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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production of Mixed Alcohols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). However, biomass is not always available in sufficient quantity at a price compatible with fuels production. Municipal solid waste (MSW) on the other hand is readily available in large quantities in some communities and is considered a partially renewable feedstock. Furthermore, MSW may be available for little or no cost. This report provides a techno-economic analysis of the production of mixed alcohols from MSW and compares it to the costs for a wood based plant. In this analysis, MSW is processed into refuse derived fuel (RDF) and then gasified in a plant co-located with a landfill. The resulting syngas is then catalytically converted to mixed alcohols. At a scale of 2000 metric tons per day of RDF, and using current technology, the minimum ethanol selling price at a 10% rate of return is approximately $1.85/gallon ethanol (early 2008 $). However, favorable economics are dependent upon the toxicity characteristics of the waste streams and that a market exists for the by-product scrap metal recovered from the RDF process.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Valkenburt, Corinne

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

2014 ENERGY AND ECONOMIC VALUE OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (MSW), INCLUDING NON-RECYCLED PLASTICS (NRP),  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-to-energy (WTE) plants, 0.27 million tons (0.7%) were used as alternative fuel in cement production, and 32 Earth Engineering Center (EEC) Report to the American Chemistry Council (ACC) which was based on U.S. 2008 data and quantified the energy and economic value of municipal solid wastes (MSW) and non

Columbia University

3

MSW Biogenic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MSW Biogenic MSW Biogenic Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

4

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology Municipal solid waste (MSW) is...

5

Clean liquid fuels from MSW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for a cost effective and cleaner method of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) disposal hardly needs emphasizing. With funding through the US EPA and US DOE-METC, EnerTech demonstrated its SlurryCarb{trademark} process for producing homogeneous, pumpable fuels from Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) with continuous pilot plant facilities, and characterized flue gas and ash emissions from combustion of the carbonized RDF slurry fuel. Pilot scale slurry carbonization experiments with RDF produced a homogeneous pumpable slurry fuel with a Higher Heating Value up to approximately 6,600 Btu/lb at 51.7 wt% total solids. The viscosity of this carbonized RDF slurry fuel was approximately 500 cP {at} 100 Hz decreasing, and ambient temperature. Also, pilot scale slurry carbonization experiments extracted up to approximately 94% of the feed RDF chlorine content as chloride salts. Atmospheric combustion of the carbonized RDF slurry fuel produced a carbon burnout exceeding 99.9%, with excess air as low as 15%. CO emissions averaged below 16 ppm (corrected to 7% O{sub 2}), while HCl and SO{sub 2} emissions were below 17 and 40 ppm, respectively, without acid gas scrubbing. NO{sub x} emissions depended on combustion temperature and averaged between 82--211 ppm, without selective noncatalytic or catalytic reduction. In addition, mercury emissions were measured at 0.003 mg/dscm. Combustion ash was non-hazardous, with low leaching characteristics, based on a TCLP analysis.

Klosky, M. [EnerTech Environmental, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

6

The utilization of flue gas desulfurization waste by-products in construction brick.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Millions of tons of waste by-products from Texas coal burning plants are produced each year. Two common byproducts are the fuel ashes and calcium sulfate… (more)

Berryman, Charles Wayne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Wet welding qualification trials at 35 MSW  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet welding is gaining increased attention and attraction for application on marine buildings and offshore structures all over the world because of its versatility, flexibility and mobility in combination with low investment costs. In a common research and development project between PETROBRAS/CENPES, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and GKSS Research Centre, Geesthacht, Germany wet welding qualification trials have been performed in different water depths up to 35 msw. The tests have been performed with newly developed electrodes in two different wet welding procedures. The experiments have been carried out on SS- as well as on 5F-specimens acc. ANSI/AWS D 3.6-89. Results will be presented in respect to the performance of the two welding procedures especially with regard to the avoidance of hydrogen induced cold cracking and high hardness values.

Dos Santos, V.R.; Teixeira, C.J. [Petrobras/CENPES, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Szelagowski, P.J.F. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

A 150-Ton Universal Structure Testing Machine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... 150-ton universal structure testing machine for Short Bros, and Harland, Ltd. (Engineer, December 26, pp. 594–596). ...

C. F. TIPPER

1948-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

9

An overview of renewable energy utilization from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration in Taiwan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

summarized in the paper. Finally, we present the regulatory system including Air Pollution Control Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 495 4. Air pollution control regulations on MSW-to-energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 497 4.1. MSW incinerator air pollutants emission standards

Columbia University

10

Global MSW Generation in 2007 estimated at two billion tons Global Waste Management Market Assessment 2007, Key Note Publications Ltd ,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-gas emissions, water pollution, air pollution and noise/visual impact (of recycling/waste disposal facilities including construction/demolition, mining, quarrying, manufacturing and municipal waste. Much of the focus

Columbia University

11

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization CLEAN COAL BY-PRODUCTS UTILIZATION IN ROADWAY, EMBANKMENTS-fueled plants, particularly use of eastern coals, has lead to the use of clean coal and using advanced sulfur dioxide control technologies. Figure 1 shows clean coal technology benefits(2) . In 1977, the concept

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

12

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%) were used in producing the concrete mixtures. The water to cementitious materials ratio was kept with and without by-products, and soil and groundwater remediation technologies including bioremediation. ACI

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

13

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECONOMICAL SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Yoon-moon Chun, Fethullah Canpolat #12;USE OF FLY ASH AND LIMESTONE QUARRY BY-PRODUCTS FOR DEVELOPING ECONOMICAL SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE material in the development of economical self-compacting concrete (SCC). Class C fly ash was also used

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

14

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, and Yoon-moon Chun Report No. CBU-2004 of Limestone Quarry By-Products for Developing Economical Self-Compacting Concrete Principle Investigator Name. For this proposed project, self-compacting concrete mixtures will be developed for prototype production that utilize

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

15

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE (SCC) OR SELF- LEVELING CONCRETE (SLC - MILWAUKEE #12;2 SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE (SCC) OR SELF ­LEVELING CONCRETE (SLC) INTRODUCTION Self-compacting as the concrete which can be placed and compacted into every corner of a form work, purely by means of its self

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

16

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Yoon-moon Chun, Fethullah Canpolat ECONOMICAL SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE by Tarun R. Naik* , Rudolph N. Kraus** , Yoon-moon Chun*** , Fethullah of limestone-quarry by-product material in the development of economical self-compacting concrete (SCC). Class

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

17

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SELF-COMPACTING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik and Rakesh Kumar Report No. CBU-2003-15 REP-509 April 2003 CONCRETE April 2003 REP-509 #12;ii Use of Limestone Quarry By-Products for Developing Economical Self-Compacting in the production of economical self-compacting concrete. OBJECTIVE: The primary objective of this project

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

18

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI and Ronald H. Carty Director Illinois Clean Coal Institute Carterville, IL ABSTRACT, Naik and Singh [16] summarized various applications of fly ash generated from conventional and clean coal technologies. Uses of coal combustion by- products can be categorized into three classes: high-volum

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

19

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN COAL ASH AS SETTING TIME REGULATOR IN PORTLAND OF WISCONSIN ­ MILWAUKEE #12;2 Use of Clean Coal Ash as Setting Time Regulator in Portland Cement by Zichao Wu as setting time regulator for portland cement production. In this paper a source of clean coal ash (CCA

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

20

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of coal in conventional and/ or advanced clean coal technology combustors. These include fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products from advanced clean coal technology clean coal technology combustors. Over 60% of the CCBs are generated as fly ash. An estimate

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R #12;1 HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Shiw S. Singh, and Bruce for manufacture of cement-based products using ashes generated from combustion of high-sulfur coals. A clean coal

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

22

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shrinkage; durability; freezing and thawing; recycling; sludge; wastewater treatment; wood cellulose fibersCenter for By-Products Utilization RECYCLING OF PULP AND PAPER MILL RESIDUALS TO INCREASE FREEZING College of Engineering and Applied Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN ­ MILWAUKEE #12;Recycling of Pulp

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

23

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization GREENER CONCRETE FROM WOOD FLY ASH AND COAL FLY ASH By Tarun R CONCRETE FROM WOOD FLY ASH AND COAL FLY ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Shiw S. Singh, Lori-Lynn C mixtures were developed using blends of wood FA and Class C coal FA. Two levels of blended ash

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

24

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fellow at the UWM-CBU. His research interests include the use of coal fly ash, coal bottom ash, and usedCenter for By-Products Utilization USE OF UNDER-UTILIZED COAL- COMBUSTION PRODUCTS IN PERMEABLE-Utilized Coal-Combustion Products in Permeable Roadway Base Construction 1 (MS #LV-R67) Use of Under

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

25

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) coal-ash and by replacing up to 9% of aggregates with wet-collected, low-lime, coarse coal-ash. Cast of coal fly ash, coal bottom ash, and used foundry sand in concrete and cast-concrete productsCenter for By-Products Utilization PROPERTIES OF CAST-CONCRETE PRODUCTS MADE WITH FBC ASH

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

26

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST Report No.CBU-1996-07 July 1996 Presented and Published at the American Coal Ash Association's Twelfth International Coal Ash Use Symposium, Orlando, FL, January 26-30, 1997. Department of Civil Engineering

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

27

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization GREENER CONCRETE FROM WOOD FLY ASH AND COAL FLY ASH By Tarun R OF WISCONSIN­MILWAUKEE #12;1 GREENER CONCRETE FROM WOOD FLY ASH AND COAL FLY ASH Synopsis: This investigation coal FA. Two levels of blended ash of approximately 25% and 35% were used. The effect of source of wood

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

28

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization PROPERTIES OF CONCRETE CONTAINING SCRAP TIRE RUBBER in a variety of rubber and plastic products, thermal incineration of waste tires for production of electricity rubber in asphalt mixes, (ii) thermal incineration of worn-out tires for the production of electricity

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

29

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization APPLICATION OF SCRAP TIRE RUBBER IN ASPHALTIC MATERIALS: STATE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. PRODUCING CRUMB RUBBER MODIFIER (CRM) FROM USED TIRES . . . . . 3 2.1 PRODUCTION OF CRM THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN - MILWAUKEE #12;APPLICATION OF SCRAP TIRE RUBBER IN ASPHALTIC MATERIALS: STATE

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

30

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include workability, water requirement, bleeding, segregation, air content, time of set, and temperature with and without by-products, and soil and groundwater remediation technologies including bioremediation. ACI for power production. Its combustion in electric power plants produces large amounts of fly ash and bottom

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

31

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-strength materials (CLSM); and, future research needs. The fresh concrete properties discussed are workability, water with and without by-products, and soil and groundwater remediation technologies including bioremediation. ACI for power production. Its combustion in electric power plants produces large amounts of fly ash and bottom

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

32

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a combination with a number of fuels including coal, petroleum coke, natural gas, etc. In the mid 1990s, the unit was firing a combination of coal and petroleum coke to generate energy. It has been established;1 PROJECT 1 - COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS: CHARACTERIZATION AND USE OPTIONS Introduction An AFBC system

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

33

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wood with supplementary fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and coke by pulp and paper mills and wood, knots, chips, etc. with other supplementary fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and coke to generateCenter for By-Products Utilization DEVELOPMENT OF CLSM USING COAL ASH AND WOOD ASH, A SOURCE OF NEW

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

34

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with supplementary fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and coke by pulp and paper mills and wood, such as bark, twigs, knots, chips, etc. with other supplementary fuels such as coal, oil, natural gas, and cokeCenter for By-Products Utilization CLSM CONTAINING MIXTURES OF COAL ASH AND A NEW POZZOLANIC

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

35

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF FBC ASH AND PONDED COAL-ASH IN READY-MIXED CONCRETE #12;Naik, Kraus, Chun, & Botha Use of FBC ash and Ponded Coal-Ash in Ready-Mixed Concrete 1 MS# M8-60. FINAL. October 2005. Use of FBC Ash and Ponded Coal-Ash in Ready-Mixed Concrete by Tarun R. Naik

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

36

REACTION AND COMBUSTION INDICATORS IN MSW LANDFILLS Jeffrey W. Martin1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REACTION AND COMBUSTION INDICATORS IN MSW LANDFILLS Jeffrey W. Martin1 ,P.G., R.S., Timothy D, Ohio. ABSTRACT Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills may contain aluminum from residential, particularly aluminum production wastes, may react exothermically with liquid within a landfill and cause

37

A hybrid procedure for MSW generation forecasting at multiple time scales in Xiamen City, China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? We propose a hybrid model that combines seasonal SARIMA model and grey system theory. ? The model is robust at multiple time scales with the anticipated accuracy. ? At month-scale, the SARIMA model shows good representation for monthly MSW generation. ? At medium-term time scale, grey relational analysis could yield the MSW generation. ? At long-term time scale, GM (1, 1) provides a basic scenario of MSW generation. - Abstract: Accurate forecasting of municipal solid waste (MSW) generation is crucial and fundamental for the planning, operation and optimization of any MSW management system. Comprehensive information on waste generation for month-scale, medium-term and long-term time scales is especially needed, considering the necessity of MSW management upgrade facing many developing countries. Several existing models are available but of little use in forecasting MSW generation at multiple time scales. The goal of this study is to propose a hybrid model that combines the seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) model and grey system theory to forecast MSW generation at multiple time scales without needing to consider other variables such as demographics and socioeconomic factors. To demonstrate its applicability, a case study of Xiamen City, China was performed. Results show that the model is robust enough to fit and forecast seasonal and annual dynamics of MSW generation at month-scale, medium- and long-term time scales with the desired accuracy. In the month-scale, MSW generation in Xiamen City will peak at 132.2 thousand tonnes in July 2015 – 1.5 times the volume in July 2010. In the medium term, annual MSW generation will increase to 1518.1 thousand tonnes by 2015 at an average growth rate of 10%. In the long term, a large volume of MSW will be output annually and will increase to 2486.3 thousand tonnes by 2020 – 2.5 times the value for 2010. The hybrid model proposed in this paper can enable decision makers to develop integrated policies and measures for waste management over the long term.

Xu, Lilai, E-mail: llxu@iue.ac.cn [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1799 Jimei Road, Xiamen 361021 (China); Xiamen Key Lab of Urban Metabolism, Xiamen 361021 (China); Gao, Peiqing, E-mail: peiqing15@yahoo.com.cn [Xiamen City Appearance and Environmental Sanitation Management Office, 51 Hexiangxi Road, Xiamen 361004 (China); Cui, Shenghui, E-mail: shcui@iue.ac.cn [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1799 Jimei Road, Xiamen 361021 (China); Xiamen Key Lab of Urban Metabolism, Xiamen 361021 (China); Liu, Chun, E-mail: xmhwlc@yahoo.com.cn [Xiamen City Appearance and Environmental Sanitation Management Office, 51 Hexiangxi Road, Xiamen 361004 (China)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Evaluation of landfill gas production and emissions in a MSW large-scale Experimental Cell in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill gas (LFG) emissions from municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills are an important environmental concern in Brazil due to the existence of several uncontrolled disposal sites. A program of laboratory and field tests was conducted to investigate gas generation in and emission from an Experimental Cell with a 36,659-ton capacity in Recife/PE – Brazil. This investigation involved waste characterisation, gas production and emission monitoring, and geotechnical and biological evaluations and was performed using three types of final cover layers. The results obtained in this study showed that waste decomposes 4–5 times faster in a tropical wet climate than predicted by traditional first-order models using default parameters. This fact must be included when considering the techniques and economics of projects developed in tropical climate countries. The design of the final cover layer and its geotechnical and biological behaviour proved to have an important role in minimising gas emissions to the atmosphere. Capillary and methanotrophic final cover layers presented lower CH4 flux rates than the conventional layer.

Felipe Jucá Maciel; José Fernando Thomé Jucá

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Modeling and simulation of landfill gas production from pretreated MSW landfill simulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cumulative landfill gas (LFG) production and its rate ... simulated for pretreated municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill using four models namely first order exponential ... . Considering the behavior of the p...

Rasool Bux Mahar; Abdul Razaque Sahito…

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a domestic energy resource with the potential to provide a significant amount of energy to meet US liquid fuel requirements. MSW is defined as household waste, commercial solid waste, nonhazardous sludge, conditionally exempt, small quantity hazardous waste, and industrial solid waste. It includes food waste, residential rubbish, commercial and industrial wastes, and construction and demolition debris. It has an average higher heating value (HHV) of approximately 5100 btu/lb (as arrived basis).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW)!in!the!United!States!A!National!Survey!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! 1! ! Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW on Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Generation and Disposition in the U.S., in collaboration with Ms. Nora Goldstein was not carried out in 2012 and in 2013 EEC and BioCycle agreed that the 2013 Survey of Waste Generation

Columbia University

42

Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW)!in!the!United!States!A!National!Survey!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! 1! ! Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW Waste (MSW) Generation and Disposition in the U.S., in collaboration with Ms. Nora Goldstein of Bio in 2012 and in 2013 EEC and BioCycle agreed that the 2013 Survey of Waste Generation and Disposition

43

(Data in metric tons of silver content unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

60 to 90 tons of silver that is reclaimed and recycled annually from photographic wastewater. Import in photographic wastewater may be recycled. Silver demand for use in coins, electronics, industrial applications Recycling: In 2010, approximately 1,600 tons of silver was recovered from old and new scrap. This includes

44

Tons of Heavy Metals in Mill Creek Sediments Heather Freeman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

objectives for this summer research were to: 1.) determine how much heavy metal pollution has accumulatedTons of Heavy Metals in Mill Creek Sediments Heather Freeman 8/30/99 Geology Department Advisors: Dr. Kees DeJong Dr. Barry Manyard Dr. David Nash #12;Tons of heavy metals in Mill Creek sediments

Maynard, J. Barry

45

Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

'Billion-Ton' Study 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting Opportunities for Growth in Bioenergy Resources Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting Opportunities for Growth in Bioenergy Resources August 10, 2011 - 3:41pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy today released a report - 2011 U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry - detailing U.S. biomass feedstock potential nationwide. The report examines the nation's capacity to produce a billion dry tons of biomass resources annually for energy uses without impacting other vital U.S. farm and forest products, such as food, feed, and fiber crops. The study provides industry, policymakers, and the agricultural community with county-level data and includes analyses of

46

Waste/By-Product Hydrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN Ruth Cox DOE/DOD Workshop January 13, 2011 January 13, 2011 Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association The Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association FCHEA ƒ Trade Association for the industry ƒ Member driven - Market focused ƒ Developers, suppliers, customers, nonprofits, government Ad ƒ Advocacy ƒ Safety and standardization ƒ Education ƒ Strategic Alliances Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association O M b Our Members 5 W t /B d t H d Waste/By-product Hydrogen Overview Overview ƒ Growing populations, rising standards of living, and increased urbanization leads to a escalating volume of waste leads to a escalating volume of waste. ƒ Huge volumes of waste are collected in dumps, creating a major environmental issue. ƒ ƒ Wastewater treatment plants generate noxious gasses that are released in Wastewater treatment plants generate noxious gasses that are released in

47

Neutrino-electron scattering and the choice between different MSW solutions of the solar neutrino problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the scattering of solar neutrinos by electrons as a means for distinguishing between MSW solutions of the solar neutrino problem. In terms of the ratio R between the observed cross-section and that for pure electron-type neutrinos, we find that some correlation between the value R and the appropriate solution. 9 refs., 3 figs.

Rosen, S.P.; Gelb, J.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor July 9, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE, (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Mark McKenna, WCH, (509) 372-9032 media@wch-rcc.com RICHLAND, Wash. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors have disposed of 15 million tons of contaminated material at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) since the facility began operations in 1996. Removing contaminated material and providing for its safe disposal prevents contaminants from reaching the groundwater and the Columbia River. ERDF receives contaminated soil, demolition debris, and solid waste from

49

Operational and maintenance manual, 100 ton hydraulic trailer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100 ton hydraulic trailer is used to remove the mitigation pump from Tank 241SY101. This manual explains how to inspect, operate, and maintain the trailer in a state of readiness.

Koons, B.M.

1995-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

50

Coal combustion by-products: State regulatory overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal combustion by-products (CCBs) are generated from the combustion of coal for energy production. Approximately 82 million tons of CCBs are produced each year by electric utilities. (1991 Coal Combustion By-Product Production and Use, American Coal Ash Association, 1992.) There are several common types of CCBs produced by coal combustion--fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, flue gas desulfurization material (FGD) and fluidized bed combustion byproducts (FBC). Some CCBs, such as fly ash, have pozzolanic properties and may have cementitious properties, both of which are advantageous for engineering, construction and waste remediation applications. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) in ASTM C-618 has created two classifications of useful and quality coal ash, Class F ash and Class C ash. Each class of coal ash has different pozzolanic and cementitious characteristics. Coal ash can be utilized in many manufacturing, mining, agricultural, engineering, construction and waste remediation applications. This is a review by state of regulations concerning coal combustion by-products.

Jagiella, D. [Howard and Howard Attorneys, Peoria, IL (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Oxygen-enriched coincineration of MSW and sewage sludge: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal regulations banning ocean dumping of sewage sludge coupled with stricter regulations on the disposal of sewage sludge in landfills have forced municipalities, especially those in the northeast United States, to consider alternate methods for disposal of this solid waste. Coincineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) and sludge has proven to be economically attractive for both Europe and Japan, but has not yet proven to be a viable sludge disposal technology in the United States because of a history of operational problems in existing facilities. The most prevalent problem in coincinerating MSW and a dewatered sewage sludge (15 to 25% solids) is incomplete sludge combustion. Incomplete sludge combustion is primarily a function of sludge particle size, occurring when the surface of the sludge particle dries and hardens, while the inner mass is unaffected. This phenomenon is commonly referred to in the industry as the {open_quotes}hamburger effect.{close_quotes} In an effort to promote technology development in this area, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. teamed with the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate a new process being developed for the disposal of a dewatered sewage sludge, {open_quotes}Oxygen-Enriched Coincineration of MSW and Sewage Sludge.{close_quotes} This report provides a comprehensive summary of the pilot demonstration test program for oxygen-enriched coincineration of MSW and sewage sludge. This report describes the pilot test facility, instrumentation, and methods of data collection and data analyses; describes how the tests were executed; and discusses the test results. Recommendations for the future development of this technology in the current marketplace are also provided.

none,

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Seasonal characterization of municipal solid waste (MSW) in the city of Chihuahua, Mexico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Management of municipal solid waste (MSW) has become a significant environmental problem, especially in fast-growing cities. The amount of waste generated increases each year and this makes it difficult to create solutions which due to the increase in waste generation year after year and having to identify a solution that will have minimum impact on the environment. To determine the most sustainable waste management strategy for Chihuahua, it is first necessary to identify the nature and composition of the city’s urban waste. The MSW composition varied considerably depending on many factors, the time of year is one of them. Therefore, as part of our attempt to implement an integral waste management system in the city of Chihuahua, we conducted a study of the characteristics of MSW composition for the different seasons. This paper analyzes and compares the findings of the study of the characterization and the generation of solid waste from households at three different socio-economic levels in the city over three periods (April and August, 2006 and January, 2007). The average weight of waste generated in Chihuahua, taking into account all three seasons, was 0.592 kg capita?1 day?1. Our results show that the lowest income groups generated the least amount of waste. We also found that less waste was generated during the winter season. The breakdown for the composition of the waste shows that organic waste accounts for the largest proportion (45%), followed by paper (17%) and others (16%).

Guadalupe Gómez; Montserrat Meneses; Lourdes Ballinas; Francesc Castells

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Seasonal characterization of municipal solid waste (MSW) in the city of Chihuahua, Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Management of municipal solid waste (MSW) has become a significant environmental problem, especially in fast-growing cities. The amount of waste generated increases each year and this makes it difficult to create solutions which due to the increase in waste generation year after year and having to identify a solution that will have minimum impact on the environment. To determine the most sustainable waste management strategy for Chihuahua, it is first necessary to identify the nature and composition of the city's urban waste. The MSW composition varied considerably depending on many factors, the time of year is one of them. Therefore, as part of our attempt to implement an integral waste management system in the city of Chihuahua, we conducted a study of the characteristics of MSW composition for the different seasons. This paper analyzes and compares the findings of the study of the characterization and the generation of solid waste from households at three different socio-economic levels in the city over three periods (April and August, 2006 and January, 2007). The average weight of waste generated in Chihuahua, taking into account all three seasons, was 0.592 kg capita{sup -1} day{sup -1}. Our results show that the lowest income groups generated the least amount of waste. We also found that less waste was generated during the winter season. The breakdown for the composition of the waste shows that organic waste accounts for the largest proportion (45%), followed by paper (17%) and others (16%)

Gomez, Guadalupe [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, 31310 (Mexico); Meneses, Montserrat [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Ballinas, Lourdes [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, 31310 (Mexico); Castells, Francesc [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, 43007 Tarragona (Spain)], E-mail: francesc.castells@urv.cat

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

(Data in metric tons1 of gold content, unless noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combined production accounted for nearly 80% of the U.S. total. The trend for recent U.S. gold exploration68 GOLD (Data in metric tons1 of gold content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: Gold was recovered as a byproduct of processing base metals, chiefly copper. Twenty-five lode mines yielded

55

Factory Acceptance Test Procedure Westinghouse 100 ton Hydraulic Trailer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Factory Acceptance Test Procedure (FAT) is for the Westinghouse 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer. The trailer will be used for the removal of the 101-SY pump. This procedure includes: safety check and safety procedures; pre-operation check out; startup; leveling trailer; functional/proofload test; proofload testing; and rolling load test.

Aftanas, B.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

56

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hafnium metal was insignificant. Import Sources (1997-2000): Zirconium ores and concentrates: South Africa%; Germany, 7%; United Kingdom, 2%; and other, 9%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12 Stockpile, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held over 500 tons of zirconium in various forms. DOE also

57

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Import Sources (1995-98): Zirconium ores and concentrates: South Africa, 53%; Australia, 45%; and other Kingdom, 4%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12/31/99 Zirconium ores and concentrates 2615.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held over 500 tons of zirconium in various forms. DOE also maintained a supply

58

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hafnium metal was insignificant. Import Sources (1998-2001): Zirconium ores and concentrates: South Africa%; Germany, 8%; United Kingdom, 3%; and other, 9%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12,838 short tons) of zirconium ore (baddeleyite) during fiscal year 2002. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE

59

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was insignificant. Import Sources (1996-99): Zirconium ores and concentrates: South Africa, 56%; Australia, 41, 4%; and other, 9%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12/31/00 Zirconium ores.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held over 500 tons of zirconium in various forms. DOE also maintained a stockpile

60

Greenhouse gas emissions from MSW incineration in China: Impacts of waste characteristics and energy recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Determination of the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emitted during municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) is complex because both contributions and savings of GHGs exist in the process. To identify the critical factors influencing GHG emissions from MSWI in China, a GHG accounting model was established and applied to six Chinese cities located in different regions. The results showed that MSWI in most of the cities was the source of GHGs, with emissions of 25-207 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. Within all process stages, the emission of fossil CO{sub 2} from the combustion of MSW was the main contributor (111-254 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw), while the substitution of electricity reduced the GHG emissions by 150-247 kg CO{sub 2}-eq t{sup -1} rw. By affecting the fossil carbon content and the lower heating value of the waste, the contents of plastic and food waste in the MSW were the critical factors influencing GHG emissions of MSWI. Decreasing food waste content in MSW by half will significantly reduce the GHG emissions from MSWI, and such a reduction will convert MSWI in Urumqi and Tianjin from GHG sources to GHG sinks. Comparison of the GHG emissions in the six Chinese cities with those in European countries revealed that higher energy recovery efficiency in Europe induced much greater reductions in GHG emissions. Recovering the excess heat after generation of electricity would be a good measure to convert MSWI in all the six cities evaluated herein into sinks of GHGs.

Yang Na [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhang Hua, E-mail: zhanghua_tj@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Chen Miao; Shao Liming [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); He Pinjing, E-mail: xhpjk@tongji.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products Current Regulations Governing Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Products Products Current Regulations Governing Coal Combustion By-Products - Database of State Regulations Database of State Regulations Affecting Disposal and Utilization of Coal Combustion By-Products A Summary Provided by the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the American Coal Ash Association Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBs) are generated when coal is used to generate electricity and power industrial processes. Tens of millions of tons of these materials are produced each year. Many uses of these byproducts are possible, but currently most of them wind up in landfills. Previous work at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) identified regulatory issues as one factor preventing more widespread reuse of CCBs. CCBs are generally regulated by state authorities, and the various states have developed widely differing rules. This web site was developed as one way to help CCB generators, users, and regulators share information across state boundaries.

62

Performance of a municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator predicted with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to investigate by the means of numerical simulation the performance of the MSW incinerator with of Vercelli (Italy). FLUENT, a finite-volumes commercial code for Fluid Dynamics has been used to predict the 3-D reacting flows (gaseous phase) within the incinerator geometry, in order to estimate if the three conditions settled by the Italian law (P.D. 915 / 82) are respected: (a) Flue gas temperature at the input of the secondary combustion chamber must exceed 950 C. (b) Oxygen concentration in the same section must exceed 6 %. (c) Residence time for the flue gas in the secondary combustion chamber must exceed 2 seconds. The model of the incinerator has been created using the software pre-processing facilities (wall, input, outlet and live cells), together with the set-up of boundary conditions. There are also imposed the combustion constants (stoichiometry, heat of combustion, air excess). The solving procedure transforms at the level of each live cell the partial derivative equations in algebraic equations, computing the velocities field, the temperatures, gases concentration, etc. These predicted values were compared with the design properties, and the conclusion was that the conditions (a), (b), (c), are respected in normal operation. The powerful graphic interface helps the user to visualize the magnitude of the computed parameters. These results may be successfully used for the design and operation improvements for MSW incinerators. This fact will substantially increase the efficiency, reduce pollutant emissions and optimize the plant overall performance.

Anglesio, P.; Negreanu, G.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area - Vault held waste...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area - Vault held waste tanks with contamination from Hanford's former laboratory facilities 1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area -...

64

(Data in metric tons1 of silver content unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This includes 60 to 90 tons of silver that are reclaimed and recycled annually from photographic wastewater 53 61 65 Recycling: Approximately 1,000 tons of silver was recovered from old and new scrap in 2006

65

Photo of the Week: Smashing Atoms with 80-ton Magnets | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Smashing Atoms with 80-ton Magnets Photo of the Week: Smashing Atoms with 80-ton Magnets April 11, 2014 - 1:32pm Addthis The cyclotron, invented by Ernest Lawrence in the 1930s, is...

66

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products : Regulatory Drivers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers Since 1993, Federal Regulations have treated the four major large-volume CUB's -- fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts -- as solid wastes that do not warrant regulation as hazardous wastes under Subtitle C of RCRA, as long as these CUBÂ’s were not co-managed with other waste materials. On May 22, 2000, EPA published a final Regulatory Determination [PDF-320KB] that retained the hazardous waste exemption for coal utilization by-products. EPA has concluded that fossil fuel combustion wastes do not warrant regulation as hazardous under Subtitle C of RCRA and is retaining the hazardous waste exemption for these wastes. However, the Agency has determined that national non-hazardous waste regulations under RCRA Subtitle D are needed for coal combustion wastes disposed in surface impoundments and landfills and used as minefilling. EPA also concluded beneficial uses of these wastes, other than for minefilling, pose no significant risk and no additional national regulations are needed. This determination affects more than 110 million tons of fossil fuel combustion wastes that are generated each year, virtually all from burning coal.

67

Transportation system benefits of early deployment of a 75-ton multipurpose canister system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1993 the US Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) began developing two multipurpose canister (MPC) systems to provide a standardized method for interim storage and transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at commercial nuclear power plants. One is a 75-ton concept with an estimated payload of about 6 metric tons (t) of SNF, and the other is a 125-ton concept with an estimated payload of nearly 11 t of SNF. These payloads are two to three times the payloads of the largest currently certified US rail transport casks, the IF-300. Although is it recognized that a fully developed 125-ton MPC system is likely to provide a greater cost benefit, and radiation exposure benefit than the lower-capacity 75-ton MPC, the authors of this paper suggest that development and deployment of the 75-ton MPC prior to developing and deploying a 125-ton MPC is a desirable strategy. Reasons that support this are discussed in this paper.

Wankerl, M.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schmid, S.P. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Coal Combustion By-Products (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of the Environment is responsible for regulating fugitive air emissions from the transportation of coal combustion by-products and the permissible beneficial uses of these by...

69

WATER AND BY-PRODUCT ISSUES IN THE ELECTRIC-UTILITY INDUSTRY  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Power Conference in conjunction with 2 and Power Conference in conjunction with 2 nd Joint U.S.-People's Republic of China Conference on Clean Energy, November 17-19, 2003, Washington, DC A DOE R&D RESPONSE TO EMERGING COAL BY-PRODUCT AND WATER ISSUES IN THE ELECTRIC-UTILITY INDUSTRY Thomas J. Feeley, III Technology Manager U.S. Department of Energy - Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh, PA ABSTRACT While the regulation and control of air emissions will continue to be of primary concern to the electric-utility industry over the next several decades, other environmental-related issues may also impact the operation of existing and new coal-based power systems. Coal by-products are one such issue. Coal-fired power plants generate nearly 118 million tons of fly ash, flue gas

70

Management of dry flue gas dsulfurization by-products in underground mines - an update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1993, the U.S. produced about 100 million tons of coal combustion by-products (CCBs) primarily from conventional coal-fired boilers. The requirement to reduce SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} emissions to comply with the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) force utilities to adopt advanced combustion and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technologies, such as wet scrubbers, fluidized bed combustion (FBC), dry sorbent duct or furnace injection. These technologies will double to triple the amount of FGD by-products while only slightly increasing the amounts of conventional combustion residues, such as fly ash, bottom ash and boiler slag. This paper describes a program concerned with the underground disposal of combustion products in abandoned underground coal mines.

Chugh, Y.P.; Thomasson, E.M. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Acceptance test report for the Westinghouse 100 ton hydraulic trailer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SY-101 Equipment Removal System 100 Ton Hydraulic Trailer was designed and built by KAMP Systems, Inc. Performance of the Acceptance Test Procedure at KAMP`s facility in Ontario, California (termed Phase 1 in this report) was interrupted by discrepancies noted with the main hydraulic cylinder. The main cylinder was removed and sent to REMCO for repair while the trailer was sent to Lampson`s facility in Pasco, Washington. The Acceptance Test Procedure was modified and performance resumed at Lampson (termed Phase 2 in this report) after receipt of the repaired cylinder. At the successful conclusion of Phase 2 testing the trailer was accepted as meeting all the performance criteria specified.

Barrett, R.A.

1995-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

72

Processing and properties of a solid energy fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW) and recycled plastics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Diversion of waste streams such as plastics, woods, papers and other solid trash from municipal landfills and extraction of useful materials from landfills is an area of increasing interest especially in densely populated areas. One promising technology for recycling municipal solid waste (MSW) is to burn the high-energy-content components in standard coal power plant. This research aims to reform wastes into briquettes that are compatible with typical coal combustion processes. In order to comply with the standards of coal-fired power plants, the feedstock must be mechanically robust, free of hazardous contaminants, and moisture resistant, while retaining high fuel value. This study aims to investigate the effects of processing conditions and added recyclable plastics on the properties of MSW solid fuels. A well-sorted waste stream high in paper and fiber content was combined with controlled levels of recyclable plastics PE, PP, PET and PS and formed into briquettes using a compression molding technique. The effect of added plastics and moisture content on binding attraction and energy efficiency were investigated. The stability of the briquettes to moisture exposure, the fuel composition by proximate analysis, briquette mechanical strength, and burning efficiency were evaluated. It was found that high processing temperature ensures better properties of the product addition of milled mixed plastic waste leads to better encapsulation as well as to greater calorific value. Also some moisture removal (but not complete) improves the compacting process and results in higher heating value. Analysis of the post-processing water uptake and compressive strength showed a correlation between density and stability to both mechanical stress and humid environment. Proximate analysis indicated heating values comparable to coal. The results showed that mechanical and moisture uptake stability were improved when the moisture and air contents were optimized. Moreover, the briquette sample composition was similar to biomass fuels but had significant advantages due to addition of waste plastics that have high energy content compared to other waste types. Addition of PP and HDPE presented better benefits than addition of PET due to lower softening temperature and lower oxygen content. It should be noted that while harmful emissions such as dioxins, furans and mercury can result from burning plastics, WTE facilities have been able to control these emissions to meet US EPA standards. This research provides a drop-in coal replacement that reduces demand on landfill space and replaces a significant fraction of fossil-derived fuel with a renewable alternative.

JeongIn Gug; David Cacciola; Margaret J. Sobkowicz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of uranium mill tailings. The project had originally planned to ship 2 million tons of tailings with Recovery Act funds. Now, Recovery Act workers are surpassing that goal. Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds More Documents & Publications EIS-0355: Record of Decision EIS-0355: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0355: Final Environmental Impact Statement

74

Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) October 8, 2013 - 2:22pm Addthis Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Project Type New Installation Replacement New Installation Condenser Type Air Source Water Source Air Source Existing Capacity * ton - Existing Cooling Efficiency * EER - Existing Heating Efficiency * COP - Existing IPLV Efficiency * IPLV - New Capacity ton 10 tons New Cooling Efficiency EER 10.1 EER New Heating Efficiency COP 3.2 COP New IPLV Efficiency IPLV 10.4 IPLV Energy Cost $ per kWh $0.06 per kWh

75

LMA MSW solution of the solar neutrino problem and first KamLAND results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first KamLAND results are in a very good agreement with the predictions made on the basis of the solar neutrino data and the LMA realization of the MSW mechanism. We perform a combined analysis of the KamLAND (rate, spectrum) and the solar neutrino data with a free boron neutrino flux f_B. The best fit values of neutrino parameters are Delta m^2 = 7.3e-5 eV^2, tg^2 theta = 0.41 and f_B = 1.05 with the 1 sigma intervals: Delta m^2 = (6.2 - 8.4)e-5 eV^2, tg^2 theta = 0.33 - 0.54. We find the 3 sigma upper bounds: Delta m^2 4e-5 eV^2. At 99% C.L. the KamLAND spectral result splits the LMA region into two parts with the preferred one at Delta m^2 solar neutrino and KamLAND results are considered.

P. C. de Holanda; A. Yu. Smirnov

2002-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

76

U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

An update to the 2005 report, "Biomass as a Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply"

77

Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone July 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Matt McCormick, manager of the Richland Operations Office, commends a large group of Hanford workers for the 15-million-ton milestone at a public event at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. Matt McCormick, manager of the Richland Operations Office, commends a large group of Hanford workers for the 15-million-ton milestone at a public event at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. RICHLAND, Wash. - EM's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) - a massive landfill for low-level radioactive and hazardous waste at the Hanford site - has achieved a major cleanup milestone. Since beginning operations in 1996, workers supporting the Richland

78

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons, signifying the Bush Administration's ongoing commitment to nonproliferation. Nine metric tons of plutonium is enough material to make over 1,000 nuclear weapons. The Secretary made today's announcement while speaking before the International Atomic Energy Agency's annual general conference.

79

Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation August 11, 2011 - 3:59pm Addthis Total potential biomass resources by county in the contiguous U.S. from the baseline scenario of the Update (Figure 6.4, page 159) | Map from Billion-Ton Update Total potential biomass resources by county in the contiguous U.S. from the baseline scenario of the Update (Figure 6.4, page 159) | Map from Billion-Ton Update Paul Bryan Biomass Program Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? With continued developments in biorefinery capacity and technology, the feedstock resources identified in the report could produce about 85 billion gallons of biofuels -- enough to replace approximately 30 percent

80

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons, signifying the Bush Administration's ongoing commitment to nonproliferation. Nine metric tons of plutonium is enough material to make over 1,000 nuclear weapons. The Secretary made today's announcement while speaking before the International Atomic Energy Agency's annual general conference.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site June 18, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler, Moab Federal Project Director (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan, S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager (970) 257-2145 (Grand Junction, CO) - Today, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced that 6 million tons of uranium mill tailings have been shipped from Moab, Utah, under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project to an engineered disposal cell near Crescent Junction, Utah. The shipments mark continued progress toward relocating the 16-million-ton uranium mill tailings pile away from the Colorado River. "The federal budget continues to be stretched thin, and I am proud this

82

6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site June 18, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler, Moab Federal Project Director (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan, S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager (970) 257-2145 (Grand Junction, CO) - Today, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced that 6 million tons of uranium mill tailings have been shipped from Moab, Utah, under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project to an engineered disposal cell near Crescent Junction, Utah. The shipments mark continued progress toward relocating the 16-million-ton uranium mill tailings pile away from the Colorado River. "The federal budget continues to be stretched thin, and I am proud this

83

Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project Accomplishes Milestone While Doing it Safely Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project Accomplishes Milestone While Doing it Safely February 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler, Moab Federal Project Director, (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan, S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager, (970) 257-2145 Grand Junction, CO- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reached another milestone today for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, having shipped 5 million tons of tailings from the massive pile located in Moab, Utah, to the engineered disposal cell near Crescent Junction, Utah. The pile comprised an estimated 16 million tons total when DOE's Remedial

84

Reconsidering Municipal Solid Waste as a Renewable Energy Feedstock For many years, opposition to the use of municipal solid waste (MSW) as an energy resource has been nearly universal among  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reconsidering Municipal Solid Waste as a Renewable Energy Feedstock July 2009 For many years, opposition to the use of municipal solid waste (MSW) as an energy resource has been nearly universal among of technologies can be used to create energy from MSW: · Landfill Gas Capture -- Waste in landfills naturally

Columbia University

85

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production of Mixed Alcohols  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). However, biomass is not always available in sufficient quantity at a price compatible with fuels production. Municipal solid waste (MSW) on the other hand is readily available in large quantities in some communities and is considered a partially renewable feedstock. Furthermore, MSW may be available for little or no cost.

86

Center for By-Products Utilization CO2 SEQUESTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization CO2 SEQUESTRATION IN NON-AIR ENTRAINED CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik. Maximize environmental benefits: resource conservation, clean water, and clean air. #12;Center for By-Products, Italy, June 30, 2010. #12;Center for By-Products Utilization UWM Center for By-Products Utilization

Saldin, Dilano

87

DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 November 5, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) storage project in Mississippi has become the fifth worldwide to reach the important milestone of more than 1 million tons injected. As a result, it is helping to both further carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a mitigation strategy for global climate change and move forward G-8 recommendations for launching 20 projects of this type internationally by 2010. The project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE), is located at the Cranfield site in Southwestern Mississippi. It is led by the Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration

88

Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of uranium mill tailings. The project had originally planned to ship 2 million tons of tailings with Recovery Act funds. Now, Recovery Act workers are surpass- ing that goal. "Although shipping 2 million tons was the original Recovery Act goal, we are planning to exceed this goal by shipping about 300,000 tons more using savings resulting from efficiencies we've gained in our first 2 years of moving tailings," Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler said. The project is using $108 million from the Recovery Act to move the tailings from the banks of the Colorado River by rail to a permanent

89

Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone June 20, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis At Tuesday's Grand County Council meeting in Utah, Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler, center, moves a piece from a plaque representing Moab’s uranium mill tailings pile to a plaque representing the disposal cell in recognition of the site achieving a milestone by shipping 6 million tons of the tailings. Grand County Council Chair Gene Ciarus is on the left and Grand County Council Vice Chair Lynn Jackson is on the right. At Tuesday's Grand County Council meeting in Utah, Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler, center, moves a piece from a plaque representing Moab's uranium mill tailings pile to a plaque representing the disposal

90

DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile November 7, 2005 - 12:38pm Addthis Will Be Redirected to Naval Reactors, Down-blended or Used for Space Programs WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove up to 200 metric tons (MT) of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU), in the coming decades, from further use as fissile material in U.S. nuclear weapons and prepare this material for other uses. Secretary Bodman made this announcement while addressing the 2005 Carnegie International Nonproliferation Conference in Washington, DC.

91

DOE Moab Project Safely Removes 7 Million Tons of Mill Tailings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

(Grand Junction, CO) ? The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has safely moved another million tons of uranium mill tailings from the Moab site in Utah under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project.

92

9,248,559 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of January 16, 2015  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE’s Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is equivalent to the...

93

Experimental studies of 1 ton/day coal slurry feed type oxygen blown, entrained flow gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental Studies of a 1 Ton/Day coal slurry feed type oxygen blown, entrained flow gasifier have been performed with the slurry concentration and gasifier temperature at 65% and above 1,300...2.../coal feed r...

Young-Chan Choi; Tae-Jun Park; Jae-Ho Kim…

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

9,449,421 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 12, 2015...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is...

95

U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproduct...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

GW. 1986. Biomass production from herbaceous plant. In biomass energy development. WH Smith (ed.). Plenum Press, New York, NY. pp. 163-175. 165 U.S. BILLION-TON UPDATE: BIOMASS...

96

CCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW landfill disposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW in waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities. In other countries, the predominant disposal option for wood, others have not, and the product continues to enter the waste stream from construction, demolition

Florida, University of

97

Fuel-Slurry Integrated Gasifier/Gas Turbine (FSIG/GT) Alternative for Power Generation Applied to Municipal Solid Waste (MSW)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gas is cleaned to bring the particle content and size as well alkaline concentration within the acceptable limits for injections into standard gas turbines. ... The proper disposal and use of Municipal Solid Wastes (MSW) for power generation remains among the most pressing problems of medium to large cities. ... Bubble sizes and raising velocities through the gasifier bed (Configuration A). ...

Marcio L. de Souza-Santos; Kevin B. Ceribeli

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

98

WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN DOE/DOD Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; 6 Waste/Byproduct HydrogenWaste/By product Hydrogen Waste H2 sources include: Waste biomass: biogas Waste/Byproduct Hydrogen Waste/By product Hydrogen Fuel FlexibilityFuel Flexibility Biogas: generated

99

Center for By-Products Utilization Environment, Energy, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

benefits: resource conservation, clean water, and clean air. #12;Center for By-Products Utilization Basic;Center for By-Products Utilization RESOURCE CONSERVATION CLEAN WATER and CLEAN AIR "The earth, the seaCenter for By-Products Utilization Environment, Energy, and Economic Benefits of Using Recyclable

Saldin, Dilano

100

DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin February 27, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. DOE's Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), led by Battelle of Columbus, Ohio, began injecting the CO2 this week in the Michigan Basin near Gaylord, Mich., in a deep saline formation, the Silurian-age Bass Island dolomite. The MRCSP is one of seven partnerships

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the passing of legislation designed to permanently cap and reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired utilities, it is more important than ever to develop and improve upon methods of controlling mercury emissions. One promising technique is carbon sorbent injection into the flue gas of the coal-fired power plant. Currently, this technology is very expensive as costly commercially activated carbons are used as sorbents. There is also a significant lack of understanding of the interaction between mercury vapor and the carbon sorbent, which adds to the difficulty of predicting the amount of sorbent needed for specific plant configurations. Due to its inherent porosity and adsorption properties as well as on-site availability, carbons derived from gasifiers are potential mercury sorbent candidates. Furthermore, because of the increasing restricted use of landfilling, the coal industry is very interested in finding uses for these materials as an alternative to the current disposal practice. The results of laboratory investigations and supporting technical assessments conducted under DOE Subcontract No. DE-FG26-03NT41795 are reported. This contract was with the University of Kentucky Research Foundation, which supports work with the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute. The worked described was part of a project entitled ''Advanced Gasification By-Product Utilization''. This work involved the development of technologies for the separation and characterization of coal gasification slags from operating gasification units, activation of these materials to increase mercury and nitrogen oxide capture efficiency, assessment of these materials as sorbents for mercury and nitrogen oxides, assessment of the potential for leaching of Hg captured by the carbons, analysis of the slags for cement applications, and characterization of these materials for use as polymer fillers. The objectives of this collaborative effort between the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), The Pennsylvania State University Energy Institute, and industry collaborators supplying gasifier char samples were to investigate the potential use of gasifier slag carbons as a source of low cost sorbent for Hg and NOX capture from combustion flue gas, concrete applications, polymer fillers and as a source of activated carbons. Primary objectives were to determine the relationship of surface area, pore size, pore size distribution, and mineral content on Hg storage of gasifier carbons and to define the site of Hg capture. The ability of gasifier slag carbon to capture NOX and the effect of NOX on Hg adsorption were goals. Secondary goals were the determination of the potential for use of the slags for cement and filler applications. Since gasifier chars have already gone through a devolatilization process in a reducing atmosphere in the gasifier, they only required to be activated to be used as activated carbons. Therefore, the principal objective of the work at PSU was to characterize and utilize gasification slag carbons for the production of activated carbons and other carbon fillers. Tests for the Hg and NOX adsorption potential of these activated gasifier carbons were performed at the CAER. During the course of this project, gasifier slag samples chemically and physically characterized at UK were supplied to PSU who also characterized the samples for sorption characteristics and independently tested for Hg-capture. At the CAER as-received slags were tested for Hg and NOX adsorption. The most promising of these were activated chemically. The PSU group applied thermal and steam activation to a representative group of the gasifier slag samples separated by particle sizes. The activated samples were tested at UK for Hg-sorption and NOX capture and the most promising Hg adsorbers were tested for Hg capture in a simulated flue gas. Both UK and PSU tested the use of the gasifier slag samples as fillers. The CAER analyzed the slags for possible use in cement applications

Rodney Andrews; Aurora Rubel; Jack Groppo; Brock Marrs; Ari Geertsema; Frank Huggins; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Brandie M. Markley; Zhe Lu; Harold Schobert

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

NETL: News Release - DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of Carbon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

February 27, 2009 February 27, 2009 DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of Carbon Dioxide in Michigan Basin Project Expected to Advance National Carbon Sequestration Program, Create Jobs Washington, DC-Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change. MORE INFO Learn more about DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program DOE's Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), led by Battelle of Columbus, Ohio, began injecting the CO2 this week in the

103

NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More Than One Ton of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Removes More Than One Ton of Removes More Than One Ton of Food | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More ... NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative Removes More Than One Ton of Food Posted By Office of Public Affairs Contributing to DOE/NNSA's efforts to support the Office of Personnel

104

NETL: News Release - DOE Regional Partnerships Find Up To 3.5 Billion Tons  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7, 2007 7, 2007 DOE Regional Partnerships Find More Than 3,500 Billion Tons of Possible CO2 Storage Capacity Atlas Details Stationary Sources and Geologic Reservoirs in U.S. and Canada WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships have identified the powerplant and other stationary sources of more than 3.8 billion tons a year of the greenhouse gas CO2 in the United States and Canada and companion candidate storage capacity for more than 3,500 billion tons. The results are detailed in the new Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada which became available online today. MORE INFO Link to NETL's Carbon Sequestration Atlas web page Link to the Interactive Carbon Sequestration Atlas Learn more about DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program

105

In-field remediation of tons of heavy metal-rich waste by Joule heating vitrification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An in-field remediation method of tons of Pb and Zn-rich ceramic waste based on Joule heating vitrification is presented. The progressive heating up to about 1850 °C led to the complete melting of the waste material and the rapid cooling of the melt formed a monolithic glass of 55 tons. The obtained glass was chemically and morphologically homogeneous and immobilized the heavy metals and non-volatile inorganic compounds. The occurrence of crystalline phases such as zircon and cordierite was observed in the lowermost part of the monolith due to the different cooling rate. Leaching tests showed that the vitrified monolith presented a high chemical resistance and metal ions were immobilized into the glass matrix. The presented in-field vitrification process was highly effective in the remediation of tons of heavy metal-rich materials and can be exploited further for remediation of large amounts of soils and asbestos-based materials.

Francesco Dellisanti; Piermaria L. Rossi; Giovanni Valdrè

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Photo of the Week: An Incredible Journey -- Transporting a 50-ton Magnet |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

An Incredible Journey -- Transporting a 50-ton An Incredible Journey -- Transporting a 50-ton Magnet Photo of the Week: An Incredible Journey -- Transporting a 50-ton Magnet July 11, 2013 - 4:38pm Addthis The Muon g-2 (pronounced gee minus two) is an experiment that will use the Fermilab accelerator complex to create an intense beam of muons -- a type of subatomic particle -- traveling at the speed of light. The experiment is picking up after a previous muon experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, which concluded in 2001. In this photo, the massive electromagnet is beginning its 3,200-mile journey from the woods of Long Island to the plains near Chicago, where scientists at Fermilab will refill its storage ring with muons created at Fermilab’s Antiproton Source. The 50-foot-diameter ring is made of steel, aluminum and superconducting wire. It will travel down the East Coast, around the tip of Florida, and up the Mississippi River to Fermilab in Illinois. Transporting the 50-ton device by truck requires meticulous precision -- just a tilt or a twist of a few degrees could leave the internal wiring irreparably damaged.

107

Engineering safety evaluation for 22 ton steel disposal box lifting bail design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this analysis is to design and analyze the lifting bail of the 22 Ton Steel Waste Disposal Box (SWDB). The new design takes the original lifting bail and adds a hinge allowing the top portion of the bail to fold over towards the lid.

BOEHNKE, W.M.

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

108

2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 2 million tons per year: A performing biofuels supply chain for EU aviation NOTE It is understood that in the context of this text the term "biofuel(s) use in aviation" categorically implies "sustainably produced biofuel(s)" according to the EU legislation. June 2011 #12;2 This technical paper was drafted

109

Fertilizer and Nitrogen 1 billion tons of artificial nitrogen fertilizer used annually.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fertilizer and Nitrogen 1 billion tons of artificial nitrogen fertilizer used annually. Emissions. (fertilizers that use nitric acid or ammonium bicarbonate result in emissions of nitrogen oxides, nitrous oxide, ammonia and carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.) ~Indirect: Phosphorus in excess causes eutrophication

Toohey, Darin W.

110

Energy Department Project Captures and Stores One Million Metric Tons of Carbon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

As part of President Obama’s all-of-the-above energy strategy, the Department of Energy announced today that its Illinois Basin-Decatur Project successfully captured and stored one million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) and injected it into a deep saline formation.

111

TITANIUM AND TITANIUM DIOXIDE1 (Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stockpile Center continued to solicit offers for the sale of titanium sponge held in the Government-grade sponge. For fiscal year 2001, 4,540 tons of titanium sponge is being offered for sale. Stockpile Status for disposal FY 2000 FY 2000 Titanium sponge 19,100 3,390 19,100 4,540 4,240 Ev

112

Energy Department Project Captures and Stores more than One Million Metric Tons of CO2  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

WASHINGTON – Following the one year mark since the release of the President’s Climate Action Plan, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) - in partnership with Air Products and Chemicals Inc. – today announced a major milestone, successfully capturing more than one million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) at the hydrogen-production facility in Port Arthur, Texas.

113

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of CCB materials. The two technologies for the underground placement that were to be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry CCB products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of CCB products with about 70% solids. The period covered by this report is the second quarter of Phase 3 of the overall program. During this period over 8,000 tons of CCB mixtures was injected using the hydraulic paste technology. This amount of material virtually filled the underground opening around the injection well, and was deemed sufficient to demonstrate fully the hydraulic injection technology. By the end of this quarter about 2,000 tons of fly ash had been placed underground using the pneumatic placement technology. While the rate of injection of about 50 tons per hour met design criteria, problems were experienced in the delivery of fly ash to the pneumatic demonstration site. The source of the fly ash, the Archer Daniels Midland Company power plant at Decatur, Illinois is some distance from the demonstration site, and often sufficient tanker trucks are not available to haul enough fly ash to fully load the injection equipment. Further, on some occasions fly ash from the plant was not available. The injection well was plugged three times during the demonstration. This typically occurred due to cementation of the FBC ash in contact with water. After considerable deliberations and in consultation with the technical project officer, it was decided to stop further injection of CCB`s underground using the developed pneumatic technology.

Chugh, Y.P.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2012 increased by 4% to about 1.15 million tons,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

48 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2012 increased by 4% to about 1.15 million tons of production--accounted for more than 99% of domestic mine production; copper also was recovered in Alaska

115

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2011 increased slightly to about 1.1 million tons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

48 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2011 increased slightly to about 1.1 million tons order of production--accounted for more than 99% of domestic mine production; copper also was recovered

116

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2013 increased by 4% to about 1.22 million tons,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

48 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: U.S. mine production of copper in 2013 increased by 4% to about 1.22 million tons of production--accounted for more than 99% of domestic mine production; copper also was recovered in Idaho

117

CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS MADE WITH COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ash and bottom ash are produced as by-products of coal-fired electricity generation. In many countries coal ashes are by-products of the coal combustion, their properties are influenced by the nature of understanding behavior of masonry products made from coal ashes. The objective of this research program

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

118

Center for By-Products Utilization Sustainable Concrete with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

landfilling them but also leads to the reduction of the the environmental pollution. #12;Center for ByCenter for By-Products Utilization Sustainable Concrete with Industrial and Post-Consumer By Construction Materials and Technologies, Ancona, Italy, June 2010 #12;Center for By-Products Utilization Why

Saldin, Dilano

119

Solar Neutrino Rates, Spectrum, and its Moments : an MSW Analysis in the Light of Super-Kamiokande Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We re-examine MSW solutions of the solar neutrino problem in a two flavor scenario taking (a) the results on total rates and the electron energy spectrum from the 1117-day SuperKamiokande (SK) data and (b) those on total rates from the Chlorine and Gallium experiments. We find that the SMA solution gives the best fit to the total rates data from the different experiments. One new feature of our analysis is the use of the moments of the SK electron spectrum in a $\\chi^2$ analysis. The best-fit to the moments is broadly in agreement with that obtained from a direct fit to the spectrum data and prefers a $\\Delta m^2$ comparable to the SMA fit to the rates but the required mixing angle is larger. In the combined rate and spectrum analysis, apart from varying the normalization of the $^8$B flux as a free parameter and determining its best-fit value we also obtain the best-fit parameters when correlations between the rates and the spectrum data are included and the normalization of the $^8$B flux held fixed at its SSM value. We observe that the correlations between the rates and spectrum data are important and the goodness of fit worsens when these are included. In either case, the best-fit lies in the LMA region.

Srubabati Goswami; Debasish Majumdar; Amitava Raychaudhuri

2001-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

120

Reuse of coal combustion by-products: A new profit center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal combustion by-products (CCBs) are generated from the combustion of coal for energy production. Approximately 82 million tons of CCBs are produced each year by electric utilities. There are several common types of CCBs produced by coal combustion--fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, flue gas desulfurization material (FGD) and fluidized bed combustion byproducts (FBC). Some CCBs such as fly ash, have pozzolanic properties and may have cementitious properties, both of which are advantageous for engineering, construction and waste remediation applications. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) in ASTM C-618 has created two classifications of useful and quality coal ash, Class F ash and Class C ash. Each class of coal ash has different pozzolanic and cementitious characteristics. Coal ash can be utilized in many manufacturing, mining, agricultural, engineering, construction and waste remediation applications. These potential applications may provide a new revenue source for utilities. The profitability of these applications can, however, be limited by applicable state regulations. Prior to initiating any reuse application, a utility should ensure regulatory approval of the proposed use. Approval may be apparent from a review of state law and regulations. Often times, further regulatory analysis and consultations may be necessary.

Jagiella, D. [Howard and Howard Attorneys, Peoria, IL (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

You are here You are here Home » U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments September 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Underscoring the Obama Administration's efforts to double energy productivity by 2030 and help businesses save money and energy, the Energy Department today recognized more than 120 manufacturers that are making smart investments to save on energy costs, cut greenhouse gas emissions and improve their bottom lines. Through the Department's Better Buildings, Better Plants Program (Better Plants), over 1,750 plants across the United States have saved about $1 billion in energy costs and

122

Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of soil and debris disposed of from D, H Reactor Areas Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of soil and debris disposed of from D, H Reactor Areas January 11, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Dieter Bohrmann, Ecology (509) 372-7954, Dieter.Bohrmann@ecy.wa.gov Emerald Laija, EPA (509) 376-4919, Laija.Emerald@epamail.epa.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - Department of Energy (DOE) contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, recently cleaned up 77 waste sites at Hanford to meet two Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) milestones before the end of 2011. The waste sites were located in the D and H Reactor Areas at Hanford along

123

NETL: News Release - DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5, 2009 5, 2009 DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 Project Helping Further CCS Technology and Meeting G-8 Goals for Deployment Washington, D.C. -A large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) storage project in Mississippi has become the fifth worldwide to reach the important milestone of more than 1 million tons injected. As a result, it is helping to both further carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a mitigation strategy for global climate change and move forward G-8 recommendations for launching 20 projects of this type internationally by 2010. MORE INFO Learn more about DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Link to SECARB web site The project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE), is located at the Cranfield site in Southwestern

124

Wastes and by-products - alternatives for agricultural use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Top address a growing national problem with generation of wastes and by-products, TVA has been involved for several years with developing and commercializing environmentally responsible practices for eliminating, minimizing, or utilizing various wastes/by-products. In many cases, reducing waste generation is impractical, but the wastes/by-products can be converted into other environmentally sound products. In some instances, conversion of safe, value-added agricultural products in the best or only practical alternative. TVA is currently involved with a diversity of projects converting wastes/by-products into safe, economical, and agriculturally beneficial products. Environmental improvement projects have involved poultry litter, cellulosic wastes, used battery acid, ammonium sulfate fines, lead smelting effluents, deep-welled sulfuric acid/ammonium bisulfate solutions, wood ash, waste magnesium ammonium sulfate slurry from recording tape production, and ammunition plant waste sodium nitrate/ammonium nitrate streams.

Boles, J.L.; Craft, D.J.; Parker, B.R.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - avoiding by-product formation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

78 By-Products Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization ECONOMICAL SELF-CONSOLIDATING CONCRETE FOR THE WISCONSIN... production using by-product materials to...

126

(Data in thousand metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2004, clay and shale production was reported in 41 States. About 240  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

million tons. The 49 million tons probably includes crude clay production tonnages which contain E Recycling: Insignificant. Import Sources (2000-03): Brazil, 68%; Mexico, 9%; United Kingdom, 8 probably includes crude clay production which contains significant water content. Compensating

127

Impact of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Quality on the Behavior of Alkali Metals and Trace Elements during Combustion: A Thermodynamic Equilibrium Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Light, thermal- and bacterial-resistant, and inexpensive leathers, especially in the footwear industry, are obtained by the Cr tanning method. ... The selected waste items are representing the major combustible fractions found in MSW, i.e. paper, plastic, textile, and biogenic materials (both food and biomass), but also the other waste fraction (a mixed and poorly defined fraction). ... Pedersen et al.(6) studies six different waste fractions separately under different operational conditions in a full-scale incinerator: NaCl (road salt), household batteries, automotive shredder waste (rubber and plastics), Cu?Cr?As (CCA)-impregnated wood, PVC, and shoes (leather mainly). ...

Michae?l Becidan; Lars Sørum; Daniel Lindberg

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

128

Investigations on catalyzed steam gasification of biomass. Appendix A. Feasibility study of methane production via catalytic gasification of 2000 tons of wood per day  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study has been made of the economic feasibility of producing substitute natural gas (SNG) from wood via catalytic gasification with steam. The plant design in this study was developed from information on gasifier operation supplied by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The plant is designed to process 2000 tons per day of dry wood to SNG. Plant production is 21.6 MM scfd of SNG with a HHV of 956 Btu per scf. All process and support facilities necessary to convert wood to SNG are included. The plant location is Newport, Oregon. The capital cost for the plant is $95,115,000 - September, 1980 basis. Gas production costs which allow for return on capital have been calculated for various wood prices for both utility and private investor financing. For utility financing, the gas production costs are respectively $5.09, $5.56, $6.50, and $8.34 per MM Btu for wood costs of $5, $10, $20, and $40 per dry ton delivered to the plant at a moisture content of 49.50 wt %. For private investor financing, the corresponding product costs are $6.62, $7.11, $8.10, and $10.06 per MM Btu. The cost calculated by the utility financing method includes a return on equity of 15% and an interest rate of 10% on the debt. The private investor financing method, which is 100% equity financing, incorporates a discounted cash flow (DCF) return on equity of 12%. The thermal efficiency without taking an energy credit for by-product char is 58.3%.

Mudge, L.K.; Weber, S.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Grain Sorghum By-Product Feeds for Farm Animals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of feeding trials with farm animals from 1945 throug 1951 to determine the nutritional value and feed usage of the$ bv-products. These experiments were supported in part h grants-in-aid and gifts of by-product feeds from the Cor Products Refining Company... by grants-in-aid from the Corn Products Refining Company. GRAIN SORGHUM BY-PRODUCT FEEDS FOR FARM ANIMALS GRAIN SORGHUM 80.5 million bu. I\\ \\I 30.55% total \\ WHEAT 59.6 million bu. 27.16 % total CORN / 64.3 million bu. Figure 3. Ten-year average...

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Options for Determining Equivalent MHTM (Metric Tons of Heavy Metal) for DOE High Level Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Section 114(d) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (NWPA), limits the overall capacity of the first repository to 70,000 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM). Current DOE policy is to allocate DOE spent fuel and high-level waste (HLW) at 10 percent of the total, or 7,000 MTHM. For planning purposes, 4,667 MTHM will be allocated for HLW. While the NWPA provides a technical basis for determining the MTHM equivalence of HLW, it does not address the significant technical differences between DOE HLW and commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Although more than 170,000 MTHM of DOE fuel has been reprocessed to produce the inventory of HLW, the amount of radioactive waste generated per metric ton of DOE fuel is only a few percent of that in a metric ton of commercial fuel. This study compares the results of four methods for determining the MTHM equivalence of DOE HLW. These methods include (1) using the actual weight of heavy metal in reprocessed DOE fuel, (2) assuming the historical equivalence of 0.5 MTHM/canister of vitrified DOE HLW, (3) comparing the total radioactivity in DOE HLW to the radioactivity of commercial SNF, and (4) comparing the total radiotoxicity of DOE HLW, as defined for those radionuclides identified in 10 CFR 20, with SNF at 1,000 and 10,000 years. This study concludes that either of the last two options would meet Congress’s stated purposes of the NWPA, which are to (1) provide "reasonable assurance that the public and the environment will be adequately protected from the hazards posed by high-level radioactive waste and such spent nuclear fuel as may be disposed of in a repository", and (2) to "define Federal policy for the disposal of such waste and spent fuel".

Knecht, Dieter August; Valentine, James Henry; Luptak, Alan Jay; Staiger, Merle Daniel; Loo, Henry Hung Yiu; Wichmann, Thomas Leonard

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. EPA has issued a final regulation for control of mercury from coal-fired power plants. An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. These adulterated by-products, both ashes and FGD material, represent the greatest challenge to the DOE goal of increased utilization of by-products. The degree of stability of capture by-products and their potential for release of mercury can have a large economic impact on material sales or the approach to disposal. One of the considerations for mercury control technology is the potential trade-off between effective but temporary mercury capture and less effective but more permanent sequestration. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed aqueous leaching procedures on a select subset of the available sample pairs. This report describes batch leaching results for mercury, arsenic, and selenium.

Hesbach, P.A.; Kachur, E.K.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Rapid Batch Characterization of Coal Utilization By-Products  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Batch Characterization Batch Characterization of Coal Utilization By-Products Peter A. Hesbach 1 *, Alexander S. P. Abel 2 Ann G. Kim 3 , and Steven C. Lamey 4 1 U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 USA; 2 NETL Site Support Contractor, Parsons, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, Morgantown, WV 26505 USA; 3 U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Post-Doctoral Fellow, 626 Cochrans Mill Road, P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 USA; 4 retired, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV USA (* author for correspondence, phone: 304-285-4443, fax: 304-285-4487, e-mail: peter.hesbach@netl.doe.gov) KEYWORDS: leaching methods, ash characterization, coal utilization by-products

133

Mineral Sequestration Utilizing Industrial By-Products, Residues, and Minerals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

J. Fauth and Yee Soong J. Fauth and Yee Soong U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Pittsburgh PA, 15236-0940 Mineral Sequestration Workshop National Energy Technology Laboratory August 8, 2001 Mineral Sequestration Utilizing Industrial By-Products, Residues, and Minerals Mineral Sequestration Workshop, U.S. Department of Energy, NETL, August 8, 2001 Overview * Introduction - Objective - Goals - NETL Facilities * Effect of Solution Chemistry on Carbonation Efficiency - Buffered Solution + NaCl - Buffered Solution + MEA * Effect of Pretreatment on Carbonation Efficiency - Thermal Treatments - Chemical Treatments * Carbonation Reaction with Ultramafic Minerals - Serpentine - Olivine Mineral Sequestration Workshop, U.S. Department of Energy, NETL, August 8, 2001 Overview * Carbonation Reaction with Industrial By-products

134

Utilization of by-product gypsum in construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a by-product (called phosphogypsum) during acidulation of phosphate rock in the manufacture phosphoric acid. The sulfate is produced in either a dihydrate or a hemihydrate form depending on the operating conditions. Phosphogypsum produced... by Mobil Chemi- cal Company (Pasadena, Texas) is in the dihydrate form and was previously studied. Phosphogypsum produced by Occidental Chemical Company (White Springs, Florida), on the other hand, is produced in a hemihydrate form and transforms...

Stephenson, Angela Lorraine

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

135

* 96 total credits in A&S courses are required for the degree. ** BA/MSW students may count 6 credits from SCWK7721 and SCWK7723 toward the required 96 A&S credits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Children+ OR Financial Management & Resource Development++ 3 CR SCWK8800 Basic Skills in Macro Practice 3/MSW PROGRAM Curriculum Plan Freshman Year [30 A&S credits*] Course # Semester 1 Course Semester 2 15 Behavior in the Social Environment ** 3 CR SCWK7701 Social Welfare System 3 CR SCWK7723 Diversity and Cross-Cultural

Huang, Jianyu

136

Questions and Answers - How many atoms would it take to create a ton?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

there in the world? there in the world? Previous Question (How many atoms are there in the world?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (Could you please explain density?) Could you please explain density? How many atoms would it take to create a ton? There's a lot more to this question than first appears. There are many types of atoms and each of them has its own mass, so the answer varies depending on which atom you are talking about. Since even a tiny bit of matter has many atoms, it has become customary to use the unit "mole" to signify a standard number of atoms, namely, it is Avogadro's number which (almost) equals 6*1023, or 600,000 billion billon. If you look up the periodic table of elements, one of the numbers usually listed is the atomic mass which is the mass (in grams) of one mole of those atoms. Let's use

137

Cracked lifting lug welds on ten-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ten-ton, Type 48X, UF{sub 6} cylinders are used at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to withdraw enriched uranium hexafluoride from the cascade, transfer enriched uranium hexafluoride to customer cylinders, and feed enriched product to the cascade. To accomplish these activities, the cylinders are lifted by cranes and straddle carriers which engage the cylinder lifting lugs. In August of 1988, weld cracks on two lifting lugs were discovered during preparation to lift a cylinder. The cylinder was rejected and tagged out, and an investigating committee formed to determine the cause of cracking and recommend remedial actions. Further investigation revealed the problem may be general to this class of cylinder in this use cycle. This paper discusses the actions taken at the Portsmouth site to deal with the cracked lifting lug weld problem. The actions include inspection activities, interim corrective actions, metallurgical evaluation of cracked welds, weld repairs, and current monitoring/inspection program.

Dorning, R.E. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Dynamic performance testing of prototype 3 ton air-cooled carrier absorption chiller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of a prototype 3 ton cooling capacity air-cooled lithium bromide/water absorption chiller was tested using an absorption chiller test facility which was modified to expand its testing capabilities to include air-cooled chillers in addition to water-cooled chillers. Temperatures of the three externally supplied fluid loops: hot water, chilled water, and cooling air, were varied in order to determine the effects this would have on the two principal measures of chiller performance: cooling capacity and thermal coefficient of performance (COP). A number of interrelated factors were identified as contributing to less than expected performance. For comparison, experimental correlations of other investigators for this and other similar absorption chillers are presented. These have been plotted as both contour and three-dimensional performance maps in order to more clearly show the functional dependence of the chiller performance on the fluid loop temperatures.

Borst, R.R.; Wood, B.D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The ArDM - a ton-scale liquid argon experiment for direct Dark Matter Detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ArDM is a ton-scale double phase detector for the direct search of the Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMPs) as Dark Matter candidates. The detector is based on a liquid Argon (LAr) target. The present goal is to assemble, fully characterize the detector on the surface and then operate it at an underground facility. The scintillation light and ionization charge produced by recoiling nuclei in WIMP-Ar collision can be measured independently. The discrimination of the WIMP induced nuclear recoils from the electron/gamma background is done using the pulse discrimination technique and the ratio between the produced light and charge. The experiment and the last results from the detector commissioning are presented.

Otyugova, Polina [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

140

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2003 declined to 1.12 million tons and was valued at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

54 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in three other States. Although copper-electrowinning facilities operated during the year. Refined copper and direct melt scrap were consumed at about 30 brass

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2007 declined nominally to 1.19 million tons, but its  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

54 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic--Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, and Montana--accounted for 99% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in two other States. Although copper was recovered at 26 mines operating in the United

142

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 2009 declined by about 9% to 1.2 million tons and its  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

48 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic--Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, Nevada, and Montana--accounted for more than 99% of domestic production; copper also was recovered at mines in Idaho and Missouri. Although copper was recovered at 29 mines operating in the United

144

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons of zirconium oxide (ZrO ) equivalent, unless otherwise noted)2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and concentrates: Australia, 51%; South Africa, 48%; and other, 1%. Zirconium, wrought, unwrought, waste and scrap: France, 69%; Australia, 21%; Germany, 8%; and United Kingdom, 2%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held over 500 tons of zirconium in various forms. DOE also

145

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products - Utilization Projects -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University of North Dakota, EERC - Table of Contents University of North Dakota, EERC - Table of Contents Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Stabilizing Feedlots Using Coal Ash Environmental Evaluation for Utilization of Ash in Soil Stabilization Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium Background CAEEC is a cooperation among industry, government, and the research community to work together to solve CCB- related problems and promote the environmentally safe, technically sound, and economically viable utilization and disposal of CCBs. Objectives To improve the technical and economic aspects of coal combustion by-product (CCB) management. Description CARRC tasks fall into three general categories: Member-prioritized research tasks, Technical and administrative tasks, and Special projects that support CARRC objectives and strengthen and increase the availability of sound technical data for CARRC use.

146

Clean coal technology. Coal utilisation by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need to remove the bulk of ash contained in flue gas from coal-fired power plants coupled with increasingly strict environmental regulations in the USA result in increased generation of solid materials referred to as coal utilisation by-products, or CUBs. More than 40% of CUBs were sold or reused in the USA in 2004 compared to less than 25% in 1996. A goal of 50% utilization has been established for 2010. The American Coal Ash Association (ACCA) together with the US Department of Energy's Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPPI) and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) sponsor a number of projects that promote CUB utilization. Several are mentioned in this report. Report sections are: Executive summary; Introduction; Where do CUBs come from?; Market analysis; DOE-sponsored CUB demonstrations; Examples of best-practice utilization of CUB materials; Factors limiting the use of CUBs; and Conclusions. 14 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs., 14 photos.

NONE

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Solar Grade Silicon from Agricultural By-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, Mayaterials developed a low cost, low energy and low temperature method of purifying rice hull ash to high purity (5-6Ns) and converting it by carbothermal reduction to solar grade quality silicon (Sipv) using a self-designed and built electric arc furnace (EAF). Outside evaluation of our process by an independent engineering firm confirms that our technology greatly lowers estimated operating expenses (OPEX) to $5/kg and capital expenses (CAPEX) to $24/kg for Sipv production, which is well below best-in-class plants using a Siemens process approach (OPEX of 14/kg and CAPEX of $87/kg, respectively). The primary limiting factor in the widespread use of photovoltaic (PV) cells is the high cost of manufacturing, compared to more traditional sources to reach 6 g Sipv/watt (with averages closer to 8+g/watt). In 2008, the spot price of Sipv rose to $450/kg. While prices have since dropped to a more reasonable $25/kg; this low price level is not sustainable, meaning the longer-term price will likely return to $35/kg. The 6-8 g Si/watt implies that the Sipv used in a module will cost $0.21-0.28/watt for the best producers (45% of the cost of a traditional solar panel), a major improvement from the cost/wafer driven by the $50/kg Si costs of early 2011, but still a major hindrance in fulfilling DOE goal of lowering the cost of solar energy below $1/watt. The solar cell industry has grown by 40% yearly for the past eight years, increasing the demand for Sipv. As such, future solar silicon price spikes are expected in the next few years. Although industry has invested billions of dollars to meet this ever-increasing demand, the technology to produce Sipv remains largely unchanged requiring the energy intensive, and chlorine dependent Siemens process or variations thereof. While huge improvements have been made, current state-of-the-art industrial plant still use 65 kWh/kg of silicon purified. Our technology offers a key distinction to other technologies as it starts one step upstream from all other Sipv production efforts. Our process starts by producing high purity SiO2/C feedstocks from which Sipv can be produced in a single, chlorine free, final EAF step. Specifically, our unique technology, and the resultant SiO2/C product can serve as high purity feedstocks to existing metallurgical silicon (Simet) producers, allowing them to generate Sipv with existing US manufacturing infrastructure, reducing the overall capital and commissioning schedule. Our low energy, low CAPEX and OPEX process purifies the silica and carbon present in rice hull ash (RHA) at low temperatures (< 200C) to produce high purity (5-6 Ns) feedstock for production of Sipv using furnaces similar to those used to produce Simet. During the course of this project we partnered with Wadham Energy LP (Wadham), who burns 220k ton of rice hulls (RH)/yr generating 200 GWh of electricity/yr and >30k ton/yr RHA. The power generation step produces much more energy (42 kWh/kg of final silicon produced) than required to purify the RHA (5 kWh/kg of Sipv, compared to 65 kWh/kg noted above. Biogenic silica offers three very important foundations for producing high purity silicon. First, wastes from silica accumulating plants, such as rice, corn, many grasses, algae and grains, contain very reactive, amorphous silica from which impurities are easily removed. Second, plants take up only a limited set of, and minimal quantities of the heavy metals present in nature, meaning fewer minerals must be removed. Third, biomass combustion generates a product with intrinsic residual carbon, mixed at nanometer length scales with the SiO2. RHA is 80-90 wt% high surface area (20 m2/g), amorphous SiO2 with some simple mineral content mixed intimately with 5-15 wt% carbon. The mineral content is easily removed by low cost, acid washes using Mayaterials IP, leading to purified rice hull ash (RHAclean) at up to 6N purity. This highly reactive silica is partially extracted from RHAclean at 200 C in an environmentally benign process to adjust SiO2:C ratios to those needed in EA

Richard M. Laine

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

148

High temperature experiments on a 4 tons UF6 container TENERIFE program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents an experimental program (called TENERIFE) whose aim is to investigate the behaviour of a cylinder containing UF{sub 6} when exposed to a high temperature fire for model validation. Taking into account the experiments performed in the past, the modelization needs further information in order to be able to predict the behaviour of a real size cylinder when engulfed in a 800{degrees}C fire, as specified in the regulation. The main unknowns are related to (1) the UF{sub 6} behaviour beyond the critical point, (2) the relationship between temperature field and internal pressure and (3) the equivalent conductivity of the solid UF{sub 6}. In order to investigate these phenomena in a representative way it is foreseen to perform experiments with a cylinder of real diameter, but reduced length, containing 4 tons of UF{sub 6}. This cylinder will be placed in an electrically heated furnace. A confinement vessel prevents any dispersion of UF{sub 6}. The heat flux delivered by the furnace will be calibrated by specific tests. The cylinder will be changed for each test.

Casselman, C.; Duret, B.; Seiler, J.M.; Ringot, C.; Warniez, P.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

149

1000–ton testing machine for cyclic fatigue tests of materials at liquid nitrogen temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the main tasks of superconductive magnets R and D is to determine the mechanical and fatigue properties of structural materials and the critical design elements in the cryogenic temperature range. This paper describes a new facility built based on the industrial 1000-ton (10 MN) testing machine Schenk PC10.0S. Special equipment was developed to provide the mechanical and cyclic tensile fatigue tests of large-scale samples at the liquid nitrogen temperature and in a given load range. The main feature of the developed testing machine is the cryostat, in which the device converting a standard compression force of the testing machine to the tensile force affected at the test object is placed. The control system provides the remote control of the test and obtaining, processing and presentation of test data. As an example of the testing machine operation the test program and test results of the cyclic tensile fatigue tests of fullscale helium inlet sample of the PF1 coil ITER are presented.

Khitruk, A. A.; Klimchenko, Yu. A.; Kovalchuk, O. A.; Marushin, E. L.; Mednikov, A. A.; Nasluzov, S. N.; Privalova, E. K.; Rodin, I. Yu.; Stepanov, D. B.; Sukhanova, M. V. [The D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (NIIEFA), 3 Doroga na Metallostroy, Metallostroy, Saint Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

150

Potential for Materials and Energy RecoveryPotential for Materials and Energy Recovery the Municipal Solid Wastes (the Municipal Solid Wastes (MSWMSW) of Beograd) of Beograd  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potential for Materials and Energy RecoveryPotential for Materials and Energy Recovery fromfrom;26.2World total 1.30.255.2Developing world 0.380.550.7 EU, Japan, Canada, Australia 0.331.10.3U.S.A. Tons MSW generated, billions Tons MSW per capita Population, billion Global generation of MSW Estimated SCG

Columbia University

151

Methodology for Estimating ton-Miles of Goods Movements for U.S. Freight Mulitimodal Network System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ton-miles is a commonly used measure of freight transportation output. Estimation of ton-miles in the U.S. transportation system requires freight flow data at disaggregated level (either by link flow, path flows or origin-destination flows between small geographic areas). However, the sheer magnitude of the freight data system as well as industrial confidentiality concerns in Census survey, limit the freight data which is made available to the public. Through the years, the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been working in the development of comprehensive national and regional freight databases and network flow models. One of the main products of this effort is the Freight Analysis Framework (FAF), a public database released by the ORNL. FAF provides to the general public a multidimensional matrix of freight flows (weight and dollar value) on the U.S. transportation system between states, major metropolitan areas, and remainder of states. Recently, the CTA research team has developed a methodology to estimate ton-miles by mode of transportation between the 2007 FAF regions. This paper describes the data disaggregation methodology. The method relies on the estimation of disaggregation factors that are related to measures of production, attractiveness and average shipments distances by mode service. Production and attractiveness of counties are captured by the total employment payroll. Likely mileages for shipments between counties are calculated by using a geographic database, i.e. the CTA multimodal network system. Results of validation experiments demonstrate the validity of the method. Moreover, 2007 FAF ton-miles estimates are consistent with the major freight data programs for rail and water movements.

Oliveira Neto, Francisco Moraes [ORNL] [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL] [ORNL; Hwang, Ho-Ling [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Studies of a three-stage dark matter and neutrino observatory based on multi-ton combinations of liquid xenon and liquid argon detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a three stage dark matter and neutrino observatory based on multi-ton two-phase liquid Xe and Ar detectors with sufficiently low backgrounds to be sensitive to WIMP dark matter interaction cross sections down to 10E-47 cm^2, and to provide both identification and two independent measurements of the WIMP mass through the use of the two target elements in a 5:1 mass ratio, giving an expected similarity of event numbers. The same detection systems will also allow measurement of the pp solar neutrino spectrum, the neutrino flux and temperature from a Galactic supernova, and neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe to the lifetime level of 10E27 - 10E28 y corresponding to the Majorana mass predicted from current neutrino oscillation data. The proposed scheme would be operated in three stages G2, G3, G4, beginning with fiducial masses 1-ton Xe + 5-ton Ar (G2), progressing to 10-ton Xe + 50-ton Ar (G3) then, dependent on results and performance of the latter, expandable to 100-ton Xe + 500-ton Ar (G4). This ...

Arisaka, K; Smith, P F; Beltrame, P; Ghag, C; Lung, K; Teymourian, A; Wang, H; Cline, D B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

(Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%; primary aluminum production, 6%; continuous casting, 4%; rubber and thermoplastics, 4%; pharmaceuticals, 294 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production resources, reported production and value of production were withheld from publication to avoid disclosing

154

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc-induced toxic by-products Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

as by-products and thus be affected by an allocation coefficient. Indeed, in LCA when a produc- tion Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection:...

155

Methods and results for stress analyses on 14-ton, thin-wall depleted UF{sub 6} cylinders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium enrichment operations at the three US gaseous diffusion plants produce depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) as a residential product. At the present time, the inventory of DUF{sub 6} in this country is more than half a million tons. The inventory of DUF{sub 6} is contained in metal storage cylinders, most of which are located at the gaseous diffusion plants. The principal objective of the project is to ensure the integrity of the cylinders to prevent causing an environmental hazard by releasing the contents of the cylinders into the atmosphere. Another objective is to maintain the cylinders in such a manner that the DUF{sub 6} may eventually be converted to a less hazardous material for final disposition. An important task in the DUF{sub 6} cylinders management project is determining how much corrosion of the walls can be tolerated before the cylinders are in danger of being damaged during routine handling and shipping operations. Another task is determining how to handle cylinders that have already been damaged in a manner that will minimize the chance that a breach will occur or that the size of an existing breach will be significantly increased. A number of finite element stress analysis (FESA) calculations have been done to analyze the stresses for three conditions: (1) while the cylinder is being lifted, (2) when a cylinder is resting on two cylinders under it in the customary two-tier stacking array, and (3) when a cylinder is resting on tis chocks on the ground. Various documents describe some of the results and discuss some of the methods whereby they have been obtained. The objective of the present report is to document as many of the FESA cases done at Oak Ridge for 14-ton thin-wall cylinders as possible, giving results and a description of the calculations in some detail.

Kirkpatrick, J.R.; Chung, C.K.; Frazier, J.L.; Kelley, D.K.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

OpenEI - MSW Biogenic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/51 Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls License

157

Synthesis of super plasticizer NF-30 from coal coking by product washing oil and performance analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Super plasticizer was synthesized by using coal coking by product washing oil and industrial naphthalene....2 in exhaust (20%). Compared with NF, NF-30 have some advantages in lower cost, high water reducing rate...

Zifang Xu ???; Mingxu Zhang; Wenpei Hu

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

IGCC and PFBC By-Products: Generation, Characteristics, and Management Practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following report is a compilation of data on by-products/wastes from clean coal technologies, specifically integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC). DOE had two objectives in providing this information to EPA: (1) to familiarize EPA with the DOE CCT program, CCT by-products, and the associated efforts by DOE contractors in the area of CCT by-product management and (2) to provide information that will facilitate EPA's effort by complementing similar reports from industry groups, including CIBO (Council of Industrial Boiler Owners) and EEI USWAG (Edison Electric Institute Utility Solid Waste Activities Group). The EERC cooperated and coordinated with DOE CCT contractors and industry groups to provide the most accurate and complete data on IGCC and PFBC by-products, although these technologies are only now being demonstrated on the commercial scale through the DOE CCT program.

Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

PRODUCTION OF LOW-ENERGY, 100% BY-PRODUCT CEMENT UTILIZING COAL COMBUSTION PRODUCTS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The ever-increasing quantity of by-products generated from burning coal in the production of electricity has brought about the need for new areas of utilization. This… (more)

Rust, David E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Optimization of compost fermentation of glycerol by-product discharged from biodiesel fuel production process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of a cheap system for reuse of glycerol by-product discharged from the biodiesel fuel (BDF) production process is needed in parallel with development of ... in the compost. Finally, a material cost evaluation

Yuta Sadano; Ryota Toshimitsu; Jiro Kohda…

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Optimum energy and by-product recovery in chlorinated hydrocarbon disposal systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper covers the three principal areas of a chlorinated hydrocarbon waste disposal system for a typical vinyl chloride monomer facility. These are the incineration, the energy recovery system, and the by-product recovery system. It is shown that the overall efficiency of the energy and by-product recovery systems is dependent on the optimization of the primary combustor (incineration system). 11 refs.

Santoleri, J.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to design, construct, and operate an ash beneficiation facility that will generate several products from coal combustion ash stored in a utility ash pond. The site selected is LG&E's Ghent Station located in Carroll County, Kentucky. The specific site under consideration is the lower ash pond at Ghent, a closed landfill encompassing over 100 acres. Coring activities revealed that the pond contains over 7 million tons of ash, including over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. These potential products are primarily concentrated in the lower end of the pond adjacent to the outlet. A representative bulk sample was excavated for conducting laboratory-scale process testing while a composite 150 ton sample was also excavated for demonstration-scale testing at the Ghent site. A mobile demonstration plant with a design feed rate of 2.5 tph was constructed and hauled to the Ghent site to evaluate unit processes (i.e. primary classification, froth flotation, spiral concentration, secondary classification, etc.) on a continuous basis to determine appropriate scale-up data. Unit processes were configured into four different flowsheets and operated at a feed rate of 2.5 tph to verify continuous operating performance and generate bulk (1 to 2 tons) products for product testing. Cementitious products were evaluated for performance in mortar and concrete as well as cement manufacture process addition. All relevant data from the four flowsheets was compiled to compare product yields and quality while preliminary flowsheet designs were generated to determine throughputs, equipment size specifications and capital cost summaries. A detailed market study was completed to evaluate the potential markets for cementitious products. Results of the study revealed that the Ghent local fly ash market is currently oversupplied by more than 500,000 tpy and distant markets (i.e. Florida) are oversupplied as well. While the total US demand for ultrafine pozzolan is currently equal to demand, there is no reason to expect a significant increase in demand. Despite the technical merits identified in the pilot plant work with regard to beneficiating the entire pond ash stream, market developments in the Ohio River Valley area during 2006-2007 were not conducive to demonstrating the project at the scale proposed in the Cooperative Agreement. As a result, Cemex withdrew from the project in 2006 citing unfavorable local market conditions in the foreseeable future at the demonstration site. During the Budget Period 1 extensions provided by the DOE, CAER has contacted several other companies, including cement producers and ash marketing concerns for private cost share. Based on the prevailing demand-supply situation, these companies had expressed interest only in limited product lines, rather than the entire ash beneficiation product stream. Although CAER had generated interest in the technology, a financial commitment to proceed to Budget Period 2 could not be obtained from private companies. Furthermore, the prospects of any decisions being reached within a reasonable time frame were dim. Thus, CAER concurred with the DOE to conclude the project at the end of Budget Period 1, March 31, 2007. The activities presented in this report were carried out during the Cooperative Agreement period 08 November 2004 through 31 March 2007.

Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

163

(Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1996, clays were produced in most States except Alaska, Delaware, Hawaii, Rhode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

46 CLAYS (Data in thousand metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use% kiln furniture, 6% fiberglass, 4% paint, and 3% rubber; ball clay--25% floor and wall tile, 21 Statistics--United States: 1992 1993 1994 1995 19961 e Production, mine: Kaolin 8,740 8,830 8,770 9,480 9

164

(Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world, followed by China, the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and greases and in the production of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics--United States: 1995 1996 1997 1998100 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production States, Russia, and Argentina, in descending order of production. Australia and Canada were major

165

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1997, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997e Production: Mine, recoverable 488 570 614 600 6071 Primary slab zinc 240 217

166

(Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States was the largest producer and consumer of lithium minerals and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and greases and in the production of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics--United States: 1992 1993 1994 199598 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production worldwide. The value of domestic lithium production was estimated to be about $115 million in 1996. Two

167

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2001, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production-fourths of production. Three primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal of commercial principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining

168

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2002, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production% of production. Two primary and 13 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal of commercial principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining

169

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2000, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

186 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production three-fourths of production. Three primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major

170

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1999, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting: 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999e Production: Mine, recoverable1 614 600 605 722 775 Primary slab zinc 232 226

171

(Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the manufacture of lubricants and greases and in the production of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics98 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production from domestic resources, reported production and value of production data cannot be published

172

(Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the manufacture of lubricants and greases and in the production of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics96 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production from domestic resources, reported production and value of production data cannot be published

173

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2006, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

186 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production accounted for about 80% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting, in order of decreasing tonnage, were

174

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2004, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts

175

(Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world, followed by China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and greases and in the production of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics--United States: 1994 1995 1996 1997102 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production, the United States, and Argentina, in descending order of production. Australia and Canada were major

176

(Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The United States was the largest producer and consumer of lithium minerals and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and greases and synthetic rubber production. Salient Statistics--United States: 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995e96 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use. The value of domestic lithium production was estimated to be about $115 million in 1995. Two companies

177

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2003, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production three-fourths of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber

178

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2005, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production accounted for 86% of total U.S. production. Two primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber

179

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1998, based on contained zinc recoverable from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

192 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining--United States: 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998e Production: Mine, recoverable 570 614 598 605 6551 Primary slab zinc

180

(Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the manufacture of lubricants and greases and in the production of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics100 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production from domestic resources, reported production and value of production data cannot be published

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

(Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2010, five companies operated nine primary aluminum smelters; six smelters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

16 ALUMINUM1 (Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2010, five companies operated nine primary aluminum smelters; six smelters were closed on published market prices, the value of primary metal production was $3.99 billion. Aluminum consumption

182

(Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2007. Indium-containing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were exported to Canada for processing. Two companies, one in New York and the other in Rhode Island for the recycling industry to handle because of large capital costs, environmental restrictions, and storage space gallium diselenide (CIGS) solar cells require approximately 50 metric tons of indium to produce 1 gigawatt

183

ADVANCED MULTI-PRODUCT COAL UTILIZATION BY-PRODUCT PROCESSING PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes the examination of the feedstocks for the beneficiation plant. The ash, as produced by the plant, and that stored in the lower pond were examined. The ash produced by the plant was found to be highly variable as the plant consumes high and low sulfur bituminous coal, in Units 1 and 2 and a mixture of subbituminous and bituminous coal in Units 3 and 4. The ash produced reflected this consisting of an iron-rich ({approx}24%, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), aluminum rich ({approx}29% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and high calcium (6%-7%, CaO) ash, respectively. The LOI of the ash typically was in the range of 5.5% to 6.5%, but individual samples ranged from 1% to almost 9%. The lower pond at Ghent is a substantial body, covering more than 100 acres, with a volume that exceeds 200 million cubic feet. The sedimentation, stratigraphy and resource assessment of the in place ash was investigated with vibracoring and three-dimensional, computer-modeling techniques. Thirteen cores to depths reaching nearly 40 feet, were retrieved, logged in the field and transported to the lab for a series of analyses for particle size, loss on ignition, petrography, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence. Collected data were processed using ArcViewGIS, Rockware, and Microsoft Excel to create three-dimensional, layered iso-grade maps, as well as stratigraphic columns and profiles, and reserve estimations. The ash in the pond was projected to exceed 7 million tons and contain over 1.5 million tons of coarse carbon, and 1.8 million tons of fine (<10 {micro}m) glassy pozzolanic material. The size, quality and consistency of the ponded material suggests that it is the better feedstock for the beneficiation plant.

Robert Jewell; Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

(Data in thousand metric tons of boric oxide (B2O3), unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The estimated value of boric oxide contained in minerals and compounds produced in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was centered in southern California. The largest producer operated an open-pit tincal and kernite mine domestic producer continued mining and processing ore at its open pit mine. The production of boron, sodium year to 60,000 tons per year by 2002. Turkey is building a 274,000-ton-per-year pyrite-burning sulfuric

185

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production of copper in 2010 declined by about 5% to 1.12 million  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

48 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production of copper in 2010 declined by about 5% to 1.12 million tons--Arizona, Utah, Nevada, New Mexico, and Montana--accounted for more than 99% of domestic production; copper also

186

Plutonium by the Ton  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...N reactor at the Hanford Reservation in Senator...was in just such a meeting between senators...discuss the issue in public for fear ofviolating...and forth in secret meetings, a private group...through the year 2000. The databook reports...by the Washington Public Power Supply System...

ELIOT MARSHALL

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Removal of selected heavy metals from aqueous solutions using a solid by-product from the Jordanian oil shale refining  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...?The potential use of treated solid by-product of oil shale to treat aqueous solutions containing several heavy ... Results indicate that the solid by-product of oil shale removes Cd(II), Cu(II),...

W. Y. Abu-El-Sha'r; S. H. Gharaibeh; M. M. Al-Kofahi

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Alaska has 4. 0 trillion tons of low-sulfur coal: Is there a future for this resource  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The demand for and use of low-sulfur coal may increase because of concern with acid rain. Alaska's low-sulfur coal resources can only be described as enormous: 4.0 trillion tons of hypothetical onshore coal. Mean total sulfur content is 0.34% (range 0.06-6.6%, n = 262) with a mean apparent rank of subbituminous B. There are 50 coal fields in Alaska; the bulk of the resources are in six major fields or regions: Nenana, Cook Inlet, Matanuska, Chignik-Herendeen Bay, North Slope, and Bering River. For comparison, Carboniferous coals in the Appalachian region and Interior Province have a mean total sulfur content of 2.3% (range 0.1-19.0%, n = 5,497) with a mean apparent rank of high-volatile A bituminous coal, and Rocky Mountain and northern Great Plains Cretaceous and Tertiary coals have a mean total sulfur content of 0.86% (range 0.02-19.0%, n = 2,754) with a mean apparent rank of subbituminous B. Alaskan coal has two-fifths the total sulfur of western US coals and one-sixth that of Carboniferous US coals. Even though Alaska has large resources of low-sulfur coal, these resources have not been developed because of (1) remote locations and little infrastructure, (2) inhospitable climate, and (3) long distances to potential markets. These resources will not be used in the near future unless there are some major, and probably violent, changes in the world energy picture.

Stricker, G.D. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11002: Number of Cars Equivalent to 100 Metric Tons of Avoided Greenhouse Gases per Year  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

02 Date: January 5, 2011 02 Date: January 5, 2011 Title: Number of Cars Equivalent to 100 Metric Tons of Avoided Greenhouse Gases per Year Originator: Andrea Chew & Tien Nguyen Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: January 25, 2011 A conventional mid-size gasoline car emits 0.45 kg of greenhouse gases (GHG) per mile. 1 One hundred (100) metric tons (t) of GHG per year are equivalent to emissions from 17 conventional gasoline cars. Item: The GHG emissions cited above are from an analysis record prepared by the Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies and Vehicle Technologies Programs on life-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases and petroleum use for several light-duty vehicles. 1 For cars that are between 1 and 5 years old, the average mileage is approximately 13,000,

190

Better Air Quality in Asian and Pacific Rim Cities (BAQ 2002) 16 Dec 2002 18 Dec 2002, Hong Kong SAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rate of MSW production in China is in the range of 8.98%-10%, and the total amount of MSW added up to 140 million tons. The per capita MSW production reaches 1.58kg/d. By the end of the year 1998, wastes waste Moisture % Density (ton/m3) Heating value (kJ/kg) Rubber % Glass % Metal % city/year Organic

Columbia University

191

Demonstration and evaluation of the 20-ton-capacity load-cell-based weighing system, Eldorado Resources, Ltd. , Port Hope, Ontario, September 3-4, 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 3 and 4, 1986, the prototype 20-ton-capacity load-cell-based weighing system (LCBWS) developed by the US Enrichment Safeguards Program (ESP) at Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., was field tested at the Eldorado Resources, Ltd., (ERL) facility in Port Hope, Ontario. The 20-ton-capacity LCBWS has been designed and fabricated for use by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for verifying the masses of large-capacity UF/sub 6/ cylinders during IAEA safeguards inspections at UF/sub 6/ handling facilities. The purpose of the Canadian field test was to demonstrate and to evaluate with IAEA inspectorates and with UF/sub 6/ bulk handling facility operators at Eldorado the principles, procedures, and hardware associated with using the 20-ton-capacity LCBWS as a portable means for verifying the masses of 10- and 14-ton UF/sub 6/ cylinders. Session participants included representatives from the IAEA, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Eldorado Resources, Ltd., the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), and the International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Appendix A presents the list of participants and their organization affiliation. The two-day field test involved a formal briefing by ESP staff, two cylinder weighing sessions, IAEA critiques of the LCBWS hardware and software, and concluding discussions on the field performance of the system. Appendix B cites the meeting agenda. Summarized in this report are (1) the technical information presented by the system developers, (2) results from the weighing sessions, and (3) observations, suggestions, and concluding statements from meeting participants.

Cooley, J.N.; Huxford, T.J.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Digestion Experiments with Oat By-Products and Other Feeds : Report No. 7.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION GRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TEXAS B. BIZZELL, President --- Y -- BULLETIN NO. 315 February, 1924 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY DIGESTION EXPERIMENTS WITH OAT BY- PRODUCTS AND OTHER FEEDS -- -- - B... Breeding G. R. WARREN, B. S., Swine Husbandman MAIN STATION FARM: R. M. SHERWOOD, B. S., Poultry HUS- D. T. KILLOUGH, B. S., Superinte. bandman J. J. HUNT, Wool Grader FEED CONTROL SERVICE: K. YOUNGBLOOD, M. S.. Ph. D., ENTOMOLOGY: F. D. FULLER, M. S...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1924-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes the examination of the feedstocks for the beneficiation plant. The ash, as produced by the plant, and that stored in the lower pond were examined. A mobile demonstration unit has been designed and constructed for field demonstration. The demonstration unit was hauled to the test site on trailers that were place on a test pad located adjacent to the ash pond and re-assembled. The continuous test unit will be operated at the Ghent site and will evaluate three processing configurations while producing sufficient products to facilitate thorough product testing. The test unit incorporates all of the unit processes that will be used in the commercial design and is self sufficient with respect to water, electricity and processing capabilities. Representative feed ash for the operation of the filed testing unit was excavated from a location within the lower ash pond determined from coring activities. Approximately 150 tons of ash was excavated and pre-screened to remove +3/8 inch material that could cause plugging problems during operation of the demonstration unit.

Thomas Robl; John Groppo

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Long-Term Column Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. The stability of mercury and any co-captured elements in the by-products could have a large economic impact if it reduced by-product sales or increasing their disposal costs. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed continuous leaching of a select subset of the available sample pairs using four leachants: water (pH=5.7), dilute sulfuric acid (pH=1.2), dilute acetic acid (pH=2.9), and sodium carbonate (pH=11.1). This report describes results obtained for mercury, arsenic, and selenium during the 5-month leaching experiments.

Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.; White, Fredrick; Rohar, P.C.; Kim, A.G

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of coal combustion by-products (CCBs) in an environmentally sound manner is a major issue facing the coal and utility industries in the US today. Disposal into abandoned sections of underground coal mines may overcome many of the surface disposal problems along with added benefits such as mitigation of subsidence and acid mine drainage. However, many of the abandoned underground coal mines are located far from power plants, requiring long distance hauling of by-products which will significantly contribute to the cost of disposal. For underground disposal to be economically competitive, the transportation and handling cost must be minimized. This requires careful selection of the system and optimal design for efficient operation. The materials handling and system economics research addresses these issues. Transportation and handling technologies for CCBs were investigated from technical, environmental and economic points of view. Five technologies were found promising: (1) Pneumatic Trucks, (2) Pressure Differential Rail Cars, (3) Collapsible Intermodal Containers, (4) Cylindrical Intermodal Tanks, and (5) Coal Hopper Cars with Automatic Retractable Tarping. The first two technologies are currently being utilized in transporting by-products from power plants to disposal sites, whereas the next three are either in development or in conceptualization phases. In this research project, engineering design and cost models were developed for the first four technologies. The engineering design models are in the form of spreadsheets and serve the purpose of determining efficient operating schedules and sizing of system components.

Sevim, H.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Technical support for the Ohio Coal Technology Program. Volume 1, Baseline of knowledge concerning by-product characteristics: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared for the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) under Grant Agreement No. CDO/R-88-LRl and comprises two volumes. Volume I presents data on the chemical, physical, and leaching characteristics of by-products from a wide variety of clean coal combustion processes. Volume II consists of a discussion of (a) process modification waste minimization opportunities and stabilization considerations; (b) research and development needs and issues relating to clean coal combustion technologies and by-products; (c) the market potential for reusing or recycling by-product materials; and (d) regulatory considerations relating to by-product disposal or reuse.

Olfenbuttel, R.; Clark, S.; Helper, E.; Hinchee, R.; Kuntz, C.; Means, J.; Oxley, J.; Paisley, M.; Rogers, C.; Sheppard, W.; Smolak, L. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1989-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

197

Investigations on catalyzed steam gasification of biomass: feasibility study of methane production via catalytic gasification of 200 tons of wood per day  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a result of an additional study made of the economic feasibility of producing substitute natural gas (SNG) from wood via catalytic gasification with steam. The report has as its basis the original 2000 tons of wood per day study generated from process development unit testing performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of this additional work was to determine the feasibility of a smaller scale plant one-tenth the size of the original or 200 tons of dry wood feed per day. Plant production based on this wood feed is 2.16 MM Scfd of SNG with a HHV of 956 Btu per Scf. All process and support facilities necessary to convert wood to SNG are included in this study. The plant location is Newport, Oregon. The capital cost for the plant is $26,680,000 - September 1980 basis. Gas production costs which allow for return on capital have been calculated for various wood prices for both utility and private investor financing. These wood prices represent the cost of unchipped wood delivered to the plant site. For utility financing, the gas production costs are, respectively, $14.34, $14.83, $15.86, and $17.84 per MM Btu for wood costs of $5, $10, $20, and $40 per dry ton. For private investor financing, the corresponding product costs are $18.76, $19.26, $20.28, and $22.31 per MM Btu for the corresponding wood costs. The costs calculated by the utility financing method includes a return on equity of 15% and an interest rate of 10% on the debt. The private investor financing method, which is 100% equity financing, incorporates a discounted cash flow (DCF) return on equity of 12%. The thermal efficiency without taking an energy credit for char is 57.4%.

Mudge, L.K.; Weber, S.L.; Mitchell, D.H.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Robertus, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

A nuclear criticality safety assessment of the loss of moderation control in 2 1/2 and 10-ton cylinders containing enriched UF{sub 6}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Moderation control for maintaining nuclear criticality safety in 2 {1/2}-ton, 10-ton, and 14-ton cylinders containing enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) has been used safely within the nuclear industry for over thirty years, and is dependent on cylinder integrity and containment. This assessment evaluates the loss of moderation control by the breaching of containment and entry of water into the cylinders. The first objective of this study was to estimate the required amounts of water entering these large UF{sub 6} cylinders to react with, and to moderate the uranium compounds sufficiently to cause criticality. Hypothetical accident situations were modeled as a uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) slab above a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder, and a UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} sphere centered within a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder. These situations were investigated by computational analyses utilizing the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Computer Code. The results were used to estimate both the masses of water required for criticality, and the limiting masses of water that could be considered safe. The second objective of the assessment was to calculate the time available for emergency control actions before a criticality would occur, i.e., a {open_quotes}safetime{close_quotes}, for various sources of water and different size openings in a breached cylinder. In the situations considered, except the case for a fire hose, the safetime appears adequate for emergency control actions. The assessment shows that current practices for handling moderation controlled cylinders of low enriched UF{sub 6}, along with the continuation of established personnel training programs, ensure nuclear criticality safety for routine and emergency operations.

Newvahner, R.L. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Potential for by-product recovery in geothermal energy operations issue paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document identifies and discusses the significant issues raised by the idea of recovering useful by-products from wastes (primarily spent brine) generated during geothermal power production. The physical availability of numerous valuable materials in geothermal brines has captured the interest of geothermal resource developers and other parties ever since their presence was known. The prospects for utilizing huge volumes of highly-saline geothermal brines for electricity generation in the Imperial Valley of California have served to maintain this interest in both private sector and government circles.

None

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Electricity from coal and utilization of coal combustion by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most electricity in the world is conventionally generated using coal, oil, natural gas, nuclear energy, or hydropower. Due to environmental concerns, there is a growing interest in alternative energy sources for heat and electricity production. The major by-products obtained from coal combustion are fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials. The solid wastes produced in coal-fired power plants create problems for both power-generating industries and environmentalists. The coal fly ash and bottom ash samples may be used as cementitious materials.

Demirbas, A. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Mechanisms for formation of organic and inorganic by-products and their control in nonthermal plasma chemical processing of VOCs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the major by-products derived from Nonthermal Plasma (NTP) chemical processing of different types of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs), mechanisms for their formation, effects of reactor types and additives such as water and gaseous oxygen on by-product distribution, and safe operations of NTP reactors for the removal of VOCs.

Shigeru Futamura; Masami Sugasawa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

NETL: Hg Control – The Effects on By-products: What Do We Know and Where  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hg Control – The Effects on By-products: Hg Control – The Effects on By-products: What Do We Know and Where Do We Go? Table of Contents Foreword Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Introductions Field Demonstrations Laboratory Studies Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

203

Gas treatment and by-products recovery of Thailand`s first coke plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coke is needed in the blast furnace as the main fuel and chemical reactant and the main product of a coke plant. The second main product of the coke plant is coke oven gas. During treatment of the coke oven gas some coal chemicals like tar, ammonia, sulphur and benzole can be recovered as by-products. Since the market prices for these by-products are rather low and often erratic it does not in most cases justify the investment to recover these products. This is the reason why modern gas treatment plants only remove those impurities from the crude gas which must be removed for technical and environmental reasons. The cleaned gas, however, is a very valuable product as it replaces natural gas in steel work furnaces and can be used by other consumers. The surplus can be combusted in the boiler of a power plant. A good example for an optimal plant layout is the new coke oven facility of Thai Special Steel Industry (TSSI) in Rayong. The paper describes the TSSI`s coke oven gas treatment plant.

Diemer, P.E.; Seyfferth, W. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

Acidic soil amendment with a magnesium-containing fluidized bed combustion by-product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Removal of SO{sub 2} from the emissions of coal-fired boilers produces by-products that often consist of CaSO{sub 4}, residual alkalinity, and coal ash. These by-products could be beneficial to acidic soils because of their alkalinity and the ability of gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center{underscore}dot}2H{sub 2}O) to reduce Al toxicity in acidic subsoils. A 3-yr field experiment was conducted to determine the liming efficacy of a fluidized bed combustion boiler by-product (FBC) that contained 129 g Mg kg{sup {minus}1} as CaMg(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} and MgO and its effects on surface and subsurface soil chemistry. The FBC was mixed in the surface 10 cm of two acidic soils (Wooster silt loam, an Oxyaquic Fragiudalf, and Coshocton silt loam, an Aquultic Hapludalf) at rates of 0, 0.5, 1, and 2 times each soil's lime requirement (LR). Soils were sampled in 10-cm increments to depths ranging from 20 to 110 cm, and corn (Zea mays L.) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) were grown. Application of Mg-FBC increased alfalfa yields in all six site-years, whereas it had no effect on corn grain yield in five site-years and decreased grain yield in one site-year. Plant tissue concentrations of Mg, S, and Mo were increased by Mg-FBC, while most trace elements were either unaffected or decreased. Application of Mg-FBC at one or two times LR increased surface soil pH to near 7 within 1 wk. Although surface soil pH remained near 7 for 2 yr, there was minimal effect on subjacent soil pH. Application of Mg-FBC increased surface soil concentrations of Ca, Mg, and S, which promoted downward movement of Mg and SO{sub 4}. This had different effects on subsoil chemistry in the two soils: in the high-Ca-status Wooster subsoil, exchangeable Ca was decreased and exchangeable Al was increased, whereas in the high-Al-status Coshocton subsoil, exchangeable Al was decreased and exchangeable Mg was increased. The Mg-FBC was an effective liming material and, because of the presence of both Mg and SO{sub 4}, may be more effective than gypsum in ameliorating subsoil Al phytotoxicity.

Stehouwer, R.C.; Dick, W.A.; Sutton, P.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Environmental chamber measurements of mercury flux from coal utilization by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An environmental chamber was constructed to measure the mercury flux from coal utilization by-product (CUB) samples. Samples of fly ash, FGD gypsum, and wallboard made from FGD gypsum were tested under both dark and illuminated conditions with or without the addition of water to the sample. Mercury releases varied widely, with 7-day experiment averages ranging from -6.8 to 73 ng/m2 h for the fly ash samples and -5.2 to 335 ng/m2 h for the FGD/wallboard samples. Initial mercury content, fly ash type, and light exposure had no observable consistent effects on the mercury flux. For the fly ash samples, the effect of a mercury control technology was to decrease the emission. For three of the four pairs of FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, the wallboard sample released less (or absorbed more) mercury than the gypsum.

Pekney, N.J.; Martello, D.V.; Schroeder, K.T.; Granite, E.J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Case-Control Study of Colon and Rectal Cancers and Chlorination By-Products in Treated Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Articles Case-Control Study of Colon and Rectal Cancers and Chlorination By-Products in Treated Water 1 Will D. King 2 Loraine D. Marrett Christy G. Woolcott Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Queens University, Kingston, Ontario...

Will D. King; Loraine D. Marrett; Christy G. Woolcott

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Heterogeneous distribution of trace elements and fluorine in phosphogypsum by-product  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phosphogypsum (PG), a by-product from phosphate fertilizer production, is composed mainly of gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O) but also contains minor quantities of trace elements (TE), rare earth elements (REE) and F. Some elements may be elevated in quantities to be of environmental concern. This study determined the distribution of TE, REE and F among three size fractions (53 ?m) in \\{PGs\\} derived from three different phosphate rock sources. Fine fraction PG (<20 ?m) composed of <10% of total PG mass but was highly enriched in TE, REE and F compared to unfractionated PG. For PG derived from Idaho rock, Se in the fine fraction was enriched 830 times over soil and 415 times over shale while Cd was enriched in the fine fraction 70-fold over shale and soil. Fluorine was elevated 37 times in the fine fraction compared to shale. The same trends were observed for PG derived from Togo and Florida rocks. Elevated elemental concentrations in fine particles and particle sorting during PG deposition may contribute to chemical heterogeneity of PG repositories, and make elements more susceptible to mobilization processes, such as leaching and erosion. Removal of fines will improve the utilization of PG in other industries, such as for use as an amendment to agricultural soils.

J.M. Arocena; P.M. Rutherford; M.J. Dudas

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Variability of chlorination by-product occurrence in water of indoor and outdoor swimming pools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Swimming is one of the most popular aquatic activities. Just like natural water, public pool water may contain microbiological and chemical contaminants. The purpose of this study was to study the presence of chemical contaminants in swimming pools, in particular the presence of disinfection by-products (DBPs) such as trihalomethanes (THMs), haloacetic acids (HAAs) and inorganic chloramines (CAMi). Fifty-four outdoor and indoor swimming pools were investigated over a period of one year (monthly or bi-weekly sampling, according to the type of pool) for the occurrence of DBPs. The results showed that DBP levels in swimming pools were greater than DBP levels found in drinking water, especially for HAAs. Measured concentrations of \\{THMs\\} (97.9 vs 63.7 ?g/L in average) and \\{HAAs\\} (807.6 vs 412.9 ?g/L in average) were higher in outdoor pools, whereas measured concentrations of \\{CAMi\\} (0.1 vs 0.8 mg/L in average) were higher in indoor pools. Moreover, outdoor pools with heated water contained more \\{DBPs\\} than unheated pools. Finally, there was significant variability in tTHM, HAA9 and \\{CAMi\\} levels in pools supplied by the same municipal drinking water network, suggesting that individual pool characteristics (number of swimmers) and management strategies play a major role in DBP formation.

Sabrina Simard; Robert Tardif; Manuel J. Rodriguez

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

TREATMENT OF METAL-LADEN HAZARDOUS WASTES WITH ADVANCED CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal-laden wastes can be stabilized and solidified using advanced clean coal technology by-products (CCTBs)--fluid bed combustor ash and spray drier solids. These utility-generated treatment chemicals are available for purchase through brokers, and commercial applications of this process are being practiced by treaters of metal-laden hazardous waste. A complex of regulations governs this industry, and sensitivities to this complex has discouraged public documentation of treatment of metal-laden hazardous wastes with CCTBs. This report provides a comprehensive public documentation of laboratory studies that show the efficacy of the stabilization and solidification of metal-laden hazardous wastes--such as lead-contaminated soils and sandblast residues--through treatment with CCTBs. It then describes the extensive efforts that were made to obtain the permits allowing a commercial hazardous waste treater to utilize CCTBs as treatment chemicals and to install the equipment required to do so. It concludes with the effect of this lengthy process on the ability of the treatment company to realize the practical, physical outcome of this effort, leading to premature termination of the project.

James T. Cobb, Jr.

2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

210

New perspectives on the cancer risks of trichloroethylene, its metabolites, and chlorination by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientific developments in the 1990`s have important implications for the assessment of cancer risks posed by exposures to trichloroethylene (TCE). These new developments include: epidemiological studies; experimental studies of TCE carcinogenicity, metabolism and metabolite carcinogenicity; applications of new physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for TCE; and new pharmacodynamic data obtained for TCE and its rhetabolites. Following a review of previous assessments of TCE carcinogenicity, each of these new sets of developments is summarized. The new epidemiological data do not provide evidence of TCE carcinogenicity in humans, and the new pharmacodynamic data support the hypothesis that TCE carcinogenicity is caused by TCE-induced cytotoxicity. Based on this information, PBPK-based estimates for likely no-adverse effect levels (NOAELs) for human exposures to TCE are calculated to be 16 ppb for TCE in air respired 24 hr/day, and 210 ppb for TCE in drinking water. Cancer risks of zero are predicted for TCE exposures below these calculated NOAELs. For comparison, hypothetical cancer risks posed by lifetime ingestive and multiroute household exposures to TCE in drinking water, at the currently enforced Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) concentration of 5 ppb are extrapolated from animal bioassay data using a conservative, linear dose-response model. These TCE-related risks are compared to corresponding ones associated with concentrations of chlorination by-products (CBP) in household water. It is shown that, from the standpoint of comparative hypothetical cancer risks, based on conservative linear dose-response extrapolations, there would likely be no health benefit, and more likely a possible health detriment, associated with any switch from a household water supply containing <375 ppb TCE to one containing CBP at levels corresponding to the currently proposed 80-ppb MCL for total trihalomethanes.

Bogen, K.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Slone, T.; Gold, L.S.; Manley, N.; Revzan, K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

211

Strontium Isotope Study of Coal Untilization By-products Interacting with Environmental Waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sequential leaching experiments on coal utilization by-products (CUB) were coupled with chemical and strontium (Sr) isotopic analyses to better understand the influence of coal type and combustion processes on CUB properties and the release of elements during interaction with environmental waters during disposal. Class C fly ash tended to release the highest quantity of minor and trace elements—including alkaline earth elements, sodium, chromium, copper, manganese, lead, titanium, and zinc—during sequential extraction, with bottom ash yielding the lowest. Strontium isotope ratios ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) in bulk-CUB samples (total dissolution of CUB) are generally higher in class F ash than in class C ash. Bulk-CUB ratios appear to be controlled by the geologic source of the mineral matter in the feed coal, and by Sr added during desulfurization treatments. Leachates of the CUB generally have Sr isotope ratios that are different than the bulk value, demonstrating that Sr was not isotopically homogenized during combustion. Variations in the Sr isotopic composition of CUB leachates were correlated with mobility of several major and trace elements; the data suggest that arsenic and lead are held in phases that contain the more radiogenic (high-{sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr) component. A changing Sr isotope ratio of CUB-interacting waters in a disposal environment could forecast the release of certain strongly bound elements of environmental concern. This study lays the groundwork for the application of Sr isotopes as an environmental tracer for CUB–water interaction.

Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J; Stewart, Brian W; Capo, Rosemary C; Chapman, Elizabeth C; Schroeder, Karl T; Brubaker, Tonya M

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2012, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agricultural, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Salient Statistics--United States: 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 e Production: Mine, zinc in ore

213

(Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: For the first time in history, Chile surpassed the United States as the largest producer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of synthetic rubber. Salient Statistics--United States: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997e Production W W W W W Imports98 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of contained lithium, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production for domestic consumption as well as for export to other countries; reported production and value of production

214

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1995 was about $700 million. Essentially all came from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use were used principally by the agricultural, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts--United States: 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995e Production: Mine, recoverable 518 523 488 570 600 Primary slab zinc 253

215

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2010, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber, and germanium. Salient Statistics--United States: 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 e Production: Mine, zinc in ore

216

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2011, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

188 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Salient Statistics--United States: 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 e Production: Mine, zinc in ore

217

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 1996 was about $800 million. Essentially all came from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production were used principally by the agricultural, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts--United States: 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996e Production: Mine, recoverable 523 488 570 614 6201 Primary slab zinc

218

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2007, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

190 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production U.S. production. One primary and 12 large- and medium-sized secondary smelters refined zinc metal by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber industries. Major coproducts of zinc mining and smelting, in order

219

(Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of zinc mined in 2009, based on zinc contained in concentrate, was about  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

184 ZINC (Data in thousand metric tons of zinc content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production uses. Zinc compounds and dust were used principally by the agriculture, chemical, paint, and rubber, and germanium. Salient Statistics--United States: 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009e Production: Mine, zinc in ore

220

(Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Domestic mine production in 1997 was essentially unchanged at 1.9 million metric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

52 COPPER (Data in thousand metric tons of copper content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Mexico, Nevada, and Montana, accounted for 98% of domestic production; copper was also recovered at mines in six other States. While copper was recovered at about 35 mines operating in the United States, 15

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of Coal Combustion By-Product Disposal and Utilizaton  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) conducted a multiyear study to evaluate the impact of mercury and other air toxic elements (ATEs) on the management of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). The ATEs evaluated in this project were arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, and selenium. The study included laboratory tasks to develop measurement techniques for mercury and ATE releases, sample characterization, and release experiments. A field task was also performed to measure mercury releases at a field site. Samples of fly ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials were collected preferentially from full-scale coal-fired power plants operating both without and with mercury control technologies in place. In some cases, samples from pilot- and bench-scale emission control tests were included in the laboratory studies. Several sets of 'paired' baseline and test fly ash and FGD materials collected during full-scale mercury emission control tests were also included in laboratory evaluations. Samples from mercury emission control tests all contained activated carbon (AC) and some also incorporated a sorbent-enhancing agent (EA). Laboratory release experiments focused on measuring releases of mercury under conditions designed to simulate CCB exposure to water, ambient-temperature air, elevated temperatures, and microbes in both wet and dry conditions. Results of laboratory evaluations indicated that: (1) Mercury and sometimes selenium are collected with AC used for mercury emission control and, therefore, present at higher concentrations than samples collected without mercury emission controls present. (2) Mercury is stable on CCBs collected from systems both without and with mercury emission controls present under most conditions tested, with the exception of vapor-phase releases of mercury exposed to elevated temperatures. (3) The presence of carbon either from added AC or from unburned coal can result in mercury being sorbed onto the CCB when exposed to ambient-temperature air. The environmental performance of the mercury captured on AC used as a sorbent for mercury emission control technologies indicated that current CCB management options will continue to be sufficiently protective of the environment, with the potential exception of exposure to elevated temperatures. The environmental performance of the other ATEs investigated indicated that current management options will be appropriate to the CCBs produced using AC in mercury emission controls.

David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher; Mei Xin; Mae Sexauer Gustin; Rob Jung

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

CORROSION OF ALUMINUM CLAD SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN THE 70 TON CASK DURING TRANSFER FROM L AREA TO H-CANYON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33 % was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 260 {degrees}C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 {degrees}C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

Mickalonis, J.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Management of dry gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion by-products in abandoned underground coal mines, and to assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of coal combustion by-products. The two technologies for the underground placement that will be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement using virtually dry coal combustion by-products, and (2) hydraulic placement using a paste mixture of combustion by-products with about 70% solids. Phase 2 of the overall program began April 1, 1996. The principal objective of Phase 2 is to develop and fabricate the equipment for both the pneumatic and hydraulic placement technologies, and to conduct a limited, small-scale shakedown test of the pneumatic and hydraulic placement equipment. The shakedown test originally was to take place on the surface, in trenches dug for the tests. However, after a thorough study it was decided, with the concurrence of DOE-METC, to drill additional injection wells and conduct the shakedown tests underground. This will allow a more thorough test of the placement equipment.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Utilization of low NO{sub x} coal combustion by-products. Quarterly report, April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is studying a beneficiation process to make power plant fly ash a more useful by-product. The tasks include: (1) Laboratory characterization: Sample collection; Material characterization; and Lab testing of ash processing operations; (2) Pilot plant testing of the separation of carbon from fly ash; (3) Product testing: Concrete testing and Plastic fillers; and (4) Market and economic analysis. Appendices present information on material characterization, laboratory testing of a flotation process, pilot runs, and concrete testing results.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Topical report, October 1, 1993--March 31, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DESEVAL-TRANS program is developed for the purpose of helping the engineer to design and economically evaluate coal combustion byproduct transportation systems that will operate between the power plant and the disposal site. The objective of the research project was to explore the technical, environmental and economic feasibility of disposing coal combustion byproducts in underground mines in Illinois. The DESEVAL-TRANS (short for Design and Evaluation of Transportation Systems) was developed in the Materials Handling and Systems Economics branch of the overall project. Four types of coal combustion byproducts were targeted for transportation and handling: Conventional fly ash; Scrubber sludge; Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) fly ash; and Spent-bed ash. Several transportation and handling systems that could handle these byproducts were examined. These technologies were classified under three general categories: Truck; Rail; and Container. The purpose of design models is to determine the proper number of transport units, silo capacity, loading and unloading rates, underground placement capacity, number of shifts, etc., for a given case, defined by a distance-tonnage combination. The cost computation models were developed for the determination of the operating and capital costs. An economic evaluation model, which is common to all categories, was also developed to establish the cost-per-ton of byproduct transported.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 30, 1993, the US Department of Energy - Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE-METC) and Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC) entered into a cooperative research agreement entitled {open_quotes}Management of Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products in Underground Mines{close_quotes} (DE-FC21-93MC30252). Under the agreement Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate two technologies for the placement of coal combustion residues in abandoned underground coal mines, and will assess the environmental impact of these technologies for the management of coal combustion by-products. The two technologies for the underground placement that will be developed and demonstrated are: (1) pneumatic placement, using virtually dry materials, and (2) hydraulic placement, using a {open_quotes}paste{close_quotes} mixture of materials with about 70% solids. Phase II of the overall program began April 1, 1996. The principal objective of Phase II is to develop and fabricate the equipment for placing the coal combustion by-products underground, and to conduct a demonstration of the technologies on the surface. Therefore, this quarter has been largely devoted to developing specifications for equipment components, visiting fabrication plants throughout Southern Illinois to determine their capability for building the equipment components in compliance with the specifications, and delivering the components in a timely manner.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Task 1.13 - Data Collection and Database Development for Clean Coal Technology By-Product Characteristics and Management Practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Technology Center-Morgantown (DOE FETC) efforts in the areas of fossil fuels and clean coal technology (CCT) have included involvement with both conventional and advanced process coal conversion by-products. In 1993, DOE submitted a Report to Congress on "Barriers to the Increased Utilization of Coal Combustion Desulfurization Byproducts by Governmental and Commercial Sectors" that provided an outline of activities to remove the barriers identified in the report. DOE charged itself with participation in this process, and the work proposed in this document facilitates DOE's response to its own recommendations for action. The work reflects DOE's commitment to the coal combustion by-product (CCB) industry, to the advancement of clean coal technology, and to cooperation with other government agencies. Information from DOE projects and commercial endeavors in fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) and coal gasification is the focus of this task. The primary goal is to provide an easily accessible compilation of characterization information on the by-products from these processes to government agencies and industry to facilitate sound regulatory and management decisions. Additional written documentation will facilitate the preparation of an updated final version of background information collected for DOE in preparation of the Report to Congress on barriers to CCB utilization.

Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Prediction of the digestible and metabolizable energy content of wheat milling by-products for growing pigs from chemical composition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thirty samples of wheat milling by-products (wheat bran, wheat middlings, wheat shorts, wheat red dog, wheat feed flour), collected from 11 flour mills, were fed to growing pigs to determine their digestible energy (DE) and metabolizable energy (ME) content and to establish equations for predicting their DE and ME content based on chemical analysis. The basal diet was based on corn and soybean meal while the other 30 experimental diets contained 290.4 g/kg wheat milling by-products added at the expense of corn and soybean meal. The 31 diets were fed to 96 growing pigs (BW = 61.9 ± 3.2 kg) according to a completely randomized design during two successive periods. During each period, the 30 experimental diets were fed to three pigs and the basal diet was fed to six pigs, resulting in 6 replications per experimental diet and 12 replications for the basal diet over the two periods. The chemical composition of the 30 samples was variable, and starch and fiber content had a strong negative correlation (r = ?0.96 to ?0.99 for CF and ADF, respectively). The DE content of wheat feed flour, wheat red dog, wheat shorts, wheat middlings and wheat bran averaged 17.4, 16.9, 15.2, 12.5 and 12.0 MJ/kg DM, respectively. From the stepwise regression analysis, a series of DE and ME prediction equations were generated. The best fit equations for wheat milling by-products were: DE (MJ/kg DM) = 19.2 ? (0.016×aNDF) with R2 = 0.94, RSD = 0.58 and Pcontent varied substantially and various correlated single predictors (aNDF, ash, CF, starch, etc.) can be used to accurately predict the DE and ME content when fed to growing pigs.

Q. Huang; C.X. Shi; Y.B. Su; Z.Y. Liu; D.F. Li; L. Liu; C.F. Huang; X.S. Piao; C.H. Lai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

A Second Generation Biofuel from Cellulosic Agricultural By-product Fermentation Using Clostridium Species for Electricity Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The production of second generation biofuel is essential for limiting food versus fuel competition. Butanol is one of the important biofuel for the future. Agricultural by-products namely bagasse and potato peel were hydrolyzed to produce readily fermented sugar for butanol fermentation. The butanol concentration was 1 – 2 g/l. To test the electricity generation, a customized generator was used for butanol combustion. The electricity produced was up to 1300 watts. Further improvements are needed in the hydrolysis method, medium composition, and generator design. This research has demonstrated that bagasse and potato peel are potential feedstock for producing butanol for generating electricity

Yalun Arifin; Ellen Tanudjaja; Arbi Dimyati; Reinhard Pinontoan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Dairyland Power Cooperative, La Crosse, WI; Madison Gas and Electric Company, Madison, WI; National Minerals contents or use thereof. This report does not constitute a standard, specification, or regulation

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

231

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ash. A clean-coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SO2 control technologies. Investigations were CONTAINING CLEAN-COAL ASH AND CLASS F FLY ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Rafat Siddique, Berlin, Germany, October 2003 Department of Civil Engineering and Mechanics College of Engineering

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

232

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the Cement and Concrete Institute of Mexico Symposium "Worldof Concrete - Mexico," Guadalajara, Mexico, June with proper use of form oil to allow migration of released air pockets. Sand content should be increased

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

233

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

addition for mortars and concretes, especially for self-compacting concrete. This marble powder showed on self-compacting concrete mixtures (1-6). MATERIALS Portland Cement A commercial portland AND CONCRETE By Valeria Corinaldesi, Giacomo Moriconi, and Tarun R. Naik Report No. CBU-2005-09 REP-580 August

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

234

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dust in self-consolidating concrete (SCC). A control SCC mixture was made, in which ASTM C 618 Class C fly ash: tarun@uwm.edu (T. R. Naik). 1. Introduction Self-consolidating concrete (SCC), a relatively recent- compacting concrete, super-workable concrete, highly flowable concrete, non-vibrating concrete, and other

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

235

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was carried out to utilize wood ash in making self- compacting controlled low-strength materials (CLSM), air and Presentation at the Seventh CANMET/ACI International Conference on Recent Advances in Concrete Technology, Las-entrained and non-air- entrained concretes, and bricks/blocks/paving stones. Initial test results indicated

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

236

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of consistency and fluidity, self-leveling and self-compacting, contain very little portland cement, and large applications, such as Roller Compacted Concrete for industrial plants, materials handling yards, parking lots quantities of ash and water. It is believed that concrete Bricks, Blocks, and Paving Stones can also be made

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

237

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6 concretes, especially for self-compacting concrete. This marble powder showed a very high7 Blaine AND CONCRETE By Valeria Corinaldesi, Giacomo Moriconi, and Tarun R. Naik Report No. CBU-2007-07 REP-628 #12;1 CHARACTERIZATION OF MARBLE POWDER FOR ITS USE IN1 MORTAR AND CONCRETE2 3 Valeria Corinaldesi

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

238

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be handled without segregation. It is also referred to as self-compacting concrete, super-workable concrete SELF- CONSOLIDATING CONCRETE By Tarun R. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Yoon-moon Chun, Fethullah Canpolat-Dust in Manufacturing Economical Self-Consolidating Concrete T. R. Naika, *, R. N. Krausa , Y. Chuna , F. Canpolata , R

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

239

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-reinforced concrete, self-compacting concrete, ultra-high-strength concrete, conductive concrete, self-curing concrete chemical environments and complex applied loading conditions. The recent development of self-compacting-performance concrete, high-durability concrete (HDC), roller compacted concrete, high-volume fly ash concrete, fiber

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

240

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ash. Paving applications, such as Roller Compacted Concrete for industrial plants, parking lots be used in Self-Consolidating Concrete applications. This type of concrete requires additional fines that concrete Bricks, Blocks, and Paving Stones can also be made with the Corn Products' coal ash. Additionally

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Self-Compactability of Fresh Concrete............................................... 6 Slump-Flow Test Energies Fly Ash for Developing Economical Self- Consolidating Concrete (by Tarun R. Naik, Yoon-moon Chun, particularly the viscosity modifying admixture (VMA), for producing an economical self- consolidating concrete

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

242

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-leveling, self-compacting, cementitious material, which has a consistency similar to a pancake batter. CLSM can fibrous residuals from pulp and paper mills. The flowable slurry will meet ACI (American Concrete Institute) 229 recommendations for flowable Controlled Low-Strength Materials (CLSM). CLSM is a self

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

243

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is defined as a self compacted, cementitious material used primarily as a backfill in lieu of compacted fill and published at the third CANMET/ACI International Symposium on Advances in Concrete Technology, Auckland, New of low strength fill materials and has been known by many other names. The American Concrete Institute

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

244

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the National Seminar on Building Materials and Technology for Sustainable Developments, CEPT-SBST, Ahmedabad a leading role in the sustainable development of the cement and concrete industry in this century. Sustainable design and construction of structures have a small impact on the environment, use "green

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

245

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-28 REP-482 November 2002 Final Technical Report Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute For Project

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

246

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.4 April 2000 A Mid-Year Project Management Report Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute for Project for evaluation. Clean coal fly ash was obtained from Southern Illinois University and a wet collected Class F fly and Quarters Cumulative$ Cumulative Project Budget Total Illinois Clean Coal Institute Award $ 86,095 Estimated

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

247

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the combination of Class C fly ash and clean coal ash. Two percent to four percent sodium sulfate anhydrite

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

248

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 784, Milwaukee, WI 53201 d Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute * Director UWM products containing clean coal ash compared to conventional coal ash. Utilization of clean coal ash is much products that utilize clean coal ash. With increasing federal regulations on power plant emissions, finding

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

249

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-19 REP-443 November 2001 Final Technical Report Issued to the Illinois Clean Coal Institute For Project

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

250

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), at 28 days, using various sources of ASTM Class F and clean coal fly ashes. For each reference mixture

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

251

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Products Utilization E-mail: ymchun@uwm.edu and F. D. Botha Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute 5776 Coal, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, USA. 4 Project Manager, Illinois Clean Coal Institute

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

252

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the Technical Session on Recycling Concrete and Other Materials for Sustainable Development at 2003 ACI Spring; microfiber reinforcement; pulp and paper mill residual solids; recycling; salt-scaling resistance. 1 Director - INTRODUCTION Pulp and paper mill wastewater treatment plant residuals (also called sludge) are the solid

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

253

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; microfibers; pulp and paper mills; recycling; deicing salt scaling; sludge; wastewater treatment residuals with Recycled Materials. Yoon-moon Chun is a postdoctoral fellow at the UWM-CBU. His research interests include residuals from the pulp and paper industry in concrete. INTRODUCTION Pulp and paper mill wastewater

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

254

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,and Bruce W. Ramme CBU-1996-08 REP-283 July 1996 Presented andPublished at the American Coal Ash Association's Twelfth International Coal Ash Use Symposium,Orlando,FL,January 26-30, 1997. Department of Civil-sulfurcoal combustionby-products generated by using both conventional and clean coal technologies. A clean coal ash

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

255

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-specification ash generated from the combustion of high- sulfure coal. The coal combustion products used of the project indicate that high-carbon coal ash can be successfully used in porous base course applications is a Research Associate at the UWM-CBU. His research interests include the use of coal fly ash, coal bottom ash

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

256

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interests include the use of coal fly ash, coal bottom ash, and used foundry sand in concrete and masonry led to high resistance to freezing and thawing. Ash slurry made with ASTM Class C fly ash can set too rapidly. In addition, ash slurry and sandy slurry made with Class C fly ash can develop a very high long

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

257

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were made using ponded coal-combustion fly ash and quarry screenings (fine crushed sand). In Series 2, six mixtures of flowable slurry were made, the first five mixtures using the ponded coal-ash is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the UWM-CBU. His research interests include the use of coal fly ash, coal bottom ash

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

258

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and block. Four block and four brick mixtures were also used in combination of wood ash and coal ash with up a combination of wood ash and coal ash with up to 50% cement reduction also met strength requirements. Concrete brick mixtures containing wood ash and a combination of wood ash with coal ash also met requirements

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

259

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), including construction materials, metal recovery, and pollution control. Landfilling is becoming very of some heavy metals, the use of wood fly ash as a soil supplement is also becoming limited; in addition

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

260

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

currently being produced by Manitowoc Public Utilities. Flowable Materials have up to 1200 psi compressive of water, and consist mostly of ash or similar materials. It is believed that concrete Bricks, Blocks in manufacturing Blended Cements. Soil stabilization or site remediation is another significant potential use

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consume all of the ashes currently being produced by Manitowoc Public Utilities. Flowable Materials have little portland cement and a lot of water, and consist mostlyof ash or similar materials. It is believed fly ash in manufacturing Blended Cements. Soil stabilization or site remediation is another

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

262

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

would consume all of the wood ashes produced at Consolidated Papers. Flowable Materials have up to 1200 portland cement and a lot of water, and consist mostly of ash or similar materials. It is believed remediation is another significant potential use of the ashes. For example, for log-yard paving (Roller

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

263

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ettringite to monosulphate and hemi-sulphate was prevented. Instead, ettringite transformed to monocarbonate of aggregate. The presence of CO2 in the pastes prevents the reaction of ettringite, formed in the course of ettringite remains almost unchanged and the crystallisation of hemicarbonate, monocarbonate or both

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

264

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. Department of Energy FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM/PROJECT STATUS REPORT OMB Burden Disclosure 2001 Fourth quarterly technical report submitted to the US Department of Energy for the Project DE- FC (1910-0400), U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20585

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

265

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Editions Are Obsolete U.S. Department of Energy FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM/PROJECT STATUS REPORT OMB Burden April 2001 First quarterly technical report for Year 2 submitted to the US Department of Energy Project (1910-0400), U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20585

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

266

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of landfilling is increasing due to strict environmental regulations and limited availability of landfill space a stricter environmental regulation. In light of these, it is essential to develop beneficial uses of wood and publication at the ACI Maharastra Chapter, Mumbai, India, July 2001. Department of Civil Engineering

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

267

DOE/NETL's R&D Response to Emerging Coal By-Product and Water Issues  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R&D Response to Emerging R&D Response to Emerging Coal By-Product and Water Issues Clean Coal and Power Conference in conjunction with 2 nd Joint U.S.-People's Republic of China Conference on Clean Energy Washington, DC November 17-19, 2003 Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory Feeley_CC&P Conf. 11/03 Electric Power Using Coal Clean Liquid Fuels Natural Gas Coal Production Environmental Control V21 Next Generation Carbon Sequestration Exploration & Production Refining & Delivery Alternative Fuels Exploration & Production Pipelines & Storage Fuel Cells Combustion Turbines NETL Plays Key Role in Fossil Energy Supply, Delivery, and Use Technologies Future Fuels Photo of hydrogen fueled car: Warren Gretz, NREL Feeley_CC&P Conf. 11/03 Innovations for Existing Plants Program

268

A comparison of biologically active filters for the removal of ozone by-products, turbidity, and particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biofiltration tests were performed at the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California`s 5.5-mgd (21,000 m{sup 3}d) demonstration plant using two 400 ft{sup 2} (37 m{sup 2}) anthracite/sand filters and a 6 ft{sup 2} (0.56 m{sup 2}) granular activated carbon (GAC)/sand filter operated in parallel. The empty-bed contact time (EBCT) within the GAC and anthracite ranged from 2.1-3.1 min. The filters were evaluated based on (1) conventional filtration performance (turbidity, particle removal, and headloss); (2) removal of biodegradable ozone by-products (assimilable organic carbon [AOC], aldehydes, and aldoketoacids) after startup; (3) removal of biodegradable ozone by-products at steady state; and (4) resistance to short-term process upsets such as intermittent chlorination or filter out-of-service time. Approximately 80 percent formaldehyde removal was achieved by the anthracite/sand filter operated at a 2.1-min EBCT (6 gpm/ft{sup 2} [15 m/h]) within 8 days of ozone operation. The GAC/sand filter operated at the same rate achieved 80 percent removal within 1 day, possibly as an additive effect of adsorption and biological removal. In-depth aldehyde monitoring at four depths (0.5-min EBCT intervals) provided additional insight into the removal kinetics. During periods of warmer water temperature, from 20 to 48 percent of the AOC was removed in the flocculation/sedimentation basins by 40-75 percent. This percentage removal typically resulted in AOC concentrations within 40 {mu}g C/L of the raw, unozonated water levels.

Coffey, B.M.; Krasner, S.W.; Sclimenti, M.J.; Hacker, P.A.; Gramith, J.T. [Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, La Verne, CA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels standard requires 36 billion gallons of renewable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels studies. Current research focuses on impacts of feeding by-prod- ucts of the bioenergy industry on Animal

270

Powder River Basin coalbed methane: The USGS role in investigating this ultimate clean coal by-product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past few decades, the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin has supplied the Nation with comparatively clean low ash and low sulfur coal. However, within the past few years, coalbed methane from the same Fort Union coal has become an important energy by-product. The recently completed US Geological Survey coal resource assessment of the Fort Union coal beds and zones in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains (Fort Union Coal Assessment Team, 1999) has added useful information to coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin has rapidly accelerated in the past three years. During this time more than 800 wells have been drilled and recent operator forecasts projected more than 5,000 additional wells to be drilled over the next few years. Development of shallow (less than 1,000 ft. deep) Fort Union coal-bed methane is confined to Campbell and Sheridan Counties, Wyoming, and Big Horn County, Montana. The purpose of this paper is to report on the US Geological Survey's role on a cooperative coalbed methane project with the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Wyoming Reservoir Management Group and several gas operators. This paper will also discuss the methodology that the USGS and the BLM will be utilizing for analysis and evaluation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Powder River Basin. The USGS and BLM need additional information of coalbed methane reservoirs to accomplish their respective resource evaluation and management missions.

Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Ochs, A.M.; Stanton, R.W.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON FROM NORTH DAKOTA LIGNITE: AN OPTION FOR DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCT CONTROL IN WATER TREATMENT PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New federal drinking water regulations have been promulgated to restrict the levels of disinfection by-products (DBPs) in finished public water supplies. DBPs are suspected carcinogens and are formed when organic material is partially oxidized by disinfectants commonly used in the water treatment industry. Additional federal mandates are expected in the near future that will further affect public water suppliers with respect to DBPs. Powdered activated carbon (PAC) has traditionally been used by the water treatment industry for the removal of compounds contributing to taste and odor problems. PAC also has the potential to remove naturally occurring organic matter (NOM) from raw waters prior to disinfection, thus controlling the formation of regulated DBPs. Many small water systems are currently using PAC for taste and odor control and have the potential to use PAC for controlling DBPs. This project, a cooperative effort between the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), the Grand Forks Water Treatment Plant, and the University of North Dakota Department of Civil Engineering, consists of several interrelated tasks. The objective of the research was to evaluate a cost-effective PAC produced from North Dakota lignite for removing NOM from water and reducing trihalomethane formation potential. The research approach was to develop a statistically valid testing protocol that can be used to compare dose-response relationships between North Dakota lignite-derived PAC and commercially available PAC products. A statistical analysis was performed to determine whether significant correlations exist between operating conditions, water properties, PAC properties, and dose-response behavior. Pertinent physical and chemical properties were also measured for each of the waters and each of the PACs.

Daniel J. Stepan; Thomas A. Moe; Melanie D. Hetland; Margaret L. Laumb

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Advanced coal technology by-products: Long-term results from landfill test cells and their implications for reuse or disposal applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New air pollution regulations under the 1991 Clean Air Act and other legislation are motivating continued development and implementation, of cleaner, more efficient processes for converting coal to electrical power. These clean coal processes produce solid by-products which differ in important respects from conventional pulverized coal combustion ash. Clean coal by-products` contain both residual sorbent and captured SO{sub 2} control products, as well as the mineral component of the coal. The Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center has contracted Radian Corporation to construct and monitor landfill test cells with a several different advanced coal combustion by-products at three locations around the US; data from these sites provide a unique picture of the long-term field behavior of clean coal combustion by-products. The field testing sites were located in western Colorado, northern Ohio, and central Illinois. Fluidized bed combustion and lime injection residues are characterized by high lime and calcium sulfate contents` contributed by reacted and unreacted sorbent materials, and produce an leachate, when wetted. Compared with conventional coal fly ash, the clean coal technology ashes have been noted for potential difficulties when wetted, including corrosivity, heat generation, cementation, and swelling on hydration. On the other hand, the high lime content and chemical reactivity of clean coal residues offer potential benefits in reuse as a cementitious material.The results of three years of data collection suggest a fairly consistent pattern of behavior for the calcium-based dry sorbent systems involved in the project, despite differences in the initial of the by-products, differences in the methods of placement, and differences in climate at the test sites.

Weinberg, A. [Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States); Harness, J.L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Emerging issues on degradation by-products deriving from personal care products and pharmaceuticals during disinfection processes of water used in swimming pools  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The use of disinfection substances in the sanitation and disinfection processes of artificial water used for sports amenities and swimming pools has recently raised some serious concerns. Recreational Water Illnesses (RWIs) can put at serious risk the health of bathers and swimmers due to adverse effects caused by the use of disinfection chemicals, such as chlorine, chloramine, ozone and UV radiation, as well as their by-products. Remarkable documented evidence is available on the impact of Disinfection By-Products (DBPs), such as chloroform and other trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids and chlorophenols, deriving from the oxidation of common organic pollutants dissolved in raw, drinking, waste and artificial waters. Appropriate countermeasures, aimed at avoiding bathers' exposures to these chemicals, have been developed and adopted in public and private structures, also through important scientific contributions and technical provisions issued by the WHO and some national health authorities. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that high reactive disinfection agents may transform other undesirable chemicals released by bathers, namely pharmaceuticals, sunscreens and other Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) into chlorinated and oxidized compounds and nitrosamine precursors. The first symptoms of potentially adverse health effects on human subjects of these largely unknown by-products should be adequately taken into consideration and investigated.

Paola Bottoni; Lucia Bonadonna; Mattea Chirico; Sergio Caroli; Gyula Záray

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Emissions inventories for MSW landfills under Title V  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past, many states were either not concerned with, or unaware that, municipal solid waste landfills (MSWLFs) were potential sources of regulated air pollutants. This philosophy is rapidly changing, in part due to US EPA policy documents concerning (and defining) fugitive and non-fugitive emissions from MSWLFs, the attention given to the newly released New Source Performance Standards and a recent lawsuit that gained national notoriety involving landfill air emissions and air permitting applicability issues. Most states now recognize that MSWLFs are sources of regulated air pollutants and are subject to permitting requirements (and pollutant emission fees) as other industries; i.e., state-level minor- and major-source operating permit programs, and the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments Title V Operating Permits Program (Title V).

Vogt, W.G. [SCS Engineers, Reston, VA (United States); Peyser, T.R. [SCS Engineers, Birmingham, AL (United States); Hamilton, S.M. [SCS Engineers, Tampa, FL (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Synthesis, Volume 2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production of Mixed Alcohols Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for...

276

Mark A. Newbrough, MD Hanna Thurman, MSW, LGSW, MPA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

endorsement inferred by the HRSA, DHHR, or U. S. Government. 1 #12;"World's oldest woman had normal brain an essentially normal brain, with little or no evidence of Alzheimer's disease, according to a study -amyloid plaques Tau protein deposition in neurofibrillary tangles Biomarkers Biomarkers of brain

Mohaghegh, Shahab

277

Barriers to the increased utilization of coal combustion/desulfurization by-products by government & commercial sectors - update 1998,7/99,3268845  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BARRIERS TO THE INCREASED UTILIZATION BARRIERS TO THE INCREASED UTILIZATION OF COAL COMBUSTION/DESULFURIZATION BY-PRODUCTS BY GOVERNMENT AND COMMERCIAL SECTORS - UPDATE 1998 EERC Topical Report DE-FC21-93MC-30097--79 Submitted by: Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett Everett A. Sondreal Edward N. Steadman Kurt E. Eylands Bruce A. Dockter Energy & Environmental Research Center PO Box 9018 Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 99-EERC-07-08 July 1999 i TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv LIST OF TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v ACKNOWLEDGMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi LIST OF ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii TERMINOLOGY AND DEFINITIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

278

"EMM Region","PC","IGCC","PC","Conv. CT","Adv. CT","Conv. CC","Adv. CC","Adv. CC w/CCS","Fuel Cell","Nuclear","Biomass","MSW","On-shore Wind","Off-shore Wind","Solar Thermal","Solar PV"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Regional cost adjustments for technologies modeled by NEMS by Electric Market Modul (EMM) region 10,11" Regional cost adjustments for technologies modeled by NEMS by Electric Market Modul (EMM) region 10,11" "EMM Region","PC","IGCC","PC","Conv. CT","Adv. CT","Conv. CC","Adv. CC","Adv. CC w/CCS","Fuel Cell","Nuclear","Biomass","MSW","On-shore Wind","Off-shore Wind","Solar Thermal","Solar PV" ,,,"w/CCS" "1 (ERCT)",0.91,0.92,0.92,0.93,0.95,0.91,0.92,0.9,0.96,0.96,0.93,0.93,0.95,0.92,0.86,0.87 "2 (FRCC)",0.92,0.93,0.94,0.93,0.93,0.91,0.92,0.92,0.97,0.97,0.94,0.94,"N/A","N/A",0.89,0.9 "3 (MROE)",1.01,1.01,0.99,0.99,1.01,0.99,0.99,0.97,0.99,1.01,0.99,0.98,0.99,0.97,"N/A",0.96

279

Mechanistic and kinetic evaluation of organic disinfection by-product and assimilable organic carbon (AOC) formation during the ozonation of drinking water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ozonation of drinking water results in the formation of low molecular weight (LMW) organic by-products. These compounds are easily utilisable by microorganisms and can result in biological instability of the water. In this study, we have combined a novel bioassay for assessment of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) with the detection of selected organic acids, aldehydes and ketones to study organic by-product formation during ozonation. We have investigated the kinetic evolution of LMW compounds as a function of ozone exposure. A substantial fraction of the organic compounds formed immediately upon exposure to ozone and organic acids comprised 60–80% of the newly formed AOC. Based on experiments performed with and without hydroxyl radical scavengers, we concluded that direct ozone reactions were mainly responsible for the formation of small organic compounds. It was also demonstrated that the laboratory-scale experiments are adequate models to describe the formation of LMW organic compounds during ozonation in full-scale treatment of surface water. Thus, the kinetic and mechanistic information gained during the laboratory-scale experiments can be utilised for upscaling to full-scale water treatment plants.

Frederik Hammes; Elisabeth Salhi; Oliver Köster; Hans-Peter Kaiser; Thomas Egli; Urs von Gunten

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Waste/By-Product Hydrogen  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation by Ruth Cox, Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association, at the DOE-DOD Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop held Jan. 13, 2011

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

SOLVENT FIRE BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) conducted a burn test of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent to determine the combustion products. The testing showed hydrogen fluoride gas is not a combustion product from a solvent fire when up to 70% of the solvent is consumed. The absence of HF in the combustion gases may reflect concentration of the modifier containing the fluoride groups in the unburned portion. SwRI reported results for other gases (CO, HCN, NOx, formaldehyde, and hydrocarbons). The results, with other supporting information, can be used for evaluating the consequences of a facility fire involving the CSSX solvent inventory.

Walker, D; Samuel Fink, S

2006-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

282

Bay County, Florida waste-to-energy facility air emission tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bay County Resource Management Center is located 10 miles Northeast of Panama City, Florida. Panama City is a resort community approximately 100 miles east of Pensacola, Florida, on the northwest coast of Florida's panhandle. The average population of this area is approximately 115,000. The average quantity of municipal solid (MSW) waste generated in Bay County during most of the year is 300 tons per day. However, during the summer months when the population increases to more than 150,000 the community must handle in excess of 350 tons of MSW per day. The County decided to design the facility to ultimately burn 510 tons of MSW to allow additional waste to be processed as the population and quantity of waste increases. Until other sources of MSW are procured, the facility is supplementing the 350 tpd of MSW with about 160 tpd of wood waste.The facility began initial start-up, equipment check-out, and instrument calibration in February 1987. Plant shakedown and systems operational checks were made from February through May. This paper discusses emission testing which was conducted from late April through early June. The emission compliance tests were completed on June 4-5, 1987. The facility acceptance test and emission compliance test were completed five months ahead of the original project schedule.

Beachler, D.S.; Pompelia, D.M.; Weldon, J. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

2013 Year-end letter to members and friends of the Global WTERT Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 2013 Year-end letter to members and friends of the Global WTERT Council From: Prof. Nickolas Council and showed that in 2011 the U.S. generated a total of 389 million tons of MSW, of which 22 publications. 8. The Global WTERT Council (GWC) now consists of fourteen national groups. In 2013

284

Proceedings of International Thermal Treatment Technologies (IT3), San Antonio, TX, October 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). This paper examines the emergence of the circulating fluidized bed (CFB) in China. This technology is less of the 21 st century, 47 CFB plants, of total capacity of over 14.6 million ton per year of MSW, have been

285

Dioxin/furans and Air Pollution Control Dioxins and furans are chlorinated compounds produced during all  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dioxin/furans and Air Pollution Control Dioxins and furans are chlorinated compounds produced baghouse. As a result of the new controls, the dioxin/furan emissions of WTE plants in the U (28 million tons of MSW combusted) emit less than six grams TEQ dioxins per year. In comparison

286

High-volume, high-value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by- products in underground mines: Phase 1, Laboratory investigations. Quarterly report, April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kinetics study which is investigating hydration reactions of the ADM by-product (Subtask 2.2) was continued this quarter. This study further aided in gaining information on mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions during hydration of the ADM materials. The information is of importance for a comprehensive understanding of the factors that control strength and long-term stability during aging of FGD materials. The decision was made by Addington, Inc., DOE, and the University of Kentucky that the originally selected mine site for the emplacement demonstration must be changed, mainly for safety reasons. Mine selection will be a priority for the next quarter (Jul--Sep, 1995). Another activity during this reporting period was related to Subtask 4.3, the selection and testing of the transport system for the FGD material. A laboratory-scale pneumatic emplacement test unit (ETU) for dry FGD materials was built at the CAER to generate data so that a final selection of the field demonstration technology can be made. A dry pneumatic system was chosen for laboratory testing because the equipment and expertise available at the CAER matched this sort of technology best. While the design of the laboratory system was based on shotcrete technology, the physical properties of the emplaced FGD material is expected to be similar for other transport techniques, either pneumatic or hydraulic. In other words, the selection of a dry pneumatic transport system for laboratory testing does not necessarily imply that a scaled-up version will be used for the field demonstration. The ETU is a convenient means of producing samples for subsequent chemical and physical testing by a representative emplacement technology. Ultimately, the field demonstration technology will be chosen based on the laboratory data and the suitability of locally available equipment.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Is It Better To Burn or Bury Waste for Clean Electricity Generation?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The process models in MSW-DST can calculate total electricity generated and apply an offset analysis on the grid mix of fuels specific to each of the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions, an average national grid mix, or a user-defined grid mix. ... The background LCI data are collected on a unit mass of fuel (23); when converted on a per unit of electricity generated basis, the magnitude of resultant emissions depends on the efficiency of the power plant. ... While we have provided a detailed, side-by-side comparison of life-cycle emissions from LFGTE and WTE, there is an important remaining question about scale: How big an impact can energy recovery from MSW make if all of the discarded MSW (166 million tons/year) is utilized? ...

P. Ozge Kaplan; Joseph DeCarolis; Susan Thorneloe

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

288

The potential of GHG emission savings for programmatic CDM by municipal solid waste composting in the Western Province - Sri Lanka  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Western Province (WP) of Sri Lanka, as the most populated province in the country is burdened with a high level of municipal solid waste generation. Out of the 48 administrative local authorities within the WP, only 16 local authorities are practicing municipal solid waste composting. All other local authorities are practicing the most common method of MSW disposal; open dumping. The study was aimed at finding the potential of green house gas emission savings by municipal solid waste composting according to Programmatic Clean Development Mechanism in 32 local authorities of the WP which are not currently practicing MSW composting in order to quantify the certified emission reduction. The daily collection rate of municipal solid waste in the entire WP is around 2,000 tons per day. Biodegradable portion dominates the bulk of municipal solid waste in WP as about 76.30%. There is potential of claiming 231 certified emission reductions annually with regard to MSW composting within the WP.

V.K.D.H. Kariyakarawana; N.J.G.J. Bandara; S. Leelarathne

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Linear Extrusion 400 Tons/Day Dry Solids Pump  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept that uses rocket engine experience to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to current state-of-the-art systems. The PWR gasifier concept uses a compact and highly efficient (>50%) dry solids pump that has excellent availability (>99.5%). PWR is currently developing this dry solids pump under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative agreement. The conceptual design on two dry solids pumps were completed under this agreement and one pump concept was selected for preliminary design. A preliminary design review (PDR) of the selected pump was presented on September 20, 2007 to PWR management and numerous technical specialists. Feedback from the PDR review team has been factored into the design and a Delta-PDR was held on April 9, 2008.

Kenneth Sprouse; David Matthews

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

KCP relocates 18-ton machine | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

8 a.m. and by lunchtime that day, it was in place at the NSC. The machine will undergo laser alignment and build test parts around mid-June. It will be ready for production again...

291

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%; South Africa, 37%; China, 3%; Canada, 1%; and other, 2%. Zirconium, unwrought, including powder: France coatings, and sandblasting. The leading consumers of zirconium and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy Kingdom, 5%; and other, 9%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12-31-08 Zirconium ores

292

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sources (2002-05): Zirconium ores and concentrates: Australia, 57%; South Africa, 35%; China, 4%; Canada consumers of zirconium and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy and chemical process industries. Salient%; Japan, 4%; and other, 2%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12-31-06 Zirconium ores

293

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrates: South Africa, 52%; Australia, 43%; and other, 5%. Zirconium, unwrought, including powder: Japan. The leading consumers of zirconium metal and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy and chemical process, 58%; Australia, 24%; Germany, 11%; other, 7%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12

294

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%; South Africa, 46%; China, 3%; Russia, 1%; and other, 1%. Zirconium, unwrought, including powder: France coatings, and sandblasting. The leading consumers of zirconium and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy, 21%; Canada, 8%; United Kingdom, 6%; and other, 5%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12

295

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was insignificant. Import Sources (2008­11): Zirconium mineral concentrates: Australia, 52%; South Africa, 42. The leading consumers of zirconium metal and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy and chemical process: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12­31­12 Zirconium ores and concentrates 2615.10.0000 Free

296

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrates: Australia, 49%; South Africa, 44%; and other, 7%. Zirconium, unwrought, including powder: Germany. The leading consumers of zirconium metal and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy and chemical process, 17%; United Kingdom, 5%; and other, 9%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12-31-11 Zirconium

297

ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM (Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%; South Africa, 32%; China, 4%; Canada, 2%; and other, 1%. Zirconium, unwrought, including powder: France coatings, and sandblasting. The leading consumers of zirconium and hafnium metal are the nuclear energy, 2%; Austria, 1%; and other, 1%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12-31-07 Zirconium ores

298

The BosTon College COMING UP@BC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with warmth and energy for 35 years, and is a world-renowned ethics scholar. We are fortunate to have him- enne Andry's. Raised in the Commonwealth Housing Development (CHD), a low-income Brighton public and government ethics who has taught at the school for more than three decades, is the inaugural holder

Huang, Jianyu

299

Coolerado 5 Ton RTU Performance: Western Cooling Challenge Results (Revised)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Western Cooling Efficiency Center (WCEC) developed a set of criteria for test conditions, minimum energy, and water use performance for prototype cooling equipment and identified these conditions as indicative of western state climates.

Kozubal, E.; Slayzak, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

OFFICE WASTE DATA 2010 Recyclable Materials 1680 tons / 62%  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is used to stabilise temperatures within conventional Energy from Waste incineration plants as well materials and to produce a combustible product. This involves the removal of inert and compostable materials

Guillas, Serge

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

(Data in metric tons of silver content unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in photographic wastewater may be recycled. Silver demand for use in photographic applications, jewelry reliance 7 as a percentage of apparent consumption 61 58 65 64 57 Recycling: In 2012, approximately 1

302

Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

biomass resources identified in the report could be used to produce clean, renewable biofuels, biopower, or bioproducts. For example, with continued developments in biorefinery...

303

Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and hundreds of support structures. McCormick and Washington Closure President Carol Johnson praised a large group of Hanford workers. "We have an exceptional workforce committed...

304

The BosTon College Chronicle summer 2009 edition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

halls to enable BC to meet 100 percent of demand for undergraduate hous- ing. In addition provided advice and sup- port during the various phases of the IMP process," said University President of time, energy and resources will result in a stronger Boston College and an enhanced neighborhood." Jack

Huang, Jianyu

305

Transportation of a 451 ton generator stator and a 234 ton generator rotor from Hartsville, TN, to Los Alamos, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 1430 MVA steam turbine generator was acquired from a cancelled nuclear power plant in Tennessee to be used as the pulsed power and energy storage unit for the Confinement Physics Research Facility being built at Los Alamos, NM. The transportation from Hartsville, near Nashville, TN, to Los Alamos, NM, of the two largest single pieces of the generator, a 451 t stator and a 234 t rotor presented a special challenge. Details of the move, by barge from Hartsville to Catoosa, near Tulsa, OK, by rail from Catoosa to Lamy, near Santa Fe, NM, and by road from Lamy to Los Alamos are described. The greatest difficulty of the successful move was the crossing of the Rio Grande river on an existing reinforced concrete bridge. The two-lane wide road transporters for the stator and rotor were fitted with outriggers to provide a four-lane wide vehicle, thus spreading the load over the entire bridge width and meeting acceptable load distribution and bridge safety factors. 2 refs., 6 figs.

Boenig, H.J.; Rogers, J.D.; McLelland, G.R.; Pelts, C.T. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); McLelland Engineering, Dallas, TX (USA); Reliance Crane and Rigging, Inc., Phoenix, AZ (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Two (2) 175 Ton (350 Tons total) Chiller Geothermal Heat Pumps for recently commissioned LEED Platinum Building  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This project will operate; collect data; and market the energy savings and capital costs of a recently commissioned chiller geothermal heat pump project to promote the wide-spread adoption of this mature technology.

307

The estimation of N{sub 2}O emissions from municipal solid waste incineration facilities: The Korea case  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The greenhouse gases (GHGs) generated in municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration are carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). In South Korea case, the total of GHGs from the waste incineration facilities has been increasing at an annual rate 10%. In these view, waste incineration facilities should consider to reduce GHG emissions. This study is designed to estimate the N{sub 2}O emission factors from MSW incineration plants, and calculate the N{sub 2}O emissions based on these factors. The three MSW incinerators examined in this study were either stoker or both stoker and rotary kiln facilities. The N{sub 2}O concentrations from the MSW incinerators were measured using gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD) equipment. The average of the N{sub 2}O emission factors for the M01 plant, M02 plant, and M03 plant are 71, 75, and 153 g-N{sub 2}O/ton-waste, respectively. These results showed a significant difference from the default values of the intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC), while approaching those values derived in Japan and Germany. Furthermore, comparing the results of this study to the Korea Energy Economics Institute (KEEI) (2007) data on waste incineration, N{sub 2}O emissions from MSW incineration comprised 19% of the total N{sub 2}O emissions.

Park, Sangwon; Choi, Jun-Ho [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinwon, E-mail: jwpark@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids. Volume 10. Jet fuels production by-products, utility, and sulfur-emissions control integration study. Interim report, 1 May 1988-1 April 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1986, the Fuels Branch of the Aero Propulsion Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, began an investigation of the potential of jet-fuel production from the liquid by-product streams produced by the gasification of lignite at the Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota. Funding has been provided by the Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to administer the experimental portion of this effort. This document reports the results of the effort by Burns and Roe Services Corporation/Science Applications International Corporation (BRSC/SAIC) to evaluate the impact of integrating Jet Fuel and/or Chemical Production Facilities with the Great Plains Gasification Plant.

Rossi, R.J.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

First real time detection of Be7 solar neutrinos by Borexino  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper reports a direct measurement of the Be7 solar neutrino signal rate performed with the Borexino low background liquid scintillator detector. This is the first real-time spectral measurement of sub-MeV solar neutrinos. The result for 0.862 MeV Be7 is 47 +- 7 (stat} +- 12 (sys} counts/(day x 100 ton), consistent with predictions of Standard Solar Models and neutrino oscillations with LMA-MSW parameters.

Borexino Collaboration

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

310

82370 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 250 / Thursday, December 30, 2010 / Proposed Rules (2) Beginning July 1, 2011, in addition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

under the federal Clean Air Act for the first time after January 2, 2011. [FR Doc. 2010­32785 Filed 12­29­10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 6560­50­P ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 [EPA­R04­OAR­2010 tons per day of municipal solid waste (MSW). See 40 CFR part 60, subpart Cb. In the Final Rules section

311

E-Print Network 3.0 - asian livestock production Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

production but will produce millions of tons of by-products that can be fed... Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels......

312

Formation of deposits on the surfaces of superheaters and economisers of MSW incinerator plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composition of deposits depends on the temperature profile and boiler geometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mineralogy of deposits defines critical and uncritical zones in the boiler. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical zones in boilers can be characterised by a classification systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Specific measures to enhance energy efficiency can be defined. - Abstract: Mineralogical and chemical investigations of deposits from superheaters and economisers from a MSWI plant in Mannheim, Germany, lead to a classification system which provides information about the most critical parameters leading to fouling and corrosion. With the help of this classification system parameters like the geometry of boilers and the waste input can be changed in order to prolong run times between revisions and enhance energy efficiency of MSWI plants.

Reichelt, J. [IBR, Obergrombacher Strasse 29, D-76646 Bruchsal (Germany); Pfrang-Stotz, G., E-mail: Gudrun.Pfrang-Stotz@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), ITC, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bergfeldt, B.; Seifert, H. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), ITC, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Knapp, P. [MVV O and M GmbH, Muellheizkraftwerk Mannheim, Otto-Hahn-Strasse 1, D-68169 Mannheim (Germany)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

The effect of very low energy solar neutrinos on the MSW mechanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study some implications on standard matter oscillations of solar neutrinos induced by a background of extremely low energy thermal neutrinos trapped inside the Sun by means of coherent refractive interactions. Possible experimental tests are envisaged and current data on solar neutrinos detected at Earth are briefly discussed.

S. Esposito

2003-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

314

Modeling On-Grate MSW Incineration with Experimental Validation in a Batch Incinerator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This knowledge cannot be readily obtained from direct experimental studies on industrial-scale incinerators; in contrast, mathematical modeling and numerical simulation appear to be an attractive approach for quantitative insight into the mechanisms and variables of waste-bed incineration. ... This approach was successfully employed for grate(6) or rotary kiln(7) plants. ... Gasification of carbon (char or coke) by steam is a well-known process for producing syngas. ...

Abhishek Asthana; Yannick Me?nard; Philippe Sessiecq; Fabrice Patisson

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

315

The modelling of biochemical-thermal coupling effect on gas generation and transport in MSW landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The landfill gas generation was investigated based on the theories of the thermodynamics, microbial dynamics and chemical dynamics. The coupling model was developed for describing the gas transport and heat release. And the relationship between the gas generation rate and the temperature was proposed. The parameters in the gas generation model were obtained by bioreactor test in order to evaluate the volume of gas production of the Erfeishan landfill in China. The simulation results shown that the operating life of the landfill will be overestimated if the model does not consider the thermal effect during degradation of the solid substrate.

Liu Lei; Liang Bing; Xue Qiang; Zhao Ying; Yang Chun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix provides information on fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) technology as it has been applied to municipal waste combustion (MWC). A review of the literature was conducted to determine: (1) to what extent FBC technology has been applied to MWC, in terms of number and size of units was well as technology configuration; (2) the operating history of facilities employing FBC technology; and (3) the cost of these facilities as compared to conventional MSW installations. Where available in the literature, data on operating and performance characteristics are presented. Tabular comparisons of facility operating/cost data and emissions data have been complied and are presented. The literature review shows that FBC technology shows considerable promise in terms of providing improvements over conventional technology in areas such as NOx and acid gas control, and ash leachability. In addition, the most likely configuration to be applied to the first large scale FBC dedicated to municipal solid waste (MSW) will employ circulating bed (CFB) technology. Projected capital costs for the Robbins, Illinois 1600 ton per day CFB-based waste-to-energy facility are competitive with conventional systems, in the range of $125,000 per ton per day of MSW receiving capacity.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids. Volume 7. GPGP jet-fuels production program. Evaluation of technical uncertainties for producing jet fuels from liquid by-products of the Great Plains gasification plant. Interim report, 2 October 1987-30 September 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1986, the Fuels Branch of the Aero Propulsion Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, began an investigation of the potential of jet-fuel production from the liquid by-product streams produced by the gasification of lignite at the Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota. Funding was provided by the Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) to administer the experimental portion of this effort. This document reports the results of the effort by Burns and Roe Services Corporation/Science Applications International Corporation (BRSC/SAIC) to analyze GPGP operations and develop correlations for the liquid by-products and plant operating factors such as coal feed rate and coal characteristics.

Fraser, M.D.; Rossi, R.J.; Wan, E.I.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Biogas Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells Impurities and Cleanup for Fuel Cells Dennis Papadias and Shabbir Ahmed Argonne National Laboratory Presented at the Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop Golden, CO June 11-13, 2012 Biogas is the product of anaerobic decomposition of organic waste Municipal solid wastes (MSW)  For every 1 million tons of MSW: - 432,000 cubic feet per day of landfill gas (LFG) for a period of 20 years - 1 MW of electricity 1 Sewage sludge/waste water (WWTP or ADG)  A typical WWTP processes 100 gallons per day (GD) for every person served - 1 cubic foot of digester gas can be produced per 100 gallons of wastewater  100 kW of electricity 1 can be generated from 4.5 MGD of waste water Agricultural waste (i.e. dairy waste)  About 70-100 ft 3 /day of digester gas is produced

319

Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Landfill Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Get Feedback Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.epa.gov/lmop/publications-tools/handbook.html Cost: Free References: Project Development Handbook[1] The handbook describes the process of implementing a waste-to-energy landfill gas project. Overview "Approximately 250 million tons of solid waste was generated in the United States in 2008 with 54 percent deposited in municipal solid waste (MSW)

320

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products: Consortium Byproducts Recycling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) The mission of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to promote and support the commercially viable and environmentally sound recycling of coal combustion byproducts for productive uses through scientific research, development, and field testing. The overall goals of CBRC are to: Increase the overall national rate of byproduct use by to ~ 50 % by 2010 Increase the number of “allowable” byproduct uses under state regulations by ~ 25% Double of the current rate of FGD byproduct use CBRC is a unique partnership that integrates the electric power industry, State and Federal regulatory agencies, and academia to form a strong, cohesive consortium to guide the national and regional research priorities of the CBRC. CBRC is managed by the West Virginia Water Research Institute at West Virginia University and is administered by regional centers at the University of Kentucky (Eastern Region), Southern Illinois University (Midwest Region) and the University of North Dakota (Western Region). Primary funding for CBRC is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Evaluation of liquid brewery by-products for finishing cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

corn. If corn could be fed in whole form a substantial reduction in energy costs would result. 'Ieichenthal and Webb (1969) and Hixon et al. (I969) not, d that cattle fed whole shel led corn gainer! an average 55 faster and had a 7! increase in feed... indicated that some of the benefit obtained from feeding high moisture corn may be due to increased digestibility. NcLaren and Matsushima (1968) reported increased digestibility of protein, dry matter and the gross energy for high moisture corn compared...

Hobbs, Dane Allie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

322

Chemical production from industrial by-product gases: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for conservation of natural gas is studied and the technical and economic feasibility and the implementation of ventures to produce such chemicals using carbon monoxide and hydrogen from byproduct gases are determined. A survey was performed of potential chemical products and byproduct gas sources. Byproduct gases from the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries were selected for detailed study. Gas sampling, preliminary design, market surveys, and economic analyses were performed for specific sources in the selected industries. The study showed that production of methanol or ammonia from byproduct gas at the sites studied in the elemental phosphorus and the iron and steel industries is technically feasible but not economically viable under current conditions. Several other applications are identified as having the potential for better economics. The survey performed identified a need for an improved method of recovering carbon monoxide from dilute gases. A modest experimental program was directed toward the development of a permselective membrane to fulfill that need. A practical membrane was not developed but further investigation along the same lines is recommended. (MCW)

Lyke, S.E.; Moore, R.H.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

UTILIZATION OF LOW NOx COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCo) Class F fly ash is the first material to be worked on in this project. A head sample was taken and a screen analysis performed. Each size fraction was evaluated for LOI content. Table 1 shows the distribution of the as-received material by size and LOI content. From the data, 80% of the as-received material is finer than 400 mesh and the LOI content goes from high at coarse fractions and decreases to a low at the finest size fraction. SEM chemical analysis identified the as-received fly ash to mainly consist of silica (46%), aluminum oxide (21%), and iron in various forms (16%). The high iron content presents an extreme case as compared to other fly ash samples we have evaluated previously. Its effect on product testing applications could identify physical and chemical limitations as product testing progresses. Because of the high iron content, it was realized that magnetic separation would be incorporated into the early part of the pilot plant flowsheet to remove magnetic iron and, hopefully, reduce the total iron content. More analytical data will be presented in the next reporting period.

A.M. HEIN; J.Y. HWANG; M.G. MCKIMPSON; R.C. GREENLUND; X. HUANG

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Inorganic by-products in waters disinfected with chlorine dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The continuing diminishing sources of fresh waters has stimulated the search for unconventional water resources, such as effluents from municipal sewage treatment plants, which can be reused for purposes of irrigation in agriculture, cooling water in industry, groundwater aquifer recharge and in the long term even for drinking water. The main problem of using effluents is the presence of pathogenic bacteria and viruses that can affect human and animal health. Therefore, disinfection has been used for many years to control and reduce waterborne diseases. At the moment, most water treatment plants use sodium hypochlorite as their primary biocide. However, the toxicity of chlorinated organic compounds produced during the treatment has led to increased interest in the use of alternative agents. One possible candidate as viable substitute of free chlorine is chlorine dioxide. Before this disinfectant can be recommended for routine use, it is imperative that its safety be assessed. In this research we have investigated the presence of chlorite and chlorate in sewage disinfected with chlorine dioxide. The effect of initial concentration of biocide and contact time was evaluated using a pilot plant fed with the effluent of a municipal treatment plant. Moreover, the influence of ClO2 generator performance was analyzed and discussed.

E. Veschetti; B. Cittadini; D. Maresca; G. Citti; M. Ottaviani

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Chemical pollution and toxicity of water samples from stream receiving leachate from controlled municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study was aimed to determine the impact of municipal waste landfill on the pollution level of surface waters, and to investigate whether the choice and number of physical and chemical parameters monitored are sufficient for determining the actual risk related to bioavailability and mobility of contaminants. In 2007–2012, water samples were collected from the stream flowing through the site at two sampling locations, i.e. before the stream?s entry to the landfill, and at the stream outlet from the landfill. The impact of leachate on the quality of stream water was observed in all samples. In 2007–2010, high values of TOC and conductivity in samples collected down the stream from the landfill were observed; the toxicity of these samples was much greater than that of samples collected up the stream from the landfill. In 2010–2012, a significant decrease of conductivity and TOC was observed, which may be related to the modernization of the landfill. Three tests were used to evaluate the toxicity of sampled water. As a novelty the application of Phytotoxkit F™ for determining water toxicity should be considered. Microtox® showed the lowest sensitivity of evaluating the toxicity of water samples, while Phytotoxkit F™ showed the highest. High mortality rates of Thamnocephalus platyurus in Thamnotoxkit F™ test can be caused by high conductivity, high concentration of TOC or the presence of compounds which are not accounted for in the water quality monitoring program.

A. Melnyk; K. Kukli?ska; L. Wolska; J. Namie?nik

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Comparative Analysis of the Complete Genome Sequence of the California MSW Strain of Myxoma Virus Reveals Potential Host Adaptations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...European rabbits in the 1930s (10). Fenner and Marshall (11) characterized two...powdered rabbit tissue from the late Frank Fenner (John Curtin School of Medical Research...ARC Future Fellowship. REFERENCES 1. Fenner, F , and FN Ratcliffe. 1965. Myxomatosis...

Peter J. Kerr; Matthew B. Rogers; Adam Fitch; Jay V. DePasse; Isabella M. Cattadori; Peter J. Hudson; David C. Tscharke; Edward C. Holmes; Elodie Ghedin

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

327

Robbins project - start-up and commercial operation at a leading-edge recycling, waste-to-energy plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On January 22, 1997, the Robbins Resource Recovery Facility began commercial operation in Robbins, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago, after a very successful start-up program. The first installation of its kind in the United States, the Robbins facility converts municipal solid waste (MSW) into refuse-derived fuel (RDF) that is fired in two circulating fluidized-bed boilers. Steam from the boilers powers a turbine generator that can produce enough electricity to service more than 50,000 homes. The Robbins facility processes a minimum of 1600 tons of MSW per day. Some 75 percent of the MSW is converted into RDF. In addition to compostable material, the balance yields reusable aluminum, ferrous materials, and glass. Even ash produced by the circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) boilers can be used to manufacture cement. The Robbins facility is operated by Foster Wheeler Illinois, Inc., a member of the Foster Wheeler Power Systems Group. The plant was engineered by Foster Wheeler USA Corporation and built by Foster Wheeler Constructors, Inc. Foster Wheeler Energy International, Inc. provided the circulating fluidized-bed boilers.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

EA-1841: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Taylor Biomass  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

41: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Taylor Biomass 41: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Taylor Biomass Montgomery Project in the Town of Montgomery, Orange County, New York EA-1841: Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for the Taylor Biomass Montgomery Project in the Town of Montgomery, Orange County, New York Summary Taylor Biomass, LLC (Taylor) submitted an application to DOE for a Federal loan guarantee to support the construction and startup of a biomass gasification-to energy facility at a 95-acre recycling facility in the Town of Montgomery, Orange County, NY. The Project would involve the construction of a Post-Collection Separation Facility, a Gasification System and a Combined Cycle Gas Turbine Power Island. The Post-Collection Separation Facility would accept 950 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW), construction and demolition debris, and 100 tons of

329

Gasification characteristics of combustible wastes in a 5 ton/day fixed bed gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gasification characteristics of combustible wastes were determined in ... To capture soot or unburned carbon from the gasification reaction, solid/gas separator and water fluidized...2: 10.7%, CH4: 6.0%, CO2:...

See Hoon Lee; Kyong Bin Choi; Jae Goo Lee…

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

8,993,963 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of December 17, 2014...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

210,526 passenger vehicles. The projects currently injecting CO2 within DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program and the Major Demonstration Program are detailed...

331

Long-term Decline of Aggregate Fuel Use per Cargo-ton-mile of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). deer07santini.pdf More Documents & Publications Diesel Injection Shear-Stress Advanced Nozzle (DISSAN) Electric Turbo Compounding...

332

U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproduct...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

WORKSHOP Biomass Program Peer Review Sustainability Platform Bioenergy Technologies Office: Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Agricultural Conservation Committee Meeting...

333

Removal of 1,082-Ton Reactor Among Richland Operations Office’s 2014 Accomplishments  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

RICHLAND, Wash. – Workers with EM’s Richland Operations Office and its contractors made progress this year in several areas of Hanford site cleanup that helped protect employees, the public, environment, and Columbia River.

334

The BosTon College ChroniclemarCh 1, 2007-vol. 15 no. 12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, from urban centers to rural coal mining towns, Cleveland to Biloxi, Miss. More BC students will spend, Aberdeen will be home to Chiozzi, Keating and this contingent of students in BC's Appalachia Volunteers pro. The remainder of the some 650 Appalachia Volunteers participants will scatter far and wide across the country

Huang, Jianyu

335

Testing and Economic Evaluation of a High Efficiency 10-ton Rooftop Air Conditioner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by LaSalle Manufacturing Corporation of Houston, Texas. The rooftop unit was then tested at Texas A&M University. The economics of manufacturing, purchasing and operating were also evaluated. This report summarizes the testing of the unit...

O'Neal, D. L.; Davis, M. A.

2006-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

336

DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

plutonium to meet the non-proliferation goals agreed to by the United States and Russia in September 2000. Eliminating immobilization from the disposition pathway saves...

337

DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Energy and NTI Announce Key Nonproliferation Project with Kazakhstan U.S.-Russia Twenty-Year Partnership Completes Final Milestone in Converting 20,000 Russian Nuclear...

338

9,355,469 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of January 29, 2015...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Unit of the Anadarko Basin. Learn more about the DOE's RCSP Program. Major Demonstrations Air Products.jpg Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.: Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., is...

339

(Data in metric tons1 of silver content unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that is reclaimed and recycled annually from photographic wastewater. Import Sources (2004-07):2 Mexico, 50%; Canada reliance8 as a percentage of apparent consumptione 54 54 38 59 60 Recycling: In 2008, approximately 1

340

(Data in metric tons1 of silver content unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that is reclaimed and recycled annually from photographic wastewater. Import Sources (2005-08):2 Mexico, 54%; Canada in photographic wastewater may be recycled. Silver demand for industrial, photographic, jewelry, silverware Net import reliance8 as a percentage of apparent consumptione 72 63 68 67 63 Recycling: In 2009

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

(Data in metric tons1 of silver content unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, electronics, electroplating, medical and wound care, mirrors, solar energy, and water purification. Salient in 2005. Import Sources (2001-04):2 Mexico, 48%; Canada, 37%; Peru, 9%; Chile, 2%; and other, 4%. Tariff,340 1,330 16,000 35,000 Chile 1,360 1,400 NA NA China 2,450 2,800 26,000 120,000 Mexico 2,700 2,700 37

342

Removal of 1,082-Ton Reactor Among Richland Operations Office...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

so the plant can be torn down. Nearly 2,000 capsules of highly radioactive cesium and strontium need to be removed from water-filled storage basins and placed in dry storage....

343

Hybrid 320 Ton Off Highway Haul Truck: Quarterly Technical Status Report 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mine proving ground to be used for the hybrid off highway vehicle (OHV) demonstration was visited, to obtain haul route profile data and OHV vehicle data. A 6500-ft haul mission with 7% average grade was selected. Enhancements made to a dynamic model of hybrid missions provided capability to analyze hybrid OHV performance. A benefits study defined relationships between fuel and productivity benefits and hybrid system parameters. OHV hybrid system requirements were established, and a survey of candidate energy storage technology characteristics was carried out. Testing of the performance of an existing power battery bank verified its suitability for use in the hybrid OHV demonstration.

Salasoo, Lembit

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

344

9,030,305 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of January 6, 2015 ...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

210,526 passenger vehicles. The projects currently injecting CO2 within DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program and the Major Demonstration Program are detailed...

345

Investigating the reflection contribution to the X-ray emission of Ton S180  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......innermost stable orbit for a Schwarzschild black hole of 107 Mo. In...spectrum has been assumed to mirror the direct power-law continuum...innermost stable orbit in a Schwarzschild metric hint at nearly maximally...is not consistent with a Schwarzschild (non-rotating) black......

E. Nardini; A. C. Fabian; D. J. Walton

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

346

Delivering Tons to the Register: Energy Efficient Design and Operation of Residential Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, was used to determine the effect of several parameters on energy consumption, peak electrical demand cooling performance and lower energy consumption than houses with ducts in conventional attics. However consumption, and power demand. The effects of refrigerant charge, evaporator air flow), oversizing (relative

347

Long-term Decline of Aggregate Fuel Use per Cargo-ton-mile of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

J. Santini, John L. Anderson, and Anant D. Vyas Center for Transportation Research, Energy Systems Division Kenneth M. Bertram Decision and Information Sciences Division...

348

A ton?scale bolometric detector for the search for neutrinoless double beta decay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After an introduction on neutrinoless double beta decay physics a description of CUORE and CUORICINO experiments detectors and results are reported. The actual efforts and next steps of the CUORE Project required to probe the inverted hierarchy region of the neutrino effective Majorana mass are also described.

M. Pedretti; CUORE Collaboration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Preliminary Design Report (PDR) provides a detailed description of the design, analyses, and testing programs for the BR-100 cask. The BR-100 is a Type B(U) cask designed for transport by rail or barge. This report presents the preliminary analyses and tests which have been performed for the BR-100 and outlines the confirmatory analyses and tests which will be performed.

none,

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

The BosTon College Chronicle april 12, 2007-vol. 15 no. 15  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phases during the next several years, will address numerous problems that have resulted from nearly contemporary issues from stem cell research, abortion and euthanasia to gay marriage and "just war," among

Huang, Jianyu

351

(Data in metric tons1 of gold content, unless otherwise noted)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1997 1998 1999e Production: Mine 317 326 362 366 340 Refinery: Primary (2 ) (2 ) 270 277 260 Secondary, and the size of gold mining operations increased. Most of the larger companies were successfully replacing the future role of gold in the reserves of the European Central Bank, which began operation on January 1

352

Dioxin and trace metal emissions from combustion of carbonized RDF slurry fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1994, the U.S. generated approximately 209 million tons of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), with 61% landfilled, 24% recycled, and 15% processed through Municipal Waste Combustion (MWC). In order to divert a larger portion of this generated MSW from landfills, MWC will have to play a growing role in MSW disposal. However, recently promulgated New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for MWC will add an additional financial burden, through mandated emission reductions and air pollution control technologies, to an already financially pressured MWC marketplace. In the past, Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF), a solid fuel produced from MSW, has been fired in industrial and coal boilers as an alternative means of MWC. While lower sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions provided the impetus, firing RDF in industrial and coal boilers frequently suffered from several disadvantages including increased solids handling, increased excess air requirements, increased air emissions, increased slag formation in the boiler, and higher fly ash resistivity. This paper summarizes the latest emissions and combustion tests with the carbonized RDF slurry fuel. With EnerTech`s SlurryCarb{trademark} process, a pumpable slurry of RDF is continuously pressurized with a pump to between 1200 and 2500 psi. The RDF slurry is pressurized above the saturated steam curve to maintain a liquid state when the slurry is heated to approximately 480-660{degrees}F. Slurry pressure and temperature then are maintained for less than 30 minutes in plug-flow reactors. At this temperature and pressure, oxygen functional groups in the molecular structure of the RDF are split off as carbon dioxide gas. This evolved carbon dioxide gas comprises a significant weight percentage of the feed RDF, but only a minimal percentage of the heating value.

Klosky, M. [EnerTech Environmental, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); Fisher, M. [American Plastics Council, Washington, DC (United States); Singhania, A. [American Plastics Council/Amoco Chemicals, Alpharetta, GA (United States)] [and others

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Advanced thermal processing alternatives for solid waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1990`s have seen a resurgence of interest in the development of new thermal processing alternatives for municipal solid waste (MSW). Sparked by increasingly stringent environmental regulations, much of this creative energy has been applied to technologies for the gasification of MSW: converting the solid, hard to handle material into a clean, medium to high-Btu fuel gas. Other developers have focussed on full combustion technology but with a {open_quotes}twist{close_quotes} that lowers emissions or reduces cost. A comprehensive study of these new technologies was recently completed under the sponsorship of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy. The study characterized the state-of-the-art among emerging MSW thermal processing technologies that have reached the point of `incipient commercialization.` More than 45 technologies now under development were screened to develop a short list of seven processes that have passed through the idea stage, laboratory and benchscale testing, and have been prototyped at an MSW feed rate of at least several tons per hour. In-depth review of these seven included inspections of operating pilot or prototype units and a detailed analysis of technical, environmental and economic feasibility issues. No attempt was made to select `the best` technology since best can only be defined in the context of the constraints, aspirations and circumstances of a specific, local situation. The basic flowsheet, heat and material balances and available environmental data were summarized to help the reader grasp the underlying technical concepts and their embodiment in hardware. Remaining development needs, as seen by the study team are presented. Economic analysis shows the general balance of capital and operating costs.

Niessen, W.R. [Camp Dresser & McKee Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Driven by the Transportation of Goods Associated with French Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By product, transport of coal and coke and intermediate goods make the largest contribution to overall freight transport emissions associated with French household consumption. ... Finally, improving rail and inland water transportation infrastructure between northern European countries and France also serves the purpose of improving trade-relations and economic efficiency within Europe. ... per capita footprints were 1 ton CO2 equiv./yr in African countries to ?30ton CO2 equiv./yr in Luxembourg and the USA. ...

Troy R. Hawkins; Sébastien M. R. Dente

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Biothermal gasification of biomass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The BIOTHERMGAS Process is described for conversion of biomass, organic residues, and peat to substitute natural gas (SNG). This new process, under development at IGT, combines biological and thermal processes for total conversion of a broad variety of organic feeds (regardless of water or nutrient content). The process employs thermal gasification for conversion of refractory digester residues. Ammonia and other inorganic nutrients are recycled from the thermal process effluent to the bioconversion unit. Biomethanation and catalytic methanation are presented as alternative processes for methanation of thermal conversion product gases. Waste heat from the thermal component is used to supply the digester heat requirements of the bioconversion component. The results of a preliminary systems analysis of three possible applications of this process are presented: (1) 10,000 ton/day Bermuda grass plant with catalytic methanation; (2) 10,000 ton/day Bermuda grass plant with biomethanation; and (3) 1000 ton/day municipal solid waste (MSW) sewage sludge plant with biomethanation. The results indicate that for these examples, performance is superior to that expected for biological or thermal processes used separately. The results of laboratory studies presented suggest that effective conversion of thermal product gases can be accomplished by biomethanation.

Chynoweth, D.P.; Srivastava, V.J.; Henry, M.P.; Tarman, P.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The USC School of Social Work offers programs of study leading to the Master of Social Work (MSW) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in social  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

field placement at James Jordan Charter Middle School in Northridge, CA. #12;776 / USC School of Social

Southern California, University of

357

Experimental research on emission and removal of dioxins in flue gas from a co-combustion of MSW and coal incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the experimental study of dioxins removal from flue gas from a co-combustion municipal solid waste and coal incinerator by means of a fluidized absorption tower and a fabric filter. A test rig has been set up. The flow rate of flue gas of the test rig is 150-2000 m{sup 3}/h. The system was composed of a humidification and cooling system, an absorption tower, a demister, a slurry make-up tank, a desilter, a fabric filter and a measurement system. The total height of the absorption tower was 6.5 m, and the diameter of the reactor pool was 1.2 m. When the absorbent was 1% limestone slurry, the recirculation ratio was 3, the jet rate was 5-15 m/s and the submerged depth of the bubbling pipe under the slurry was 0.14 m, the removal efficiency for dioxins was 99.35%. The concentration of dioxins in the treated flue gas was 0.1573 x 10{sup -13} kg/Nm{sup 3} and the concentration of oxygen was 11%. This concentration is comparable to the emission standards of other developed countries.

Zhong Zhaoping [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)]. E-mail: zzhong@seu.edu.cn; Jin Baosheng [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Huang Yaji [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Zhou Hongcang [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Lan Jixiang [Department of Power Engineering, Research Institute of Thermal Energy Engineering, Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Circulating fluidized-bed boiler makes inroads for waste recycling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) boilers have ben used for years in Scandinavia to burn refuse-derived fuel (RDF). Now, Foster Wheeler Power Systems, Inc., (Clinton, N.J.) is bringing the technology to the US. Touted as the world`s largest waste-to-energy plant to use CFB technology, the Robbins (III.) Resource Recovery Facility will have the capacity to process 1,600 tons/d of municipal solid waste (MSW) when it begins operation in early 1997. The facility will have two materials-separation and RDF-processing trains, each with dual trommel screens, magnetic and eddy current separators, and shredders. About 25% of the incoming MSW will be sorted and removed for recycling, while 75% of it will be turned into fuel, with a heat value of roughly 6,170 btu/lb. Once burned in the twin CFB boilers the resulting steam will be routed through a single turbine generator to produce 50,000 mW of electric power.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

boiler boiler stove district heating heat pump conditionerSmall cogen Stove District heating Heat pump Centralized AC

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Y. , Yu, C. , Guo, Y. , Sinton, J. , and Lewis, J. and Zhu,Ernst Worrell, Jonathan E. Sinton, and Jiang Yun. 2003. “1998; Volume 19, No. 4 Sinton, J. , Fridley, D. , Lewis,

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30% or more of the country's present petroleum consumption.

362

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World Energy Outlook, IEA International Monetary Fund (IMF), 2006. Data and Statistics.Statistics in Japan, the Energy Conservation Center, Japan The World

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Preliminary design report: Babcock and Wilcox BR-100 100-ton rail/barge spent fuel shipping cask  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide information on burnup credit as applied to the preliminary design of the BR-100 shipping cask. There is a brief description of the preliminary basket design and the features used to maintain a critically safe system. Following the basket description is a discussion of various criticality analyses used to evaluate burnup credit. The results from these analyses are then reviewed in the perspective of fuel burnups expected to be shipped to either the final repository or a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The hurdles to employing burnup credit in the certification of any cask are then outlines and reviewed. the last section gives conclusions reached as to burnup credit for the BR-100 cask, based on our analyses and experience. All information in this study refers to the cask configured to transport PWR fuel. Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel satisfies the criticality requirements so that burnup credit is not needed. All calculations generated in the preparation of this report were based upon the preliminary design which will be optimized during the final design. 8 refs., 19 figs., 16 tabs.

none,

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recently. In 2005, total energy consumption reached 2,225unfolds as forecast, total energy consumption in 2010 wouldthereby reducing total energy consumption from 2,833 Mtce to

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

differences in 2010 primary energy consumption among three12 illustrates the primary energy consumption for the BPS,Efficiency Figure 12 Primary energy consumption by sector in

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Corrosion and degradation of test materials in the Westinghouse 15 ton/day Coal Gasification Process Development Unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two periods of in-plant exposures of candidate materials in the Westinghouse PDU have been completed. Coupons were exposed in the gasifier, hot-gas cyclone, quench scrubber, and gas cooler vessels. Corrosion monitoring of test materials is currently being conducted in the Westinghouse Coal Gasification Process Development Unit (PDU) coal gasification pilot plant. The corrosion data presented are from work during 1981 through 1984. During these two exposure periods, several coals ranging from lignites to bituminous coals and two petroleum cokes were gasified in the steam-oxygen mode. Fouling was observed on most corrosion racks. The effect of this process-related material was to promote corrosion. In the gasifier environment, alloys 6B, IN 671, and 18SR were the best performing alloys. Nickel-base alloys with Ni/Cr ratios >1.5, namely IN-617, IN-825, and alloy X, incurred severe corrosion attack in both exposures. Other alloys, although generally acceptable in corrosion performance, were not immune to solids-induced corrosion around coupon mounting holes. Several refractories such as Brickram 90, Harbison-Walker Ruby, and Chemal 85B showed little degradation in both gasifier exposures. Nitride bonded silicon carbon Refrax 20 had the greatest reduction in abrasion resistance as well as other properties. Single-phase structural ceramics including siliconized SiC, sintered ..cap alpha..-SiC, and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ did not suffer any noticeable damage. Materials evaluation in the hot-gas cyclone showed IN-671 and 26-1 to be more resistant than Type 310 and Type 310 aluminized. 18 refs., 23 figs., 24 tabs.

Yurkewycz, R.

1985-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intercity Trucks Coal, oil, coke, other Freight water localmetal min prod petroleum, coke, & nuke smelting & rolling ofElectricity heat Coal and coke Coal Electr icity heat

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

AFFILIATIONS: MILLER--Brookhaven National Laboratory, Up-ton, New York; SLINGO--Environmental Systems Science Centre,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

con- tinuously for periods of 6­12 months and includes a core suite of active remote sensors of radiation, latent heat, sensible heat, and carbon dioxide at the surface. The centerpieces of the AMF are a collection of active and passive remote sensors (Table 1) including a vertically pointing 95-GHz Doppler

369

Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a result, energy use per unit of GDP (energy intensity)a rebound in energy use per unit of GDP after 2001, afterresidual energy use in industry per unit of GDP (economic

Lin, Jiang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Characterization and Expression of HmuR, a TonB-Dependent Hemoglobin Receptor of Porphyromonas gingivalis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...energy-dependent process (). The energy dependence of hemin transport...analog may function to transduce energy for the transport of hemin...surface protein. . V. Braun Energy-coupled transport and signal...proteinase/gene accounting audit. . J. L. Rasmussen D. A...

Waltena Simpson; Teresa Olczak; Caroline Attardo Genco

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Advanced Hybrid Propulsion and Energy Management System for High Efficiency, Off Highway, 240 Ton Class, Diesel Electric Haul Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to reduce the fuel consumption of off-highway vehicles, specifically large tonnage mine haul trucks. A hybrid energy storage and management system will be added to a conventional diesel-electric truck that will allow capture of braking energy normally dissipated in grid resistors as heat. The captured energy will be used during acceleration and motoring, reducing the diesel engine load, thus conserving fuel. The project will work towards a system validation of the hybrid system by first selecting an energy storage subsystem and energy management subsystem. Laboratory testing at a subscale level will evaluate these selections and then a full-scale laboratory test will be performed. After the subsystems have been proven at the full-scale lab, equipment will be mounted on a mine haul truck and integrated with the vehicle systems. The integrated hybrid components will be exercised to show functionality, capability, and fuel economy impacts in a mine setting.

Richter, Tim; Slezak, Lee; Johnson, Chris; Young, Henry; Funcannon, Dan

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Fission Power: An Evolutionary Strategy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for Use in Nuclear Energy Systems Studies (Hanford Engineering Develop-ment Laboratory, Hanford, Wash., October 1977). One change that...economy growing through 450 GWe in the year 2000. It includes the 0.34 million tons of by-product...

Harold A. Feiveson; Frank von Hippel; Robert H. Williams

1979-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

373

Industrial Use of Fish Oils UNITED STATES DEPART MENT OF THE INTERIOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of commerce are obtained as by-products from fish-meal production or from food fish wastes. vVorld fish-oil production was an estimated 865,000 tons in 1966. Production has increased 2S.Sjr since 1961. All other oils, selectively hydrogenated, and de- odorized for these applications. Fish oils in food products were discontin

374

Modern approaches to the analysis of disinfection by-products in drinking water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...methods Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry methods Halogenation Hydrogen-Ion Concentration Models, Chemical Oxides analysis Ozone chemistry Water analysis Water Pollutants, Chemical analysis Water Purification methods Water Supply analysis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Pollution control and by-product recovery in the New Zealand wool-scouring industry.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Wool-scouring in New Zealand (N.Z.) is a conventional aqueous process. Such a process results in the production of a highly-polluting aqueous effluent. The population equivalent… (more)

Halliday, L. A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Impact of ozonation and biological treatment on disinfection by-products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper summarizes several recent studies on the impact of ozonation and biological treatment on DBP formation. Ozonation was characterized by the formation of ozonation DBPs such as aldehydes, assimilable organic carbon (AOC), biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC) and the oxidation of bromide to bromate. The oxidation of the DBP precursor compounds and the effectiveness of biotreatent for the control of DBPs were monitored by the formation potential (FP) for total organic halogen (TOX), total THMs (TTHMs) and total measured haloacetic acid (THAAs). Special attention was also given to the impact of bromide concentration on the speciation of the DBPs. A specific objective of the paper was to compare DBP control by batch biological treatment at the bench-scale to that by a continuous flow sand filter at the pilot-scale.

Shukairy, H.M.; Summers, R.S.; Miltner, R.J.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Optimization of Jatropha Oil Extraction and Its By-Product Utilization by Pyrolysis Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bio-Energy Testing and Analysis Laboratory EERE Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EIA Energy Information Administration FC Fixed Carbon GC Gas Chromatography HID Helium Ionization Detector LSD Least Significant Difference NTP Normal..., resulting in 50 wt.% oil yield, 23 wt.% char, 17 wt.% gas and ash. 20 CHAPTER III METHODOLOGY All experiments of this study were performed at the Bio-Energy Testing and Analysis Laboratory (BETA Lab) of the Biological and Agricultural...

Kongkasawan, Jinjuta 1987-

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

378

Design manual for management of solid by-products from advanced coal technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing coal conversion technologies face major obstacles in byproduct management. This project has developed several management strategies based on field trials of small-scale landfills in an earlier phase of the project, as well as on published/unpublished sources detailing regulatory issues, current industry practice, and reuse opportunities. Field testing, which forms the basis for several of the disposal alternatives presented in this design manual, was limited to byproducts from Ca-based dry SO{sub 2} control technologies, circulating fluidized bed combustion ash, and bubbling bed fluidized bed combustion ash. Data on byproducts from other advanced coal technologies and on reuse opportunities are drawn from other sources (citations following Chapter 3). Field results from the 5 test cases examined under this project, together with results from other ongoing research, provide a basis for predictive modeling of long-term performance of some advanced coal byproducts on exposure to ambient environment. This manual is intended to provide a reference database and development plan for designing, permitting, and operating facilities where advanced coal technology byproducts are managed.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Tokamak reactor for treating fertile material or waste nuclear by-products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a tokamak reactor. The reactor includes a first toroidal chamber, current carrying conductors, at least one divertor plate within the first toroidal chamber and a second chamber adjacent to the first toroidal chamber surrounded by a section that insulates the reactor from neutrons. The current carrying conductors are configured to confine a core plasma within enclosed walls of the first toroidal chamber such that the core plasma has an elongation of 1.5 to 4 and produce within the first toroidal chamber at least one stagnation point at a perpendicular distance from an equatorial plane through the core plasma that is greater than the plasma minor radius. The at least one divertor plate and current carrying conductors are configured relative to one another such that the current carrying conductors expand the open magnetic field lines at the divertor plate.

Kotschenreuther, Michael T.; Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Valanju, Prashant M.

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

380

LOW-COST, HIGH-PERFORMANCE MATERIALS USING ILLINOIS COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conventional and clean coal technologies. This project was primarily directed toward developing concrete, mineralogical, and microstructural properties. A clean coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SO2 control technologies. Based on these properties, two sources of both conventional and clean coal ashes were selected

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The nutritive properties of two by-products of the wet milling of corn.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The supplementary protein value of several combinations of a refined law fiber corn gluten meal and a refined soybean oilmeal in supporting growth of weanling… (more)

Christensen, David. A.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

DURABILITY EVALUATION AND PRODUCTION OF MANUFACTURED AGGREGATES FROM COAL COMBUSTION BY-PRODUCTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the cooperative agreement with DOE, the Research and Development Department of CONSOL Energy (CONSOL R&D), teamed with Universal Aggregates, LLC, to conduct a systematic study of the durability of aggregates manufactured using a variety of flue gas desulfurization (FGD), fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) and fly ash specimens with different chemical and physical properties and under different freeze/thaw, wet/dry and long-term natural weathering conditions. The objectives of the study are to establish the relationships among the durability and characteristics of FGD material, FBC ash and fly ash, and to identify the causes of durability problems, and, ultimately, to increase the utilization of FGD material, FBC ash and fly ash as a construction material. Manufactured aggregates made from FGD material, FBC ash and fly ash, and products made from those manufactured aggregates were used in the study. The project is divided into the following activities: sample collection and characterization; characterization and preparation of manufactured aggregates; determination of durability characteristics of manufactured aggregates; preparation and determination of durability characteristics of manufactured aggregate products; and data evaluation and reporting.

M. M. Wu

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Quantitative Methods for the Gas Chromatographic Characterization of Acidic Fermentation By-Products of Anaerobic Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......250 C. The nitrogen carrier gas flow rate...incubated in a water bath at 50...deionized water and 0.5...as above. Gas Chromatographic...ml/min nitrogen and the injector...showed low solubility in water, especially...Overall, the gas chromatographic......

Thomas E. Bohannon; Gerald Manius; Francisco Mamaril; Lan-Fun Li Wen

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Modern approaches to the analysis of disinfection by-products in drinking water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with organic nitrogen in the pool...in drinking water with ozone...inherent aqueous solubility of many of...organic-nitrogen precursors...Annual Conf. (Water Quality...capillary column gas chromatography...inherent aqueous solubility of many of...extraction from water difficult...Monitoring methods Gas Chromatography-Mass...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. This part of the study includes the examination of the feedstocks for the beneficiation plant. The ash, as produced by the plant, and that stored in the lower pond were examined. Filter media candidates were evaluated for dewatering the ultrafine ash (UFA) product. Media candidates were selected based on manufacturer recommendations and evaluated using standard batch filtration techniques. A final media was selected; 901F, a multifilament polypropylene. While this media would provide adequate solids capture and cake moisture, the use of flocculants would be necessary to enable adequate filter throughput. Several flocculant chemistries were also evaluated and it was determined that polyethylene oxide (PEO) at a dosage of 5 ppm (slurry basis) would be the most suitable in terms of both settling rate and clarity. PEO was evaluated on a continuous vacuum filter using 901F media. The optimum cycle time was found to be 1.25 minutes which provided a 305% moisture cake, 85% solids capture with a throughput of 115 lbs dry solids per hour and a dry cake rate of 25 lb/ft2/hr. Increasing cycle time not did not reduce cake moisture or increase throughput. A mobile demonstration unit has been designed and constructed for field demonstration. The continuous test unit will be operated at the Ghent site and will evaluate three processing configurations while producing sufficient products to facilitate thorough product testing. The test unit incorporates all of the unit processes that will be used in the commercial design and is self sufficient with respect to water, electricity and processing capabilities.

John Groppo; Thomas Robl

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Photodissociation channels for N2O near 130 nm studied by product imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the experiments of Gilpin and Welge GW 15 and of Stone, Lawrence, and Fairchild SLF .16 In both studies of metastable fragments at an ionizer was recorded. In the SLF study, data for the 130-nm photodissociation

Houston, Paul L.

387

REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

388

Utilization of low NOx coal combustion by-products. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to commercialize fly ash beneficiation at various facilities around the country. The paper describes laboratory characterization of fly ash samples, pilot plant testing, product testing, and market and economic analyses. Products include concrete, concrete blocks and bricks, plastic fillers, activated carbon, and metal matrix composites.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Feasibility Analysis of Steam Reforming of Biodiesel by-product Glycerol to Make Hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, lubricants, cleaners, and semiconductor circuits. It can be used to make electricity. NASA is the primary user of hydrogen as energy fuel-called fuel cells- to power the shuttle?s electrical system (Hydrogen Energy, 2008). Hydrogen can fuel tomorrow?s fuel-cell... wide application in industries and refineries. In the United States, about 17.2 billion pounds of hydrogen are produced per year and 95% are from steam reforming of methane (Hydrogen Now). It can be used as a fuel in tomorrow?s fuel-cell vehicles...

Joshi, Manoj

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

390

Productive Energy of Certain Feeds as Measured by Production of Fat and Flesh by Growing Rats.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are not widely different from those of the chicken, so that differences in the .6 3. Ave rage corn I position, weigh* and calories per 100 gm for rats Cal. per loolgm Fat % O/o crnpty wt. 01 live wt. - Exp. V Wt. after prepara- tion Protein 1... flour ration ----------------------------------- 16.48 14.39 12.32 15.84 14.56 17.941 16.17 8.11 12.91 6.62' 7.92 8.39 9.82 8.34 11.80 10.00 11.58 9.33 12.W 1. 6 8 8 8 8 7 S 263.5 248.6 226.6 2 2 4 M 2f3l.9 253.6 z M...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1943-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Chlorine Decay and Disinfection By-product Formation of Dissolved Organic Carbon Fractions with Goethite.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Water from the raw water intake at Barberton, Ohio water treatment plant was collected on two separate dates and fractionated into operationally defined dissolved organic… (more)

Wannamaker, Christopher L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Rapid nutrient determination of sugarcane milling by-products using near infrared spectroscopy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis investigates the use of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopic methods for rapid measurement of nutrient elements in mill mud and mill ash. Adoption of… (more)

Keeffe, Eloise Caitlin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric oxidation by-products Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

only a few electrode materials are known... exhibits some selectivity towards the reduction of nitric oxide in a net oxidising atmosphere. Several... and in the nitric oxide...

394

Comanagement of coal combustion by-products and low-volume wastes: A midwestern site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results from a field evaluation of the environmental effects of co-management of high-volume coal combustion residues with low-volume non-combustion wastes at a utility power plant. At the C-site, located in the midwestern United States, fly ash and bottom ash from the combustion of bituminous Indiana coal are co-managed with non-combustion wastes including pyrite rejects from coal cleaning, demineralizer regenerant, runoff water from the plant grounds, and boiler cleaning wastes. These wastes are disposed of in an unlined ash pond on site. The pond discharges primarily to the surrounding shallow groundwater with a limited surface discharge to a nearby river. Hydrological monitoring took place over a nine-month period in 1989 and 1990. Groundwater and soil samples were collected on three occasions during this time. Samples were analyzed to determine the groundwater chemistry, and soil and waste chemistry and geochemistry. Downgradient wells showed an increased concentration of several ash-derived species including boron, calcium, fluoride, potassium, sodium, strontium, and sulfate. The median sulfate concentration in downgradient wells was 350 mg/L, which exceeds the secondary drinking water limit. Statistical comparison of the composition of background groundwater with water from wells downgradient of the ash ponds was limited by a single set of background water samples. Soils beneath the pond appear to have limited attenuative capacity for ash-derived trace metals, and groundwater velocities are high; however, trace metal concentrations in downgradient wells are similar to background levels. No impact uniquely attributable to the co-management of low-volume wastes was detectable at this site.

Holcombe, L.J.; Thompson, C.M.; Weinberg, A. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States)); Erickson, J.R. (GeoTrans, Inc., Sterling, VA (United States)); Fruchter, J.S. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Addressing the effectiveness of industrial energy efficiency incentives in overcoming investment barriers in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy savings multiplied by a coal price of CNY 600/ton [€assuming a CNY 600/ton coal price, 1 ton coal = 0.7143 ton

Romankiewicz, John

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Burning mill sludge in a fluidized-bed incinerator and waste-heat-recovery system; Ten years of successful operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on burning mill sludge in a fluidized-bed incinerator and waste-heat-recovery system. In the late 1970s, the Lielahti sulfite mill of G.A. Serlachius Corp. (now Metsa Serla Oy) began investigating alternative methods of sludge disposal. The mill had an annual capacity of 100,000 tons of bleached pulp, generated 80,000 tons of by-product lignin sulfonates, and specialized in dissolving pulps. Because of the end product's high quality requirements, the mill had a low pulp yield and high losses in the form of both dissolved and suspended solids.

Nickull, O. (Metsa Serla, Oy (FI)); Lehtonen, O. (Tampella Ltd., Tampere (FI)); Mullen, J. (Tampella Keeler, Williamsport, PA (US))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Bioreactor Landfill Research and Demonstration Project Northern Oaks Landfill, Harrison, MI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A bioreactor landfill cell with 1.2-acre footprint was constructed, filled, operated, and monitored at Northern Oaks Recycling and Disposal Facility (NORDF) at Harrison, MI. With a filled volume of 74,239 cubic yards, the cell contained approximately 35,317 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) and 20,777 tons of cover soil. It was laid on the slope of an existing cell but separated by a geosynthetic membrane liner. After the cell reached a design height of 60 feet, it was covered with a geosynthetic membrane cap. A three-dimensional monitoring system to collect data at 48 different locations was designed and installed during the construction phase of the bioreactor cell. Each location had a cluster of monitoring devices consisting of a probe to monitor moisture and temperature, a leachate collection basin, and a gas sampling port. An increase in moisture content of the MSW in the bioreactor cell was achieved by pumping leachate collected on-site from various other cells, as well as recirculation of leachate from the bioreactor landfill cell itself. Three types of leachate injection systems were evaluated in this bioreactor cell for their efficacy to distribute pumped leachate uniformly: a leachate injection pipe buried in a 6-ft wide horizontal stone mound, a 15-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer, and a 60-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer. All leachate injection systems were installed on top of the compacted waste surface. The distribution of water and resulting MSW moisture content throughout the bioreactor cell was found to be similar for the three designs. Water coming into and leaving the cell (leachate pumped in, precipitation, snow, evaporation, and collected leachate) was monitored in order to carry out a water balance. Using a leachate injection rate of 26 – 30 gal/yard3, the average moisture content increased from 25% to 35% (wet based) over the period of this study. One of the key aspects of this bioreactor landfill study was to evaluate bioreactor start up and performance in locations with colder climate. For lifts filled during the summer months, methane generation started within three months after completion of the lift. For lifts filled in winter months, very little methane production occurred even eight months after filling. The temperature data indicated that subzero or slightly above zero (oC) temperatures persisted for unusually long periods (more than six months) in the lifts filled during winter months. This was likely due to the high thermal insulation capability of the MSW and the low level of biological activity during start up. This observation indicates that bioreactor landfills located in cold climate and filled during winter months may require mechanisms to increase temperature and initiate biodegradation. Thus, besides moisture, temperature may be the next important factor controlling the biological decomposition in anaerobic bioreactor landfills. Spatial and temporal characterization of leachate samples indicated the presence of low levels of commonly used volatile organic compounds (including acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, and toluene) and metals (including arsenic, chromium, and zinc). Changes and leachate and gaseous sample characteristics correlated with enhanced biological activity and increase in temperature. Continued monitoring of this bioreactor landfill cell is expected to yield critical data needed for start up, design, and operation of this emerging process.

Zhao, Xiando; Voice, Thomas; and Hashsham, Syed A.

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

398

Blending high sulfer coal with refuse derived fuel to make SO{sub 2} compliant slurry fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for a better method of disposing of the international community`s garbage hardly needs emphasizing. In 1993, the United States alone generated approximately 207 million ton per year of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), with 62% landfilled, 220/6 recycled, and 16% combusted for energy recovery. Despite strenuous efforts to make these disposal methods meet present needs, the cost of disposal is rising dramatically. Concurrently, the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 have severely restricted the SO{sub 2} emissions from coal fired boilers. Medium and high sulfur coals will not comply with the Phase II CAAA regulation limit of 1.2 lb SO{sub 2}/MM Btu, without advanced coal cleaning technologies or flue gas desulfurization, including the majority of the North Dakota lignite reserves. Utility power plants have attempted to burn refuse derived fuel (RDF), a heterogeneous solid fuel produced from MSW, with coal in utility scale boilers (generally referred to as co-firing). Co-firing of RDF with coal has been attempted in sixteen different boilers, five commercially. While lower SO{sub 2} emissions provided the impetus, co-firing RDF with coal suffered from several disadvantages including increased solids handling, increased excess air requirements, higher HCI, CO, NO{sub x} and chlorinated organic emissions, increased slag formation in the boiler, and higher fly ash resistivity. Currently, only two of the sixteen boilers are still regularly used to co-fire RDF. The overall objective of this research program was to assess the feasibility of blending RDF with lignite coal to form SO{sub 2} Compliant slurry fuels using EnerTech`s SlurryCarb{trademark} process. In particular, the objective was to overcome the difficulties of conventional co-firing. Blended slurry fuels were produced with the Energy & Environmental Research Center`s (EERC) bench-scale autoclave and were combusted in a pressurized fluidized-bed reactor (PFBR).

Klosky, M. [EnerTech Environmental, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); Anderson, C. [Energy & Environmental Research Center, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

The renewable energy contribution from waste across Europe.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas MSW or Mixed residual waste LFG Biogas -> Electr. (and Heat) 100 Solid Recovered Fuel Sorted Digestion Source separated biomass fraction or Sorted bio-fraction of MSW AD Biogas -> Electr. & Heat 100

400

Pyrolysis of Municipal Solid Waste for Syngas Production by Microwave Irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present study, we discuss the application of microwave-irradiated pyrolysis of municipal solid waste (MSW) for total recovery of useful gases and energy. The MSW pyrolysis under microwave irradiation hi...

Vidyadhar V. Gedam; Iyyaswami Regupathi

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Acute and Genetic Toxicity of Municipal Landfill Leachate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills have been found to contain many of the same hazardous constituents as found in hazardous waste landfills. Because of the large number of MSW landfills, these sites pose a serious environmental threat...

Brown, K.W.; Schrab, G.E.; Donnelly, K.C.

402

Proceedings of the 17th Annual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference May 18-20, 2009, Chantilly, Virginia, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the U.S. did not recover the heat of combustion generated via MSW incineration, until the mid seventies

Columbia University

403

Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hanford Woodwaste Steam Turbine, Cfb Fresno Petroleum Coke,Woodwaste MSW Steam Turbine, Cfb Riverside Corona Landfill

McKone, Thomas E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

On mobilization of lead and arsenic in groundwater in response to CO2 leakage from deep geological storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluation and mitigation of landfill gas impacts on cadmiummunicipal solid waste (MSW) landfill gas on the release of

Zheng, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Balancing Cost and Risk: The Treatment of Renewable Energy in Western Utility Resource Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermal, solar PV, and landfill gas, while PGE initiallywave energy, solar, landfill gas, and MSW, but excluded each

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

The Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada, was the site for a 12-kiloton-ton nuclear test  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NV/13609-53 NV/13609-53 Development of a Groundwater Management Model for the Project Shoal Area prepared by Gregg Lamorey, Scott Bassett, Rina Schumer, Douglas P. Boyle, Greg Pohll, and Jenny Chapman submitted to Nevada Site Office National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy Las Vegas, Nevada September 2006 Publication No. 45223 Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof or its contractors or subcontractors. Available for sale to the public, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce

407

M thanh ton 4310-55 [FWS-R4-FHC-2013-N108; [FVHC98130406900-XXX-FF04G01000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lng cha tng có du và thi khác t các giàn khoan và t u ging khoan trên áy bin. Deepwater Horizon tràn tràn. Mt s lng cha xác nh khí t nhiên cng c phát hành cho môi trng nh là kt qu ca v tràn du. Ngi c y gian c bn (cht lng và iu kin có th tn ti nu s c tràn du ã không xy ra tài nguyên) hoàn tt. Cn c các

408

(Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: No indium was recovered from ores in the United States in 1997. Domestically  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--United States: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997e Production, refinery -- -- -- -- -- Imports for consumption 73.4 70 for the indium market remains promising. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery

409

(Data in metric tons, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: No indium was recovered from ores in the United States in 1995. Domestic indium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, refinery NA NA NA NA -- Imports for consumption 36.3 36.3 73.4 70.2 73.0 Exports NA NA NA NA NA marketed through a U.S. company. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery

410

(Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2000. Domestically  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistics--United States: 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000e Production, refinery -- -- -- -- -- Imports fluctuations. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery productione Reserves2 Reserve

411

(Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2005, 6 companies operated 15 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

547 550 542 554 Norway 1,320 1,350 1,320 1,380 Russia 3,590 3,650 3,640 3,760 South Africa 863 830 850%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12-31-05 Unwrought (in coils) 7601.10.3000 2.6% ad val aluminum production decreased slightly owing to cutbacks attributed to increased energy and alumina costs

412

(Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2006, 5 companies operated 13 primary aluminum smelters; 6 smelters were  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,800 South Africa 851 890 860 900 United Arab Emirates, Dubai 75%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations 12-31-06 Unwrought (in coils) 7601.10.3000 2.6% ad val aluminum production decreased slightly owing to cutbacks attributed to increased energy and alumina costs

413

(Data in thousand metric tons of silicon content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Estimated value of silicon metal and alloys (excluding semiconductor-grade silicon)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

%; China, 16%; South Africa, 13%; Canada, 12%; and other, 39%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations metal: Brazil, 37%; South Africa, 25%; Canada, 14%; Norway, 6%; and other, 18%. Total: Brazil, 20 energy costs. Demand for silicon metal comes primarily from the aluminum and chemical industries

414

1,153-ton Waste Vault Removed from 300 Area- Vault held waste tanks with contamination from Hanford’s former laboratory facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Today, the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Richland Operations Office announced the removal of a massive concrete vault that once held two 15,000-gallon stainless steel tanks used to collect highly contaminated waste from Hanford’s 300 Area laboratories as part of the River Corridor Closure project.

415

(Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, vehicles with an internal combustion engine and a battery-powered electric motor. Most commercially that was prone to dangerous overheating. Interest continued in lithium batteries for hybrid electric vehicles lithium batteries were being used increasingly in portable electronic devices and electrical tools

416

(Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

companies were pursuing the development of lithium batteries for hybrid electric vehicles--vehicles with an internal combustion engine and a battery-powered electric motor. Most commercially available hybrid rechargeable lithium batteries were being used increasingly in portable electronic devices and electrical tools

417

(Data in metric tons of lithium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the largest lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for electric vehicles (EVs) continued; acceptance, however, of battery-powered EVs was not expanding significantly. Hybrid electric vehicles, vehicles with an internal combustion engine and a battery- powered electric motor, have been more popular than pure EVs. Commercially available hybrid vehicles do not use

418

(Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

batteries for hybrid electric vehicles, vehicles with an internal combustion engine and a battery-powered electric motor, continued. Commercially available hybrid vehicles do not use lithium batteries, although

419

(Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vehicles, vehicles with an internal combustion engine and a battery-powered electric motor. Most increasingly in portable electronic devices and electrical tools. Salient Statistics--United States: 2003 2004 two major automobile companies were pursuing the development of lithium batteries for hybrid electric

420

(Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Chile was the leading lithium chemical producer in the world; Argentina, China,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion engine and a battery-powered electric motor, continued. Commercially available hybrid vehicles do, and cordless tools. Interest in lithium batteries for hybrid electric vehicles, vehicles with an internal batteries were growing in popularity for powering video cameras, portable computers and telephones

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1998, little if any tungsten concentrate was produced from U.S. mines.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as cutting and wear-resistant materials primarily in the metalworking, oil and gas drilling, mining plan Disposals Material inventory inventory for disposal FY 1998 FY 1998 Carbide powder 871

422

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and wear- resistant materials primarily in the metalworking, oil and gas drilling, mining, and construction--9-30-006 Uncommitted Committed Authorized Disposal plan Disposals Material inventory inventory

423

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded production of tungsten concentrates in the United States was in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parts to be used as cutting and wear-resistant materials primarily in the metalworking, oil and gas plan Disposals Material inventory inventory for disposal FY 1999 FY 1999 Carbide powder 760 111 760 454

424

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: A mine in California restarted operations and made its first shipment of tungsten  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the metalworking, mining, oil- and gas-drilling, and construction industries. The remaining tungsten was consumed inventory inventory for disposal FY 2007 FY 2007 Ferrotungsten 6 136 Metal powder 268 268 136 34 Ores

425

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 1997, little if any tungsten concentrate was produced from U.S. mines.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as cutting and wear-resistant materials primarily in the metalworking, oil and gas drilling, mining inventory inventory for disposal FY 1997 FY 1997 Carbide powder 871 -- -- -- -- Ferrotungsten 385

426

E-CAD sEEms likE a perfect application for the concept of `software as a service.' There's tons of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of cloud computing. The other two application fields are infrastructure as a service and platform cloud can be public, private or a hybrid. In other words, companies can choose to implement their own internal cloud as a LAN (private cloud), use the cloud-infrastructure from a third-party provider (public

427

JOURNAL DE PHYSlQIJE Colloque C7, supplkment au no 12. Ton~e38, dkcembre 1977, page C7-227 ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE AND ORDERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-227 ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE AND ORDERING OF INTERSTITIALS IN TRANSITION METALS M. C. CADEVILLE, C. DEMANGEAT, F. GAUTIER and M. F. LAPIERRE Laboratoire de Structure Electronique des Solides (ERA 100) Universitt Louis connaissance actuelle de la structure electro- nique et de l'ordre dans les alliages interstitiels carbone

Boyer, Edmond

428

Long-term Decline of Aggregate Fuel Use per Cargo-ton-mile of Commercial Trucking; A Key Enabler of Expanded U.S. Trade and Economic Growth  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

429

KenyaPri nce ton -columbia Progr a m i n troPi cal bi ology and SuStai nabi lit y  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

productivity, diversity, and eco- logical processes in the diverse farming systems of Kenya, which include highland and lowland, large and small-scale systems, monoculture ce- real crops, mixed farming with crops Biology and Sustainability which gives students the opportunity to study ecology, evolutionary biology

Tong, Liang

430

(Data in thousand metric tons of metal unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: In 2012, 5 companies operated 10 primary aluminum smelters; 4 smelters were  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­11): Canada, 62%; Russia, 7%; China, 5%; Mexico, 4%; and other, 22%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade@usgs.gov] #12;17 ALUMINUM with the amount exported in 2011, and imports of crude and semifabricated aluminum in 2012 were 21% higher than the amount imported in 2011. China, Canada, Mexico, and the Republic of Korea

431

(Data in metric tons unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2009. Indium-containing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Japan, and the Republic of Korea--the countries where ITO production and sputtering take place. An LCD tailings viable when the price of indium is high. Import Sources (2005-08):1 China, 40%; Japan, 19%; Canada where exports of flat panels rose significantly owing to China's household appliance subsidy program

432

(Data in thousand metric tons of silicon content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Estimated value of silicon alloys and metal (excluding semiconductor-and solar-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and Use: Estimated value of silicon alloys and metal (excluding semiconductor- and solar- grade and aluminum alloys and the chemical industry. The semiconductor and solar industries, which manufacture chips%; Venezuela, 15%; Canada, 8%; and other, 8%. Silicon metal: Brazil, 38%; South Africa, 24%; Canada, 16

433

(Data in metric tons, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Indium was not recovered from ores in the United States in 2003. Two companies,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with the curtailment of primary refining capacity have added an extra incentive to the recovery of secondary indium be compared with Japan where the decline in domestic zinc refining has stimulated an aggressive recycling in the world economy. The report of reduced production from mines that produce byproduct indium had a negative

434

Viet Nam: Wood Industry Short of Raw Material, Sound Policies The Secretary General of the Viet Nam Timber and Forestry Products Association, Nguyen Ton Quyen, talked with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Viet Nam: Wood Industry Short of Raw Material, Sound Policies The Secretary General of the Viet Nam (Vietnam Economic Times) about Viet Nam's export of wood products. The year 2005 marks an in-crease in wood explain this increase? The State allows 150,000 cu.m of wood from natural forests and 1.2 million cu

435

Potential for energy conservation in the cement industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report assesses the potential for energy conservation in the cement industry. Energy consumption per ton of cement decreased 20% between 1972 and 1982. During this same period, the cement industry became heavily dependent on coal and coke as its primary fuel source. Although the energy consumed per ton of cement has declined markedly in the past ten years, the industry still uses more than three and a half times the fuel that is theoretically required to produce a ton of clinker. Improving kiln thermal efficiency offers the greatest opportunity for saving fuel. Improving the efficiency of finish grinding offers the greatest potential for reducing electricity use. Technologies are currently available to the cement industry to reduce its average fuel consumption per ton by product by as much as 40% and its electricity consumption per ton by about 10%. The major impediment to adopting these technologies is the cement industry's lack of capital as a result of low or no profits in recent years.

Garrett-Price, B.A.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Waste to Energy: Biogas CHP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Southside Wastewater Treatment Plant Biogas Cogeneration Project November 9, 2011 2011 Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference ?Turning Waste Into Energy? What to Expect ? ? Southside Overview ? Wastewater Treatment Process... gallons per day ? Processes and disposes over 150 tons of solids/day from both of the City?s wastewater treatment plants What is Biogas? ? Biogas is the methane (CH4) produced as a by-product of the anaerobic digestion process at the Southside...

Wagner, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Fears About Nuclear Proliferation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recovery and reuse of plutonium in nuclear power programs poses serious threats regarding diversion and terrorism ... A nuclear power plant typically generates about 1000 MW of electric power and, as a worrisome by-product, makes several kilograms a week of plutonium-239. ... Many tons of plutonium- 239 are produced in U.S. power plants; most of it remains in spent fuel elements now being held in interim storage. ...

WINSTON M MANNING

1985-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

438

Contamination of Soil by Crude Oil and Drilling Muds. Use of Wastes by Production of Road Construction Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A thermal method of separating wastes into organic and mineral parts is proposed for processing crude oil sludges and oil-contaminated soils accumulated in operation of oil fields and oil pipelines. After expo...

Z. A. Mansurov; E. K. Ongarbaev…

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Economic viability of shale gas production in the Marcellus Shale; indicated by production rates, costs and current natural gas prices.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The U.S. natural gas industry has changed because of the recent ability to produce natural gas from unconventional shale deposits. One of the largest… (more)

Duman, Ryan J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Combined to Non-Thermal Plasma: Effect on Activation Catalyst Temperature and by-products formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Combined to Non-Thermal Plasma: Effect on Activation Catalyst Temperature efficiency together with the catalyst activation temperature when a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) is placed the advantageous plasma catalyst coupling effect on the lowering of the catalyst activation temperature

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Utilizing the heat content of gas-to-liquids by-product streams for commercial power generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sulphur. They have no aromatics due to the isomerisation of the highly paraffinic Fischer-Tropsch liquids into GTL fuels and are practically100%iso-paraffinic,thustheyhaveveryhighcetaneratings. The... and sulphur. They have no aromatics due to the isomerisation of the highly paraffinic Fischer-Tropsch liquids into GTL fuels and are practically100%iso-paraffinic,thustheyhaveveryhighcetaneratings. The...

Adegoke, Adesola Ayodeji

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

442

Barriers to the increased utilization of coal combustion/desulfurization by-products by government and commercial sectors - Update 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following conclusions are drawn from the information presented in this report: (1) Joint efforts by industry and government focused on meeting RTC recommendations for reduction/removal of barriers have met with some success. The most notable of these are the changes in regulations related to CCB utilization by individual states. Regionally or nationally consistent state regulation of CCB utilization would further reduce regulatory barriers. (2) Technology changes will continue to be driven by the CAAA, and emission control technologies are expected to continue to impact the type and properties of CCBs generated. As a result, continued RD and D will be needed to learn how to utilize new and changing CCBs in environmentally safe, technically sound, and economically advantageous ways. Clean coal technology CCBs offer a new challenge because of the high volumes expected to be generated and the different characteristics of these CCBs compared to those of conventional CCBs. (3) Industry and government have developed the RD and D infrastructure to address the technical aspects of developing and testing new CCB utilization applications, but this work as well as constant quality control/quality assurance testing needs to be continued to address both industry wide issues and issues related to specific materials, regions, or users. (4) Concerns raised by environmental groups and the public will continue to provide environmental and technical challenges to the CCB industry. It is anticipated that the use of CCBs in mining applications, agriculture, structural fills, and other land applications will continue to be controversial and will require case-by-case technical and environmental information to be developed. The best use of this information will be in the development of generic regulations specifically addressing the use of CCBs in these different types of CCB applications. (5) The development of federal procurement guidelines under Executive Order 12873 titled ''Federal Acquisition, Recycling and Waste Prevention,'' in October 1993 was a positive step toward getting CCBs accepted in the marketplace. Industry needs to continue to work with EPA to develop additional procurement guidelines for products containing CCBs--and to take advantage of existing guidelines to encourage the use of CCBs in high-profile projects. (6) Accelerated progress toward increased utilization of CCBs can be made only if there is an increased financial commitment and technical effort by industry and government. The framework for this has been set by the successful cooperation of industry and government under DOE leadership. Cooperation should continue, with DOE fulfilling its lead role established in the RTC. It is clear that the RTC recommendations continue to have validity with respect to increasing CCB utilization and continue to provide guidance to industry and government agencies.

Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Sondreal, E.A.; Steadman, E.N.; Eylands, K.E.; Dockter, B.A.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Estimated Effects of Disinfection By-products on Birth Weight in a Population Served by a Single Water Utility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

related hypertension, sickle cell anemia, Rh sen- sitivity,Rh sensitivity, sickle cell anemia, and uterine bleeding. y

Lewis, C.; Suffet, I. H.; Ritz, B.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Silica Scale Management: Lowering Operating Costs through Improved Scale Control, and Adding Value by Extracting Marketable By-Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are using laboratory and field experiments to design modeling tools and technology that will improve silica scale management practices in geothermal plants. Our work will help to lower operating costs through improved scale prediction and add new revenue streams from sale of mineral byproducts extracted from geothermal fluids. Improving the economics and effectiveness of scale control programs and/or extraction systems in geothermal operations requires a coupled kinetic-thermodynamic model of silica behavior. Silica scale precipitation is a multi-step process, involving a nucleation-related induction period, aqueous polymerization, condensation of polymers to form colloids, and deposition onto a solid surface. Many chemical and physical variables influence the rates of these steps and their impacts must be quantified and predictable in order to optimally control silica behavior. To date, in laboratory studies, we have quantified the effects on silica polymerization of the following set of chemical variables: Na at 500 and 2000 ppm, pH values from 5 to 9, temperatures of 25 and 50 C, and silica saturation values from 1.2 to 6 at initial dissolved silica concentrations of 600 ppm. Lowering pH both increases the induction time prior to polymerization and decreases the polymerization rate. We have successfully used a multiple regression model to predict polymerization rates from these variables. Geothermal fluids contain significant dissolved concentrations of potentially valuable mineral resources such as zinc, lithium, cesium and rubidium, but silica fouling interferes with traditional extraction methods. We are developing customized and new technologies to extract the silica as a commercial-grade commodity as well as the valuable metals. We are conducting field testing of some of these techniques at a Mammoth, CA geothermal plant using a reverse osmosis unit to concentrate the fluid, adding a commercial agglomerating agent to promote silica precipitation, and then removing the silica using a tangential flow ultrafilter. The particle size, surface area and trace impurities of the silica are characterized for comparison with commercial-grade silica products. We are also testing ion exchange resins and other functionalized materials to extract potentially economic concentrations of lithium, cesium, and rubidium that are enriched in the reverse osmosis concentrate.

Burton, E A; Bourcier, W L; Wallce, A; Bruton, C J; Leif, R

2003-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

445

Use of fluidized bed combustion by-products for liners and alkali substitutes. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluidized Bed Combustion of coal eliminates most emissions of S and N oxides but produces sizable volumes of a solid residue that EPA may require to be placed in capped and lined landfills. Fluidized Bed Combustors are one of the most promising growth markets for Illinois coal and imposing cap and liner requirements may make the technology uneconomic. Fluidized Bed residues are cementlike and when mixed with soil, produce a material as impermeable as the clay liners used at landfills. This project will demonstrate that the residues can be mixed with soils by regular construction equipment and used in place of clays as liner material. The demonstration cap will cover an area of 7 acres and will prevent water infiltration into acid producing material. Baseline studies of Briar Creek indicate that the water is now highly degraded by acid drainage. Construction delays have enhanced the data collected on Briar Creek by allowing monitoring to continue through major seasonal changes without any effects attributable to the FBC ash. Materials needed to place the wells and lysimeters have been obtained. A contractor will build and deliver a mobile foam generator and spray to the field to demonstrate fugitive dust control from FBC fly ash (dust problem is one key barrier to more widespread use of FBC ash).

Paul, B.C.; Esling, S. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States); Pisani, F. [Illinois Abandoned Mined Lands reclamation Council (United States); Wells, T. [Archer-Daniels-Midland Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

446

Management of dry flue gas desulfurization by-products in underground mines. Technical progress report, 1 January--31 March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Southern Illinois University at Carbondale will develop and demonstrate several technologies for the handling and transport of dry coal combustion residues and for the underground placement in abandoned coal mines and assess associated environmental impacts. Although parts of the Residue Characterization portion of the program were delayed because residue samples were not obtained, other parts of the program are proceeding on schedule. The delays in obtaining residue samples were primarily caused by adverse weather conditions, the shut-down of one unit at the City Water, Light, and Power Company Plant for routing maintenance and problems due to conflicting schedules of utility and program personnel. However, by the end of the quarter most residue samples had been obtained, and the residue characterization studies were under way. Progress is described for five studies: environmental assessment and geotechnical stability and subsidence impacts; residue characterization; physico-chemical characterization of residues; identification and assessment of handling/transportation systems for FGD residues; and residue handling and transport.

Chugh, Y.P.; Esling, S.; Ghafoori, N.; Honaker, R.; Paul, B.; Sevim, H.; Thomasson, E.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Utilization of low NO{sub x} coal combustion by-products. Quarterly report, July--September 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three ash samples have been processed in the pilot plant, providing samples for the utilization tasks. The concrete task is nearly complete and efforts are underway to evaluate market potential and ash suitability for use in related concrete products such as block, aggregate, and aerated autoclaved concrete. Use of ash as a filler in plastics has attracted attention from a nationwide filler supplier. The task to evaluate the carbon products is just getting underway, with the preliminary market study indicating that wastewater sorbent applications may be the best way to go with this product. Moving the project into a third or demonstration phase has been discussed with several utilities, including Detroit Edison and American Electric Power. The feedback has been very favorable. This report discusses the work accomplished under each subtask.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Agricultural by-products provide critical habitat components for cold-climate populations of an oviparous snake (Natrix natrix)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The optimal temperature for embryonic development in the laboratory is in the range ... 27–29 °C, which closely matches the temperatures recorded inside manure heaps (Löwenborg et al...2010). Below and above thes...

Kristin Löwenborg; Simon Kärvemo; Alma Tiwe…

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Composition of Commercial Bis(2-ethylhexyl) Sulfosuccinate Surfactant By-Products and their Effects on an Agrochemical Formulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we investigated the composition of commercial Aerosol OT (AOT) products that are commonly used as surfactants in agrochemicals, and the influence that variations of the product’s composition have o...

Johannes Glaubitz; Karl Molt; Torsten C. Schmidt

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Co-management of coal combustion by-products and low-volume wastes: A Southeastern Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute initiated this study to provide environmental data on the co-management of utility high volume and low volume residues. This report presents results from a field investigation at an ash pond located at a 400 MW, coal-fired power plant in the southeastern US. The pond receives wet-sluiced fly ash and bottom ash from the generating station as well as low volume wastes from coal preparation, demineralizer regeneration, and boiler cleaning. A detailed hydrogeochemical characterization of the primary ash disposal pond and surrounding groundwater system was performed. A total of 25 monitoring wells were installed to characterize groundwater flow directions, rates and chemistry. Ash and soil cores were also collected for hydrogeochemical characterization.

Holcombe, L.J.; Thompson, C.M.; Rehage, J.A. (Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States)); Erickson, J.R. (GeoTrans, Inc., Sterling, VA (United States)); Fruchter, J.S. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Flue gas desulfurization gypsum and fly ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cumberland Fossil Plant (CUF) is located in Stewart County, Tennessee, and began commercial operation in 1972. This is the Tennessee Valley Authority`s newest fossil (coal-burning) steam electric generating plant. Under current operating conditions, the plant burns approximately seven million tons of coal annually. By-products from the combustion of coal are fly ash, approximately 428,000 tons annually, and bottom ash, approximately 115,000 tons annually. Based on historical load and projected ash production rates, a study was initially undertaken to identify feasible alternatives for marketing, utilization and disposal of ash by-products. The preferred alternative to ensure that facilities are planned for all by-products which will potentially be generated at CUF is to plan facilities to handle wet FGD gypsum and dry fly ash. A number of different sites were evaluated for their suitability for development as FGD gypsum and ash storage facilities. LAW Engineering was contracted to conduct onsite explorations of sites to develop information on the general mature of subsurface soil, rock and groundwater conditions in the site areas. Surveys were also conducted on each site to assess the presence of endangered and threatened species, wetlands and floodplains, archaeological and cultural resources, prime farmland and other site characteristics which must be considered from an environmental perspective.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

FGD gypsum issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The article first explains how gypsum by-product is produced in flue gas desulfurization systems in coal-fired power plants. It goes on to talk about the main markets for gypsum - wallboard manufacture (Plaster of Paris), cement production and soil stabilization. In the USA in 2006 41.6 million tons of gypsum was used by manufacturers of wallboard and plaster products, 3.0 mt for cement production and 1.1 mt for agricultural purposes. A method of determining the by-product gypsum content by thermogravimetric analysis is outlined. 4 refs., 1 fig.

Buecker, B.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

First evidence of pep solar neutrinos by direct detection in Borexino  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We observed, for the first time, solar neutrinos in the 1.0-1.5 MeV energy range. We measured the rate of pep solar neutrino interactions in Borexino to be [3.1+-0.6(stat)+-0.3(syst)] counts/(day x 100 ton) and provided a constraint on the CNO solar neutrino interaction rate of solar neutrino signal is disfavored at 99.97% C.L., while the absence of the pep signal is disfavored at 98% C.L. This unprecedented sensitivity was achieved by adopting novel data analysis techniques for the rejection of cosmogenic 11C, the dominant background in the 1-2 MeV region. Assuming the MSW-LMA solution to solar neutrino oscillations, these values correspond to solar neutrino fluxes of [1.6+-0.3]x10^8 cm^-2s-1 and 7.7x10^8 cm^-2s-1 (95% C.L.), respectively, in agreement with the Standard Solar Model. These results represent the first measurement of the pep neutrino flux and the strongest constraint of the CNO solar neutrino flux to date.

The Borexino Collaboration

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

454

Engineering/design of a co-generation waste-to-energy facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five hundred fifteen thousand tons of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is being generated every day in America. At present 68% of this trash is dumped into landfill operations. As the amount of garbage is increasing daily, the amount of land reserved for landfills is diminishing rapidly. With the sentiment of the public that you produce it, you keep it, the import-export of waste between the counties and states for the landfills, no longer appears to be feasible, especially when combined with expensive disposal costs. One method of reducing the quantity of waste sent to landfills is through the use of waste-to-energy facilities - the technology of resource recovery - the technology of today INCINERATION. All cogeneration projects are not alike. This paper examines several aspects of the electrical system of a particular municipal solid waste-to-energy project at Charleston, S.C. which includes plant auxiliary loads as well as a utility interconnection through a step-up transformer.

Bajaj, K.S.; Virgilio, R.J. (Foster Wheeler USA Corp., Clinton, NJ (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

FINAL PROJECT REPORT LOAD MODELING TRANSMISSION RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unit Evaporator Coil Size (Tons) Compressor Type Refrigerant SEER FANUnit Evaporator Coil Size (Tons) Compressor Type Refrigerant SEER FANUnit Evaporator Coil Size (Tons) Compressor Type Refrigerant SEER FAN

Lesieutre, Bernard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Utilization of lightweight materials made from coal gasification slags  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Praxis is working on a DOE/METC funded project to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of making lightweight and ultra- lightweight aggregates from slags left as solid by-products from the coal gasification process. These aggregates are produced by controlled heating of the slags to temperatures ranging between 1600 and 1900{degrees}F. Over 10 tons of expanded slag lightweight aggregates (SLA) were produced using a direct-fired rotary kiln and a fluidized bed calciner with unit weights varying between 20 and 50 lb/ft{sup 3}. The slag-based aggregates are being evaluated at the laboratory scale as substitutes for conventional lightweight aggregates in making lightweight structural concrete, roof tiles, blocks, insulating concrete, and a number of other applications. Based on the laboratory data, large-scale testing will be performed and the durability of the finished products evaluated. Conventional lightweight aggregates made from pyroprocessing expansible shales or clays are produced for $30/ton. The net production costs of SLA are in the range of $22 to $24/ton for large systems (44 t/d) and $26-$30/ton for small systems (220 t/d). Thus, the technology provides a good opportunity for economic use of gasification slags.

NONE

1996-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

457

The Least-cost Hydrogen for Southern California Zhenhong Lin*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and maintenance SMR = steam methane reforming tonC = one ton of carbon VMT = vehicle miles traveled 1

Fan, Yueyue

458

Characterization of Landfill Gas Composition at the Fresh Kills Municipal Solid-Waste Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characterization of Landfill Gas Composition at the Fresh Kills Municipal Solid-Waste Landfill ... The most common disposal method in the United States for municipal solid waste (MSW) is burial in landfills. ... Under the New Source Performance Standards and Emission Guidelines for MSW landfills, MSW operators are required to determine the nonmethane organic gas generation rate of their landfill through modeling and/or measurements. ...

Bart Eklund; Eric P. Anderson; Barry L. Walker; Don B. Burrows

1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

459

An overview of the sustainability of solid waste management at military installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arc Gasification. Sustainability of Solid Waste Management.and gasification technologies for energy efficient and environmentally sound MSW disposal." Wastewaste to energy (Provence 2008). Plasma Arc Gasification

Borglin, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply Chains Using Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Production by Gasification of Biomass." Departmentand Celik, Fuat (2005). "Gasification-Based Fuels andon a study of slagging gasification for MSW that reported

Parker, Nathan C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Biofuel Boundaries: Estimating the Medium-Term Supply Potential of Domestic Biofuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pathways, such as gasification. However, the current studysuch as MSW, the gasification to Fischer- Tropsch fuelof research on biomass gasification to FT-fuels compared to

Jones, Andrew; O'Hare, Michael; Farrell, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Optimizing the Design of Biomass Hydrogen Supply ChainsUsing Real-World Spatial Distributions: A Case Study Using California Rice Straw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Production by Gasification of Biomass." Departmentand Celik, Fuat (2005). "Gasification-Based Fuels andon a study of slagging gasification for MSW that reported

Parker, Nathan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Biomass power and state renewable energy policies under electric industry restructuring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geothermal, MSW, and small hydro (less than or equal to 30solar, sustainable biomass, small hydro under 100 MW that do

Porter, Kevin; Wiser, Ryan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Comparing state portfolio standards and system-benefits charges under restructuring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geothermal, MSW, and small hydro (less than or equal to 30sustainable biomass, small hydro under 100 MW that does not

Wiser, Ryan; Porter, Kevin; Bolinger, Mark

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Review of International Experience with Renewable Energy Obligation Support Mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ocean, biomass, small hydro and MSW (many resources withfuelled CHP plants and small hydro plants) are favoured bycost electricity from RES (from small hydro and biomass, and

Wiser, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Market Drivers for Biofuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, entitled "Market Drivers for Biofuels," was given at the Third Annual MSW to Biofuels Summit in February, 2013, by Brian Duff.

467

Haraldrud Municipal Solid Waste Combustion Plant in Oslo.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis has studied Haraldrud MSW combustion process. Haraldrud is a realcombustion plant burning waste for citizens of Oslo. A thoroughly description ofthe combustion process… (more)

Gudim, Simen Johan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

'Incineration: A burning issue or a load of rubbish?’ Examining public attitudes to municipal solid waste incineration.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The author set out to investigate public attitudes to municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration. The area chosen for the study was Carlow town, a regional… (more)

Dillon, Rachel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic fixed bed Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The objective... . The overall plant consists of MSW reception , separation and recycling, aerobic composting of the organic... the incinerator plant and especially the...

470

EVALUATION OF POSSIBLE GASIFIER-ENGINE APPLICATIONS WITH MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE (A CASE STUDY OF KAMPALA).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Gasification of biomass for electricity power generation has been a proven technology in a number of countries in the world. MSW consists of biomass,… (more)

BERNARD, KIVUMBI

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Renewable Portfolio Standards in the United States - A Status Report with Data Through 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solid waste (MSW), and hydropower vary considerably acrossconsisting of existing hydropower, biomass, and MSWthese sources, may use hydropower to qualify for up to 30%

Wiser, Ryan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminium dross waste Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Copyright 2008 by ASME Proceedings of NAWTEC16 16th Annual North American Waste... analysis of the mass streams and the properties of residual Municipal Solid Waste (MSW)....

473

Conversion of carboxylate salts to carboxylic acids via reactive distillation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biomass used in this study . . . 1-2 Approxitnate annual production and spot selling price of various carboxylic acids. 1-3 Names used for biomass feedstocks. . 1-4 2-1 Sample processing. Rinsing scheme for precipitated solids. 12 3-1 Concentration... fermentation broth derived trom various wastes. Table 1-4 describes the studies performed for each fermentation broth, as well as reagent-grade chemicals. Table 1-3. Names used for biomass feedstocks. Sample Name MSW1 MSW2 MSW3 MSW4 MSWS PF/Biol PF...

Williamson, Shelly Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

474

Development of Energy Balances for the State of California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geothermal, wind, solar, landfill gas and municipal solidgeothermal, wind, solar, landfill gas and municipal solidGeothermal Wind Solar Wood Landfill & MSW Other Biomass

Murtishaw, Scott; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Sahtaye, Jayant

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

The Physician Clinical Support System-Buprenorphine (PCSS-B): a Novel Project to Expand/Improve Buprenorphine Treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Addiction Medicine. Netherland J, Botsko M, Egan JE, etKatz, MD, PhD 5 , Julie Netherland, MSW 1 , John A. Renner,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Salvaging Timber: Frequently Asked Questions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the timber. Casualty losses can be claimed on IRS Form 4684, which is available in IRS Publication 2194, the Disaster Losses Kit. To file this form and claim a loss, a landowner needs three values: ? the fair market value before the disaster; ? the fair... if a forester?s fee is less than 15 percent of the estimated basis. Values calculated from cruise needed on IRS Form 4684: Fair market value before = the sum by product [total tons/ac x values before disaster]. Fair market value after = {the sum...

Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

2005-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

477

(Data in thousand metric tons of boric oxide (B2O3) unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The estimated value of boric oxide contained in minerals and compounds produced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Salta Mining and Energy Resources, located in Salta Province in northern Argentina, increased exports--All forms Reserves10 Reserve base10 2005 2006e United States 1,150 1,150 40,000 80,000 Argentina 820 650 2

478

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2004,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in cemented carbide parts for cutting and wear-resistant materials primarily in the metalworking, mining, oil inventory inventory for disposal FY 2004 FY 2004 Ferrotungsten 233 3 233 136 Metal powder 463 463 136

479

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2002,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

parts for cutting and wear-resistant materials primarily in the metalworking, oil and gas drilling Authorized Disposal plan Disposals Material inventory inventory for disposal FY 2002 FY 2002 Carbide powder

480

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last recorded U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2001,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for cutting and wear-resistant materials primarily in the metalworking, oil and gas drilling, mining Authorized Disposal plan Disposals Material inventory inventory for disposal FY 2001 FY 2001 Carbide powder

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "by-products msw tons" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2003,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in cemented carbide parts for cutting and wear-resistant materials primarily in the metalworking, oil- and gas--9-30-036 Uncommitted Committed Authorized Disposal plan Disposals Material inventory inventory

482

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2005,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in cemented carbide parts for cutting and wear-resistant materials primarily in the metalworking, mining, oil Material inventory inventory for disposal FY 2005 FY 2005 Ferrotungsten 105 105 7 136 121 Metal powder 266

483

(Data in metric tons of tungsten content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The last reported U.S. production of tungsten concentrates was in 1994. In 2006,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in cemented carbide parts for cutting and wear-resistant materials primarily in the metalworking, mining, oil Material inventory inventory for disposal FY 2006 FY 2006 Ferrotungsten 7 136 133 Metal powder 266 266

484

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2007. All  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2007. All yttrium Number Normal Trade Relations 12-31-07 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth-bearing materials and compounds containing by weight >19% to rare-earth

485

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2009. All  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2009. All yttrium. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805.30.0000 5.0% ad. Other rare-earth compounds, including yttrium oxide >85% Y2O3, yttrium nitrate, and other individual

486

[Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted] Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2010. All  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2010. All yttrium. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805.30.0000 5.0% ad. Other rare-earth compounds, including yttrium oxide >85% Y2O3, yttrium nitrate, and other individual

487

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium

488

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2008. All  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2008. All yttrium 12-31-08 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and compounds containing by weight >19% to rare-earth compounds, including

489

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnsite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnäsite at Mountain Pass, CA, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnäsite, a rare-earth Number Normal Trade Relations 12/31/02 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth

490

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2006. All  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2006. All yttrium-31-06 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium and compounds containing by weight >19% to rare-earth compounds, including

491

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2010. All  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2010. All yttrium Normal Trade Relations 12-31-10 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth-bearing materials and compounds containing by weight >19% to rare-earth compounds

492

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2003.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2003. Yttrium Relations 12/31/03 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and compounds containing by weight >19% to rare-earth compounds, including

493

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y O ) content, unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805

494

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2004. Yttrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2004. Yttrium Relations 12-31-04 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and compounds containing by weight >19% to rare-earth compounds, including

495

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth fluocarbonate mineral, was mined and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium, whether or not intermixed

496

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth fluocarbonate mineral, was mined.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium, whether or not intermixed or interalloyed 2805.30.0000 5

497

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y O ) content, unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined by one company as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth/31/96 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium

498

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2005. All  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was not mined in the United States in 2005. All yttrium-31-05 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium and compounds containing by weight >19% to rare-earth compounds, including

499

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y O ) content, unless otherwise noted)2 3 Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element, yttrium, was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth/31/98 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free Free. Rare-earth metals, scandium and yttrium

500

(Data in metric tons of yttrium oxide (Y2O3) content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production and Use: The rare-earth element yttrium was mined as a constituent of the mineral bastnasite at Mountain Pass, CA, but was not recovered as a separate element during processing. Bastnasite, a rare-earth Number Normal Trade Relations 12/31/01 Thorium ores and concentrates (monazite) 2612.20.0000 Free. Rare-earth