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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

MSW Instantons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze M5-instantons in F-theory, or equivalently D3-instantons with varying axio-dilaton, in the presence of 7-brane gauge groups. The chiral two-form on the M5-brane plays an important role, because it couples the M5-brane to vector multiplets and charged chiral fields. The chiral two-form does not have a semi-classical description. However if the worldvolume of the M5 admits a fibration over a curve with surface fibers, then we can reduce the worldvolume theory to an `MSW' CFT by shrinking the surface. For this class of MSW instantons, we can use heterotic methods to do computations. We explain this in some detail using the physical gauge approach. We further compare M5-instantons with D3-instantons in perturbative type IIb and find some striking differences. In particular, we show that instanton zero modes tend to disappear and constraints from chirality on instanton contributions to the superpotential evaporate for finite string coupling.

Ron Donagi; Martijn Wijnholt

2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

2

MSW Instantons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze M5-instantons in F-theory, or equivalently D3-instantons with varying axio-dilaton, in the presence of 7-brane gauge groups. The chiral two-form on the M5-brane plays an important role, because it couples the M5-brane to vector multiplets and charged chiral fields. The chiral two-form does not have a semi-classical description. However if the worldvolume of the M5 admits a fibration over a curve with surface fibers, then we can reduce the worldvolume theory to an `MSW' CFT by shrinking the surface. For this class of MSW instantons, we can use heterotic methods to do computations. We explain this in some detail using the physical gauge approach. We further compare M5-instantons with D3-instantons in perturbative type IIb and find some striking differences. In particular, we show that instanton zero modes tend to disappear and constraints from chirality on instanton contributions to the superpotential evaporate for finite string coupling.

Donagi, Ron

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

MSW Informational Session Dates . . .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSW Informational Session Dates . . . Please RSVP . . . Space is limited so we ask that you call: Enderis Hall 115 Friday, December 7, 2012 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Location: Enderis Hall 115 The MSW invites you to attend one of three MSW informational sessions. While the admissions packet contains most

Saldin, Dilano

4

ADMISSION INFORMATION FORM MSW Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADMISSION INFORMATION FORM MSW Program Please indicate the MSW degree plan(s) for which you would.5 overall GPA in social work courses) In completing your application to the MSW program, please be aware of the following: 1. The MSW courses start in the summer and are offered during the summer, fall and spring

Ward, Karen

5

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production of Mixed Alcohols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). However, biomass is not always available in sufficient quantity at a price compatible with fuels production. Municipal solid waste (MSW) on the other hand is readily available in large quantities in some communities and is considered a partially renewable feedstock. Furthermore, MSW may be available for little or no cost. This report provides a techno-economic analysis of the production of mixed alcohols from MSW and compares it to the costs for a wood based plant. In this analysis, MSW is processed into refuse derived fuel (RDF) and then gasified in a plant co-located with a landfill. The resulting syngas is then catalytically converted to mixed alcohols. At a scale of 2000 metric tons per day of RDF, and using current technology, the minimum ethanol selling price at a 10% rate of return is approximately $1.85/gallon ethanol (early 2008 $). However, favorable economics are dependent upon the toxicity characteristics of the waste streams and that a market exists for the by-product scrap metal recovered from the RDF process.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Valkenburt, Corinne

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

MSW Application Checklist IMPORTANT NOTES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSW Application Checklist IMPORTANT NOTES 1. Please submit all Application Materials and Fees SUBMIT Application for Admission to Graduate Studies Statement of Academic Interests (1-2 pages) MSW

Northern British Columbia, University of

7

MSW STUDENT HANDBOOK 2012 Edition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSW STUDENT HANDBOOK 2012 Edition The University of Mississippi Department of Social Work 208 Longstreet Hall Dr. Carol Minor Boyd, Chair Department of Social Work Dr. Susan C. Allen, MSW Program to inform MSW students at The University of Mississippi about the mission, goals, objectives, policies

Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

8

MSW Registration Info/ 1 10/11/13 TO: MSW Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSW Registration Info/ 1 10/11/13 MEMO TO: MSW Students FROM: Sandy Butler, MSW Coordinator DATE Licensure for students in the Full "Regular" MSW and Advanced Standing programs.Please note the distinction the last five years and are thus completing the MSW program with fewer credits #12;MSW Registration Info/ 2

Thomas, Andrew

9

2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW), INCLUDING NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS (NRP),  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-to-energy (WTE) plants, 0.27 million tons (0.7%) were used as alternative fuel in cement production, and 32 Earth Engineering Center (EEC) Report to the American Chemistry Council (ACC) which was based on U.S. 2008 data and quantified the energy and economic value of municipal solid wastes (MSW) and non

Columbia University

10

Malcolm E Scott, MSW, Ph.D. 1 Malcolm E. Scott, MSW, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Malcolm E Scott, MSW, Ph.D. 1 Malcolm E. Scott, MSW, Ph.D. Curriculum Vitae Business Address Seeking Advanced Social Work Education M.S.W. (2001) Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 Department of Social Work Baton Rouge, LA Major: Social Work #12;Malcolm E Scott, MSW, Ph.D. 2 LICENSES

Stephens, Graeme L.

11

Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ash Chemistry in MSW Incineration Plants: Advanced Characterization and Thermodynamic to analyze MSW-derived ashes by use of CCSEM. Representative samples of 2nd -3rd pass and ESP/E-filter ashes

12

Estelli Ramos, MSW 859 Vista Palma Way  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estelli Ramos, MSW 859 Vista Palma Way Orlando, FL 32825 (407) 924-6918 University of Central Experience: 2006 - Present University of Central Florida Full Time Instructor MSW Program Coordinator MSW Course Taught: Social Welfare Policy and Services Human Behavior in the Social Environment Social

Wu, Shin-Tson

13

New MSW Students Course Planning & Registration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New MSW Students Course Planning & Registration Guide #12;Table of Contents 1 The New MSW Students Course Planning and Registration Guide has been developed to assist you with fall and multiple sections of all required MSW courses allow you to build a flexible schedule meeting your

Huang, Jianyu

14

Mary Mann, MSW Mann, 2013 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mary Mann, MSW Mann, 2013 1 Education Ph.D. in Public Affairs, Social Work Cognate present College Work (MSW) 2005 School of Social Work, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida Bachelors. Mann, MSW Registered Clinical Social Work Intern License# SW7278 407-620-8384 mary.mann@ucf.edu #12

Wu, Shin-Tson

15

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of New York is approximately 28% composed of leaves, grass, yard, food, and other organic waste. New York) of MSW generated per year were landfilled, 14.0% were combusted, and 31% were recycled or composted). Recycling of MSW increased 9% and composting of MSW increased 5% from 1990 to 2003, totaling 7

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

16

MSW SOCIAL WORK -Application Checklist (Last updated: April 7, 2014)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSW SOCIAL WORK - Application Checklist (Last updated: April 7, 2014) IMPORTANT NOTES 1. Applicants Application Statement of Academic Interests: Your academic interests and ambitions, reasons for applying MSW

Northern British Columbia, University of

17

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology Municipal solid waste (MSW) is...

18

MSW/MBA DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM 2013 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MSW/MBA DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM 2013 ­ 2014 Purpose The MSW/MBA Dual Degree Program was developed of an Individualized Concentration. Course of Study In broad outline, the course of study for the MSW/MBA dual degree two days per week during the academic year). Note: It is also possible to begin the MSW Program

Huang, Jianyu

19

MSW/JD DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM 2014 -2015  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MSW/JD DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM 2014 - 2015 Purpose The MSW/JD Dual degree Program is designed or constituencies. Students admitted to the program may expect to receive both the Master of Social Work (MSW in Appendix 1. 6. The integrity of both the MSW and the JD degrees is maintained in the following manner: a

Huang, Jianyu

20

MSW/MBA DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM 2014 2015  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MSW/MBA DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM 2014 ­ 2015 Purpose The MSW/MBA Dual Degree Program was developed of an Individualized Concentration. Course of Study In broad outline, the course of study for the MSW/MBA dual degree two days per week during the academic year). Note: It is also possible to begin the MSW Program

Huang, Jianyu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

MSW/JD DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM 2013 -2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MSW/JD DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM 2013 - 2014 Purpose The MSW/JD Dual degree Program is designed or constituencies. Students admitted to the program may expect to receive both the Master of Social Work (MSW BCGSSW intervention method is described in Appendix 1. 6. The integrity of both the MSW and the JD

Huang, Jianyu

22

Robin M. Kohn, MSW, LCSW University of Central Florida  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Robin M. Kohn, MSW, LCSW University of Central Florida School of Social Work P.O. Box 163358 Work Practice with Loss and Life's Transitions o Field Education Seminar Media Enhanced #12;2 MSW Committee Member o MSW Coordinator of Advising Position, Co-Chair o MSW Coordinator Position Search

Wu, Shin-Tson

23

E-Print Network 3.0 - angles msw resonances Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1997 Cl-387 MSW... of MSW signal-to- noise enhancers is characterized by operational power level and frequency, frequency... -selectivity,and transientresponse in MSW...

24

Kim Gryglewicz, Ph.D., MSW Curriculum Vitae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kim Gryglewicz, Ph.D., MSW Curriculum Vitae College of Health & Public Affairs School of Social of South Florida 12/08 MSW Field Instructor/Liaison, School of Social Work, University of South Florida 09

Wu, Shin-Tson

25

Postgraduate Diploma in Social Work/MSW Frequently Asked Questions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Postgraduate Diploma in Social Work/MSW Frequently Asked Questions Educational Qualifications Q 1 I months full-time equivalent relevant experience always required of applicants to the MSW at the point

Mottram, Nigel

26

MSW Student Handbook Rena Harold, PhD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSW Student Handbook 2013-2017 Rena Harold, PhD Interim Director of the School of Social Work Marcia Lampen, PhD Director of the MSW Program Joan Reid Office Assistant for the Graduate Program #12;I

27

TOTAL CURRICULUM MSW CURRICULUM ACROSS THE FOUR DEGREE PLANS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOTAL CURRICULUM MSW CURRICULUM ACROSS THE FOUR DEGREE PLANS The following pages delineate that allows students to graduate with their MSW in the shortest amount of time, graduating in December

Ward, Karen

28

The MSW effect and Solar Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MSW (Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein) effect is the effect of transformation of one neutrino species (flavor) into another one in a medium with varying density. Three basic elements of the effect include: the refraction of neutrinos in matter, the resonance (level crossing) and the adiabaticity. The key notion is {\\it the neutrino eigenstates} in matter. Physical picture of the effect is described in terms of the flavors and the relative phases of eigenstates and the transitions between eigenstates. Features of the large mixing realization of the MSW effect are discussed. The large mixing MSW effect (LMA) provides the solution of the solar neutrino problem. We show in details how this mechanism works. Physics beyond the LMA solution is discussed. The lower $Ar$-production rate (in comparison with the LMA prediction) and absence of significant "turn up" of the spectrum at low energies can be due to an additional effect of the light sterile neutrino with very small mixing.

A. Yu. Smirnov

2003-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

29

Social Work Research Colloquium presentations by MSW Grads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Social Work Research Colloquium presentations by MSW Grads Monday March 21, 2011 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm Saskatchewan: Strategic Anti-Poverty Organizing by Kirk Englot Kirk will present on his MSW field practicum Agricultural Program, and Refugee Protection in Canada. Getachew will present the findings of his MSW research

Argerami, Martin

30

ADVANCED YEAR MSW PROGRAM Innovation in Community, Policy and Leadership  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADVANCED YEAR MSW PROGRAM CURRICULUM 2014-2015 Innovation in Community, Policy and Leadership Master of Social Work (MSW) professional practitioners. This booklet describes the school's advanced year MSW Program. Please take time to read it carefully. Both current and potential students will find

Berdichevsky, Victor

31

Overview of the MSW Application Process for Fall 2011 Admission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Overview of the MSW Application Process for Fall 2011 Admission # 1: Minimum Requirements in order to begin their MSW study at the Jane Addams College of Social Work. Ideally, all requirements Applicants Transferring From Other MSW Programs October 1 to January 31 International Applicants October 1

Illinois at Chicago, University of

32

Instructions for MSW Application for Fall 2011 Admission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Instructions for MSW Application for Fall 2011 Admission I. JACSW Application Application Item undergraduate courses that are the equivalent to courses taken in the foundation year of the MSW program. Please note you must have received a "B" or better in order to get credit toward the MSW. Also, be sure

Illinois at Chicago, University of

33

MSW Implications of Solar Neutrino Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I discuss the implications for future solar neutrino experiments of the most recent gallium data in the context of the MSW mechanism. At the low energy end of the solar neutrino spectrum we need to measure the $^7$Be component directly; and at the high energy end, we need precise measurements of the shape of the spectrum.

S. P. Rosen

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Cosmo MSW effect for mass varying neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider neutrinos with varying masses which arise in scenarios relating neutrino masses to the dark energy density in the universe. We point out that the neutrino mass variation can lead to level crossing and thus a cosmo MSW effect, having dramatic consequences for the flavor ratio of astrophysical neutrinos.

Pham Quang Hung; Heinrich Ps

2005-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

35

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Rakesh Kumar Report No. CBU-2003-08 REP-503 March 2003 A CBU Report Department of Civil Engineering.6 billion tons of cement, 10 billion tons of sand and rock, and 1 billion tons of mixing water (Mehta, 2001 plants are the major source of generation of electricity. Coal-fired power plants derive energy

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

36

Helioseismology, MSW and the Solar Neutrino Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk I summarize recent work done in collaboration with Cliff Burgess and Denis Michaud, in which we performed a detailed investigation of how solar neutrinos propagate through helioseismic waves. We find that the MSW solar neutrino spectrum is not modified at all in the presence of seismic waves. This finding differs from earlier estimates mainly because most helioseismic waves are too weak in the vicinity of the MSW resonance to be of relevance for neutrino propagation. A special class of waves may however by subject to an instability and potentially have very large amplitudes. These waves do have long wavelengths, a situation for which the formalism employed in earlier analyses does not apply. Our numerical simulation significantly reduces their influence on neutrino propagation.

P. Bamert

1997-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

37

Model of Large Mixing Angle MSW Solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have obtained the neutrino mass matrix with the large mixing angle (LMA) MSW solution, $\\sin^2 2\\th_\\odot=0.65\\sim 0.97$ and $\\Delta m_{\\odot}^2= 10^{-5}\\sim 10^{-4}\\eV^2$, in the $S_{3L}\\times S_{3R}$ flavor symmetry. The structure of our neutrino mass matrix is found to be stable against radiative corrections.

Morimitsu Tanimoto

2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Dirac Quasinormal modes of MSW black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we study the Dirac quasinormal modes of an uncharged 2 + 1 black hole proposed by Mandal et. al and referred to as MSW black hole in this work. The quasi- normal mode is studied using WKB approximation method. The study shows that the imaginary part of quasinormal frequencies increases indicating that the oscillations are damping and hence the black hole is stable against Dirac perturbations.

Sebastian, Saneesh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Dirac Quasinormal modes of MSW black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we study the Dirac quasinormal modes of an uncharged 2 + 1 black hole proposed by Mandal et. al and referred to as MSW black hole in this work. The quasi- normal mode is studied using WKB approximation method. The study shows that the imaginary part of quasinormal frequencies increases indicating that the oscillations are damping and hence the black hole is stable against Dirac perturbations.

Saneesh Sebastian; V. C. Kuriakose

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

The MSW Effect in Quantum Field Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show in detail the general relationship between the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation approach to calculating the MSW effect and the quantum field theoretical S-matrix approach. We show the precise form a generic neutrino propagator must have to allow a physically meaningful ``oscillation probability'' to be decoupled from neutrino production fluxes and detection cross-sections, and explicitly list the conditions---not realized in cases of current experimental interest---in which the field theory approach would be useful.

Christian Y. Cardall; Daniel J. H. Chung

1999-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Status of the MSW Solutions to the Solar Neutrino Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk we present the results of an updated global analysis of two-flavor MSW solutions to the solar neutrino problem in terms of conversions of $\

M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; C. Pea-Garay

2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

42

MA/MSW DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM In 1989 the Dual Degree in Social Work (MSW) and Pastoral Ministry (MA) Program was  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA/MSW DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM 2013-2014 PURPOSE In 1989 the Dual Degree in Social Work (MSW) or Theology and Ministry (academic year) (MA) and the Master of Social Work (MSW) degrees in approximately 3 Standards Review Committee and the Dean of the GSSW. 4. The integrity of both the MA and the MSW degrees

Huang, Jianyu

43

Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of MSW Black Hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the thermodynamics and spectroscopy of a 2+1 dimensional black hole pro- posed by Mandal et. al1 . We put the background space time in Kruskal like co-ordinate and find period with respect to Euclidean time. Different thermodynamic quantities like entropy, specific heat, temperature etc are obtained. The adiabatic invariant for the black hole is found out and quantized using Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization rule. The study shows that the area spectrum of MSW black hole is equally spaced and the value of spacing is found to be h bar

Sebastian, Saneesh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Spectroscopy and Thermodynamics of MSW Black Hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the thermodynamics and spectroscopy of a 2+1 dimensional black hole pro- posed by Mandal et. al1 . We put the background space time in Kruskal like co-ordinate and find period with respect to Euclidean time. Different thermodynamic quantities like entropy, specific heat, temperature etc are obtained. The adiabatic invariant for the black hole is found out and quantized using Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization rule. The study shows that the area spectrum of MSW black hole is equally spaced and the value of spacing is found to be h bar

Saneesh Sebastian; V. C. Kuriakose

2013-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

45

Neutrino signal of supernova shock wave propagation:MSW distortion of the spectra and neucleosynthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrino signal of supernova shock wave propagation:MSW distortion of the spectra and neucleosynthesis

Kawagoe, S; Sumiyoshi, K; Yamada, H; Kajino, T

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Associate Professors Limb, Gordon E. (2005) BS, Brigham Young U., 1994; MSW, U. of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Associate Professors Limb, Gordon E. (2005) BS, Brigham Young U., 1994; MSW, U. of Utah, 1997; PhD, U. of California, Berkeley, 2000. Marett, Kevin M. (1992) BS, Brigham Young U., 1982; MSW, U State U., 1972; MSW, DSW, U. of Utah, 1978, 1990. Panos, Patrick T. (1999) BS, U. of Utah, 1985; MS, MSW

Hart, Gus

47

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report No. 321 August 1997-15 Department of Civil Engineering and Mechanics College of Engineering and sand to produce concrete. The United States consumes approximately 90 million tons of Portland cement annually. The manufacture of cement is quite energy intensive. It requires approximately 3000 kJ of energy

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

48

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MILWAUKEE #12;USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH combustion by-products (such as clean-coal ash) from power plants. Maximum recycling of such by- products

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

49

An overview of renewable energy utilization from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration in Taiwan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

summarized in the paper. Finally, we present the regulatory system including Air Pollution Control Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 495 4. Air pollution control regulations on MSW-to-energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 497 4.1. MSW incinerator air pollutants emission standards

Columbia University

50

On the MSW $?_e \\to ?_s$ transition solution of the solar neutrino problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the stability of the two--neutrino MSW solution of the solar neutrino problem, corresponding to solar $\

P. I. Krastev; S. T. Petcov; L. Qiuyu

1996-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

51

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report investigated the potential of using municipal solid waste (MSW) to make synthesis gas (syngas) suitable for production of liquid fuels. Issues examined include: MSW physical and chemical properties affecting its suitability as a gasifier feedstock and for liquid fuels synthesis expected process scale required for favorable economics the availability of MSW in quantities sufficient to meet process scale requirements the state-of-the-art of MSW gasification technology.

Valkenburt, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Thompson, Becky L.; Gerber, Mark A.; Jones, Susanne B.; Stevens, Don J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

*Course can be taken fall or spring ** Yearlong course MA/MSW DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 *Course can be taken fall or spring ** Yearlong course MA/MSW DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM 2014-2015 PURPOSE In 1989 the Dual Degree in Social Work (MSW) and Pastoral Ministry (MA) Program was developed) and the Master of Social Work (MSW) degrees in approximately 3 years of full-time study (less if taking STM

Huang, Jianyu

53

Boise State master of social work (MSW) programs are intentionally small. They offer an informal climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boise State master of social work (MSW) programs are intentionally small. They offer an informal service agencies in small, frontier communities. The mission and objectives of the MSW program have been for the MSW program takes place every fall. Students are encouraged to apply early for admission. Applications

Barrash, Warren

54

Master of Social Work The Master of Social Work (MSW) program is structured  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Master of Social Work The Master of Social Work (MSW) program is structured upon an advanced at an advanced professional level. The mission of the MSW program at Wichita State University is to prepare and empowering interventions on all practices levels. The MSW program is accredited by the Council on Social Work

55

Control Engineering Practice 10 (2002) 315326 MIMO closed-loop identification of an MSW incinerator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control Engineering Practice 10 (2002) 315­326 MIMO closed-loop identification of an MSW of a specific system identification procedure to a municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator is discussed that with the proposed identification procedure a model of the MSW incinerator is obtained which, according to system

Van den Hof, Paul

56

Eligibility Acceptance into the full-time Advanced Standing MSW program at SU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eligibility Acceptance into the full-time Advanced Standing MSW program at SU School of Social of Social Welfare, members of the consortium are the MSW Programs at: University at Buffalo, University University. Unique opportunity for Advanced Standing MSW students interested in social work practice

McConnell, Terry

57

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-first Century, Hyderabad, India, February 1999. Department of Civil EngineeringandMechanics College) of foundry by-products, including foundry sand and slag. Most of these by-products are landfilled, primarily due to non-availability of economically attractive use options. Landfilling is not a desirable option

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

58

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion by-products #12;3 generated by using both conventional and clean-coal technologies. A clean-coal that obtained from clean-coal technology, are not utilized in cast-concrete masonry products (bricks, blocksCenter for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

59

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST OF CLASS F FLYASHAND CLEAN-COAL ASHBLENDS FOR CAST CONCRETE PRODUCTS Authors: TarunR.Naik, Director, Center,Illinois Clean Coal Institute RudolphN.Kraus, Research Associate, UWM Center forBy-Products Utilization Shiw S

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

60

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization CLEAN COAL BY-PRODUCTS UTILIZATION IN ROADWAY, EMBANKMENTS-fueled plants, particularly use of eastern coals, has lead to the use of clean coal and using advanced sulfur dioxide control technologies. Figure 1 shows clean coal technology benefits(2) . In 1977, the concept

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Updated MSW Analysis and the Standard Solar Model Uncertainties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We update the analysis of the MSW and general astrophysical solutions to the combined solar neutrino observations by including the GALLEX II result. We also show that our parametrized flux uncertainties are equivalent to the Monte-Carlo results of Bahcall and Ulrich.

Naoya Hata; Paul Langacker

1993-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

62

The MSW effect and Matter Effects in Neutrino Oscillations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MSW (Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein) effect is the adiabatic or partially adiabatic neutrino flavor conversion in medium with varying density. The main notions related to the effect, its dynamics and physical picture are reviewed. The large mixing MSW effect is realized inside the Sun providing the solution of the solar neutrino problem. The small mixing MSW effect driven by the 1-3 mixing can be realized for the supernova (SN) neutrinos. Inside the collapsing stars new elements of the MSW dynamics may show up: the non-oscillatory transition, non-adiabatic conversion, time dependent adiabaticity violation induced by shock waves. Effects of the resonance enhancement and the parametric enhancement of oscillations can be realized for the atmospheric and accelerator neutrinos in the Earth. Precise results for neutrino oscillations in the low density medium with arbitrary density profile are presented and the attenuation effect is described. The area of applications is the solar and SN neutrinos inside the Earth, and the results are crucial for the neutrino oscillation tomography.

A. Yu. Smirnov

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

63

Three-Neutrino MSW Effect and the LNW Mass Matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review recent work on analytical solutions to the MSW equations for three neutrino flavours, for exponential and linear potentials. An application to a particular mass matrix is also discussed. The three neutrino masses are determined, respectively, to be 0.001--0.004, and roughly 0.01 and 0.05 eV.

Per Osland; Tai Tsun Wu

2001-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

64

Global MSW Generation in 2007 estimated at two billion tons Global Waste Management Market Assessment 2007, Key Note Publications Ltd ,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-gas emissions, water pollution, air pollution and noise/visual impact (of recycling/waste disposal facilities including construction/demolition, mining, quarrying, manufacturing and municipal waste. Much of the focus

Columbia University

65

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%) were used in producing the concrete mixtures. The water to cementitious materials ratio was kept with and without by-products, and soil and groundwater remediation technologies including bioremediation. ACI

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

66

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization DRAFT REPORT CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN CEMENTITIOUS-MILWAUKEE #12;CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN CEMENTITIOUS PRODUCTS Progress Report by Tarun R. Naik, Rakesh of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Technologies

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

67

Installation of geosynthetic clay liners at California MSW landfills  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The California regulations for liner systems at municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills require that alternatives to the prescriptive federal Subtitle D liner system have a containment capability greater than that of the prescriptive system. Regulators may also require a demonstration that use of the prescriptive system is burdensome prior to approval of an alternative liner design. This paper presents seven case histories of the design and installation of geosynthetic clay liners (GCL) as an alternative to the low-permeability soil component of the prescriptive Subtitle D composite liner system at MSW landfills in California. These case histories cover GCLs from different manufacturers and landfill sites with a wide range of conditions including canyon landfills with slopes as steep as 1H:1V.

Snow, M.; Jesionek, K.S.; Dunn, R.J.; Kavazanjian, E. Jr.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Three-Neutrino MSW Effect and the Lehmann Mass Matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent work on analytical solutions to the MSW equations for three neutrino flavours is reviewed, with emphasis on the exponential density. Application to a particular mass matrix, proposed by Lehmann, Newton and Wu, is also discussed. Within this model, the experimental data allow a determination of the three neutrino masses. They are found to be 0.002-0.004, 0.01 and 0.05 eV.

Per Osland

2002-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

69

Three-flavor MSW solutions of the solar neutrino problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform an updated phenomenological analysis of the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) solutions of the solar neutrino problem, assuming oscillations between two and three neutrino families. The analysis includes the total rates of the Homestake, SAGE, GALLEX, Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande experiments, as well as the day-night asymmetry and the 18-bin energy spectrum of Super-Kamiokande. Solutions are found at several values of the theta_{13} mixing angle. Among the most interesting features, we find that solar neutrino data alone put the constraint theta_{13} MSW solutions extends at and beyond maximal (nu_1,nu_2) mixing (theta_{12} > pi/4), especially if the neutrino square mass splitting is in its lower range (m^2_2-m^2_1 ~ 10^{-7} eV^2) and if theta_{13} is nonzero. In particular, bimaximal (or nearly bimaximal) mixing is possible for atmospheric and MSW solar neutrino oscillations within the stringent reactor bounds on theta_{13}.

G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; D. Montanino; A. Palazzo

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

70

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wood with supplementary fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and coke by pulp and paper mills and wood, knots, chips, etc. with other supplementary fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and coke to generateCenter for By-Products Utilization DEVELOPMENT OF CLSM USING COAL ASH AND WOOD ASH, A SOURCE OF NEW

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

71

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a combination with a number of fuels including coal, petroleum coke, natural gas, etc. In the mid 1990s, the unit was firing a combination of coal and petroleum coke to generate energy. It has been established;1 PROJECT 1 - COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS: CHARACTERIZATION AND USE OPTIONS Introduction An AFBC system

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

72

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presentationand Publicationat the CBIP International Conference onFly Ash Disposal & Utilization,New Delhi, India, January 1998 foundry sand and slag. Most of these by-products are landfilled, primarily due to non-availability of economically attractive use options. Landfilling is not a desirable option because it not only causes huge

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

73

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include workability, water requirement, bleeding, segregation, air content, time of set, and temperature with and without by-products, and soil and groundwater remediation technologies including bioremediation. ACI for power production. Its combustion in electric power plants produces large amounts of fly ash and bottom

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

74

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-strength materials (CLSM); and, future research needs. The fresh concrete properties discussed are workability, water with and without by-products, and soil and groundwater remediation technologies including bioremediation. ACI for power production. Its combustion in electric power plants produces large amounts of fly ash and bottom

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

75

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

clean coal technology, are not extensively utilized in the cast concrete masonry products (bricks both conventional and clean coal technologies. A clean coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SO2Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

76

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute For Project 02-1/3.1D-2 Department of Civil Engineering of technology and market development for controlled low-strength material (CLSM) slurry using Illinois coal ashCenter for By-Products Utilization IMPLEMENTATION OF FLOWABLE SLURRY TECHNOLOGY IN ILLINOIS

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

77

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and paper mills in concrete. INTRODUCTION Concrete is a porous solid that is created by combining four basicCenter for By-Products Utilization CURING TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON HIGH-PERFORMANCE CONCRETE By Tarun For presentation and publication at the symposium entitled "High-Performance Concrete and Concrete for Marine

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

78

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Shiw S. Singh, Lori- Lynn C. Pennock, and Bruce Ramme Report No. CBU-2001 with numerous projects on the use of by-product materials including utilization of used foundry sand and fly ash;2 INTRODUCTION Wood FA is generated due to combustion of wood for energy production at pulp and paper mills, saw

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

79

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASSF FLY ASHCOAL AND CLEAN-COAL #12;-1- CHARACTERIZATION AND APPLICATION OF CLASSF FLYASHCOAL AND CLEAN-COAL ASHFOR CEMENT -Milwaukee (UWM) Daniel D.Banerjee, Project Manager,Illinois Clean Coal Institute RudolphN.Kraus, Research

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

80

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN NO-FINES CONCRETE By Tarun R;CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN NO-FINES CONCRETE ABSTRACT By Tarun, R. Naik, Yoon-moon Chun, Rudolph N. Kraus, and Fethullah Canpolat This paper presents a detailed experimental study on the sequestration

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN COAL ASH AS SETTING TIME REGULATOR IN PORTLAND OF WISCONSIN ­ MILWAUKEE #12;2 Use of Clean Coal Ash as Setting Time Regulator in Portland Cement by Zichao Wu as setting time regulator for portland cement production. In this paper a source of clean coal ash (CCA

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

82

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R #12;1 HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Shiw S. Singh, and Bruce for manufacture of cement-based products using ashes generated from combustion of high-sulfur coals. A clean coal

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

83

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of coal in conventional and/ or advanced clean coal technology combustors. These include fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products from advanced clean coal technology clean coal technology combustors. Over 60% of the CCBs are generated as fly ash. An estimate

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

84

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI and Ronald H. Carty Director Illinois Clean Coal Institute Carterville, IL ABSTRACT, Naik and Singh [16] summarized various applications of fly ash generated from conventional and clean coal technologies. Uses of coal combustion by- products can be categorized into three classes: high-volum

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

85

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECONOMICAL SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Yoon-moon Chun, Fethullah Canpolat #12;USE OF FLY ASH AND LIMESTONE QUARRY BY-PRODUCTS FOR DEVELOPING ECONOMICAL SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE material in the development of economical self-compacting concrete (SCC). Class C fly ash was also used

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

86

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, and Yoon-moon Chun Report No. CBU-2004 of Limestone Quarry By-Products for Developing Economical Self-Compacting Concrete Principle Investigator Name. For this proposed project, self-compacting concrete mixtures will be developed for prototype production that utilize

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

87

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE (SCC) OR SELF- LEVELING CONCRETE (SLC - MILWAUKEE #12;2 SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE (SCC) OR SELF ­LEVELING CONCRETE (SLC) INTRODUCTION Self-compacting as the concrete which can be placed and compacted into every corner of a form work, purely by means of its self

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

88

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Yoon-moon Chun, Fethullah Canpolat ECONOMICAL SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE by Tarun R. Naik* , Rudolph N. Kraus** , Yoon-moon Chun*** , Fethullah of limestone-quarry by-product material in the development of economical self-compacting concrete (SCC). Class

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

89

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik and Rakesh Kumar Report No. CBU-2003-15 REP-509 April 2003 CONCRETE April 2003 REP-509 #12;ii Use of Limestone Quarry By-Products for Developing Economical Self-Compacting in the production of economical self-compacting concrete. OBJECTIVE: The primary objective of this project

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

90

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, compressive strength, concrete testing, fly ash, high-performance concrete, hot weather, permeability, silica Testing of Concrete", Committee 214, "Evaluation of Results of Strength Tests of Concrete", and CommitteeCenter for By-Products Utilization STRENGTH AND DURABILITY OF HIGH- PERFORMANCE CONCRETE SUBJECTED

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

91

Faculty of Law The objective of the MSW/JD program is to promote the integration of law and social work through  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty of Law MSW/JD The objective of the MSW/JD program is to promote the integration of law of promoting quality of life for all citizens. #12;MSW/JD Experiential Learning Our clinics, mooting program

92

Licensing Information & FAQs Social Work is a licensed profession with an entry level post-MSW license, the LGSW (Licensed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Licensing Information & FAQs Social Work is a licensed profession with an entry level post-MSW of the Licensing Exam Preparation Services available to MSW students? UM School of Social Work Continuing

Weber, David J.

93

Review of solar neutrinos and the MSW effect  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I review the MSW solution to the solar neutrino problem in light of the existing data from the {sup 37}Cl and Kamiokande II experiments. Taken together, they disfavor the adiabatic solution and tend to support either the large angle solution or the nonadiabatic one. In both cases the {sup 71}Ga experiment will yield a much smaller signal than that predicted by the standard solar model; the suppression factor in the former case will be about the same as for {sup 37}Cl, and in the latter it could be as large as 10 or more. I await the outcome of this experiment with great anticipation. 10 refs.

Rosen, S.P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Solving Solar Neutrino Puzzle via LMA MSW Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the existing solar neutrino experiment data and show the allowed regions. The result from SNO's salt phase itself restricts quite a lot the allowed region's area. Reactor neutrinos play an important role in determining oscillation parameters. KamLAND gives decisive conclusion on the solution to the solar neutrino puzzle, in particular, the spectral distortion in the 766.3 Ty KamLAND data gives another new improvement in the constraint of solar MSW-LMA solutions. We confirm that at 99.73% C.L. the high-LMA solution is excluded.

Q. Y. Liu; B. L. Chen; J. Zhou; M. J. Luo; S. C. Jing

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

95

MSW mediated neutrino decay and the solar neutrino problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the solar neutrino problem assuming simultaneous presence of MSW transitions in the sun and neutrino decay on the way from sun to earth. We do a global $\\chi^2$-analysis of the data on total rates in Cl, Ga and Superkamiokande (SK) experiments and the SK day-night spectrum data and determine the changes in the allowed region in the $\\dm - \\tan^2\\theta$ plane in presence of decay. We also discuss the implications for unstable neutrinos in the SNO experiment.

Abhijit Bandyopadhyay; Sandhya Choubey; Srubabati Goswami

2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

MSW PORTLAND CAMPUS COURSES OPEN TO NON-ADMIT STUDENTS Spring 2014 We are pleased to offer several MSW-level social work elective courses in Spring term 2014 to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MSW PORTLAND CAMPUS COURSES OPEN TO NON-ADMIT STUDENTS ­ Spring 2014 We are pleased to offer several MSW-level social work elective courses in Spring term 2014 to nonadmitted students: SW 510: Social) PLEASE NOTE THAT THESE COURSES ARE ADVANCED ELECTIVES, WITH PREREQUISITES, IN OUR MSW CURRICULUM

Lafferriere, Gerardo

97

MSW PORTLAND CAMPUS COURSES OPEN TO NON-ADMIT STUDENTS Winter 2015 We are pleased to offer five MSW-level social work elective courses in Winter term 2015 to nonadmitted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MSW PORTLAND CAMPUS COURSES OPEN TO NON-ADMIT STUDENTS ­ Winter 2015 We are pleased to offer five MSW-level social work elective courses in Winter term 2015 to nonadmitted students: SW 510: Racial MSW PROGRAM ELECTIVES, some with prerequisites. You must obtain permission from the instructor

Caughman, John

98

West Virginia University Faculty Position/Coordinator of Extended Campus MSW Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West Virginia University Faculty Position/Coordinator of Extended Campus MSW Program The West to coordinate its extended campus MSW program offered in Wheeling, West Virginia. The position is full the mission of the School of Social Work with particular emphasis on the needs of northern West Virginia

Azevedo, Ricardo

99

U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil pri

Downing, Mark [ORNL; Eaton, Laurence M [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Langholtz, Matthew H [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL; Stokes, Bryce [Navarro Research & Engineering; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Rachel (Levine) Steinberg, MSW/MAJCS 2001 "I knew that I wanted to continue my work in the Jewish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rachel (Levine) Steinberg, MSW/MAJCS 2001 "I knew that I wanted to continue my work in the Jewish with the opportunity to learn from and with an impressive group of faculty and students." MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK (MSW)/ CERTIFICATE IN JEWISH COMMUNAL SERVICE Amy (Wagner) Weinstein, MSW 2009/CJCS 2010 "This joint program allowed

Sharp, Kim

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Is a large mixing angle MSW effect the solution of the solar neutrino problems? J. N. Bahcall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Is a large mixing angle MSW effect the solution of the solar neutrino problems? J. N. Bahcall results on solar neutrinos provide hints that the LMA MSW solution could be correct. We perform accurate/or low probability LOW Mikheyev- Smirnou-Wolfenstein MSW solutions and vacuum oscilla- tions; cf. Ref. 12

Bahcall, John

102

Is a large mixing angle MSW effect the solution of the solar neutrino problems? J. N. Bahcall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Is a large mixing angle MSW effect the solution of the solar neutrino problems? J. N. Bahcall 1999# Recent results on solar neutrinos provide hints that the LMA MSW solution could be correct. We­ Smirnou­Wolfenstein #MSW# solutions and vacuum oscilla­ tions; cf. Ref. #12# for a recent discussion

Bahcall, John

103

LMA MSW Solution from the Inverted Hierarchical Model of Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine whether the inverted hierarchical model of neutrinos is compatible with the explanation of the large mixing angles (LMA)MSW solution of the solar neutrino problem. The left-handed Majorana neutrino mass matrix for the inverted hierarchical model, is generated through the seesaw mechanism using the diagonal form of the Dirac neutrino mass matrix and the non-diagonal texture of the right-handed Majorana mass matrix. In a model independent way, we construct a specific form of the charged lepton mass matrix having a special structure in 1-2 block, which contribution to the leptonic mixing (MNS) matrix leads to the predictions $\\sin^{2}2\\theta_{12}=0.8517$, $\\sin^{2}2\\theta_{23}=0.9494$, and $|V_{e3}|=0.159$ at the unification scale. These predictions are found to be consistent with the LMA MSW solution of the solar neutrino problem. The inverted hierarchical model is also found to be stable against the quantum radiative corrections in the MSSM. A numerical analysis of the renormalisation group equations (RGEs) in the MSSM shows a mild decrease of the mixing angles with the decrease of energy scale and the corresponding values of the neutrino mixings at the top-quark mass scale are found as $\\sin^{2}2\\theta_{12}=0.8472$, $\\sin^{2}2\\theta_{23}=0.9399$, $|V_{e3}|=0.1509$ respectively.

Mahadev Patgiri; N. Nimai Singh

2001-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

104

Call for Nominations to the WTERT/SUR 2010 Awards -February 22, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/other heating from WTE/EfW: Tons of MSW landfilled: Tons of MSW landfilled with Landfill Gas Recovery: MWh

Columbia University

105

A hybrid procedure for MSW generation forecasting at multiple time scales in Xiamen City, China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? We propose a hybrid model that combines seasonal SARIMA model and grey system theory. ? The model is robust at multiple time scales with the anticipated accuracy. ? At month-scale, the SARIMA model shows good representation for monthly MSW generation. ? At medium-term time scale, grey relational analysis could yield the MSW generation. ? At long-term time scale, GM (1, 1) provides a basic scenario of MSW generation. - Abstract: Accurate forecasting of municipal solid waste (MSW) generation is crucial and fundamental for the planning, operation and optimization of any MSW management system. Comprehensive information on waste generation for month-scale, medium-term and long-term time scales is especially needed, considering the necessity of MSW management upgrade facing many developing countries. Several existing models are available but of little use in forecasting MSW generation at multiple time scales. The goal of this study is to propose a hybrid model that combines the seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) model and grey system theory to forecast MSW generation at multiple time scales without needing to consider other variables such as demographics and socioeconomic factors. To demonstrate its applicability, a case study of Xiamen City, China was performed. Results show that the model is robust enough to fit and forecast seasonal and annual dynamics of MSW generation at month-scale, medium- and long-term time scales with the desired accuracy. In the month-scale, MSW generation in Xiamen City will peak at 132.2 thousand tonnes in July 2015 1.5 times the volume in July 2010. In the medium term, annual MSW generation will increase to 1518.1 thousand tonnes by 2015 at an average growth rate of 10%. In the long term, a large volume of MSW will be output annually and will increase to 2486.3 thousand tonnes by 2020 2.5 times the value for 2010. The hybrid model proposed in this paper can enable decision makers to develop integrated policies and measures for waste management over the long term.

Xu, Lilai, E-mail: llxu@iue.ac.cn [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1799 Jimei Road, Xiamen 361021 (China); Xiamen Key Lab of Urban Metabolism, Xiamen 361021 (China); Gao, Peiqing, E-mail: peiqing15@yahoo.com.cn [Xiamen City Appearance and Environmental Sanitation Management Office, 51 Hexiangxi Road, Xiamen 361004 (China); Cui, Shenghui, E-mail: shcui@iue.ac.cn [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1799 Jimei Road, Xiamen 361021 (China); Xiamen Key Lab of Urban Metabolism, Xiamen 361021 (China); Liu, Chun, E-mail: xmhwlc@yahoo.com.cn [Xiamen City Appearance and Environmental Sanitation Management Office, 51 Hexiangxi Road, Xiamen 361004 (China)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Just So? Vacuum Oscillations and MSW: An Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We find that vacuum oscillations (VO), large-mixing-angle and small-mixing-angle MSW solutions to the solar neutrino problem (SNP) give all very good fits to the most recent results. Measurements of the $^7$Be flux can, in some cases, discriminate between different solutions to the SNP; in particular, VO allow $^7$Be fluxes almost as large as the one predicted by the SSM. We find that no evidence for seasonal variations can be extracted from present data, but that the large statistics of SuperKamiokande should make possible to study a significant portion of the presently allowed parameter space by just looking for seasonal variations. We also discuss the Borexino potential for detecting seasonal variations, which looks really impressive.

E. Calabresu; N. Ferrari; G. Fiorentini; M. Lissia

1995-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

107

Just-So Oscillation: as Just as MSW?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The neutrino long wavelength (just-so) oscillation is reconsidered as a solution to the solar neutrino problem. In the light of the presently updated results of the four solar neutrino experiments, the data fit in the just-so scenario substantially improves and becomes almost as good as in the MSW scenario. Surprising result of our analysis is that best fit is achieved when the oscillation occurs only between two neutrino states: switching on the oscillation into third neutrino increases the $\\chi^2$ value. Namely, we consider the vacuum oscillation scenario in the three-neutrino system (4 parameters) and find out that the $\\chi^2$ minimum is always achieved in the {\\it two} parameter subspace in which actually only {\\it two} neutrino states oscillate. This holds in the framework of any solar model with relaxed prediction of the various neutrino fluxes. The possible theoretical implications of this observation are also discussed.

Zurab G. Berezhiani; Anna Rossi

1995-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

108

Measuring Earth Matter Density and Testing the MSW Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk I have raised the question of how the future discovery of leptonic CP violation can be made robust even at accepting the rather large current experimental uncertainties in our knowledges of neutrino propagation in matter. To make progress toward answering the difficult question, I listed ways to proceed: (1) Obtain tighter constraints on the MSW theory by testing it by various neutrino experiments. (2) Measure the matter effect in situ, namely within the experiment for discovering CP violation itself. (3) Uncover leptonic CP violation in a matter effect free environment. I also reported a step made toward the above point (2) by taking neutrino factory as a concrete setting; An accurate in situ measurement of the matter effect looks promising.

Minakata, Hisakazu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Measuring Earth Matter Density and Testing the MSW Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk I have raised the question of how the future discovery of leptonic CP violation can be made robust even at accepting the rather large current experimental uncertainties in our knowledges of neutrino propagation in matter. To make progress toward answering the difficult question, I listed ways to proceed: (1) Obtain tighter constraints on the MSW theory by testing it by various neutrino experiments. (2) Measure the matter effect in situ, namely within the experiment for discovering CP violation itself. (3) Uncover leptonic CP violation in a matter effect free environment. I also reported a step made toward the above point (2) by taking neutrino factory as a concrete setting; An accurate in situ measurement of the matter effect looks promising.

Hisakazu Minakata

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

110

Supernova Neutrino Energy Spectra and the MSW Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The distortions in the thermal energy spectra for neutrinos produced in a supernova when a resonant oscillation, MSW effect, occurs are determined. In order to show this effect for some relevant and representative examples of unified gauge models, we have chosen $SO(10)$, and $SU(5)_{SUSY}$, $SO(10)_{SUSY}$ with a particular scheme for fermion masses (DHR model). The analysis has been performed for two choices of neutrinos parameters, predicted by the above models, and capable to explain the solar neutrino problem. In both cases one observes a strong distortion in the electron neutrino energy spectrum. This effect, computed for a wide range of $SO(10)_{SUSY}$ models has produced the same results of the previous supersymmetric ones.

F. Buccella; S. Esposito; C. Gualdi; G. Miele

1996-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

111

Direct test of the MSW effect by the solar appearance term in beam experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss if one can verify the MSW effect in neutrino oscillations at a high confidence level in long-baseline experiments. We demonstrate that for long enough baselines at neutrino factories, the matter effect sensitivity is, as opposed to the mass hierarchy sensitivity, not suppressed by $\\sin^2 2 \\theta_{13}$ because it is driven by the solar oscillations in the appearance probability. Furthermore, we show that for the parameter independent direct verification of the MSW effect at long-baseline experiments, a neutrino factory with a baseline of at least 6000 km is needed. For superbeams, we do not find a $5\\sigma$ discovery potential of the MSW effect independent of $\\sin^2 2 \\theta_{13}$. We finally summarize different methods to test the MSW effect.

Walter Winter

2005-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

112

Leptogenesis and the Small-Angle MSW Solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The lepton asymmetry created in the out-of-equilibrium decay of a heavy Majorana neutrino can generate the cosmological baryon asymmetry when processed through fast anomalous electroweak reactions. In this work I examine this process under the following assumptions: (1) maximal nu_mu/nu_tau mixing (2) hierarchical mass spectrum m_3 >> m_2 (3) small-angle MSW solution to the solar neutrino deficit. Working in a basis where the charged lepton and heavy neutrino mass matrices are diagonal, I find the following bounds on the heavy Majorana masses M_i: (a) for a symmetric Dirac neutrino mass matrix (no other constraints), an asymmetry compatible with BBN constraints can be obtained for min(M_2,M_3)> 10^{11} GeV; (b) if {\\em any} of the Dirac matrix elements vanishes, successful baryogenesis can be effected for a choice of min(M_2,M_3) as low as a few times 10^{9} GeV. The latter is compatible with reheat requirements for supersymmetric cosmologies with sub-TeV gravitino masses.

Haim Goldberg

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

113

SOCIAL WORK Program of Study The full MSW Program consists of 63 credit hours-45 credits of classroom work and 18 credits of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOCIAL WORK Program of Study The full MSW Program consists of 63 credit hours- 45 credits can complete the MSW in one full year. A two-year extended program is available after the summer

Thomas, Andrew

114

Does the LMA MSW solar solution imply the Dirac nature of neutrinos?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operating with the bilarge neutrino mixing, we show that in the option of Dirac neutrinos the fermion universality -- expressed by the proportionality of neutrino masses to charged-lepton masses -- predicts $\\Delta m_{21}^2$ of the order $10^{-5} {\\rm eV}^2$, consistently with the LMA MSW solar solution. In contrast, in the option of Majorana neutrinos the fermion universality -- introduced as the seesaw proportionality of neutrino masses to charged-lepton masses squared -- predicts $\\Delta m_{21}^2$ of the order $10^{-8} {\\rm eV}^2$, what is consistent rather with the LOW MSW solar solution. Thus, the favored LMA MSW estimation of $\\Delta m_{21}^2$ might be a signal from the Dirac nature of neutrinos.

Wojciech Krolikowski

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

115

Large or Small Angle MSW from Single Right-Handed Neutrino Dominance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk we discuss a natural explanation of both neutrino mass hierarchies {\\it and} large neutrino mixing angles, as required by the atmospheric neutrino data, in terms of a single right-handed neutrino giving the dominant contribution to the 23 block of the light effective neutrino matrix, and illustrate this mechanism in the framework of models with U(1) family symmetries. Sub-dominant contributions from other right-handed neutrinos are required to give small mass splittings appropriate to the MSW solution to the solar neutrino problem. We present three explicit examples for achieving the small angle MSW solution in the framework of U(1) family symmetry models containing three right-handed neutrinos, which can naturally describe all quark and lepton masses and mixing angles. In this talk we also extend the analysis to the large angle MSW solution.

S. F. King

1999-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

116

Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW)!in!the!United!States!A!National!Survey!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! 1! ! Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW on Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Generation and Disposition in the U.S., in collaboration with Ms. Nora Goldstein was not carried out in 2012 and in 2013 EEC and BioCycle agreed that the 2013 Survey of Waste Generation

Columbia University

117

Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW)!in!the!United!States!A!National!Survey!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! 1! ! Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW Waste (MSW) Generation and Disposition in the U.S., in collaboration with Ms. Nora Goldstein of Bio in 2012 and in 2013 EEC and BioCycle agreed that the 2013 Survey of Waste Generation and Disposition

118

HOW TO APPLY TO THE MSW PROGRAM Thank you for your interest in applying to the University of Texas at El Paso's Master of Social  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HOW TO APPLY TO THE MSW PROGRAM Thank you for your interest in applying to the University of Texas and requirements of UTEP's MSW program are consistent with your personal and educational needs and goals: 1. The advanced concentration for the MSW program is Social Work in the Border Region. Please review Master

Ward, Karen

119

MSW Program Application Requirements: Items 1-3 are processed by the UT Arlington Office of Admissions, Records and Registration and should be sent to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSW Program Application Requirements: Items 1-3 are processed by the UT Arlington Office Fee*** *Submission of the 200 word essay entitled General Academic Plans is not required for MSW directly to the School of Social Work at the address listed below: UT Arlington School of Social Work MSW

Huang, Haiying

120

The USC School of Social Work offers programs of study leading to the Master of Social Work (MSW) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in social  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The USC School of Social Work offers programs of study leading to the Master of Social Work (MSW Work, noted for its innova- tive learning methods, offers the MSW@USC program, which allows students nationwide to earn their Master of Social Work through Web-based study. Like all MSW students, online

Southern California, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Tons of Heavy Metals in Mill Creek Sediments Heather Freeman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

objectives for this summer research were to: 1.) determine how much heavy metal pollution has accumulatedTons of Heavy Metals in Mill Creek Sediments Heather Freeman 8/30/99 Geology Department Advisors: Dr. Kees DeJong Dr. Barry Manyard Dr. David Nash #12;Tons of heavy metals in Mill Creek sediments

Maynard, J. Barry

122

(Data in metric tons of silver content unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

146 SILVER (Data in metric tons 1 of silver content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production.S. refiners of commercial-grade silver, with an estimated total output of 6,500 tons from domestic and foreign to minimize odor, electroplating, hardening bearings, inks, mirrors, solar cells, water purification, and wood

123

(Data in metric tons of silver content unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

146 SILVER (Data in metric tons 1 of silver content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production.S. refiners of commercial-grade silver, with an estimated total output of 6,500 tons from domestic and foreign, hardening bearings, inks, mirrors, solar cells, water purification, and wood treatment to resist mold

124

(Data in metric tons of silver content unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

146 SILVER (Data in metric tons 1 of silver content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production, with an estimated total output of 2,500 tons from domestic and foreign ores and concentrates, and from old and new, mirrors, solar cells, water purification, and wood treatment. Silver was used for miniature antennas

125

Status of the MSW Solutions to the Solar Neutrino Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an updated global analysis of two-flavor MSW solutions to the solar neutrino problem in terms of conversions of nu_e into active or sterile neutrinos. We perform a fit to the full data set corresponding to the 825-day Super-Kamiokande data sample as well as to Chlorine, GALLEX and SAGE experiments. We use all measured total event rates as well as Super-Kamiokande data on the zenith angle dependence, energy spectrum and seasonal variation of the events. For conversions into active neutrinos we find that, although the data on the total event rates favours the Small Mixing Angle (SMA) solution, once the full data set is included both SMA and Large Mixing Angle (LMA) solutions give an equivalent fit to the data. The best-fit points for the combined analysis are Delta m^2=3.6 10^{-5} eV^2 sin^2(2theta)=0.79 with chi^2_min=35.4/30 d.o.f and Delta m^2=5.1~ 10^{-6} eV^2 and sin^2(2theta)=5.5 10^{-3} with chi^2_min=37.4/30 d.o.f. In contrast with the earlier 504-day study of Bahcall-Krastev-Smirnov our results indicate that the LMA solution is not only allowed, but slightly preferred. We also show that seasonal effects, although small, may still reach 8.5 % at the best-fit LMA solution without conflict with the hints of a day-night variation (6% is due to the eccentricity of the Earth's orbit). For conversions into sterile neutrinos only the SMA solution is allowed with best-fit point Delta m^2=5.0 10^{-6} eV^2 and sin^2(2theta)=3. 10^{-3} and chi^2_min=40.2/30 d.o.f. We also consider departures of the Standard Solar Model of Bahcall and Pinsonneault 1998 by allowing arbitrary 8^B and hep fluxes. Best fit is obtained for ^8B/^8B_SSM=0.61 (1.37) and hep/hep_SSM=12 (38) for the SMA (LMA) solution.

M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; P. C. de Holanda; C. Pea-Garay; J. W. F. Valle

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

metal recycled by the titanium industry totaled about 18,000 tons in 2001. Estimated use of titanium as scrap and in the form of ferrotitanium made from scrap by the steel industry was about 6,000 tons; by the superalloy industry, 900 tons; and, in other industries, 700 tons. Old scrap reclaimed totaled about 500 tons

127

The MSW conversion of solar neutrinos and random matter density perturbations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a generalization of the resonant neutrino conversion in matter, including a random component in the matter density profile. The study is focused on the effect of such matter perturbations upon both large and small mixing angle MSW solutions to the solar neutrino problem. This is carried out both for the active-active $\

H. Nunokawa; A. Rossi; V. B. Semikoz; J. W. F. Valle

1996-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

128

Testing large mixing MSW solutions of the solar neutrino problem through Earth regeneration effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large mixing MSW solutions to the solar neutrino problem appear to be currently favored by the data. We discuss the possibility of discriminating them by means of present and future experiments. In particular, we show that the study of energy and time dependence of the Earth regeneration effect can be useful in this respect.

Antonio Palazzo

2001-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

129

Synchronisation and MSW sharpening of neutrinos propagating in a flavour blind medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider neutrino oscillations in a medium in which scattering processes are blind to the neutrino flavour. We present an analytical derivation of the synchronised behaviour obtained in the limit where the average scattering rate is much larger than the oscillation frequency. We also examine MSW transitions in these circumstances, and show that a sharpening of the transition can result.

Nicole F. Bell; R. F. Sawyer; Raymond R. Volkas

2001-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

130

Model Independent Determination of the Solar Neutrino Spectrum with and without MSW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Besides the opportunity for discovering new neutrino physics, solar neutrino measurements provide a sensitive probe of the solar interior, and thus a rigorous test of solar model predictions. We present model independent determinations of the neutrino spectrum by using relevant flux components as free parameters subject only to the luminosity constraint. (1) Without the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect, the best fit for the combined data is poor. Furthermore, the data indicate a severe suppression of the $^7$Be flux relative to the $^8$B, contradicting both standard and nonstandard solar models in general; the $pp$ flux takes its maximum value allowed by the luminosity constraint. This pathology consistently appears even if we ignore any one of the three data. (2) In the presence of the two-flavor MSW effect, the current constraint on the initial $^8$B flux is weak, but consistent with the SSM and sufficient to exclude nonstandard models with small $^8$B fluxes. No meaningful constraint is obtained for the other fluxes. In the future, even allowing MSW, the $^8$B and $^7$Be fluxes can be determined at the $\\pm$(15 -- 20)\\% level, making competing solar models distinguishable. We emphasize that the neutral current sensitivity for $^7$Be neutrinos in BOREXINO, HELLAZ, and HERON is essential for determining the initial fluxes. The constraints on the MSW parameters in the model independent analysis are also discussed.

Naoya Hata; Paul Langacker

1994-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

131

Neutrino-electron scattering and the choice between different MSW solutions of the solar neutrino problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the scattering of solar neutrinos by electrons as a means for distinguishing between MSW solutions of the solar neutrino problem. In terms of the ratio R between the observed cross-section and that for pure electron-type neutrinos, we find that some correlation between the value R and the appropriate solution. 9 refs., 3 figs.

Rosen, S.P.; Gelb, J.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

REACTION AND COMBUSTION INDICATORS IN MSW LANDFILLS Jeffrey W. Martin1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Ohio. ABSTRACT Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills may contain aluminum from residential and commercial solid waste, industrial waste, and aluminum production wastes. Some aluminum-bearing waste municipal solid waste, industrial wastes, and aluminum production waste such as dross, salt cake, baghouse

133

Current MSW Management and Waste-to-Energy Status in the Republic of Korea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(WTE) in Korea and the potential for improvement. Despite growth of per capita GDP of nearly 501 Current MSW Management and Waste-to-Energy Status in the Republic of Korea By Yoonjung Seo of the generally accepted hierarchy of waste management. The study also investigated the status of waste-to-energy

Columbia University

134

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 10, Appendix H: Anaerobic digestion of MSW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While municipal solid waste (MSW) thermoconversion and recycling technologies have been described in Appendices A through E, this appendix addresses the role of bioconversion technologies in handling the organic fraction in MSW and sewage sludge. Much of the organic matter in MSW, consisting mainly of paper, food waste, and yard waste, has potential for conversion, along with sewage sludge, through biochemical processes to methane and carbon dioxide providing a measurable, renewable energy resource potential. The gas produced may be treated for removal of carbon dioxide and water, leaving pipeline quality gas. The process also has the potential for producing a stabilized solid product that may be suitable as a fuel for combustion or used as a compost fertilizer. Anaerobic digestion can occur naturally in an uncontrolled environment such as a landfill, or it can occur in a controlled environment such as a confined vessel. Landfill gas production is discussed in Appendix F. This appendix provides information on the anaerobic digestion process as it has been applied to produce methane from the organic fraction of MSW in enclosed, controlled reactors.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The MSW solution to the solar neutrino problem in the presence of random solar matter density perturbations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the evolution equation describing MSW conversion, derived in the framework of the Schr\\"odinger approach, in the presence of matter density fluctuations. Then we analyse the effect of such fluctuations in the MSW scenario as a solution to the solar neutrino problem. It is shown that the non-adiabatic MSW parameter region is rather stable (especially in $\\delta m^2$) for matter density noise at the few percent level. We also discuss the possibility to probe solar matter density fluctuations at the future Borexino experiment.

Anna Rossi

1996-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

136

Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

The U.S. Department of Energy today released a report - 2011 U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry - detailing U.S. biomass feedstock...

137

The MSW solution to the solar neutrino problem for non-standard solar models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The difficulties for non-standard solar models (NSSM) in resolving the solar neutrino problem are discussed stressing the incompatibility of the gallium--Kamiokande data, and of the gallium--chlorine data. We conclude that NSSM's cannot explain simultaneously the results of any two of the solar neutrino data (chlorine, Kamiokande and gallium). We address further the question whether the MSW solution exists for NSSM's (e.g. models with $^8$B neutrino flux much lower than the standard one and/or central temperature $T_c$ very different from $T_c^{\\text{SSM}}$). We demonstrate that the MSW solution exists and is very stable relative to changes of $S_{17}$ ($S$-factor for $p$ + $^7$Be reaction) and $T_c$. In particular, $\\Delta m^2$ is almost constant while $\\sin^2 2\\theta$ depends on the exact values of $S_{17}$ (or $^8$B-neutrino flux) and $T_c$.

V. Berezinsky; G. Fiorentini; M. Lissia

1994-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

138

Green's Function in Weak Interactions (in Matter) and Impossibility of Realizing the MSW Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that the equation for Green's function of fermions (neutrinos) with weak interactions (in matter) coincides with the equation for Green's function of fermions in vacuum. This result is a consequence of the fact that the right components of fermions do not participate in weak interactions. As a result we come to a conclusion: the mechanism of resonance enhancement of neutrino oscillations in matter (i.e. MSW effect) cannot exist.

Kh. M. Beshtoev

2000-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

139

Oxygen-enriched coincineration of MSW and sewage sludge: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal regulations banning ocean dumping of sewage sludge coupled with stricter regulations on the disposal of sewage sludge in landfills have forced municipalities, especially those in the northeast United States, to consider alternate methods for disposal of this solid waste. Coincineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) and sludge has proven to be economically attractive for both Europe and Japan, but has not yet proven to be a viable sludge disposal technology in the United States because of a history of operational problems in existing facilities. The most prevalent problem in coincinerating MSW and a dewatered sewage sludge (15 to 25% solids) is incomplete sludge combustion. Incomplete sludge combustion is primarily a function of sludge particle size, occurring when the surface of the sludge particle dries and hardens, while the inner mass is unaffected. This phenomenon is commonly referred to in the industry as the {open_quotes}hamburger effect.{close_quotes} In an effort to promote technology development in this area, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. teamed with the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate a new process being developed for the disposal of a dewatered sewage sludge, {open_quotes}Oxygen-Enriched Coincineration of MSW and Sewage Sludge.{close_quotes} This report provides a comprehensive summary of the pilot demonstration test program for oxygen-enriched coincineration of MSW and sewage sludge. This report describes the pilot test facility, instrumentation, and methods of data collection and data analyses; describes how the tests were executed; and discusses the test results. Recommendations for the future development of this technology in the current marketplace are also provided.

none,

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Unparticle-Higgs Mixing: MSW Resonances, See-saw Mechanism and Spinodal Instabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by slow-roll inflationary cosmology we study a scalar unparticle weakly coupled to a Higgs field in the broken symmetry phase. The mixing between the unparticle and the Higgs field results in a seesaw type matrix and the mixing angles feature a Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect as a consequence of the unparticle field being noncanonical. We find two (MSW) resonances for small and large spacelike momenta. The unparticlelike mode features a nearly flat potential with spinodal instabilities and a large expectation value. An effective potential for the unparticlelike field is generated from the Higgs potential, but with couplings suppressed by a large power of the small seesaw ratio. The dispersion relation for the Higgs-like mode features an imaginary part even at "tree level" as a consequence of the fact that the unparticle field describes a multiparticle continuum. Mixed unparticle-Higgs propagators reveal the possibility of oscillations, albeit with short coherence lengths. The results are generalized to the case in which the unparticle features a mass gap, in which case a low energy MSW resonance may occur for lightlike momenta depending on the scales. Unparticle-Higgs mixing leads to an effective unparticle potential of the new-inflation form. Slow-roll variables are suppressed by seesaw ratios and the anomalous dimensions and favor a red spectrum of scalar perturbations consistent with cosmic microwave background data.

D. Boyanovsky; R. Holman; Jimmy A. Hutasoit

2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hafnium metal was insignificant. Import Sources (1997-2000): Zirconium ores and concentrates: South Africa%; Germany, 7%; United Kingdom, 2%; and other, 9%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12 Stockpile, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held over 500 tons of zirconium in various forms. DOE also

142

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Import Sources (1995-98): Zirconium ores and concentrates: South Africa, 53%; Australia, 45%; and other Kingdom, 4%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12/31/99 Zirconium ores and concentrates 2615.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held over 500 tons of zirconium in various forms. DOE also maintained a supply

143

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hafnium metal was insignificant. Import Sources (1998-2001): Zirconium ores and concentrates: South Africa%; Germany, 8%; United Kingdom, 3%; and other, 9%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12,838 short tons) of zirconium ore (baddeleyite) during fiscal year 2002. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE

144

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was insignificant. Import Sources (1996-99): Zirconium ores and concentrates: South Africa, 56%; Australia, 41, 4%; and other, 9%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12/31/00 Zirconium ores.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held over 500 tons of zirconium in various forms. DOE also maintained a stockpile

145

(Data in metric tons1 of gold content, unless noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combined production accounted for nearly 80% of the U.S. total. The trend for recent U.S. gold exploration68 GOLD (Data in metric tons1 of gold content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: Gold was recovered as a byproduct of processing base metals, chiefly copper. Twenty-five lode mines yielded

146

Greenhouse gas emissions from MSW incineration in China: Impacts of waste characteristics and energy recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determination of the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted during municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is complex because both contributions and savings of GHGs exist in the process. To identify the critical factors influencing GHG emissions from MSWI in China, a GHG accounting model was established and applied to six Chinese cities located in different regions. The results showed that MSWI in most of the cities was the source of GHGs, with emissions of 25-207 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. Within all process stages, the emission of fossil CO{sub 2} from the combustion of MSW was the main contributor (111-254 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw), while the substitution of electricity reduced the GHG emissions by 150-247 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. By affecting the fossil carbon content and the lower heating value of the waste, the contents of plastic and food waste in the MSW were the critical factors influencing GHG emissions of MSWI. Decreasing food waste content in MSW by half will significantly reduce the GHG emissions from MSWI, and such a reduction will convert MSWI in Urumqi and Tianjin from GHG sources to GHG sinks. Comparison of the GHG emissions in the six Chinese cities with those in European countries revealed that higher energy recovery efficiency in Europe induced much greater reductions in GHG emissions. Recovering the excess heat after generation of electricity would be a good measure to convert MSWI in all the six cities evaluated herein into sinks of GHGs.

Yang Na [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Hua, E-mail: zhanghua_tj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Chen Miao; Shao Liming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); He Pinjing, E-mail: xhpjk@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

MSW effect with flavor changing interactions and the atmospheric neutrino problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider flavor changing effective neutrino interactions in the context of massive neutrinos in the issue of atmospheric neutrinos. Assuming as usual that this is an indication of the oscillation of muon neutrinos into tau neutrinos we show that there is a set of parameters which is consistent with the MSW resonance condition for the typical Earth density and atmospheric neutrino energies. In particular we show that even if the vacuum mixing angle vanishes it is still possible to have a resonance which is compatible with the atmospheric neutrino data. We also briefly consider the case of the solar neutrino problem.

J. C. Montero; V. Pleitez

2000-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

148

Large Angle MSW Solution in Grand Unified Theories with SU(3) X U(1) Horizontal Symmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct a model with a SU(3) X U(1) horizontal symmetry in the context of Grand Unified Theories. In our models, the bi-maximal lepton mixing and suitable neutrino masses for the large angle MSW solution are obtained without any fine-tuning due to the spontaneously broken SU(3)_H symmetry. The three generations of quarks and leptons are unified as members of the SU(3)_H fundamental representation, and the U(1)_H charge gives the origin of the fermion mass hierarchy and mixing angles. We present two explicit examples of SU(5)_GUT and SO(10)_GUT models, in which the Yukawa structures are given successfully.

Ryuichiro Kitano; Yukihiro Mimura

2000-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

149

Vacuum and MSW interpretations of solar neutrino data with the LNW mass matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Lehmann-Newton-Wu mass matrix, which was recently applied to neutrinos, is further investigated. The analytic results presented earlier are confirmed numerically for the solar density profile of the Standard Solar Model. The combined analysis of atmospheric and solar neutrino data favors the MSW solution over the vacuum-oscillation solution. The total rates from the solar neutrino detectors and spectrum distortion reported by the Super-Kamiokande collaboration for solar neutrinos favors one heavy (m3\\sim 0.05 eV) and two light (m1, m2\\lsim 0.003 eV) neutrinos.

Per Osland; Geir Vigdel

2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

150

Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management system - An Italian case study on the quality of MSW data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper analyses the way numerical data on Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) quantities are recorded, processed and then reported for six of the most meaningful Italian Districts and shows the difficulties found during the comparison of these Districts, starting from the lack of homogeneity and the fragmentation of the data indispensable to make this critical analysis. These aspects are often ignored, but data certainty are the basis for serious MSW planning. In particular, the paper focuses on overall Source Separation Level (SSL) definition and on the influence that Special Waste (SW) assimilated to MSW has on it. An investigation was then necessary to identify new parameters in place of overall SSL. Moreover, these parameters are not only important for a waste management system performance measure, but are fundamental in order to design and check management plan and to identify possible actions to improve it.

Bianchini, A.; Pellegrini, M. [DIEM, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 2, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Saccani, C., E-mail: cesare.saccani@unibo.it [DIEM, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 2, 40136 Bologna (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

MSW PORTLAND CAMPUS COURSES OPEN TO NON-ADMIT STUDENTS Fall 2014 We are pleased to offer three graduate level social work elective courses in Fall term 2014 to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MSW PORTLAND CAMPUS COURSES OPEN TO NON-ADMIT STUDENTS ­ Fall 2014 We are pleased to offer three, WITH PREREQUISITES, IN OUR MSW CURRICULUM. As described below, you must obtain permission from the instructor. If you are considering applying to the MSW program and might wish to transfer in credits for one

Latiolais, M. Paul

152

The TCU Department of Social Work invites applications for a full-time, nine-month lecturer position beginning August 2014. The Department, offering BSW and MSW degrees, is located in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

position beginning August 2014. The Department, offering BSW and MSW degrees, is located in the Harris in the MSW program. Applicants must demonstrate a strong commitment to quality teaching and be willing to teach in both undergraduate and graduate programs. The MSW program offers the Advanced Generalist

Azevedo, Ricardo

153

UTILIZATION OF LOW NOx COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low NO{sub x} combustion practices are critical for reducing NO{sub x} emissions from power plants. These low NO{sub x} combustion practices, however, generate high residual carbon contents in the fly ash produced. These high carbon contents threaten utilization of this combustion by-product. This research has successfully developed a separation technology to render fly ash into useful, quality-controlled materials. This technology offers great flexibility and has been shown to be applicable to all of the fly ashes tested (more than 10). The separated materials can be utilized in traditional fly ash applications, such as cement and concrete, as well as in nontraditional applications such as plastic fillers, metal matrix composites, refractories, and carbon adsorbents. Technologies to use beneficiated fly ash in these applications are being successfully developed. In the future, we will continue to refine the separation and utilization technologies to expand the utilization of fly ash. The disposal of more than 31 million tons of fly ash per year is an important environmental issue. With continued development, it will be possible to increase economic, energy and environmental benefits by re-directing more of this fly ash into useful materials.

J.Y. Hwang; X. Huang; M.G. McKimpson; R.E. Tieder; A.M. Hein; J.M. Gillis; D.C. Popko; K.L. Paxton; Z. Li; X. Liu; X. Song; R.I. Kramer

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

THERMAL MODELING ANALYSIS OF SRS 70 TON CASK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this work was to perform the thermal calculations to evaluate the Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel assembly temperatures inside the SRS 70-Ton Cask loaded with various bundle powers. MTR fuel consists of HFBR, MURR, MIT, and NIST. The MURR fuel was used to develop a bounding case since it is the fuel with the highest heat load. The results will be provided for technical input for the SRS 70 Ton Cask Onsite Safety Assessment. The calculation results show that for the SRS 70 ton dry cask with 2750 watts total heat source with a maximum bundle heat of 670 watts and 9 bundles of MURR bounding fuel, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are below about 263 C. Maximum top surface temperature of the plastic cover is about 112 C, much lower than its melting temperature 260 C. For 12 bundles of MURR bounding fuel with 2750 watts total heat and a maximum fuel bundle of 482 watts, the highest fuel assembly temperatures are bounded by the 9 bundle case. The component temperatures of the cask were calculated by a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics approach. The modeling calculations were performed by considering daily-averaged solar heat flux.

Lee, S.; Jordan, J.; Hensel, S.

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

155

Hybrid MSW + VO Solution of the Solar Neutrino Problem in String-Motivated Unified Theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that the hybrid MSW + VO solution of the solar neutrino problem, according to which the solar nu_e undergo matter-enhanced transitions into nu_mu, nu_tau in the Sun followed by long wave length (about 1.5 10^8 km) nu_e -> nu_mu, nu_tau oscillations in vacuum between the Sun and the Earth, can occur naturally in string-motivated grand unified theories. We consider the supersymmetric version of a string-type SU(4)xSU(2)_LxSU(2)_R theory with U(1)_X family symmetry, which was shown to successfully describe the charged fermion masses and the quark mixing, and extend the earlier fermion mass analysis to the neutrino sector. We show that the four oscillation parameters Delta m_31^2, Delta m_21^2 and sin^2 2 theta_12, sin^2 2 theta_13, characterising the combined matter-enhanced transitions and vacuum oscillations of the solar nu_e, naturally get values in the ranges of the hybrid MSW + VO solutions found recently.

B. C. Allanach; G. K. Leontaris; S. T. Petcov

1997-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

156

Unparticle-Higgs Mixing: MSW Resonances, See-saw Mechanism and Spinodal Instabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by slow roll inflationary cosmology we study a scalar unparticle weakly coupled to a Higgs field in the broken symmetry phase. The mixing between the unparticle and the Higgs field results in a see-saw type matrix and the mixing angles feature a Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect as a consequence of the unparticle field being non-canonical. We find \\emph{two} (MSW) resonances for small and large space-like momenta. The unparticle-like mode features a nearly flat potential with \\emph{spinodal instabilities} and a large expectation value. An effective potential for the unparticle-like field is generated from the Higgs potential, but with couplings suppressed by a large power of the small see-saw ratio. The dispersion relation for the Higgs-like mode features an imaginary part even at "tree level" as a consequence of the fact that the unparticle field describes a multiparticle continuum. Mixed unparticle-Higgs propagators reveal the possibility of oscillations, albeit with short coherence length...

Boyanovsky, D; Hutasoit, Jimmy A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Sterile neutrinos produced near the EW scale I: mixing angles, MSW resonances and production rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the production of sterile neutrinos in the region $T\\sim M_W$ in an extension beyond the standard model with the see-saw mass matrix originating in Yukawa couplings to Higgs-like scalars with masses and vev's of the order of the electroweak scale. Sterile neutrinos are produced by the decay of scalars and standard model vector bosons. We obtain the index of refraction, dispersion relations, mixing angles in the medium and production rates including those for right-handed sterile neutrinos, from the standard model and beyond the standard model self-energies. For $1 \\lesssim M_W/T \\lesssim 3$ we find narrow MSW resonances with $k \\lesssim T$ for both left and right handed neutrinos even in absence of a lepton asymmetry in the (active) neutrino sector, as well as very low energy ($k/T \\ll |\\xi|$) narrow MSW resonances in the presence of a lepton asymmetry consistent with the bounds from WMAP and BBN. For small vacuum mixing angle, consistent with observational bounds, the absorptive part of the self-ene...

Wu, Jun; Boyanovsky, Daniel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Performance of a municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator predicted with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to investigate by the means of numerical simulation the performance of the MSW incinerator with of Vercelli (Italy). FLUENT, a finite-volumes commercial code for Fluid Dynamics has been used to predict the 3-D reacting flows (gaseous phase) within the incinerator geometry, in order to estimate if the three conditions settled by the Italian law (P.D. 915 / 82) are respected: (a) Flue gas temperature at the input of the secondary combustion chamber must exceed 950 C. (b) Oxygen concentration in the same section must exceed 6 %. (c) Residence time for the flue gas in the secondary combustion chamber must exceed 2 seconds. The model of the incinerator has been created using the software pre-processing facilities (wall, input, outlet and live cells), together with the set-up of boundary conditions. There are also imposed the combustion constants (stoichiometry, heat of combustion, air excess). The solving procedure transforms at the level of each live cell the partial derivative equations in algebraic equations, computing the velocities field, the temperatures, gases concentration, etc. These predicted values were compared with the design properties, and the conclusion was that the conditions (a), (b), (c), are respected in normal operation. The powerful graphic interface helps the user to visualize the magnitude of the computed parameters. These results may be successfully used for the design and operation improvements for MSW incinerators. This fact will substantially increase the efficiency, reduce pollutant emissions and optimize the plant overall performance.

Anglesio, P.; Negreanu, G.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area - Vault held waste...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area - Vault held waste tanks with contamination from Hanford's former laboratory facilities 1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area -...

160

TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E E E E E Recycling: New scrap metal recycled by the titanium industry was about 25,000 tons in 1996 industry was 4,700 tons; by the superalloy industry, 730 tons; and in other industries, 510 tons. Old scrap nation (MFN) Non-MFN3 12/31/96 12/31/96 Waste and scrap metal 8108.10.1000 Free Free. Unwrought metal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The stability of the MSW solution to the solar neutrino problem with respect to random matter density perturbations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a generalization of the resonant neutrino conversion in matter, including a random component in the matter density profile. The study is focused on the effect of such matter perturbations upon both large and small mixing angle MSW solutions to the solar neutrino problem. This is carried out both for the active-active $\

A. Rossi

1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

162

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 6, Appendix D, Pyrolysis and gasification of MSW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Appendix summarizes information available in the open literature describing the technology and operating experierice of pyrolysis technology as applied to the management of municipal solid waste (MSW). The literature search, which emphasized the time frame of greatest activity in MSW pyrolysis (i.e., the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s), focused on the scale of application, material feedstock, technical limitations and economic considerations. Smaller scale facilities, either laboratory/research scale (< I TPD) or process development/pilot scale plants (1-20 TPD) for municipal waste and related materials (agricultural, forest residues, industrial wastes, etc.), are mentioned in the literature (275, 495). However, such data are sparse, dated, and often have limited applicability to MSW in general, and for design scale-up in particular. Therefore, greatest emphasis was placed on identifying demonstration scale (20--150 TPD) will commercial seals (> 150 TPD) studies which could be expected to provide economic, environmental, and energy data that can be scaled with possibly less risk. While the promise of pyrolysis of MSW lies in its ability to transform municipal waste into gaseous and liquid chemicals and fuel products, the major limitation is the unproven technical and economic feasibility of a large scale facility.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of the Environment is responsible for regulating fugitive air emissions from the transportation of coal combustion by-products and the permissible beneficial uses of these by...

164

The USC School of Social Work works with thousands of selected agencies and centers across the country that represent the complete range of social services, providing MSW@USC students with the opportunity to apply what they learn in class and work with re  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the country that represent the complete range of social services, providing MSW@USC students and the ability to make personnel and resources available. Becoming a field instructor for the MSW@USC program can of each semester. Field Instructors for the MSW@USC Criteria for Becoming an MSW@USC Field Instructor

Southern California, University of

165

Public perception of odour and environmental pollution attributed to MSW treatment and disposal facilities: A case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? Effects of closing MSW facilities on perception of odour and pollution studied. ? Residents perception of odour nuisance considerably diminished post closure. ? Odour perception showed an association with distance from MSW facilities. ? Media coverage increased knowledge about MSW facilities and how they operate. ? Economic compensation possibly affected residents views and concerns. - Abstract: If residents perceptions, concerns and attitudes towards waste management facilities are either not well understood or underestimated, people can produce strong opposition that may include protest demonstrations and violent conflicts such as those experienced in the Campania Region of Italy. The aim of this study was to verify the effects of the closure of solid waste treatment and disposal facilities (two landfills and one RDF production plant) on public perception of odour and environmental pollution. The study took place in four villages in Southern Italy. Identical questionnaires were administered to residents during 2003 and after the closure of the facilities occurred in 2008. The residents perception of odour nuisance considerably diminished between 2003 and 2009 for the nearest villages, with odour perception showing an association with distance from the facilities. Post closure, residents had difficulty in identifying the type of smell due to the decrease in odour level. During both surveys, older residents reported most concern about the potentially adverse health impacts of long-term exposure to odours from MSW facilities. However, although awareness of MSW facilities and concern about potentially adverse health impacts varied according to the characteristics of residents in 2003, substantial media coverage produced an equalisation effect and increased knowledge about the type of facilities and how they operated. It is possible that residents of the village nearest to the facilities reported lower awareness of and concern about odour and environmental pollution because the municipality received economic compensation for their presence.

De Feo, Giovanni, E-mail: g.defeo@unisa.it [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Salerno, via Ponte don Melillo 1, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); De Gisi, Sabino [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Salerno, via Ponte don Melillo 1, 84084 Fisciano (Italy); Williams, Ian D. [Waste Management Research Group, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

KCP relocates 18-ton machine | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNational Nuclear SecurityNationalApply for Our Jobs / HowSecurityrelocates 18-ton

167

Hint of non-standard MSW dynamics in solar neutrino conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by the recent low-threshold measurements of the solar 8B neutrino spectrum performed by Borexino, Super-Kamiokande and the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory -- all now monitoring the transition regime between low-energy (vacuum-like) and high-energy (matter-dominated) flavor conversions -- we consider the role of sub-dominant dynamical terms induced by new flavor-changing interactions. We find that the presence of such perturbations with strength ~ 0.1 G_F is favored by the analysis, being able to describe the anomalous behavior of the solar neutrino spectrum suggested by the new results, which show no sign of the typical low-energy upturn predicted by the standard MSW mechanism. Our findings, if interpreted as a positive indication, provide a hint of such new effects at the ~ 2 sigma level.

Palazzo, Antonio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Discriminating MSW solutions to the solar neutrino problem with flux-independent information at SuperKamiokande and SNO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The two possible Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) solutions of the solar neutrino problem (one at small and the other at large mixing angle), up to now tested mainly through absolute neutrino flux measurements, require flux-independent tests both for a decisive confirmation and for their discrimination. To this end, we perform a joint analysis of various flux-independent observables that can be measured at the SuperKamiokande and Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiments. In particular, we analyze the recent data collected at SuperKamiokande after 374 days of operation, work out the corresponding predictions for SNO, and study the interplay between SuperKamiokande and SNO observables. It is shown how, by using only flux-independent observables from SuperKamiokande and SNO, one can discriminate between the two MSW solutions and separate them from the no oscillation case.

G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; D. Montanino

1998-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

169

Large Mixing Angle MSW and Atmospheric Neutrinos from Single Right-Handed Neutrino Dominance and U(1) Family Symmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single right-handed neutrino dominance (SRHND) in the 23 sector of the light effective neutrino mass matrix has been proposed as a natural explanation for the concurrent large 23 mixing angle and large 23 mass hierarchy. In this paper we show how large 12 mixing angles, suitable for the large mixing angle (LMA) MSW solution to the solar neutrino problem, may arise from SRHND. In order to understand the conditions for SRHND and LMA MSW we first consider the case of one and two right-handed neutrinos, and obtain simple analytic conditions which are then extended to the case of three right-handed neutrinos. We then introduce a single U(1) family symmetry and show how these analytic conditions may be translated into U(1) charge assignments and perform a systematic search for the simplest examples.

S. F. King

2000-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

170

Analysis of the SN1987A two-stage explosion hypothesis with account for the MSW neutrino flavour conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detection of 5 events by the Liquid Scintillation Detector (LSD) on February, 23, 1987 was interpreted in the literature as the detection of neutrinos from the first stage of the two-stage supernova collapse. We pose rigid constraints on the properties of the first stage of the collapse, taking into account neutrino flavour conversion due to the MSW-effect and general properties of supernova neutrino emission. The constraints depend on the unknown neutrino mass hierarchy and mixing angle \\theta_{13}.

Lychkovskiy, Oleg

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The LMA MSW Solution of the Solar Neutrino Problem, Inverted Neutrino Mass Hierarchy and Reactor Neutrino Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the context of three-neutrino oscillations, we study the possibility of using antineutrinos from nuclear reactors to explore the 10^{-4} {\\rm eV^2} MSW solution of the solar neutrino problem and measure $\\ms$ with high precision. The KamLAND experiment is not expected to determine $\\ms$ if the latter happens to lie in the indicated region. By analysing both the total event rate suppression and the energy spectrum distortion caused by \\bar{\

S. T. Petcov; M. Piai

2002-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

172

Analysis of the SN1987A two-stage explosion hypothesis with account for the MSW neutrino flavour conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detection of 5 events by the Liquid Scintillation Detector (LSD) on February, 23, 1987 was interpreted in the literature as the detection of neutrinos from the first stage of the two-stage supernova collapse. We pose rigid constraints on the properties of the first stage of the collapse, taking into account neutrino flavour conversion due to the MSW-effect and general properties of supernova neutrino emission. The constraints depend on the unknown neutrino mass hierarchy and mixing angle \\theta_{13}.

Oleg Lychkovskiy

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

173

MSW Solutions to the Solar Neutrino Problem in Presence of Noisy Matter Density Fluctuations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the effect of random matter density fluctuations in the sun on resonant neutrino conversion in matter by solving numerically the evolution equation for the neutrino system including the full effect of the random matter density fluctuations of given amplitude and correlation length. In order to establish the possible effect on the MSW solutions to the solar neutrino problem we perform a global analysis of all the existing observables including the measured total rates as well as the Super-Kamiokande measurement on the time dependence of the event rates during the day and night and the recoil electron energy spectrum. We find the effects of random noise to be larger for small mixing angles and they are mostly important for correlation lengths in the range few 100 km $\\lesssim L_0\\lesssim$ few 1000 km. They can be understood as due to a parametric resonance occuring when the phase acquired by the oscillating neutrino state on one fluctuation length L_0 is a multiple of 2$\\pi$. We find that this resonant parametric condition is mainly achieved for low energy neutrinos such as the pp-neutrinos and therefore its effect is mostly seen on the total event rates while the other Super-Kamiokande observables are very marginally sensitive to the presence of noise due to the higher energy threshold.

A. A. Bykov; M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; C. Pea-Garay; V. Yu. Popov; V. B. Semikoz

2000-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

174

LMA MSW solution of the solar neutrino problem and first KamLAND results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first KamLAND results are in a very good agreement with the predictions made on the basis of the solar neutrino data and the LMA realization of the MSW mechanism. We perform a combined analysis of the KamLAND (rate, spectrum) and the solar neutrino data with a free boron neutrino flux f_B. The best fit values of neutrino parameters are Delta m^2 = 7.3e-5 eV^2, tg^2 theta = 0.41 and f_B = 1.05 with the 1 sigma intervals: Delta m^2 = (6.2 - 8.4)e-5 eV^2, tg^2 theta = 0.33 - 0.54. We find the 3 sigma upper bounds: Delta m^2 4e-5 eV^2. At 99% C.L. the KamLAND spectral result splits the LMA region into two parts with the preferred one at Delta m^2 solar neutrino and KamLAND results are considered.

P. C. de Holanda; A. Yu. Smirnov

2002-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

175

DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change.

176

Characterization of Arsenic Contamination on Rust from Ton Containers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The speciation and spatial distribution of arsenic on rusted steel surfaces affects both measurement and removal approaches. The chemistry of arsenic residing in the rust of ton containers that held the chemical warfare agents bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide (sulfur mustard) and 2-chlorovinyldichloroarsine (Lewisite) is of particular interest, because while the agents have been decontaminated, residual arsenic could pose a health or environmental risk. The chemistry and distribution of arsenic in rust samples was probed using imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX). Arsenic in the +3 and or +5 oxidation state is homogeneously distributed at the very top-most layer of the rust samples, and is intimately associated with iron. Sputter depth profiling followed by SIMS and XPS shows As at a depth of several nm, in some cases in a reduced form. The SEM/EDX experiments show that As is present at a depth of several microns, but is inhomogeneously distributed; most locations contained oxidized As at concentrations of a few percent, however several locations showed very high As in a metallic form. These results indicate that the rust material must be removed if the steel containers are to be cleared of arsenic.

Gary S. Groenewold; Recep Avci; Robert V. Fox; Muhammedin Deliorman; Jayson Suo; Laura Kellerman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Center for By-Products Utilization CO2 SEQUESTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN NON-AIR ENTRAINED CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik. Maximize environmental benefits: resource conservation, clean water, and clean air. #12;Center for By-Products, Italy, June 30, 2010. #12;Center for By-Products Utilization UWM Center for By-Products Utilization

Saldin, Dilano

178

ADVANCED GASIFICATION BY-PRODUCT UTILIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported for the period September 1, 2003 to August 31, 2004. This contract is with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involves the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers.

Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Ari Geertsema; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu; Harold Schobert

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Key: AAS/AS = Associate Degree Programs | BS/BA = Baccalaureate Degree Programs | MA/MS, MBA, MD, MPH and MSW = Master Degree Programs | DPT, AuD, DPH, DNP, DNS and PhD = Doctoral Degree Programs Joint degree program with SUNY Downstate. 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, MPH and MSW = Master Degree Programs | DPT, AuD, DPH, DNP, DNS and PhD = Doctoral Degree Programs 1 Counseling MS Therapeutic Recreation BS AS AAS Social Work/Social Welfare BA MSW BA/ MSW BS BS PhD Surgical

Rosen, Jay

180

Field education remains at the heart of social work education. While the MSW@USC utilizes advancements in technology to reach students in the far corners of our nation, the value of our degree is on the strength of traditional field internships.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field education remains at the heart of social work education. While the MSW@USC utilizes is on the strength of traditional field internships. During the course of completing the MSW@USC program, students generation of social work leaders by becoming a part of the MSW@USC national network of field placement

Southern California, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

9,248,559 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of January 16, 2015  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOEs Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is equivalent to the...

182

9,981,117 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of April 2, 2015 | Department...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

183

9,449,421 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 12, 2015...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

184

Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of...

185

9,805,742 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 27, 2015...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

186

Testing solar neutrino MSW oscillations at low delta m^2 through time variations of event rates in GNO and BOREXINO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) explanation of the solar neutrino problem is currently compatible with three distinct regions of the two-neutrino oscillation parameter space (delta m^2,sin^2 2theta). We focus on the region with the lowest value of delta m^2 (~10^{-7} eV^2), which implies significant Earth regeneration effects for low-energy solar neutrinos. We point out that such effects are not only observable as day-night variations of neutrino event rates in the real-time BOREXINO experiment, but also as seasonal variations in the radiochemical Gallium Neutrino Observatory (GNO) at Gran Sasso. We present detailed calculations of the difference between winter and summer rates in GNO (six months averages) in excess of the trivial seasonal variation due to the Earth orbital eccentricity. We show that, within the low-delta m^2 MSW solution, the net winter-summer GNO rate difference amounts to 4-6 SNU, with a dominant contribution from pp neutrinos. We also give analytical expressions for the winter and summer solar exposure functions at the Gran Sasso site.

G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; D. Montanino; A. Palazzo

1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

187

Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the recent passing of new legislation designed to permanently cap and reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities, it is more important than ever to develop and improve upon methods of controlling mercury emissions. One promising technique is carbon sorbent injection into the flue gas of the coal-fired power plant. Currently, this technology is very expensive as costly commercially activated carbons are used as sorbents. There is also a significant lack of understanding of the interaction between mercury vapor and the carbon sorbent, which adds to the difficulty of predicting the amount of sorbent needed for specific plant configurations. Due to its inherent porosity and adsorption properties as well as on-site availability, carbons derived from gasifiers are potential mercury sorbent candidates. Furthermore, because of the increasing restricted use of landfilling, the coal industry is very interested in finding uses for these materials as an alternative to the current disposal practice. The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported for the period September 1, 2004 to August 31, 2005. This contract is with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involves the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers.

Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Ari Geertsema; Frank Huggins; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Brandie M. Markley; Harold Schobert

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN DOE/DOD Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; 6 Waste/Byproduct HydrogenWaste/By product Hydrogen Waste H2 sources include: Waste biomass: biogas Waste/Byproduct Hydrogen Waste/By product Hydrogen Fuel FlexibilityFuel Flexibility Biogas: generated

189

Center for By-Products Utilization Environment, Energy, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

benefits: resource conservation, clean water, and clean air. #12;Center for By-Products Utilization Basic;Center for By-Products Utilization RESOURCE CONSERVATION CLEAN WATER and CLEAN AIR "The earth, the seaCenter for By-Products Utilization Environment, Energy, and Economic Benefits of Using Recyclable

Saldin, Dilano

190

CCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW landfill disposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW in waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities. In other countries, the predominant disposal option for wood, others have not, and the product continues to enter the waste stream from construction, demolition

Florida, University of

191

future science group 133ISSN 1758-300410.4155/CMT.12.11 2012 Future Science Ltd Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a ubiquitous byprod-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or electricity (waste-to-energy [WTE]) could reduce net GHG emissions in the USA compared with combusting methane. One alternative to LFGTE is the combustion of MSW to generate electricity or heat in a process com [2]; 77% of the WTE facilities in the USA already have this capacity [3]. If WTE facilities

Jackson, Robert B.

192

Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the passing of legislation designed to permanently cap and reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities, it is more important than ever to develop and improve upon methods of controlling mercury emissions. One promising technique is carbon sorbent injection into the flue gas of the coal-fired power plant. Currently, this technology is very expensive as costly commercially activated carbons are used as sorbents. There is also a significant lack of understanding of the interaction between mercury vapor and the carbon sorbent, which adds to the difficulty of predicting the amount of sorbent needed for specific plant configurations. Due to its inherent porosity and adsorption properties as well as on-site availability, carbons derived from gasifiers are potential mercury sorbent candidates. Furthermore, because of the increasing restricted use of landfilling, the coal industry is very interested in finding uses for these materials as an alternative to the current disposal practice. The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported. This contract was with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involved the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, assessment of the potential for leaching of Hg captured by the carbons, analysis of the slags for cement applications, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers. The objectives of this collaborative effort between the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute, and industry collaborators supplying gasifier char samples were to investigate the potential use of gasifier slag carbons as a source of low cost sorbent for Hg and NOX capture from combustion flue gas, concrete applications, polymer fillers and as a source of activated carbons. Primary objectives were to determine the relationship of surface area, pore size, pore size distribution, and mineral content on Hg storage of gasifier carbons and to define the site of Hg capture. The ability of gasifier slag carbon to capture NOX and the effect of NOX on Hg adsorption were goals. Secondary goals were the determination of the potential for use of the slags for cement and filler applications. Since gasifier chars have already gone through a devolatilization process in a reducing atmosphere in the gasifier, they only required to be activated to be used as activated carbons. Therefore, the principal objective of the work at PSU was to characterize and utilize gasification slag carbons for the production of activated carbons and other carbon fillers. Tests for the Hg and NOX adsorption potential of these activated gasifier carbons were performed at the CAER. During the course of this project, gasifier slag samples chemically and physically characterized at UK were supplied to PSU who also characterized the samples for sorption characteristics and independently tested for Hg-capture. At the CAER as-received slags were tested for Hg and NOX adsorption. The most promising of these were activated chemically. The PSU group applied thermal and steam activation to a representative group of the gasifier slag samples separated by particle sizes. The activated samples were tested at UK for Hg-sorption and NOX capture and the most promising Hg adsorbers were tested for Hg capture in a simulated flue gas. Both UK and PSU tested the use of the gasifier slag samples as fillers. The CAER analyzed the slags for possible use in cement applications

Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Brock Marrs; Ari Geertsema; Frank Huggins; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Brandie M. Markley; Zhe Lu; Harold Schobert

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of CCB materials. The two technologies for the underground placement that were to be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry CCB products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of CCB products with about 70% solids. The period covered by this report is the second quarter of Phase 3 of the overall program. During this period over 8,000 tons of CCB mixtures was injected using the hydraulic paste technology. This amount of material virtually filled the underground opening around the injection well, and was deemed sufficient to demonstrate fully the hydraulic injection technology. By the end of this quarter about 2,000 tons of fly ash had been placed underground using the pneumatic placement technology. While the rate of injection of about 50 tons per hour met design criteria, problems were experienced in the delivery of fly ash to the pneumatic demonstration site. The source of the fly ash, the Archer Daniels Midland Company power plant at Decatur, Illinois is some distance from the demonstration site, and often sufficient tanker trucks are not available to haul enough fly ash to fully load the injection equipment. Further, on some occasions fly ash from the plant was not available. The injection well was plugged three times during the demonstration. This typically occurred due to cementation of the FBC ash in contact with water. After considerable deliberations and in consultation with the technical project officer, it was decided to stop further injection of CCB`s underground using the developed pneumatic technology.

Chugh, Y.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Center for By-Products Utilization Sustainable Concrete with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

landfilling them but also leads to the reduction of the the environmental pollution. #12;Center for ByCenter for By-Products Utilization Sustainable Concrete with Industrial and Post-Consumer By Construction Materials and Technologies, Ancona, Italy, June 2010 #12;Center for By-Products Utilization Why

Saldin, Dilano

195

Planning for the 400,000 tons/year AISI ironmaking demonstration plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) has formulated a four-year program to design, construct, and operate a 400,000 net ton per year ironmaking demonstration plant. The plant will employ the coal-based ironmaking process developed under a 1989 cooperative agreement with DOE. AISI will manage the design and construction to be completed in the first two years and operate the plant for the second two years with a variety or ores, coals, and fluxes. Campaigns of increasing length are planned to optimize operations. After successful operation, the plant will be taken over by the host company. Results of studies to date indicate that, on a commercial scale, the AISI process will use 27% less energy and have variable operating costs $10 per ton lower and capital costs of $160 per annual ton, compared to the $250 per annual ton rebuild cost for the coke oven-blast furnace process it will replace. The process will enable the domestic steel industry to become more competitive by reducing its capital and operating cost. Furthermore, by eliminating the pollution problems associated with coke production and by completely enclosing the smelting reactions, this process represents a major step towards an environmentally friendly steel industry.

Aukrust, E. (LTV Steel Corp., Cleveland, OH (United States). AISI Direct Steelmaking Program)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Fertilizer and Nitrogen 1 billion tons of artificial nitrogen fertilizer used annually.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fertilizer and Nitrogen 1 billion tons of artificial nitrogen fertilizer used annually. Emissions. (fertilizers that use nitric acid or ammonium bicarbonate result in emissions of nitrogen oxides, nitrous oxide, ammonia and carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.) ~Indirect: Phosphorus in excess causes eutrophication

Toohey, Darin W.

197

2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for EU aviation NOTE It is understood that in the context of this text the term "biofuel(s) use in aviation" categorically implies "sustainably produced biofuel(s)" according to the EU legislation. June 2011 #12;2 This technical paper was drafted

198

TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stockpile Center continued to solicit offers for the sale of titanium sponge held in the Government-grade sponge. For fiscal year 2001, 4,540 tons of titanium sponge is being offered for sale. Stockpile Status for disposal FY 2000 FY 2000 Titanium sponge 19,100 3,390 19,100 4,540 4,240 Ev

199

TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption E E E E E Recycling: New scrap metal recycled by the titanium industry totaled about 29,000 tons and automotive industries led to an increase in global production of TiO2 pigment compared with that in 2009

200

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2012 increased by 4% to about 1.15 million tons,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%; and copper smelters and refiners, 5%. Copper in all old and new, refined or remelted scrap contributed about48 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2012 increased by 4% to about 1.15 million tons

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2011 increased slightly to about 1.1 million tons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%; and copper smelters and refiners, 5%. Copper in all old and new, refined or remelted scrap contributed about48 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2011 increased slightly to about 1.1 million tons

202

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2013 increased by 4% to about 1.22 million tons,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manufacturers, foundries, and chemical plants, 11%; ingot makers,10%; and copper smelters and refiners, 548 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2013 increased by 4% to about 1.22 million tons

203

Absence of day-night asymmetry of 862 keV Be-7 solar neutrino rate in Borexino and MSW oscillation parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on a search for the day-night asymmetry of the Be-7 solar neutrino rate measured by Borexino at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS), Italy. The measured value, Adn=0.001 +- 0.012 (stat) +- 0.007 (syst), shows the absence of a significant asymmetry. This result alone rejects the so-called LOW solution at more than 8.5 sigma. Combined with the other solar neutrino data, it isolates the Large Mixing Angle (LMA) -- MSW solution at DeltaChi2 > 190 without relying on the assumption of CPT symmetry in the neutrino sector. We also show that including the day-night asymmetry, data from Borexino alone restricts the MSW neutrino oscillations to the LMA solution at 90% confidence level.

,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Absence of day-night asymmetry of 862 keV Be-7 solar neutrino rate in Borexino and MSW oscillation parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on a search for the day-night asymmetry of the Be-7 solar neutrino rate measured by Borexino at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS), Italy. The measured value, Adn=0.001 +- 0.012 (stat) +- 0.007 (syst), shows the absence of a significant asymmetry. This result alone rejects the so-called LOW solution at more than 8.5 sigma. Combined with the other solar neutrino data, it isolates the Large Mixing Angle (LMA) -- MSW solution at DeltaChi2 > 190 without relying on the assumption of CPT symmetry in the neutrino sector. We also show that including the day-night asymmetry, data from Borexino alone restricts the MSW neutrino oscillations to the LMA solution at 90% confidence level.

The Borexino Collaboration

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

205

Relaxations for Production Planning Problems with Increasing By-products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relaxations for Production Planning Problems with Increasing By-products Srikrishna Sridhar, Jeff, James Leudtke SILO Seminars: Feb 1, 2012 #12;One slide summary Problem Description Production process involves desirable & undesirable products. Srikrishna Sridhar, Jeff Linderoth, James Leudtke SILO Seminars

Sheridan, Jennifer

206

Review of corrosion in 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature review was conducted to determine the type, extent and severity of corrosion found in the 10- and 14-ton mild steel depleted UF{sub 6} storage cylinders. Also discussed in this review is corrosion found in the valves and plugs used in the cylinders. Corrosion of the cylinders is a gradual process which occurs slowly over time. Understanding corrosion of the cylinders is an important concern for long term storage of the UF{sub 6} in the cylinder yards, as well as the final disposition of the depleted UF{sub 6} tails inventory in the future. The following conclusions are made from the literature review: (1) The general external corrosion rate of the cylinders is about 1 to 2 mils per year (1 mil = 0.001{double_prime}). The highest general external corrosion rate was over 5 mpy on the 48G type cylinders. (2) General internal corrosion from the depleted UF{sub 6} is negligible under normal storage conditions. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/saddle interface from the retention of water in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur at the cylinder/skirt interface on the older skirted cylinders due to the lack of water drainage in this area. Crevice corrosion can occur on cylinders that have been in ground contact. Crevice corrosion and galvanic corrosion can occur where the stainless steel I.D. nameplates are attached to the cylinder. The packing nuts on the bronze one-inch valves used in the cylinders are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Mechanical damage from routine handling can lead to a breach in a cylinder with subsequent accelerated corrosion of the mild steel due to attack from HF and other UF{sub 6} hydrolysis by-products.

Lykins, M.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Grain Sorghum By-Product Feeds for Farm Animals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X3.AJ.N SORGHUM BY-PRODUCT FEEDS FOR FARM ANIMALS FEED FOR LIVESTOCK -. Grain sorghum is the leading feed grain produced in Texas and in the Southwest. Its importance as a feed fc farm animals is generally recognized. Recent developments... in Texas have made available 1 livestock producers and the feed industry a considerab tonnage of sorghum gluten meal and sorghum gluten fee as by-products in sorghum grain processing. The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station conduct( a series...

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Solar Neutrino Rates, Spectrum, and its Moments : an MSW Analysis in the Light of Super-Kamiokande Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We re-examine MSW solutions of the solar neutrino problem in a two flavor scenario taking (a) the results on total rates and the electron energy spectrum from the 1117-day SuperKamiokande (SK) data and (b) those on total rates from the Chlorine and Gallium experiments. We find that the SMA solution gives the best fit to the total rates data from the different experiments. One new feature of our analysis is the use of the moments of the SK electron spectrum in a $\\chi^2$ analysis. The best-fit to the moments is broadly in agreement with that obtained from a direct fit to the spectrum data and prefers a $\\Delta m^2$ comparable to the SMA fit to the rates but the required mixing angle is larger. In the combined rate and spectrum analysis, apart from varying the normalization of the $^8$B flux as a free parameter and determining its best-fit value we also obtain the best-fit parameters when correlations between the rates and the spectrum data are included and the normalization of the $^8$B flux held fixed at its SSM value. We observe that the correlations between the rates and spectrum data are important and the goodness of fit worsens when these are included. In either case, the best-fit lies in the LMA region.

Srubabati Goswami; Debasish Majumdar; Amitava Raychaudhuri

2001-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - avoiding by-product formation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

78 By-Products Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization ECONOMICAL SELF-CONSOLIDATING CONCRETE FOR THE WISCONSIN... production using by-product materials to...

210

A Specification Logic for Termination Reasoning Ton-Chanh Le, Cristian Gherghina, Aquinas Hobor, and Wei-Ngan Chin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Specification Logic for Termination Reasoning Ton-Chanh Le, Cristian Gherghina, Aquinas Hobor a logical framework for specifying and proving asser- tions about program termination. Although termination. Here we propose to integrate termination requirements directly into our specification logic

Hobor, Aquinas

211

The Scale of the Energy Challenge 22,000 gallons of fuel oil 150 tons of coal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and rooftops in the United States. The total land area required by nuclear power plants is small! ? 20 15The Scale of the Energy Challenge Biomass Wind Nuclear Solar 22,000 gallons of fuel oil 150 tons

Hochberg, Michael

212

UNDERGROUNG PLACEMENT OF COAL PROCESSING WASTE AND COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS BASED PASTE BACKFILL FOR ENHANCED MINING ECONOMICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has successfully demonstrated that the extraction ratio in a room-and-pillar panel at an Illinois mine can be increased from the current value of approximately 56% to about 64%, with backfilling done from the surface upon completion of all mining activities. This was achieved without significant ground control problems due to the increased extraction ratio. The mined-out areas were backfilled from the surface with gob, coal combustion by-products (CCBs), and fine coal processing waste (FCPW)-based paste backfill containing 65%-70% solids to minimize short-term and long-term surface deformations risk. This concept has the potential to increase mine productivity, reduce mining costs, manage large volumes of CCBs beneficially, and improve the miner's health, safety, and environment. Two injection holes were drilled over the demonstration panel to inject the paste backfill. Backfilling was started on August 11, 1999 through the first borehole. About 9,293 tons of paste backfill were injected through this borehole with a maximum flow distance of 300-ft underground. On September 27, 2000, backfilling operation was resumed through the second borehole with a mixture of F ash and FBC ash. A high-speed auger mixer (new technology) was used to mix solids with water. About 6,000 tons of paste backfill were injected underground through this hole. Underground backfilling using the ''Groutnet'' flow model was simulated. Studies indicate that grout flow over 300-foot distance is possible. Approximately 13,000 tons of grout may be pumped through a single hole. The effect of backfilling on the stability of the mine workings was analyzed using SIUPANEL.3D computer program and further verified using finite element analysis techniques. Stiffness of the backfill mix is most critical for enhancing the stability of mine workings. Mine openings do not have to be completely backfilled to enhance their stability. Backfill height of about 50% of the seam height is adequate to minimize surface deformations. Freeman United Coal Company performed engineering economic evaluation studies for commercialization. They found that the costs for underground management at the Crown III mine would be slightly higher than surface management at this time. The developed technologies have commercial potential but each site must be analyzed on its merit. The Company maintains significant interest in commercializing the technology.

Y.P. Chugh; D. Biswas; D. Deb

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. EPA has issued a final regulation for control of mercury from coal-fired power plants. An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. These adulterated by-products, both ashes and FGD material, represent the greatest challenge to the DOE goal of increased utilization of by-products. The degree of stability of capture by-products and their potential for release of mercury can have a large economic impact on material sales or the approach to disposal. One of the considerations for mercury control technology is the potential trade-off between effective but temporary mercury capture and less effective but more permanent sequestration. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed aqueous leaching procedures on a select subset of the available sample pairs. This report describes batch leaching results for mercury, arsenic, and selenium.

Hesbach, P.A.; Kachur, E.K.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Center for By-Products Utilization High Durability Concrete Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TESTING · Fresh Concrete Properties ·Unit Weight (ASTM C 138) ·Air Content (ASTM C 237) ·Slump (ASTM C 143Center for By-Products Utilization High Durability Concrete Using High-Carbon Fly Ash and Pulp Mill-Products Utilization Durable Concrete in Northern Climates · Producing durable concrete in a freezing and thawing

Saldin, Dilano

215

Land application uses for dry FGD by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. Presently FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. However, landfill sites are becoming more scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. In summary Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD byproduct materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)); Haefner, R. (Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

MSW Without Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the effects of a scalar field, coupled only to neutrinos, on oscillations among weak interaction current eigenstates. The existence of a real scalar field is manifested as effective masses for the neutrino mass eigenstates, the same for $\

T. Goldman; B. H. J. McKellar; G. J. Stephenson Jr.

1996-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

217

* 96 total credits in A&S courses are required for the degree. ** BA/MSW students may count 6 credits from SCWK7721 and SCWK7723 toward the required 96 A&S credits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Children+ OR Financial Management & Resource Development++ 3 CR SCWK8800 Basic Skills in Macro Practice 3/MSW PROGRAM Curriculum Plan Freshman Year [30 A&S credits*] Course # Semester 1 Course Semester 2 15 Behavior in the Social Environment ** 3 CR SCWK7701 Social Welfare System 3 CR SCWK7723 Diversity and Cross-Cultural

Huang, Jianyu

218

Cracked lifting lug welds on ten-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ten-ton, Type 48X, UF{sub 6} cylinders are used at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to withdraw enriched uranium hexafluoride from the cascade, transfer enriched uranium hexafluoride to customer cylinders, and feed enriched product to the cascade. To accomplish these activities, the cylinders are lifted by cranes and straddle carriers which engage the cylinder lifting lugs. In August of 1988, weld cracks on two lifting lugs were discovered during preparation to lift a cylinder. The cylinder was rejected and tagged out, and an investigating committee formed to determine the cause of cracking and recommend remedial actions. Further investigation revealed the problem may be general to this class of cylinder in this use cycle. This paper discusses the actions taken at the Portsmouth site to deal with the cracked lifting lug weld problem. The actions include inspection activities, interim corrective actions, metallurgical evaluation of cracked welds, weld repairs, and current monitoring/inspection program.

Dorning, R.E. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

Proposal to Increase the Amount of the Contract about to be Awarded for the Supply of 12 Tons of Heavy Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal to Increase the Amount of the Contract about to be Awarded for the Supply of 12 Tons of Heavy Water

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2009 declined by about 9% to 1.2 million tons and its  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

makers, 11%; and copper smelters and refiners, 6%. Copper in all old and new, refined or remelted scrap48 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic--Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, and Montana--accounted for more than 99% of domestic production; copper also

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2002 declined to 1.13 million metric tons and was  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- and nickel-base scrap), brass mills recovered 70%; copper smelters and refiners, 8%; ingot makers, 1156 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic, accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in three other States. Although

222

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2008 increased by about 12% to 1.3 million tons and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plants, 14%; ingot makers, 9%; and copper smelters and refiners, 5%. Copper in all old and new, refined50 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic--Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, and Montana--accounted for more than 99% of domestic production; copper also

223

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2000 declined to 1.45 million metric tons and was  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scrap, brass mills recovered 67%; copper smelters and refiners,18%; ingot makers, 11%; and miscellaneous52 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic, and Montana, accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in three other

224

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2004 rose to 1.16 million tons and was valued at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scrap (including aluminum- and nickel-base scrap), brass mills recovered 71%; copper smelters54 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in four other States. Although copper was recovered

225

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2001 declined to 1.34 million metric tons and was  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scrap (including aluminum- and nickel-base scrap), brass mills recovered 65%; copper smelters54 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic, accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in three other States. Although

226

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2007 declined nominally to 1.19 million tons, but its  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plants, 11%; ingot makers, 9%; and copper smelters and refiners, 5%. Copper in all old and new, refined54 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic--Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, and Montana--accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also

227

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2006 rose to more than 1.2 million tons and was  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

manufacturers, foundries, and chemical plants, 12%; ingot makers, 10%; and copper smelters and refiners, 452 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Mexico, Nevada, and Montana--accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines

228

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 1999 declined to 1.66 million metric tons and was  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mills. Of the total copper recovered from scrap, brass mills recovered 67%; copper smelters and refiners56 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic, Nevada, and Montana, accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines

229

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2003 declined to 1.12 million tons and was valued at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- and nickel-base scrap), brass mills recovered 70%; copper smelters and refiners, 6%; ingot makers, 1254 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in three other States. Although copper

230

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 1998 declined to 1.85 million metric tons and was  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, copper smelters and refiners recovered 23%; ingot makers, 10%; brass mills, 63%; and miscellaneous56 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic, Nevada, and Montana, accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines

231

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2005 fell nominally to 1.15 million tons and was  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(including aluminum- and nickel-base scrap), brass mills recovered 73%; copper smelters and refiners, 556 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Mexico, Nevada, and Montana, accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines

232

Solar Grade Silicon from Agricultural By-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, Mayaterials developed a low cost, low energy and low temperature method of purifying rice hull ash to high purity (5-6Ns) and converting it by carbothermal reduction to solar grade quality silicon (Sipv) using a self-designed and built electric arc furnace (EAF). Outside evaluation of our process by an independent engineering firm confirms that our technology greatly lowers estimated operating expenses (OPEX) to $5/kg and capital expenses (CAPEX) to $24/kg for Sipv production, which is well below best-in-class plants using a Siemens process approach (OPEX of 14/kg and CAPEX of $87/kg, respectively). The primary limiting factor in the widespread use of photovoltaic (PV) cells is the high cost of manufacturing, compared to more traditional sources to reach 6 g Sipv/watt (with averages closer to 8+g/watt). In 2008, the spot price of Sipv rose to $450/kg. While prices have since dropped to a more reasonable $25/kg; this low price level is not sustainable, meaning the longer-term price will likely return to $35/kg. The 6-8 g Si/watt implies that the Sipv used in a module will cost $0.21-0.28/watt for the best producers (45% of the cost of a traditional solar panel), a major improvement from the cost/wafer driven by the $50/kg Si costs of early 2011, but still a major hindrance in fulfilling DOE goal of lowering the cost of solar energy below $1/watt. The solar cell industry has grown by 40% yearly for the past eight years, increasing the demand for Sipv. As such, future solar silicon price spikes are expected in the next few years. Although industry has invested billions of dollars to meet this ever-increasing demand, the technology to produce Sipv remains largely unchanged requiring the energy intensive, and chlorine dependent Siemens process or variations thereof. While huge improvements have been made, current state-of-the-art industrial plant still use 65 kWh/kg of silicon purified. Our technology offers a key distinction to other technologies as it starts one step upstream from all other Sipv production efforts. Our process starts by producing high purity SiO2/C feedstocks from which Sipv can be produced in a single, chlorine free, final EAF step. Specifically, our unique technology, and the resultant SiO2/C product can serve as high purity feedstocks to existing metallurgical silicon (Simet) producers, allowing them to generate Sipv with existing US manufacturing infrastructure, reducing the overall capital and commissioning schedule. Our low energy, low CAPEX and OPEX process purifies the silica and carbon present in rice hull ash (RHA) at low temperatures (< 200C) to produce high purity (5-6 Ns) feedstock for production of Sipv using furnaces similar to those used to produce Simet. During the course of this project we partnered with Wadham Energy LP (Wadham), who burns 220k ton of rice hulls (RH)/yr generating 200 GWh of electricity/yr and >30k ton/yr RHA. The power generation step produces much more energy (42 kWh/kg of final silicon produced) than required to purify the RHA (5 kWh/kg of Sipv, compared to 65 kWh/kg noted above. Biogenic silica offers three very important foundations for producing high purity silicon. First, wastes from silica accumulating plants, such as rice, corn, many grasses, algae and grains, contain very reactive, amorphous silica from which impurities are easily removed. Second, plants take up only a limited set of, and minimal quantities of the heavy metals present in nature, meaning fewer minerals must be removed. Third, biomass combustion generates a product with intrinsic residual carbon, mixed at nanometer length scales with the SiO2. RHA is 80-90 wt% high surface area (20 m2/g), amorphous SiO2 with some simple mineral content mixed intimately with 5-15 wt% carbon. The mineral content is easily removed by low cost, acid washes using Mayaterials IP, leading to purified rice hull ash (RHAclean) at up to 6N purity. This highly reactive silica is partially extracted from RHAclean at 200 C in an environmentally benign process to adjust SiO2:C ratios to those needed in EA

Richard M. Laine

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

233

Clean coal technology. Coal utilisation by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need to remove the bulk of ash contained in flue gas from coal-fired power plants coupled with increasingly strict environmental regulations in the USA result in increased generation of solid materials referred to as coal utilisation by-products, or CUBs. More than 40% of CUBs were sold or reused in the USA in 2004 compared to less than 25% in 1996. A goal of 50% utilization has been established for 2010. The American Coal Ash Association (ACCA) together with the US Department of Energy's Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPPI) and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) sponsor a number of projects that promote CUB utilization. Several are mentioned in this report. Report sections are: Executive summary; Introduction; Where do CUBs come from?; Market analysis; DOE-sponsored CUB demonstrations; Examples of best-practice utilization of CUB materials; Factors limiting the use of CUBs; and Conclusions. 14 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs., 14 photos.

NONE

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and pigment industries. Global production of titanium mineral concentrates was expected to increase during half of 2015. In Western Australia, the heavy-mineral resource, data for at the Keysbrook project were172 TITANIUM MINERAL CONCENTRATES1 (Data in thousand metric tons of contained TiO2 unless otherwise

235

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons of zirconium oxide (ZrO ) equivalent, unless otherwise noted)2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and concentrates: Australia, 51%; South Africa, 48%; and other, 1%. Zirconium, wrought, unwrought, waste and scrap: France, 69%; Australia, 21%; Germany, 8%; and United Kingdom, 2%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held over 500 tons of zirconium in various forms. DOE also

236

26The Frequency of Large Meteor Impacts On February 14, 2013 a 10,000 ton meteor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

over the town of Chelyabinsk and the explosion caused major damage to the town injuring 1,000 people `discovered' for many decades afterwards, the Chelyabinsk Meteor was extensively videoed by hundreds explodes with an energy of 4.2x109 Joules. How many tons of TNT did the Chelyabinsk Meteor yield

237

ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND END-USE SCENARIOS OF SAVINGS POTENTIAL PT.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency** Process Process BTU/Ton of MSW Input* RDSF1 - Col. 2; Col. 4 = Col. 3/11.4 Million BTU/per ton of MSWfor RDSF and 9.1 Million BTU/ton for direct combustion and

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Methane Production: In the United States cattle emit about 5.5 million metric tons of methane per year into the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane Production: In the United States cattle emit about 5.5 million metric tons of methane per year into the atmosphere. o Accounts for 20% of methane emissions from human sources. Globally cattle produce about 80 million metric tons of methane annually. o Accounts for 28% of global methane emissions

Toohey, Darin W.

239

(Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States was the largest producer and consumer of lithium minerals and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,000 tons of the material from the Department of Energy's stockpile, while the remaining 10,000 tons,700 1,800 150,000 160,000e Bolivia -- -- -- 5,400,00 Brazil 32 32 910 NA Canada 660 660 180,000 360

240

High temperature experiments on a 4 tons UF6 container TENERIFE program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents an experimental program (called TENERIFE) whose aim is to investigate the behaviour of a cylinder containing UF{sub 6} when exposed to a high temperature fire for model validation. Taking into account the experiments performed in the past, the modelization needs further information in order to be able to predict the behaviour of a real size cylinder when engulfed in a 800{degrees}C fire, as specified in the regulation. The main unknowns are related to (1) the UF{sub 6} behaviour beyond the critical point, (2) the relationship between temperature field and internal pressure and (3) the equivalent conductivity of the solid UF{sub 6}. In order to investigate these phenomena in a representative way it is foreseen to perform experiments with a cylinder of real diameter, but reduced length, containing 4 tons of UF{sub 6}. This cylinder will be placed in an electrically heated furnace. A confinement vessel prevents any dispersion of UF{sub 6}. The heat flux delivered by the furnace will be calibrated by specific tests. The cylinder will be changed for each test.

Casselman, C.; Duret, B.; Seiler, J.M.; Ringot, C.; Warniez, P.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

1000ton testing machine for cyclic fatigue tests of materials at liquid nitrogen temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the main tasks of superconductive magnets R and D is to determine the mechanical and fatigue properties of structural materials and the critical design elements in the cryogenic temperature range. This paper describes a new facility built based on the industrial 1000-ton (10 MN) testing machine Schenk PC10.0S. Special equipment was developed to provide the mechanical and cyclic tensile fatigue tests of large-scale samples at the liquid nitrogen temperature and in a given load range. The main feature of the developed testing machine is the cryostat, in which the device converting a standard compression force of the testing machine to the tensile force affected at the test object is placed. The control system provides the remote control of the test and obtaining, processing and presentation of test data. As an example of the testing machine operation the test program and test results of the cyclic tensile fatigue tests of fullscale helium inlet sample of the PF1 coil ITER are presented.

Khitruk, A. A.; Klimchenko, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, O. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Nasluzov, S. N.; Privalova, E. K.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, D. B.; Sukhanova, M. V. [The D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (NIIEFA), 3 Doroga na Metallostroy, Metallostroy, Saint Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

242

DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVATED CARBONS FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increasing role of coal as a source of energy in the 21st century will demand environmental and cost-effective strategies for the use of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs), mainly unburned carbon in fly ash. Unburned carbon is nowadays regarded as a waste product and its fate is mainly disposal, due to the present lack of efficient routes for its utilization. However, unburned carbon is a potential precursor for the production of adsorbent carbons, since it has gone through a devolatilization process while in the combustor, and therefore, only requires to be activated. Accordingly, the principal objective of this work was to characterize and utilize the unburned carbon in fly ash for the production of activated carbons. The unburned carbon samples were collected from different combustion systems, including pulverized utility boilers, a utility cyclone, a stoker, and a fluidized bed combustor. LOI (loss-on-ignition), proximate, ultimate, and petrographic analyses were conducted, and the surface areas of the samples were characterized by N2 adsorption isotherms at 77K. The LOIs of the unburned carbon samples varied between 21.79-84.52%. The proximate analyses showed that all the samples had very low moisture contents (0.17 to 3.39 wt %), while the volatile matter contents varied between 0.45 to 24.82 wt%. The elemental analyses show that all the unburned carbon samples consist mainly of carbon with very little hydrogen, nitrogen, sulfur and oxygen In addition, the potential use of unburned carbon as precursor for activated carbon (AC) was investigated. Activated carbons with specific surface area up to 1075m{sup 2}/g were produced from the unburned carbon. The porosity of the resultant activated carbons was related to the properties of the unburned carbon feedstock and the activation conditions used. It was found that not all the unburned carbon samples are equally suited for activation, and furthermore, their potential as activated carbons precursors could be inferred from their physical and chemical properties. The developed porosity of the activated carbon was a function of the oxygen content, porosity and H/C ratio of the parent unburned carbon feedstock. It was observed that extended activation times and high activation temperatures increased the porosity of the produced activated carbon at the expense of the solid yield. The development of activated carbon from unburned carbon in fly ash has been proven to be a success by this study in terms of the higher surface areas of the resultant activated carbons, which are comparable with commercial activated carbons. However, unburned carbon samples obtained from coal-fired power plants as by-product have high ash content, which is unwanted for the production of activated carbons. Therefore, the separation of unburned carbon from the fly ash is expected to be beneficial for the utilization of unburned carbon to produce activated carbons with low ash content.

Harold H. Schobert; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Zhe Lu

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Methodology for Estimating ton-Miles of Goods Movements for U.S. Freight Mulitimodal Network System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ton-miles is a commonly used measure of freight transportation output. Estimation of ton-miles in the U.S. transportation system requires freight flow data at disaggregated level (either by link flow, path flows or origin-destination flows between small geographic areas). However, the sheer magnitude of the freight data system as well as industrial confidentiality concerns in Census survey, limit the freight data which is made available to the public. Through the years, the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been working in the development of comprehensive national and regional freight databases and network flow models. One of the main products of this effort is the Freight Analysis Framework (FAF), a public database released by the ORNL. FAF provides to the general public a multidimensional matrix of freight flows (weight and dollar value) on the U.S. transportation system between states, major metropolitan areas, and remainder of states. Recently, the CTA research team has developed a methodology to estimate ton-miles by mode of transportation between the 2007 FAF regions. This paper describes the data disaggregation methodology. The method relies on the estimation of disaggregation factors that are related to measures of production, attractiveness and average shipments distances by mode service. Production and attractiveness of counties are captured by the total employment payroll. Likely mileages for shipments between counties are calculated by using a geographic database, i.e. the CTA multimodal network system. Results of validation experiments demonstrate the validity of the method. Moreover, 2007 FAF ton-miles estimates are consistent with the major freight data programs for rail and water movements.

Oliveira Neto, Francisco Moraes [ORNL] [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL] [ORNL; Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN KAZAKHASTAN: USING OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION BY-PRODUCT SULFUR FOR COST-EFFECTIVE SECONDARY END-USE PRODUCTS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Republic of Kazakhstan is continuing to develop its extensive petroleum reserves in the Tengiz region of the northeastern part of the Caspian Sea. Large quantities of by-product sulfur are being produced as a result of the removal of hydrogen sulfide from the oil and gas produced in the region. Lack of local markets and economic considerations limit the traditional outlets for by-product sulfur and the buildup of excess sulfur is a becoming a potential economic and environmental liability. Thus, new applications for re-use of by-product sulfur that will benefit regional economies including construction, paving and waste treatment are being developed. One promising application involves the cleanup and treatment of mercury at a Kazakhstan chemical plant. During 19 years of operation at the Pavlodar Khimprom chlor-alkali production facility, over 900 tons of mercury was lost to the soil surrounding and beneath the buildings. The Institute of Metallurgy and Ore Benefication (Almaty) is leading a team to develop and demonstrate a vacuum-assisted thermal process to extract the mercury from the soil and concentrate it as pure, elemental mercury, which will then be treated using the Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process. The use of locally produced sulfur will recycle a low-value industrial by-product to treat hazardous waste and render it safe for return to the environment, thereby helping to solve two problems at once. SPSS chemically stabilizes mercury to mercuric sulfide, which has a low vapor pressure and low solubility, and then physically encapsulates the material in a durable, monolithic solid sulfur polymer matrix. Thus, mercury is placed in a solid form very much like stable cinnabar, the form in which it is found in nature. Previous research and development has shown that the process can successfully encapsulate up to 33 wt% mercury in the solid form, while still meeting very strict regulatory standards for leachable mercury (0.025 mg/l in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure). The research and development to deploy Kazakhstan recycled sulfur for secondary applications described in this paper is being conducted with support from the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) and the U.S. Department of Energy Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (DOE IPP).

KALB, P.D.; VAGIN, S.; BEALL, P.W.; LEVINTOV, B.L.

2004-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

245

Synthetic aggregates prepared from flue gas desulfurization by-products using various binder materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) by-products can be converted into environmentally safe and structurally stable aggregates. One type of synthetic aggregate was prepared using an optimum mixture of (FGD) by-products, fly ash, and water. Mineral reactions have been examined using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope.

Bellucci, J.; Graham, U.M.; Hower, J.C.; Robl, T.L. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

A FLUKA Study of $\\beta$-delayed Neutron Emission for the Ton-size DarkSide Dark Matter Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the published cosmogenic background study for a ton-sized DarkSide dark matter search, only prompt neutron backgrounds coincident with cosmogenic muons or muon induced showers were considered, although observation of the initiating particle(s) was not required. The present paper now reports an initial investigation of the magnitude of cosmogenic background from $\\beta$-delayed neutron emission produced by cosmogenic activity in DarkSide. The study finds a background rate for $\\beta$-delayed neutrons in the fiducial volume of the detector on the order of < 0.1 event/year. However, detailed studies are required to obtain more precise estimates. The result should be compared to a radiogenic background event rate from the PMTs inside the DarkSide liquid scintillator veto of 0.2 events/year.

Empl, Anton

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target for energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and binding target has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift in China's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energy development. The 20% energy intensity target also translates into an annual reduction of over 1.5 billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making the Chinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in the world today. While it is still too early to tell whether China will achieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend in energy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options toward meeting the 20% target using a detailed end-use energy model.

Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Fridley, David

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Methods and results for stress analyses on 14-ton, thin-wall depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium enrichment operations at the three US gaseous diffusion plants produce depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) as a residential product. At the present time, the inventory of DUF{sub 6} in this country is more than half a million tons. The inventory of DUF{sub 6} is contained in metal storage cylinders, most of which are located at the gaseous diffusion plants. The principal objective of the project is to ensure the integrity of the cylinders to prevent causing an environmental hazard by releasing the contents of the cylinders into the atmosphere. Another objective is to maintain the cylinders in such a manner that the DUF{sub 6} may eventually be converted to a less hazardous material for final disposition. An important task in the DUF{sub 6} cylinders management project is determining how much corrosion of the walls can be tolerated before the cylinders are in danger of being damaged during routine handling and shipping operations. Another task is determining how to handle cylinders that have already been damaged in a manner that will minimize the chance that a breach will occur or that the size of an existing breach will be significantly increased. A number of finite element stress analysis (FESA) calculations have been done to analyze the stresses for three conditions: (1) while the cylinder is being lifted, (2) when a cylinder is resting on two cylinders under it in the customary two-tier stacking array, and (3) when a cylinder is resting on tis chocks on the ground. Various documents describe some of the results and discuss some of the methods whereby they have been obtained. The objective of the present report is to document as many of the FESA cases done at Oak Ridge for 14-ton thin-wall cylinders as possible, giving results and a description of the calculations in some detail.

Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Chung, C.K.; Frazier, J.L.; Kelley, D.K.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

IGCC and PFBC By-Products: Generation, Characteristics, and Management Practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following report is a compilation of data on by-products/wastes from clean coal technologies, specifically integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC). DOE had two objectives in providing this information to EPA: (1) to familiarize EPA with the DOE CCT program, CCT by-products, and the associated efforts by DOE contractors in the area of CCT by-product management and (2) to provide information that will facilitate EPA's effort by complementing similar reports from industry groups, including CIBO (Council of Industrial Boiler Owners) and EEI USWAG (Edison Electric Institute Utility Solid Waste Activities Group). The EERC cooperated and coordinated with DOE CCT contractors and industry groups to provide the most accurate and complete data on IGCC and PFBC by-products, although these technologies are only now being demonstrated on the commercial scale through the DOE CCT program.

Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

atmospheric oxidation by-products: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utilization Engineering Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied...

251

arc-induced toxic by-products: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utilization Engineering Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied...

252

animal protein by-products: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utilization Engineering Websites Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied...

253

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to design, construct, and operate an ash beneficiation facility that will generate several products from coal combustion ash stored in a utility ash pond. The site selected is LG&E's Ghent Station located in Carroll County, Kentucky. The specific site under consideration is the lower ash pond at Ghent, a closed landfill encompassing over 100 acres. Coring activities revealed that the pond contains over 7 million tons of ash, including over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. These potential products are primarily concentrated in the lower end of the pond adjacent to the outlet. A representative bulk sample was excavated for conducting laboratory-scale process testing while a composite 150 ton sample was also excavated for demonstration-scale testing at the Ghent site. A mobile demonstration plant with a design feed rate of 2.5 tph was constructed and hauled to the Ghent site to evaluate unit processes (i.e. primary classification, froth flotation, spiral concentration, secondary classification, etc.) on a continuous basis to determine appropriate scale-up data. Unit processes were configured into four different flowsheets and operated at a feed rate of 2.5 tph to verify continuous operating performance and generate bulk (1 to 2 tons) products for product testing. Cementitious products were evaluated for performance in mortar and concrete as well as cement manufacture process addition. All relevant data from the four flowsheets was compiled to compare product yields and quality while preliminary flowsheet designs were generated to determine throughputs, equipment size specifications and capital cost summaries. A detailed market study was completed to evaluate the potential markets for cementitious products. Results of the study revealed that the Ghent local fly ash market is currently oversupplied by more than 500,000 tpy and distant markets (i.e. Florida) are oversupplied as well. While the total US demand for ultrafine pozzolan is currently equal to demand, there is no reason to expect a significant increase in demand. Despite the technical merits identified in the pilot plant work with regard to beneficiating the entire pond ash stream, market developments in the Ohio River Valley area during 2006-2007 were not conducive to demonstrating the project at the scale proposed in the Cooperative Agreement. As a result, Cemex withdrew from the project in 2006 citing unfavorable local market conditions in the foreseeable future at the demonstration site. During the Budget Period 1 extensions provided by the DOE, CAER has contacted several other companies, including cement producers and ash marketing concerns for private cost share. Based on the prevailing demand-supply situation, these companies had expressed interest only in limited product lines, rather than the entire ash beneficiation product stream. Although CAER had generated interest in the technology, a financial commitment to proceed to Budget Period 2 could not be obtained from private companies. Furthermore, the prospects of any decisions being reached within a reasonable time frame were dim. Thus, CAER concurred with the DOE to conclude the project at the end of Budget Period 1, March 31, 2007. The activities presented in this report were carried out during the Cooperative Agreement period 08 November 2004 through 31 March 2007.

Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

Utilization of by-products from alkaline hydroxide preservation of whole broiler carcasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UTILIZATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM ALKALINE HYDROXIDE PRESERVATION OF WHOLE BROILER CARCASSES A Thesis by TRUITT PRESTON NIEMEYER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2002 Major Subject: Poultry Science UTILIZATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM ALKALINE HYDROXIDE PRESERVATION OF WHOLE BROILER CARCASSES A Thesis by TRUITT PRESTON NIEMEYER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies...

Niemeyer, Truitt Preston

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Optimum energy and by-product recovery in chlorinated hydrocarbon disposal systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper covers the three principal areas of a chlorinated hydrocarbon waste disposal system for a typical vinyl chloride monomer facility. These are the incineration, the energy recovery system, and the by-product recovery system. It is shown that the overall efficiency of the energy and by-product recovery systems is dependent on the optimization of the primary combustor (incineration system). 11 refs.

Santoleri, J.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Land application uses for dry flue gas desulfurization by-products: Phase 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbing technologies create a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction product that contains sulfate and sulfite, and coal fly ash. Generally, dry FGD by-products are treated as solid wastes and disposed in landfills. However, landfill sites are becoming scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. Provided the environmental impacts are socially and scientifically acceptable, beneficial uses via recycling can provide economic benefits to both the producer and the end user of the FGD. A study titled ''Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products'' was initiated in December, 1990 to develop and demonstrate large volume, beneficial uses of FGD by-products. Phase 1 and Phase 2 reports have been published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA. Phase 3 objectives were to demonstrate, using field studies, the beneficial uses of FGD by-products (1) as an amendment material on agricultural lands and on abandoned surface coal mine land, (2) as an engineering material for soil stabilization and raid repair, and (3) to assess the environmental and economic impacts of such beneficial uses. Application of dry FGD by-product to three soils in place of agricultural limestone increased alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and corn (Zea may L.) yields. No detrimental effects on soil and plant quality were observed.

Dick, W.; Bigham, J.; Forster, R.; Hitzhusen, F.; Lal, R.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.; Haefner, R.; Rowe, G.

1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

MSW Effects in Vacuum Oscillations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We point out that for solar neutrino oscillations with the mass-squared difference of Delta m^2 ~ 10^-10 - 10^-9 eV^2, traditionally known as ``vacuum oscillation'' range, the solar matter effects are non-negligible, particularly for the low energy pp neutrinos. One consequence of this is that the values of the mixing angle theta and pi/2-theta are not equivalent, leading to the need to consider the entire physical range of the mixing angle 0<=theta<=pi/2 when determining the allowed values of the neutrino oscillation parameters.

Alexander Friedland

2000-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

258

Microsoft Word - MSW Part I  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy HealthComments MEMA:May1.docEx Parte Memo.docx68 PageDepartment144 Prepared

259

Land application uses for dry FGD by-products, Phase 1 report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. It is highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. The results indicated the chemical composition of the FGD by-product materials were dominated by Ca, S, Al, and Si. Many of the elements regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency reside primarily in the fly ash. Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD by-product materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Land application uses for dry FGD by-products. Phase 2 report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was initiated in December 1990 to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products. A Phase 1 report provided results of an extensive characterization of chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of 58 dry FGD by-product samples. The Phase 1 report concluded that high volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics related to their ability to substitute for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mine lands). Phase 2 objectives were (1) to conduct laboratory and greenhouse studies of FGD and soil (spoil) mixtures for agronomic and engineering applications, (2) to initiate field studies related to high volume agronomic and engineering uses, and (3) to develop the basic methodological framework for estimation of the financial and economic costs and benefits to society of several FGD reuse options and to make some preliminary runs of economic models. High volume beneficial reuses of dry FGD by-products have been successfully demonstrated. Adverse environmental impacts have been negligible. Although few sources of dry FGD by-products currently exist in Ohio and the United States there is potential for smaller coal-fired facilities to adopt S0{sub 2} scrubbing technologies that produce dry FGD material. Also much of what we have learned from studies on dry FGD by-products is applicable to the more prevalent wet FGD by-products. The adaptation of the technologies demonstrated in this project seem to be not only limited by economic constraints, but even more so, by the need to create awareness of the market potential of using these FGD by-products.

Stehouwer, R.; Dick, W.; Bigham, J. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)] [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

(Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. The mine's production capacity was expanded in 2012, and a new lithium hydroxide plant opened in North

262

(Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

100 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States were large producers also. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

263

(Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

98 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States were large producers also. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

264

(Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

96 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, Russia, and the United States were large producers also. Australia, Canada, and Zimbabwe were major producers of lithium

265

(Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine operating in the United States was a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine operating in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from

266

(Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

44 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2009, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies operated approximately 830% drilling mud, 17% foundry sand bond, 14% iron ore pelletizing, and 20% other uses; common clay--57% brick

267

(Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2008, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 190 companies operated approximately 830% drilling mud, 17% foundry sand bond, 14% iron ore pelletizing, and 20% other uses; common clay--57% brick

268

(Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world, followed by China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but growing through the recycling of lithium batteries. Import Sources (1994-97): Chile, 96%; and other, 4 lithium salts from battery recycling and lithium hydroxide monohydrate from former Department of Energy102 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production

269

(Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2013, 5 companies operated 10 primary aluminum smelters; 3 smelters were  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Use: In 2013, 5 companies operated 10 primary aluminum smelters; 3 smelters were closed temporarily, and Issues: In February 2013, the owner of the 270,000-ton-per-year Hannibal, OH, smelter filed for chapter in October. In June, the Sebree, KY, smelter was sold as part of a corporate restructuring. Expansion

270

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Limited shipments of tungsten concentrates were made from a California mine in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

178 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 43%; Germany, 11%; Canada,630 1,450 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

271

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A tungsten mine in California produced concentrates in 2012. Approximately eight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 45,200 3,630 1,610 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

272

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: One mine in California produced tungsten concentrates in 2010. Approximately  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Import Sources (200609): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply is dominated by Chinese production and exports. China

273

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A mine in California produced tungsten concentrates in 2009. Approximately eight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production. Import Sources (2005-08): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production and exports. China's Government limited

274

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A tungsten mine in California produced concentrates in 2013. Approximately eight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

174 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought and unwrought tungsten, and waste and scrap: China, 45,100 2,300 2,240 Events, Trends, and Issues: World tungsten supply was dominated by Chinese production

275

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: One mine in California produced tungsten concentrates in 2011. Approximately  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

176 TUNGSTEN (Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production (200710): Tungsten contained in ores and concentrates, intermediate and primary products, wrought: World tungsten supply is dominated by Chinese production and exports. China's Government regulates its

276

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production, which had remained unchanged in 1995, resumed the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recovered from scrap, copper smelters and refiners recovered 26%; ingot makers, 10%; brass mills, 5752 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in six other States. While copper was recovered

277

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 1995 continued its upward trend, begun in 1984, rising  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in new scrap was consumed at brass mills. Of the total copper recovered from scrap, copper smelters50 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless noted) Domestic Production, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Montana, and Michigan, accounted for 97% of domestic production; copper

278

Measurement of the solar 8B neutrino flux with 246 live days of Borexino and observation of the MSW vacuum-matter transition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the measurement of the 8B solar neutrinos interaction rate with the Borexino detector. The threshold energy of 2.8 MeV is the lowest for 8B achieved so far. The rate of 8B solar neutrino interaction as measured through their scattering on the target electrons is 0.26+-0.04(stat)+-0.02(syst) c/d/100 tons. This corresponds to an equivalent electron neutrino flux of (2.65+-0.44(stat)+-0.18(syst))x10^6 cm^-2 s^-1, as derived from the elastic scattering only, in good agreement with existing measurements and predictions. The corresponding 8B mean electron neutrino survival probability, assuming the BS07(GS98) Standard Solar Model, is 0.35+-0.10 at the effective energy of 8.6 MeV. The survival probability of the 0.862 MeV 7Be neutrinos was previously reported with a subset of these data as 0.56+-0.10. Eliminating the common sources of systematic errors, the ratio between the measured survival probabilities for 7Be and 8B neutrinos is 1.60+-0.33, 1.8 sigmas different form unity. For the first time we confir...

Bellini, G; Bonetti, S; Buizza Avanzini, M; Caccianiga, B; Cadonati, L; Calaprice, F; Carraro, C; Chavarria, A; Dalnoki-Veress, F; D'Angelo, D; De Kerret, H; Derbin, A; Etenko, A; Fomenko, K; Franco, D; Galbiati, C; Gazzana, S; Giammarchi, M; Goeger-Neff, M; Goretti, A; Grieb, C; Hardy, a S; Aldo, Ianni; Andrea, Ianni; Joyce, M; Kobychev, V; Korga, G; Kryn, D; Laubenstein, M; Leung, M; Lewke, T; Litvinovich, E; Loer, B; Lombardi, P; Ludhova, L; Machulin, I; Manecki, S; Maneschg, W; Manuzio, G; Masetti, F; McCarty, K; Meindl, Q; Meroni, E; Miramonti, L; Misiaszek, M; Montanari, D; Muratova, V; Oberauer, L; Obolensky, M; Ortica, F; Pallavicini, M; Papp, L; Perasso, L; Perasso, S; Pocar, A; Raghavan, b R S; Ranucci, G; Razeto, A; Risso, P; Romani, A; Rountree, D; Sabelnikov, A; Saldanha, R; Salvo, C; Schnert, S; Simgen, H; Skorokhvatov, M; Smirnov, O; Sotnikov, A; Sukhotin, S; Suvorov, Y; Tartaglia, R; Testera, G; Vignaud, D; Vogelaar, R B; Von Feilitzsch, F; Wjcik, M; Wurm, M; Zaimidoroga, O; Zavatarelli, S; Zuzel, G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production of copper in 2010 declined by about 5% to 1.12 million  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plants, 14%; ingot makers, 11%; and copper smelters and refiners, 5%. Copper in all old and new, refined48 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production of copper in 2010 declined by about 5% to 1.12 million tons

280

Chemical reactions of UF{sub 6} with water on ingress to damaged model 48X 10 ton cylinder  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemistry studies of the effects of water flooding in Model 48X 10-ton UF{sub 6} storage cylinders, as a result of impact fractures, were conducted to support the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) review of the Paducah Tiger Overpack for transportation of those cylinders. The objectives of the study were to determine the maximum amount of water that could be admitted to the interior of such a damaged cylinder, the resulting geometries and chemical compositions from reactions of water with the UF{sub 6} contents of the cylinder, and the end-state water moderated and reflected configurations for input to nuclear criticality safety analyses. The case identified for analysis was the flooding of the inside of a cylinder, submerged horizontally in 3 ft of water. The flooding was driven by an initial pressure drop of 13 psig, through an assumed fracture (1/32 in. wide {times} 1/2 in. deep {times} 18 in. long) in the barrel of the cylinder. During the initial addition of water, transient back pressures occur from the effects of the heats of reaction and solution at the water/UF{sub 6} interface, with some chugging as more water is added to alternately coot the reaction surface and then heat it again as the added water reacts with more UF{sub 6}.

Rothman, A.B.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Light oil yield improvement project at Granite City Division Coke/By-Product Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Light oil removal from coke oven gas is a process that has long been proven and utilized throughout many North American Coke/By-Products Plants. The procedures, processes, and equipment requirements to maximize light oil recovery at the Granite City By-Products Plant will be discussed. The Light Oil Yield Improvement Project initially began in July, 1993 and was well into the final phase by February, 1994. Problem solving techniques, along with utilizing proven theoretical recovery standards were applied in this project. Process equipment improvements and implementation of Operator/Maintenance Standard Practices resulted in an average yield increase of 0.4 Gals./NTDC by the end of 1993.

Holloran, R.A. [National Steel Corp., Granite City, IL (United States). Granite City Div.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Succinic Acid Production with Reduced By-Product Formation in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Succinic Acid Production with Reduced By-Product Formation in the Fermentation; accepted 13 July 2000 Abstract: Succinic acid was produced by fermentation of Anaerobiospirillum-product acetic acid. The gram ratio of suc- cinic acid to acetic acid was 25.8:1, which is 6.5 times higher than

283

Alaska has 4. 0 trillion tons of low-sulfur coal: Is there a future for this resource  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The demand for and use of low-sulfur coal may increase because of concern with acid rain. Alaska's low-sulfur coal resources can only be described as enormous: 4.0 trillion tons of hypothetical onshore coal. Mean total sulfur content is 0.34% (range 0.06-6.6%, n = 262) with a mean apparent rank of subbituminous B. There are 50 coal fields in Alaska; the bulk of the resources are in six major fields or regions: Nenana, Cook Inlet, Matanuska, Chignik-Herendeen Bay, North Slope, and Bering River. For comparison, Carboniferous coals in the Appalachian region and Interior Province have a mean total sulfur content of 2.3% (range 0.1-19.0%, n = 5,497) with a mean apparent rank of high-volatile A bituminous coal, and Rocky Mountain and northern Great Plains Cretaceous and Tertiary coals have a mean total sulfur content of 0.86% (range 0.02-19.0%, n = 2,754) with a mean apparent rank of subbituminous B. Alaskan coal has two-fifths the total sulfur of western US coals and one-sixth that of Carboniferous US coals. Even though Alaska has large resources of low-sulfur coal, these resources have not been developed because of (1) remote locations and little infrastructure, (2) inhospitable climate, and (3) long distances to potential markets. These resources will not be used in the near future unless there are some major, and probably violent, changes in the world energy picture.

Stricker, G.D. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

XAX: a multi-ton, multi-target detection system for dark matter, double beta decay and pp solar neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A multi-target detection system XAX, comprising concentric 10 ton targets of 136Xe and 129/131Xe, together with a geometrically similar or larger target of liquid Ar, is described. Each is configured as a two-phase scintillation/ionization TPC detector, enhanced by a full 4pi array of ultra-low radioactivity Quartz Photon Intensifying Detectors (QUPIDs) replacing the conventional photomultipliers for detection of scintillation light. It is shown that background levels in XAX can be reduced to the level required for dark matter particle (WIMP) mass measurement at a 10^-10 pb WIMP-nucleon cross section, with single-event sensitivity below 10^-11 pb. The use of multiple target elements allows for confirmation of the A^2 dependence of a coherent cross section, and the different Xe isotopes provide information on the spin-dependence of the dark matter interaction. The event rates observed by Xe and Ar would modulate annually with opposite phases from each other for WIMP mass >~100 GeV/c^2. The large target mass of 136Xe and high degree of background reduction allow neutrinoless double beta decay to be observed with lifetimes of 10^27-10^28 years, corresponding to the Majorana neutrino mass range 0.01-0.1 eV, the most likely range from observed neutrino mass differences. The use of a 136Xe-depleted 129/131Xe target will also allow measurement of the pp solar neutrino spectrum to a precision of 1-2%.

K. Arisaka; H. Wang; P. F. Smith; D. Cline; A. Teymourian; E. Brown; W. Ooi; D. Aharoni; C. W. Lam; K. Lung; S. Davies; M. Price

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

285

Demonstration and evaluation of the 20-ton-capacity load-cell-based weighing system, Eldorado Resources, Ltd. , Port Hope, Ontario, September 3-4, 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 3 and 4, 1986, the prototype 20-ton-capacity load-cell-based weighing system (LCBWS) developed by the US Enrichment Safeguards Program (ESP) at Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., was field tested at the Eldorado Resources, Ltd., (ERL) facility in Port Hope, Ontario. The 20-ton-capacity LCBWS has been designed and fabricated for use by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for verifying the masses of large-capacity UF/sub 6/ cylinders during IAEA safeguards inspections at UF/sub 6/ handling facilities. The purpose of the Canadian field test was to demonstrate and to evaluate with IAEA inspectorates and with UF/sub 6/ bulk handling facility operators at Eldorado the principles, procedures, and hardware associated with using the 20-ton-capacity LCBWS as a portable means for verifying the masses of 10- and 14-ton UF/sub 6/ cylinders. Session participants included representatives from the IAEA, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Eldorado Resources, Ltd., the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), and the International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Appendix A presents the list of participants and their organization affiliation. The two-day field test involved a formal briefing by ESP staff, two cylinder weighing sessions, IAEA critiques of the LCBWS hardware and software, and concluding discussions on the field performance of the system. Appendix B cites the meeting agenda. Summarized in this report are (1) the technical information presented by the system developers, (2) results from the weighing sessions, and (3) observations, suggestions, and concluding statements from meeting participants.

Cooley, J.N.; Huxford, T.J.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

(Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and 32% other uses; bentonite--26% foundry sand bond, 23% pet waste absorbent, 20% drilling mud, 16% iron,710 Total3 43,000 43,100 41,800 41,600 42,200 Imports for consumption 35 45 64 86 97 Exports 4,680 4,830 5,080 5,230 4,700 Consumption, apparent 38,500 38,300 36,800 36,500 37,600 Price, average, dollars per ton

287

(Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% foundry sand bond, 23% drilling mud, 17% pet waste absorbent, 15% iron ore pelletizing, and 9% other uses,100 43,100 42,000 43,0003 Imports for consumption 36 35 45 64 75 Exports 4,620 4,680 4,830 5,080 5,100 Consumption, apparent 37,600 38,500 38,300 37,000 38,000 Price, average, dollars per ton: Ball clay 43 46 44

288

(Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2003, clay and shale production was reported in all States except Alaska,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; bentonite-- 25% pet waste absorbent, 21% drilling mud, 21% foundry sand bond, 15% iron ore pelletizing,300 Imports for consumption: Artificially activated clay and earth 17 18 21 27 20 Kaolin 57 63 114 158 275,980 Consumption, apparent 37,500 35,600 34,800 34,600 34,600 Price, average, dollars per ton: Ball clay 40 42 42

289

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes an investigation of the secondary classification characteristics of the ash feedstock excavated from the lower ash pond at Ghent Station. The market study for the products of the processing plant (Subtask 1.6), conducted by Cemex, is reported herein. The study incorporated simplifying assumptions and focused only on pozzolan and ultra fine fly ash (UFFA). It found that the market for pozzolan in the Ghent area was oversupplied, with resultant poor pricing structure. Reachable export markets for the Ghent pozzolan market were mostly locally served with the exception of Florida. It was concluded that a beneficiated material for that market may be at a long term disadvantage. The market for the UFFA was more complex as this material would compete with other beneficiated ash and potential metakaolin and silica fume as well. The study concluded that this market represented about 100,000 tons of sales per year and, although lucrative, represented a widely dispersed niche market.

Andrew Jackura; John Groppo; Thomas Robl

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Sulfur by-product formation in the Stretford process. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid redox sulfur recovery processes remove H2S from sour gas streams and produce elemental sulfur for sale or disposal. The Stretford Process is one of the oldest commercial liquid redox processes and it is based on a vanadium and anthraquinone redox system. Improvements in the operability and reliability of the Stretford process would be beneficial to the process user. The report presents results of research focused on developing an understanding of the process parameters and factors that impact sulfur by-product formation (e.g., sodium thiosulfate and sodium sulfate) in the Stretford process. The information in the report can help current Stretford plant process users better understand the operations of their plants, especially with regards to sulfur by-product formation and control strategies.

Trofe, T.W.; DeBerry, D.W.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

The utilization of flue gas desulfurization waste by-products in construction brick  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPENDIX D. TEST PROCEDURES APPENDIX E. CONVERSION TABLES VITA 85 90 93 96 99 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Model for FGD Waste By-Product Research Unconfined Compressive Strength for Fly Ash Mixed with Various Inductions of Portland Cement 15... properties such as weight, durability, strength, density, etc. Varying mixes of bottom ash, fly ash, portland cement, and sand will be tested for possible enhancement of the hemihydrate. Also, a mix design that best utilizes all the waste by...

Berryman, Charles Wayne

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Long-Term Column Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. The stability of mercury and any co-captured elements in the by-products could have a large economic impact if it reduced by-product sales or increasing their disposal costs. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed continuous leaching of a select subset of the available sample pairs using four leachants: water (pH=5.7), dilute sulfuric acid (pH=1.2), dilute acetic acid (pH=2.9), and sodium carbonate (pH=11.1). This report describes results obtained for mercury, arsenic, and selenium during the 5-month leaching experiments.

Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.; White, Fredrick; Rohar, P.C.; Kim, A.G

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasability of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are both strongly committed to expanding the role of biomass as an energy source. In particular, they support biomass fuels and products as a way to reduce the need for oil and gas imports; to support the growth of agriculture, forestry, and rural economies; and to foster major new domestic industries--biorefineries--making a variety of fuels, chemicals, and other products. As part of this effort, the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory Committee, a panel established by the Congress to guide the future direction of federally funded biomass R&D, envisioned a 30 percent replacement of the current U.S. petroleum consumption with biofuels by 2030. Biomass--all plant and plant-derived materials including animal manure, not just starch, sugar, oil crops already used for food and energy--has great potential to provide renewable energy for America's future. Biomass recently surpassed hydropower as the largest domestic source of renewable energy and currently provides over 3 percent of the total energy consumption in the United States. In addition to the many benefits common to renewable energy, biomass is particularly attractive because it is the only current renewable source of liquid transportation fuel. This, of course, makes it invaluable in reducing oil imports--one of our most pressing energy needs. A key question, however, is how large a role could biomass play in responding to the nation's energy demands. Assuming that economic and financial policies and advances in conversion technologies make biomass fuels and products more economically viable, could the biorefinery industry be large enough to have a significant impact on energy supply and oil imports? Any and all contributions are certainly needed, but would the biomass potential be sufficiently large to justify the necessary capital replacements in the fuels and automobile sectors? The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30 percent or more of the country's present petroleum consumption--the goal set by the Advisory Committee in their vision for biomass technologies. Accomplishing this goal would require approximately 1 billion dry tons of biomass feedstock per year.

Perlack, R.D.

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

THE USE OF COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS FOR IN SITU TREATMENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1994 a demonstration project was undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of using CCBs for the in situ treatment of acidic mine water. Actual injection of alkaline material was performed in 1997 with initial positive results; however, the amount of alkalinity added to the system was limited and resulted in short duration treatment. In 1999, a CBRC grant was awarded to further investigate the effectiveness of alkaline injection technology (AIT). Funds were released in fall 2001. In December 2001, 2500 tons of fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash were injected into the wells used in the 1997 injection project. Post injection monitoring continued for 24 months. During this period the mine chemistry had gone through a series of chemical changes that manifested as stages or ''treatment phases.'' The mine system appeared to be in the midst of reestablishing equilibrium with the partial pressure of mine headspace. Alkalinity and pH appeared to be gradually increasing during this transition. As of December 2003, the pH and alkalinity were roughly 7.3 and 65 ppm, respectively. Metal concentrations were significantly lower than pre-injection levels, but iron and manganese concentrations appeared to be gradually increasing (roughly 30 ppm and 1.25 ppm, respectively). Aluminum, nickel, and zinc were less than pre-injection concentrations and did not appear to be increasing (roughly

Geoffrey A. Canty; Jess W. Everett

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

Potential for by-product recovery in geothermal energy operations issue paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document identifies and discusses the significant issues raised by the idea of recovering useful by-products from wastes (primarily spent brine) generated during geothermal power production. The physical availability of numerous valuable materials in geothermal brines has captured the interest of geothermal resource developers and other parties ever since their presence was known. The prospects for utilizing huge volumes of highly-saline geothermal brines for electricity generation in the Imperial Valley of California have served to maintain this interest in both private sector and government circles.

None

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This sixteenth quarterly report describes work done during the sixteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant of Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works, Russia, decided to erect a new coke oven gas treatment and by-product plant to replace the existing obsolete units and to improve the environmental conditions of the area. The paper deals with the technological concept and the design requirements. Commissioning is scheduled at the beginning of 1996. The paper describes H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} removal, sulfur recovery and ammonia destruction, primary gas cooling and electrostatic tar precipitation, and the distributed control system that will be installed.

Egorov, V.N.; Anikin, G.J. [Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works, (Russian Federation); Gross, M. [Krupp Koppers GmbH, Essen (Germany)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fifteenth quarterly report describes work done during the fifteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing and giving presentations, and making and responding to several outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

299

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This seventeenth quarterly report describes work done during the seventeenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, giving a presentation, submitting a manuscript and making and responding to one outside contact.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fourteenth quarterly report describes work done during the fourteenth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh's project on the ''Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.'' This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon new laboratory evaluation of samples from Phase 1, discussions with MAX Environmental Technologies, Inc., on the field work of Phase 2, preparing presentations, and making and responding to two outside contacts.

James T. Cobb, Jr.; Ronald D. Neufeld; Jana Agostini

1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A nuclear criticality safety assessment of the loss of moderation control in 2 1/2 and 10-ton cylinders containing enriched UF{sub 6}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Moderation control for maintaining nuclear criticality safety in 2 {1/2}-ton, 10-ton, and 14-ton cylinders containing enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) has been used safely within the nuclear industry for over thirty years, and is dependent on cylinder integrity and containment. This assessment evaluates the loss of moderation control by the breaching of containment and entry of water into the cylinders. The first objective of this study was to estimate the required amounts of water entering these large UF{sub 6} cylinders to react with, and to moderate the uranium compounds sufficiently to cause criticality. Hypothetical accident situations were modeled as a uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) slab above a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder, and a UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} sphere centered within a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder. These situations were investigated by computational analyses utilizing the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Computer Code. The results were used to estimate both the masses of water required for criticality, and the limiting masses of water that could be considered safe. The second objective of the assessment was to calculate the time available for emergency control actions before a criticality would occur, i.e., a {open_quotes}safetime{close_quotes}, for various sources of water and different size openings in a breached cylinder. In the situations considered, except the case for a fire hose, the safetime appears adequate for emergency control actions. The assessment shows that current practices for handling moderation controlled cylinders of low enriched UF{sub 6}, along with the continuation of established personnel training programs, ensure nuclear criticality safety for routine and emergency operations.

Newvahner, R.L. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

Feasibility of producing jet fuel from GPGP (Great Plains Gasification Plant) by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota, is in close proximity to several Air Force bases along our northern tier. This plant is producing over 137 million cubic feet per day of high-Btu Natural Gas from North Dakota lignite. In addition, the plant generates three liquid streams, naphtha, crude phenol, and tar oil. The naphtha may be directly marketable because of its low boiling point and high aromatic content. The other two streams, totalling about 4300 barrels per day, are available as potential sources of aviation fuel jet fuel for the Air Force. The overall objective of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing aviation turbine fuel from the by-product streams of GPGP. These streams, as well as fractions, thereof, will be characterized and subsequently processed over a wide range of process conditions. The resulting turbine fuel products will be analyzed to determine their chemical and physical characteristics as compared to petroleum-based fuels to meet the military specification requirements. A second objective is to assess the conversion of the by-product streams into a new, higher-density aviation fuel. Since no performance specifications currently exist for a high-density jet fuel, reaction products and intermediates will only be characterized to indicate the feasibility of producing such a fuel. This report discusses the suitability of the tar oil stream. 5 refs., 20 figs., 15 tabs.

Willson, W.G.; Knudson, C.L.; Rindt, J.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Gas treatment and by-products recovery of Thailand`s first coke plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coke is needed in the blast furnace as the main fuel and chemical reactant and the main product of a coke plant. The second main product of the coke plant is coke oven gas. During treatment of the coke oven gas some coal chemicals like tar, ammonia, sulphur and benzole can be recovered as by-products. Since the market prices for these by-products are rather low and often erratic it does not in most cases justify the investment to recover these products. This is the reason why modern gas treatment plants only remove those impurities from the crude gas which must be removed for technical and environmental reasons. The cleaned gas, however, is a very valuable product as it replaces natural gas in steel work furnaces and can be used by other consumers. The surplus can be combusted in the boiler of a power plant. A good example for an optimal plant layout is the new coke oven facility of Thai Special Steel Industry (TSSI) in Rayong. The paper describes the TSSI`s coke oven gas treatment plant.

Diemer, P.E.; Seyfferth, W. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Authorized Limits for the Release of a 25 Ton Locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains process knowledge and radiological data and analysis to support approval for release of the 25-ton locomotive, Serial Number 21547, at the Area 25 Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD) Facility, located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The 25-ton locomotive is a small, one-of-a-kind locomotive used to move railcars in support of the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application project. This locomotive was identified as having significant historical value by the Nevada State Railroad Museum in Boulder City, Nevada, where it will be used as a display piece. A substantial effort to characterize the radiological conditions of the locomotive was undertaken by the NTS Management and Operations Contractor, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). During this characterization process, seven small areas on the locomotive had contamination levels that exceeded the NTS release criteria (limits consistent with U.S. Department of Energy [DOE] Order DOE O 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment). The decision was made to perform radiological decontamination of these known accessible impacted areas to further the release process. On February 9, 2010, NSTec personnel completed decontamination of these seven areas to within the NTS release criteria. Although all accessible areas of the locomotive had been successfully decontaminated to within NTS release criteria, it was plausible that inaccessible areas of the locomotive (i.e., those areas on the locomotive where it was not possible to perform radiological surveys) could potentially have contamination above unrestricted release limits. To access the majority of these inaccessible areas, the locomotive would have to be disassembled. A complete disassembly for a full radiological survey could have permanently destroyed parts and would have ruined the historical value of the locomotive. Complete disassembly would also add an unreasonable financial burden for the contractor. A decision was reached between the NTS regulator and NSTec, opting for alternative authorized limits from DOE Headquarters. In doing so, NSTec personnel performed a dose model using the DOE-approved modeling code RESRAD-BUILD v3.5 to evaluate scenarios. The parameters used in the dose model were conservative. NSTecs Radiological Engineering Calculation, REC-2010-001, Public Dose Estimate from the EMAD 25 Ton Locomotive, concluded that the four scenarios evaluated were below the 25-millirem per year limit, the likely dose scenarios met the few millirem in a year criteria, and that the EMAD 25-ton locomotive met the radiological requirements to be released with residual radioactivity to the public.

Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

305

CHARACTERIZATION OF COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS FOR THE RE-EVOLUTION OF MERCURY INTO ECOSYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is concern that mercury (Hg) in coal combustion by-products might be emitted into the environment during processing to other products or after the disposal/landfill of these by-products. This perception may limit the opportunities to use coal combustion by-products in recycle/reuse applications and may result in additional, costly disposal regulations. In this program, CONSOL conducted a comprehensive sampling and analytical program to include ash, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludge, and coal combustion by-products. This work is necessary to help identify potential problems and solutions important to energy production from fossil fuels. The program objective was to evaluate the potential for mercury emissions by leaching or volatilization, to determine if mercury enters the water surrounding an active FGD disposal site and an active fly ash slurry impoundment site, and to provide data that will allow a scientific assessment of the issue. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test results showed that mercury did not leach from coal, bottom ash, fly ash, spray dryer/fabric filter ash or forced oxidation gypsum (FOG) in amounts leading to concentrations greater than the detection limit of the TCLP method (1.0 ng/mL). Mercury was detected at very low concentrations in acidic leachates from all of the fixated and more than half of the unfixated FGD sludge samples, and one of the synthetic aggregate samples. Mercury was not detected in leachates from any sample when deionized water (DI water) was the leaching solution. Mercury did not leach from electrostatic precipitator (ESP) fly ash samples collected during activated carbon injection for mercury control in amounts greater than the detection limit of the TCLP method (1.0 ng/mL). Volatilization tests could not detect mercury loss from fly ash, spray dryer/fabric filter ash, unfixated FGD sludge, or forced oxidation gypsum; the mercury concentration of these samples all increased, possibly due to absorption from ambient surroundings. Mercury loss of 18-26% was detected after 3 and 6 months at 100 F and 140 F from samples of the fixated FGD sludge. Water samples were collected from existing ground water monitoring wells around an active FGD disposal site (8 wells) and an active fly ash slurry impoundment (14 wells). These were wells that the plants have installed to comply with ground water monitoring requirements of their permits. Mercury was not detected in any of the water samples collected from monitoring wells at either site. A literature review concluded that coal combustion byproducts can be disposed of in properly designed landfills that minimize the potentially negative impacts of water intrusion that carries dissolved organic matter (DOM). Dissolved organic matter and sulfate-reducing bacteria can promote the transformation of elemental or oxidized mercury into methyl mercury. The landfill should be properly designed and capped with clays or similar materials to minimize the wet-dry cycles that promote the release of methylmercury.

J.A. Withum; J.E. Locke; S.C. Tseng

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Environmental chamber measurements of mercury flux from coal utilization by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An environmental chamber was constructed to measure the mercury flux from coal utilization by-product (CUB) samples. Samples of fly ash, FGD gypsum, and wallboard made from FGD gypsum were tested under both dark and illuminated conditions with or without the addition of water to the sample. Mercury releases varied widely, with 7-day experiment averages ranging from -6.8 to 73 ng/m2 h for the fly ash samples and -5.2 to 335 ng/m2 h for the FGD/wallboard samples. Initial mercury content, fly ash type, and light exposure had no observable consistent effects on the mercury flux. For the fly ash samples, the effect of a mercury control technology was to decrease the emission. For three of the four pairs of FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, the wallboard sample released less (or absorbed more) mercury than the gypsum.

Pekney, N.J.; Martello, D.V.; Schroeder, K.T.; Granite, E.J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Recovery of solvent and by-products from organosolv black liquor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recovery of alcohol and by-products from ethanol-water and methanol-water pulping liquors was studied. The recovery system proposed consists of three stages: black liquor flashing, lignin precipitation, and precipitation distillation of mother liquor. At the flash stage, 47 and 51% of the alcohol in the black liquor are recovered for ethanol and methanol processes, respectively. The lignin recovery yield at the precipitation stage is 67% for ethanol black liquor and 73% for methanol black liquor. The distillation of precipitation mother liquors enables recovery of 98% ethanol and 96% methanol from this stream as distillate, whereas the distillation residue contains significant amounts of sugars, furfural, and acetic acid that can be recovered. The study concludes with the overall mass balance for the recovery system proposed.

Botello, J.I.; Gilarranz, M.A.; Rodriguez, F.; Oliet, M. [Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica] [Univ. Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Joint Test Plan to Identify the Gaseous By-Products of CH3I Loading on AgZ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this test plan is to describe research to determine the gaseous by-products of the adsorption of CH3I on hydrogen reduced silver exchanged mordenite (AgZ).

R. T. Jubin; N. R. Soelberg; D. M. Strachan; T. M. Nenoff; B. B. Spencer

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Sugar-Based Ethanol Biorefinery: Ethanol, Succinic Acid and By-Product Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work conducted in this project is an extension of the developments itemized in DE-FG-36-04GO14236. This program is designed to help the development of a biorefinery based around a raw sugar mill, which in Louisiana is an underutilized asset. Some technical questions were answered regarding the addition of a biomass to ethanol facility to existing sugar mills. The focus of this work is on developing technology to produce ethanol and valuable by-products from bagasse. Three major areas are addressed, feedstock storage, potential by-products and the technology for producing ethanol from dilute ammonia pre-treated bagasse. Sugar mills normally store bagasse in a simple pile. During the off season there is a natural degradation of the bagasse, due to the composting action of microorganisms in the pile. This has serious implications if bagasse must be stored to operate a bagasse/biorefinery for a 300+ day operating cycle. Deterioration of the fermentables in bagasse was found to be 6.5% per month, on pile storage. This indicates that long term storage of adequate amounts of bagasse for year-round operation is probably not feasible. Lignin from pretreatment seemed to offer a potential source of valuable by-products. Although a wide range of phenolic compounds were present in the effluent from dilute ammonia pretreatment, the concentrations of each (except for benzoic acid) were too low to consider for extraction. The cellulosic hydrolysis system was modified to produce commercially recoverable quantities of cellobiose, which has a small but growing market in the food process industries. A spin-off of this led to the production of a specific oligosaccharide which appears to have both medical and commercial implications as a fungal growth inhibitor. An alternate use of sugars produced from biomass hydrolysis would be to produce succinic acid as a chemical feedstock for other conversions. An organism was developed which can do this bioconversion, but the economics of succinic acid production were such that it could not compete with current commercial practice. To allow recovery of commercial amounts of ethanol from bagasse fermentation, research was conducted on high solids loading fermentations (using S. cerevisiae) with commercial cellulase on pretreated material. A combination of SHF/SSF treatment with fed-batch operation allowed fermentation at 30% solids loading. Supplementation of the fermentation with a small amount of black-strap molasses had results beyond expectation. There was an enhancement of conversion as well as production of ethanol levels above 6.0% w/w, which is required both for efficient distillation as well as contaminant repression. The focus of fermentation development was only on converting the cellulose to ethanol, as this yeast is not capable of fermenting both glucose and xylose (from hemicellulose). In anticipation of the future development of such an organism, we screened the commercially available xylanases to find the optimum mix for conversion of both cellulose and hemicellulose. A different mixture than the spezyme/novozyme mix used in our fermentation research was found to be more efficient at converting both cellulose and hemicellulose. Efforts were made to select a mutant of Pichia stipitis for ability to co-ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol. New mutation technology was developed, but an appropriate mutant has not yet been isolated. The ability to convert to stillage from biomass fermentations were determined to be suitable for anaerobic degradation and methane production. An economic model of a current sugar factory was developed in order to provide a baseline for the cost/benefit analysis of adding cellulosic ethanol production.

Donal F. Day

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal-laden wastes can be stabilized and solidified using advanced clean coal technology by-products (CCTBs)--fluid bed combustor ash and spray drier solids. These utility-generated treatment chemicals are available for purchase through brokers, and commercial applications of this process are being practiced by treaters of metal-laden hazardous waste. A complex of regulations governs this industry, and sensitivities to this complex has discouraged public documentation of treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with CCTBs. This report provides a comprehensive public documentation of laboratory studies that show the efficacy of the stabilization and solidification of metal-laden hazardous wastes--such as lead-contaminated soils and sandblast residues--through treatment with CCTBs. It then describes the extensive efforts that were made to obtain the permits allowing a commercial hazardous waste treater to utilize CCTBs as treatment chemicals and to install the equipment required to do so. It concludes with the effect of this lengthy process on the ability of the treatment company to realize the practical, physical outcome of this effort, leading to premature termination of the project.

James T. Cobb, Jr.

2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

311

Scale-up of mild gasification to be a process development unit mildgas 24 ton/day PDU design report. Final report, November 1991--July 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From November 1991 to April 1996, Kerr McGee Coal Corporation (K-M Coal) led a project to develop the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) Mild Gasification (MILDGAS) process for near-term commercialization. The specific objectives of the program were to: design, construct, and operate a 24-tons/day adiabatic process development unit (PDU) to obtain process performance data suitable for further design scale-up; obtain large batches of coal-derived co-products for industrial evaluation; prepare a detailed design of a demonstration unit; and develop technical and economic plans for commercialization of the MILDGAS process. The project team for the PDU development program consisted of: K-M Coal, IGT, Bechtel Corporation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC), General Motors (GM), Pellet Technology Corporation (PTC), LTV Steel, Armco Steel, Reilly Industries, and Auto Research.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

New perspectives on the cancer risks of trichloroethylene, its metabolites, and chlorination by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientific developments in the 1990`s have important implications for the assessment of cancer risks posed by exposures to trichloroethylene (TCE). These new developments include: epidemiological studies; experimental studies of TCE carcinogenicity, metabolism and metabolite carcinogenicity; applications of new physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for TCE; and new pharmacodynamic data obtained for TCE and its rhetabolites. Following a review of previous assessments of TCE carcinogenicity, each of these new sets of developments is summarized. The new epidemiological data do not provide evidence of TCE carcinogenicity in humans, and the new pharmacodynamic data support the hypothesis that TCE carcinogenicity is caused by TCE-induced cytotoxicity. Based on this information, PBPK-based estimates for likely no-adverse effect levels (NOAELs) for human exposures to TCE are calculated to be 16 ppb for TCE in air respired 24 hr/day, and 210 ppb for TCE in drinking water. Cancer risks of zero are predicted for TCE exposures below these calculated NOAELs. For comparison, hypothetical cancer risks posed by lifetime ingestive and multiroute household exposures to TCE in drinking water, at the currently enforced Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) concentration of 5 ppb are extrapolated from animal bioassay data using a conservative, linear dose-response model. These TCE-related risks are compared to corresponding ones associated with concentrations of chlorination by-products (CBP) in household water. It is shown that, from the standpoint of comparative hypothetical cancer risks, based on conservative linear dose-response extrapolations, there would likely be no health benefit, and more likely a possible health detriment, associated with any switch from a household water supply containing <375 ppb TCE to one containing CBP at levels corresponding to the currently proposed 80-ppb MCL for total trihalomethanes.

Bogen, K.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Slone, T.; Gold, L.S.; Manley, N.; Revzan, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

313

Effect of industrial by-products containing electron acceptors on mitigating methane emission during rice cultivation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three industrial by-products (fly ash, phosphogypsum and blast furnace slag), were evaluated for their potential re-use as soil amendments to reduce methane (CH{sub 4}) emission resulting from rice cultivation. In laboratory incubations, CH{sub 4} production rates from anoxic soil slurries were significantly reduced at amendment levels of 0.5%, 1%, 2% and 5% (wt wt{sup -1}), while observed CO{sub 2} production rates were enhanced. The level of suppression in methane production was the highest for phosphogypsum, followed by blast slag and then fly ash. In the greenhouse experiment, CH{sub 4} emission rates from the rice planted potted soils significantly decreased with the increasing levels (2-20 Mg ha{sup -1}) of the selected amendments applied, while rice yield simultaneously increased compared to the control treatment. At 10 Mg ha{sup -1} application level of the amendments, total seasonal CH{sub 4} emissions were reduced by 20%, 27% and 25%, while rice grain yields were increased by 17%, 15% and 23% over the control with fly ash, phosphogypsum, and blast slag amendments, respectively. The suppression of CH{sub 4} production rates as well as total seasonal CH{sub 4} flux could be due to the increased concentrations of active iron, free iron, manganese oxides, and sulfate in the amended soil, which acted as electron acceptors and controlled methanogens' activity by limiting substrates availability. Among the amendments, blast furnace slag and fly ash contributed mainly to improve the soil nutrients balance and increased the soil pH level towards neutral point, but soil acidity was developed with phosphogypsum application. Conclusively, blast slag among the selected amendments would be a suitable soil amendment for reducing CH{sub 4} emissions as well as sustaining rice productivity.

Ali, Muhammad Aslam [Department of Environmental Science, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh 2202 (Bangladesh); Lee, Chang Hoon [Functional Cereal Crop Research Division, National Institute of Crop Science, RDA, 1085, Naey-dong, Milyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Yoon [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School (Brain Korea 21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Pil Joo [Division of Applied Life Science, Graduate School (Brain Korea 21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: pjkim@gnu.ac.kr

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

AFCI Transmutation Fuel Processes and By-Products Planning: Interim Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program are to reduce high-level waste volume, reduce long-lived and radiotoxic elements, and reclaim valuable energy content of spent nuclear fuel. The AFCI chartered the Fuel Development Working Group (FDWG) to develop advanced fuels in support of the AFCI goals. The FDWG organized a phased strategy of fuel development that is designed to match the needs of the AFCI program: Phase 1 - High-burnup fuels for light-water reactors (LWRs) and tri-isotopic (TRISO) fuel for gas-cooled reactors Phase 2 Mixed oxide fuels with minor actinides for LWRs, Am transmutation targets for LWRs, inert matrix fuels for LWRs, and TRISO fuel containing Pu and other transuranium for gas-cooled reactors Phase 3 Fertile free or low-fertile metal, ceramic, ceramic dispersed in a metal matrix (CERMET), and ceramics dispersed in a ceramic matrix (CERCER) that would be used primarily in fast reactors. Development of advanced fuels requires the fabrication, assembly, and irradiation of prototypic fuel under bounding reactor conditions. At specialized national laboratory facilities small quantities of actinides are being fabricated into such fuel for irradiation tests. Fabrication of demonstration quantities of selected fuels for qualification testing is needed but not currently feasible, because existing manual glovebox fabrication approaches result in significant radiation exposures when larger quantities of actinides are involved. The earliest demonstration test fuels needed in the AFCI program are expected to be variants of commercial mixed oxide fuel for use in an LWR as lead test assemblies. Manufacture of such test assemblies will require isolated fabrication lines at a facility not currently available in the U.S. Such facilities are now being planned as part of an Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF). Adequate planning for and specification of actinide fuel fabrication facilities capable of producing transmutation fuels dictates the need for detailed process flows, mass balances, batch size data, and radiological dose estimates. Full definition of the materials that will need to be handled in the facility as feed material inputs, in-process fuel, scrap recycle, scrap requiring recovery, and by-product wastes is required. The feed material for demonstrating transmutation fuel fabrication will need to come from the separations of actinides from spent nuclear fuel processed in the same AFCF.

Eric L. Shaber

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of Coal Combustion By-Product Disposal and Utilizaton  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) conducted a multiyear study to evaluate the impact of mercury and other air toxic elements (ATEs) on the management of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). The ATEs evaluated in this project were arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, and selenium. The study included laboratory tasks to develop measurement techniques for mercury and ATE releases, sample characterization, and release experiments. A field task was also performed to measure mercury releases at a field site. Samples of fly ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials were collected preferentially from full-scale coal-fired power plants operating both without and with mercury control technologies in place. In some cases, samples from pilot- and bench-scale emission control tests were included in the laboratory studies. Several sets of 'paired' baseline and test fly ash and FGD materials collected during full-scale mercury emission control tests were also included in laboratory evaluations. Samples from mercury emission control tests all contained activated carbon (AC) and some also incorporated a sorbent-enhancing agent (EA). Laboratory release experiments focused on measuring releases of mercury under conditions designed to simulate CCB exposure to water, ambient-temperature air, elevated temperatures, and microbes in both wet and dry conditions. Results of laboratory evaluations indicated that: (1) Mercury and sometimes selenium are collected with AC used for mercury emission control and, therefore, present at higher concentrations than samples collected without mercury emission controls present. (2) Mercury is stable on CCBs collected from systems both without and with mercury emission controls present under most conditions tested, with the exception of vapor-phase releases of mercury exposed to elevated temperatures. (3) The presence of carbon either from added AC or from unburned coal can result in mercury being sorbed onto the CCB when exposed to ambient-temperature air. The environmental performance of the mercury captured on AC used as a sorbent for mercury emission control technologies indicated that current CCB management options will continue to be sufficiently protective of the environment, with the potential exception of exposure to elevated temperatures. The environmental performance of the other ATEs investigated indicated that current management options will be appropriate to the CCBs produced using AC in mercury emission controls.

David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher; Mei Xin; Mae Sexauer Gustin; Rob Jung

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Clean-coal technology by-products used in a highway embankment stabilization demonstration project. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clean-coal technology by-products are used in a highway embankment demonstration project. This research chronicles the procedures used in the process and analyzes the stability of a repaired highway embankment. The reconstructed slope is analyzed using an Intelligent Discussion Support System that was developed from a slope stability program. Water quality studies are performed and an instrumentation plan is suggested. The calculated factors of safety and the observed embankment performance give indications that the field demonstration project was a success. Long-term monitoring will be the best barometer for determining embankment gross movement and the future of FGD by-products as a stabilizing material.

Nodjomian, S.M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

(Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from domestic or South

318

(Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms used about 92% of the primary tin consumed

319

(Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 90% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2012. The major uses were as follows

320

(Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

174 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms used about 80% of the primary tin consumed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

(Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

180 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 85% of the primary tin. The major uses

322

(Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

178 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 85% of the primary tin. The major uses

323

(Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

172 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 81% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2006. The major uses were as follows

324

(Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

172 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 86% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2008. The major uses were as follows

325

(Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

176 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1999, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 97% of the primary tin. The major uses

326

(Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

174 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined domestically since 1993. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms used about 77% of the primary tin consumed

327

(Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 81% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2005. The major uses were as follows

328

(Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 84% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2009. The major uses were as follows

329

(Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

178 TIN (Data in metric tons of contained tin, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, there was no domestic tin mine production. Production of tin at the only U.S. tin smelter, at Texas City, TX, stopped in 1989. Twenty-five firms consumed about 85% of the primary tin. The major uses

330

(Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

168 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms accounted for about 90% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2013. The major uses for tin

331

(Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

170 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 91% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2010. The major uses were as follows

332

(Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

176 TIN (Data in metric tons of tin content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Tin has not been mined or smelted in the United States since 1993 and 1989, respectively. Twenty-five firms used about 84% of the primary tin consumed domestically in 2007. The major uses were as follows

333

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 1997 was essentially unchanged at 1.9 million metric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

52 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Mexico, Nevada, and Montana, accounted for 98% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in six other States. While copper was recovered at about 35 mines operating in the United States, 15

334

Management of dry gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of coal combustion by-products. The two technologies for the underground placement that will be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry coal combustion by-products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of combustion by-products with about 70% solids. Phase 2 of the overall program began April 1, 1996. The principal objective of Phase 2 is to develop and fabricate the equipment for both the pneumatic and hydraulic placement technologies, and to conduct a limited, small-scale shakedown test of the pneumatic and hydraulic placement equipment. The shakedown test originally was to take place on the surface, in trenches dug for the tests. However, after a thorough study it was decided, with the concurrence of DOE-METC, to drill additional injection wells and conduct the shakedown tests underground. This will allow a more thorough test of the placement equipment.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Land application uses for dry FGD by-products. Phase 1, [Annual report], December 1, 1991--November 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. Presently FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. However, landfill sites are becoming more scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. In summary Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD byproduct materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Haefner, R. [Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

CORROSION OF ALUMINUM CLAD SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN THE 70 TON CASK DURING TRANSFER FROM L AREA TO H-CANYON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33 % was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 260 {degrees}C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 {degrees}C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

Mickalonis, J.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Solar Fluctuations and the MSW Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This talk summarizes the results of recent calculations of how fluctuations within the solar medium can influence resonant neutrino oscillations within the sun. Although initial calculations pointed to helioseismic waves as possibly producing detectable effects, recent more careful calculations show this not to be true. Those features of fluctuations which maximize their influence on neutrino propagation are identified, and are likely to have implications for supernovae and the early universe.

C. P. Burgess

1997-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

338

MSW-like Enhancements without Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the effects of a scalar field, coupled only to neutrinos, on oscillations among weak interaction current eigenstates. The effect of a real scalar field appears as effective masses for the neutrino mass eigenstates, the same for $\

G. J. Stephenson Jr.; T. Goldman; B. H. J. McKellar

1996-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

339

MSW effect for large mixing angles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The traditional physical description of neutrino flavor conversion in the Sun focuses on the notion of resonance. However, the resonance picture is valid only in the limit of small mixing angles theta. For large values of theta, the resonance picture leads to seemingly paradoxical results. This observation is important for understanding the physics of neutrino flavor conversion in the Sun, since the latest solar neutrino data seems to prefer large mixing angles. Here we review the basic arguments and in particular show that the resonance does not in general coincide with either the point of maximal violation of adiabaticity in the nonadiabatic case or the point of maximal flavor conversion in the adiabatic case. We also discuss a modified adiabaticity criterion.

Alexander Friedland

2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

340

MSW Oscillations - LMA and Subdominant Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New physics near the TeV scale could modify neutrino-matter interactions or generate a relatively large neutrino magnetic (transition) moment. Both types of effects have been discussed since the 1970's as alternatives to mass-induced neutrino flavor oscillations. Nowadays, the availability of high-statistics data makes it possible to turn the idea around and ask: How well do the simple mass-induced oscillations describe solar neutrinos? At what level are the above-mentioned nonstandard effects excluded? Can we use solar neutrinos to constrain physics beyond the Standard Model? These notes review the sensitivity of the present-day solar neutrino experiments to the nonstandard neutrino interactions and transition moment and outline progress that may be expected in the near future. Based on a talk given at the Neutrino 2006 conference.

Friedland, A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Utilization of low NO{sub x} coal combustion by-products. Quarterly report, April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is studying a beneficiation process to make power plant fly ash a more useful by-product. The tasks include: (1) Laboratory characterization: Sample collection; Material characterization; and Lab testing of ash processing operations; (2) Pilot plant testing of the separation of carbon from fly ash; (3) Product testing: Concrete testing and Plastic fillers; and (4) Market and economic analysis. Appendices present information on material characterization, laboratory testing of a flotation process, pilot runs, and concrete testing results.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Mineralogical and physical considerations related to the separation and recovery of constituents from aluminum smelter by-products and wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several by-products and waste products of aluminum smelting were characterized mineralogically and physically, in order to evaluate the potential for their decontamination or separation and recovery into valuable products using mineral processing techniques. The test samples were selected from among Bayer process red mud, bath-alumina mixture, cleaned anode butts, anode recycle residues, spent potlining, saltcake and fluorogypsum. Several of these materials were shown to be composed either of highly liberated, potentially separable mineral phases, or of locked minerals which could be partially liberated by grinding to smaller but practical particle sizes. An analysis of specific physical properties of the liberated constituent mineral phases was accompanied by preliminary experimental evaluation of their separability. An assessment was made of potential mineral processing techniques including size and form differentiation, gravitational and magnetic field separation, flotation, separation based on surface charging phenomena or work function, and pneumatic tabling. The results confirmed the suitability of low-cost physical separation techniques for the treatment of some by-products and wastes. This paper presents results of a preliminary evaluation of two smelter products. The conference paper will analyze and discuss in more detail the potential for the mineral processing of these and other smelter by-products and wastes.

Plumpton, A.J.; Wilhelmy, J.F.; Blackburn, D.; Caouette, J.L. [Centre de Recherches Minerales, Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Topical report, April 1, 1996--April 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report represents the Final Technical Progress Report for Phase II of the overall program for a cooperative research agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy - MORGANTOWN Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC). Under the agreement, SIUC will develop and demonstrate technologies for the handling, transport, and placement in abandoned underground coal mines of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products, such as fly ash, scrubber sludge, fluidized bed combustion by-products, and will assess the environmental impact of such underground placement. The overall program is divided into three (3) phases. Phase II of the program is primarily concerned with developing and testing the hardware for the actual underground placement demonstrations. Two technologies have been identified and hardware procured for full-scale demonstrations: (1) hydraulic placement, where coal combustion by-products (CCBs) will be placed underground as a past-like mixture containing about 70 to 75 percent solids; and (2) pneumatic placement, where CCBs will be placed underground as a relatively dry material using compressed air. 42 refs., 36 figs., 36 tabs.

Chugh, Y.P.; Brackebusch, F.; Carpenter, J. [and others

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Task 1.13 - Data Collection and Database Development for Clean Coal Technology By-Product Characteristics and Management Practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center-Morgantown (DOE FETC) efforts in the areas of fossil fuels and clean coal technology (CCT) have included involvement with both conventional and advanced process coal conversion by-products. In 1993, DOE submitted a Report to Congress on "Barriers to the Increased Utilization of Coal Combustion Desulfurization Byproducts by Governmental and Commercial Sectors" that provided an outline of activities to remove the barriers identified in the report. DOE charged itself with participation in this process, and the work proposed in this document facilitates DOE's response to its own recommendations for action. The work reflects DOE's commitment to the coal combustion by-product (CCB) industry, to the advancement of clean coal technology, and to cooperation with other government agencies. Information from DOE projects and commercial endeavors in fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) and coal gasification is the focus of this task. The primary goal is to provide an easily accessible compilation of characterization information on the by-products from these processes to government agencies and industry to facilitate sound regulatory and management decisions. Additional written documentation will facilitate the preparation of an updated final version of background information collected for DOE in preparation of the Report to Congress on barriers to CCB utilization.

Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Assessment of municipal solid waste for energy production in the western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste (MSW) represents both a significant problem and an abundant resource for the production of energy. The residential, institutional, and industrial sectors of this country generate about 250 million tons of MSW each year. In this report, the authors have compiled data on the status of MSW in the 13-state western region, including economic and environmental issues. The report is designed to assist the members of the Western Regional Biomass Energy Program Ad Hoc Resource Committee in determining the potential for using MSW to produce energy in the region. 51 refs., 7 figs., 18 tabs.

Goodman, B.J.; Texeira, R.H.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the National Seminar on Building Materials and Technology for Sustainable Developments, CEPT-SBST, Ahmedabad a leading role in the sustainable development of the cement and concrete industry in this century. Sustainable design and construction of structures have a small impact on the environment, use "green

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

347

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

suitable for highway construction applications. 1.0 INTRODUCTION Scrapped tires are produced in the U. At the present time, landfilling is the major technique for scrap tire disposal in the country. Scrap tires used as economic advantages. Scrap tires are primarily composed of natural rubber, steel, synthetic rubber

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

348

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-28 REP-482 November 2002 Final Technical Report Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute For Project

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

349

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the combination of Class C fly ash and clean coal ash. Two percent to four percent sodium sulfate anhydrite

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

350

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-19 REP-443 November 2001 Final Technical Report Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute For Project

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

351

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), at 28 days, using various sources of ASTM Class F and clean coal fly ashes. For each reference mixture

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

352

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

different types of compressed gases, compressed air, carbon dioxide, and a mixed gas. This mixed gas the compressive strength and binding the carbon dioxide in the carbonation-reaction products. The carbonation-reaction of the CLSM would also have the potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions at a coal-fired power plant

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

353

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Conference onFly Ash Disposal and Utilization,onJanuary 20-22, 1998, New Delhi, India. COAL ASH and embankments, pavement and subbase courses, subgrade stabilizations, landfill cover, soil improvement, land

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

354

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pozzolans in Concrete, Chennai (Madras), India, July 2001. Department of Civil Engineering and Mechanics for construction, landfill space conservation as well as preserving virgin materials that would otherwise

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

355

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

", Portland Cement Association Skokie, IL, pp. 1-10. 11. Burnham, J. C., Bennet, G. F., and Logan, T. J., 1990

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

356

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is presented below. #12;Gasoline and Light Distillates Gasolines are blends of petroleum derived chemicals hydrocarbons (RFWI and UM 1993; API 1989). These hydrocarbons can be categorized as: gasoline and light are highly soluble components in gasoline and can be present up to a maximum concentration of 10% [API 1989

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

357

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is carried in the flue gas, separated by electrostatic precipitators, and collected in a field of hoppers in the dry form or mixed with water and discharged as slurry into locations called ash pond - wet method

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

358

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), including construction materials, metal recovery, and pollution control. Landfilling is becoming very of some heavy metals, the use of wood fly ash as a soil supplement is also becoming limited; in addition

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

359

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of cellulose fibers and papermaking fillers (kaolinitic clay, calcium carbonate, and/or titanium dioxide). In some cases, ash generated at mill and inert solids rejected during chemical recovery processes become soluble organic matter to carbon dioxide and water while consuming oxygen. Secondary residual is mainly

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

360

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

currently being produced by Manitowoc Public Utilities. Flowable Materials have up to 1200 psi compressive of water, and consist mostly of ash or similar materials. It is believed that concrete Bricks, Blocks in manufacturing Blended Cements. Soil stabilization or site remediation is another significant potential use

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consume all of the ashes currently being produced by Manitowoc Public Utilities. Flowable Materials have little portland cement and a lot of water, and consist mostlyof ash or similar materials. It is believed fly ash in manufacturing Blended Cements. Soil stabilization or site remediation is another

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

362

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

would consume all of the wood ashes produced at Consolidated Papers. Flowable Materials have up to 1200 portland cement and a lot of water, and consist mostly of ash or similar materials. It is believed remediation is another significant potential use of the ashes. For example, for log-yard paving (Roller

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

363

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

clean-coal technologies such as SO2 Control Systems, NOx Control Technology, Fluidized Bed Combustion Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute, 5776 Coal Drive, Suite 200, Carterville, IL 62918-sulfur coal. Ponded ash is usually a mixture of fly ash and bottom ash or boiler slag. Concrete was made

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

364

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is defined as the ash derived from thermal power plants using clean-coal technologies such as SO2 Control of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 784, Milwaukee, WI 53201. 4 Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute Systems, NOx Control Technology, Fluidized Bed Combustion, and Gasification Combined Cycle for reducing

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

365

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion of coal in conventional and advanced clean-coal technology combustors. These include fly ash clean-coal technology combustors. Although 560 million tonnes (Mt) of fly ash, bottom ash, and boiler furnaces, or advanced clean-coal technology furnaces. The ash collected from pulverized-coal-fired furnaces

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

366

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

after combustion of coal in conventional and advanced clean-coal technology combustors. These include and advanced clean-coal technology combustors. Although 560 million tonnes (Mt) of fly ash, bottom ash use either pulverized-coal-fired furnaces, cyclone furnaces, or advanced clean-coal technology

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

367

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies. A clean-coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SOxand NOxcontrol technologies, and FBC that obtained from clean-coal technology, are not utilized in cast-concrete masonry products (bricks, blocks conventional and clean-coal technologies. Fifteen high-sulfur coal ash samples were obtained from eight

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

368

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ash or CFAs. Based on these properties, a number of constructive use options such as #12;pollution by saw mills, pulp mills, and the wood-products industry, by burning a combination of wood products control [3], land application [9,10,11], construction materials [13,14], have been reported. However, most

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

369

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the ability of future generations to meet their own requirements (13). As a business model, this means is ecologically unfriendly: it consumes much energy and natural resources, and emits a number of undesirable air AND ECO-EFFICIENCY The definition of "sustainability", following the World Commission on Environment

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

370

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to establish and demonstrate technical benefits of porous, low-strength concrete that uses large amounts of non in construction materials. Porous concrete mixtures do not require air entrainment for freezing and thawing resistance. Therefore, high-carbon ash could be used in such concretes. Porous concrete mixtures were first

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

371

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are recycled/reused. #12;2 Naik et al. [2] evaluated the literature concerning use of polymers and used containing discardedpolyethylene terephthalate (PET) derived from soda bottles in manufacture of polymer concrete. The PET was chemically modified to produce a liquid resin using facilities available

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

372

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-burning electricity gene-ration is the current principal energy source. The total amounts of fly ash and bottom ash, University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee #12;The bar graph (Fig. 1) compares the production and utilization of fly shows the percentage of various usage of fly ash in China in 1988 [1]. Fig. 2 Percentage of Fly Ash

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

373

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Products Utilization University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee ABSTRACT This project consisted of performance testing at a typical electric power plant. One of the goals of this project was to determine the feasibility of using. The carbonation reaction of the CLSM would also have the potential to reduce carbon dioxide emissions at a coal-fired

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

374

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generated at mill and inert solids rejected during chemical recovery processes become part of the primary residual. The water clarified by the primary treatment is passed on to the secondary treatment. Secondary dioxide and water while consuming oxygen. Secondary residual is mainly microbial biomass (called also

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

375

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generated by the mill and inert #12;solids rejected during chemical recovery processes become part of the primary residual. The water clarified by the primary treatment is passed on to the secondary treatment. The secondary treatment is usually a biological process in which micro-organisms convert soluble organic matter

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

376

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generated at mill and inert solids rejected during chemical recovery processes become part of the primary residual. The water clarified by the primary treatment is passed on to the secondary treatment. Secondary dioxide and water while consuming oxygen. Secondary residual is mainly microbial biomass (also called

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

377

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solids rejected during chemical recovery processes become part of the primary residual. The water clarified by the primary treatment is passed on to the secondary treatment. Secondary treatment is usually consuming oxygen. Secondary residual is mainly microbial biomass (also called biosolids) grown during

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

378

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report No. CBU-1997-19 October 1997 For presentation and publication at the CBIP International Conference as carbon from unburnt coal, fire polished sand, thin-walled hollow spheres and their fragments, magnetic to the producer, lost resources and energy, and environmental problems. To solve these problems, it is essential

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

379

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRACTICE By Rudolph N. Kraus, Tarun R. Naik, and Yoon-moon Chun Report No. CBU-2006-12 REP-611 April 2006 to be mined, cement continues to be manufactured or imported, and energy is consumed in the processing briefly describes the uses of coal ash, wood ash, and used foundry sand, in concrete. Typically, one

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

380

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monosi, Giacomo Moriconi, and Tarun R. Naik Report No. CBU-2007-11 REP-632 June 2007 Presented of paper mill sludge: as a secondary raw material to produce blended cements, as a very fine sand addition energy for internal use. Such combustion fumes carry fly ashes which are collected and available as a new

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a variety of rubber and plastic products, thermal incineration of waste tires for production of electricity rubber in asphalt mixes, (ii) thermal incineration of worn-out tires for the production of electricity

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

382

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manager at the Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI). He is involved in implementing and monitoring) coal-ash and by replacing up to 9% of aggregates with wet-collected, low-lime, coarse coal-ash. Cast of coal fly ash, coal bottom ash, and used foundry sand in concrete and cast-concrete products

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

383

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be used in clean-coal applications for the removal of sulfur dioxide emissions from flue gas. Since mineral addition to coal, and spraying coal to minimize dusting due to coal handling, transportation

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

384

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Dairyland Power Cooperative, La Crosse, WI; Madison Gas and Electric Company, Madison, WI; National Minerals contents or use thereof. This report does not constitute a standard, specification, or regulation

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

385

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Products Utilization E-mail: ymchun@uwm.edu and F. D. Botha Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute 5776 Coal, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, USA. 4 Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

386

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 784, Milwaukee, WI 53201 d Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute * Director UWM products containing clean coal ash compared to conventional coal ash. Utilization of clean coal ash is much products that utilize clean coal ash. With increasing federal regulations on power plant emissions, finding

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

387

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.4 April 2000 A Mid-Year Project Management Report Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute for Project for evaluation. Clean coal fly ash was obtained from Southern Illinois University and a wet collected Class F fly and Quarters Cumulative$ Cumulative Project Budget Total Illinois Clean Coal Institute Award $ 86,095 Estimated

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

388

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the Cement and Concrete Institute of Mexico Symposium "Worldof Concrete - Mexico," Guadalajara, Mexico, June with proper use of form oil to allow migration of released air pockets. Sand content should be increased

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

389

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

addition for mortars and concretes, especially for self-compacting concrete. This marble powder showed on self-compacting concrete mixtures (1-6). MATERIALS Portland Cement A commercial portland AND CONCRETE By Valeria Corinaldesi, Giacomo Moriconi, and Tarun R. Naik Report No. CBU-2005-09 REP-580 August

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

390

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dust in self-consolidating concrete (SCC). A control SCC mixture was made, in which ASTM C 618 Class C fly ash: tarun@uwm.edu (T. R. Naik). 1. Introduction Self-consolidating concrete (SCC), a relatively recent- compacting concrete, super-workable concrete, highly flowable concrete, non-vibrating concrete, and other

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

391

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was carried out to utilize wood ash in making self- compacting controlled low-strength materials (CLSM), air and Presentation at the Seventh CANMET/ACI International Conference on Recent Advances in Concrete Technology, Las-entrained and non-air- entrained concretes, and bricks/blocks/paving stones. Initial test results indicated

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

392

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of consistency and fluidity, self-leveling and self-compacting, contain very little portland cement, and large applications, such as Roller Compacted Concrete for industrial plants, materials handling yards, parking lots quantities of ash and water. It is believed that concrete Bricks, Blocks, and Paving Stones can also be made

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

393

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6 concretes, especially for self-compacting concrete. This marble powder showed a very high7 Blaine AND CONCRETE By Valeria Corinaldesi, Giacomo Moriconi, and Tarun R. Naik Report No. CBU-2007-07 REP-628 #12;1 CHARACTERIZATION OF MARBLE POWDER FOR ITS USE IN1 MORTAR AND CONCRETE2 3 Valeria Corinaldesi

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

394

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be handled without segregation. It is also referred to as self-compacting concrete, super-workable concrete SELF- CONSOLIDATING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Yoon-moon Chun, Fethullah Canpolat-Dust in Manufacturing Economical Self-Consolidating Concrete T. R. Naika, *, R. N. Krausa , Y. Chuna , F. Canpolata , R

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

395

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-reinforced concrete, self-compacting concrete, ultra-high-strength concrete, conductive concrete, self-curing concrete chemical environments and complex applied loading conditions. The recent development of self-compacting-performance concrete, high-durability concrete (HDC), roller compacted concrete, high-volume fly ash concrete, fiber

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

396

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ash. Paving applications, such as Roller Compacted Concrete for industrial plants, parking lots be used in Self-Consolidating Concrete applications. This type of concrete requires additional fines that concrete Bricks, Blocks, and Paving Stones can also be made with the Corn Products' coal ash. Additionally

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

397

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Self-Compactability of Fresh Concrete............................................... 6 Slump-Flow Test Energies Fly Ash for Developing Economical Self- Consolidating Concrete (by Tarun R. Naik, Yoon-moon Chun, particularly the viscosity modifying admixture (VMA), for producing an economical self- consolidating concrete

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

398

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-leveling, self-compacting, cementitious material, which has a consistency similar to a pancake batter. CLSM can fibrous residuals from pulp and paper mills. The flowable slurry will meet ACI (American Concrete Institute) 229 recommendations for flowable Controlled Low-Strength Materials (CLSM). CLSM is a self

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

399

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is defined as a self compacted, cementitious material used primarily as a backfill in lieu of compacted fill and published at the third CANMET/ACI International Symposium on Advances in Concrete Technology, Auckland, New of low strength fill materials and has been known by many other names. The American Concrete Institute

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

400

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ash. A clean-coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SO2 control technologies. Investigations were CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Rafat Siddique, Berlin, Germany, October 2003 Department of Civil Engineering and Mechanics College of Engineering

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Objectives This testing work will evaluate use of high-carbon fly ash in non-air entrained concrete in the concrete mixture. The testing work for this project will involve laboratory testing of mechanical varied types for concrete construction applications. Specific objectives for this testing work

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

402

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of landfilling is increasing due to strict environmental regulations and limited availability of landfill space a stricter environmental regulation. In light of these, it is essential to develop beneficial uses of wood and publication at the ACI Maharastra Chapter, Mumbai, India, July 2001. Department of Civil Engineering

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

403

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;ACI member Bruce W. Ramme, P.E., Manager- Environmental Land Quality, Wisconsin Electric Power Materials, 230 Soil Cement, 232 Fly Ash and Natural Pozzolans, and 555 Recycled Materials. He is a member of ASCE, NSPE, and other professional organizations. Haifang Wen is a Transportation Engineer at Bloom

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

404

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, calcium carbonate, and/or titanium dioxide) and the biomass from biological treatment of wastewater. Fiber wastewater-treatment residuals; wood fibers. #12;Naik, Chun, & Kraus Flowable Slurry Made With Class C Fly include wastewater-treatment residuals (also called sludge), fiber reclaim, and screening rejects

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

405

Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels standard requires 36 billion gallons of renewable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels studies. Current research focuses on impacts of feeding by-prod- ucts of the bioenergy industry on Animal

406

Treatability study on the use of by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan for the stabilization of hazardous and radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Republic of Kazakhstan generates significant quantities of excess elemental sulfur from the production and refining of petroleum reserves. In addition, the country also produces hazardous, and radioactive wastes which require treatment/stabilization. In an effort to find secondary uses for the elemental sulfur, and simultaneously produce a material which could be used to encapsulate, and reduce the dispersion of harmful contaminants into the environment, BNL evaluated the use of the sulfur polymer cement (SPC) produced from by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan. This thermoplastic binder material forms a durable waste form with low leaching properties and is compatible with a wide range of waste types. Several hundred kilograms of Kazakhstan sulfur were shipped to the US and converted to SPC (by reaction with 5 wt% organic modifiers) for use in this study. A phosphogypsum sand waste generated in Kazakhstan during the purification of phosphate fertilizer was selected for treatment. Waste loadings of 40 wt% were easily achieved. Waste form performance testing included compressive strength, water immersion, and Accelerated Leach Testing.

Kalb, P.D.; Milian, L.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Environmental and Waste Technology Center; Yim, S.P. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst. (Korea, Republic of); Dyer, R.S.; Michaud, W.R. [Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Treatability study on the use of by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan for the stabilization of hazardous and radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Republic of Kazakhstan generates significant quantities of excess sulfur from the production and refining of petroleum reserves. In addition, the country also produces hazardous, and radioactive wastes which require treatment/stabilization. In an effort to find secondary uses for the elemental sulfur, and simultaneously produce a material which could be used to encapsulate, and reduce the dispersion of harmful contaminants into the environment, BNL evaluated the use of the sulfur polymer cement (SPC) produced from by-product sulfur in Kazakhstan. This thermoplastic binder material forms a durable waste form with low leaching properties and is compatible with a wide range of waste types. Several hundred kilograms of Kazakhstan sulfur were shipped to the U.S. and converted to SPC (by reaction with 5 wt% organic modifiers) for use in this study. A phosphogypsum sand waste generated in Kazakhstan during the purification of phosphate fertilizer was selected for treatment. Waste loading of 40 wt% were easily achieved. Waste form performance testing included compressive strength, water immersion, and Accelerated Leach Testing. 14 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Yim, Sung Paal; Kalb, P.D.; Milian, L.W.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Review Chlorination Disinfection By-Products in Drinking Water and Congenital Anomalies: Review and Meta-Analyses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Objectives: The aim of this study was to review epidemiologic evidence, provide summary risk estimates of the association between exposure to chlorination disinfection by-products (DBPs) and congenital anomalies, and provide recommendations for future studies. Data s o u r c e s a n d extraction: We included all published epidemiologic studies that evaluated a relationship between an index of DBP exposure (treatment, water source, DBP measurements, and both DBP measurements and personal characteristics) and risk of congenital anomalies. When three or more studies examined the same exposure index and congenital anomaly, we conducted a metaanalysis to obtain a summary risk estimate comparing the highest exposure group with the lowest exposure group. When five or more studies examined total trihalomethane (TTHM) exposure and a specific congenital anomaly, we conducted a meta-analysis to obtain exposureresponse risk estimates per 10 g/L TTHM. Data synthesis: For all congenital anomalies combined, the meta-analysis gave a statistically significant excess risk for high versus low exposure to water chlorination or TTHM [17%; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 334] based on a small number of studies. The meta-analysis also suggested a statistically significant excess risk for ventricular septal defects (58%; 95 % CI, 21107), but this was

Mark J. Nieuwenhuijsen; David Martinez; James Grellier; James Bennett; Nicky Best; Nina Iszatt; Martine Vrijheid; Mireille B. Toledano

409

Powder River Basin coalbed methane: The USGS role in investigating this ultimate clean coal by-product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past few decades, the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin has supplied the Nation with comparatively clean low ash and low sulfur coal. However, within the past few years, coalbed methane from the same Fort Union coal has become an important energy by-product. The recently completed US Geological Survey coal resource assessment of the Fort Union coal beds and zones in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains (Fort Union Coal Assessment Team, 1999) has added useful information to coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin has rapidly accelerated in the past three years. During this time more than 800 wells have been drilled and recent operator forecasts projected more than 5,000 additional wells to be drilled over the next few years. Development of shallow (less than 1,000 ft. deep) Fort Union coal-bed methane is confined to Campbell and Sheridan Counties, Wyoming, and Big Horn County, Montana. The purpose of this paper is to report on the US Geological Survey's role on a cooperative coalbed methane project with the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Wyoming Reservoir Management Group and several gas operators. This paper will also discuss the methodology that the USGS and the BLM will be utilizing for analysis and evaluation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Powder River Basin. The USGS and BLM need additional information of coalbed methane reservoirs to accomplish their respective resource evaluation and management missions.

Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Ochs, A.M.; Stanton, R.W.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary environmental risk assessment on the FGD by-products to be placed underground is virtually complete. The initial mixes for pneumatic and hydraulic placement have been selected and are being subject to TCLP, ASTM, and modified SLP shake tests as well as ASTM column leaching. Results of these analyses show that the individual coal combustion residues, and the residues mixes, are non-hazardous in character. Based on available information, including well logs obtained from Peabody Coal Company, a detailed study of the geology of the placement site was completed. The study shows that the disposal site in the abandoned underground mine workings at depths of between 325 and 375 feet are well below potable groundwater resources. This, coupled with the benign nature of the residues and residues mixtures, should alleviate any concern that the underground placement will have adverse effects on groundwater resources. Seven convergence stations were installed in the proposed underground placement area of the Peabody Coal Company No. 10 mine. Several sets of convergence data were obtained from the stations. A study of materials handling and transportation of coal combustion residues from the electric power plant to the injection site has been made. The study evaluated the economics of the transportation of coal combustion residues by pneumatic trucks, by pressure differential rail cars, and by SEEC, Inc. collapsible intermodal containers (CICs) for different annual handling rates and transport distances. The preliminary physico-chemical characteristics and engineering properties of various FBC fly ash-spent bed mixes have been determined, and long-term studies of these properties are continuing.

Chugh, Y.P.; Dutta, D.; Esling, S.; Ghafoori, N.; Paul, B.; Sevim, H.; Thomasson, E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, February--May 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focused upon the laboratory treatment of six wastes with three by-products and the evaluation of the stability of the resulting eighteen materials. Other efforts during the third quarter have been directed toward completion of the collection and analysis of by-products, the identification of a suitable fourth by-product, and the definition of the approach to the solidification tests. The activity on the project during the third quarter of Phase One has fallen into three major areas: acquiring and analyzing by-products; treating hazardous wastes with by-products in the laboratory and analyzing the results; and conducting administrative activities, including public relations and personnel additions. The hazardous wastes that are used include industrial wastewater treatment residue from battery manufacturing plant; contaminated soil from a remediation project conducted at a munitions depot; contaminated soil from a remediation project conducted at an abandoned industrial site; contaminated soil from a remediation project conducted at a former sewage treatment plant; air pollution control dust from basic oxygen furnace steel production; and air pollution control ash from municipal waste incineration.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, November 1994--February 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This second quarterly report describes work during the second three months of the University of Pittsburgh`s (Pitt`s) project on the {open_quotes}Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.{close_quotes} Participating with Pitt on this project are Dravo Lime Company (DLC), Mill Service, Inc. (MSI) and the Center for Hazardous Materials Research (CHMR). The report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focussed upon the acquisition of by-product samples and their initial analysis. Other efforts during the second quarter have been directed toward identifying the first hazardous waste samples and preparing for their treatment and analysis. Relatively little data has yet been collected. Major presentation of technical details and data will appear for the first time in the third quarterly report. The activity on the project during the second quarter of Phase One, as presented in the following sections, has fallen into seven areas: (1) Acquiring by-products, (2) Analyzing by-products, (3) Identifying, analyzing and treating suitable hazardous wastes, (4) Carrying out the quality assurance/quality control program, (5) Developing background, and (6) Initiating public relations

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Modification of the EIC hydrogen sulfide abatement process to produce valuable by-products. Final report, May 4, 1981-May 4, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program of analytical and experimental studies has been carried out to develop modifications of the CUPROSUL process for the desulfurization of geothermal steam. The objective of the program was to devise practical means to manipulate the chemistry of the process so that the consumption of raw materials could be controlled and a variety of valuable by-products could be produced. The process had been demonstrated, at one-tenth commercial scale, for steam of the Geysers' average composition in a configuration which resulted in essentially complete oxidation of sulfide to sulfate. The ability to control the extent of oxidation would increase process flexibility and extend its range of applicability to steams of widely varying composition. Preliminary market surveys of raw materials required for the process and by-products which could be produced indicated that controlling the oxidation of sulfides to produce elemental sulfur would probably be the preferred process option. Use of lime to treat sulfate-containing purge streams to produce by-product gypsum and ammonia for recycle or sale could also be justified for certain steam compositions. Recovery of ammonium sulfate alone from the purge stream would not normally be justified unless corecovery of other valuable by-products, such as boric acid, was possible at incremental cost. It was found that ferric sulfate was a highly effective, selective oxidant for the controlled oxidation of copper sulfide solids to produce elemental sulfur for sale and copper sulfate for recycle.

Offenhartz, P. O'D.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

High volume - high value usage of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amount of dry FGD materials produced in the U.S. has not been increasing at the high rate originally anticipated. This has been due to a number of economic factors affecting the utility industry. Technologies for the disposal of large amounts of materials are not going to be implemented in the near term. In light of this development the target application for this project is being changed from highwall adit filling to the filling of auger holes to allow for highwall mining. This application focuses on using the dry FGD material to recover coal isolated by excessive augering. It produces 10 or more times the amount of coal per ton of dry FGD utilized than the originally proposed methodology. It also does not require extensive equipment development and, if applied to abandoned mine lands, may have substantially more significant environmental benefit. We also propose to use a spray dryer material for the demonstration instead of the fluidized bed material originally proposed. The spray dryer material is already slacked eliminating problems associated with heat generation at the mine site. Auger hole grouting with FGD material is also best performed by hydraulic emplacement methods.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Technical support for the Ohio Clean Coal Technology Program. Volume 2, Baseline of knowledge concerning process modification opportunities, research needs, by-product market potential, and regulatory requirements: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LR1 and comprises two volumes. Volume 1 presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume 2 consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1989-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

416

Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, September 1995--December 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fifth quarterly report describes work done during the fifth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh`s project on the {open_quotes}Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.{close_quotes} Participating with the university on this project is Mill Service, Inc. This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focussed upon completing laboratory evaluation of samples produced during Phase 1, preparing reports and presentations, and seeking environmental approvals and variances to permits that will allow the field work to proceed. The compressive strength of prepared concretes is described.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

The BosTon College STOKES HALL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's enduring commit- ment to the liberal arts," said Col- lege of Arts & Sciences Dean Da- vid Quigley. "The David Quigley September 30, 2010 Publi

Huang, Jianyu

418

Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quarterly report, May 1995--August 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fourth quarterly report describes work done during the fourth three-month period of the University of Pittsburgh`s project on the {open_quotes}Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.{close_quote} Participating with the university on this project are Dravo Lime Company, Mill Service, Inc., and the Center for Hazardous Materials Research. This report describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. The principal work has focussed upon the production of six sets of samples with high water content for solidification testing and the mixing of five dry samples for solidification testing by the Proctor method. Twenty-eight day compressive strengths are reported for five of the six sets of samples with high water content. The report also discusses completion of the format of the database and the inclusion in it of all data collected to date. Special reports presented during the quarter include the Continuation Application, a News Release, and modification to the Test Plan. Work is progressing on the NEPA report and the Topical Report. The activity on the project during the fourth quarter of Phase one, as presented in the following sections, has fallen into six major areas: (1) Completion of by-product evaluations, (2) Completion of analyses of six wastes, (3) Initiation of eleven solidification tests, (4) Continued extraction and extract analysis of solidified samples, (5) Development of the database, and (6) Production of reports.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

By By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

229 1994)." CLSM is primarily used for nonstructural applications such as a backfill material foundations, or as a fill for abandoned tunnels, sewers, storage tanks, etc. Water permeation through CLSM can

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

420

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Synthesis, Volume 2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production of Mixed Alcohols Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Non-supersymmetric Microstates of the MSW System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analysis parallel to that of Giusto, Ross, and Saxena (arXiv:0708.3845) and construct a discrete family of non-supersymmetric microstate geometries of the Maldacena-Strominger-Witten system. The supergravity configuration in which we look for the smooth microstates is constructed using SO(4,4) dualities applied to an appropriate seed solution. The SO(4,4) approach offers certain technical advantages. Our microstate solutions are smooth in five dimensions, as opposed to all previously known non-supersymmetric microstates with AdS3 cores, which are smooth only in six dimensions. The decoupled geometries for our microstates are related to global AdS3 x S2 by spectral flows.

Souvik Banerjee; Borun D. Chowdhury; Bert Vercnocke; Amitabh Virmani

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

422

Mixed MSW and Vacuum Solutions of Solar Neutrino Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assuming three flavour neutrino mixing takes place in vacuum, we investigate the possibility that the solar $\

Qiu-Yu Liu

1997-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

423

The MSW effect in a fluctuating matter density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the effect on matter-enhanced neutrino flavor transformation of a randomly fluctuating, delta-correlated matter density. The fluctuations will produce a distribution of neutrino survival probabilities. We find the mean and variance of the distribution for the case of solar neutrinos, and discuss the possibility of placing a limit on solar density fluctuations using neutrino data.

A. B. Balantekin; J. M. Fetter; F. N. Loreti

1996-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

424

Non-supersymmetric Microstates of the MSW System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analysis parallel to that of Giusto, Ross, and Saxena (arXiv:0708.3845) and construct a discrete family of non-supersymmetric microstate geometries of the Maldacena-Strominger-Witten system. The supergravity configuration in which we look for the smooth microstates is constructed using SO(4,4) dualities applied to an appropriate seed solution. The SO(4,4) approach offers certain technical advantages. Our microstate solutions are smooth in five dimensions, as opposed to all previously known non-supersymmetric microstates with AdS3 cores, which are smooth only in six dimensions. The decoupled geometries for our microstates are related to global AdS3 x S2 by spectral flows.

Banerjee, Souvik; Vercnocke, Bert; Virmani, Amitabh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Emissions inventories for MSW landfills under Title V  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past, many states were either not concerned with, or unaware that, municipal solid waste landfills (MSWLFs) were potential sources of regulated air pollutants. This philosophy is rapidly changing, in part due to US EPA policy documents concerning (and defining) fugitive and non-fugitive emissions from MSWLFs, the attention given to the newly released New Source Performance Standards and a recent lawsuit that gained national notoriety involving landfill air emissions and air permitting applicability issues. Most states now recognize that MSWLFs are sources of regulated air pollutants and are subject to permitting requirements (and pollutant emission fees) as other industries; i.e., state-level minor- and major-source operating permit programs, and the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments Title V Operating Permits Program (Title V).

Vogt, W.G. [SCS Engineers, Reston, VA (United States); Peyser, T.R. [SCS Engineers, Birmingham, AL (United States); Hamilton, S.M. [SCS Engineers, Tampa, FL (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Mark A. Newbrough, MD Hanna Thurman, MSW, LGSW, MPA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

endorsement inferred by the HRSA, DHHR, or U. S. Government. 1 #12;"World's oldest woman had normal brain an essentially normal brain, with little or no evidence of Alzheimer's disease, according to a study -amyloid plaques Tau protein deposition in neurofibrillary tangles Biomarkers Biomarkers of brain

Mohaghegh, Shahab

427

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 1:  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't32Department ofMoving AwayAvailability of Feedstock and

428

Treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with advanced clean coal technology by-products. Quartery report, August 1994--November 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This first quarterly report describes work during the first three months of the University of Pittsburgh`s (Pitt`s) project on the {open_quotes}Treatment of Metal-Laden Hazardous Wastes with Advanced Clean Coal Technology By-Products.{close_quotes} Participating with Pitt on this project are Dravo Lime Company (DLC), Mill Service, Inc. (MSO and the Center for Hazardous Materials Research (CHMR)). The report states the goals of the project - both general and specific - and then describes the activities of the project team during the reporting period. All of this work has been organizational and developmental in nature. No data has yet been collected. Technical details and data will appear for the first time in the second quarterly report and be the major topic of subsequent reports.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Performance Evaluation of a 4.5 kW (1.3 Refrigeration Tons) Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide/Water Solar Powered (Hot-Water-Fired) Absorption Unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the summer months, air-conditioning (cooling) is the single largest use of electricity in both residential and commercial buildings with the major impact on peak electric demand. Improved air-conditioning technology has by far the greatest potential impact on the electric industry compared to any other technology that uses electricity. Thermally activated absorption air-conditioning (absorption chillers) can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. This innovative absorption technology is based on integrated rotating heat exchangers to enhance heat and mass transfer resulting in a potential reduction of size, cost, and weight of the "next generation" absorption units. Rotartica Absorption Chiller (RAC) is a 4.5 kW (1.3 refrigeration tons or RT) air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)/water unit powered by hot water generated using the solar energy and/or waste heat. Typically LiBr/water absorption chillers are water-cooled units which use a cooling tower to reject heat. Cooling towers require a large amount of space, increase start-up and maintenance costs. However, RAC is an air-cooled absorption chiller (no cooling tower). The purpose of this evaluation is to verify RAC performance by comparing the Coefficient of Performance (COP or ratio of cooling capacity to energy input) and the cooling capacity results with those of the manufacturer. The performance of the RAC was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a controlled environment at various hot and chilled water flow rates, air handler flow rates, and ambient temperatures. Temperature probes, mass flow meters, rotational speed measuring device, pressure transducers, and a web camera mounted inside the unit were used to monitor the RAC via a web control-based data acquisition system using Automated Logic Controller (ALC). Results showed a COP and cooling capacity of approximately 0.58 and 3.7 kW respectively at 35 C (95 F) design condition for ambient temperature with 40 C (104 F) cooling water temperature. This is in close agreement with the manufacturer data of 0.60 for COP and 3.9 kW for cooling capacity. This study resulted in a complete performance map of RAC which will be used to evaluate the potential benefits of rotating heat exchangers in making the "next-generation" absorption chillers more compact and cost effective without any significant degradation in the performance. In addition, the feasibility of using rotating heat exchangers in other applications will be evaluated.

Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL; Linkous, Randall Lee [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Use of Xenon Difluoride to Clean Hazardous By-Products in Ion Implanter Source Housings, Turbo Pumps, and Fore-Lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of xenon difluoride to clean deposits in the source housing, source turbo pump, and source turbo pump fore-line of ion implanters. Xenon difluoride has previously been shown to be effective in increasing the lifetime of the ion source{sup 1,2} and this paper presents an extension of the technology to other areas within the tool. Process by-products that are deposited in the source housing, turbo pump, and turbo pump fore-line can not only pose productivity issues, in the case of coatings on insulators, but can also be flammable and toxic in the case of deposits formed within the turbo pump and fore-line. The results presented in this paper detail the initial successful examples of using xenon difluoride to clean these deposits.ATMI has shown that xenon difluoride is capable of cleaning an insulator in an ion implanter. Typically during use an insulator will become increasingly coated with deposits that could lead to productivity problems. By introducing xenon difluoride into the source housing the insulator residues were effectively cleaned in-situ, thereby extending the maintenance interval and resulting in significant consumable savings.Similar deposits that form in the turbo pump and fore-line could not only lead to production problems due to turbo pump failure or fore-line build-up, but pose significant health risks during the ex-situ cleaning process. Through internal testing ATMI has shown that xenon difluoride is able to clean phosphorus and germanium deposits located within a turbo pump. Additionally, testing has demonstrated that the turbo pump fore-line can be cleaned in-situ without the need to remove these components, thereby virtually eliminating the possibility of fires. The cleaning reaction progress and by-products were monitored using FTIR spectrometry and thermocouples.In order to efficiently clean the source housing, turbo pump, and turbo pump fore-line xenon difluoride delivery must be optimized. This paper also details a hardware concept that maximizes xenon difluoride delivery and allows the clean to be done in a way that is viable for production ion implanters.

Despres, J.; Chambers, B.; Bishop, S.; Kaim, R.; Letaj, S.; Sergi, S.; Sweeney, J.; Tang, Y.; Wilson, S.; Yedave, S. [ATMI, 7 Commerce Drive, Danbury, CT, 06810 (United States)

2011-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

431

Municipal solid waste management: A bibliography of US Department of Energy contractor report through 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy contractors continue to conduct research targeting the productive and responsible use of the more than 516,000 metric tons (567,000 tons) of municipal solid waste (MSW) that is generated each day in the United States. It is becoming more and more prudent to improve current methods of MSW management and to continue to search for additional cost-effective, energy-efficient means to manage our MSW resource. This bibliography provides information about technical reports on energy from municipal waste that were prepared under grants or contracts from the US DOE. The reports listed focus on energy from municipal waste technologies and energy conservation in wastewater treatment.

None

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines - Phase I: Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project proposes to use pneumatically or hydraulically emplaced dry-flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products to backfill the adits left by highwall mining. Backfilling highwall mine adits with dry-FGD materials is technically attractive. The use of an active highwall mine would allow the dry-FGD material to be brought in using the same transportation network used to move the coal out, eliminating the need to recreated the transportation infrastructure, thereby saving costs. Activities during the period included the negotiations leading to the final cooperative agreement for the project and the implementation of the necessary instruments at the University of Kentucky to administer the project. Early in the negotiations, a final agreement on a task structure was reached and a milestone plan was filed. A review was initiated of the original laboratory plan as presented in the proposal, and tentative modifications were developed. Selection of a mine site was made early; the Pleasant Valley mine in Greenup County was chosen. Several visits were made to the mine site to begin work on the hydrologic monitoring plan. The investigation of the types of permits needed to conduct the project was initiated. Considerations concerning the acceptance and implementation of technologies led to the choice of circulating fluidized bed ash as the primary material for the study. Finally, the membership of a Technical Advisory Committee for the study was assembled.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Internal and External Radioactive Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 3 Internal and External Radioactive Backgrounds New physics is often discovered by pushing energies. With the current large mixing angle-MSW oscillation parameters, Borexino expects to observe 0.35 neutrino events per day per ton from 7Be in the energy window. Because there are so few events

434

Dioxin/furans and Air Pollution Control Dioxins and furans are chlorinated compounds produced during all  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dioxin/furans and Air Pollution Control Dioxins and furans are chlorinated compounds produced baghouse. As a result of the new controls, the dioxin/furan emissions of WTE plants in the U (28 million tons of MSW combusted) emit less than six grams TEQ dioxins per year. In comparison

435

Environmental analysis of biomass-ethanol facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report analyzes the environmental regulatory requirements for several process configurations of a biomass-to-ethanol facility. It also evaluates the impact of two feedstocks (municipal solid waste [MSW] and agricultural residues) and three facility sizes (1000, 2000, and 3000 dry tons per day [dtpd]) on the environmental requirements. The basic biomass ethanol process has five major steps: (1) Milling, (2) Pretreatment, (3) Cofermentation, (4) Enzyme production, (5) Product recovery. Each step could have environmental impacts and thus be subject to regulation. Facilities that process 2000 dtpd of MSW or agricultural residues would produce 69 and 79 million gallons of ethanol, respectively.

Corbus, D.; Putsche, V.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Alternative approaches for better municipal solid waste management in Mumbai, India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste is an unavoidable by product of human activities. Economic development, urbanization and improving living standards in cities, have led to an increase in the quantity and complexity of generated waste. Rapid growth of population and industrialization degrades the urban environment and places serious stress on natural resources, which undermines equitable and sustainable development. Inefficient management and disposal of solid waste is an obvious cause of degradation of the environment in most cities of the developing world. Municipal corporations of the developing countries are not able to handle increasing quantities of waste, which results in uncollected waste on roads and in other public places. There is a need to work towards a sustainable waste management system, which requires environmental, institutional, financial, economic and social sustainability. This study explores alternative approaches to municipal solid waste (MSW) management and estimates the cost of waste management in Mumbai, India. Two alternatives considered in the paper are community participation and public private partnership in waste management. Data for the present study are from various non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and from the private sector involved in waste management in Mumbai. Mathematical models are used to estimate the cost per ton of waste management for both of the alternatives, which are compared with the cost of waste management by Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai (MCGM). It is found that the cost per ton of waste management is Rs. 1518 (US$35) with community participation; Rs. 1797 (US$41) with public private partnership (PPP); and Rs. 1908 (US$44) when only MCGM handles the waste. Hence, community participation in waste management is the least cost option and there is a strong case for comprehensively involving community participation in waste management.

Rathi, Sarika [International Research Institute for Climate Prediction, Earth Institute, Columbia University, 61 Rt. 9W, Monell, Palisades, NY 10964 (United States)]. E-mail: sarika@iri.columbia.edu

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

River. ERDF receives contaminated soil, demolition debris, and solid waste from cleanup operations across the 586-square-mile Hanford Site in southeast Washington state. On...

438

OFFICE WASTE DATA 2010 Recyclable Materials 1680 tons / 62%  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is used to stabilise temperatures within conventional Energy from Waste incineration plants as well materials and to produce a combustible product. This involves the removal of inert and compostable materials

Guillas, Serge

439

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%; South Africa, 37%; China, 3%; Canada, 1%; and other, 2%. Zirconium, unwrought, including powder: France coatings, and sandblasting. The leading consumers of zirconium and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy Kingdom, 5%; and other, 9%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12-31-08 Zirconium ores

440

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sources (2002-05): Zirconium ores and concentrates: Australia, 57%; South Africa, 35%; China, 4%; Canada consumers of zirconium and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy and chemical process industries. Salient%; Japan, 4%; and other, 2%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12-31-06 Zirconium ores

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrates: South Africa, 52%; Australia, 43%; and other, 5%. Zirconium, unwrought, including powder: Japan. The leading consumers of zirconium metal and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy and chemical process, 58%; Australia, 24%; Germany, 11%; other, 7%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12

442

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%; South Africa, 46%; China, 3%; Russia, 1%; and other, 1%. Zirconium, unwrought, including powder: France coatings, and sandblasting. The leading consumers of zirconium and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy, 21%; Canada, 8%; United Kingdom, 6%; and other, 5%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12

443

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was insignificant. Import Sources (2008­11): Zirconium mineral concentrates: Australia, 52%; South Africa, 42. The leading consumers of zirconium metal and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy and chemical process: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12­31­12 Zirconium ores and concentrates 2615.10.0000 Free

444

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrates: Australia, 49%; South Africa, 44%; and other, 7%. Zirconium, unwrought, including powder: Germany. The leading consumers of zirconium metal and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy and chemical process, 17%; United Kingdom, 5%; and other, 9%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12-31-11 Zirconium

445

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%; South Africa, 32%; China, 4%; Canada, 2%; and other, 1%. Zirconium, unwrought, including powder: France coatings, and sandblasting. The leading consumers of zirconium and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy, 2%; Austria, 1%; and other, 1%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12-31-07 Zirconium ores

446

Coolerado 5 Ton RTU Performance: Western Cooling Challenge Results (Revised)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Cooling Efficiency Center (WCEC) developed a set of criteria for test conditions, minimum energy, and water use performance for prototype cooling equipment and identified these conditions as indicative of western state climates.

Kozubal, E.; Slayzak, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

(Data in metric tons of silver content unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

odor, electronics and circuit boards, electroplating, hardening bearings, inks, mirrors, solar cells,250 1,250 1,280 Refinery: Primary 2,210 791 779 796 800 Secondary (new and old scrap) 1,110 1,220 1

448

Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and hundreds of support structures. McCormick and Washington Closure President Carol Johnson praised a large group of Hanford workers. "We have an exceptional workforce committed...

449

150 g-ton Capacity Centrifuge Renssealer Polytechnic Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comprised of periodic, aperiodic, random, or scaled earthquake signals. The large 1D shaker is a servo, the adjacent cyclic soils, laboratory and computers for small soil sample, soil characterization to the study of the effects of liquefaction during lateral spreading near pile foundation. #12;NEES

Salama, Khaled

450

The BosTon College Chronicle summer 2009 edition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

halls to enable BC to meet 100 percent of demand for undergraduate hous- ing. In addition provided advice and sup- port during the various phases of the IMP process," said University President of time, energy and resources will result in a stronger Boston College and an enhanced neighborhood." Jack

Huang, Jianyu

451

Linear Extrusion 400 Tons/Day Dry Solids Pump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept that uses rocket engine experience to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to current state-of-the-art systems. The PWR gasifier concept uses a compact and highly efficient (>50%) dry solids pump that has excellent availability (>99.5%). PWR is currently developing this dry solids pump under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative agreement. The conceptual design on two dry solids pumps were completed under this agreement and one pump concept was selected for preliminary design. A preliminary design review (PDR) of the selected pump was presented on September 20, 2007 to PWR management and numerous technical specialists. Feedback from the PDR review team has been factored into the design and a Delta-PDR was held on April 9, 2008.

Kenneth Sprouse; David Matthews

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

452

WithcoteWistow Skef'tonSomerbyStap'ford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rocklands House OldCourt The Coppice Spinneys Howard House Ashcroft House John Foster Facilities Building

Jensen, Max

453

Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013 many autoThis road mapF ReactorJohn

454

Energy Department Employee Recognized for Eliminating One Million Tons of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -Department ofto Cellulosic Bioenergy |EnergyDevelopment |Irene

455

14,700 tons of silver at Y-12  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience hands-on halloweenReliable solar:210th

456

Energy Department Sponsored Project Captures One Millionth Metric Ton of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia Nanoparticles asSecondCareer Awards | U.S. DOE Office ofCO2 |

457

Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | June 24, 2014: Massive 30-ton  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial ThinFORFALLSubscriptioncomplete theat

458

Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealing WithDevelopment ofNoPreparesReport | Department

459

First real time detection of Be7 solar neutrinos by Borexino  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper reports a direct measurement of the Be7 solar neutrino signal rate performed with the Borexino low background liquid scintillator detector. This is the first real-time spectral measurement of sub-MeV solar neutrinos. The result for 0.862 MeV Be7 is 47 +- 7 (stat} +- 12 (sys} counts/(day x 100 ton), consistent with predictions of Standard Solar Models and neutrino oscillations with LMA-MSW parameters.

Borexino Collaboration

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

460

82370 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 250 / Thursday, December 30, 2010 / Proposed Rules (2) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

under the federal Clean Air Act for the first time after January 2, 2011. [FR Doc. 2010­32785 Filed 12­29­10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6560­50­P ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 [EPA­R04­OAR­2010 tons per day of municipal solid waste (MSW). See 40 CFR part 60, subpart Cb. In the Final Rules section

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Two (2) 175 Ton (350 Tons total) Chiller Geothermal Heat Pumps for recently commissioned LEED Platinum Building  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This project will operate; collect data; and market the energy savings and capital costs of a recently commissioned chiller geothermal heat pump project to promote the wide-spread adoption of this mature technology.

462

E-Print Network 3.0 - asian livestock production Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

production but will produce millions of tons of by-products that can be fed... Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels......

463

Neutrino condensates at center of galaxies as background for the MSW mechanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The possibility is explored that neutrino condensates, possible candidates for the explanation of very massive objects in galactic centers, could act as background for the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfeinstein mechanism responsible of neutrino oscillations. Assuming a simple neutrino star model with constant density, the lower limit of the mass squared difference of neutrino oscillations is inferred. Consequences on neutrino asymmetry are discussed.

S. Capozziello; G. Iovane; G. Lambiase

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Combining collective, MSW, and turbulence effects in supernova neutrino flavor evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Abridged) In order to decode the neutrino burst signal from a Galactic core-collapse supernova and reveal the complicated inner workings of the explosion we need a thorough understanding of the neutrino flavor evolution from the proto-neutron star outwards. The flavor content of the signal evolves due to both neutrino collective effects and matter effects which can lead to a highly interesting interplay and distinctive spectral features. In this paper we investigate the supernova neutrino flavor evolution in three different progenitors and include collective flavor effects, the evolution of the Mikheyev, Smirnov & Wolfenstein conversion due to the shock wave passage through the star, and the impact of turbulence. In the Oxygen-Neon-Magnesium supernova we find that the impact of turbulence is both brief and slight during a window of 1-2 seconds post bounce. Thus the spectral features of collective and shock effects in the neutrino signals from ONeMg supernovae may be almost turbulence free making them the...

Lund, Tina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Mary Elizabeth Dillon, MSW, Ed.D. 5801 N. Atlantic Avenue Unit 710  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Practice and the Addictions: Alcohol and other Drugs PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 2010-2011 Faculty Liaison OU: Evaluate the AC-OK-Co-Occurring Disorder Screen in a Primary Health Care Practice Setting. 2004 Education. 1995-1999 Member of New Horizons Community Mental Health Center's Family Service Treatment Plan

Wu, Shin-Tson

466

The effect of very low energy solar neutrinos on the MSW mechanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study some implications on standard matter oscillations of solar neutrinos induced by a background of extremely low energy thermal neutrinos trapped inside the Sun by means of coherent refractive interactions. Possible experimental tests are envisaged and current data on solar neutrinos detected at Earth are briefly discussed.

S. Esposito

2003-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

467

Metal recovery from fly ash generated from vitrification process for MSW ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal-bearing wastes have to be carefully treated because heavy metals could be leached out under uncontrolled conditions when disposed of in a landfill. Consequently, heavy metals should be principally recovered and recycled forever. From this standpoint, the author has been trying to develop a technology to recover heavy metals from toxic vitrification fly ash for recycling to smelters. After a number of laboratory-scale experiments, pilot plant tests were successfully carried out and the developed process has been proven to be commercially realized. The main features of the process are that it recovers almost 100% of the heavy metals, simultaneously separating the metals which are recovered in a lead smelter from those in a zinc smelter, and that the output of the process are only metallurgical products recyclable for smelters and the effluent water which can be released into the environment. The process is considered an ideal one for the treatment of toxic fly ash from the viewpoint of not only natural resources but also environmental conservation.

Izumikawa, Chiaki [Dowa Mining Co. Ltd., Chiyoda, Tokyo (Japan)] [Dowa Mining Co. Ltd., Chiyoda, Tokyo (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

468

The use of LCA in selecting the best MSW management system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the study of eleven environmental impact categories produced by several municipal solid waste management systems (scenarios) operating on a provincial scale in Southern Italy. In particular, the analysis takes into account 12 management scenarios with 16 management phases for each one. The only difference among ten of the scenarios (separated kerbside collection of all recyclables, glass excepted, composting of putrescibles, RDF pressed bales production and incineration, final landfilling) is the percentage of separated collection varying in the range of 35-80%, while the other two scenarios, for 80% of separate collection, consider different alternatives in the disposal of treatment residues (dry residue sorting and final landfilling or direct disposal in landfill). The potential impacts induced on the environmental components were analysed using the life cycle assessment (LCA) procedure called 'WISARD' (Waste Integrated System Assessment for Recovery and Disposal). Paper recycling was the phase with the greatest influence on avoided impacts, while the collection logistics of dry residue was the phase with the greatest influence on produced impacts. For six impact categories (renewable and total energy use, water, suspended solids and oxydable matters index, eutrophication and hazardous waste production), for high percentages of separate collection a management system based on recovery and recycling but without incineration would be preferable.

Feo, Giovanni De [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Salerno, via Ponte don Melillo 1, 84084 Fisciano (Italy)], E-mail: g.defeo@unisa.it; Malvano, Carmela [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Salerno, via Ponte don Melillo 1, 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

The environmental comparison of landfilling vs. incineration of MSW accounting for waste diversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residential waste diversion initiatives are more successful with organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using a incineration to manage part of the waste is better environmentally. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incineration leads to more power plant emission offsets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Landfilling all of the waste would be preferred financially. - Abstract: This study evaluates the environmental performance and discounted costs of the incineration and landfilling of municipal solid waste that is ready for the final disposal while accounting for existing waste diversion initiatives, using the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. Parameters such as changing waste generation quantities, diversion rates and waste composition were also considered. Two scenarios were assessed in this study on how to treat the waste that remains after diversion. The first scenario is the status quo, where the entire residual waste was landfilled whereas in the second scenario approximately 50% of the residual waste was incinerated while the remainder is landfilled. Electricity was produced in each scenario. Data from the City of Toronto was used to undertake this study. Results showed that the waste diversion initiatives were more effective in reducing the organic portion of the waste, in turn, reducing the net electricity production of the landfill while increasing the net electricity production of the incinerator. Therefore, the scenario that incorporated incineration performed better environmentally and contributed overall to a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions because of the displacement of power plant emissions; however, at a noticeably higher cost. Although landfilling proves to be the better financial option, it is for the shorter term. The landfill option would require the need of a replacement landfill much sooner. The financial and environmental effects of this expenditure have yet to be considered.

Assamoi, Bernadette [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E5 (Canada); Lawryshyn, Yuri, E-mail: yuri.lawryshyn@utoronto.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E5 (Canada)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

Formation of deposits on the surfaces of superheaters and economisers of MSW incinerator plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composition of deposits depends on the temperature profile and boiler geometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mineralogy of deposits defines critical and uncritical zones in the boiler. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical zones in boilers can be characterised by a classification systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific measures to enhance energy efficiency can be defined. - Abstract: Mineralogical and chemical investigations of deposits from superheaters and economisers from a MSWI plant in Mannheim, Germany, lead to a classification system which provides information about the most critical parameters leading to fouling and corrosion. With the help of this classification system parameters like the geometry of boilers and the waste input can be changed in order to prolong run times between revisions and enhance energy efficiency of MSWI plants.

Reichelt, J. [IBR, Obergrombacher Strasse 29, D-76646 Bruchsal (Germany); Pfrang-Stotz, G., E-mail: Gudrun.Pfrang-Stotz@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), ITC, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bergfeldt, B.; Seifert, H. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), ITC, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Knapp, P. [MVV O and M GmbH, Muellheizkraftwerk Mannheim, Otto-Hahn-Strasse 1, D-68169 Mannheim (Germany)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

471

Mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash from a MSW fluidized-bed incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an investigation of the mineralogy and pore water chemistry of a boiler ash sampled from a municipal solid waste fluidized-bed incinerator, subject to 18 months of dynamic leaching in a large percolation column experiment. A particular focus is on the redox behaviour of Cr(VI) in relation to metal aluminium Al{sup 0}, as chromium may represent an environmental or health hazard. The leaching behaviour and interaction between Cr(VI) and Al{sup 0} are interpreted on the basis of mineralogical evolutions observed over the 18-month period and of saturation indices calculated with the geochemical code PhreeqC and reviewed thermodynamic data. Results of mineralogical analyses show in particular the alteration of mineral phases during leaching (e.g. quartz and metal aluminium grains), while geochemical calculations suggest equilibria of percolating fluids with respect to specific mineral phases (e.g. monohydrocalcite and aluminium hydroxide). The combination of leaching data on a large scale and mineralogical analyses document the coupled leaching behaviour of aluminium and chromium, with chromium appearing in the pore fluids in its hexavalent and mobile state once metal aluminium is no longer available for chromium reduction.

Bodenan, F., E-mail: f.bodenan@brgm.f [BRGM - French Geological Survey, Environment and Processes Division, BP 36009, 3 Av. C. Guillemin, 45060 Orleans Cedex (France); Guyonnet, D.; Piantone, P.; Blanc, P. [BRGM - French Geological Survey, Environment and Processes Division, BP 36009, 3 Av. C. Guillemin, 45060 Orleans Cedex (France)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 2: A  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't32Department ofMoving AwayAvailability of Feedstock

473

Municipal solid waste management: A bibliography of US Department of Energy contractor reports through 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US Department of Energy contractors continue to conduct research targeting the productive and responsible use of the more than 536,000 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) that is generated each day in the United States. It is becoming more and more prudent to improve current methods of MSW management and to continue to search for additional cost-effective, energy-efficient means to manage our MSW resource. This bibliography is an updated version of Municipal Waste to Energy: An Annotated Bibliography of US Department of Energy Contractor Reports, by Caroline Brooks, published in 1987. Like its predecessor, this bibliography provides information about technical reports on energy from municipal waste that were prepared under grants or contracts from the US Department of Energy. The reports listed focus on energy from municipal waste technologies and energy conservation in wastewater treatment. The bibliography contains three indexes -- an author index, a subject index, and a title index. The reports are listed alphabetically in the subject areas and may appear under more than one subject. All of the reports cited in the original MSW bibliography are also included in this update. The number of copies of each report originally published varied according to anticipated public demand. However, all reports are available in either microfiche or hard copy form and may be ordered from the National Technical Information Service (NTIS), US Department of Commerce, Springfield, VA 22161. Explicit information on ordering reports is included in Appendix A.

Shepherd, P.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Life cycle assessment of solid waste management options for Eskisehir, Turkey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology was used to determine the optimum municipal solid waste (MSW) management strategy for Eskisehir city. Eskisehir is one of the developing cities of Turkey where a total of approximately 750 tons/day of waste is generated. An effective MSW management system is needed in this city since the generated MSW is dumped in an unregulated dumping site that has no liner, no biogas capture, etc. Therefore, five different scenarios were developed as alternatives to the current waste management system. Collection and transportation of waste, a material recovery facility (MRF), recycling, composting, incineration and landfilling processes were considered in these scenarios. SimaPro7 libraries were used to obtain background data for the life cycle inventory. One ton of municipal solid waste of Eskisehir was selected as the functional unit. The alternative scenarios were compared through the CML 2000 method and these comparisons were carried out from the abiotic depletion, global warming, human toxicity, acidification, eutrophication and photochemical ozone depletion points of view. According to the comparisons and sensitivity analysis, composting scenario, S3, is the more environmentally preferable alternative. In this study waste management alternatives were investigated only on an environmental point of view. For that reason, it might be supported with other decision-making tools that consider the economic and social effects of solid waste management.

Banar, Mufide [Anadolu University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Environmental Engineering, Iki Eylul Campus, 26555 Eskisehir (Turkey)], E-mail: mbanar@anadolu.edu.tr; Cokaygil, Zerrin; Ozkan, Aysun [Anadolu University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Environmental Engineering, Iki Eylul Campus, 26555 Eskisehir (Turkey)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

475

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 5, Appendix C, Fluidized-bed combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix provides information on fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) technology as it has been applied to municipal waste combustion (MWC). A review of the literature was conducted to determine: (1) to what extent FBC technology has been applied to MWC, in terms of number and size of units was well as technology configuration; (2) the operating history of facilities employing FBC technology; and (3) the cost of these facilities as compared to conventional MSW installations. Where available in the literature, data on operating and performance characteristics are presented. Tabular comparisons of facility operating/cost data and emissions data have been complied and are presented. The literature review shows that FBC technology shows considerable promise in terms of providing improvements over conventional technology in areas such as NOx and acid gas control, and ash leachability. In addition, the most likely configuration to be applied to the first large scale FBC dedicated to municipal solid waste (MSW) will employ circulating bed (CFB) technology. Projected capital costs for the Robbins, Illinois 1600 ton per day CFB-based waste-to-energy facility are competitive with conventional systems, in the range of $125,000 per ton per day of MSW receiving capacity.

none,

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix provides information on fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) technology as it has been applied to municipal waste combustion (MWC). A review of the literature was conducted to determine: (1) to what extent FBC technology has been applied to MWC, in terms of number and size of units was well as technology configuration; (2) the operating history of facilities employing FBC technology; and (3) the cost of these facilities as compared to conventional MSW installations. Where available in the literature, data on operating and performance characteristics are presented. Tabular comparisons of facility operating/cost data and emissions data have been complied and are presented. The literature review shows that FBC technology shows considerable promise in terms of providing improvements over conventional technology in areas such as NOx and acid gas control, and ash leachability. In addition, the most likely configuration to be applied to the first large scale FBC dedicated to municipal solid waste (MSW) will employ circulating bed (CFB) technology. Projected capital costs for the Robbins, Illinois 1600 ton per day CFB-based waste-to-energy facility are competitive with conventional systems, in the range of $125,000 per ton per day of MSW receiving capacity.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Wheat Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the most important reasons why wheat paper is more sustainable than 30% recycled paper. The total carbon to Tons Conversion 11 Equation 3: Price of Paper per Ton 12 #12;5 GLOSSARY by-product - A product made, soils, ocean, or underground in depleted oil and gas reservoirs, coal seams and saline aquifers. minimum

478

Oil palm vegetation liquor: a new source of phenolic bioactives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waste from agricultural products represents a disposal liability, which needs to be addressed. Palm oil is the most widely traded edible oil globally, and its production generates 85 million tons of aqueous by-products ...

Sambandan, T. G.

479

The Composition of Peanuts and Peanut By-Products.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................... Hi A. BREIHAN, Bartlett Term expjres 1923 .......................... F. M. LAW, Houston exp~res 1923 MAIN STATION COMMITTEE L. J. HAR;~, Chairman WILL A. MILLER, JR. .GOVERNING BOARD, STATE SUBSTATIONS.... FULLER, M. S., Chief JAMES SULLIVAN. Executtrfe Secretary J. H. ROGERS. Tnspertnr W. H. WOOD. Tns~ector W. M. WICKAS, Inspertor W. F. CHRISTIAN, Inspecfor SUBSTATION NO. 1: Becville, Ree'Couniy I. E. COWART. M. S.. Superinfcndent SUBSTATION NO. 2...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1917-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Chemical production from industrial by-product gases: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for conservation of natural gas is studied and the technical and economic feasibility and the implementation of ventures to produce such chemicals using carbon monoxide and hydrogen from byproduct gases are determined. A survey was performed of potential chemical products and byproduct gas sources. Byproduct gases from the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries were selected for detailed study. Gas sampling, preliminary design, market surveys, and economic analyses were performed for specific sources in the selected industries. The study showed that production of methanol or ammonia from byproduct gas at the sites studied in the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries is technically feasible but not economically viable under current conditions. Several other applications are identified as having the potential for better economics. The survey performed identified a need for an improved method of recovering carbon monoxide from dilute gases. A modest experimental program was directed toward the development of a permselective membrane to fulfill that need. A practical membrane was not developed but further investigation along the same lines is recommended. (MCW)

Lyke, S.E.; Moore, R.H.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Oxidation kinetics of by-product calcium sulfite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constant and order of reaction for calcium sulfite oxidation using succinic acid as an additive 6. Corrosion behavior of metals and alloys in contact with sulfuric and acetic acid . 7. Maximum operating temperature for lining material . . . 8. Costs... of sodium thiosulfate required to inhibit the oxidation was very sma11 The second mechanism suggests that the thiosulfate reacts with the metal ions which were considered to catalyze the sulfite oxidation. The third possible mechanism involves...

Othman, Hasliza

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Evaluation of liquid brewery by-products for finishing cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

auction sales. The cattle arrived at the Texas ARM Uni ver sity Farm Feedlot on June 9, 1978. The hei fers were vaccinated for blackleg and malignant edema, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis and para influenza. Each animal was injected with one million...

Hobbs, Dane Allie

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Center forCenter for ByBy--ProductsProducts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the closing of these plants was the increasing cost of energy due to the energy crisis in the mid 1970's

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

484

Utilization of by-product gypsum in construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Neutralization processes with NaOH and Ca(OH) & were studied and stabilization with commercial grade types of portland cement and fly ash was investigated (after different curing periods) to compare relative strengths as applied to road construction.... For phosphogypsum stabilized by portland cement, initial and intermediate stages of strength development obtained for the material, cured for 3 and 7 days at approximate pH levels of 4, 6, and 8 and cement contents of 34 and 64, yielded strengths which increase...

Stephenson, Angela Lorraine

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Fluorine in coal and coal by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluorine occurs in awe amounts in most coals. It is typically associated with minerals of the apatite group, principally fluorapatite and clays, and with fluorite, tourmaline, topaz, amphiboles and micas. The average fluorine content of US coal is, according to the tabulation of Swanson, 74 {mu}g/g. In the United States, the lowest average fluorine concentration of 30 {mu}g/g is found in coals from Eastern Kentucky and the highest average value of 160 {mu}g/g is found in coals from Wyoming and New Mexico. The concentration range of fluorine in European coals is similar to that found in the US while the average fluorine content of Australian coals ranges from 15 to 500 {mu}g/g. We have determined the fluorine content in coal and fly ash standards by proton-induced gamma ray emission analysis (PIGE).

Robertson, J.D.; Wong, A.S.; Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

486

Waste/By-Product Hydrogen | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department of EnergyDepartmentDepartmentofTechnologiesusing

487

Bioelectrochemical Treatment of Gaseous By-products - Energy Innovation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScienceCareers Apply for aCould WorkVehicles,000

488

Municipal solid waste management in Rasht City, Iran  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pollution and health risks generated by improper solid waste management are important issues concerning environmental management in developing countries. In most cities, the use of open dumps is common for the disposal of wastes, resulting in soil and water resource contamination by leachate in addition to odors and fires. Solid waste management infrastructure and services in developing countries are far from achieving basic standards in terms of hygiene and efficient collection and disposal. This paper presents an overview of current municipal solid waste management in Rasht city, Gilan Province, Iran, and provides recommendations for system improvement. The collected data of different MSW functional elements were based on data from questionnaires, visual observations of the authors, available reports and several interviews and meetings with responsible persons. Due to an increase in population and changes in lifestyle, the quantity and quality of MSW in Rasht city has changed. Lack of resources, infrastructure, suitable planning, leadership, and public awareness are the main challenges of MSW management of Rasht city. However, the present situation of solid waste management in this city, which generates more than 400 tons/d, has been improved since the establishment of an organization responsible only for solid waste management. Source separation of wastes and construction of a composting plant are the two main activities of the Rasht Municipality in recent years.

Alavi Moghadam, M.R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: alavi@aut.ac.ir; Mokhtarani, N. [Jahesh Kimia Company, No. 26, Sadeghi St., Azadi Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mokhtarani@jaheshkimia.com; Mokhtarani, B. [Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Research Center, P.O. Box 14335-186 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mokhtaranib@ccerci.ac.ir

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

489

Robbins project - start-up and commercial operation at a leading-edge recycling, waste-to-energy plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On January 22, 1997, the Robbins Resource Recovery Facility began commercial operation in Robbins, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago, after a very successful start-up program. The first installation of its kind in the United States, the Robbins facility converts municipal solid waste (MSW) into refuse-derived fuel (RDF) that is fired in two circulating fluidized-bed boilers. Steam from the boilers powers a turbine generator that can produce enough electricity to service more than 50,000 homes. The Robbins facility processes a minimum of 1600 tons of MSW per day. Some 75 percent of the MSW is converted into RDF. In addition to compostable material, the balance yields reusable aluminum, ferrous materials, and glass. Even ash produced by the circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) boilers can be used to manufacture cement. The Robbins facility is operated by Foster Wheeler Illinois, Inc., a member of the Foster Wheeler Power Systems Group. The plant was engineered by Foster Wheeler USA Corporation and built by Foster Wheeler Constructors, Inc. Foster Wheeler Energy International, Inc. provided the circulating fluidized-bed boilers.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

490

MSW Social Work Experience 1995-97. Los Angeles County Mental Health, Los Angeles, Ca. Evaluation of AB3632,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-93. Centro de Desarrollo Familiar, Huntington Park, Ca. Treatment of child 1995-97. sexual abuse cases Home Health Care. Casework services for home based health care with aging population. 1994. Participation in needs assessment for AIDS clients in the Austin area. 1994. Home Health Care. Paragon, Austin

Ahmad, Sajjad

491

Technical Report for the MVB (MSW & Biomass) Waste to Energy Plants and the AVG Hazardous WTE Plant in Hamburg, Germany  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a small steam-turbine producing 3 MW for the plant's internal needs · The filtration part of the plant is equipped with SNCR technology, baghouse filters, HCl & SO2 scrubbers Power Plant: Coal and Gas MVB Unit 3 per line, at 90 bar and 500° C · The plant is equipped with a steam turbine of 20 MWe · On 2009

Columbia University

492

Determining the Impact of MSW as a Feedstock Blending Agent Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent Company AgreesDesiree PipkinsSuper ESPC BestDOE

493

Advanced thermal processing alternatives for solid waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1990`s have seen a resurgence of interest in the development of new thermal processing alternatives for municipal solid waste (MSW). Sparked by increasingly stringent environmental regulations, much of this creative energy has been applied to technologies for the gasification of MSW: converting the solid, hard to handle material into a clean, medium to high-Btu fuel gas. Other developers have focussed on full combustion technology but with a {open_quotes}twist{close_quotes} that lowers emissions or reduces cost. A comprehensive study of these new technologies was recently completed under the sponsorship of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy. The study characterized the state-of-the-art among emerging MSW thermal processing technologies that have reached the point of `incipient commercialization.` More than 45 technologies now under development were screened to develop a short list of seven processes that have passed through the idea stage, laboratory and benchscale testing, and have been prototyped at an MSW feed rate of at least several tons per hour. In-depth review of these seven included inspections of operating pilot or prototype units and a detailed analysis of technical, environmental and economic feasibility issues. No attempt was made to select `the best` technology since best can only be defined in the context of the constraints, aspirations and circumstances of a specific, local situation. The basic flowsheet, heat and material balances and available environmental data were summarized to help the reader grasp the underlying technical concepts and their embodiment in hardware. Remaining development needs, as seen by the study team are presented. Economic analysis shows the general balance of capital and operating costs.

Niessen, W.R. [Camp Dresser & McKee Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

plutonium to meet the non-proliferation goals agreed to by the United States and Russia in September 2000. Eliminating immobilization from the disposition pathway saves...

495

DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation Project with Kazakhstan U.S.-Russia Twenty-Year Partnership Completes Final Milestone in Converting 20,000 Russian Nuclear...

496

9,355,469 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of January 29, 2015...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Unit of the Anadarko Basin. Learn more about the DOE's RCSP Program. Major Demonstrations Air Products.jpg Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.: Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., is...

497

Saving Tons at the Register Iain Walker, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Modera 1991). As a result, the "market" for residential ducts is slowly transforming. Energy codes have are additional potential benefits from HVAC system optimization that are made possible by duct improvements

498

Removal of 1,082-Ton Reactor Among Richland Operations Office...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

so the plant can be torn down. Nearly 2,000 capsules of highly radioactive cesium and strontium need to be removed from water-filled storage basins and placed in dry storage....

499

The BosTon College Chroniclefebruary 14, 2008-vol. 16 no. 11  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, who commutes from his home in Wakefield each day to an extended on-ice session at the Boston Skating accompany his older sister to a lo- cal rink. His skill on the blades was quickly recognized and his parents en- rolled him in a US Figure Skating Ba- sic Skills Program at the Stoneham Rink, the skating home

Huang, Jianyu

500

U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

WASHINGTON - Underscoring the Obama Administration's efforts to double energy productivity by 2030 and help businesses save money and energy, the Energy Department today...