National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for butylene isobutane isobutylene

  1. TABLE16.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    597 PropanePropylene ... 345 355 108 - -35 137 - 0 12 625 Normal ButaneButylene ... 77 145 63 - 13 127 - 17 1 153 IsobutaneIsobutylene...

  2. TABLE17.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0 614 PropanePropylene ... 342 351 56 - -83 11 - 0 20 636 Normal ButaneButylene ... 74 84 32 - 13 41 - 42 2 118 IsobutaneIsobutylene...

  3. TABLE56.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... 2,153 0 2,153 1,884 1,514 370 Normal ButaneButylene ... 0 0 0 527 415 112 IsobutaneIsobutylene...

  4. TABLE04.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0 637 PropanePropylene ... 527 581 214 - 224 - 0 22 1,076 Normal ButaneButylene ... 144 258 69 - 214 - 41 27 190 IsobutaneIsobutylene...

  5. table09.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    709 PropanePropylene ... 363 301 4 - -158 -120 - 0 21 610 Normal ButaneButylene ... 76 3 6 - -11 -89 - 100 8 54 IsobutaneIsobutylene...

  6. table03.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    734 PropanePropylene ... 533 527 137 - -310 - 0 29 1,478 Normal ButaneButylene ... 155 -65 28 - -179 - 234 24 39 IsobutaneIsobutylene...

  7. TABLE13.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    - 0 0 (s) PropanePropylene ... 12 47 (s) - 0 -26 - 0 5 80 Normal ButaneButylene ... 21 -8 0 - 0 -25 - 43 10 -15 IsobutaneIsobutylene...

  8. TABLE12.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    - 0 0 39 PropanePropylene ... 99 111 75 - 12 46 - 0 2 248 Normal ButaneButylene ... 31 47 1 - 4 77 - 2 7 -2 IsobutaneIsobutylene...

  9. TABLE09.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 - 0 0 1 PropanePropylene ... 9 50 40 - 97 (s) - 0 1 194 Normal ButaneButylene ... 3 10 4 - 1 4 - (s) 2 12 IsobutaneIsobutylene...

  10. table04.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Propylene ... 334 1,689 1,206 - 4,630 -262 - 0 20 8,101 4,043 Normal ButaneButylene ... 116 -843 27 - 107 -548 - 162 3 -210 821 IsobutaneIsobutylene...

  11. TABLE13.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    - 0 0 68 PropanePropylene ... 101 112 89 - 30 -6 - 0 2 337 Normal ButaneButylene ... 33 14 2 - 2 19 - 18 4 12 IsobutaneIsobutylene...

  12. TABLE11.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    - 0 0 -10 PropanePropylene ... 48 9 8 - -23 -2 - 0 (s) 43 Normal ButaneButylene ... 18 -7 6 - -10 1 - 11 0 -5 IsobutaneIsobutylene...

  13. TABLE08.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 - 0 0 1 PropanePropylene ... 10 47 28 - 69 25 - 0 1 129 Normal ButaneButylene ... 3 25 3 - 0 13 - (s) 2 16 IsobutaneIsobutylene...

  14. table07.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 0 26 PropanePropylene ... 100 116 86 - 31 -155 - 0 3 485 Normal ButaneButylene ... 37 -27 16 - 18 -48 - 74 6 12 IsobutaneIsobutylene...

  15. table10.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Propylene ... 1,473 284 233 - -705 -50 - 0 (s) 1,335 439 Normal ButaneButylene ... 561 -209 191 - -322 17 - 355 0 -151 323 IsobutaneIsobutylene...

  16. table05.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    - 0 0 8 PropanePropylene ... 11 54 39 - 149 -8 - 0 1 261 Normal ButaneButylene ... 4 -27 1 - 3 -18 - 5 (s) -7 IsobutaneIsobutylene...

  17. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    880 2,076 PropanePropylene 4,739 0 4,739 5,400 2,129 3,271 1,449 8,824 -7,375 Normal ButaneButylene 210 0 210 968 656 312 715 855 -140 IsobutaneIsobutylene 0 0 0 693 193 500...

  18. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 PropanePropylene 337 1 338 923 41 417 1,381 Normal ButaneButylene 579 8 587 741 317 267 1,325 IsobutaneIsobutylene 206 7 213 155 55 170 380...

  19. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    48 EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 PropanePropylene 20 21 782 0 548 1,371 44 Normal ButaneButylene 10 76 29 0 3 118 4 IsobutaneIsobutylene 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Other Liquids 174 25...

  20. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 PropanePropylene 152 450 5,241 12 4,094 9,950 36 Normal ButaneButylene 746 2,648 533 160 1,090 5,177 19 IsobutaneIsobutylene 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Other...

  1. Petroleum Supply Annual 2005, Volume 1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Ethylene 649 20 1 - 10 0 0 660 PropanePropylene 499 540 233 - 6 0 37 1,229 Normal ButaneButylene 134 43 66 - -2 119 15 110 IsobutaneIsobutylene 168 -30 28 - 1 134 0 30 Other...

  2. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1,285 43 EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 PropanePropylene 11 42 479 0 434 965 32 Normal ButaneButylene 9 251 13 30 17 319 11 IsobutaneIsobutylene 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Other Liquids 100...

  3. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Ethylene 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 PropanePropylene 206 544 7,332 12 5,589 13,683 37 Normal ButaneButylene 833 2,882 673 173 1,095 5,655 15 IsobutaneIsobutylene 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Other...

  4. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    751 3,661 PropanePropylene 2,638 0 2,638 2,474 1,238 1,236 1,631 4,298 -2,667 Normal ButaneButylene 7 0 7 563 278 285 604 456 148 IsobutaneIsobutylene 0 0 0 544 128 416 327 490...

  5. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 PropanePropylene 426 2 428 940 27 887 1,854 Normal ButaneButylene 1,811 40 1,851 1,361 415 768 2,544 IsobutaneIsobutylene 151 4 155 99 62 164...

  6. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 PropanePropylene 337 1 338 903 41 312 1,256 Normal ButaneButylene 579 8 587 741 317 245 1,303 IsobutaneIsobutylene 206 7 213 155 55 184 394...

  7. Self-Assembly of Carboxylated Poly(styrene-b-ethylene-co-butylene-b-styrene) Triblock Copolymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Chi

    Self-Assembly of Carboxylated Poly(styrene-b-ethylene-co-butylene-b-styrene) Triblock Copolymer Manuscript Received June 8, 2000 ABSTRACT: Carboxylated poly(styrene-b-ethylene-co-butylene-b-styrene) (CSEBS of this balance, in the present study, we systematically in- creased the carboxylation extent of the styrene

  8. Isobutane ignition delay time measurements at high pressure and detailed chemical kinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Healy, D.; Curran, H.J.; Donato, N.S.; Aul, C.J.; Petersen, E.L.; Zinner, C.M.; Bourque, G.

    2010-08-15

    Rapid compression machine and shock-tube ignition experiments were performed for real fuel/air isobutane mixtures at equivalence ratios of 0.3, 0.5, 1, and 2. The wide range of experimental conditions included temperatures from 590 to 1567 K at pressures of approximately 1, 10, 20, and 30 atm. These data represent the most comprehensive set of experiments currently available for isobutane oxidation and further accentuate the complementary attributes of the two techniques toward high-pressure oxidation experiments over a wide range of temperatures. The experimental results were used to validate a detailed chemical kinetic model composed of 1328 reactions involving 230 species. This mechanism has been successfully used to simulate previously published ignition delay times as well. A thorough sensitivity analysis was performed to gain further insight to the chemical processes occurring at various conditions. Additionally, useful ignition delay time correlations were developed for temperatures greater than 1025 K. Comparisons are also made with available isobutane data from the literature, as well as with 100% n-butane and 50-50% n-butane-isobutane mixtures in air that were presented by the authors in recent studies. In general, the kinetic model shows excellent agreement with the data over the wide range of conditions of the present study. (author)

  9. Single event kinetic modeling of solid acid alkylation of isobutane with butenes over proton-exchanged Y-Zeolites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinis Coll, Jorge Maximiliano

    2006-04-12

    Complex reaction kinetics of the solid acid alkylation of isobutane with butenes over a proton-exchanged Y-zeolite has been modeled at the elementary step level. Starting with a computer algorithm that generated the reaction network based...

  10. Dynamics of Exchange at Gas-Zeolite Interfaces 1: Pure Component n-Butane and Isobutane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHANDROSS,MICHAEL E.; WEBB III,EDMUND B.; GREST,GARY S.; MARTIN,MARCUS G.; THOMPSON,AIDAN P.; ROTH,M.W.

    2000-07-13

    The authors present the results of molecular dynamics simulations of n-butane and isobutane in silicalite. They begin with a comparison of the bulk adsorption and diffusion properties for two different parameterizations of the interaction potential between the hydrocarbon species, both of which have been shown to reproduce experimental gas-liquid coexistence curves. They examine diffusion as a function of the loading of the zeolite, as well as the temperature dependence of the diffusion constant at loading and for infinite dilution. They continue with simulations in which interfaces are formed between single component gases and the zeolite. After reaching equilibrium, they examine the dynamics of exchange between the bulk gas and the zeolite. Finally, they calculate the permeability of the zeolite for n-butane and isobutane as a function of pressure. Their simulations are performed for a number of different gas temperatures and pressures, covering a wide range of state points.

  11. Synthesis of Isobutene and Isobutane from Synthesis Gas. A Literature Review Since 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2012-04-01

    The isosynthesis reaction is commonly referred as the reaction that converts selectively synthesis gas to isobutene and isobutane. The main feature of this reaction is the production of branched hydrocarbons in higher proportion with respect to linear hydrocarbons than expected from thermodynamic equilibrium and with a molecular weight distribution favoring iso-C4 hydrocarbons. This article reviews and summarizes isosynthesis research results reported in the open scientific literature with emphasis on the articles published in the last two decades.

  12. Ignition properties of n-butane and iso-butane in a rapid compression machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gersen, S.; Darmeveil, J.H.; Mokhov, A.V.; Levinsky, H.B.

    2010-02-15

    Autoignition delay times of n-butane and iso-butane have been measured in a Rapid Compression Machine in the temperature range 660-1010 K, at pressures varying from 14 to 36 bar and at equivalence ratios {phi} = 1.0 and {phi} = 0.5. Both butane isomers exhibit a negative-temperature-coefficient (NTC) region and, at low temperatures, two-stage ignition. At temperatures below {proportional_to}900 K, the delay times for iso-butane are longer than those for the normal isomer, while above this temperature both butanes give essentially the same results. At temperatures above {proportional_to}720 K the delay times of the lean mixtures are twice those for stoichiometric compositions; at T < 720 K, the equivalence ratio is seen to have little influence on the ignition behavior. Increasing the pressure from 15 bar to 30 bar decreases the amplitude of the NTC region, and reduces the ignition delay time for both isomers by roughly a factor of 3. In the region in which two-stage ignition is observed, 680-825 K, the duration of the first ignition stage decreases sharply in the range 680-770 K, but is essentially flat above 770 K. Good quantitative agreement is found between the measurements and calculations for n-butane using a comprehensive model for butane ignition, including both delay times in the two-stage region, with substantial differences being observed for iso-butane, particularly in the NTC region. (author)

  13. Thermodynamic properties of a geothermal working fluid; 90% isobutane-10% isopentane: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallagher, J.S.; Linsky, D.; Morrison, G.; Levelt Sengers, J.M.H.

    1987-04-01

    We present tables of thermodynamic properties, and dew and bubble properties, of a mixture of 90 mol % isobutane and 10 mol % isopentane, a working fluid in a binary geothermal power cycle. The tables are generated by a formulation of the Helmholtz free energy, in which the mixture properties are mapped onto the known properties of pure isobutane by means of the principle of generalized corresponding states. The data base for the Helmholtz free energy formulation is new. We report data obtained in three different apparatus: critical-line and isopentane vapor pressure data obtained in a visual cell; vapor-liquid equilibria data obtained in a mercury-operated variable-volume cell; and pressure-volume-temperature data for the 90 mol %-10 mol % mixture obtained in a semi-automated Burnett-isochoric apparatus. The principles of the methods, and estimates of the reliability, are discussed and all experimental data are compared with the surface. The results are tables of specific volume, enthalpy, entropy, specific heat and density and temperature derivatives of the pressure at 10 K temperature increments from 240 to 600 K along isobars from 0.01 to 20 MPa. Separate tables are prepared from the dew and bubble properties of the 90-10 mixture. Estimates of the effects of isomeric impurity of isobutane are given in graphical form.

  14. Support shape effect in metal oxide catalysis: ceria nanoshapes supported vanadia catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation of iso-butane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Zili; Schwartz, Viviane; Li, Meijun; Rondinone, Adam Justin; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H

    2012-01-01

    The activation energy of VOx/CeO2 catalysts in oxidative dehydrogenation of iso-butane was found dependent on the shape of ceria support: rods < octahedra, closely related to the surface oxygen vacancy formation energy and defects amount of the two ceria supports with different crystallographic surface planes.

  15. TABLE12.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Propylene ... 358 1,447 5 - 0 -805 - 0 149 2,466 1,676 Normal ButaneButylene ... 639 -241 0 - 0 -771 - 1,348 301 -480 1,111 Isobutane...

  16. table06.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... 3,095 3,602 2,661 - 968 -4,799 - 0 96 15,029 13,173 Normal ButaneButylene ... 1,156 -837 486 - 571 -1,497 - 2,303 201 369 3,305 Isobutane...

  17. Transport of Injected Isobutane by Thermal Groundwater in Long...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    uses of isotopes have led to novel interpretations of the evolution of fluid and rock chemistry over time. New modelling techniques have allowed elucidation of multi-component...

  18. Transport of Injected Isobutane by Thermal Groundwater in Long Valley

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown of

  19. Experimental and DFT studies of initiation processes for butane isomerization over sulfated-zirconia catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Z.; Watwe, R.M.; Natal-Santiago, M.A.; Hill, J.M.; Dumesic, J.A.; Fogash, K.B.; Kim, B.; Masqueda-Jimenez, B.I.

    1998-09-10

    Reaction kinetics studies were conducted of isobutane and n-butane isomerization at 423 K over sulfated-zirconia, with the butane feeds purified of olefins. Dihydrogen evolution was observed during butane isomerization over fresh catalysts, as well as over catalysts selectively poisoned by preadsorbed ammonia. Butane isomerization over sulfated-zirconia can be viewed as a surface chain reaction comprised of initiation, propagation, and termination steps. The primary initiation step in the absence of feed olefins is considered to be the dehydrogenation of butane over sulfated-zirconia, generating butenes which adsorb onto acid sites to form protonated olefinic species associated with the conjugate base form of the acid sites. Quantum-chemical calculations, employing density-functional theory, suggest that the dissociative adsorption of dihydrogen, isobutylene hydrogenation, and dissociative adsorption of isobutane are feasible over the sulfated-zirconia cluster, and these reactions take place over Zr-O sites.

  20. Diffusion of isobutane in silicalite studied by transition path sampling Thijs J. H. Vlugta)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dellago, Christoph

    WV Amsterdam, The Netherlands Received 9 May 2000; accepted 23 August 2000 The diffusion process is important in the design of petrochemical applications.1 As both adsorption and dif- fusion experiments can- ventional molecular dynamics MD techniques cannot be used to study this process. A naive way of computing

  1. Selective oxidation of alkanes and/or alkenes to valuable oxygenates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Manhua (Maple Glen, PA); Pillai, Krishnan S. (North Brunwick, NJ)

    2011-02-15

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing at least one of methacrolein and methacrylic acid, for example, by subjecting isobutane or isobutylene or a mixture thereof to a vapor phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen. In the case where isobutane alone is subjected to a vapor phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, the product is at least one of isobutylene, methacrolein and methacrylic acid. The catalyst comprises a compound having the formula A.sub.aB.sub.bX.sub.xY.sub.yZ.sub.zO.sub.o wherein A is one or more elements selected from the group of Mo, W and Zr, B is one or more elements selected from the group of Bi, Sb, Se, and Te, X is one or more elements selected from the group of Al, Bi, Ca, Ce, Co, Fe, Ga, Mg, Ni, Nb, Sn, W and Zn, Y is one or more elements selected from the group of Ag, Au, B, Cr, Cs, Cu, K, La, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Nb, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Re, Ru, Sn, Te, Ti, V and Zr, and Z is one or more element from the X or Y groups or from the following: As, Ba, Pd, Pt, Sr, or mixtures thereof, and wherein a=1, 0.05

  2. CarbonCarbon Bond Cleavage and Dehydrogenation of Isobutane Over HZSM-5 at Low Pressures and Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Acidic zeolite substrates, such as HZSM-5 are vital cata- lysts in the petrochemical industry, due-temperature activation for C­C bond cleavage to propene and methane, and dehydrogenation to isobutene and hydrogen

  3. E. In Situ Polymerization of Cyclic Butylene Terephthalate(CBT) Oligomers with Conductive fillers for Thermal Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Julie P.

    copolymers with Thermal conductivity Composites This research is funded by Honeywell Corporation. For the generous assistance in measuring thermal conductivities of our composites. The original purpose% diamond composites, tested by Cool Polymer, Inc. in #12;Warwick. Cool Polymers measured a value of 4.21 W

  4. CATALYSIS BY PLATINUM SINGLE CRYSTAL SURFACES: LOW PRESSURE HYDROCARBON REACTIONS AND THE EFFECTS OF INTRODUCING STRONGLY BOUND OXYGEN AT THE SURFACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Carol Ellen

    2011-01-01

    of neo-pentane and iso-butane in the presence of excessof neo-pentane to iso-butane was found to be a demandingof neo-pentane and iso-butane in the presence of excess

  5. Mechanistic details of acid-catalyzed reactions and their role in the selective synthesis of triptane and isobutane from dimethyl ether

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    and dimethyl ether (DME) to hydro- carbons provides a potential route to transportation fuels from C1 Transportation fuels a b s t r a c t We report here kinetic and isotopic evidence for the elementary steps involved in dimethyl ether (DME) homologation and for their role in the preferential synthesis of 2

  6. Dynamics of H abstraction from alcohols (CH3OH, C2H5OH and 2-C3H7OH) using velocity map imaging in crossed molecular beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, M.

    2011-01-01

    investigation of the reactions with propane, isobutane,selectively deuterated propane and also methane. State-ratios were very similar for propane and isobutane. Andresen

  7. Polymer International Polym Int 55:292298 (2006) DOI: 10.1002/pi.1951

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Siqun

    2006-01-01

    Polymer International Polym Int 55:292­298 (2006) DOI: 10.1002/pi.1951 Crystallization behaviour of cellulose acetate butylate/poly(butylene succinate)-co-(butylene carbonate) blends Seung-Hwan Lee and Siqun(butylene succinate)-co-(butylene carbonate) (PBS-co-BC) and its blends with cellulose acetate butylate (CAB) (10

  8. Dielectric Elastomers for Actuation and Energy Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brochu, Paul

    2012-01-01

    polymer based on sulfonated poly (styrene-ethylene-co-butylene-b-styrene). Materials Letters, [34] S. Nemat-based on a sulfonated poly(styrene-b-ethylene-co-butylene-b-

  9. Thermodynamics and Ionic Conductivity of Block Copolymer Electrolytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wanakule, Nisita Sidra

    2010-01-01

    et al. , Transport properties of sulfonated poly (styrene-b-isobutylene-b- styrene) triblock copolymers at high iondoped poly(isoprene-b-styrene-b-ethylene oxide) and poly(

  10. Efficient Energy Usage in Butane Splitters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnwell, J.; Morris, C. P.

    1982-01-01

    A World surplus of mixed butanes coupled with an increased need for gasoline extenders has raised the demand for isobutane. Isobutane is readily separated from an admixture with normal butane by conventional distillation techniques. However...

  11. HYDROCARBON FORMATION ON POLYMER-SUPPORTED COBALT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benner, Linda S.

    2013-01-01

    ·omatography, mass , propane, butane , wa:ter, and CO co dueethane ( 1. 7 flillOl) , n~butane (0.17 flmol), isobutane (not possess Isobutane/n~butane activity, this activity The

  12. 1MSE 2090: Introduction to Materials Science Chapter 14, Polymer Structures Chapter Outline: Polymer Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    the same atoms) but have different atomic arrangement. An example is butane and isobutane: Butane C4H10

  13. Pergamon Atmospheric Environment Vol. 31, No. 23, pp. 4017 4038, 1997 X-1997 Elsevier Science Ltd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aneja, Viney P.

    , propane, n-butane, iso-butane, ethene and acetylene) display a seasonal variation of a winter maximum

  14. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 8, 17371750, 2008 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/8/1737/2008/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    chemistry, and [isobutane]/[n-butane] and [methyl ethyl ketone]/[n- butane] are used to study the extent

  15. ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    > 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and butane > butylene. There are three end member fluid compositions: type 1 fluids in which...

  16. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    These streams may also contain significant levels of olefins andor fluorides contamination. Butylene (C 4 H 8 ). An olefinic hydrocarbon recovered from refinery processes....

  17. Materials Today Communications 2 (2015) e33e37 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    2015-01-01

    in stress- bearing applications such as bulletproof body armor, shielding for sports equipment, and fiber, dynamic mechan- ical analysis; PEB, poly(ethylene-butylene); PET, polyethylene terephthalate; PS

  18. Dielectric Elastomers for Fluidic and Biomedical Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCoul, David

    2015-01-01

    Morphology and properties of poly[styrene-b- (ethylene-co-butylene)-b-styrene] multiwalled carbon nanotubeethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) film through

  19. THE TRANSPOSED CRITICAL TEMPERATURE RANKINE THERMODYNAMIC CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pope, William L.

    2012-01-01

    and Optimize Geothermal Power Cycles," presented at the 1lthbinary) Rankine power cycle based on our observations on ageothermal binary Rankine power cycles for the isobutane/

  20. Assumptions and Expectations for Annual Energy Outlook 2015:...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    * Update NPGL factors as well as the composition shares of NGPLs (ethane, propane, butane, iso-butane, pentanes plus). * Update EURs as time allows - focus on PA Marcellus...

  1. Molecular Components of Catalytic Selectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2009-01-01

    Hexagonal Square isobutane n-butane isobutane C 1 – C 3H 2 O H 3 C OH 1-Butanol H 3 C H 2 Butane H H 3 C + H 2 CH 3Pyrrolidine + H 2 +NH 3 Butane and ammonia Scheme 1. (a) (b)

  2. Safe Operating Procedure (Revised 7/09)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    ://ehs.unl.edu/) LPG includes propane, butane, and butylenes used for heating, cooking, and fuel. The purpose Food Service No more than two 10 ounce non-refillable butane cylinders in use per appliance

  3. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelis, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    and Gas Journal, 2006c). 1,3 Butadiene is another co-productIn 2005, 4.4 billion lbs of butadiene were produced in thepropylene, butylenes and butadiene) and aromatics (benzene,

  4. Prediction of the Three-Phase Coexistence Conditions of Pure Methane and Carbon Dioxide Hydrates Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costandy, Joseph GN

    2015-06-12

    different molecules can form hydrates when mixed with water at relatively low temperatures and high pressures, including methane, ethane, propane, iso-butane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen and hydrogen. The accurate prediction of thermodynamic properties...

  5. Supplement of Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 63376350, 2015 http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/15/6337/2015/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Acetate Anthropogenic No ALK3 n-Butane, Ethanol, Isobutane, Dimethyl, Butane, Dimethyl Pentane Anthropogenic No ALK4 n-Pentane, n-Hexane, Branched C5-C6, Alkanes, Cyclopetane, Trimethyl Butane, Trimethyl

  6. Consequences of Confinement in Zeolite Acid Catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gounder, Rajamani Pachayappan

    2011-01-01

    diameters of propane and n-butane. Scheme 3.5. MOR crystaldehydrogenation of propane, n-butane and isobutane. CHAPTERkJ mol -1 ] Propane n n-Butane n-P Pentane n-H Hexane Figure

  7. Molecular and isotopic partitioning of low-molecular-weight hydrocarbons during migration and gas hydrate precipitation in deposits of a high-flux seepage site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    2). Propane, iso- and n-butane were found in much smallercarbon dioxide, and are virtually devoid of iso-butane andn-butane (Fig. 4). Similar molecular distinctions observed

  8. Proceedings of the Workshop on Radiation Damage to Wire Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kadyk, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    operated in argon (60070) + ethane (40070) before (top) andit ! "". , /" ft:_o-~o---o ETHANE (PURE) -x- ISOBUTANE 199~Z t- v ).. I,() WAVE LENGTH -v- ETHANE+ETHANOL 1+1' C. -2hl

  9. DIRECT CONTACT HEAT EXCHANGER 10 kW POWER LOOP. SECTION 1: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. SECTION 2: TEST SERIES NO. 1. SECTION 3; TEST SERIES NO. 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering, Barber-Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    high pressure brine to a direct contact heat exchanger whichPRESSURE RATIO Figure ,11. Pure IC4 calibration test (using hairpin heat exchanger).exchanger where heat was extracted from it to isobutane. The high pressure

  10. Direct contact, binary fluid geothermal boiler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rapier, Pascal M. (Richmond, CA)

    1982-01-01

    Energy is extracted from geothermal brines by direct contact with a working fluid such as isobutane which is immiscible with the brine in a geothermal boiler. The geothermal boiler provides a distributor arrangement which efficiently contacts geothermal brine with the isobutane in order to prevent the entrainment of geothermal brine in the isobutane vapor which is directed to a turbine. Accordingly the problem of brine carry-over through the turbine causes corrosion and scaling thereof is eliminated. Additionally the heat exchanger includes straightening vanes for preventing startup and other temporary fluctuations in the transitional zone of the boiler from causing brine carryover into the turbine. Also a screen is provided in the heat exchanger to coalesce the working fluid and to assist in defining the location of the transitional zone where the geothermal brine and the isobutane are initially mixed.

  11. Transformation of Acetone and Isopropanol to Hydrocarbons using HZSM-5 Catalyst 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taco Vasquez, Sebastian

    2010-07-14

    .2 i-Butane ? ? 0.1 3.9 n-Butane ? ? ? 1.7 i-Butene 19.1 31.3 83.3 3.6 n-Butene ? ? butane, isobutene, butane, isobutylene), carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. The liquid products are hydrocarbons...

  12. Fundamental Studies towards Transistion Metal Catalysis and Application of Chromium Salen Complexes for the Synthesis of Polymers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreatta, Jeremy R.

    2010-07-14

    also undertaken. The addition of the 1000 Dalton poly(isobutylene) arms to the salen ligand in (salen)CrCl complexes yielded a catalyst that could be extracted from the reaction mixture containing poly(cyclohexene carbonate) via the addition...

  13. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Plus 32 - 0 0 - 8 22 2 0 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 36 68 2 0 - 23 36 15 32 EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 PropanePropylene 14 58 1 0 - 11 0 14 47 Normal ButaneButylene...

  14. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Plus 37 - 0 0 - 0 25 1 11 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 40 69 2 0 - 0 38 18 55 EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 PropanePropylene 13 56 2 0 - 0 0 15 56 Normal ButaneButylene...

  15. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Plus 38 - 0 0 - 1 26 1 11 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 40 77 3 0 - 9 34 19 58 EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 PropanePropylene 13 56 2 0 - 3 0 15 53 Normal ButaneButylene...

  16. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Pentanes Plus 3 - 0 0 - 0 0 0 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 14 13 56 88 - -8 5 1 174 EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 1 PropanePropylene 9 45 50 88 - 1 0 0 191 Normal ButaneButylene...

  17. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Pentanes Plus 37 - 0 0 - 0 28 1 8 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 40 68 2 0 - 0 39 18 53 EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 PropanePropylene 13 56 2 0 - 0 0 15 56 Normal ButaneButylene...

  18. table02.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... 16,528 16,343 4,241 - -9,623 - 0 904 45,831 34,422 Normal ButaneButylene ... 4,818 -2,023 880 - -5,547 - 7,256 753 1,213 12,826...

  19. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Propane 687 27 714 1,615 208 453 2,276 Propylene 492 0 492 937 85 208 1,230 Normal ButaneButylene -645 -47 -692 -253 -438 -772 -1,463 Normal Butane -645 -47 -692 -254 -438...

  20. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    18,826 2,541 5,013 26,380 Propylene 6,005 0 6,005 10,165 831 2,101 13,097 Normal ButaneButylene -574 -38 -612 4,428 -1,347 -2,463 618 Normal Butane -547 -38 -585 4,467...

  1. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Propane 842 30 872 1,517 189 444 2,150 Propylene 478 0 478 840 62 121 1,023 Normal ButaneButylene -739 -19 -758 -277 -70 -209 -556 Normal Butane -733 -19 -752 -261 -70 -209...

  2. table08.chp:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... 11,268 9,321 136 - -4,893 -3,707 - 0 637 18,902 15,091 Normal ButaneButylene ... 2,346 107 176 - -356 -2,748 - 3,088 248 1,685 7,266...

  3. Coupling of CO_(2) and CS_(2) with Novel Oxiranes: Polycarbonate vs. Cyclic Carbonate Production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Stephanie Jo

    2013-07-09

    ,2-butylene oxide, and styrene oxide with CO_(2) utilizing (salen)CrCl/nBu_(4)NCl to yield their corresponding cyclic carbonates. Additionally, the metal-free backbiting of the singly-coupled styrene oxide/CO_(2) intermediate was simulated utilizing...

  4. Bibliography of Soft X-ray Microscopy (UPDATE of supplemental material for Polymer invited review) A.P. Hitchcock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    (-caprolacatam) PAR polyacrylate PBMA poly-n-butyl-methacrylate PPrS poly-bromo-styrene PC polycarbonate PET poly + ethylenediamine + MDI) RBC poly[(styrene-r-isoprene)-b-(styrene-r-isoprene)], (S/I)-b-(S/I), copolymer; = 75/25; = 50/50 (wt %) S/I block compositions SEBS poly(styrene-b-ethylene butylene-b-styrene) TDI toluene di

  5. Acid strength and solvation effects on methylation, hydride transfer, and isomerization rates during catalytic homologation of C1 species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Acid strength and solvation effects on methylation, hydride transfer, and isomerization rates,b, a Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, USA b Division, FAU, MFI) via methylation and hydride transfer steps that favor isobutane and triptane formation

  6. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0 1,485 19,829 1,625 2,903 24,357 Ethane 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Propane 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Normal Butane 229 0 229 8,676 829 625 10,130 Isobutane 1,256 0 1,256 11,153 796 2,278 14,227 Other...

  7. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1,285 200,458 117,409 24,041 20,032 161,482 Pentanes Plus 0 0 0 0 17 102 119 Normal Butane 199 0 199 32 115 1,146 1,293 Isobutane 9 0 9 0 0 0 0 Oxygenates 16,391 1,285 17,676...

  8. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6,559 Ethane 13 5 18 682 0 1,802 2,484 Propane 15 288 303 574 204 1,939 2,717 Normal Butane 11 99 110 151 114 499 764 Isobutane 0 45 45 106 0 488 594 Natural Gas Liquids 12 60 72...

  9. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gases 157 0 157 2,987 173 476 3,636 Ethane 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Propane 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Normal Butane 78 0 78 2,096 132 282 2,510 Isobutane 79 0 79 891 41 194 1,126 Other Liquids 196 -44...

  10. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Input 16,465 108 16,573 10,405 2,208 1,923 14,536 Pentanes Plus 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 Normal Butane 32 0 32 8 2 59 69 Isobutane 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Oxygenates 1,521 108 1,629 2,369 724 497...

  11. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gases 189 0 189 2,995 175 535 3,705 Ethane 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Propane 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Normal Butane 110 0 110 2,104 134 341 2,579 Isobutane 79 0 79 891 41 194 1,126 Other Liquids 16,629...

  12. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Input 17,809 97 17,906 9,452 1,740 1,790 12,982 Pentanes Plus 0 0 0 0 7 15 22 Normal Butane 27 0 27 1 43 310 354 Isobutane 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Oxygenates 1,580 97 1,677 2,133 528 393...

  13. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gases 157 0 157 1,479 172 557 2,208 Ethane 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Propane 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Normal Butane 80 0 80 423 103 371 897 Isobutane 77 0 77 1,056 69 186 1,311 Other Liquids 17,327 44...

  14. untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gases 130 0 130 1,478 129 247 1,854 Ethane 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Propane 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Normal Butane 53 0 53 422 60 61 543 Isobutane 77 0 77 1,056 69 186 1,311 Other Liquids -455 -53 -508...

  15. 4912r 2010 American Chemical Society pubs.acs.org/EF Energy Fuels 2010, 24, 49124918 : DOI:10.1021/ef1007962

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    of Binary Mixtures of Ethylene and Butane Isomers and Synergistic Effects Ahmet E. Karatas-,* Mario Commodo fractions of binary mixtures of butane isomers, ethylene-butane isomers, and propane- butane isomers were. Binary mixtures of iso-butane and n-butane did not show any synergistic effects on soot formation

  16. Normal butane/iso-butane separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volles, W.K.; Cusher, N.A.

    1986-08-26

    This patent describes an improved pressure swing adsorption process for the separation of iso-butane from normal butane in an adsorption system having at least three adsorbent beds, each bed of which undergoes, on a cyclic basis and a processing sequence comprising: introducing a feed gas mixture of iso-butane and normal butane at an upper adsorption pressure to the feed end of the bed capable of selectively adsorbing normal butane as the more selectivity adsorbable component of the gas mixture. The iso-butane as the less readily adsorbable component passes through the bed and is discharged from the discharge end. The feed gas introduction is continued as a normal butane adsorption front is formed in the bed and passes through the bed from the feed end and breaks through at the discharge end of the bed, a portion of the iso-butane effluent stream thus discharged being diverted for passage as purge gas to another bed in the system; and countercurrently depressurizing the bed with release of gas from the feed end.

  17. untitled

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    7,801 Ethane 0 5 5 1,040 0 2,303 3,343 Propane 0 278 278 740 171 2,146 3,057 Normal Butane 0 95 95 148 111 515 774 Isobutane 0 40 40 106 0 521 627 Natural Gas Liquids 7 52 59...

  18. Roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of alkanes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harding, L. B.; Klippenstein, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    CASPT2 calculations predict the existence of roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of propane, n-butane, isobutane and neopentane. The roaming radical paths lead to the formation of an alkane and an alkene instead of the expected radical products. The predicted barriers for the roaming radical paths lie {approx}1 kcal/mol below the corresponding radical asymptotes.

  19. Spartan Chemical Company, Inc. Material Safety Data Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wikswo, John

    /A Vapor Pressure: Unknown Vapor Density (AIR = 1): Unknown Solubility in Water: Complete pH: 11 NTP, IARC or OSHA Carcinogen *2-Butoxyethanol Isobutane Monoethanolamine Propane 10-15 5-10 1-5 1 in eyes, on skin or clothing. Avoid breathing product vapors or mist. Do not swallow. Use with adequate

  20. Atmospheric budget of acetone Daniel J. Jacob, Brendan D. Field, Emily M. Jin, Isabelle Bey, Qinbin Li,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    Li, Jennifer A. Logan, and Robert M. Yantosca Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences isoalkanes (propane, isobutane, isopentane). Model simulation of isoalkanes and comparison to observations yields best global emission estimates of 12 Tg C yrÀ1 for propane (including only 0.6 Tg C yrÀ1 from

  1. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhinde, Manoj V. (Boothwyn, PA); Bierl, Thomas W. (West Chester, PA)

    1998-01-01

    The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol.

  2. Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhinde, M.V.; Bierl, T.W.

    1998-03-03

    The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol. 1 fig.

  3. 1 | P a g e A u g u s t 1 6 , 2 0 1 0 Joint Analysis Group (JAG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the "Tentatively Identified Compounds" (TICs) were also included in the summation. These substances included propane, butane, pentane, isobutane, etc. The identity of the TICs was obtained from the mass spectral estimated concentrations were based on surrogate response factors. However, the decision to add the TICs

  4. Heterogeneous Catalysis DOI: 10.1002/anie.200503898

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    , as in the reactions of isobutane on sulfated zirconia[14] and tert-butyl alcohol[5,7,8] on acidic ZSM5, MOR, BEA of Chemical Engineering University of California at Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720 (USA) Fax: (+1)510-642-4778 E

  5. War against water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitz-Hugh, S.

    1982-01-01

    It is stressed that waterproofing should be the most important concern in an earth-sheltered home, starting with the design and continuing throughout the construction. Damage which may be caused by water leakage is discussed. Proper site selection is most important and the need for outside professionals and consultants is emphasized. The ideal waterproofing system is discussed and illustrated. Waterproofing agents are discussed in detail. They are: (1) sodium bentonite; (2) elastomers, such as isobutylene isoprene (butyl rubber), EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer), and liquid elastomers (polyurethanes); and (3) rubberized asphalt. Availability, sheet sizes and application of these waterproofing agents are discussed. (MJJ)

  6. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 1,693 19,861 1,740 4,049 25,650 Ethane 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Propane 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Normal Butane 428 0 428 8,708 944 1,771 11,423 Isobutane 1,265 0 1,265 11,153 796 2,278 14,227 Other...

  7. PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    66 148 13,465 0 28,916 42,381 Propane 136 3,223 3,359 8,343 2,251 25,880 36,474 Normal Butane 89 986 1,075 2,107 1,322 7,597 11,026 Isobutane 0 620 620 1,588 0 5,317 6,905 Natural...

  8. PROPRIETARY MATERIAL. 2011 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Limited distribution permitted only to teachers and educators for course preparation. If you are a student using this Manual, you are using it without permission.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    from the steam turbine and the binary cycle, and the thermal efficiencies for the binary cycle from the steam turbine and the binary cycle are kW15,410 kJ/kg)7.23448.1kJ/kg)(27438.19()( 433steamT,binarynet, 98isoT, inp iso wmWW hhmW steam turbine production well reinjection well isobutane turbine heat

  9. Application of the Cell Potential Method To Predict Phase Equilibria of Multicomponent Gas Hydrate Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazant, Martin Z.

    of Chemical Engineering and Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts (R-22) in structure I; and ethane (C2H6), cyclopropane (C3H6), propane (C3H8), isobutane (C4H10-sI-sII-Lhc-V) points have been predicted for the ethane-propane-water (277.3 K, 12.28 bar, and xeth,waterfree ) 0

  10. Chem 115Lithium-Halogen ExchangeMyers RLi + R'X RX + R'Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chem 115Lithium-Halogen ExchangeMyers RLi + R'X RX + R'Li Lithium-halogen exchange reactions are essentially inert. 2 t-BuLi t-BuI + RLi t-BuLi isobutene + isobutane + LiI Lithium-halogen exchange reactions, and lithium iodide. H OEtBr H H OEtLi H1.1 eq n-BuLi Et2O, !80 °C Lau, K. S.; Schlosser, M. J. Org. Chem. 1978

  11. Binary module test. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schilling, J.R.; Colley, T.C.; Pundyk, J.

    1980-12-01

    The objective of this project was to design and test a binary loop module representative of and scaleable to commercial size units. The design was based on state-of-the-art heat exchanger technology, and the purpose of the tests was to confirm performance of a supercritical boiling cycle using isobutane and a mixture of isobutane and isopentane as the secondary working fluid. The module was designed as one percent of a 50 MW unit. It was installed at Magma Power's East Mesa geothermal field and tested over a period of approximately 4 months. Most of the test runs were with isobutane but some data were collected for hydrocarbon mixtures. The results of the field tests are reported. In general these results indicate reasonably good heat balances and agreement with overall heat transfer coefficients calculated by current stream analysis methods and available fluid property data; however, measured pressure drops across the heat exchangers were 20 percent higher than estimated. System operation was stable under all conditions tested.

  12. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes. Final report, January 1, 1990--October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-31

    During the course of the first three years of the Cooperative Agreement (Phase I-III), we uncovered a family of metal perhaloporphyrin complexes which had unprecedented activity for the selective air-oxidation of fight alkanes to alcohols. The reactivity of fight hydrocarbon substrates with air or oxygen was in the order: isobutane>propane>ethane>methane, in accord with their homolytic bond dissociation energies. Isobutane was so reactive that the proof-of concept stage of a process for producing tert-butyl alcohol from isobutane was begun (Phase V). It was proposed that as more active catalytic systems were developed (Phases IV, VI), propane, then ethane and finally methane oxidations will move into this stage (Phases VII through IX). As of this writing, however, the program has been terminated during the later stages of Phases V and VI so that further work is not anticipated. We made excellent progress during 1994 in generating a class of less costly new materials which have the potential for high catalytic activity. New routes were developed for replacing costly perfluorophenyl groups in the meso-position of metalloporphyrin catalysts with far less expensive and lower molecular weight perfluoromethyl groups.

  13. Intrinsic kinetics of lower alcohols: C2, C3 dehydration over Lewis acidic ordered mesoporous silicate: Zr-KIT-6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Qing

    2013-12-31

    % is produced as a by-product of gasoline production from fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) and 7% of is on-purpose product from the dehydrogenation of propane and metathesis of ethylene and butylene. The remainder (~4%) is from selected gas streams from coal... because they not only can reduce net greenhouse gas emissions and dependency on fossil fuels but also represent the only renewable carbon source that can be converted into solid, liquid and gaseous fuels through bio-chemical or thermo-chemical processes...

  14. Composites structures for bone tissue reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neto, W.; Santos, João; Avérous, L.; Schlatter, G.; Bretas, Rosario

    2015-05-22

    The search for new biomaterials in the bone reconstitution field is growing continuously as humane life expectation and bone fractures increase. For this purpose, composite materials with biodegradable polymers and hydroxyapatite (HA) have been used. A composite material formed by a film, nanofibers and HA has been made. Both, the films and the non-woven mats of nanofibers were formed by nanocomposites made of butylene adipate-co-terephthalate (PBAT) and HA. The techniques used to produce the films and nanofibers were spin coating and electrospinning, respectively. The composite production and morphology were evaluated. The composite showed an adequate morphology and fibers size to be used as scaffold for cell growth.

  15. Urban leakage of liquefied petroleum gas and its impact on Mexico City air quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, D.R.; Rowland, F.S.

    1995-08-18

    Alkane hydrocarbons (propane, isobutane, and n-butane) from liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are present in major quantities throughout Mexico City air because of leakage of the unburned gas from numerous urban sources. These hydrocarbons, together with olefinic minor LPG components, furnish substantial amounts of hydroxyl radical reactivity, a major precursor to formation of the ozone component of urban smog. The combined processes of unburned leakage and incomplete combustion of LPG play significant role in causing the excessive ozone characteristic of Mexico City. Reductions in ozone levels should be possible through changes in LPG composition and lowered rates of leakage. 23 refs., 3 tabs.

  16. Crystalline mesoporous zirconia catalysts having stable tetragonal pore wall structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H. (Evanston, IL); Huang, Yin-Yan (Evanston, IL)

    1998-01-01

    Methods for the preparation of new sulfated mesoporous zirconia materials/catalysts with crystalline pore walls of predominantly tetragonal crystal structure, characterized by nitrogen physisorption measurement, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and catalytic tests using n-butane isomerization to iso-butane and alkylation of 1-naphthol with 4-tert-butylstyrene as probe reactions. Sulfate deposition is preferred for the transformation of a mesoporous precursor with amorphous pore walls into a material with crystalline pore walls maintaining the mesoporous characteristics.

  17. Crystalline mesoporous zirconia catalysts having stable tetragonal pore wall structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Huang, Y.Y.

    1998-07-28

    Methods are disclosed for the preparation of new sulfated mesoporous zirconia materials/catalysts with crystalline pore walls of predominantly tetragonal crystal structure, characterized by nitrogen physical sorption measurement, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and catalytic tests using n-butane isomerization to iso-butane and alkylation of 1-naphthol with 4-tert-butylstyrene as probe reactions. Sulfate deposition is preferred for the transformation of a mesoporous precursor with amorphous pore walls into a material with crystalline pore walls maintaining the mesoporous characteristics. 17 figs.

  18. Low Energy Distillation Schemes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polley, G. T.

    2002-01-01

    .6 62.7 C/O 80.9 die 17.5 62.7 C/OE AlDC 57.5 5.3 5.3 Table 5. Cumulative Heat Load Table Component Mole Fraction Molal Flow kmol/hr A: Propane 0.05 45.36 B: iso-Butane 0.15 136.08 C: Butane 0.25 226.80 D: iso-Pentane 0.20 181.46 E: Pentane 0...

  19. Asymptotic normalization coefficients for C-13+p -> N-14 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trache, L.; Azhari, A.; Clark, HL; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Lui, YW; Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Tribble, Robert E.; Carstoiu, F.

    1998-01-01

    chamber and the residual energy as determined by the light output from the plastic scintillator. The focal plane position and the scattering angle at the target were reconstructed us- ing the position measurements from any two of the four wires..., followed by an NE102A plastic scintillator to mea- sure the residual energy. The entrance and exit windows of the detector were made of 1.8 and 7.2 mg/cm2 thick Kapton foils, respectively. The ionization chamber was filled with purified isobutane at a...

  20. Low-temperature superacid catalysis: Reactions of n-butane catalyzed by iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, T.K.; D`Itri, J.L.; Gates, B.C.

    1995-02-01

    Environmental concerns are leading to the replacement of aromatic hydrocarbons in gasoline with high-octane-number branched paraffins and oxygenated compounds such as methyl t-butyl ether, which is produced from methanol and isobutylene. The latter can be formed from n-butane by isomerization followed by dehydrogenation. To meet the need for improved catalysts for isomerization of n-butane and other paraffins, researchers identified solid acids that are noncorrosive and active at low temperatures. Sulfated zirconia catalyzes the isomerization of n-butane even at 25{degrees}C, and the addition of Fe and Mn promoters increases its activity by three orders of magnitude. Little is known about this new catalyst. Here the authors provide evidence of its performance for n-butane conversion, demonstrating that isomerization is accompanied by disproportionation and other, less well understood, acid-catalyzed reactions and undergoes rapid deactivation associated with deposition of carbonaceous material. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Catalyst Activity Comparison of Alcohols over Zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol transformation to transportation fuel range hydrocarbon on HZSM-5 (SiO2 / Al2O3 = 30) catalyst was studied at 360oC and 300psig. Product distributions and catalyst life were compared using methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol or 1-butanol as a feed. The catalyst life for 1-propanol and 1-butanol was more than double compared to that for methanol and ethanol. For all the alcohols studied, the product distributions (classified to paraffin, olefin, napthene, aromatic and naphthalene compounds) varied with time on stream (TOS). At 24 hours TOS, liquid product from 1-propanol and 1-butanol transformation primarily contains higher olefin compounds. The alcohol transformation process to higher hydrocarbon involves a complex set of reaction pathways such as dehydration, oligomerization, dehydrocyclization, and hydrogenation. Compared to ethylene generated from methanol and ethanol, oligomerization of propylene and butylene has a lower activation energy and can readily take place on weaker acidic sites. On the other hand, dehydrocyclization of propylene and butylene to form the cyclic compounds requires the sits with stronger acid strength. Combination of the above mentioned reasons are the primary reasons for olefin rich product generated in the later stage of the time on stream and for the extended catalyst life time for 1 propanol and 1 butanol compared to methanol and ethanol conversion over HZSM-5.

  2. Analyses of mixed-hydrocarbon binary thermodynamic cycles for moderate-temperature geothermal resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demuth, O.J.

    1981-02-01

    A number of binary geothermal cycles utilizing mixed hydrocarbon working fluids were analyzed with the overall objective of finding a working fluid which can produce low-cost electrical energy using a moderately-low temperature geothermal resource. Both boiling and supercritical shell-and-tube cycles were considered. The performance of a dual-boiling isobutane cycle supplied by a 280/sup 0/F hydrothermal resource (corresponding to the 5 MW pilot plant at the Raft River site in Idaho) was selected as a reference. To investigate the effect of resource temperature on the choice of working fluid, several analyses were conducted for a 360/sup 0/F hydrothermal resource, which is representative of the Heber resource in California. The hydrocarbon working fluids analyzed included methane, ethane, propane, isobutane, isopentane, hexane, heptane, and mixtures of those pure hydrocarbons. For comparison, two fluorocarbon refrigerants were also analyzed. These fluorocarbons, R-115 and R-22, were suggested as resulting in high values of net plant geofluid effectiveness (watt-hr/lbm geofluid) at the two resource temperatures chosen for the study. Preliminary estimates of relative heat exchanger size (product of overall heat transfer coefficient times heater surface area) were made for a number of the better performing cycles.

  3. Separation of vapour and gas mixtures using a thin zeolite MFI membrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vroon, Z.A.E.P.; Gilde, M.J.; Kiezer, K.

    1994-12-31

    Zeolite MFI composite membranes were prepared by in situ crystallisation. A very thin (L < 5 {mu}m) polycrystalline MFI layer was grown on a flat {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} support (pore radii 80 nm). XRD and SEM showed that the layer was built of small MFI particles ({+-}200 nm). The single gas flux of methane, n-butane and iso-butane are respectively 9.7, 2.7 and 0.032 10{sup -3} mol.m{sup -2}.s{sup -1} at 25{degrees}C and 100 kPa. The separation of n-butane/methane is reversible. At 25{degrees}C it is possible to separate n-butane from methane. At 200{degrees}C it is possible to separate methane from n-butane. The separation factor for 50 n-butane/50 iso-butane is 26 at 50{degrees}C. Experiments with large molecules showed that the zeolite MFI membrane contains no pores larger than inherent to the zeolite.

  4. Performance of a new LMRPC prototype for the STAR MTD system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruan, L.J.; Wang, Y.; Chen, H. S.; Ding, W. C.; Qiu, X. Z.; Wang, J. B.; Zhu, X. L.; Kang, K. J.; Cheng, J. P.; Li, Y. J.; Ruan, L.; Xu, Z.; Asselta, K.; Christie, W.; D'Agostino, C.; Dunlop, J.; Landgraf, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Scheblein, J.; Soja, R.; Tang, A. H.; Ullrich, T.; Crawford, H. J.; Engelage, J.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Reed, R.; Liu, H. D.; Butterworth, J.; Eppley, G.; Geurts, F.; Llope, W. J.; McDonald, D.; Nussbaum, T.; Roberts, J.; Xin, K.; Bridges, L.; Li, J. C.; Qian, S.; Ning, Z.; Chen, H. F.; Huang, B. C.; Li, C.; Shao, M.; Sun, Y. J.; Tang, Z. B.; Wang, X. L.; Xu, Y. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zeng, H.; Zhou, Y.; Clarke, R.; Mioduszewski, S.; Davila, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Li, L.; Markert, C.; Ray, L.; Schambach, J.; Thein, D.; Wada, M.; Ahammed, Z.; Bhaduri, P. P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Dubey, A. K.; Dutt-Mazumdar, M. R.; Ghosh, P.; Khan, S. A.; Muhuri, S.; Mohanty, B.; Nayak, T. K.; Pal, S.; Singaraju, R.; Singhal, V.; Tribedy, P.; Viyogi, Y. P.

    2011-03-21

    A new prototype of a Long-Strip Multi-Gap Resistive Plate Chamber (LMRPC) for the STAR Muon Telescope Detector (MTD) at RHIC has been developed. This prototype has an active area of 52 x 90 cm{sup 2} and consists of six 250 {mu}m wide gaps. Each detector has 12 strips, read-out at both ends, which are each 3.8 cm wide and 90 cm long with 0.6 cm intervals. In cosmic-ray tests, the efficiency was larger than 95% and the time resolution was {approx}75 ps for the 94% Freon, 5% iso-butane, and 1% SF{sub 6} gas mixture. There was good uniformity in the performance across the different strips. The module was also tested in a proton beam at IHEP in Beijing. The efficiency was close to 100% and the best timing resolution achieved was 55 ps for the 90% Freon, 5% iso-butane, and 5% SF6 gas mixture. Trigger scans along and across the strip direction were also performed.

  5. Reactivity Screening of Anatase TiO2 Nanotube Arrays and Anatase Thin Films: A Surface Chemistry Point of View

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Funk, S.; Hokkanen, B.; Nurkic, T.; Goering, J.; Kadossov, E.; Burghaus, Uwe; Ghicov, A.; Schmuki, P.; Yu, Zhongqing; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2008-09-19

    As a reactivity screening we collected thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) data of iso-butane, O2, CO2, and CO adsorbed on ordered TiO2 nanotube (TiNTs) arrays. As a reference system iso-butane adsorption on an anatase TiO2 thin film has been considered as well. The as-grown TiNTs are vertically aligned and amorphous. Polycrystalline (poly.) anatase or poly. anatase/rutile mixed nanotubes are formed by annealing confirmed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The anatase thin film was grown on SrTiO3(001) and characterized by XRD and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Surprisingly, oxygen distinctly interacts with the TiNTs whereas this process is not observed on fully oxidized single crystal rutile TiO2(110). Desorption temperatures of 110-150 K and 100-120 K were observed for CO2 and CO, respectively, on the TiNTs. Variations in the binding energies of the alkanes on TiNTs and anatase thin films also were present, i.e., a structure-activity relationship (SAR) is evident.

  6. Kinetics and deactivation of sulfated zirconia catalysts for butane isomerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fogash, K.B.; Larson, R.B.; Gonzalez, M.R.

    1996-09-15

    Reaction kinetics studies were conducted of n-butane and isobutane isomerization over sulfated zirconia at 423 K. The kinetic data can be described well by a rate expression based on a reversible, bimolecular surface reaction between two adsorbed n-C{sub 4} species, probably through a C{sub 8} intermediate, to produce one i-C{sub 4} species, as well as surface reaction between two adsorbed i-C{sub 4} species to produce one n-C{sub 4} species. This reaction sequence also describes well the rates of C{sub 4}-disproportionation reactions to produce C{sub 3} and C{sub 5} species. The initial rate of catalyst deactivation is faster during n-butane isomerization than during isobutane isomerization, and the longer-term rate of deactivation during n-butane isomerization increases with the pressures of n-butane. The more rapid catalyst deactivation during n-butane isomerization may be related to the formation of n-C{sub 4}-diene species. 25 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Study of optimal sequences and energy requirements of integrated processing systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Enezi, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    The increased demand for high quality unleaded gasoline produced from a refinery has caused an increased in developing processing alternatives for producing high-octane gasoline components. The production of methyl tertiary butyl ether is currently considered one of the most practical alternatives. The production of methyl tertiary butyl ether is based mainly on the availability of light hydrocarbons as a feed, such as isobutane from a refinery. The availability of isobutane is increased by isomerization of normal butanes. Even though distillation processes are widely used to separate mixtures of light hydrocarbons, they are highly energy intensive. A steady-state design of several configurations of distillation columns were studied for separating light hydrocarbon mixtures. A number of energy conservation alternatives were evaluated for the distillation process integrated with an isomerization unit. A modified form of the Complex Method of Box was used for optimizing the design and operating conditions of these energy conservation alternatives. The use of vapor recompression with distillation columns was evaluated as one of the alternatives. Despite the more complex processing scheme required, this alternative used only about 30% of the external energy required in a conventional distillation process for the same separation. The operating conditions of the multi-effect distillation columns were optimized as another alternative. Reduction in energy consumption for this case was about 40% compared to conventional distillation columns.

  8. Production of biodiesel using expanded gas solvents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginosar, Daniel M; Fox, Robert V; Petkovic, Lucia M

    2009-04-07

    A method of producing an alkyl ester. The method comprises providing an alcohol and a triglyceride or fatty acid. An expanding gas is dissolved into the alcohol to form a gas expanded solvent. The alcohol is reacted with the triglyceride or fatty acid in a single phase to produce the alkyl ester. The expanding gas may be a nonpolar expanding gas, such as carbon dioxide, methane, ethane, propane, butane, pentane, ethylene, propylene, butylene, pentene, isomers thereof, and mixtures thereof, which is dissolved into the alcohol. The gas expanded solvent may be maintained at a temperature below, at, or above a critical temperature of the expanding gas and at a pressure below, at, or above a critical pressure of the expanding gas.

  9. Luminescence-Based Spectroelectrochemical Sensor for [Tc(dmpe)3]2+/+ (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane) within a Charge-Selective Polymer Film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, Sayandev; Del Negro, Andrew S.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Kaval, Necati; Pantelic, Nebojsa; Morris, Laura K.; Heineman, W. R.; Seliskar, Carl J.

    2011-03-01

    A spectroelectrochemical sensor consisting of an indium tin oxide (ITO) optically transparent electrode (OTE) coated with a thin film of sulfonated polystyrene-blockpoly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polystyrene (SSEBS) was developed for [Tc(dmpe)3]+.. [Tc(dmpe)3]+ preconcentrated by ion-exchange into the SSEBS film after 20 min exposure to aqueous [Tc(dmpe)3]+ solution, resulting in a 14-fold increase in cathodic peak current compared to a bare OTE. Colorless [Tc(dmpe)3]+ was reversibly oxidized to colored [Tc(dmpe)3]2+ by cyclic voltammetry. Detection of [Tc(dmpe)3]2+ was accomplished by electrochemically cycling the complex between non-emissive [Tc(dmpe)3]+ and emissive [Tc(dmpe)3]2+ and monitoring the modulated emission (?exc = 532 nm; ?em = 660 nm). The sensor gave a linear response over the range of 0.16 to 340.0 µM.

  10. Fabrication and Characterisation of Oil-Free Large Bakelite Resistive Plate Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajesh Ganai; Arindam Roy; Kshitij Agarwal; Zubayer Ahammed; Subikash Choudhury; Subhasis Chattopadhyay

    2015-10-08

    A large (240 cm $\\times$ 120 cm $\\times$ 0.2 cm) oil-free bakelite Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) has been developed at VECC-Kolkata using locally available P-301 OLTC grade bakelite paper laminates. The chamber has been operated in streamer mode using Argon, Freon(R134a) and Iso-butane in a ratio of 34:57:9 by volume. The electrodes and glue samples have been characterised by measuring their electrical parameters like bulk resistivity and surface resistivity. The performance of the chamber has been studied by measuring the efficiency, time resolution and uniformity in detection of cosmic muons. The chamber showed an efficiency $>$95$\\%$ and time resolution ($\\sigma$) of $\\sim$0.83 ns at 9000V. Details of the material characterisation, fabrication procedure and performance studies have been discussed.

  11. Simple electronic apparatus for the analysis of radioactively labeled gel electrophoretograms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goulianos, Konstantin (New York, NY); Smith, Karen K. (New York, NY); White, Sebastian N. (New York, NY)

    1982-01-01

    A high resolution position sensitive radiation detector for analyzing radiation emanating from a source, constructed of a thin plate having an elongated slot with conductive edges acting as a cathode, a charged anode wire positioned within 0.5 mm adjacent the source and running parallel to the slot and centered therein, an ionizable gas ionized by radiation emanating from the source provided surrounding the anode wire in the slot, a helical wire induction coil serving as a delay line and positioned beneath the anode wire for detecting gas ionization and for producing resulting ionization signals, and processing circuits coupled to the induction coil for receiving ionization signals induced therein after determining therefrom the location along the anode wire of any radiation emanating from the source. An ionization gas of 70% Ar, 29% Isobutane, 0.6% Freon 13BI, and 0.4% Methylal is used.

  12. Fabrication and Characterisation of Oil-Free Large Bakelite Resistive Plate Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganai, Rajesh; Agarwal, Kshitij; Ahammed, Zubayer; Choudhury, Subikash; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2015-01-01

    A large (240 cm $\\times$ 120 cm $\\times$ 0.2 cm) oil-free bakelite Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) has been developed at VECC-Kolkata using locally available P-301 OLTC grade bakelite paper laminates. The chamber has been operated in streamer mode using Argon, Freon(R134a) and Iso-butane in a ratio of 34:57:9 by volume. The electrodes and glue samples were characterised by measuring their electrical parameters like bulk resistivity and surface resistivity. The performance of the chamber was studied by measuring the efficiency, time resolution and uniformity in detection of cosmic muons. The chamber showed an efficiency $>$95$\\%$ and time resolution ($\\sigma$) of $\\sim$0.83 ns. Details of the material characterisation, fabrication procedure and performance studies have been discussed.

  13. Characterization of the micropore structure of activated carbons by adsorptions of nitrogen and some hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guezel, F. [Dicle Univ., Diyarbakir (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry] [Dicle Univ., Diyarbakir (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry

    1999-02-01

    In the present study the effects of the duration of carbonization and physical activation properties of activated carbon from vegetable materials were investigated. Peanut shells were used to obtain active carbon. These shells were activated chemically with ZnCl{sub 2} and/or CO{sub 2} for different times, and the micropore structures of these active carbons were studied by measuring the adsorption isotherms for nitrogen and some hydrocarbons such as benzene, n-butane, isobutane, 2,2-dimethylbutane, and isooctane. As the physical activation time was increased, the primary micropores, which were measured at 0.01 relative pressure, were reduced, and they were replaced by larger secondary and tertiary micropores which were measured at 0.15--0.01 and 0.30--0.15 relative pressures. The ratios of the mesopore volume to the micropore volume also increased as the duration of physical activation increased.

  14. Mass transfer of volatile organic compounds from drinking water to indoor air: The role of residential dishwashers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard-Reed, C.; Corsi, R.L.; Moya, J.

    1999-07-01

    Contaminated tap water may be a source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in residential indoor air. To better understand the extent and impact of chemical emissions from this source, a two-phase mass balance model was developed based on mass transfer kinetics between each phase. Twenty-nine experiments were completed using a residential dishwasher to determine model parameters. During each experiment, inflow water was spiked with a cocktail of chemical tracers with a wide range of physicochemical properties. In each case, the effects of water temperature, detergent, and dish-loading pattern on chemical stripping efficiencies and mass transfer coefficients were determined. Dishwasher headspace ventilation rates were also measured using an isobutylene tracer gas. Chemical stripping efficiencies for a single cycle ranged from 18% to 55% for acetone, from 96% to 98% for toluene, and from 97% to 98% for ethylbenzene and were consistently 100% for cyclohexane. Experimental results indicate that dishwashers have a relatively low but continuous ventilation rate that results in significant chemical storage within the headspace of the dishwasher. In conjunction with relatively high mass transfer coefficients, low ventilation rates generally lead to emissions that are limited by equilibrium conditions after approximately 1--2 min of dishwasher operation.

  15. DME-to-oxygenates process studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tartamella, T.L.; Sardesai, A.; Lee, S.; Kulik, C.J.

    1994-12-31

    The feasibility of the production of hydrocarbons from dimethyl ether (DNM) has been illustrated in a fixed bed micro-reactor as well as a bench scale fluidized bed reactor by the University of Akron/EPRI DME-to-Hydrocarbon (DTG) Process. The DTG process has distinct advantages over its methanol based counterpart. Specifically, the DTG process excels in the area of higher productivity, higher per-pass conversion, and lower heat duties than the MTG process. Also of special importance is the production of oxygenates -- including MTBE, ETBE, and TAME. DME may be reacted with isobutylene to produce a mixture of MTBE and ETBE. The properties of ETBE excel over MTBE in the areas of lower RVP and higher RON. According to industrial reports, MTBE is the fastest growing chemical (1992 US capacity 135,350 BPD, with expected growth of 34%/year to 1997). Also, recent renewed interest as an octane-enhancer and as a source of oxygen has spurred a growing interest in nonrefinery synthesis routes to ETBE. TAME, with its lower RVP and higher RON has proven useful as a gasoline blending agent and octane enhancer and may also be produced directly from DME. DME, therefore, serves as a valuable feedstock in the conversion of may oxygenates with wide-scale industrial importance. It should be also noted that the interest in the utilization of DME as process feedstock is based on the favorable process economics of EPRI/UA`s liquid phase DME process.

  16. Solvation and Acid Strength Effects on Catalysis by Faujasite Zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gounder, Rajamani P.; Jones, Andrew J.; Carr, Robert T.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2012-02-01

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and chemical titration data indicate that differences in monomolecular isobutane cracking and dehydrogenation and methanol dehydration turnover rates (per H+) among FAU zeolites treated thermally with steam (H-USY) and then chemically with ammonium hexafluorosilicate (CDHUSY) predominantly reflect differences in the size and solvating properties of their supercage voids rather than differences in acid strength. The number of protons on a given sample was measured consistently by titrations with Na+, with CH3 groups via reactions of dimethyl ether, and with 2,6-di-tert-butylpyridine during methanol dehydration catalysis; these titration values were also supported by commensurate changes in acidic OH infrared band areas upon exposure to titrant molecules. The number of protons, taken as the average of the three titration methods, was significantly smaller than the number of framework Al atoms (Alf) obtained from X-ray diffraction and 27Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy on H-USY (0.35 H+/Alf) and CD-HUSY (0.69 H+/Alf). These data demonstrate that the ubiquitous use of Alf sites as structural proxies for active H+ sites in zeolites can be imprecise, apparently because distorted Al structures that are not associated with acidic protons are sometimes detected as Alf sites. Monomolecular isobutane cracking and dehydrogenation rate constants, normalized non-rigorously by the number of Alf species, decreased with increasing Na+ content on both H-USY and CD-HUSY samples and became undetectable at sub-stoichiometric exchange levels (0.32 and 0.72 Na+/Alf ratios, respectively), an unexpected finding attributed incorrectly in previous studies to the presence of minority ‘‘super-acidic’’ sites. These rate constants, when normalized rigorously by the number of residual H+ sites were independent of Na+ content on both H-USY and CD-HUSY samples, reflecting the stoichiometric replacement of protons that are uniform in reactivity by Na+ cations. Monomolecular isobutane cracking and dehydrogenation rate constants (per H+; 763 K), however, were higher on H-USY than CD-HUSY (by a factor of 1.4). Equilibrium constants for the formation of protonated methanol dimers via adsorption of gaseous methanol onto adsorbed methanol monomers, determined from kinetic studies of methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether (433 K), were also higher on H-USY than CD-HUSY (by a factor of 2.1). These larger constants predominantly reflect stronger dispersive interactions in H-USY, consistent with its smaller supercage voids that result from the occlusion of void space by extraframework Al (Alex) residues. These findings appear to clarify enduring controversies about the mechanistic interpretation of the effects of Na+ and Alex species on the catalytic reactivity of FAU zeolites. They also illustrate the need to normalize rates by the number of active sites instead of more convenient but less accurate structural proxies for such sites.

  17. FCC Tail Gas olefins conversion to gasoline via catalytic distillation with aromatics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Partin, E.E. (Brown and Root U.S.A., Inc., Houston, TX (US))

    1988-01-01

    The goal of every refiner is to continually improve profitability by such means as increasing gasoline production, increasing gasoline octane pool and in cases where fuel balance becomes a problem, decreasing refinery fuel gas production. A new refinery process is currently being developed which accomplish these goals. Chemical Research and Licensing Company (CR and L) developed Catalytic Distillation technology in 1978 to produce MTBE. They have since used the Catalytic Distillation technique to produce cumene. CR and L has further developed this technology to convert olefin gases currently consumed as refinery fuel, to high octane gasoline components. The process, known as CATSTILL, alkylates olefin gases such as ethylene, propylene and butylene, present in FCC Tail Gas with light aromatics such as benzene, toluene and xylene, present in reformate, to produce additional quantities of high octane gasoline components. A portable CATSTILL demonstration plant has been constructed by Brown and Root U.S.A., under an agreement with CR and L, for placement in a refinery to further develop data necessary to design commercial plants. This paper presents current data relative to the CATSTILL development.

  18. Formation and polymerization of cyclic disilsesquioxanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A.; Carpenter, J.P.; Myers, S.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Under acidic sol-gel polymerization conditions, 1,3-bis(triethoxysilyl)-propane 1 and 1,4-bis(triethoxysilyl)butane 2 were shown to preferentially form cyclic disilsesquioxanes 3 and 4 rather than the expected 1,3-propylene- and 1,4-butylene-bridged polysilsesquioxane gels. Formation of 3 and 4 is driven by a combination of an intramolecular cyclization to six and seven membered rings, and a pronounced reduction in reactivity under acidic conditions as a function of increasing degree of condensation. The stability of cyclic disilsesquioxanes was confirmed with the synthesis of 3 and 4 in gram quantities; the cyclic disilsesquioxanes react slowly to give tricyclic dimers containing a thermodynamically stable eight membered siloxane ring. Continued reactions were shown to perserve the cyclic structure, opening up the possibility of utilizing cyclic disilsesquioxanes as sol-gel monomers. Preliminary polymerization studies with these new, carbohydrate-like monomers revealed the formation of network poly(cyclic disilsesquioxanes) under acidic conditions and polymerization with ring-opening under basic conditions.

  19. Intramolecular condensation reactions of {alpha}, {omega}- bis(triethoxy-silyl)alkanes. Formation of cyclic disilsesquioxanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A.; Carpenter, J.P.; Myers, S.A.; Assink, R.A.; Small, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Greaves, J.; Shea, K.J. [California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-08-01

    Under acidic sol-gel polymerization conditions, 1,3-bis(triethoxysilyl)-propane (1) and 1,4-bis(triethoxysilyl)butane (2) were shown to preferentially form cyclic disilsesquioxanes 3 and 4 rather than the expected 1,3-propylene- and 1,4-butylene-bridged polysilsesquioxane gels. Formation of 3 and 4 is driven by a combination of an intramolecular cyclization to six and seven membered rings, and a pronounced reduction in reactivity under acidic conditions as a function of increasing degree of condensation. The ease with which these relatively unreactive cyclic monomers and dimers are formed (under acidic conditions) helps to explain the difficulties in forming gels from 1 and 2. The stability of cyclic disilsesquioxanes was confirmed withe the synthesis of 3 and 4 in gram quantities; the cyclic disilsesquioxanes react slowly to give tricyclic dimers containing a thermodynamically stable eight membered siloxane ring. Continued reactions were shown to perserve the cyclic structure, opening up the possibility of utilizing cyclic disilsesquioxanes as sol-gel monomers. Preliminary polymerization studies with these new, carbohydrate-like monomers revealed the formation of network poly(cyclic disilsesquioxanes) under acidic conditions and polymerization with ring-opening under basic conditions.

  20. Superacid catalysis of light hydrocarbon conversion. DOE PETC third quarterly report, February 25, 1994--May 24, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gates, B.C.

    1995-12-31

    Environmental concerns are leading to the replacement of aromatic hydrocarbons in gasoline by high-octane-number branched paraffins and oxygenated compounds such as methyl t-butyl ether. The ether is produced from methanol and isobutylene, and the latter can be formed from n-butane by isomerization followed by dehydrogenation. Paraffin isomerization reactions are catalyzed by very strong acids such as aluminum chloride supported on alumina. The aluminum chloride-containing catalysts are corrosive, and their disposal is expensive. Alternatively, hydroisomerization is catalyzed by zeolite-supported metals at high temperatures, but high temperatures do not favor branched products at equilibrium. Thus there is a need for improved catalysts and processes for the isomerization of n-butane and other straight-chain paraffins. Consequently, researchers have sought for solid acids that are noncorrosive and active enough to catalyze isomerization of paraffins at low temperatures. For example, sulfated zirconia catalyzes isomerization of n-butane at temperatures as low as 25{degrees}C. The addition of iron and manganese promoters has been reported to increase the activity of sulfated zirconia for n-butane isomerization by three orders of magnitude. Although the high activity of this catalyst is now established, the reaction network is not known, and the mechanism has not been investigated. The goal of this work is to investigate low-temperature reactions of light paraffins catalyzed by solid superacids of the sulfated zirconia type. The present report is concerned with catalysis of n-butane conversion catalyzed by the Fe- and Mn- promoted sulfated zirconia described in the previous report in this series.

  1. The importance of FCC catalyst selection on LPG profitability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyworth, D.A.; Gilman, R.; Pearce, J.R. )

    1989-01-01

    Recently the value of LPG in chemical operations downstream of the FCC unit has increased. Such downstream operations utilize propylene not only in alkylate, but also in rapid growth petrochemical applications such as for a raw material in the manufacture of polypropylene and propylene oxide. Isobutane and the butenes (particularly butene-2 in sulfuric acid catalyzed alkylation units) are prized for alkylate feed. The profit potential and incentives to use other LPG components such as isobutene to make MTBE is now increased because of legislative actions and increased octane performance demand; and because of the greater isobutene content in the LPG from the new FCC octane catalysts. A low non-framework alumina (NFA) zeolite studied made a more olefinic LPG with higher iso-to normal C4 ratio than the other zeolites. Pilot plant data has also shown the new low NFA zeolite gave not only outstanding motor octane (MON) performance, but produced an LPG with better propylene to propane ratio, more isobutene, more n-butenes and more C4 branching than other RE promoted zeolite catalysts. Commercial results have verified the improved performance and profitability for the new low-NFA type zeolite catalysts. Three commercial examples are described.

  2. Global gas processing will strengthen to meet expanding markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haun, R.R.; Otto, K.W.; Whitley, S.C.; Gist, R.L.

    1996-07-01

    The worldwide LPG industry continues to expand faster than the petroleum industry -- 4%/year for LPG vs. 2%/year for petroleum in 1995 and less than 1%/year in the early 1990s. This rapid expansion of LPG markets is occurring in virtually every region of the world, including such developing countries as China. The Far East is the focus of much of the LPG industry`s attention, but many opportunities exist in other regions such as the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, and Latin America. The investment climate is improving in all phases of downstream LPG marketing, including terminaling, storage, and wholesale and retail distribution. The world LPG supply/demand balance has been relatively tight since the Gulf War and should remain so. Base demand (the portion of demand that is not highly price-sensitive) is expanding more rapidly than supplies. As a result, the proportion of total LPG supplies available for price-sensitive petrochemical feedstock markets is declining, at least in the short term. The paper discusses importers, price patterns, world LPG demand, world LPG supply, US NGL supply, US gas processing, ethane and propane supply, butane, isobutane, and natural gasoline supply, and US NGL demand.

  3. Improving the stability of H-mordenite for n-butane isomerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asuquo, R.A.; Eder-Mirth, G.; Lercher, J.A.

    1997-06-01

    The conversion of n-butane over mordenite-based catalysts in the presence of hydrogen and water was investigated for reaction temperatures between 523 and 623 K. Special attention was given to the influence of Pt upon catalytic activity, selectivity, and stability. With parent mordenite the catalytic activity for n-butane conversion decreased markedly after a short time on stream. Deactivation can be minimized by hydrogen (in the presence of Pt) and water addition. Both measures are thought to reduce the concentration of intermediate olefins in the zeolite pores. The best results with respect to selective conversion of n-butane to isobutane were obtained for 0.25 wt% Pt on mordenite in the presence of hydrogen. Higher concentrations of Pt in the catalyst are shown to be detrimental for n-butane isomerization, because of increasing selectivity to hydrogenolysis. A detailed mechanistic scheme for n-butane conversion over Pt-containing mordenites is presented. n-Butane conversion is concluded to occur via a bimolecular mechanism involving a complex network of hydrogen transfer, oligomerization/cracking, isomerization, hydrogenation/dehydrogenation, and hydrogenolysis. 23 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Investigation of pressure drop in capillary tube for mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson cryocooler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ardhapurkar, P. M.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Atrey, M. D.

    2014-01-29

    A capillary tube is commonly used in small capacity refrigeration and air-conditioning systems. It is also a preferred expansion device in mixed refrigerant Joule-Thomson (MR J-T) cryocoolers, since it is inexpensive and simple in configuration. However, the flow inside a capillary tube is complex, since flashing process that occurs in case of refrigeration and air-conditioning systems is metastable. A mixture of refrigerants such as nitrogen, methane, ethane, propane and iso-butane expands below its inversion temperature in the capillary tube of MR J-T cryocooler and reaches cryogenic temperature. The mass flow rate of refrigerant mixture circulating through capillary tube depends on the pressure difference across it. There are many empirical correlations which predict pressure drop across the capillary tube. However, they have not been tested for refrigerant mixtures and for operating conditions of the cryocooler. The present paper assesses the existing empirical correlations for predicting overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the MR J-T cryocooler. The empirical correlations refer to homogeneous as well as separated flow models. Experiments are carried out to measure the overall pressure drop across the capillary tube for the cooler. Three different compositions of refrigerant mixture are used to study the pressure drop variations. The predicted overall pressure drop across the capillary tube is compared with the experimentally obtained value. The predictions obtained using homogeneous model show better match with the experimental results compared to separated flow models.

  5. Polymer Growth Rate in a Wire Chamber with Oxygen,Water, or Alcohol Gas Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyarski, Adam; /SLAC

    2008-07-02

    The rate of polymer growth on wires was measured in a wire chamber while the chamber was aged initially with helium-isobutane (80:20) gas, and then with either oxygen, water, or alcohol added to the gas. At the completion of the aging process for each gas mixture, the carbon content on the wires was measured in a SEM/EDX instrument. The same physical wires were used in all the gas mixtures, allowing measurement of polymer build up or polymer depletion by each gas additive. It is found that the rate of polymer growth is not changed by the presence of oxygen, water or alcohol. Conjecture that oxygen reduces breakdown by removing polymer deposits on field wires is negated by these measurements. Instead, it appears that the reduced breakdown is due to lower resistance in the polymer from oxygen ions being transported into the polymer. It is also observed that field wires bombarded by the electrons in the SEM and then placed back into the chamber show an abundance of single electrons being emitted, indicating that electron charge is stored in the polymer layer and that a high electric field is necessary to remove the charge.

  6. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes, Phase 3. Topical report, January 1990--December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-12-31

    The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in the first simple, economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to an alcohol-rich oxygenated product which can either be used as an environmentally friendly, high-performance liquid fuel, or a precursor to a liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuel. The authors have entered the proof-of-concept stage for converting isobutane to tert butyl alcohol in a practical process and are preparing to enter proof-of-concept of a propane to isopropyl alcohol process in the near future. Methane and ethane are more refractory and thus more difficult to oxidize than the C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} hydrocarbons. Nonetheless, advances made in this area indicate that further research progress could achieve the goal of their direct conversion to alcohols. Progress in Phase 3 catalytic vapor phase methane and ethane oxidation over metals in regular oxidic lattices are the subject of this topical report.

  7. Petroleum production at maximum efficient rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California. Draft Supplement to the 1979 Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The proposed action involves the continued operation of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) at the Maximum Efficiency Rate (MER) through the year approximately 2025 in accordance with the requirements of the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 (P.L. 94-258). NPR-1 is a large oil and gas field comprising 74 square miles. MER production primarily includes continued operation and maintenance of existing facilities; a well drilling and abandonment program; construction and operation of future gas processing, gas compression, and steamflood, waterflood, cogeneration, and butane isomerization facilities; and continued implementation of a comprehensive environmental protection program. The basis for the draft environment impact statement (DSEIS) proposed action is the April 1989 NPR-1 Long Range Plan which describes a myriad of planned operational, maintenance, and development activities over the next 25--30 years. These activities include the continued operation of existing facilities; additional well drilling; expanded steamflood operations; expanded waterflood programs; expanded gas compression, gas lift, gas processing and gas injection; construction of a new cogeneration facility; construction of a new isobutane facility; and a comprehensive environmental program designed to minimize environmental impacts.

  8. Recovery of energy from geothermal brine and other hot water sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wahl, III, Edward F. (Claremont, CA); Boucher, Frederic B. (San Juan Capistrano, CA)

    1981-01-01

    Process and system for recovery of energy from geothermal brines and other hot water sources, by direct contact heat exchange between the brine or hot water, and an immiscible working fluid, e.g. a hydrocarbon such as isobutane, in a heat exchange column, the brine or hot water therein flowing countercurrent to the flow of the working fluid. The column can be operated at subcritical, critical or above the critical pressure of the working fluid. Preferably, the column is provided with a plurality of sieve plates, and the heat exchange process and column, e.g. with respect to the design of such plates, number of plates employed, spacing between plates, area thereof, column diameter, and the like, are designed to achieve maximum throughput of brine or hot water and reduction in temperature differential at the respective stages or plates between the brine or hot water and the working fluid, and so minimize lost work and maximize efficiency, and minimize scale deposition from hot water containing fluid including salts, such as brine. Maximum throughput approximates minimum cost of electricity which can be produced by conversion of the recovered thermal energy to electrical energy.

  9. Conductive porous scaffolds as potential neural interface materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedberg-Dirk, Elizabeth L.; Cicotte, Kirsten N.; Buerger, Stephen P.; Reece, Gregory; Dirk, Shawn M.; Lin, Patrick P.

    2011-11-01

    Our overall intent is to develop improved prosthetic devices with the use of nerve interfaces through which transected nerves may grow, such that small groups of nerve fibers come into close contact with electrode sites, each of which is connected to electronics external to the interface. These interfaces must be physically structured to allow nerve fibers to grow through them, either by being porous or by including specific channels for the axons. They must be mechanically compatible with nerves such that they promote growth and do not harm the nervous system, and biocompatible to promote nerve fiber growth and to allow close integration with biological tissue. They must exhibit selective and structured conductivity to allow the connection of electrode sites with external circuitry, and electrical properties must be tuned to enable the transmission of neural signals. Finally, the interfaces must be capable of being physically connected to external circuitry, e.g. through attached wires. We have utilized electrospinning as a tool to create conductive, porous networks of non-woven biocompatible fibers in order to meet the materials requirements for the neural interface. The biocompatible fibers were based on the known biocompatible material poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) as well as a newer biomaterial developed in our laboratories, poly(butylene fumarate) (PBF). Both of the polymers cannot be electrospun using conventional electrospinning techniques due to their low glass transition temperatures, so in situ crosslinking methodologies were developed to facilitate micro- and nano-fiber formation during electrospinning. The conductivity of the electrospun fiber mats was controlled by controlling the loading with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). Fabrication, electrical and materials characterization will be discussed along with initial in vivo experimental results.

  10. Cyclization phenomena in the sol-gel polymerization of {alpha},{omega}-bis(triethoxysilyl)alkanes and incorporation of the cyclic structures into network silsesquioxane polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A.; Carpenter, J.P.; Alam, T.M.; Shaltout, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dorhout, P.K. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry] [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Greaves, J.; Shea, K.J. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry] [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Small, J.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Polymers and Coatings Group] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Polymers and Coatings Group

    1999-06-16

    Intramolecular cyclizations during acid-catalyzed sol-gel polymerizations of {alpha},{omega}-bis(triethoxysilyl)alkanes substantially lengthen gel times for monomers with ethylene (1), propylene (2), and butylene (3) bridging groups. These cyclization reactions were found, using mass spectrometry and {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopy, to lead preferentially to monomeric and dimeric products based on six- and seven-membered disilsesquioxane rings. 1,2-Bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane (1) reacts under acidic conditions to give a bicyclic dimer (5) that is composed of two annelated seven-membered rings. Under the same conditions, 1,3-bis(triethoxysilyl)propane (2), 1,4-bis(triethoxysilyl)butane (3), and Z-1,4-bis(triethoxysilyl)but-2-ene (10) undergo an intramolecular condensation reaction to give the six- and seven-membered cyclic disilsesquioxanes 6, 7, and 11. Subsequently, these cyclic monomers slowly react to form the tricyclic dimers 8, 9, and 12. With NaOH as polymerization catalyst, these cyclic silsesquioxanes readily reacted to afford gels that were shown by CP MAS {sup 29}Si NMR and infrared spectroscopies to retain some cyclic structures. Comparison of the porosity and microstructure of xerogels prepared from the cyclic monomers 6 and 7 with those of gels prepared directly from their acyclic precursors 2 and 3 indicates that the final pore structure of the xerogels is markedly dependent on the nature of the precursor. In addition, despite the fact that the monomeric cyclic disilsesquioxane species cannot be isolated from 1--3 under basic conditions due to their rapid rate of gelation, spectroscopic techniques also detected the presence of the cyclic structures in the resulting polymeric gels.

  11. Cyclization Phenomena in the Sol-Gel Polymerization of a,w-Bis(triethoxysilyl)alkanes and Incorporation of the Cyclic Structures into Network Silsesquioxane Polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, T.M.; Carpenter, J.P.; Dorhout, P.K.; Greaves, J.; Loy, D.A.; Shaltout, R.; Shea, K.J.; Small, J.H.

    1999-01-04

    Intramolecular cyclizations during acid-catalyzed, sol-gel polymerizations of ct,co- bis(tietioxysilyl)aWmes substintidly lengtien gelties formonomers witietiylene- (l), propylene- (2), and butylene-(3)-bridging groups. These cyclizations reactions were found, using mass spectrometry and %i NMR spectroscopy, to lead preferentially to monomeric and dimeric products based on six and seven membered disilsesquioxane rings. 1,2- Bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane (1) reacts under acidic conditions to give a bicyclic drier (5) that is composed of two annelated seven membered rings. Under the same conditions, 1,3- bis(triethoxysilyl)propane (2), 1,4-bis(triethoxysilyl)butane (3), and z-1,4- bis(triethoxysilyl)but-2-ene (10) undergo an intramolecular condensation reaction to give the six membemd and seven membered cyclic disilsesquioxanes 6, 7, and 11. Subsequently, these cyclic monomers slowly react to form the tricyclic dirners 8,9 and 12. With NaOH as polymerization catalyst these cyclic silsesquioxanes readily ~aeted to afford gels that were shown by CP MAS z%i NMR and infr=d spectroscopes to retain some cyclic structures. Comparison of the porosity and microstructwe of xerogels prepared from the cyclic monomers 6 and 7 with gels prepared directly from their acyclic precursors 2 and 3, indicate that the final pore structure of the xerogels is markedly dependent on the nature of the precursor. In addition, despite the fact that the monomeric cyclic disilsesquioxane species can not be isolated from 1-3 under basic conditions due to their rapid rate of gelation, spectroscopic techniques also detected the presence of the cyclic structures in the resulting polymeric gels.

  12. The use of acetylene and 1,3-butadiene as tracers for vehicular combustion in urban air and the estimation of the contributions of vehicular emissions to benzene, and alkane concentrations in the Edmonton industrial area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, R. [Environment Canada, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada). Prairie and Northern Region; Wong, R. [Alberta Environmental Protection, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Dann, T.; Wang, D. [Environment Canada, Gloucester, Ontario (Canada). Environmental Protection Service

    1998-12-31

    Acetylene, propylene and 1,3-butadiene concentrations at two downtown urban sites in Alberta, Canada were used to characterize an area dominated by vehicular emissions. The relationship of acetylene with 1,3-butadiene at the Edmonton industrial site was similar to that observed for the two downtown sites. This suggesting that these volatile organic compounds, VOCs, can be used as tracers for vehicular emissions for the Edmonton industrial area. The tracer VOCs were found to correlate with benzene, n-butane, iso-butane, n-pentane, iso-pentane, n-heptane and n-octane concentrations for the two Alberta downtown sites. The best fit lines from the downtown sites were used to predict daily concentrations of benzene and alkanes at the Edmonton industrial site. During the winter, when benzene levels are predicted to reach a maximum of 4.5 to 6.5 m g/m{sup 3}, it is estimated that industrial sources contribute < 1 m g/m{sup 3} to ambient levels at the Edmonton industrial site. During the summer, when predicted benzene levels are at a minimum of 1 to 2 m g/m{sup 3}, industrial area sources dominate the ambient benzene levels at the Edmonton industrial site, and can contribute up to 6 m g/m{sup 3}. For alkanes, such as butane and pentane, industrial area sources or evaporative storage tank emissions dominate throughout the year. This dominance of industrial sources is also observed for n-heptane and n-octane during summer months. During the winter when predicted n-heptane and n-octane concentrations reach a maximum, 11 to 100% of ambient daily levels can be attributed to vehicular emissions.

  13. Superacid catalysis of light hydrocarbon conversion. Final report, August 26, 1993--August 26, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gates, B.C.

    1996-12-31

    Motivated by the goal of finding improved catalysts for low- temperature conversion of light alkanes into fuel components or precursors of fuel components, the researchers have investigated sulfated zirconia and promoted sulfated zirconia for conversion of butane, propane, and ethane. Catalyst performance data for sulfated zirconia promoted with iron and manganese show that it is the most active noncorrosive, nonhalide catalyst known for n-butane isomerization, and it is an excellent candidate catalyst for new low- temperature n-butane isomerization processes to make isobutane, which can be converted by established technology into methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE). Various transition metals have been found to work as promoters of sulfated zirconia for n-butane isomerization. The combination of iron and manganese is the best known combination of promoters yet discovered. The iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia is also a catalyst for conversion of propane and of ethane. Ethane is converted into ethylene and butanes in the presence of the iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia; propane is also converted into butane, among other products. However, the activities of the catalyst for these reactions are orders of magnitude less than the activity for n-butane conversion, and there is no evidence that the catalyst would be of practical value for conversion of alkanes lighter than butane. The product distribution data for ethane and propane conversion provide new insights into the nature of the catalyst and its acidity. These data suggest the involvement of Olah superacid chemistry, whereby the catalyst protonates the alkane itself, giving carbonium ions (as transition states). The mechanism of protonation of the alkane may also pertain to the conversion of butane, but there is good evidence that the butane conversion also proceeds via alkene intermediates by conventional mechanisms of carbenium ion formation and rearrangement.

  14. Ignition of ethane, propane, and butane in counterflow jets of cold fuel versus hot air under variable pressures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fotache, C.G.; Wang, H.; Law, C.K.

    1999-06-01

    This study investigates experimentally the nonpremixed ignition of ethane, propane, n-butane, and isobutane in a configuration of opposed fuel versus heated air jets. For each of these fuels the authors explore the effects of inert dilution, system pressure, and flow strain rate, for fuel concentrations ranging between 3--100% by volume, pressures between 0.2 and 8 atm, and strain rates of 100--600 s{sup {minus}1}. Qualitatively, these fuels share a number of characteristics. First, flame ignition typically occurs after an interval of mild oxidation, characterized by minimal heat release, fuel conversion, and weak light emission. The temperature extent of this regime decreases with increasing the fuel concentration, the ambient pressure, or the flow residence time. Second, the response to strain rate, pressure, and fuel concentration is similar for all investigated fuels, in that the ignition temperatures monotonically decrease with increasing fuel content, decreasing flow strain, and increasing ambient pressure. The C{sub 4} alkanes, however, exhibit three distinct p-T ignition regimes, similar to the homogeneous explosion limits. Finally, at 1 atm, 100% fuel, and a fixed flow strain rate the ignition temperature increases in the order of ethane < propane < n-butane < i-butane. Numerical simulation was conducted for ethane ignition using detailed reaction kinetics and transport descriptions. The modeling results suggest that ignition for all fuels studied at pressures below 5 atm is initiated by fuel oxidation following the high-temperature mechanism of radical chain branching and with little contribution by low-to-intermediate temperature chemistry.

  15. The Anderson Quin Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.H.; Bilbow, W.M.

    1993-03-18

    The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since this grant was limited to 2150 man hours, we could not expect to achieve all the objectives within the allotted period of work. However, the most relevant program objectives have been completed as reported here. The analysis generally confirms the results originally estimated in my paper on the subject. (Ref. 2) Further optimizations should show even higher efficiencies. The Anderson Quin Cycle (US Patent applied for) basically consists of 5 elements in the power cycle: A refrigeration system to cool and clean the inlet air before it enters the compressor that supplies air for the gas turbine; a gas turbine consisting of a compressor, combustor, and turbine; a steam boiler and steam turbine system using the heat from the exhaust gas out of the gas turbine; a vapor turbine cycle, which utilizes the condensed heat from the exhaust of the steam turbine and the exhaust gas heat leaving the steam boiler to operate a vapor turbine cycle which utilizes another fluid than water, in this case isobutane; and the fifth element consists of a gas cooler and heat pump system, which removes the heat from the exhaust gas to lower its temperature essentially to atmospheric temperature, and at the same time permits treatment of the exhaust gas to remove acid components such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Current industry accepted component characteristics were incorporated in the performance analysis of the overall cycle, ensuring accurate and meaningful operating predictions. The characteristics and performance of each of the elements are described. The thermal efficiency of the optimized calculated Anderson Quin Cycle is 62 percent.

  16. The Anderson Quin Cycle. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.H.; Bilbow, W.M.

    1993-03-18

    The objective of this study was to make a more refined evaluation of the Anderson Quin Cycle based on most recent information on the performance of various elements that will be used in the Anderson Quin Cycle. My original estimate of the work plan for evaluating and optimizing the Anderson Quin Cycle called for 7000 man hours of work. Since this grant was limited to 2150 man hours, we could not expect to achieve all the objectives within the allotted period of work. However, the most relevant program objectives have been completed as reported here. The analysis generally confirms the results originally estimated in my paper on the subject. (Ref. 2) Further optimizations should show even higher efficiencies. The Anderson Quin Cycle (US Patent applied for) basically consists of 5 elements in the power cycle: A refrigeration system to cool and clean the inlet air before it enters the compressor that supplies air for the gas turbine; a gas turbine consisting of a compressor, combustor, and turbine; a steam boiler and steam turbine system using the heat from the exhaust gas out of the gas turbine; a vapor turbine cycle, which utilizes the condensed heat from the exhaust of the steam turbine and the exhaust gas heat leaving the steam boiler to operate a vapor turbine cycle which utilizes another fluid than water, in this case isobutane; and the fifth element consists of a gas cooler and heat pump system, which removes the heat from the exhaust gas to lower its temperature essentially to atmospheric temperature, and at the same time permits treatment of the exhaust gas to remove acid components such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides. Current industry accepted component characteristics were incorporated in the performance analysis of the overall cycle, ensuring accurate and meaningful operating predictions. The characteristics and performance of each of the elements are described. The thermal efficiency of the optimized calculated Anderson Quin Cycle is 62 percent.

  17. Studies on the catalytic activity of zirconia promoted with sulfate, iron, and manganese

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, K.T.; Khouw, C.B.; Davis, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic properties of iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia (SFMZ) for the isomerization of n-butane to isobutane are investigated using various catalyst pretreatments and reaction conditions. The n-butane isomerization reactivity at 30{degrees}C is effected by calcination of the catalyst at 650{degrees}C in helium and vacuum treatment at room temperature indicating that superacidity is not likely to be responsible for activity. In addition, SFMZ samples exposed to dry air at over 450{degrees}C are more active than those calcined in helium at a reaction temperature of 30{degrees}C (n-butane conversions of 18.7% vs 0.4%) suggesting the presence of an active site involving a metal {open_quotes}oxy{close_quotes} species. The oxy species is capable of reacting CO to CO{sub 2} at room temperature and is present at a number density of 10-15 {mu}mol/g. At a reaction temperature of 100{degrees}C, SFMZ catalysts calcined in air then activated in helium show similar reactivities to those activated in air up to a preheating temperature of 450{degrees}C; above 450{degrees}C the metal oxy species is formed and provides additional activity (n-butane conversions of 37.1% in air vs 15.4% in He for calcinations at 650{degrees}C). The nature of the active sites on SFMZ are investigated using temperature-programmed desorption of substituted benzenes. The liberation of CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} in the benzene TPD profile of SFMZ is attributed to the oxidation of benzene at the redox-active metal sites, resulting in the subsequent decomposition of the reduced iron (II) sulfate. Data from the TPD studies do not suggest the presence of superacidity on SFMZ that could contribute to the low-temperature n-butane isomerization activity. Instead, a bifunctional mechanism that involves a combination of a redox-active metal site and an acid site in close proximity is proposed. 62 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1995-09-01

    A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

  19. Spectroelectrochemical Sensor for Pertechnetate Applicable to Hanford and Other DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heineman, William R; Seliskar, Carl J; Bryan, Samuel A

    2012-09-18

    The general aim of our work funded by DOE is the design and implementation of a new sensor technology that offers unprecedented levels of specificity needed for analysis of the complex chemical mixtures found at DOE sites nationwide. The specific goal of this project was the development of a sensor for technetium (Tc) that is applicable to characterizing and monitoring the vadose zone and associated subsurface water at the Hanford Site and other DOE sites. The concept for the spectroelectrochemical sensor is innovative and represents a breakthrough in sensor technology. The sensor combines three modes of selectivity (electrochemistry, spectroscopy, and selective partitioning) into a single sensor to substantially improve selectivity. The sensor consists of a basic spectroelectrochemical configuration that we have developed under our previous DOE grants: a waveguide with an optically transparent electrode (OTE) that is coated with a thin chemically-selective film that preconcnetrates the analyte. The key to adapting this generic sensor to detect TcO4- and Tc complexes lies in the development of chemically-selective films that preconcentrate the analyte and, when necessary, chemically convert it into a complex with electrochemical and spectroscopic properties appropriate for sensing. Significant accomplishments were made in the general areas of synthesis and characterization of polymer films that efficiently preconcentrate the analyte, development and characterization of sensors and associated instrumentation, and synthesis and characterization of relevant Re and Tc complexes. Two new polymer films for the preconcentration step in the sensor were developed: partially sulfonated polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene-ran-butylene)-block-polystyrene (SSEBS) and phosphine containing polymer films. The latter was a directed polymer film synthesis that combined the proper electrostatic properties to attract TcO4- and also incorporated a suitable ligand for covalently trapping a lower oxidation state Tc complex within the film for spectroelectrochemical detection. Spectroelectrochemical sensors were developed and demonstrated, first using [Re(dmpe)3]+ (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane) as a model compound with the non-radioactive Re surrogate for radioactive Tc. A fluorescence based spectroelectrochemical sensor for [Tc(dmpe)3]+/2+was then developed using SSEBS as the preconcentrating film. Portable instrumentation for the fluorescence spectroelectrochemical sensor was fabricated and tested. The effects of components in Hanford subsurface water on sensor performance with a detailed evaluation of the effect of total ionic strength on sensitivity demonstrated the ability to use the spectroelectrochemical sensor on representative water samples. A variety Re and Tc complexes were synthesized and characterized to explore the best ligands to use for detection of Tc. A lower oxidation-state Tc-complex [Tc(dmpe)3]+ (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)ethane) was synthesized to use as a model compound for developing Tc sensors. [Tc(dmpe)3]+/2+ exhibited the important properties of solution fluorescence at ambient temperatures and reversible electrochemistry. A range of low oxidation state dioxo Re- and Tc-complexes of formulae [ReO2(py)4]+, [ReO2(CN)4]-, [ReO2(P-P)2]+ and [ReO2(S-S)2]+ (py = pyridine) were synthesized. An exhaustive study of the spectroscopy and electrochemistry of Re(diimine)(CO)3(halide) complexes was performed. These complexes served as models for the Tc(diimine)(CO)3(halide) complexes that were readily formed from Tc(CO)x(halides)6-x complexes which are themselves constituents of tank waste samples from Hanford. Of particular interest were new Tc complexes with the +5 and +6 oxidation states. Tetrabutylammonium salt of tetrachlorooxotechnetate(V), (nBu4N)[TcOCl4] (I) was synthesized and the structure determined. [TcO2(CN)4]3- , [TcO2(en)2]2+ , [TcO2(im)4]+, and [TcO2(py)4]+ (en = ethylenediamine; im = imidazole; py = pyridine) complexes were synthesized and solution and solid state 99Tc NMR spectra were acquired giving