, current carrying conductors, at least one divertor plate within the first toroidal chamber and a second chamber adjacent to the first toroidal chamber surrounded by a section that insulates the reactor from neutrons. The current carrying conductors are configured to confine a core plasma within enclosed walls of the first toroidal chamber such that the core plasma has an elongation of 1.5 to 4 and produce within the first toroidal chamber at least one stagnation point at a perpendicular distance from an equatorial plane through the core plasma that is greater than the plasma minor radius. The at least one divertor plate and current carrying conductors are configured relative to one another such that the current carrying conductors expand the open magnetic field lines at the divertor plate.

Kotschenreuther, Michael T.; Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Valanju, Prashant M.

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

450

Bioreactor Landfill Research and Demonstration Project Northern Oaks Landfill, Harrison, MI  

SciTech Connect

A bioreactor landfill cell with 1.2-acre footprint was constructed, filled, operated, and monitored at Northern Oaks Recycling and Disposal Facility (NORDF) at Harrison, MI. With a filled volume of 74,239 cubic yards, the cell contained approximately 35,317 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) and 20,777 tons of cover soil. It was laid on the slope of an existing cell but separated by a geosynthetic membrane liner. After the cell reached a design height of 60 feet, it was covered with a geosynthetic membrane cap. A three-dimensional monitoring system to collect data at 48 different locations was designed and installed during the construction phase of the bioreactor cell. Each location had a cluster of monitoring devices consisting of a probe to monitor moisture and temperature, a leachate collection basin, and a gas sampling port. An increase in moisture content of the MSW in the bioreactor cell was achieved by pumping leachate collected on-site from various other cells, as well as recirculation of leachate from the bioreactor landfill cell itself. Three types of leachate injection systems were evaluated in this bioreactor cell for their efficacy to distribute pumped leachate uniformly: a leachate injection pipe buried in a 6-ft wide horizontal stone mound, a 15-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer, and a 60-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer. All leachate injection systems were installed on top of the compacted waste surface. The distribution of water and resulting MSW moisture content throughout the bioreactor cell was found to be similar for the three designs. Water coming into and leaving the cell (leachate pumped in, precipitation, snow, evaporation, and collected leachate) was monitored in order to carry out a water balance. Using a leachate injection rate of 26 – 30 gal/yard3, the average moisture content increased from 25% to 35% (wet based) over the period of this study. One of the key aspects of this bioreactor landfill study was to evaluate bioreactor start up and performance in locations with colder climate. For lifts filled during the summer months, methane generation started within three months after completion of the lift. For lifts filled in winter months, very little methane production occurred even eight months after filling. The temperature data indicated that subzero or slightly above zero (oC) temperatures persisted for unusually long periods (more than six months) in the lifts filled during winter months. This was likely due to the high thermal insulation capability of the MSW and the low level of biological activity during start up. This observation indicates that bioreactor landfills located in cold climate and filled during winter months may require mechanisms to increase temperature and initiate biodegradation. Thus, besides moisture, temperature may be the next important factor controlling the biological decomposition in anaerobic bioreactor landfills. Spatial and temporal characterization of leachate samples indicated the presence of low levels of commonly used volatile organic compounds (including acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, and toluene) and metals (including arsenic, chromium, and zinc). Changes and leachate and gaseous sample characteristics correlated with enhanced biological activity and increase in temperature. Continued monitoring of this bioreactor landfill cell is expected to yield critical data needed for start up, design, and operation of this emerging process.

Zhao, Xiando; Voice, Thomas; and Hashsham, Syed A.

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

451

ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND END-USE SCENARIOS OF SAVINGS POTENTIAL PT.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Elec (RDSF) MSW to Elec (Oil) Source Separation *Million~----------- MSW to Elec (Oil) Source Separation(2) *D.C.Oil Bituminous (Incineration) Coal Particulates Sulphur Oxide Carbon Monoxide Hydrocarbon Nitrogen Oxide Source:

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Potential for energy conservation in the cement industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the potential for energy conservation in the cement industry. Energy consumption per ton of cement decreased 20% between 1972 and 1982. During this same period, the cement industry became heavily dependent on coal and coke as its primary fuel source. Although the energy consumed per ton of cement has declined markedly in the past ten years, the industry still uses more than three and a half times the fuel that is theoretically required to produce a ton of clinker. Improving kiln thermal efficiency offers the greatest opportunity for saving fuel. Improving the efficiency of finish grinding offers the greatest potential for reducing electricity use. Technologies are currently available to the cement industry to reduce its average fuel consumption per ton by product by as much as 40% and its electricity consumption per ton by about 10%. The major impediment to adopting these technologies is the cement industry's lack of capital as a result of low or no profits in recent years.

Garrett-Price, B.A.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Development of Energy Balances for the State of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Other Generation Non-fossil thermal Nuclear Geothermal Wood Landfill & MSW Other Biomass Total Generation efficiencies

Murtishaw, Scott; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Sahtaye, Jayant

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal, solar PV, and landfill gas, while PGE initiallywave energy, solar, landfill gas, and MSW, but excluded each

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

On mobilization of lead and arsenic in groundwater in response to CO2 leakage from deep geological storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation and mitigation of landfill gas impacts on cadmiummunicipal solid waste (MSW) landfill gas on the release of

Zheng, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

ORGANIZATIONAL, INTERFACE AND FINANCIAL BARRIERS TO THE COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT OF COMMUNITY ENERGY SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organizational Barriers to Cogeneration • • • OrganizationTechnologies Cogeneration. • MSW . Wind. ResidentialPage Industrial Cogeneration. • Residential Photovoltaics. •

Schladale, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 VOCsVOCs,, PAHsPAHs, soot, tar, CO, soot, tar, CO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interest for thermal powerfor thermal power industryindustry (based on 1990 US Clean(based on 1990 US Clean, TOCEmission standards: CO and THC, TOC Power plant Finland (1990+) MSW incinerator Finland (1994) MSW incinerator EU (2000) Power plant Germany (1999) MSW incinerator Germany (1999) Hazardou s waste incinerator

Zevenhoven, Ron

459

Master of Social Work Why a Master of Social Work at CSUF?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Social Work Education (CSWE) · The only MSW program offered at a public university in Orange County the CSUF MSW Program · The mission of the newly developing Master of Social Work (MSW) program at CSUFMaster of Social Work At CSUF #12;Why a Master of Social Work at CSUF? · Accredited by the Council

de Lijser, Peter

460

Barriers to the increased utilization of coal combustion/desulfurization by-products by government and commercial sectors - Update 1998  

SciTech Connect

The following conclusions are drawn from the information presented in this report: (1) Joint efforts by industry and government focused on meeting RTC recommendations for reduction/removal of barriers have met with some success. The most notable of these are the changes in regulations related to CCB utilization by individual states. Regionally or nationally consistent state regulation of CCB utilization would further reduce regulatory barriers. (2) Technology changes will continue to be driven by the CAAA, and emission control technologies are expected to continue to impact the type and properties of CCBs generated. As a result, continued RD and D will be needed to learn how to utilize new and changing CCBs in environmentally safe, technically sound, and economically advantageous ways. Clean coal technology CCBs offer a new challenge because of the high volumes expected to be generated and the different characteristics of these CCBs compared to those of conventional CCBs. (3) Industry and government have developed the RD and D infrastructure to address the technical aspects of developing and testing new CCB utilization applications, but this work as well as constant quality control/quality assurance testing needs to be continued to address both industry wide issues and issues related to specific materials, regions, or users. (4) Concerns raised by environmental groups and the public will continue to provide environmental and technical challenges to the CCB industry. It is anticipated that the use of CCBs in mining applications, agriculture, structural fills, and other land applications will continue to be controversial and will require case-by-case technical and environmental information to be developed. The best use of this information will be in the development of generic regulations specifically addressing the use of CCBs in these different types of CCB applications. (5) The development of federal procurement guidelines under Executive Order 12873 titled ''Federal Acquisition, Recycling and Waste Prevention,'' in October 1993 was a positive step toward getting CCBs accepted in the marketplace. Industry needs to continue to work with EPA to develop additional procurement guidelines for products containing CCBs--and to take advantage of existing guidelines to encourage the use of CCBs in high-profile projects. (6) Accelerated progress toward increased utilization of CCBs can be made only if there is an increased financial commitment and technical effort by industry and government. The framework for this has been set by the successful cooperation of industry and government under DOE leadership. Cooperation should continue, with DOE fulfilling its lead role established in the RTC. It is clear that the RTC recommendations continue to have validity with respect to increasing CCB utilization and continue to provide guidance to industry and government agencies.

Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Sondreal, E.A.; Steadman, E.N.; Eylands, K.E.; Dockter, B.A.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Marine pastures: a by-product of large (100 megawatt or larger) floating ocean-thermal power plants. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential biological productivity of an open-sea mariculture system utilizing the deep-sea water discharged from an ocean-thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant was investigated. In a series of land-based studies, surface water was used to inoculate deep water and the primary production of the resultant blooms was investigated. Each cubic meter of deep water can produce approximately 2.34 g of phytoplankton protein, and that an OTEC plant discharging deep water at a rate of 4.5 x 10/sup 4/ m/sup 3/ min/sup -1/ could produce 5.3 x 10/sup 7/ kg of phytoplankton protein per 350-day year. A series of land-based shellfish studies indicated that, when fed at a constant rate of 1.83 x 10/sup -3/ g of protein per second per 70-140 g of whole wet weight, the clam, Tapes japonica, could convert the phytoplankton protein-nitrogen into shellfish meat protein-nitrogen with an efficiency of about 33 per cent. Total potential wet meat weight production from an OTEC plant pumping 4.5 x 10/sup 4/ m/sup 3/ min/sup -1/ is approximately 4.14 x 10/sup 8/ kg for a 350-day year. Various factors affecting the feasibility of open-sea mariculture are discussed. It is recommended that future work concentrate on a technical and economic analysis. (WDM)

Laurence, S.; Roels, O.A.

1976-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

462

Optimization of the conversion of lignocellulosic agricultural by-products to bioethanol using different enzyme cocktails and recombinant yeast strains.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: The need to mitigate the twin crises of peak oil and climate change has driven a headlong rush to biofuels. This study was… (more)

Mubazangi, Munyaradzi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Leaching of Inorganic Constituents From Coal Combustion By-Products Under Field and Laboratory Conditions: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last two decades, EPRI has sponsored research to develop technical insights into leaching and attenuation processes and the migration of inorganic waste constituents under actual disposal conditions. This report provides an in-depth analysis of leaching data collected from several EPRI field and laboratory studies. These studies can help utilities accurately assess risks from leachate release and migration and determine the need for engineering controls to protect the environment in the vicinity...

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Great Plains gasification project  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes organizational and research work on a coal gasification project which is based on North Dakota lignite. Many design changes have been incorporated into this plant, which is now being built after years of delay due to environmental, financial, and regulatory problems. Engineering and operational details are given for a project designed for conversion of 22,000 tons/day of liquid into fuel gas and several by products. Economic considerations are included.

Kuhn, A.K.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Riverland Energy Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

80ton Air Source Heat Pump: 150ton Geothermal Heat Pump: 300ton Central Electric Thermal Storage Units: 500 Electric Thermal Storage Room Storage: 20% Electric Boiler: 100...

466

Allocating Municipal Solid Waste to Renewable and Non-renewable Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Plastic. MillionBtus to total. Heat Content. Btus. Total Btus/Total Tons. ... Containers & Packaging. Material Group (million tons)a (million Btu per ton) b. Heat ...

467

First evidence of pep solar neutrinos by direct detection in Borexino  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We observed, for the first time, solar neutrinos in the 1.0-1.5 MeV energy range. We measured the rate of pep solar neutrino interactions in Borexino to be [3.1+-0.6(stat)+-0.3(syst)] counts/(day x 100 ton) and provided a constraint on the CNO solar neutrino interaction rate of solar neutrino signal is disfavored at 99.97% C.L., while the absence of the pep signal is disfavored at 98% C.L. This unprecedented sensitivity was achieved by adopting novel data analysis techniques for the rejection of cosmogenic 11C, the dominant background in the 1-2 MeV region. Assuming the MSW-LMA solution to solar neutrino oscillations, these values correspond to solar neutrino fluxes of [1.6+-0.3]x10^8 cm^-2s-1 and 7.7x10^8 cm^-2s-1 (95% C.L.), respectively, in agreement with the Standard Solar Model. These results represent the first measurement of the pep neutrino flux and the strongest constraint of the CNO solar neutrino flux to date.

,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Metric Unit Mass Short Tons Short Tons Uranium Oxide (U 3 0 8 ) Short Tons Uranium Fluoride (UF 6 ) Long Tons Pounds(lb) Pounds Uranium Oxide(lb U 3 O 8 ) Ounces,...

469

AEP Appalachian Power - Commercial and Industrial Rebate Programs...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pumps: 40ton Packaged Terminal AC: 30ton WaterAir Cooled Chillers: 30ton Ground Source Heat Pump: 50ton VFDs: 40HP Programmable Thermostat: 25unit T8 and T5...

470

Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative - Commercial and Industrial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Pumps: 118ton, plus bonus of 5ton for each 0.1 above base requirement Condenser: 18ton, plus bonus of 5ton for each 0.1 above base requirement RTU Economizers:...

471

Biofuel Boundaries: Estimating the Medium-Term Supply Potential of Domestic Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and combustion. High Low Estimate Estimate Assumed (million (million Moisture tons) tons) Content Paper and Paperboard Wood

Jones, Andrew; O'Hare, Michael; Farrell, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Economic and environmental benefits of reducing standby power loss in DVD/VCD players and copiers in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from 2003 to 2020. NOx reduction ? thousand tons ? Carbonlabeling, 2003-2020 NOx reduction ? thousand tons ? Annual

Lin, Jiang; Li, Tienan; Li, Aizhen; Zhang, Guoqing

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydro fuel cells, anaerobic digestion, and MSW incineration.Power Landfill Gas Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Gasificationlandfill gas, and anaerobic digestion. c - Study uses NEMS.

Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

A New Trend in Collection and Transportation Management of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the system, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology is applied to the integrated management of MSW, which include collection, transportation, and ...

475

NETL: Gasification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal: AlternativesSupplements to Coal - Feedstock Flexibility Waste Streams Gasification can be applied to a variety of waste streams, of which municipal solid waste (MSW)...

476

Biofuel Boundaries: Estimating the Medium-Term Supply Potential of Domestic Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pathways, such as gasification. However, the current studysuch as MSW, the gasification to Fischer- Tropsch fuelof research on biomass gasification to FT-fuels compared to

Jones, Andrew; O'Hare, Michael; Farrell, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply Chains Using Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production by Gasification of Biomass." Departmentand Celik, Fuat (2005). "Gasification-Based Fuels andon a study of slagging gasification for MSW that reported

Parker, Nathan C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply ChainsUsing Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production by Gasification of Biomass." Departmentand Celik, Fuat (2005). "Gasification-Based Fuels andon a study of slagging gasification for MSW that reported

Parker, Nathan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Evaluation of the impact of contaminant on trace metal content of compost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Literature reviews indicated that batteries, ferrous, non-ferrous materials, and electronic products are major contributors of trace metals in municipal solid waste (MSW). In order to… (more)

Zhou, Lixian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

UTILIZATION OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE COMPOST IN HORTICULTURE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Composting of municipal solid waste (MSW) has long been considered an attractive waste management tool for effective reduction of waste volume and beneficial utilization of… (more)

Lu, Wenliang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

New Method and Reporting of Uncertainty in LBNL National Energy Modeling System Runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AEO AL02 Btu CHP DG DOE ECP EERE EIA GPRA GW ITC MBtu MSW Mtand Renewable Energy (EERE) on hundreds of National Energy

Gumerman, Etan Z.; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Marnay, Chris

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste to Biogenic and Non-Biogenic Energy  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report summarizes the methodology used to split the heat content of municipal solid waste (MSW) into its biogenic and non-biogenic shares.

Marie LaRiviere

2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

483

Master of Social Work Program STUDENT HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Master of Social Work Program STUDENT HANDBOOK 2013-2014 Academic Year #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION I: MU-SU MSW PROGRAM ............................................................................................ 1 SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION

Hardy, Christopher R.

484

Characteristics Of Fresh Municipal Solid Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hossain, Sahadat The characteristics of fresh municipal solid waste (MSW) are critical in planning, designing, operating or upgrading solid waste management systems. Physical composition, moisture… (more)

Taufiq, Tashfeena

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

EA-1790: Construction and Operation of a Heterogeneous Feed Biorefiner...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

use the dried and post-sorted biomass fraction of municipal solid waste (MSW) and wood biomass as feedstock. Enerkem's biorefinery would produce approximately 10 million gallons...

486

High-volume, high-value usage of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines Phase 1: Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, July 1994--September 1994  

SciTech Connect

During the quarter a second series of samples were collected and partially characterized chemically and mineralogically. The samples were collected at the disposal site operated by Freeman United Coal Co. The second collection was necessary because of deterioration due to hydration of the original samples. A study of the hydration characteristics was completed during the quarter. Important reactions included the immediate formation of ettringite and portlandite. The hydration and transformation was found to be a slow process. A second phase of gypsum formation from ettringite deterioration was identified. The slow hydration of anhydrite with its resultant swell is a potential problem which will be addressed further. Geotechnical characterization, during the quarter included completion of the preliminary characterization, analysis of the findings, experimentation with sample preparation for the final characterization/mix design, and design of the final experimental program. The analysis of the coals collected during the core drilling and hydrologic planning were completed. Also during the quarter a meeting was held with representatives of the shotcrete industry to discuss transport systems for emplacement. The pros and cons of pneumatic and hydraulic systems were discussed and plans formulated for further investigations.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Marine pastures: a by-product of large (100 megawatt or larger) floating ocean thermal power plants. Progress report, February 1, 1976--April 30, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Computer programs have been developed to define the temperature increase which would be needed to bring deep-ocean water into density equilibrium with surface water for locations where data are available. A series of continuous-flow studies on phytoplankton blooms resulting from mixtures of 80 percent deep and 20 percent surface water in 2000-liter concrete culturing vessels (''reactors'') has been completed. A quantitative determination of nutrient utilization and flow through a combined primary and secondary trophic level system has been completed. This study utilized the clam Tapes semidecussata, fed from phytoplankton grown in 80 percent deep and 20 percent surface water. An analysis of the fate of the deep water discharged from a floating OTEC plant indicates that horizontal containment of the resulting deep water: surface water mixture is necessary if conditions optimal for open-sea mariculture are to obtain. The design of a small open-ocean ''pool'' is in the final stages of completion. A combined mussel/oyster/clam system is in the final stages of design and will be placed in the ocean during April 1976. (WDM)

Roels, O.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

High Volume--High Volume Usage of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) By-Products in Underground Mines. Quarterly report, July 1-September 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The focus of activity for this quarter was the final selection and preparation of a mine site for the grout emplacement field demonstration. The site chosen is located in Floyd County, Kentucky and is owned by the Sunny Ridge Mining Company. Specifically, a northeast-trending highwall was selected that contains numerous auger holes of 31 inch diameter and varying depth. The coal has been deep- mined beyond the auger holes thus limiting their length. Access to the site is good, and the overlying strata are relatively un- weathered and competent. Preparation of the site involved culling a road to the highwall, followed by uncovering the auger holes which had previously been partially filled and graded with rock. The auger holes were then extensively characterized in the context of overall dimensions, condition, and extent of communication between holes. For this portion of the work, several types of apparatus were obtained, and constructed. Selection of a grout emplacement method was also completed. It was decided that concrete trucks will transport the dry FBC flyash to the site whereupon a specified amount of water will be added. This grout will then be transferred to a concrete pumping truck that will be used to inject the material into the auger holes. In this quarter, the arrangements necessary to complete the emplacement have been made.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

489

Marine pastures: a by-product of large (100 megawatt or larger) floating ocean thermal power plants. Progress report, February 1, 1976--April 30, 1976  

SciTech Connect

Computer programs have been developed to define the temperature increase which would be needed to bring deep-ocean water into density equilibrium with surface water for locations where data are available. A series of continuous-flow studies on phytoplankton blooms resulting from mixtures of 80 percent deep and 20 percent surface water in 2000-liter concrete culturing vessels (''reactors'') has been completed. A quantitative determination of nutrient utilization and flow through a combined primary and secondary trophic level system has been completed. This study utilized the clam Tapes semidecussata, fed from phytoplankton grown in 80 percent deep and 20 percent surface water. An analysis of the fate of the deep water discharged from a floating OTEC plant indicates that horizontal containment of the resulting deep water: surface water mixture is necessary if conditions optimal for open-sea mariculture are to obtain. The design of a small open-ocean ''pool'' is in the final stages of completion. A combined mussel/oyster/clam system is in the final stages of design and will be placed in the ocean during April 1976. (WDM)

Roels, O.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

A1309-09/10 The U.S. Copper-base Scrap Industry And Its By-products An Overview Tenth Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a brief background on the U.S. copper and copper alloy secondary processing industry. It is felt that policy and decision-makers can use a ready reference on an industry that is generally so little understood. The industry has undergone many changes over the past few decades and has been in decline over much of the last ten years. While the coverage is not comprehensive, a brief mention is made of the many problems impacting the health of the industry. The secondary industry and the Government agencies most concerned with legislation affecting the collection, processing and markets for scrap are both working to overcome some of the current difficulties. Nevertheless, for some sectors of the secondary copper industry, the past ten years have been particularly difficult, given the restrictions within which they have operated, the potential for new restrictions, and the current copper market. The author would like to thank those in the industry who were kind enough to host informative visits to their plants and to provide much of the information contained in this report. In particular, the late Alan Silber of RECAP, was of tremendous help in outlining the original report. Daniel Edelstein, Copper Specialist with the U.S. Geological Survey, also provided substantial help and advice. The International Copper Study Group, was of great assistance in providing world copper industry statistics. The research

Janice L. Jolly

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines: Phase 1 -- Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, July--September 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efforts primarily focused on Subtask 2.2, Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization and Subtask 4.3, Selection and Testing of Transport System. As part of Subtask 2.2, samples were collected from the Freeman United Crown Mine III FBC disposal facility representing a verity of ages and weathering. A laboratory scale transport system has been built at the CAER to evaluate the potential of pneumatic transport for flue gas desulfurization material (FGDM) emplacement and to provide essential data for the mine emplacement demonstration as part of the Subtask 4.3 effort. The system is modeled after shotcreting systems and has the advantage that the material can be remotely placed without the need for forms. The test program is focusing on determining the pneumatic conditions necessary to maximize the strength of the emplaced FGDM under anticipated mine curing conditions while minimizing dust formation. Work on Subtask 4.1, Mine Selection, also proceeded during the quarter. A new mine site, located in the south-central section of the Pikeville quadrangle, Pike County, Kentucky, was examined for the field study. The proposed fill site is in the Middle Pennsylvanian Breathitt Formation Middle Amburgy coal bed, a coal previously mined by Costain elsewhere on the property. Efforts on Subtask 4.2, Hydrologic Monitoring Plan, focused primarily on theoretical issues concerning the effects of the mining and backfill activity on the ground water and surface water due to uncertainties in the location of the final field site. There are three major concerns about the effects of the mining activity: changes in the ground water flow field, changes in ground water quality, and consequential induced changes on stream flow.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Pilot-scale testing of a new sorbent for combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new regenerable sorbent concept for SO{sub 2} and NOx removal was pilot-tested at Ohio Edison`s Edgewater generating station at a 1.5 to 2-MW(e) level. A radial panel-bed filter of a new dry, granular sorbent was exposed to flue gas and regenerated in an experimental proof-of-concept program. The project was successful in demonstrating the new sorbent`s ability to achieve 90% SO{sub 2} removal, 30% NOx removal, and over 80% removal of residual particulates with realistic approach temperatures and low pressure drops. Based on the results of this project, the retrofit cost of this technology is expected to be on the order of $400 per ton of SO{sub 2} and $900 per ton of NOx removed. This assumes that gas distribution is even and methane regeneration is used for a 30% average utilization. For a 2.5%-sulfur Ohio coal, this translates to a cost of approximately $17 per ton of coal. Two by-product streams were generated in the process that was tested: a solid, spent-sorbent stream and a highly-concentrated SO{sub 2} or elemental-sulfur stream. While not within the scope of the project, it was found possible to process these streams into useful products. The spent sorbent materials were shown to be excellent substrates for soil amendments; the elemental sulfur produced is innocuous and eminently marketable.

Nelson, S. Jr. [Sorbent Technologies Corp., Twinsburg, OH (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 18-20, 2009, Chantilly, Virginia, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.; Mondragon, F., CO2 strong chemisorption as an estimate of coal char gasification reactivity. Fuel 1999, 78 WASTE (MSW) GASIFICATION UNDER VARIOUS PRESSURES AND CO2 CONCENTRATION ATMOSPHERES Eilhann Kwon, Kelly J, New York, NY 10027 ABSTRACT The Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) gasification process is a promising

Columbia University

494

An Environment Friendly Energy Recovery Technology: Municipal Solid Waste Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy from waste, is a perspective source to replace fossil fuels in the future, municipal solid waste (MSW) gasification is a new technique for waste treatment. MSW can be combusted directly to generate heat and electricity, and by means of gasification ... Keywords: municipal solid waste, gasification, incineration

Lei Ma; Chuanhua Liao; Yuezhao Zhu; Haijun Chen; Yanghuiqin Ding

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Landfill gas emission prediction using Voronoi diagrams and importance sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills are among the nation's largest emitters of methane, a key greenhouse gas, and there is considerable interest in quantifying the surficial methane emissions from landfills. There are limitations in obtaining accurate ... Keywords: Air dispersion modeling, Delaunay tessellation, Kriging, Least squares, MSW landfill, Voronoi diagram

K. R. Mackie; C. D. Cooper

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Environmental & economical optimization for municipal solid waste collection problems, a modeling and algorithmic approach case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing environmental concerns and interests in material and energy conservation have lead to increasing advancement in the management of solid waste over the past two decades. The field of modeling of waste management system, as opposed to the modeling ... Keywords: CO2 emission, MSW collection and routing, MSW costs analysis, network design

F. Rhoma; Z. Zhang; Y. Luo; B. Noche

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

497