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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether, RBOB ...

2

State Restrictions on Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

By the end of 2005, 25 States had barred, or passed laws banning, any more than trace levels of MTBE in their gasoline supplies, and legislation to ban MTBE was pending in 4 others. Some State laws address only MTBE; others also address ethers such as ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE) and tertiary amyl methyl ether (TAME). AEO2006 assumes that all State MTBE bans prohibit the use of all ethers for gasoline blending.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Enhanced diisobutene production in the presence of methyl tertiary butyl ether  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the liquid phase reaction of isobutene in the presence of resin cation exchange resins with itself in a C[sub 4] hydrocarbon stream to form dimers, the formation of higher polymers, oligomers, and co-dimer by-products is suppressed by the presence of 0.0001 to 1 mole per mole of isobutene of methyl tertiary butyl ether. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Ethyl-tertiary-butyl-ether (ETBE) as an aviation fuel: Eleventh international symposium on alcohol fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses the preliminary flight testing of an aircraft using neat burning ethyl-tertiary-butyl-ether (ETBE) as a fuel. No additional changes were made to the fuel delivery systems which had previously been modified to provide the higher fuel flow rates required to operate the engine on neat ethanol. Air-fuel ratios were manually adjusted with the mixture control. This system allows the pilot to adjust the mixture to compensate for changes in air density caused by altitude, pressure and temperature. The engine was instrumented to measure exhaust gas temperatures (EGT), cylinder head temperatures (CHT), and fuel flows, while the standard aircraft instruments were used to collect aircraft performance data. Baseline engine data for ETBE and Avgas are compared. Preliminary data indicates the technical and economic feasibility of using ETBE as an aviation fuel for the piston engine fleet. Furthermore, the energy density of ETBE qualifies it as a candidate for a turbine engine fuel of which 16.2 billion gallons are used in the US each year.

Maben, G.D.; Shauck, M.E.; Zanin, M.G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic com-pound (VOC) derived from natural gas that is added to gas-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic com- pound (VOC) derived from natural gas Water in Urban and Agricultural Areas made from methanol, which is derived primarily from natural gas that is added to gas- oline either seasonally or year round in many parts of the United States to increase

6

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. [801Methyl tert-butyl ether  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: (1) Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. (2) Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. (3) Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins. During the sixth quarter we completed the construction of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR), conducted initial shake-down experiments in a cold-flow mode, and finalized the selection process of the acid catalysts for conversion of syngas-produced alcohols and isobutylene to MTBE (scheme 2). Tasks 3, 4, and 5 are awaiting complete implementation of the SBCR system.

Marcelin, G.

1992-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

7

Determination of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether and tert-Butyl Alcohol in Water by Solid-Phase Microextraction/Head Space Analysis in Comparison to EPA Method 5030/8260B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is now one of the most common groundwater contaminants in the United States. Groundwater contaminated with MTBE is also likely to be contaminated with tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), because TBA is a component of commercial grade MTBE, TBA can also be used as a fuel oxygenate, and TBA is a biodegradation product of MTBE. In California, MTBE is subject to reporting at concentrations greater than 3 {micro}g/L. TBA is classified as a ''contaminant of current interest'' and has a drinking water action level of 12 {micro}g/L. In this paper, we describe the development and optimization of a simple, automated solid phase microextraction (SPME) method for the analysis of MTBE and TBA in water and demonstrate the applicability of this method for monitoring MTBE and TBA contamination in groundwater, drinking water, and surface water. In this method, the headspace (HS) of a water sample is extracted with a carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane SPME fiber, the MTBE and TBA are desorbed into a gas chromatograph (GC), and detected using mass spectrometry (MS). The method is optimized for the routine analysis of MTBE and TBA with a level of quantitation of 0.3 {micro}g/L and 4 {micro}g/L, respectively, in water. MTBE quantitation was linear for over two orders of concentration (0.3 {micro}g/L -80 {micro}g/L). TBA was found to be linear within the range of 4 {micro}g/L-7,900 {micro}g/L. The lower level of detection for MTBE is 0.03 {micro}g/L using this method. This SPME method using headspace extraction was found to be advantageous over SPME methods requiring immersion of the fiber into the water samples, because it prolonged the life of the fiber by up to 400 sample analyses. This is the first time headspace extraction SPME has been shown to be applicable to the measurement of both MTBE and TBA at concentrations below regulatory action levels. This method was compared with the certified EPA Method 5030/8260B (purge-and-trap/GC/MS) using split samples from laboratory bioreactors treating MTBE contaminated water and applied to environmental samples collected throughout the East Bay area of California. Results from the SPME-HS/GC/MS method were directly comparable to the EPA Method 5030/8260B. This method provides an simple, inexpensive, accurate, and sensitive alternative to EPA Method 5030/8260B for the analysis of MTBE and TBA in water samples.

Oh, Keun-Chan; Stringfellow, William T.

2003-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

8

Experimental Pathology Laboratories, Inc. Ethyl-Tertiary-Butyl Ether  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a plantation about 15-year-old in the Les Cedres area, near Montreal (45820H N, 73854H W). Trees in open

Bandettini, Peter A.

9

Radiation chemistry of alternative fuel oxygenates -- Substituted ethers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electron beam process, an advanced oxidation and reduction technology, is based in the field of radiation chemistry. Fundamental to the development of treatment processes is an understanding of the underlying chemistry. The authors have previously evaluated the bimolecular rate constants for the reactions of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and with this study have extended their studies to include ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), di-isopropyl ether (DIPE) and tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) with the hydroxyl radical, hydrogen atom and solvated electron using pulse radiolysis. For all of the oxygenates the reaction with the hydroxyl radical appears to be of primary interest in the destruction of the compounds in water. The rates with the solvated electron are limiting values as the rates appear to be relatively low. The hydrogen atom rate constants are relatively low, coupled with the low yield in radiolysis, they concluded that these are of little significance in the destruction of the alternative fuel oxygenates (and MTBE).

Mezyk, S. P.; Cooper, W. J.; Bartels, D. M.; Tobien, T.; O'Shea, K. E.

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

PURIFICATION OF ETHER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

BS>A process for removing peroxides from ethers by sorption on a strong- base anion exchange resin in its hydroxyl form is described. Incorporation of the resin for storage is also covered. (AEC)

Feinstein, R.N.

1961-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Treatment of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Vapors in Biotrickling Filters. 2.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will controlled by diffusion in the biofilm near the outlet of the reactor. A fundamental parameter and control in bioreactors equipped with some degree of instrumentation, fundamental knowledge for the proper handbook of physical-chemical properties and environmental fate for organic chemicals, Volume III. Volatile

12

Treatment of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Vapors in Biotrickling Filters. 1.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, weed-eater, shovel, and a rake. A chipper, compost bin, or a large rented trash dumpster may be useful

13

Catalytic distillation for the synthesis of tertiary butyl alcohol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Catalytic Distillation for the synthesis of tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) is investigated in this thesis. The solvent, ethylene glycol, is proposed as a means of… (more)

Safinski, Tomasz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.O.; McBreen, J.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

15

Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors  

SciTech Connect

A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

Lee, Hung Sui (East Setauket, NY); Yang, Xiao-Oing (Port Jefferson Station, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY)

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

16

Whole-Genome Analysis of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether-Degrading Beta-Proteobacterium Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of benzene to phenol, catechol, and 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzeneof benzene to phenol (and catechol), and toluene toa multi-component PH, catechol 2,3-dioxygenase and the meta-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Whole-Genome Analysis of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether-Degrading Beta-Proteobacterium Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by pure cultures of butane-degrading bacteria. Appl.of K s values for MTBE by butane- degrading bacteria (52).

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

IDENTIFYING THE USAGE PATTERNS OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) AND OTHER OXYGENATES IN GASOLINE USING GASOLINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Energy Research (NIPER), 2) the Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association (MVMA), and 3) the U interested in fuel comparisons Thousands each year Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association (MVMA) National gasoline survey Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association 23 cities throughout the U.S. Summer of 1988

19

Comparative Environmental Performance of Two-Diesel-Fuel Oxygenates: Dibutyl Maleate (DBM) and Triproplyene Glycol Monomethyl Ether (TGME)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many studies have shown that the addition of oxygen bearing compounds to diesel fuel can significantly reduce particulate emissions. To assist in the evaluation of the environmental performance of diesel-fuel oxygenates, we have implemented a suite of diagnostic models for simulating the transport of compounds released to air, water, and soils/groundwater as well as regional landscapes. As a means of studying the comparative performance of DBM and TGME, we conducted a series of simulations for selected environmental media. Benzene and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) were also addressed because they represent benchmark fuel-related compounds that have been the subject of extensive environmental measurements and modeling. The simulations showed that DBM and TGME are less mobile in soil because of reduced vapor-phase transport and increased retention on soil particles. The key distinction between these two oxygenates is that DBM is predicted to have a greater potential than TGME for aerobic biodegradation, based on chemical structure.

Layton, D.W.; Marchetti, A.A.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Room Temperature Aging Study of Butyl O-rings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During testing under the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign in 2001, preliminary data detected a previously unknown and potentially serious concern with recently procured butyl o-rings. All butyl o-rings molded from a proprietary formulation throughout the period circa 1999 through 2001 had less than a full cure. Tests showed that sealing force values for these suspect o-rings were much lower than expected and their physical properties were very sensitive to further post curing at elevated temperatures. Further testing confirmed that these o-rings were approximately 50% cured versus the typical industry standard of > 90% cured. Despite this condition, all suspect o-rings fully conformed to their QC acceptance requirements, including their individual product drawing requirements.

Mark Wilson

2009-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Divinyl ether synthase gene and protein, and uses thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to divinyl ether synthase genes, proteins, and methods of their use. The present invention encompasses both native and recombinant wild-type forms of the synthase, as well as mutants and variant forms, some of which possess altered characteristics relative to the wild-type synthase. The present invention also relates to methods of using divinyl ether synthase genes and proteins, including in their expression in transgenic organisms and in the production of divinyl ether fatty acids, and to methods of suing divinyl ether fatty acids, including in the protection of plants from pathogens.

Howe, Gregg A. (East Lansing, MI); Itoh, Aya (Tsuruoka, JP)

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

22

Process for producing dimethyl ether form synthesis gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This invention pertains to a Fischer Tropsch process for converting synthesis gas to an oxygenated hydrocarbon with particular emphasis on dimethyl ether. Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen are converted to dimethyl ether by carrying out the reaction in the presence of an alkali metal-manganese-iron carbonyl cluster incorporated onto a zirconia-alumina support.

Pierantozzi, Ronald (Macungie, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Process for producing dimethyl ether from synthesis gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention pertains to a Fischer Tropsch process for converting synthesis gas to an oxygenated hydrocarbon with particular emphasis on dimethyl ether. Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen are converted to dimethyl ether by carrying out the reaction in the presence of an alkali metal-manganese-iron carbonyl cluster incorporated onto a zirconia-alumina support.

Pierantozzi, R.

1985-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

24

Solvent Effects on Metal Complexation with Crown Ethers from Liquid to Supercritical Fluids (DE-FG07-98ER 149 13)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to study the salvation effects of metal-crown ether complexation in different solvents. It has been suggested in the literature that supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SF-CO2) is a tunable solvent because its salvation environment can be varied with the fluid density. In this project, spectroscopic techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) were used to evaluate salvation effects of metal crown complexation in organic solvents and in SF-CO2. In most solvent extraction systems, water is often involved in the extraction processes. We have carried out extensive studies of water-crown ether interactions in different solvents and in SF-CO2 using NMR and FTIR techniques. Water molecules can be attached to crown ethers through hydrogen bonding of H-0-H to the oxygen atoms of crown ether cavities. This type of interaction is like a Lewis acid-Lewis base complexation. During the course of this project, we noticed that some CO2 soluble Lewis base such as tri-n-butyl-phosphate (TBP) can also form such Lewis acid-Lewis base complexes with water and other inorganic acids including nitric acid and hydrochloric acid. Inorganic acids (e.g. nitric acid) are normally not soluble in SF-CO2. However, because TBP is highly soluble in SF-CO2, an inorganic acid bound to TBP via hydrogen bonding becomes CO2 soluble. This Lewis acid-Lewis base complex approach provides a method of introducing inorganic acids into supercritical fluid CO2 for chemical reactions.

Wai, C.M.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Crown Ethers in Nonaqueous Electrolytes for Lithium/Air Batteries  

SciTech Connect

The effects of three crown ethers, 12-crown-4, 15-crown-5, and 18-crown-6, as additives and co-solvents in non-aqueous electrolytes on the cell performance of primary Li/air batteries operated in a dry air environment were investigated. Crown ethers have large effects on the discharge performance of non-aqueous electrolytes in Li/air batteries. A small amount (normally less than 10% by weight or volume in electrolytes) of 12-Crown-4 and 15-crown-5 reduces the battery performance and a minimum discharge capacity appears at the crown ether content of ca. 5% in the electrolytes. However, when the content increases to about 15%, both crown ethers improve the capacity of Li/air cells by about 28% and 16%, respectively. 15-Crown-5 based electrolytes even show a maximum discharge capacity in the crown ether content range from 10% to 15%. On the other hand, the increase of 18-crown-6 amount in the electrolytes continuously lowers of the cell performance. The different battery performances of these three crown ethers in electrolytes are explained by the combined effects from the electrolytes’ contact angle, oxygen solubility, viscosity, ionic conductivity, and the stability of complexes formed between crown ether molecules and lithium ions.

Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Deyu; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Jiguang

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

26

Removal of technetium from alkaline nuclear-waste media by a solvent-extraction process using crown ethers  

SciTech Connect

Crown ethers dissolved in suitably modified aliphatic kerosene diluents can be employed to extract technetium as pertechnetate anion (TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}) with good extraction ratios from realistic simulants of radioactive alkaline nitrate waste. The modifiers utilized are non-halogenated and non-volatile, and the technetium can be removed from the solvent by stripping using water. The crown ethers bis-4,4{prime}(5{prime})[(tert-butyl)cyclohexano]-18-crown-6 (di-t-BuCH18C6) and dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6) provide stronger TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} extraction than dicyclohexano-21-crown-7 and 4-tert-butylcyclohexano 15-crown-5. Whereas DCH18C6 provides somewhat higher TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} extraction ratios than the more lipophilic di-t-BuCH18C6 derivative, the latter was selected for further study owing to its lower distribution to the aqueous phase. Particularly good extraction and stripping results were obtained with di-t-BuCH 18C6 at 0.02 M in a 2:1 vol/vol blend of tributyl phosphate and Isopar{reg_sign} M. Using this solvent, 98.9% of the technetium contained (at 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M) in a Double-Shell Slurry Feed (DSSF) Hanford tank waste simulant was removed following two cross-current extraction contacts. Two cross-current stripping contacts with deionized water afforded removal of 99.1% of the technetium from the organic solvent.

Bonnesen, P.V.; Presley, D.J.; Haverlock, T.J.; Moyer, B.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Alkaline-side extraction of technetium from tank waste using crown ethers and other extractants  

SciTech Connect

The chemical development of a new crown-ether-based solvent-extraction process for the separation of (Tc) from alkaline tank-waste supernate is ready for counter-current testing. The process addresses a priority need in the proposed cleanup of Hanford and other tank wastes. This need has arisen from concerns due to the volatility of Tc during vitrification, as well as {sup 99}Tc`s long half-life and environmental mobility. The new process offers several key advantages that direct treatability--no adjustment of the waste composition is needed; economical stripping with water; high efficiency--few stages needed; non-RCRA chemicals--no generation of hazardous or mixed wastes; co-extraction of {sup 90}Sr; and optional concentration on a resin. A key concept advanced in this work entails the use of tandem techniques: solvent extraction offers high selectivity, while a subsequent column sorption process on the aqueous stripping solution serves to greatly concentrate the Tc. Optionally, the stripping solution can be evaporated to a small volume. Batch tests of the solvent-extraction and stripping components of the process have been conducted on actual melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) waste as well as simulants of MVST and Hanford waste. The tandem process was demonstrated on MVST waste simulants using the three solvents that were selected the final candidates for the process. The solvents are 0.04 M bis-4,4{prime}(5{prime})[(tert-butyl)cyclohexano]-18-crown-6 (abbreviated di-t-BuCH18C6) in a 1:1 vol/vol blend of tributyl phosphate and Isopar{reg_sign} M (an isoparaffinic kerosene); 0.02 M di-t-BuCH18C6 in 2:1 vol/vol TBP/Isopar M and pure TBP. The process is now ready for counter-current testing on actual Hanford tank supernates.

Bonnesen, P.V.; Moyer, B.A.; Presley, D.J.; Armstrong, V.S.; Haverlock, T.J.; Counce, R.M.; Sachleben, R.A.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Multipodal coordination of a tetracarboxylic crown ether with NH 4 + : A vibrational spectroscopy and computational study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The elucidation of the structural requirements for molecular recognition by the crown ether (18–crown–6)-2

Paola Hurtado; Francisco Gámez; Said Hamad; Bruno Martínez–Haya; Jeffrey D. Steill; Jos Oomens

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Solvent extraction of technetium from alkaline waste media using bis-4,4{prime}(5{prime})[(tert-butyl)cyclohexano]-18-crown-6  

SciTech Connect

The crown ether bis-4,4`(5`)[(tert-butyl)cyclohexano]-18-crown-6 can be utilized in a solvent-extraction process for the removal of technetium as pertechnetate ion, TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} from solutions simulating highly radioactive alkaline defense wastes (``tank wastes``) stored at several sites in the United States. The process employs non-halogenated and non-volatile diluents and modifiers and includes an efficient stripping procedure using only water. More than 95% of the pertechnetate present at 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M in Melton Valley (Oak Ridge, TN) and Hanford (Washington) tank-waste simulants was removed following two cross-current extraction contacts using 0.02 M bis-4,4`(5`)[(tertbutyl)cyclohexano]- 18-crown-6 in 2:1 vol/vol TBP/Isopar{reg_sign} M diluent at 25 C. Similarly, for both simulants, more than 98% of the pertechnetate contained in the solvent was back-extracted following two cross-current stripping contacts using deionized water.

Bonnesen, P.V.; Presley, D.J.; Moyer, B.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Effects of simulant mixed waste on EPDM and butyl rubber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have developed a Chemical Compatibility Testing Program for the evaluation of plastic packaging components which may be used in transporting mixed waste forms. In this program, they have screened 10 plastic materials in four liquid mixed waste simulants. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer (Nitrile) rubber, cross-linked polyethylene, epichlorohydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene (EPDM) rubber, fluorocarbons (Viton and Kel-F{trademark}), polytetrafluoro-ethylene (Teflon), high-density polyethylene, isobutylene-isoprene copolymer (Butyl) rubber, polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene (SBR) rubber. The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The screening testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to approximately 3 kGy of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste simulants at 60 C. The rubber materials or elastomers were tested using Vapor Transport Rate measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. The authors have developed a chemical compatibility program for the evaluation of plastic packaging components which may be incorporated in packaging for transporting mixed waste forms. From the data analyses performed to date, they have identified the thermoplastic, polychlorotrifluoroethylene, as having the greatest chemical compatibility after having been exposed to gamma radiation followed by exposure to the Hanford Tank simulant mixed waste. The most striking observation from this study was the poor performance of polytetrafluoroethylene under these conditions. In the evaluation of the two elastomeric materials they have concluded that while both materials exhibit remarkable resistance to these environmental conditions, EPDM has a greater resistance to this corrosive simulant mixed waste.

Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Decrease of intracellular pH as possible mechanism of embryotoxicity of glycol ether alkoxyacetic acid metabolites  

SciTech Connect

Embryotoxicity of glycol ethers is caused by their alkoxyacetic acid metabolites, but the mechanism underlying the embryotoxicity of these acid metabolites is so far not known. The present study investigates a possible mechanism underlying the embryotoxicity of glycol ether alkoxyacetic acid metabolites using the methoxyacetic acid (MAA) metabolite of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether as the model compound. The results obtained demonstrate an MAA-induced decrease of the intracellular pH (pH{sub i}) of embryonic BALB/c-3T3 cells as well as of embryonic stem (ES)-D3 cells, at concentrations that affect ES-D3 cell differentiation. These results suggest a mechanism for MAA-mediated embryotoxicity similar to the mechanism of embryotoxicity of the drugs valproic acid and acetazolamide (ACZ), known to decrease the pH{sub i}in vivo, and therefore used as positive controls. The embryotoxic alkoxyacetic acid metabolites ethoxyacetic acid, butoxyacetic acid and phenoxyacetic acid also caused an intracellular acidification of BALB/c-3T3 cells at concentrations that are known to inhibit ES-D3 cell differentiation. Two other embryotoxic compounds, all-trans-retinoic acid and 5-fluorouracil, did not decrease the pH{sub i} of embryonic cells at concentrations that affect ES-D3 cell differentiation, pointing at a different mechanism of embryotoxicity of these compounds. MAA and ACZ induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of ES-D3 cell differentiation, which was enhanced by amiloride, an inhibitor of the Na{sup +}/H{sup +}-antiporter, corroborating an important role of the pH{sub i} in the embryotoxic mechanism of both compounds. Together, the results presented indicate that a decrease of the pH{sub i} may be the mechanism of embryotoxicity of the alkoxyacetic acid metabolites of the glycol ethers.

Louisse, Jochem, E-mail: jochem.louisse@wur.n [Division of Toxicology, Wageningen University, Tuinlaan 5, 6703 HE Wageningen (Netherlands); TNO Quality of Life, PO Box 360, 3700 AJ Zeist (Netherlands); WUR/TNO Centre for Innovative Toxicology, PO Box 8000, 6700 EA Wageningen (Netherlands); Bai Yanqing [Division of Toxicology, Wageningen University, Tuinlaan 5, 6703 HE Wageningen (Netherlands); Verwei, Miriam; Sandt, Johannes J.M. van de [TNO Quality of Life, PO Box 360, 3700 AJ Zeist (Netherlands); WUR/TNO Centre for Innovative Toxicology, PO Box 8000, 6700 EA Wageningen (Netherlands); Blaauboer, Bas J. [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, PO Box 80176, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M. [Division of Toxicology, Wageningen University, Tuinlaan 5, 6703 HE Wageningen (Netherlands); WUR/TNO Centre for Innovative Toxicology, PO Box 8000, 6700 EA Wageningen (Netherlands)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Direct synthesis of dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed appropriate and excellent catalysts for direct DME synthesis. The catalysts, Cu-Zn/Al2O3 catalysts prepared by the sol-gel method, produce DME with high DME activity and high DME selectivity under milder reaction ... Keywords: DME, alumina, catalyst, clean fuel, copper, dimethyl ether, direct synthesis, hydrogen, sol-gel method, syngas

Kaoru Takeishi; Yoshimi Akaike

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

The interactions of water and perfluorodiethyl ether on Ru(100)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have studied the interactions of water and perfluorodiethyl ether on Ru(100) in order to model the effects of surface structure and humidity on the bonding and decomposition of perfluoroalkyl ether lubricants with metal surfaces. In order to understand the interactions on Ru(100), we have first investigated the interactions of each of these adsorbates alone on the clean surface. The interactions of water with Ru(100) have been studied using both thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). From these studies we conclude that a small amount of water dissociates on this surface (5--10% of a monolayer), but water is adsorbed in a predominantly molecular form on this surface with an increasing degree of hydrogen-bonding with increasing coverage. The effects of hydrogen and oxygen coadsorption on the interactions of water with this surface have also been studied using TDS. Finally, the interactions of coadsorbed water and perfluorodiethyl ether on Ru(100) have been investigated using TDS.

Leavitt, P.

1990-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

34

Thermodynamics of Hydrogen Production from Dimethyl Ether Steam Reforming and Hydrolysis  

SciTech Connect

The thermodynamic analyses of producing a hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feed from the process of dimethyl ether (DME) steam reforming were investigated as a function of steam-to-carbon ratio (0-4), temperature (100 C-600 C), pressure (1-5 atm), and product species: acetylene, ethanol, methanol, ethylene, methyl-ethyl ether, formaldehyde, formic acid, acetone, n-propanol, ethane and isopropyl alcohol. Results of the thermodynamic processing of dimethyl ether with steam indicate the complete conversion of dimethyl ether to hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide for temperatures greater than 200 C and steam-to-carbon ratios greater than 1.25 at atmospheric pressure (P = 1 atm). Increasing the operating pressure was observed to shift the equilibrium toward the reactants; increasing the pressure from 1 atm to 5 atm decreased the conversion of dimethyl ether from 99.5% to 76.2%. The order of thermodynamically stable products in decreasing mole fraction was methane, ethane, isopropyl alcohol, acetone, n-propanol, ethylene, ethanol, methyl-ethyl ether and methanol--formaldehyde, formic acid, and acetylene were not observed. The optimal processing conditions for dimethyl ether steam reforming occurred at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 1.5, a pressure of 1 atm, and a temperature of 200 C. Modeling the thermodynamics of dimethyl ether hydrolysis (with methanol as the only product considered), the equilibrium conversion of dimethyl ether is limited. The equilibrium conversion was observed to increase with temperature and steam-to-carbon ratio, resulting in a maximum dimethyl ether conversion of approximately 68% at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 4.5 and a processing temperature of 600 C. Thermodynamically, dimethyl ether processed with steam can produce hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feeds--with hydrogen concentrations exceeding 70%. This substantiates dimethyl ether as a viable source of hydrogen for PEM fuel cells.

T.A. Semelsberger

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

CATALYSTS FOR HIGH CETANE ETHERS AS DIESEL FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A tungstena-zirconia (WZ) catalyst has been investigated for coupling methanol and isobutanol to unsymmetrical ethers, i.e. methyl isobutyl ether (MIBE) and compared with earlier studied sulfated-zirconia (SZ) and Nafion-H catalysts. In all cases, the ether synthesis mechanism is a dual site S{sub N}2 process involving competitive adsorption of reactants on proximal acid sites. At low reaction temperatures, methylisobutylether (MIBE) is the predominant product. However, at temperatures >135 C the WZ catalyst is very good for dehydration of isobutanol to isobutene. The surface acid sites of the WZ catalyst and a Nafion-H catalyst were diagnosed by high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of N 1s shifts after adsorption of amines. Using pyridine, ethylenediamine, and triethylamine, it is shown that WZ has heterogeneous strong Broensted acid sites. Theoretical study located the transition state of the alcohol coupling reaction on proximal Broensted acid sites and accounted well for XPS core-level shifts upon surface acid-base interactions. While computations have not been carried out with WZ, it is shown that the SZ catalyst is a slightly stronger acid than CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}H (a model for Nafion-H) by 1.3-1.4 kcal/mol. A novel sulfated zirconia catalyst having proximal strong Broensted acid sites was synthesized and shown to have significantly enhanced activity and high selectivity in producing MIBE or isobutene from methanol/isobutanol mixtures. The catalyst was prepared by anchoring 1,2-ethanediol bis(hydrogen sulfate) salt precursor onto zirconium hydroxide, followed by calcination to remove the -(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2})- bridging residues.

Kamil Klier; Richard G. Herman; Heock-Hoi Kwon; James G. C. Shen; Qisheng Ma; Robert A. Hunsicker; Andrew P. Butler; Scott J. Bollinger

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. The strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. Within the Combustion Laboratory of the Penn State Energy Institute, they have installed and equipped a Navistar V-8 direct-injection turbodiesel engine for measurement of gaseous and particulate emissions and examination of the impact of fuel composition on diesel combustion. They have also reconfigured a high-pressure viscometer for studies of the viscosity, bulk modulus (compressibility) and miscibility of blends of diesel fuel, dimethyl ether and lubricity additives. The results include baseline emissions, performance and combustion measurements on the Navistar engine for operation on a federal low sulfur diesel fuel (300 ppm S). Most recently, they have examined blends of an oxygenated fuel additive (a liquid fuel called CETANER{trademark}) produced by Air Products, for comparison with dimethyl ether blended at the same weight of oxygen addition, 2 wt.%. While they have not operated the engine on DME yet, they are now preparing to do so. A fuel system for delivery of DME/Diesel blends has been configured and initial investigations at low DME blend ratios (around 5-10 vol%) will begin shortly. They have also performed viscosity measurements on diesel fuel, DME and 50-50 blends of DME in diesel. These tests have verified that DME has a much lower viscosity than the diesel fuel and that the viscosity of the blended fuel is also much lower than the diesel base fuel. This has implications for the injection and atomization of the DME/diesel blends.

Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Andre L. Boehman; David Klinikowski

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Use of a Balloon and N-Butyl-2-Cyanoacrylate for Treatment of Arteriovenous Fistula  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report a patient who developed a large arteriovenous fistula in right lower extremity after gunshot injury. Because other endovascular methods failed, the patient was successfully treated with concomitant use of detachable latex balloon and N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA). The combination of detachable balloon and NBCA can be effectively used for endovascular treatment of peripheral arteriovenous fistulas in selected cases when effective embolization could not be achieved with other embolizing agents or their various combinations.

Doenmez, Halil, E-mail: hdonmez68@yahoo.com; Mavili, Ertugrul [Erciyes University Medical Faculty, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Toker, Birguel; Oztuerk, M. Halil; Soylu, Serra O.; Hekimoglu, Baki [SB Diskapi Yildirim Beyazit Egitim ve Arastirma Hastanesi, Department of Radiology (Turkey)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

High octane ethers from synthesis gas-derived alcohols  

SciTech Connect

The temperature dependence of ether synthesis, particularly unsymmetric methylisobutylether (MIBE), was carried out over the Nafion-H microsaddles (MS) catalyst. The principal product formed under the rather severe reaction conditions of 1100 psig pressure and temperatures in the range of 123--157{degree}C was the expected MIBE formed directly by coupling the methanol/isobutanol reactants. In addition, significantly larger quantities of the dimethylether (DME) and hydrocarbon products were observed than were obtained under milder reaction conditions. Deactivation of the Nafion-H MS catalyst was determined by periodically testing the catalyst under a given set of reaction conditions for the synthesis of MIBE and MTBE from methanol/isobutanol = 2/1, i.e. 123{degree}C, 1100 psig, and total GHSV = 248 mol/kg cat/hr. After carrying out various tests over a period of 2420 hr, with intermittant periods of standing under nitrogen at ambient conditions, the yields of MIBE and MTBE had decreased by 25% and 41%, respectively. In order to gain insight into the role of the surface acidity in promoting the selective coupling of the alcohols to form the unsymmetric ether, the strengths of the acid sites on the catalysts are still being probed by calorimetric titrations in non-aqueous solutions. 11 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; DeTavernier, S.; Johannson, M.; Kieke, M.; Bastian, R.D.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Interactions between Ether Phospholipids and Cholesterol as Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Cholesterol and ether lipids are ubiquitous in mammalian cell membranes, and their interactions are crucial in ether lipid mediated cholesterol trafficking. We report on cholesterol s molecular interactions with ether lipids as determined using a combination of small-angle neutron and Xray scattering, and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A scattering density profile model for an ether lipid bilayer was developed using MD simulations, which was then used to simultaneously fit the different experimental scattering data. From analysis of the data the various bilayer structural parameters were obtained. Surface area constrained MD simulations were also performed to reproduce the experimental data. This iterative analysis approach resulted in good agreement between the experimental and simulated form factors. The molecular interactions taking place between cholesterol and ether lipids were then determined from the validated MD simulations. We found that in ether membranes cholesterol primarily hydrogen bonds with the lipid headgroup phosphate oxygen, while in their ester membrane counterparts cholesterol hydrogen bonds with the backbone ester carbonyls. This different mode of interaction between ether lipids and cholesterol induces cholesterol to reside closer to the bilayer surface, dehydrating the headgroup s phosphate moiety. Moreover, the three-dimensional lipid chain spatial density distribution around cholesterol indicates anisotropic chain packing, causing cholesterol to tilt. These insights lend a better understanding of ether lipid-mediated cholesterol trafficking and the roles that the different lipid species have in determining the structural and dynamical properties of membrane associated biomolecules.

Pan, Jianjun [ORNL; Cheng, Xiaolin [ORNL; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Mostofian, Barmak [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Drazba, Paul [ORNL; Katsaras, John [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Dimethyl ether (DME): a clean fuel of the 21st century and catalysts for it  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dimethyl ether (DME) is a substitute of LNG and light oil. DME burns without particulate matters and SOx, so DME is a clean fuel. DME is a storage and carrier of hydrogen. For these usages, useful catalysts such as DME steam reforming catalysts and DME ... Keywords: DME, alumina, catalyst, clean fuel, copper, dimethyl ether, direct synthesis, hydrogen, sol-gel method, steam reforming

Kaoru Takeishi

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Catalysts for hydrogen production by steam reforming of dimethyl ether (DME)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dimethyl ether (DME) is expected as one of clean fuels. We have been studying on DME steam reforming for hydrogen production. Copper alumina catalysts prepared by a sol-gel method produced large quantities of H2 with DME steam reforming. The reason was ... Keywords: DME, alumina, catalyst, clean fuel, copper, dimethyl ether, hydrogen, sol-gel method, steam reforming

Kaoru Takeishi

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Development of single type copper alumina catalysts for hydrogen production from dimethyl ether (DME)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dimethyl ether (DME) is expected as one of clean fuels. We have been studying on DME steam reforming for hydrogen production. Copper alumina catalysts prepared by the sol-gel method produced large quantities of H2 with DME steam reforming. Aiming at ... Keywords: DME, alumina, catalyst, clean fuel, copper, dimethyl ether, hydrogen, sol-gel method, steam reforming

Kaoru Takeishi; Atsushi Ban

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Comprehensive testing to measure the response of butyl rubber to Hanford tank waste simulant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the Chemical Compatibility Program developed to evaluate plastic packaging components that may be incorporated in packaging mixed-waste forms for transportation. Consistent with the methodology outlined in this report, the authors performed the second phase of this experimental program to determine the effects of simulant Hanford tank mixed wastes on packaging seal materials. That effort involved the comprehensive testing of five plastic liner materials in an aqueous mixed-waste simulant. The testing protocol involved exposing the materials to {approximately}143, 286, 571, and 3,670 krad of gamma radiation and was followed by 7-, 14-, 28-, 180-day exposures to the waste simulant at 18, 50, and 60 C. Butyl rubber samples subjected to the same protocol were then evaluated by measuring seven material properties: specific gravity, dimensional changes, mass changes, hardness, compression set, vapor transport rates, and tensile properties. From the analyses, they determined that butyl rubber has relatively good resistance to radiation, this simulant, and a combination of these factors. These results suggest that butyl rubber is a relatively good seal material to withstand aqueous mixed wastes having similar composition to the one used in this study.

NIGREY,PAUL J.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Comb-shaped single ion conductors based on polyacrylate ethers and lithium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comb-shaped single ion conductors based on polyacrylate ethers and lithium Comb-shaped single ion conductors based on polyacrylate ethers and lithium alkyl sulfonate Title Comb-shaped single ion conductors based on polyacrylate ethers and lithium alkyl sulfonate Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2005 Authors Sun, Xiao-Guang, Jun Hou, and John B. Kerr Journal Electrochimica Acta Volume 50 Pagination 1139-1147 Keywords ionic conductivity, plasticizer, polyacrylate ethers, single ion conductor Abstract Comb-shaped single ion conductors have been synthesized by sulfonation of small molecule chloroethyleneglycols, which, after ion exchange to the Li+ salt were then converted to the acrylate by reaction with acryloyl chloride and copolymerized with polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether acrylate (Mn = 454, n = 8) (PAE8-co-E3SO3Li);

45

Quantum ether: photons and electrons from a rotor model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give an example of a purely bosonic model -- a rotor model on the 3D cubic lattice -- whose low energy excitations behave like massless U(1) gauge bosons and massless Dirac fermions. This model can be viewed as a ``quantum ether'': a medium that gives rise to both photons and electrons. It illustrates a general mechanism for the emergence of gauge bosons and fermions known as ``string-net condensation.'' Other, more complex, string-net condensed models can have excitations that behave like gluons, quarks and other particles in the standard model. This suggests that photons, electrons and other elementary particles may have a unified origin: string-net condensation in our vacuum.

Michael Levin; Xiao-Gang Wen

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

46

DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as, field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. Their strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. The bulk of the efforts over the past year were focused on the conversion of the campus shuttle bus. This process, started in August 2001, took until April 2002 to complete. The process culminated in an event to celebrate the launching of the shuttle bus on DME-diesel operation on April 19, 2002. The design of the system on the shuttle bus was patterned after the system developed in the engine laboratory, but also was subjected to a rigorous failure modes effects analysis (FMEA, referred to by Air Products as a ''HAZOP'' analysis) with help from Dr. James Hansel of Air Products. The result of this FMEA was the addition of layers of redundancy and over-pressure protection to the system on the shuttle bus. The system became operational in February 2002. Preliminary emissions tests and basic operation of the shuttle bus took place at the Pennsylvania Transportation Institute's test track facility near the University Park airport. After modification and optimization of the system on the bus, operation on the campus shuttle route began in early June 2002. However, the work and challenges continued as it has been difficult to maintain operability of the shuttle bus due to fuel and component difficulties. In late June 2002, the pump head itself developed operational problems (loss of smooth function) leading to excessive stress on the magnetic coupling and excessive current draw to operate. A new pump head was installed on the system to alleviate this problem and the shuttle bus operated successfully on DME blends from 10-25 vol% on the shuttle bus loop until September 30, 2002. During the period of operation on the campus loop, the bus was pulled from service, operated at the PTI test track and real-time emissions measurements were obtained using an on-board emissions analyzer from Clean Air Technologies International, Inc. Particulate emissions reductions of 60% and 80% were observed at DME blend ratios of 12 vol.% and 25 vol.%, respectively, as the bus was operated over the Orange County driving cycle. Increases in NOx, CO and HC emissions were observed, however. In summary, the conversion of the shuttle bus was successfully accomplished, particulate emissions reductions were observed, but there were operational challenges in the field. Nonetheless, they were able to demonstrate reliable operation of the shuttle bus on DME-diesel blends.

Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Jennifer Stefanik; Howard Glunt; Andre L. Boehman; Allen Homan; David Klinikowski

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Hydrogen Oxidation Catalysis by a Nickel Diphosphine Complex with Pendant tert-Butyl Amines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A bis-diphosphine nickel complex with t-butyl functionalized pendant amines [Ni(PCy2Nt-Bu2)2]2+ has been synthesized. It is a highly active electrocatalyst for the oxidation of hydrogen in the presence of base. The turn-over rate of 50 s 1 under 1.0 atm H2 at a potential of –0.77 V vs the ferrocene couple is 5 times faster than the rate reported heretofore for any other molecular H2 oxidation catalyst. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy. Computational resources were provided by the Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL) and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Yang, Jenny Y.; Chen, Shentan; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; Bullock, R. Morris; DuBois, Daniel L.; Raugei, Simone; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dupuis, Michel; Rakowski DuBois, Mary

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

48

Method for photochemical reduction of uranyl nitrate by tri-N-butyl phosphate and application of this method to nuclear fuel reprocessing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Uranyl ion in solution in tri-n-butyl phosphate is readily photochemically reduced to U(IV). The product U(IV) may effectively be used in the Purex process for treating spent nuclear fuels to reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III). The Pu(III) is readily separated from uranium in solution in the tri-n-butyl phosphate by an aqueous strip.

De Poorter, Gerald L. (Los Alamos, NM); Rofer-De Poorter, Cheryl K. (Los Alamos, NM)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Lithium Hexamethyldisilazide-Mediated Ketone Enolization: The Influence of Hindered Dialkyl Ethers and Isostructural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lithium Hexamethyldisilazide-Mediated Ketone Enolization: The Influence of Hindered Dialkyl Ethers of the enolization of 2-methylcyclohexanone mediated by lithium hexameth- yldisilazide (LiHMDS; TMS2NLi) solvated- bine to make lithium hexamethyldisilazide (LiHMDS) one of the most important Bro¨nsted bases in organic

Collum, David B.

50

Direct synthesis of dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas containing oxygen gas considering of biomass gasfication gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed appropriate and excellent catalysts for direct DME synthesis from syngas. The catalysts, Cu-Zn/Al2O3 catalysts prepared by the sol-gel method, produce DME with high DME activity and high DME selectivity with long ... Keywords: DME, biomass, catalyst, clean fuel, dimethyl ether, direct synthesis, gasification gas, hydrogen, sol-gel method, syngas

Kaoru Takeishi; Akane Arase

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Initiation Temperature for Runaway Tri-n-Butyl Phosphate/Nitric Acid Reaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During a review of the H-Canyon authorization basis, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) staff members questioned the margin of safety associated with a postulated tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/nitric acid runaway reaction due to the inadvertent heating of a canyon tank containing greater than 3000 lbs (1362 kg) of TBP. The margin of safety was partially based on experiments and calculations performed by the Actinide Technology Section (ATS) to support deletion of indication of tank agitation as a Safety Class System. In the technical basis for deletion of this system, ATS personnel conservatively calculated the equilibrium temperature distribution of a canyon tank containing TBP and nitric acid layers which were inadvertently heated by a steam jet left on following a transfer. The maximum calculated temperature (128 degrees C) was compared to the minimum initiation temperature for a runaway reaction (greater than 130 degrees C) documented by experimental work in the mid 195 0s. In this work, the initiation temperature as a function of nitric acid concentration was measured for 0 and 20 wt percent dissolved solids. The DNFSB staff members were concerned that data for 0 wt percent dissolved solids were not conservative given the facts that data for 20 wt percent dissolved solids show initiation temperatures at or below 130 degrees C and H-Canyon solutions normally contained a small amount of dissolved solids.

Rudisill, T.S.

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

52

Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Tri-n-Butyl-Phophate Liquid: A Force Field Comparative Study  

SciTech Connect

Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were conducted to compare the performance of four force fields in predicting thermophysical properties of tri-n-butyl-phosphate (TBP) in the liquid phase. The intramolecular force parameters used were from the Assisted Model Building with Energy Refinement (AMBER) force field model. The van der Waals parameters were based on either the AMBER or the Optimized Potential for Liquid Simulation (OPLS) force fields. The atomic partial charges were either assigned by performing quantum chemistry calculations or utilized previously published data, and were scaled to approximate the average experimental value of the electric dipole moment. Canonical ensemble computations based on the aforementioned parameters were performed near the atmospheric pressure and temperature to obtain the electric dipole moment, mass density, and self-diffusion coefficient. In addition, the microscopic structure of the liquid was characterized via pair correlation functions between selected atoms. It has been demonstrated that the electric dipole moment can be approximated within 1% of the average experimental value by virtue of scaled atomic partial charges. The liquid mass density can be predicted within 0.5-1% of its experimentally determined value when using the corresponding charge scaling. However, in all cases the predicted self- diffusion coefficient is significantly smaller than a commonly quoted experimental measurement; this result is qualified by the fact that the uncertainty of the experimental value was not available.

Cui, Shengting [ORNL; de Almeida, Valmor F [ORNL; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL; Ye, Xianggui [ORNL; Khomami, Bamin [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Assessment of ether and alcohol fuels from coal. Volume 2. Technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A unique route for the indirect liquefaction of coal to produce transportation fuel has been evaluated. The resultant fuel includes alkyl tertiary alkyl ethers and higher alcohols, all in the gasoline boiling range. When blended into gasoline, the ether fuel provides several advantages over the lower alcohols: (1) lower chemical oxygen content, (2) less-severe water-separation problems, and (3) reduced front-end volatility effects. The ether fuel also has high-octane quality. Further, it can be utilized as a gasoline substitute in all proportions. Production of ether fuel combines several steps, all of which are or have been practiced on an industrial scale: (1) coal gasification, (2) gas cleanup and shift to desired H/sub 2/:CO ratio, (3) conversion of synthesis gas to isobutanol, methanol, and higher alcohols, (4) separation of alcohols, (5) chemical dehydration of isobutanol to isobutylene, and (6) etherification of isobutylene with methanol. A pilot-plant investigation of the isobutanol synthesis step was performed. Estimates of ether-fuel manufacturing costs indicate this process route is significantly more costly than synthesis of methanol. However, the fuel performance features provide incentive for developing the necessary process and catalyst improvements. Co-production of higher-molecular-weight co-solvent alcohols represents a less-drastic form of methanol modification to achieve improvement in the performance of methanol-gasoline blends. Costs were estimated for producing several proportions of methanol plus higher alcohols from coal. Estimated fuel selling price increases regularly but modestly with higher alcohol content.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Butyl benzyl phthalate suppresses the ATP-induced cell proliferation in human osteosarcoma HOS cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), an endocrine disruptor present in the environment, exerts its genomic effects via intracellular steroid receptors and elicits non-genomic effects by interfering with membrane ion-channel receptors. We previously found that BBP blocks the calcium signaling coupled with P2X receptors in PC12 cells (Liu and Chen, 2006). Osteoblast P2X receptors were recently reported to play a role in cell proliferation and bone remodeling. In this present study, the effects of BBP on ATP-induced responses were investigated in human osteosarcoma HOS cells. These receptors mRNA had been detected, named P2X4, P2X7, P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y5, P2Y9, and P2Y11, in human osteosarcoma HOS cells by RT-PCR. The enhancement of cell proliferation and the decrease of cytoviability had both been shown to be coupled to stimulation via different concentrations of ATP. BBP suppressed the ATP-induced calcium influx (mainly coupled with P2X) and cell proliferation but not the ATP-induced intracellular calcium release (mainly coupled with P2Y) and cytotoxicity in human osteosarcoma HOS cells. Suramin, a common P2 receptor's antagonist, blocked the ATP-induced calcium signaling, cell proliferation, and cytotoxicity. We suggest that P2X is mainly responsible for cell proliferation, and P2Y might be partially responsible for the observed cytotoxicity. BBP suppressed the calcium signaling coupled with P2X, suppressing cell proliferation. Since the importance of P2X receptors during bone metastasis has recently become apparent, the possible toxic risk of environmental BBP during bone remodeling is a public problem of concern.

Liu, P.-S., E-mail: pslediting@mail.scu.edu.t [Department of Microbiology, Soochow University, Shihlin, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, C.-Y. [Department of Microbiology, Soochow University, Shihlin, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Process to convert biomass and refuse derived fuel to ethers and/or alcohols  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conversion of a feedstock selected from the group consisting of biomass and refuse derived fuel (RDF) to provide reformulated gasoline components comprising a substantial amount of materials selected from the group consisting of ethers, alcohols, or mixtures thereof, comprising: drying said feedstock; subjecting said dried feedstock to fast pyrolysis using a vortex reactor or other means; catalytically cracking vapors resulting from said pyrolysis using a zeolite catalyst; condensing any aromatic byproduct fraction; catalytically alkylating any benzene present in said vapors after condensation; catalytically oligomerizing any remaining ethylene and propylene to higher olefins; isomerizing said olefins to reactive iso-olefins; and catalytically reacting said iso-olefins with an alcohol to form ethers or with water to form alcohols.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO); Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Rejai, Bahman (Lakewood, CO); Bain, Richard L. (Golden, CO); Overend, Ralph P. (Lakewood, CO)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Process to convert biomass and refuse derived fuel to ethers and/or alcohols  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for conversion of a feedstock selected from the group consisting of biomass and refuse derived fuel (RDF) to provide reformulated gasoline components comprising a substantial amount of materials selected from the group consisting of ethers, alcohols, or mixtures thereof, comprising: drying said feedstock; subjecting said dried feedstock to fast pyrolysis using a vortex reactor or other means; catalytically cracking vapors resulting from said pyrolysis using a zeolite catalyst; condensing any aromatic byproduct fraction; catalytically alkylating any benzene present in said vapors after condensation; catalytically oligomerizing any remaining ethylene and propylene to higher olefins; isomerizing said olefins to reactive iso-olefins; and catalytically reacting said iso-olefins with an alcohol to form ethers or with water to form alcohols. 35 figs.

Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.; Chum, H.L.; Evans, R.J.; Rejai, B.; Bain, R.L.; Overend, R.P.

1996-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

57

Modeling the Nanophase Structural Dynamics of Phenylated Sulfonated Poly Ether Ether Ketone Ketone (Ph-SPEEKK) Membranes as a Function of Hydration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solvated phenylated sulfonated poly ether ether ketone ketone (Ph-SPEEKK) membranes in the presence of hydronium ions were modeled by classical molecular dynamics simulations. The characterization of the nanophase structure and dynamics of such membranes was carried out as a function of the water content lambda, where lambda is the number of water molecules per sulfonate group, for lambda values of 3.5, 6, 11, 25, and 40. Analysis of pair correlation functions supports the experimental observation of membrane swelling upon hydration as well the increase in water and hydronium ion diffusion with increasing lambda. While the average number of hydrogen bonds between hydronium ions and sulfonate groups is dramatically affected by the hydration level, the average lifetime of the hydrogen bonds remains essentially constant. The membrane is found to be relatively rigid and its overall flexibility shows little dependence on water content. Compared to Nafion, water and ion diffusion coefficients are considerably smaller at lower hydration levels and room temperature. However, at higher lambda values of 25 and 40 these coefficients are comparable to those in Nafion at a lambda value of 16. This study also shows that water diffusion in Ph-SPEEKK membranes at low hydration levels can be significantly improved by raising the temperature with important implications for proton conductivity.

Lins, Roberto D.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Dupuis, Michel

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

58

2' and 3' Carboranyl uridines and their diethyl ether adducts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is disclosed a process for preparing carboranyl uridine nucleoside compounds and their diethyl ether adducts, which exhibit a tenfold increase in boron content over prior art boron containing nucleoside compounds. Said carboranyl uridine nucleoside compounds exhibit enhanced lipophilicity and hydrophilic properties adequate to enable solvation in aqueous media for subsequent incorporation of said compounds in methods for boron neutron capture therapy in mammalian tumor cells.

Soloway, Albert H. (Worthington, OH); Barth, Rolf F. (Columbus, OH); Anisuzzaman, Abul K. (Columbus, OH); Alam, Fazlul (Anaheim, CA); Tjarks, Werner (Columbus, OH)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

2[prime] and 3[prime] Carboranyl uridines and their diethyl ether adducts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for preparing carboranyl uridine nucleoside compounds and their diethyl ether adducts, which exhibit a tenfold increase in boron content over prior art boron containing nucleoside compounds. The carboranyl uridine nucleoside compounds exhibit enhanced lipophilicity and hydrophilic properties adequate to enable solvation in aqueous media for subsequent incorporation of the compounds in methods for boron neutron capture therapy in mammalian tumor cells. No Drawings

Soloway, A.H.; Barth, R.F.; Anisuzzaman, A.K.; Alam, F.; Tjarks, W.

1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Research Article Rapeseed Oil Monoester of Ethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether as a New Biodiesel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright © 2011 Jiang Dayong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. A novel biodiesel named rapeseed oil monoester of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether is developed. This fuel has one more ester group than the traditional biodiesel. The fuel was synthesized and structurally identified through FT-IR and P 1P H NMR analyses. Engine test results show that when a tested diesel engine is fueled with this biodiesel in place of 0 # diesel fuel, engine-out smoke emissions can be decreased by 25.0%–75.0%, CO emissions can be reduced by 50.0%, and unburned HC emissions are lessened significantly. However, NOx emissions generally do not change noticeably. In the area of combustion performance, both engine in-cylinder pressure and its changing rate with crankshaft angle are increased to some extent. Rapeseed oil monoester of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether has a much higher cetane number and shorter ignition delay, leading to autoignition 1.1 ? CA earlier than diesel fuel during engine operation. Because of certain amount of oxygen contained in the new biodiesel, the engine thermal efficiency is improved 13.5%–20.4 % when fueled with the biodiesel compared with diesel fuel. 1.

Jiang Dayong; Wang Xuanjun; Liu Shuguang; Guo Hejun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Calixarene crown ether solvent composition and use thereof for extraction of cesium from alkaline waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solvent composition and corresponding method for extracting cesium (Cs) from aqueous neutral and alkaline solutions containing Cs and perhaps other competing metal ions is described. The method entails contacting an aqueous Cs-containing solution with a solvent consisting of a specific class of lipophilic calix[4]arene-crown ether extractants dissolved in a hydrocarbon-based diluent containing a specific class of alkyl-aromatic ether alcohols as modifiers. The cesium values are subsequently recovered from the extractant, and the solvent subsequently recycled, by contacting the Cs-containing organic solution with an aqueous stripping solution. This combined extraction and stripping method is especially useful as a process for removal of the radionuclide cesium-137 from highly alkaline waste solutions which are also very concentrated in sodium and potassium. No pre-treatment of the waste solution is necessary, and the cesium can be recovered using a safe and inexpensive stripping process using water, dilute (millimolar) acid solutions, or dilute (millimolar) salt solutions. An important application for this invention would be treatment of alkaline nuclear tank wastes. Alternatively, the invention could be applied to decontamination of acidic reprocessing wastes containing cesium-137.

Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN); Presley, Derek J. (Ooltewah, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Commercial-scale demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process. Peroxide formation of dimethyl ether in methanol mixtures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Organic peroxides could form when dimethyl ether in methanol is stored for three to six months at a time. The objective of this work was to determine the level of peroxide formation from dimethyl ether in reagent grade methanol and raw methanol at room temperature under 3 atmospheres (45 psig) of air. Raw methanol is methanol made from syngas by the LPMEOH Process without distillation. Aliphatic ethers tend to react slowly with oxygen from the air to form unstable peroxides. However, there are no reports on peroxide formation from dimethyl ether. After 172 days of testing, dimethyl ether in either reagent methanol or raw methanol at room temperature and under 60--70 psig pressure of air does not form detectable peroxides. Lack of detectable peroxides suggests that dimethyl ether or dimethyl ether and methanol may be stored at ambient conditions. Since the compositions of {approximately} 1.3 mol% or {approximately} 4.5 mol% dimethyl ether in methanol do not form peroxides, these compositions can be considered for diesel fuel or an atmospheric turbine fuel, respectively.

Waller, F.J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Exhaust Emissions and Combustion Performances of Rapeseed Oil Monoester of Ethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether as a Novel Biodiesel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a novel biodiesel named rapeseed oil monoester of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether has been developed, which has one more ester group than traditional biodiesel. It was synthesized and structurally identified through FT-IR, 1H NMR analyses. ... Keywords: component, rapeseed oil monoester, synthesis, exhaust emissions, combustion performances

Jiang Dayong; Wang Xuanjun; Wang Wenguo; Han Qilong

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Process for the production of ethylidene diacetate from dimethyl ether using a heterogeneous catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process for producing ethylidene diacetate by the reaction of dimethyl ether, acetic acid, hydrogen and carbon monoxide at elevated temperatures and pressures in the presence of an alkyl halide and a heterogeneous, bifunctional catalyst that is stable to hydrogenation and comprises an insoluble polymer having pendant quaternized heteroatoms, some of which heteroatoms are ionically bonded to anionic Group VIII metal complexes, the remainder of the heteroatoms being bonded to iodide. In contrast to prior art processes, no accelerator (promoter) is necessary to achieve the catalytic reaction and the products are easily separated from the catalyst by filtration. The catalyst can be recycled for 3 consecutive runs without loss in activity.

Ramprasad, D.; Waller, F.J.

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

65

Process for the production of ethylidene diacetate from dimethyl ether using a heterogeneous catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a process for producing ethylidene diacetate by the reaction of dimethyl ether, acetic acid, hydrogen and carbon monoxide at elevated temperatures and pressures in the presence of an alkyl halide and a heterogeneous, bifunctional catalyst that is stable to hydrogenation and comprises an insoluble polymer having pendant quaternized heteroatoms, some of which heteroatoms are ionically bonded to anionic Group VIII metal complexes, the remainder of the heteroatoms being bonded to iodide. In contrast to prior art processes, no accelerator (promoter) is necessary to achieve the catalytic reaction and the products are easily separated from the catalyst by filtration. The catalyst can be recycled for 3 consecutive runs without loss in activity.

Ramprasad, Dorai (Allentown, PA); Waller, Francis Joseph (Allentown, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Use of aluminum phosphate as the dehydration catalyst in single step dimethyl ether process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present invention pertains to a process for the coproduction of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) directly from a synthesis gas in a single step (hereafter, the "single step DME process"). In this process, the synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon oxides is contacted with a dual catalyst system comprising a physical mixture of a methanol synthesis catalyst and a methanol dehydration catalyst. The present invention is an improvement to this process for providing an active and stable catalyst system. The improvement comprises the use of an aluminum phosphate based catalyst as the methanol dehydration catalyst. Due to its moderate acidity, such a catalyst avoids the coke formation and catalyst interaction problems associated with the conventional dual catalyst systems taught for the single step DME process.

Peng, Xiang-Dong (Allentown, PA); Parris, Gene E. (Coopersburg, PA); Toseland, Bernard A. (Allentown, PA); Battavio, Paula J. (Allentown, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Hydrogen production from the steam reforming of Dinethyl Ether and Methanol  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates dimethyl ether (DME) steam reforming for the generation of hydrogen rich fuel cell feeds for fuel cell applications. Methanol has long been considered as a fuel for the generation of hydrogen rich fuel cell feeds due to its high energy density, low reforming temperature, and zero impurity content. However, it has not been accepted as the fuel of choice due its current limited availability, toxicity and corrosiveness. While methanol steam reforming for the generation of hydrogen rich fuel cell feeds has been extensively studied, the steam reforming of DME, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} + 3H{sub 2}O = 2CO{sub 2} + 6H{sub 2}, has had limited research effort. DME is the simplest ether (CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}) and is a gas at ambient conditions. DME has physical properties similar to those of LPG fuels (i.e. propane and butane), resulting in similar storage and handling considerations. DME is currently used as an aerosol propellant and has been considercd as a diesel substitute due to the reduced NOx, SOx and particulate emissions. DME is also being considered as a substitute for LPG fuels, which is used extensively in Asia as a fuel for heating and cooking, and naptha, which is used for power generation. The potential advantages of both methanol and DME include low reforming temperature, decreased fuel proccssor startup energy, environmentally benign, visible flame, high heating value, and ease of storage and transportation. In addition, DME has the added advantages of low toxicity and being non-corrosive. Consequently, DME may be an ideal candidate for the generation of hydrogen rich fuel cell feeds for both automotive and portable power applications. The steam reforming of DME has been demonstrated to occur through a pair of reactions in series, where the first reaction is DME hydration followed by MeOH steam reforming to produce a hydrogen rich stream.

Semelsberger, T. A. (Troy A.); Borup, R. L. (Rodney L.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Understanding the redox shuttle stability of 3,5-di-tert-butyl-1,2-dimethoxybenzene for overcharge protection of lithium-ion batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

3,5-di-tert-butyl-1,2-dimethoxybenzene (DBDB) has been synthesized as a new redox shuttle additive for overcharge protection of lithium-ion batteries. DBDB can easily dissolve in carbonate-based electrolytes, which facilitates its practical use in lithium-ion batteries; however, it has poor electrochemical stability compared to 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-dimethoxybenzene (DDB). The structures of DBDB and DDB were investigated using X-ray crystallography and density functional calculations. The structures differ in the conformations of the alkoxy bonds probably due to the formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bond in the case of DBDB. We investigated reaction energies for decomposition pathways of neutral DBDB and DDB and their radical cations and found little difference in the reaction energies, although it is clear that kinetically, decomposition of DBDB is more favorable.

Zhang, Z.; Zhang, L.; Schlueter, J. A.; Redfern, P. C.; Curtiss, L.; Amine, K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Identification of volatile butyl rubber thermal-oxidative degradation products by cryofocusing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical structure and physical properties of materials, such as polymers, can be altered as aging progresses, which may result in a material that is ineffective for its envisioned intent. Butyl rubber formulations, starting material, and additives were aged under thermal-oxidative conditions for up to 413 total days at up to 124 %C2%B0C. Samples included: two formulations developed at Kansas City Plant (KCP) (%236 and %2310), one commercially available formulation (%2321), Laxness bromobutyl 2030 starting material, and two additives (polyethylene AC-617 and Vanax MBM). The low-molecular weight volatile thermal-oxidative degradation products that collected in the headspace over the samples were preconcentrated, separated, and detected using cryofocusing gas chromatography mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS). The majority of identified degradation species were alkanes, alkenes, alcohols, ketones, and aldehydes. Observations for Butyl %2310 aged in an oxygen-18 enriched atmosphere (18O2) were used to verify when the source of oxygen in the applicable degradation products was from the gaseous environment rather than the polymeric mixture. For comparison purposes, Butyl %2310 was also aged under non-oxidative thermal conditions using an argon atmosphere.

Smith, Jonell Nicole; White, Michael Irvin; Bernstein, Robert; Hochrein, James Michael

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in leachates from selected landfill sites in South Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The last few decades have seen dramatic growth in the scale of production and the use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) as flame retardants. Consequently, PBDEs such as BDE -28, -47, -66, -71, -75, -77, -85, -99, -100, -119, -138, -153, -154, and -183 have been detected in various environmental matrices. Generally, in South Africa, once the products containing these chemicals have outlived their usefulness, they are discarded into landfill sites. Consequently, the levels of PBDEs in leachates from landfill sites may give an indication of the general exposure and use of these compounds. The present study was aimed at determining the occurrence and concentrations of most common PBDEs in leachates from selected landfill sites. The extraction capacities of the solvents were also tested. Spiked landfill leachate samples were used for the recovery tests. Separation and determination of the PBDE congeners were carried out with a gas chromatograph equipped with Ni{sup 63} electron capture detector. The mean percentage recoveries ranged from 63% to 108% (n = 3) for landfill leachate samples with petroleum ether giving the highest percentage extraction. The mean concentrations of PBDEs obtained ranged from ND to 2670 pg l{sup -1}, ND to 6638 pg l{sup -1}, ND to 7230 pg l{sup -1}, 41 to 4009 pg l{sup -1}, 90 to 9793 pg l{sup -1} for the Garankuwa, Hatherly, Kwaggarsrand, Soshanguve and Temba landfill sites, respectively. Also BDE -28, -47, -71 and BDE-77 were detected in the leachate samples from all the landfill sites; and all the congeners were detected in two of the oldest landfill sites. The peak concentrations were recorded for BDE-47 at three sites and BDE-71 and BDE-75 at two sites. The highest concentration, 9793 {+-} 1.5 pg l{sup -1}, was obtained for the Temba landfill site with the highest BOD value. This may suggest some influence of organics on the level of PBDEs. Considering the leaching characteristics of brominated flame retardants, there is a high possibility that with time these compounds may infiltrate into the groundwater around the sites since most of the sites are not adequately lined.

Odusanya, David O. [Department of Environmental, Water and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, 175 Nelson Mandela Drive, Arcadia, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Okonkwo, Jonathan O. [Department of Environmental, Water and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, 175 Nelson Mandela Drive, Arcadia, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)], E-mail: OkonkwoOJ@tut.ac.za; Botha, Ben [Department of Environmental, Water and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X680, 175 Nelson Mandela Drive, Arcadia, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Mechanistic Investigation of Acid-Catalyzed Cleavage of Aryl-Ether Linkages: Implications for Lignin Depolymerization  

SciTech Connect

Carbon-oxygen bonds are the primary inter-monomer linkages lignin polymers in plant cell walls, and as such, catalyst development to cleave these linkages is of paramount importance to deconstruct biomass to its constituent monomers for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. For many decades, acid catalysis has been used to depolymerize lignin. Lignin is a primary component of plant cell walls, which is connected primarily by aryl-ether linkages, and the mechanism of its deconstruction by acid is not well understood, likely due to its heterogeneous and complex nature compared to cellulose. For effective biomass conversion strategies, utilization of lignin is of significant relevance and as such understanding the mechanisms of catalytic lignin deconstruction to constituent monomers and oligomers is of keen interest. Here, we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the acid catalysis of a range of dimeric species exhibiting the b-O-4 linkage, the most common inter-monomer linkage in lignin. We demonstrate that the presence of a phenolic species dramatically increases the rate of cleavage in acid at 150 degrees C. Quantum mechanical calculations on dimers with the para-hydroxyl group demonstrate that this acid-catalyzed pathway differs from the nonphenolic dimmers. Importantly, this result implies that depolymerization of native lignin in the plant cell wall will proceed via an unzipping mechanism wherein b-O-4 linkages will be cleaved from the ends of the branched, polymer chains inwards toward the center of the polymer. To test this hypothesis further, we synthesized a homopolymer of b-O-4 with a phenolic hydroxyl group, and demonstrate that it is cleaved in acid from the end containing the phenolic hydroxyl group. This result suggests that genetic modifications to lignin biosynthesis pathways in plants that will enable lower severity processes to fractionate lignin for upgrading and for easier access to the carbohydrate fraction of the plant cell wall.

Sturgeon, M. R.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The lightness of being: mass, ether, and unification of the forces  

SciTech Connect

How can an electron be both a wave and a particle? At the same time? Because it is a quantum field. That key insight seems to be underappreciated, given the awe and mysticism that permeate most nontechnical discussions of modern physics. Perhaps the root of the problem is that most popularizations of quantum mechanics and of particle physics shy away from quantized fields, the natural language for microscopic phenomena. In 'The Lightness of Being: Mass, Ether, and the Unification of Forces', Frank Wilczek confronts quantum field theory head on, demystifying not only wave-particle duality but also the origin of mass for hadrons (that is, everyday matter). Wilczek is the Herman Feshbach Professor of Physics at MIT and a co-recipient of the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics. His research has spanned almost all aspects of theoretical particle physics, with significant forays into condensed-matter physics and dense nuclear matter (condensed quark matter, one might say). Recurring themes are the richness of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the alluring ideas of unification. His breadth and depth make him a sought after speaker for colloquia and public lectures. Wilczek also contributes an occasional Reference Frame column to 'Physics Today'. The material in 'The Lightness of Being' reflects the scope of the author's research. The book consists of three parts: the quantum fields of QCD (the ether that makes mass), gravitation (the ether that feels mass), and unification. Part 1, which traces notions of mass from Isaac Newton's time through theoretical and computational results of the past 40 years, is the most substantial and original; it is rich, modern, and rooted in observed phenomena. Part 2 continues in the same vein as it connects gravity, also an observed phenomenon, to QCD. Part 3 is more conventional, for a popularization of particle physics, in its focus on speculative ideas that (still) await direct experimental tests. Readers of 'Physics Today' will know that Wilczek can write with wit, grace, and an uncanny facility for using lightweight language to express heavy-duty ideas. They will find much of that kind of writing in 'The Lightness of Being'. Wilczek addresses subtle ideas with vim and vigor. He avoids some of the jargon of quantum field theory; for example, he calls the vertex in a Feynman diagram a hub. In more ambitious terminology, he refers to space-filling, everfluctuating quantum fields--be they electrons, quarks, gluons, or gravity--as 'the Grid'. The term is supposed to be short and familiar, evoking the ubiquitous electric grid (and soon-to-beubiquitous computing grid). It also, for the expert, cleverly alludes to lattice gauge theory. Indeed, after vividly explaining how the dynamics of QCD and the constraints of Heisenberg uncertainty conspire to create mass from the Grid, Wilczek emphasizes that the picture is backed by lattice QCD computations of 'heroic' proportions. Unfortunately, too much of 'The Lightness' is laden with clunky affectation: silly names (a pulsed electron accelerator is called the 'ultrastroboscopic nanomicroscope'), sophomoric jokes ('hadron' is 'not a typo'), references to pop culture (Wilczek might have called quantum fields 'the Matrix, but the sequels tarnished that candidate'), and many pointless footnotes. In a public lecture the audience may guffaw at such jokes, but on the printed page they fall flat. Wilczek explains physics so well that the inappropriate humor is the biggest unexplained puzzle of the book. It is fine to be silly, even crude, as long as the reader's path to understanding is made easier. A joke can inform with an unexpected perspective or simply give the mind a pause to refresh. Some of the humor achieves such aims, but too many gags impede the pace of the otherwise fine exposition. Three appendices, a glossary, and a set of endnotes are crisp and sober. They are excellent. 'The Lightness of Being' is not unbearable, but it is weighed down with too much clutter to rank as a masterpiece. It's a pity: Wilczek's best writing--some of it in this book--is l

Kronfeld, Andreas S.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Separation of Dimethyl Ether from Syn-Gas Components by Poly(dimethylsiloxane) and Poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Permeability and selectivity in gas transport through poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) (TPX) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) using variable temperature mixed gas experiments is reported. Selected gases include H2, CO, CH4, CO2, and dimethyl ether (DME). The DME data is the first to be reported through these membranes. In this paper, the chosen polymers reflect both rubbery and crystalline materials. Rubbery polymers tend to be weakly size sieving, which, in this work, has resulted in larger permeabilities, lower separation factors, and lower activation energies of permeation (Ep). Conversely, the crystalline TPX membranes showed much greater sensitivity to penetrant size; although the gas condensability also played a role in transport.

Christopher J. Orme; Frederick F. Stewart

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Synthesis of Cyclic Aza-Ether Compounds and Studies of Their Use as Anion Receptors in Non-Aqueous Lithium Halide Salt Solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of new anion receptors, based on cyclic aza-ether compounds, have been synthesized. In all of these cyclic aza-ether compounds, the electron-withdrawing group CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2} was attached to each of the nitrogen atoms. When used as additives, all of them can significantly increase the ionic conductivity of lithium halide salts in THF solutions. This is due to the complexation between these compounds and halide anions. Ionic conductivity studies show that the complexation behavior is related to both the ring structure of the cyclic compounds and the characteristics of the halide anions. X-ray diffraction data show that the diffraction patterns of the complex crystals are different from the pure cyclic aza-ether compounds. New Bragg peaks representing a large d-spacing ({approx}15 {angstrom}) are observed for the complex crystals which provides a clear evidence for complexation.

Lee, H. S.; Sun, X.; Yang, X. Q.; McBreen, J.; Callahan, J. H.; Choi, L. S.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Impact of Renewable Fuels Standard/MTBE Provisions of S. 517 Requested by Sens. Daschle & Murkowski  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Additional analysis of the impact of the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) ban provisions of S. 517.

Information Center

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Impact of Renewable Fuels Standard/MTBE Provisions of S.1766  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

SR/OIAF/2002-06 Release date: March 2002 This report analyzes the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS)/methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) provisions of S. 1766.

77

xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a
real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Mathematical simulation and X-ray diffraction investigation of the crystal structure of 1-phenyl-1-tert-butyl-3-methyl-1,3-dihydroisobenzofuran  

SciTech Connect

An algorithm for using a priori generation of crystal structures by the discrete modeling method for the interpretation of data obtained from single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments is considered. The crystal structure of 1-phenyl-1-tert-butyl-3-methyl-1,3-dihydroisobenzofuran is mathematically simulated using the discrete modeling of molecular packings and studied by X-ray diffraction. The simulation is performed for two isomers of the initial chemical compound that are possible from the viewpoint of the mechanism of the chemical reaction used in the synthesis of this compound. Appropriate models that can serve as starting models for solving and refining the crystal structure with the use of X-ray diffraction data are chosen from a complete set of calculated structural models in accordance with specific criteria. The structure is solved using a starting model calculated using the discrete modeling method and refined by the full-matrix least-squares procedure.

Maleev, A. V., E-mail: andr_mal@mail.ru; Zhitkov, I. K.; Potekhin, K. A. [Vladimir State Pedagogical University (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Effect of Time dealumination and Solvent Concentration in Synthesis of Zeolite Catalyst and Catalytic Test for DiEthyl Ether Production Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ethanol is an alternative energy, but its has three distinct disadvantages as a transportation fuel. Its availability is currently limited, and it has a lower volumetric heating value and a lower Reid vapour pressure (RVP) than gasoline. This paper focuses for this disadvantages and to solve this problem can do with converts ethanol to DiEthyl Ether product. This research produced DiEthyl Ether by ethanol dehydration process with zeolite as catalyst. The catalyst synthesis from natural material from District Gunung Kidul, Indonesia. The catalyst produced with dealumination, neutralization, drying and calcination processes. The zeolite catalyst was analysed of Si/Al, X-ray Diffraction and specific surface area. The catalyst product then used for ethanol dehydration to produce DiEthyl Ether. The results shown the biggest surface area is 184,52 m{sup 2}/gram at catalyst production at 10 hours for time dealumination. The crystallite of catalyst product is similar like shown at diffractogram of XRD analysis. The ratio Si/Al biggest is 313.7 that obtaining at catalyst production with 7 hours for time dealumination. The catalytic test use fixed bed reactor with 1 inci diameter and ethanol fermentation both as feed. The operation condition is 150 deg. C at temperature and atmosphere pressure. The compounds product in liquid phase are diethyl ether, methanol and water.

Widayat [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Diponegoro University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Industry Technology Institute of Technology Sepuluh Nopember Surabaya Indonesia, Kampus Sukolilo Surabaya Indonesia (Indonesia); Roesyadi, A.; Rachimoellah, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Industry Technology Institute of Technology Sepuluh Nopember Surabaya Indonesia, Kampus Sukolilo Surabaya Indonesia (Indonesia)

2009-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

83

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 10.5 Estimated Number of Alternative-Fueled Vehicles in Use and Fuel Consumption, 1992-2010 Year Alternative and Replacement Fuels 1 Liquefied Petroleum Gases Compressed Natural Gas Liquefied Natural Gas Methanol, 85 Percent (M85) 3 Methanol, Neat (M100) 4 Ethanol, 85 Percent (E85) 3,5 Ethanol, 95 Percent (E95) 3 Elec- tricity 6 Hydro- gen Other Fuels 7 Subtotal Oxygenates 2 Bio- diesel 10 Total Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether 8 Ethanol in Gasohol 9 Total Alternative-Fueled Vehicles in Use 11 (number) 1992 NA 23,191 90 4,850 404 172 38 1,607 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1993 NA 32,714 299 10,263 414 441 27 1,690 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1994 NA 41,227 484 15,484 415 605 33 2,224 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1995 172,806 50,218 603 18,319 386 1,527

84

Single-Step Syngas-to-Distillates (S2D) Synthesis via Methanol and Dimethyl Ether Intermediates: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the work was to enhance price-competitive, synthesis gas (syngas)-based production of transportation fuels that are directly compatible with the existing vehicle fleet (i.e., vehicles fueled by gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, etc.). To accomplish this, modifications to the traditional methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process were investigated. In this study, we investigated direct conversion of syngas to distillates using methanol and dimethyl ether intermediates. For this application, a Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 (PdZnAl) catalyst previously developed for methanol steam reforming was evaluated. The PdZnAl catalyst was shown to be far superior to a conventional copper-based methanol catalyst when operated at relatively high temperatures (i.e., >300°C), which is necessary for MTG-type applications. Catalytic performance was evaluated through parametric studies. Process conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas-hour-space velocity, and syngas feed ratio (i.e., hydrogen:carbon monoxide) were investigated. PdZnAl catalyst formulation also was optimized to maximize conversion and selectivity to methanol and dimethyl ether while suppressing methane formation. Thus, a PdZn/Al2O3 catalyst optimized for methanol and dimethyl ether formation was developed through combined catalytic material and process parameter exploration. However, even after compositional optimization, a significant amount of undesirable carbon dioxide was produced (formed via the water-gas-shift reaction), and some degree of methane formation could not be completely avoided. Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 used in combination with ZSM-5 was investigated for direct syngas-to-distillates conversion. High conversion was achieved as thermodynamic constraints are alleviated when methanol and dimethyl are intermediates for hydrocarbon formation. When methanol and/or dimethyl ether are products formed separately, equilibrium restrictions occur. Thermodynamic relaxation also enables the use of lower operating pressures than what would be allowed for methanol synthesis alone. Aromatic-rich hydrocarbon liquid (C5+), containing a significant amount of methylated benzenes, was produced under these conditions. However, selectivity control to liquid hydrocarbons was difficult to achieve. Carbon dioxide and methane formation was problematic. Furthermore, saturation of the olefinic intermediates formed in the zeolite, and necessary for gasoline production, occurred over PdZnAl. Thus, yield to desirable hydrocarbon liquid product was limited. Evaluation of other oxygenate-producing catalysts could possibly lead to future advances. Potential exists with discovery of other types of catalysts that suppress carbon dioxide and light hydrocarbon formation. Comparative techno-economics for a single-step syngas-to-distillates process and a more conventional MTG-type process were investigated. Results suggest operating and capital cost savings could only modestly be achieved, given future improvements to catalyst performance. Sensitivity analysis indicated that increased single-pass yield to hydrocarbon liquid is a primary need for this process to achieve cost competiveness.

Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; King, David L.; Zhu, Yunhua; Gray, Michel J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Biddy, Mary J.; Hallen, Richard T.; Wang, Yong; White, James F.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Palo, Daniel R.

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

85

Effect of Gradient Sequencing on Copolymer Order?Disorder Transitions: Phase Behavior of Styrene/n-Butyl Acrylate Block and Gradient Copolymers  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the effect of gradient sequence distribution in copolymers on order-disorder transitions, using rheometry and small-angle X-ray scattering to compare the phase behavior of styrene/n-butyl acrylate (S/nBA) block and gradient copolymers. Relative to block sequencing, gradient sequencing increases the molecular weight necessary to induce phase segregation by over 3-fold, directly consistent with previous predictions from theory. Results also suggest the existence of both upper and lower order-disorder transitions in a higher molecular weight S/nBA gradient copolymer, made accessible by the shift in order-disorder temperatures from gradient sequencing. The combination of transitions is speculated to be inaccessible in S/nBA block copolymer systems due to their overlap at even modest molecular weights and also their location on the phase diagram relative to the polystyrene glass transition temperature. Finally, we discuss the potential impacts of polydispersity and chain-to-chain monomer sequence variation on gradient copolymer phase segregation.

Mok, Michelle M.; Ellison, Christopher J.; Torkelson, John M. (NWU); (UMM)

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

86

Liver Hypertrophy After Percutaneous Portal Vein Embolization: Comparison of N-Butyl-2-Cyanocrylate Versus Sodium Acrylate-Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer Particles in a Swine Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Percutaneous portal vein embolization (PPVE) induces hypertrophy of the future liver remnant before hepatic resection. The ideal embolic material has not yet been determined. We compared N-butyl-2-cyanocrylate (NBCA) with sodium acrylate-vinyl alcohol copolymer particles using a swine model. Materials and Methods: Twelve pigs underwent PPVE. Six pigs (group A) were embolized with NBCA, and 6 pigs (group B) were embolized with sodium acrylate-vinyl alcohol copolymer particles. Computed tomographic volumetry of the embolized lobe (EL) and the nonembolized lobe (NEL), along with liver function tests, was performed before and at 14 and 28 days after embolization. Tissue samples from both lobes were taken 14 and 28 days after PPVE. Results: NEL-volume and NEL-ratio increases were significantly higher in group A at 14 and 28 days after PPVE (78 and 52% and 91 and 66%, respectively) than in group B (32 and 12% and 28 and 10%, respectively) (p < 0.05). Percent change of the EL-volume was significantly higher for group A at 28 days after PPVE. No statistically significant difference was found between the groups regarding hepatocyte proliferation on the NEL and apoptosis on the EL at both time intervals. Conclusion: PPVE using NBCA is more efficient and causes more NEL hypertrophy than microspheres.

Tsoumakidou, Georgia, E-mail: gtsoumakidou@yahoo.com [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 2nd Department of Radiology, Medical School, General University Hospital Attikon (Greece); Theocharis, Stamatis, E-mail: theocharis@ath.forthnet.gr [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Department of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology, Medical School (Greece); Ptohis, Nikolaos, E-mail: nikptohis@yahoo.gr; Alexopoulou, Efthimia, E-mail: ealex64@hotmail.com [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 2nd Department of Radiology, Medical School, General University Hospital Attikon (Greece); Mantziaras, George, E-mail: gmantziaras@yahoo.com [Academy of Athens, Biomedical Research Foundation (Greece); Kelekis, Nikolaos L., E-mail: kelnik@med.uoa.gr; Brountzos, Elias N., E-mail: ebrountz@med.uoa.gr [National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 2nd Department of Radiology, Medical School, General University Hospital Attikon (Greece)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Heat Capacity Uncertainty Calculation for the Eutectic Mixture of Biphenyl/Diphenyl Ether Used as Heat Transfer Fluid: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of this study was to calculate the uncertainty at 95% confidence for the experimental values of heat capacity of the eutectic mixture of biphenyl/diphenyl ether (Therminol VP-1) determined from 300 to 370 degrees C. Twenty-five samples were evaluated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to obtain the sample heat flow as a function of temperature. The ASTM E-1269-05 standard was used to determine the heat capacity using DSC evaluations. High-pressure crucibles were employed to contain the sample in the liquid state without vaporizing. Sample handling has a significant impact on the random uncertainty. It was determined that the fluid is difficult to handle, and a high variability of the data was produced. The heat capacity of Therminol VP-1 between 300 and 370 degrees C was measured to be equal to 0.0025T+0.8672 with an uncertainty of +/- 0.074 J/g.K (3.09%) at 95% confidence with T (temperature) in Kelvin.

Gomez, J. C.; Glatzmaier, G. C.; Mehos, M.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Electrochemical Investigation of Li-Al Anodes in Oligo (ethylene glycol) Dimethyl ether/LiPF6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

LiPF{sub 6} dissolved in oligo(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether with a molecular weight 5 g mol{sup -1} was investigated as a new electrolyte (OEGDME5, 1 M LiPF{sub 6}) for metal deposition and battery applications. At 25 C a conductivity of .48 x 1{sup -3} S cm{sup -1} was obtained and at 85 C, 3.78 x 1{sup -3} S cm{sup -1}. The apparent activation barrier for ionic transport was evaluated to be 3.7 kJ mol{sup -1}. OEGDME5, 1 M LiPF{sub 6} allows operating temperature above 1 C with very attractive conductivity. The electrolyte shows excellent performance at negative and positive potentials. With this investigation, we report experimental results obtained with aluminum electrodes using this electrolyte. At low current densities lithium ion reduction and re-oxidation can be achieved on aluminum electrodes at potentials about 28 mV more positive than on lithium electrodes. In situ X-ray diffraction measurements collected during electrochemical lithium deposition on aluminum electrodes show that the shift to positive potentials is due to the negative Gibbs free energy change of the Li-Al alloy formation reaction.

Y Zhou; X Wang; H Lee; K Nam; X Yang; O Haas

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

Electrochemical Investigation of Li–Al Anodes in Oligo(ethylene glycol) Dimethyl Ether/LiPF6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

1 M LiPF{sub 6} dissolved in oligo(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether with a molecular weight 500 g mol{sup -1} was investigated as a new electrolyte (OEGDME500, 1 M LiPF{sub 6}) for metal deposition and battery applications. At 25 C a conductivity of 0.48 x 10{sup -3} S cm{sup -1} was obtained and at 85 C, 3.78 x 10{sup -3} S cm{sup -1}. The apparent activation barrier for ionic transport was evaluated to be 30.7 kJ mol{sup -1}. OEGDME500, 1 M LiPF{sub 6} allows operating temperature above 100 C with very attractive conductivity. The electrolyte shows excellent performance at negative and positive potentials. With this investigation, we report experimental results obtained with aluminum electrodes using this electrolyte. At low current densities lithium ion reduction and re-oxidation can be achieved on aluminum electrodes at potentials about 280 mV more positive than on lithium electrodes. In situ X-ray diffraction measurements collected during electrochemical lithium deposition on aluminum electrodes show that the shift to positive potentials is due to the negative Gibbs free energy change of the Li-Al alloy formation reaction.

Zhou, Y.N.; Yang, X.; Wang, X.J.; Lee, H.S.; Nam, K.W.; Haas, O.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Is Embolization of the Pancreas Safe? Pancreatic Histological Changes after Selective Transcatheter Arterial Embolization with N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate in a Swine Model  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the safety of selective transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) in a swine model in terms of histological changes in the pancreas. Methods: Three groups of two female swine (58-64 kg) per group underwent TAE of the dorsal pancreatic artery, under anesthesia, with 1:1, 1:4, and 1:9 mixtures of NBCA and iodized oil. Blood parameters were evaluated at days 1, 4, and 10 after TAE, after which the animals were sacrificed and pancreatic tissues were examined under light microscopy. Results: All of the animals were asymptomatic and survived for 10 days. Cone beam computed tomographic angiography revealed occlusion of the dorsal pancreatic artery and no enhancement in the embolized area. The white blood cell count and C-reactive protein level were elevated slightly on day 1 after TAE (mean {+-} SD: 252.7 {+-} 27.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 2}/{mu}l and 0.15 {+-} 0.07 mg/l, respectively), but they normalized or remained near the upper normal limit thereafter. The serum amylase and lipase levels also were elevated on day 1 (8831.7 {+-} 2169.2 U/l and 130 {+-} 53.4 U/l, respectively) but normalized thereafter. Histologically, necrosis and fibrosis were noted only in the embolized segment, and necrosis and acute inflammatory reactions were absent in the nonembolized segment. The border between both segments was well defined. Lymphocytic infiltration and foreign body reaction were noted around the embolized vessels. Conclusions: Selective TAE with NBCA in the pancreas caused localized ischemic necrosis without clinically significant pancreatitis; therefore, this procedure is tolerable in swine.

Okada, Takuya, E-mail: okabone@gmail.com; Yamaguchi, Masato [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Takahashi, Takuya [Kobe Red Cross Hospital, Department of Pathology (Japan); Izaki, Kenta; Uotani, Kensuke; Sakamoto, Noriaki; Sugimura, Kazuro; Sugimoto, Koji [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Challenges for Na-ion Negative Electrodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Na-ion batteries have been proposed as candidates for replacing Li-ion batteries. In this paper we examine the viability of Na-ion negative electrode materials based on Na alloys or hard carbons in terms of volumetric ...

Chevrier, V. L.

92

NA-54 IPR Production | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NA-54 IPR Production NA-54 IPR Production NA-54 IPR Production More Documents & Publications Accelerating Clean-up at Savannah River DOE EIR FM.doc Project Annex for IPR...

93

Results from NA61/SHINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we summarize recent results from NA61/SHINE relevant for heavy ion physics, neutrino oscillations and the interpretation of air showers induced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays.

Unger, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Auto-ignition during instationary jet evolution of dimethyl ether (DME) in a high-pressure atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The auto-ignition process during transient injection of gaseous dimethyl ether (DME) in a constant high-pressure atmosphere is studied experimentally by laser-optical methods and compared with numerical calculations. With different non-intrusive measurement techniques jet properties and auto-ignition are investigated at high temporal and spatial resolution. The open jet penetrates a constant pressure oxidative atmosphere of up to 4 MPa. During the transient evolution, the fuel jet entrains air at up to 720 K. The subsequent auto-ignition of the ignitable part of the jet occurs simultaneously over a wide spatial extension. The ignition delay times are not affected by variation of the nozzle exit velocity. Thus, the low-temperature oxidation is slow compared with the shorter time scales of mixing, so that chemical kinetics is dominating the process. The typical two-stage ignition is resolved optically with high-speed shadowgraphy at a sampling rate of 10 kHz. The 2D fields of jet velocity and transient mixture fraction are measured phase-coupled with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Tracer Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) during the time-frame of ignition. The instationary Probability Density Functions (PDF) of mixture fraction are described very well by Beta functions within the complete area of the open jet. Additional 1D flamelet simulations of the auto-ignition process are computed with a detailed reaction mechanism for DME [S. Fischer, F. Dryer, H. Curran, Int. J. Chem. Kinet. 32 (12) (2000) 713-740; H. Curran, S. Fischer, F. Dryer, Int. J. Chem. Kinet. 32 (12) (2000) 741-759]. Calculated ignition delay times are in very good agreement with the measured mean ignition delay times of 3 ms. Supplemental flamelet simulations address the influence of DME and air temperature, pressure and strain. Underneath a critical strain rate the air temperature is identified to be the most sensitive factor on ignition delay time. (author)

Fast, G.; Kuhn, D.; Class, A.G. [Institut fuer Kern- und Energietechnik, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Weberstrasse 5, D-76133 Karlsruhe (Germany); Maas, U. [Institut fuer Technische Thermodynamik, Universitat Karlsruhe (TH), Kaiserstrasse 12, D-76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Altered cardiovascular reactivity and osmoregulation during hyperosmotic stress in adult rats developmentally exposed to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and the structurally similar chemicals polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) disrupt the function of multiple endocrine systems. PCBs and PBDEs disrupt the secretion of vasopressin (VP) from the hypothalamus during osmotic activation. Since the peripheral and central vasopressinergic axes are critical for osmotic and cardiovascular regulation, we examined whether perinatal PBDE exposure could impact these functions during physiological activation. Rats were perinatally dosed with a commercial PBDE mixture, DE-71. Dams were given 0 (corn oil control), 1.7 (low dose) or 30.6 mg/kg/day (high dose) in corn oil from gestational day (GD) 6 through postnatal day (PND) 21 by oral gavage. In the male offspring exposed to high dose PBDE plasma thyroxine and triiodothyronine levels were reduced at PND 21 and recovered to control levels by PND 60 when thyroid stimulating hormone levels were elevated. At 14-18 months of age, cardiovascular responses were measured in four groups of rats: Normal (Oil, normosmotic condition), Hyper (Oil, hyperosmotic stress), Hyper PBDE low (1.7 mg/kg/day DE-71 perinatally, hyperosmotic stress), and Hyper PBDE high (30.6 mg/kg/day DE-71 perinatally, hyperosmotic stress). Systolic blood pressure (BP), diastolic BP, and heart rate (HR) were determined using tail cuff sphygmomanometry and normalized to pretreatment values (baseline) measured under basal conditions. Hyperosmotic treatment yielded significant changes in systolic BP in PBDE exposed rats only. Hyper PBDE low and high dose rats showed 36.1 and 64.7% greater systolic BP responses at 3 h post hyperosmotic injection relative to pretreatment baseline, respectively. No treatment effects were measured for diastolic BP and HR. Hyper and Hyper PBDE rats showed increased mean plasma osmolality values by 45 min after injection relative to normosmotic controls. In contrast to Hyper rats, Hyper PBDE (high) rats showed a further increase in mean plasma osmolality at 3 h (358.3 {+-} 12.4 mOsm/L) relative to 45 min post hyperosmotic injection (325.1 {+-} 11.4 mOsm/L). Impaired osmoregulation in PBDE-treated animals could not be attributed to decreased levels of plasma vasopressin. Our findings suggest that developmental exposure to PBDEs may disrupt cardiovascular reactivity and osmoregulatory responses to physiological activation in late adulthood. - Highlights: > We examined whether PBDE exposure could impact osmotic and cardiovascular regulation. > Hyperosmotic treatment yielded significant changes in systolic BP in PBDE exposed rats only. > PBDEs may disrupt cardiovascular and osmoregulatory responses to physiological activation.

Shah, Ashini [Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, 92521 (United States); Coburn, Cary G. [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, University of California, Riverside, 92521 (United States); Watson-Siriboe, Abena; Whitley, Rebecca; Shahidzadeh, Anoush; Gillard, Elizabeth R.; Nichol, Robert [Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, 92521 (United States); Leon-Olea, Martha [Neuromorfologia Funcional, Direccion de Investigaciones en Neurociencias, Instituto Nacional de Psiquiatria Ramon de la Fuente Muniz, Mexico City (Mexico); Gaertner, Mark [Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, 92521 (United States); Kodavanti, Prasada Rao S. [Neurotoxicology Branch, NHEERL/ORD, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Curras-Collazo, Margarita C., E-mail: margarita.curras@ucr.edu [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, University of California, Riverside, 92521 (United States); Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, University of California, Riverside, 92521 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Synthesis of Methanol and Dimethyl Ether from Syngas over Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

A Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was developed for the synthesis of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas. Studied were temperatures of operation ranging from 250°C to 380°C. High temperatures (e.g. 380°C) are necessary when combining methanol and DME synthesis with a methanol to gasoline (MTG) process in a single reactor bed. A commercial Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst, utilized industrially for the synthesis of methanol at 220-280°C, suffers from a rapid deactivation when the reaction is conducted at high temperature (>320°C). On the contrary, a Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was found to be highly stable for methanol and DME synthesis at 380°C. The Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was thus further investigated for methanol and DME synthesis at P=34-69 bars, T= 250-380°C, GHSV= 5 000-18 000 h-1, and molar feeds H2/CO= 1, 2, and 3. Selectivity to DME increased with decreasing operating temperature, and increasing operating pressure. Increased GHSV’s and H2/CO syngas feed ratios also enhanced DME selectivity. Undesirable CH4 formation was observed, however, can be minimized through choice of process conditions and by catalyst design. By studying the effect of the Pd loading and the Pd:Zn molar ratio the formulation of the Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was optimized. A catalyst with 5% Pd and a Pd:Zn molar ratio of 0.25:1 has been identified as the preferred catalyst. Results indicate that PdZn particles are more active than Pdº particles for the synthesis of methanol and less active for CH4 formation. A correlation between DME selectivity and the concentration of acid sites of the catalysts has been established. Hence, two types of sites are required for the direct conversion of syngas to DME: 1) PdZn particles are active for the synthesis of methanol from syngas, and 2) acid sites which are active for the conversion of methanol to DME. Additionally, CO2 formation was problematic as PdZn was found to be active for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction, under all the conditions evaluated.

Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Dagle, Robert A.; Kovarik, Libor; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; King, David L.; Palo, Daniel R.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Deliquescence of NaCl-NaNO3 and KNO3-NaNO3 Salt Mixtures at 90C  

SciTech Connect

We conducted reversed deliquescence experiments in saturated NaCl-NaNO3-H2O and KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O systems at 90 C to determine relative humidity and solution composition. NaCl, NaNO{sub 3}, and KNO{sub 3} represent members of dust salt assemblages that are likely to deliquesce and form concentrated brines on high-level radioactive waste package surfaces in a repository environment at Yucca Mountain, NV, USA. Model predictions agree with experimental results for the NaCl-NaNO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O system, but underestimate relative humidity by as much as 8% and solution composition by as much as 50% in the KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O system.

Carroll, S; Craig, L; Wolery, T

2003-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

98

New Improved Equations For Na-K, Na-Li And Sio2 Geothermometers...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improved Equations For Na-K, Na-Li And Sio2 Geothermometers By Outlier Detection And Rejection Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: New...

99

The Dow Chemical Company - NA System House ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Dow Chemical Company - NA System House - Wilmington. NVLAP Lab Code: 100210-0. Address and Contact Information: ...

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

100

Aquecimento Global e Mudança Climática na Amazônia:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

73 a 292. 1 Aquecimento Global e Mudana Climtica na Amaznia: Retroalimentao Clima-Vegetao e Impactos nos Recursos Hdricos Jos Marengo, 1 Carlos A. Nobre, 1...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Area: Period-Unit: Download Series History ... 51: 64: 59: 70: 70: 62: 2009-2013: Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) 41: 44: 49: 61: 49: 50: 2004-2013: Other ...

102

U.S. Oxygenate Production - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Area: Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History; Fuel Ethanol: 855: 877: 891: 868: 849: 852: 1981-2013: Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) 48: 55: 54: 51 ...

103

Radiation Chemistry of MTBE in Aqueous Solution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methyl-tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) in Aqueous Solution Stephen P. Mezyk, Jace Jones, William J. Cooper, Thomas Tobien, Michael G. Nickelsen, J. Wesley Adams, Kevin E. O'Shea, David M....

104

Preparations for Meeting New York and Connecticut MTBE Bans  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In response to a Congressional request, EIA examined the progress being made to meet the bans on the use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) being implemented in New York and Connecticut at the end of 2003.

Joanne Shore

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

35461,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,152,"MOTOR GAS, OTHER FINISHED"...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TERTIARY BUTYL ETHER (MTBE)",2809,"SANFRANCISCO, CA","CALIFORNIA",5,515,"KOREA, REPUBLIC OF",32,0,0,"WICKLAND OIL CO","SELBY TERM","CA","CALIFORNIA",5...

106

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NNSA NA-00 and NA-10  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Last printed 1/24/2013 10:50:00 AM Page 1 of 12 Last printed 1/24/2013 10:50:00 AM Page 1 of 12 Part 1. NA-00/NA-10/NA-15 Input Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report As of December 31, 2012 Reporting Offices: NNSA NA-10 HQ (including NA-15 inputs) and NA-00 (while transitioning to new organizational structure) Section One: Current Mission(s) of the Organization and Potential Changes NNSA Mission: To strengthen United States security through the military application of nuclear energy. NNSA Vision: To be an integrated nuclear security enterprise operating an efficient and agile nuclear weapons complex, recognized as preeminent in technical leadership and program management. Organizational Changes: NNSA is in the final phase of another re-organization that will split NA- 10 and establish an independent office, NA-00, to oversee the NNSA sites and other non-weapons-

107

New Improved Equations For Na-K, Na-Li And Sio2 Geothermometers By Outlier  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improved Equations For Na-K, Na-Li And Sio2 Geothermometers By Outlier Improved Equations For Na-K, Na-Li And Sio2 Geothermometers By Outlier Detection And Rejection Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: New Improved Equations For Na-K, Na-Li And Sio2 Geothermometers By Outlier Detection And Rejection Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We present new improved equations for three still widely used Na/K, Na/Li and SiO2 geothermometers (obtained by statistical treatment of the data and application of outlier detection and rejection as well as theory of error propagation) and compare them with those by Fournier and others. New equations are also developed for estimating errors associated with the use of these new geothermometric equations and comparing them with the performance of the original equations. The errors in the use of the new

108

E18: Synthesis and Mechanical Property of NaB 5 C Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A8: Microstructural Investigation of Nano-Calcium Phosphates Doped with Fluoride Ions .... D7: Surfactant Structure–property Relationship: Effect of Polypropylene ... E4: The Effect of Monobutyl Ether Ethylene Glycol on the Conductivity and ...

109

Electrochemical Investigation of Al–Li/LixFePO4 Cells in Oligo(ethylene glycol) Dimethyl Ether/LiPF6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

1 M LiPF{sub 6} dissolved in oligo(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether with a molecular weight, 500 g mol{sup -1} (OEGDME500, 1 M LiPF{sub 6}), was investigated as an electrolyte in experimental Al-Li/LiFePO{sub 4} cells. More than 60 cycles were achieved using this electrolyte in a Li-ion cell with an Al-Li alloy as an anode sandwiched between two Li x FePO{sub 4} electrodes (cathodes). Charging efficiencies of 96-100% and energy efficiencies of 86-89% were maintained during 60 cycles at low current densities. A theoretical investigation revealed that the specific energy can be increased up to 15% if conventional LiC{sub 6} anodes are replaced by Al-Li alloy electrodes. The specific energy and the energy density were calculated as a function of the active mass per electrode surface (charge density). The results reveal that for a charge density of 4 mAh cm{sup -2} about 160 mWh g{sup -1} can be reached with Al-Li/LiFePO{sub 4} batteries. Power limiting diffusion processes are discussed, and the power capability of Al-Li/LiFePO{sub 4} cells was experimentally evaluated using conventional electrolytes.

Wang, X.J.; Zhou, Y.N.; Lee, H.S.; Nam, K.W.; Yang, X.Q.; Haas, O.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Development of Low-Temperature Molten Na Batteries with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our novel battery system operates at temperatures near the melting point of Na metal, and employs a NaSICON ceramic primary electrolyte separator.

111

Workforce Statistics - NA 70 | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Blog Workforce Statistics - NA 70 Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > Workforce Statistics > Workforce Statistics - NA 70...

112

Workforce Statistics - NA MB | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Blog Workforce Statistics - NA MB Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > Workforce Statistics > Workforce Statistics - NA MB...

113

Workforce Statistics - NA 20 | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Blog Workforce Statistics - NA 20 Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > Workforce Statistics > Workforce Statistics - NA 20...

114

Workforce Statistics - NA 10 | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Blog Workforce Statistics - NA 10 Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > Workforce Statistics > Workforce Statistics - NA 10...

115

Workforce Statistics - NA EA | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Blog Workforce Statistics - NA EA Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > Workforce Statistics > Workforce Statistics - NA EA...

116

Workforce Statistics - NA-30 | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Blog Workforce Statistics - NA-30 Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > Workforce Statistics > Workforce Statistics - NA-30...

117

Workforce Statistics - NA 40 | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Blog Workforce Statistics - NA 40 Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > Workforce Statistics > Workforce Statistics - NA 40...

118

Workforce Statistics - NA GC | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Blog Workforce Statistics - NA GC Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > Workforce Statistics > Workforce Statistics - NA GC...

119

Workforce Statistics - NA 1 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Blog Workforce Statistics - NA 1 Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > Workforce Statistics > Workforce Statistics - NA 1...

120

Workforce Statistics - NA APM | National Nuclear Security Administrati...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Blog Workforce Statistics - NA APM Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > Workforce Statistics > Workforce Statistics - NA APM...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Workforce Statistics - NA SH | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Blog Workforce Statistics - NA SH Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > Workforce Statistics > Workforce Statistics - NA SH...

122

Workforce Statistics - NA 80 | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Blog Workforce Statistics - NA 80 Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > Workforce Statistics > Workforce Statistics - NA 80...

123

Workforce Statistics - NA IM | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Blog Workforce Statistics - NA IM Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > Workforce Statistics > Workforce Statistics - NA IM...

124

Transepithelial transport in cell culture: Stoichiometry of Na/phlorizin ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Membrane Biology. Transepithelial Transport in Cell Culture: Stoiehiometry of Na /Phlorizin Binding and Na/D-Glueose Cotransport. A Two-Step, Two-Sodium ...

125

Deliquescence of NaCl-NaNO3, KNO3-NaNO3, and NaCl-KNO3 Salt Mixtures From 90 to 120?C  

SciTech Connect

We conducted reversed deliquescence experiments in saturated NaCl-NaNO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O, KNO{sub 3}-NaNO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O, and NaCl-KNO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O systems from 90 to 120 C as a function of relative humidity and solution composition. NaCl, NaNO{sub 3}, and KNO{sub 3} represent members of dust salt assemblages that are likely to deliquesce and form concentrated brines on high-level radioactive waste package surfaces in a repository environment at Yucca Mountain, NV, USA. Discrepancy between model prediction and experimental code can be as high as 8% for relative humidity and 50% for dissolved ion concentration. The discrepancy is attributed primarily to the use of 25 C models for Cl-NO{sub 3} and K-NO{sub 3} ion interactions in the current Yucca Mountain Project high-temperature Pitzer model to describe the non-ideal behavior of these highly concentrated solutions.

Carroll, S A; Craig, L; Wolery, T J

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

126

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Na-ion Intercalation Electrodes for Na...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CAES Pumped Hydro Power Stationary 1 kW 100 kW 10 MW 1 GW 10 kW 1 MW 100 MW Li Ion Battery NaS, Na metal halide Vehicle Energy Density and Cost Lifetime and Capital Cost PHEV...

127

Anodic dissolution characteristics and electrochemical migration lifetimes of Sn solder in NaCl and Na2SO4 solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ water drop tests and anodic polarization tests of pure Sn solder were carried out in deaerated 0.001% NaCl and Na"2SO"4 solutions to determine the correlation between anodic dissolution characteristics and the electrochemical migration lifetime. ... Keywords: Anodic dissolution, Electrochemical migration, Life time, Na2SO4, NaCl, Sn solder

Ja-Young Jung; Shin-Bok Lee; Young-Chang Joo; Ho-Young Lee; Young-Bae Park

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20).

129

Advanced Intermediate-Temperature Na-S Battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we reported an intermediate-temperature (~150°C) sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery. With a reduced operating temperature, this novel battery can potentially reduce the cost and safety issues associated with the conventional high-temperature (300~350°C) Na-S battery. A dense ?"-Al2O3 solid membrane and tetraglyme were utilized as the electrolyte separator and catholyte solvent in this battery. Solubility tests indicated that cathode mixture of Na2S4 and S exhibited extremely high solubility in tetraglyme (e.g., > 4.1 M for Na2S4 + 4 S). CV scans of Na2S4 in tetraglyme revealed two pairs of redox couples with peaks at around 2.22 and 1.75 V, corresponding to the redox reactions of polysulfide species. The discharge/charge profiles of the Na-S battery showed a slope region and a plateau, indicating multiple steps and cell reactions. In-situ Raman measurements during battery operation suggested that polysulfide species were formed in the sequence of Na2S5 + S ? Na2S5 + Na2S4? Na2S4 + Na2S2 during discharge and in a reverse order during charge. This battery showed dramatic improvement in rate capacity and cycling stability over room-temperature Na-S batteries, which makes it attractive for renewable energy integration and other grid related applications.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Kirby, Brent W.; Xu, Wu; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo (Gary)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Densities and viscosities for binary mixtures of N-methyldiethanolamine + triethylene glycol monomethyl ether from 25 C to 70 C and N-methyldiethanolamine + ethanol mixtures at 40 C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent studies done on the absorption and desorption of acid gases (CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S) from natural gas, petroleum, and ammonia synthesis streams have shown that aqueous solutions of N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) can be used effectively for the selective removal of H{sub 2}S. This paper reports the measured values of the density and viscosity of binary mixtures of N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and triethylene glycol monomethyl ether (TEGMME) at five temperatures in the range 25 C to 70 C over the whole concentration range. The authors also report the density and viscosity of the binary mixture MDEA + ethanol at 40 C. The results are compared with data for aqueous mixtures and other alkanolamines when these are available. The derived excess molar volumes and viscosity deviations were correlated as a function of composition. The Grunberg-Nissan interaction energy constants are also reported.

Henni, A.; Maham, Y.; Tontiwachwuthikul, P.; Chakma, A.; Mather, A.E.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Workforce Statistics - NA-30 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NA-30 | National Nuclear Security Administration NA-30 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Workforce Statistics - NA-30 Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > Workforce Statistics > Workforce Statistics - NA-30 Workforce Statistics - NA-30 Workforce Statistics - Naval Reactors

132

Workforce Statistics - NA 1 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

| National Nuclear Security Administration | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Workforce Statistics - NA 1 Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > Workforce Statistics > Workforce Statistics - NA 1 Workforce Statistics - NA 1 NA 1 FY12 NA 1 Semi Annual Report

133

Classes sociais e estilos de vida na sociedade brasileira.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??O objetivo principal deste trabalho é investigar a formação das classes sociais na sociedade brasileira como possíveis coletividades que balizam a sociabilidade cotidiana e configuram… (more)

Edison Ricardo Emiliano Bertoncelo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Workforce Statistics - NA 1 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Workforce Statistics - NA 1 Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights >...

135

Workforce Statistics - NA 20 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

20 | National Nuclear Security Administration 20 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Workforce Statistics - NA 20 Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > Workforce Statistics > Workforce Statistics - NA 20 Workforce Statistics - NA 20 NA 20 FY12 NA 20 Semi Annual Report

136

Workforce Statistics - NA 40 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

40 | National Nuclear Security Administration 40 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Workforce Statistics - NA 40 Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > Workforce Statistics > Workforce Statistics - NA 40 Workforce Statistics - NA 40 NA40 FY12 NA 40 Semi Annual Report

137

Workforce Statistics - NA 10 | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0 | National Nuclear Security Administration 0 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Workforce Statistics - NA 10 Home > About Us > Our Operations > Management and Budget > Office of Civil Rights > Workforce Statistics > Workforce Statistics - NA 10 Workforce Statistics - NA 10 NA 10 FY12 NA 10 Semi Annual Report

138

FCC LPG olefinicity and branching enhanced by octane catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Refiners are increasingly recognizing the downstream opportunities for fluid catalytic cracking LPG olefins for the production of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE, if the ethanol subsidy is extended to the production of ETBE), and as petrochemical feedstocks. Some of new gasoline FCC octane-enhancing catalysts can support those opportunities because their low non-framework alumina (low NFA) preserve both LPG olefinicity and promote branching of the LPG streams from the FCCU. The combined effect results in more isobutane for alkylate feed, more propylene in the propane/propylene stream, and more isobutene - which makes the addition of an MTBE unit very enticing.

Keyworth, D.A.; Reid, T.A.; Kreider, K.R.; Yatsu, C.A.

1989-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

139

EUV microexposures at the ALS using the 0.3-NA MET projection optics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

micro-exposure capabilities at the ALS using the 0.3-NA METEUV Microexposures at the ALS using the 0.3-NA MET Optic,”microexposures at the ALS using the 0.3-NA MET projection

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Analysis of NaOH releases for Hanford tank farms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The information contained in the canceled document is now located in the document: Consequence Analysis of a NaOH Solution Spray Release During Addition to Waste Tank, WHC-SD-WM-CN-065.

Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Status and plans of the NA61/SHINE physics program  

SciTech Connect

One of the NA61/SHINE experiment's goals is to discover the critical point of strongly interacting matter and study the properties of the onset of deconfinement. This is to be achieved by performing a two-dimensional phase diagram (T- Micro-Sign {sub B}) scan-measuring hadron production in collisions of various beam particles and targets at various beam energies. NA61/SHINE also collects data for the T2K experiment, which are just about to be published.

Czopowicz, T., E-mail: Tobiasz.Roman.Czopowicz@cern.ch [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics (Poland)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Sodium Sulfur (NaS) Battery Research in Korea: Part II ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The activities of sodium sulfur (NaS) battery research in Korea ... The presentation was focused on the development of tubular NaS batteries ...

143

Office of Civil Rights, NNSA, NA 1.2, Albuquerque Complex  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

http:hq.na.govocr Fiscal Year 2011 Year-End Workforce Diversity Assistant Deputy Administrator for Secure Transportation NA-15 OCR Functions: Technical advisory services...

144

High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity, Polymer-type Membranes Based on Disulfonated Poly(arylene ether) Block and Random Copolymers Optionally Incorporating Protonic Conducting Layered Water insoluble Zirconium Fillers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our research group has been engaged in the past few years in the synthesis of biphenol based partially disulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) random copolymers as potential PEMs. This series of polymers are named as BPSH-xx, where BP stands for biphenol, S stands for sulfonated, H stands for acidified and xx represents the degree of disulfonation. All of these sulfonated copolymers phase separate to form nano scale hydrophilic and hydrophobic morphological domains. The hydrophilic phase containing the sulfonic acid moieties causes the copolymer to absorb water. Water confined in hydrophilic pores in concert with the sulfonic acid groups serve the critical function of proton (ion) conduction and water transport in these systems. Both Nafion and BPSH show high proton conductivity at fully hydrated conditions. However proton transport is especially limited at low hydration level for the BPSH random copolymer. It has been observed that the diffusion coefficients of both water and protons change with the water content of the pore. This change in proton and water transport mechanisms with hydration level has been attributed to the solvation of the acid groups and the amount of bound and bulk-like water within a pore. At low hydration levels most of the water is tightly associated with sulfonic groups and has a low diffusion coefficient. This tends to encourage isolated domain morphology. Thus, although there may be significant concentrations of protons, the transport is limited by the discontinuous morphological structure. Hence the challenge lies in how to modify the chemistry of the polymers to obtain significant protonic conductivity at low hydration levels. This may be possible if one can alter the chemical structure to synthesize nanophase separated ion containing block copolymers. Unlike the BPSH copolymers, where the sulfonic acid groups are randomly distributed along the chain, the multiblock copolymers will feature an ordered sequence of hydrophilic and hydrophobic segments. If, like in Nafion, connectivity is established between the hydrophilic domains in these multiblock copolymers, they will not need as much water, and hence will show much better protonic conductivity than the random copolymers (with similar degree of sulfonation, or IEC) at partially hydrated conditions. The goal of this research is to develop a material suitable for use as a polymer electrolyte membrane which by the year 2010 will meet all the performance requirements associated with fuel cell operation at high temperatures and low relative humidity, and will out-perform the present standard Nafion{reg_sign}. In particular, it is our objective to extend our previous research based on the use of thermally, oxidatively, and hydrolytically, ductile, high Tg ion containing polymers based on poly(arylene ethers) to the production of polymer electrolyte membranes which will meet all the performance requirements in addition to having an areal resistance of < 0.05 ohm-cm{sup 2} at a temperature of up to 120 C, relative humidity of 25 to 50%, and up to 2.5 atm total pressure. In many instances, our materials already out performs Nafion{reg_sign}, and it is expected that with some modification by either combining with conductive inorganic fillers and/or synthesizing as a block copolymer it will meet the performance criteria at high temperatures and low relative humidity. A key component in improving the performance of the membranes (and in particular proton conductivity) and meeting the cost requirements of $40/m{sup 2} is our development of a film casting process, which shows promise for generation of void free thin films of uniform thickness with controlled polymer alignment and configuration.

McGrath, James E.; Baird, Donald G.

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

145

Comparative studies of etching mechanisms of CR-39 in NaOH/H2O and NaOH/ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of scission of the carbonate ester bond in CR-39 by the hydroxide ion through basic hydro- lysis of ester-39 detectors during etching in NaOH/ethanol has also shown that sodium car- bonate is present

Yu, K.N.

146

" East North Central",9.3,"NA",10.1,10.7,11.6,11.85822  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"NA",10,10.1,10.9,11.43527 "Urban Status" " Urban ",9.4,"NA",10.3,10.7,11.4,11.68803 " Rural ",9.3,"NA",10.1,10.4,11.6,12.8337 "Household Size" " 1 Person ",8.7,"NA",9.2,9,10.1,9....

147

DE-RP52-08NA28091  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8NA28091 8NA28091 [Submit in Volume I, TAB 2] Attachment L-1 Page 1 of 4 CORPORATE, PARTNERSHIP, JOINT VENTURE CERTIFICATES If the offer is submitted by a corporation, partnership or a Joint Venture, the applicable form provided on the following pages must be completed and submitted in Volume I of the proposal. In the alternative, other evidence must be submitted to substantiate the authority of the person signing the offer. If a corporation, the same officer shall not execute both the offer and the certificate. DE-RP52-08NA28091 [Submit in Volume I, TAB 2] Attachment L-1 Page 2 of 4 CORPORATE CERTIFICATE I, _______________________________________________, certify that I am the Secretary of the

148

Plant response to Na/sup +/, K/sup +/ and K/sup +//Na/sup +/ ratios under saline conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research was undertaken to more clearly determine plant response to saline-sodic waters. In the first experiment, the response of wheat and sorghum to different K/sup +//Na/sup +/ ratios at different osmotic potentials was investigated. The plants were grown in outdoor solution culture tanks containing polyethylene glycol and/or NaCl as osmoticum with 1/2 strength Hoagland as the base nutrient solution. The mass of the root system for both wheat and sorghum was determined primarily by the osmotic potential. However, root elongation was controlled primarily by the Na/sup +/ concentration. Sorghum root elongation rates decreased with increasing Na/sup +/ while those for wheat increased. Sodium was not translocated out of the sorghum root system until a critical Na/sup +/ root saturation level of .6 moles/kg was obtained. The second experiment was designed to investigate the water, nutrient and growth responses of the second crop of wheat in a wheat-sorghum-wheat rotation to zonal saline-sodic conditions.

Devitt, D.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans and polybrominated diphenyl ethers in soil, vegetation, workshop-floor dust, and electronic shredder residue from an electronic waste recycling facility and in soils from a chemical industrial complex in eastern China  

SciTech Connect

In this study, 11 2,3,7,8-substituted PBDD/Fs and 10 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners were determined in electronic shredder waste, workshop-floor dust, soil, and leaves (of plants on the grounds of the facility) from a large-scale electronic wastes (e-waste) recycling facility and in surface soil from a chemical-industrial complex (comprising a coke-oven plant, a coal-fired power plant, and a chlor-alkali plant) as well as agricultural areas in eastern China. Total PBDD/F concentrations in environmental samples were in the range of 113-818 pg/g dry wt (dw) for leaves, 392-18,500 pg/g dw for electronic shredder residues, 716-80,0000 pg/g dw for soil samples, and 89,600-14,3000 pg/g dw for workshop-floor dust from the e-waste recycling facility and in a range from nondetect (ND) to 427 pg/g dw in soil from the chemical-industrial complex. The highest mean concentrations of total PBDD/Fs were found in soil samples and workshop-floor dust from the e-waste recycling facility. The dioxin-like toxic equivalent (measured as TEQ) concentrations of PBDD/Fs were greater than the TEQs of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) reported in our previous study for the same set of samples. The concentrations of PBDFs were several orders of magnitude higher than the concentrations of PBDDs in samples from the e-waste facility or from soil from the chemical-industrial complex. A significant correlation was found between the concentrations of {Sigma}PBDD/Fs and {Sigma}PBDEs (r = 0.769, p < 0.01) and between SPBDD/Fs and the previously reported SPCDD/F concentrations (r = 0.805, p < 0.01). The estimated daily human intakes of TEQs contributed by PBDD/Fs via soil/dust ingestion and dermal exposures in e-waste recycling facilities were higher than the intakes of TEQs contributed by PCDD/Fs, calculated in our previous study. 45 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Jing Ma; Rudolf Addink; Sehun Yun; Jinping Cheng; Wenhua Wang; Kurunthachalam Kannan [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China). School of Environmental Science and Engineering

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Development of Supported Polymeric Liquid Membrane Technology for Aqueous MTBE Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of MTBE (methyl tert-butyl ether) as a gasoline additive has generated a serious, widespread groundwater contamination problem in California. This study evaluated the use of supported polymeric liquid membrane technology in the remediation of MTBE contaminated groundwater.

2002-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

151

Motor Gasoline Outlook and State MTBE Bans  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The U.S. is beginning the summer 2003 driving season with lower gasoline inventories and higher prices than last year. Recovery from this tight gasoline market could be made more difficult by impending State bans on the blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into gasoline that are scheduled to begin later this year.

Information Center

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Sealed Gravitational Capillary Viscometry of Dimethyl Ether ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Huber, and MO McLinden, NIST Standard Reference Database 23: Reference Fluid Thermodynamic and Transport Properties-REFPROP, Version ...

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

153

Sealed Gravitational Capillary Viscometry of Dimethyl Ether ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... RF Hafer, Viscosity of Fluorinated Propane Isomers. ... EW Lemmon, An Equation of State for the ... Dense Fluids, Plenum Press, New York and London ...

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

154

A Lepton Universality Test at CERN NA62 Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NA62 experiment at CERN collected a large sample of K+ --> enu decays during a dedicated run in 2007, aiming at a precise test of lepton universality by measurement of the helicity suppressed ratio RK = BR(K+ --> enu)/BR(K+ --> munu). A preliminary result of the analysis of a partial data sample of 51089 K+ --> enu candidates is presented.

Evgueni Goudzovski

2010-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

155

Development of alternative fuels from coal derived syngas. Topical report: Task 2.2, Demonstration of a one-step slurry-phase process for the production of dimethyl ether/methanol mixtures at the LaPorte Alternative Fuels Development Unit  

SciTech Connect

This report documents engineering, modification, and operations efforts of demonstration of dimethyl-ether/methanol coproduction in a slurry-phase reactor, carried out in a 2-ft diameter bubble column reactor. Equipment modifications made it possible to remove the product DME and by-product CO{sub 2} from the reactor effluent. Coproduction of dimethyl-ether (DME) and methanol (MeOH) was accomplished in the slurry reactor by physically mixing two different catalysts. The catalyst used to produce MeOH from syngas was manufactured by BASF (type S3-86); the catalyst used to convert MeOH to DME was Catapal {gamma}-alumina. Ratio of MeOH to DME catalysts determined the selectivity towards DME. The demonstration sought to study effect of cocatalyst ratio on product selectivity. Three different proportions of DME catalyst were examined: 0, 6.6, and 19.3 wt % alumina. At each catalyst proportion, the plant was operated at two different gas space velocities. Some process variables were maintained at fixed conditions; most important variables included: reactor temperature (482F), reactor pressure (750 psig), and reactor feed gas composition (35% H{sub 2}, 51% CO,13% CO{sub 2} 1% other, nominal-molar basis).

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ethanol Plant Production Ethanol Plant Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Fuel Ethanol An anhydrous alcohol (ethanol with less than 1% water) intended for gasoline blending as described in the Oxygenates definition. Oxygenates Substances which, when added to gasoline, increase the amount of oxygen in that gasoline blend. Ethanol, Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE), Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (ETBE), and methanol are common oxygenates. Fuel Ethanol: Blends of up to 10 percent by volume anhydrous ethanol (200 proof) (commonly referred to as the "gasohol waiver"). Methanol: Blends of methanol and gasoline-grade tertiary butyl alcohol (GTBA) such that the total oxygen content does not exceed 3.5 percent by weight and the ratio of methanol to GTBA is less than or equal to 1. It is also specified that this blended fuel must meet ASTM volatility specifications (commonly referred to as the "ARCO" waiver).

157

Advanced 0.3-NA EUV lithography capabilities at the ALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

micro-exposure capabilities at the ALS using the 0.3-NA METEUV Microexposures at the ALS using the 0.3-NA MET Optic,”EUV lithography capabilities at the ALS Patrick Naulleau 1 ,

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Physicochemical basis of the Na-K-Ca geothermometer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regular changes in solution composition were observed experimentally during granite reaction with dilute NaCl (+CaCl/sub 2/) solutions; these changes closely follow the empirical Na-K-Ca geothermometer relationship. Initial minerals forming the granite (quartz, plagioclase, K-feldspar, and biotite) were etched by the reactions. Alteration phases formed include calcium-zeolite at <300/sup 0/C, feldspar overgrowths at >300/sup 0/C, and minor amounts of clay and calcsilicate at all temperatures. Amphibole overgrowths were also found at 340/sup 0/C. Quartz is near saturation in all experiments, and preliminary calculations of aqueous species distributions and mineral affinities indicate that the solutions achieve super-saturation with feldspars as the temperature increase. A consistent variation attributable to pH differences was observed in the empirical geothermometer relationship for all experimental data. At 340/sup 0/C, the experimental solutions appear to have deviated slightly from the empirical Na-K-Ca relationship. Such deviations may also be found in natural systems that attain such temperatures.

Janecky, D.R.; Charles, R.W.; Bayhurst, G.K.; Benjamin, T.M.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Motor Gasoline Blending Components Movements by Tanker and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

160

Exports of Finished Motor Gasoline - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Imports of Total Motor Gasoline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

162

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Movements by Pipeline between PAD Districts  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

163

Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Movements by Tanker and Barge between PAD ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

164

Texas Gulf Coast Refinery Net Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

165

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Petrochemical Feedstocks Net Receipts ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

166

Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Reformulated Gasoline Blending ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

167

Blender Net Input of Reformulated GTAB Gasoline Blending ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether, RBOB ...

168

Refinery Net Input of All Other Oxygenates  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

169

Imports of Distillate Fuel Oil - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

170

Exports of Total Crude Oil and Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

171

Imports of Total Motor Gasoline - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

172

Exports of Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

173

Imports of Crude Oil, Commercial  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

174

Imports of Residual Fuel Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

175

From PADD 2 to PADD 3 Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, and Barge  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and ...

176

Imports of Fuel Ethanol  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

177

Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Ethane  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether, RBOB ...

178

Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Natural Gas Plant Liquids and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether, RBOB ...

179

Alaskan Crude Oil Receipts  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

180

Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Renewable Diesel Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether, RBOB ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Total Refinery Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

182

Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Fuel Ethanol  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether, RBOB ...

183

Refinery Net Input of Fuel Ethanol  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

184

Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Normal Butane  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether, RBOB ...

185

Refinery Net Input of Isobutane  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and ...

186

Refinery Net Input of Normal Butane  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and ...

187

Exports of Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and RBOB ...

188

Imports of Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and ...

189

Refinery Net Input of Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and ...

190

Alaskan Crude Oil Receipts  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether and ...

191

Measurements of NaI(Tl) electron response: comparison of different samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, Officeof Nonproliferation Research and Development (NA-22) of theof Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, Office of Nuclear

Hull, Giulia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a 5-day test of an electrochemical bench-scale apparatus using a proprietary (NAS-GY) material formulation of a (Na) Super Ion Conductor (NaSICON) membrane in a Large Area NaSICON Structures (LANS) configuration. The primary objectives of this work were to assess system performance, membrane seal integrity, and material degradation while removing Na from Group 5 and 6 tank waste from the Hanford Site.

Fountain, Matthew S.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Balagopal, S.; Bhavaraju, S.

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Estudo do desempenho de um compressor axial de vários estágios com injeção de água na sua entrada.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A simulação numérica de compressores axiais é de fundamental importância tanto na fase de projeto quanto na de desenvolvimento do compressor. A simulação numérica é… (more)

Luciano Porto Bontempo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Na(+)-H+ exchanger kinetics in adrenal glomerulosa cells and its activation by angiotensin II  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the kinetic properties of basal and angiotensin II (ANG II) stimulated Na(+)-H+ exchange in adrenal glomerulosa cells by measuring changes in cytosolic pH (pHi) and initial rates of 22Na uptake in the presence or absence of dimethylamiloride (DMA). The cells were studied under basal conditions, at constant pHi with varied external sodium (Na+o), and at varied pHi with constant Na+o (50 mM). In 2,7-biscarboxyethyl-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein loaded cells under basal conditions, pHi rose from 7.09 +/- 0.02 to 7.19 +/- 0.02. Similarly, DMA-sensitive Na influx was enhanced from 9.2 +/- 1.3 to 14.8 +/- 2.1 nmol Na+/mg protein x min (P less than 0.01) by ANG II. In cells acid-loaded by preincubation in Na(+)-free media (pHi 6.8), addition of varying Na+o resulted in a rapid H+ efflux that was markedly inhibited by DMA. DMA-sensitive Na+ influx into these acidified cells with varied Na+o exhibited a Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) of 23 mM and a maximum velocity (Vmax) of 43 nmol Na+/mg protein x min. By varying pHi (from pHi 7.1 to 6.2), DMA-sensitive Na+ influx likewise showed activation with cellular acidification with a pK at pHi 7.09. At pHi 6.8, ANG II decreased the Km for Na+o from 23 to 17 mM and increased the Vmax from 43 to 53 nmol Na+/mg protein x min. The pHi dependence of DMA-sensitive Na+ influx was not affected by ANG II (pK at pHi 7.03). DMA also inhibited AII-stimulated aldosterone secretion and Na+ influx similarly. These results indicate that Na(+)-H+ exchange in adrenal glomerulosa cells is functioning under basal conditions, and is modulated by ANG II with enhanced Na+o affinity and Vmax but without a shift in pHi dependence (similar to ANG II effects on vascular smooth muscle cells). These effects suggest an important role for Na(+)-H+ exchange during ANG II stimulation of aldosterone production by glomerulosa cells.

Conlin, P.R.; Kim, S.Y.; Williams, G.H.; Canessa, M.L. (Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

NA Standards | Valence Geometries | Bond Angles-Furanose Rings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

angles in Furanose Rings angles in Furanose Rings ----------------------------------------------------- ribose deoxyribose ----------------------------------------------------- angle mean esd N mean esd N value value ----------------------------------------------------- C1'-C2'-C3' 101.5 (0.9, 80) 102.7 (1.4, 47) C2'-C3'-C4' 102.7 (1.0, 80) 103.2 (1.0, 47) C3'-C4'-O4' 105.5 (1.4, 80) 105.6 (1.0, 47) C4'-O4'-C1' 109.6 (0.9, 80) 109.7 (1.4, 47) O4'-C1'-C2' 106.4 (1.4, 80) 106.1 (1.0, 47) C1'-C2'-O2' 110.6 (3.0, 80) na C3'-C2'-O2' 113.3 (2.9, 80) na C2'-C3'-O3' 111.0 (2.8, 80) 110.6 (2.7, 47) C4'-C3'-O3' 110.6 (2.6, 80) 110.3 (2.2, 47) C5'-C4'-C3' 115.5 (1.5, 80) 114.7 (1.5, 47)

196

Formation of titanate nanostructures under different NaOH concentration and their application in wastewater treatment  

SciTech Connect

The effects of the concentration of NaOH on the formation and transformation of various titanate nanostructures were studied. With increasing NaOH concentration, three different formation mechanisms were proposed. Nanotubes can only be obtained under moderate NaOH conditions, and should transform into nanowires with prolonged hydrothermal treatment, and their formation rate is accelerated by increasing NaOH concentration. Low concentration of NaOH results in the direct formation of nanowires, while extra high concentration of NaOH leads to the formation of amorphous nanoparticles. Adsorption and photocatalysis studies show that titanate nanowires and nanotubes might be potential adsorbents for the removal of both heavy metal ions and dyes and photocatalysts for the removal of dyes from wastewater. -- Graphical abstract: The morphologies of the titanates depend deeply on the concentration of NaOH. With increasing NaOH concentration, three different formation mechanisms were proposed. The application of these titanate nanostructures in the wastewater treatment was studied. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Effect of NaOH concentration on the structures of various titanates was reported. {yields} Three different formation mechanisms were presented with increasing NaOH concentration. {yields} Various titanates were used as adsorbents/photocatalysts in wastewater treatment.

Huang Jiquan [Key Lab of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Graduate school of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); Cao Yongge, E-mail: caoyongge@fjirsm.ac.c [Key Lab of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Deng Zhonghua; Tong Hao [Key Lab of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Cu2Sb thin films as anode for Na-ion batteries  

SciTech Connect

Cu2Sb thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering are evaluated as an anode material for Na-ion batteries. The starting material is composed of nanocrystallites with the desired tetragonal P4/nmm structure. The study of the reaction mechanism reveals the formation of an amorphous/nanocrystalline phase of composition close to Na3Sb as the final reaction product. The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) material is mostly composed of carbonates (Na2CO3, NaCO3R). The Cu2Sb anode possesses moderate capacity retention with a reversible storage capacity (250 mAh/g) close to the theoretical value (323 mAh/g), an average reaction potential of around 0.55 V vs. Na/Na+, and a high rate performance (10 C-rate).

Baggetto, Loic [ORNL; Allcorn, Eric [University of Texas, Austin; Manthiram, Arumugam [University of Texas, Austin; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

NA-ASC-100R-04-Vol.1-Rev.0  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

100R-04-Vol.1-Rev.0 100R-04-Vol.1-Rev.0 August 2004 SAND 2004-3740P Issued by Sandia National Laboratories for NNSA's Office of Advanced Simulation & Computing, NA-114. For more information, contact Dr. Dimitri Kusnezov at dimitri.kusnezov@nnsa.doe.gov ON THE COVER: These experimental images show the evolution of three gaseous cylinders (seeded with a tracer gas) that have been accelerated by a planar shock wave. The flow fields are dominated by vortices created by the shock acceleration, so the swirling red flows are the SF6 gas being entrained by the vortices. The yellow is air. Each photo consists of two snapshots of the flow at two times (with time interval about 200 microseconds). These images are produced by a laser-induced fluorescence technique. In each image the structures are traveling from left to right at speeds of 100 m/s.

199

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NNSA NA-40  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Reporting Office: NNSA NA-40 Section One - Current Mission (s) of the Organization and Potential Changes. 1. The Office of Emergency Operations (NA-40) administers and directs DOE and NNSA programs for emergency response capabilities to ensure availability and viability to respond to emergencies at DOE and NNSA facilities and field sites, and to nuclear and radiological emergencies within the United States and abroad. NA-40 is also responsible for the development of Departmental policy and guidance, technical assistance, and supporting implementation of emergency management planning, preparedness, readiness assurance, and response activities within DOE and NNSA. 2. NA-40 has no nuclear or radiological facilities under its cognizance; however,

200

Arquitetura ODP-CIM aplicada na previsão distribuída da carga do sistema elétrico de potência.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??O presente trabalho apresenta a utilização do modelo CIM ? Common Information Model com uma abordagem ODP ? Open and Distributed Processing na definição de… (more)

Mário Roberto Bastos

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

2011 Annual Planning Summary for NNSA, Infrastructure and Environment (NA-50)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within NNSA, Infrastructure and Environment (NA-50).

202

Validação externa da metodologia de análise focada na decisão : o caso da "SEAB Paraná".  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Esta pesquisa tem como objetivo validar externamente a Metodologia da Análise Focada na Decisão (AFD) desenvolvida por Santos, Becker e Fisher (1998) a partir do… (more)

Luiz Roberto de Souza

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

High Energy Density Na-S/NiCl2 Hybrid Battery  

SciTech Connect

High temperature (250-350°C) sodium-beta alumina batteries (NBBs) are attractive energy storage devices for renewable energy integration and other grid related applications. Currently, two technologies are commercially available in NBBs, e.g., sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery and sodium-metal halide (ZEBRA) batteries. In this study, we investigated the combination of these two chemistries with a mixed cathode. In particular, the cathode of the cell consisted of molten NaAlCl4 as a catholyte and a mixture of Ni, NaCl and Na2S as active materials. During cycling, two reversible plateaus were observed in cell voltage profiles, which matched electrochemical reactions for Na-S and Na-NiCl2 redox couples. An irreversible reaction between sulfur species and Ni was identified during initial charge at 280°C, which caused a decrease in cell capacity. The final products on discharge included Na2Sn with 1< n < 3, which differed from Na2S3 found in traditional Na-S battery. Reduction of sulfur in the mixed cathode led to an increase in overall energy density over ZEBRA batteries. Despite of the initial drop in cell capacity, the mixed cathode demonstrated relatively stable cycling with more than 95% of capacity retained over 60 cycles under 10mA/cm2. Optimization of the cathode may lead to further improvements in battery performance.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Lemmon, John P.; Kim, Jin Yong; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo (Gary) [Gary

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Electrodeposition of PbTe Thermoelectric Materials in NaOH Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissolution Kinetics of Steelmaking Slag and Its Promotion for the Growth of Algae · Electrodeposition of PbTe Thermoelectric Materials in NaOH Solutions.

205

Migração silenciosa. Marcas do pensamento estético do Extremo Oriente na poesia portuguesa contemporânea.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Na viragem do séc. XIX para o séc. XX, sobretudo através de Wenceslau de Moraes e de Camilo Pessanha, a literatura e a poesia portuguesas… (more)

Almeida, Ana Catarina Dias Nunes de

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

http://hq.na.gov/default.aspx?L=ITEM&ITEM=17500&CA=30&OT=101...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Simulation & Computing (ASC) Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20) Nuclear Cities Initiative (NCI) DOE Sites DOE Callup Directory Energy.Gov Simulation in...

207

O papel da advocacia de estado na gestão pública: análise da política pública energética no Brasil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??O presente trabalho contém algumas reflexões sobre o papel da advocacia de Estado, na qual está inserida a Advocacia-Geral da União e seus membros de… (more)

Vaz, Tania Patricia de Lara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Optimization of Na 0.44 MnO 2 Cathode Material - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Energy Storage: Materials, Systems, and Applications. Presentation Title, Optimization of Na0.44MnO2 Cathode Material for Use in Aqueous ...

209

Impacto do TPS (Toyota Production System) na performance de empresas do sector automóvel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??O presente trabalho pretende demonstrar que o Sistema de Produção Toyota é na sua essência um Sistema de Gestão do Conhecimento. Sendo composto pela revisão… (more)

Gonçalves, Sérgio Manuel Gago

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

NaNO3-KNO3 Ternary Molten Salts for Parabolic Trough  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Thermodynamic Properties of Novel Low Melting Point LiNO3- NaNO3-KNO3 Ternary Molten Salts for Parabolic Trough Solar Power ...

211

Study of intradrystalline diffusion in zeolites communication 3. Kinetics of adsorption of trans-2-butene by NaA and NaMgA zeolites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article studies the kinetics of adsorption of trans-2-butene by NaA zeolite with a varying crystal size, microcrystalline granulated NaA zeolite using granules of different sizes, and microcrystalline powdered Na/sub 8/Mg/sub 2/A zeolite. It is shown that the rate of adsorption is determined by the intracrystalline diffusion and that the effect of transfer in the transport pores and the final rate of dissipation of the heat of adsorption can be neglected. In adsorption of trans-2-butene by Na/sub 8/Mg/sub 2/A zeolite with a stepwise change in the pressure of the adsorbate, the kinetic curves are satisfactorily described by an internal diffusion equation for the kinetics of isothermal adsorption. The kinetics of adsorption were studied at 303 degrees K from the one-component vapor phase on a vacuum adsorption setup using quartz spring balance.

Broddak, R.; Dubinin, M.M.; Falko, L.A.; Gorlov, V.A.; Kuhlmann, B.; Scholner, E.; Voloshchuk, A.M.

1985-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

212

Modeling of Hydrogen Storage Materials: A Reactive Force Field for NaH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the fall in potential energy surface during heating. Keywords: hydrogen storage, reactive force fieldModeling of Hydrogen Storage Materials: A Reactive Force Field for NaH Ojwang' J.G.O.*, Rutger van governing hydrogen desorption in NaH. During the abstraction process of surface molecular hydrogen charge

Goddard III, William A.

213

Application Of An Artificial Neural Network Model To A Na-K Geothermometer  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Application Of An Artificial Neural Network Model To A Na-K Geothermometer Application Of An Artificial Neural Network Model To A Na-K Geothermometer Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Application Of An Artificial Neural Network Model To A Na-K Geothermometer Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: A new geothermometer model is proposed by applying data obtained from a known Na-K geothermometer to an artificial neural network. In this model, Na and K values were implemented as input signals and geothermometers as the output signal. Multi-layer perceptrons and back propagation were used as training algorithms for the artificial neural network. Reservoir temperatures of some geothermal fields in Turkey determined by this method are in accord with those determined from other methods.

214

A New Improved Na-K Geothermometer By Artificial Neural Networks | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improved Na-K Geothermometer By Artificial Neural Networks Improved Na-K Geothermometer By Artificial Neural Networks Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A New Improved Na-K Geothermometer By Artificial Neural Networks Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A new Na/K geothermometer equation has been developed. The temperature function is:Concentrations are in mg/kg. The new improved geothermometer equation was developed by artificial neural networks. The normalized mean square error (NMSE) used in the new improved Na/K equation for temperatures ranging from 94 to 345°C is 0.179, which is lower than the corresponding NMSE 0.226, 0.598, 0.656, 0.268, 0.328 and 0.225 for the equations of Arnorsson et al. (1983; Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 47, 567-577), Truesdell (1975; Proc. 2nd UN Symposium), Tonani (1980; Proc. Adv. Eur.

215

Adipose tissue stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 index is increased and linoleic acid is decreased in obesity-prone rats fed a high-fat diet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the adipose tissue and whether these changes occur simul- taneously across lipid fractions. It has previously been found that a HFD, especially a diet rich in SFA, decreases SCD expression in both rat liver and adipose tissue [33,34]. A HFD has also been shown... of petroleum ether containing 0.005% butylated hydroxytolvene after addition of 1.5 ml distilled water. The phases were separated after thorough mixing and centrifugation at 1500 × g for 10 min. The petroleum ether phase was pipetted off and the solvent...

Cedernaes, Jonathan; Alsiö, Johan; Västermark, Åke; Risérus, Ulf; Schiöth, Helgi B

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

216

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October 1, 1991--December 31, 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins.

Marcelin, G.

1992-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

217

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins.

Marcelin, G.

1992-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

218

" East North Central",21.3,"NA",26,27.6,29,32.4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Vehicles, Selected Survey Years (Millions)" Number of Vehicles, Selected Survey Years (Millions)" ,"Survey Years" ,1983,1985,1988,1991,1994,2001 "Total",129.3,137.3,147.5,151.2,156.8,191 "Household Characteristics" "Census Region and Division" " Northeast",23.9,"NA",26.6,27,26.6,31.7 " New England",6.6,"NA",6.6,6.5,7.6,10 " Middle Atlantic ",17.3,"NA",20.1,20.5,19,21.7 " Midwest ",32.5,"NA",37.8,38.4,41.1,47.1 " East North Central",21.3,"NA",26,27.6,29,32.4 " West North Central ",11.3,"NA",11.8,10.8,12.1,14.7 " South",45.1,"NA",50.6,52.7,56,70.2 " South Atlantic",22.2,"NA",25.9,26.6,28.4,38.8

219

" East North Central",751,"NA",539,650,639,792.21608  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Expenditures per Vehicle, Selected Survey Years (Nominal Dollars) " Fuel Expenditures per Vehicle, Selected Survey Years (Nominal Dollars) " ,"Survey Years" ,1983,1985,1988,1991,1994,2001 "Total",736,722,550,650,668,787 "Household Characteristics" "Census Region and Division" " Northeast",731,"NA",532,660,647,766.42074 " New England",706,"NA",526,687,637,810.19092 " Middle Atlantic ",740,"NA",534,651,651,746.41162 " Midwest ",738,"NA",539,651,644,792.60265 " East North Central",751,"NA",539,650,639,792.21608 " West North Central ",714,"NA",538,654,656,793.45498 " South",758,"NA",575,663,673,775.63816 " South Atlantic",772,"NA",559,639,676,755.54606

220

" East North Central",627,"NA",550,553,574,585.28553  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption per Vehicle, Selected Survey Years (Gallons) " Fuel Consumption per Vehicle, Selected Survey Years (Gallons) " ,"Survey Years" ,1983,1985,1988,1991,1994,2001 "Total",621,611,559,548,578,592 "Household Characteristics" "Census Region and Division" " Northeast",609,"NA",525,523,545,571.15003 " New England",582,"NA",517,541,542,585.83989 " Middle Atlantic ",619,"NA",528,517,545,564.4347 " Midwest ",620,"NA",550,554,580,588.14092 " East North Central",627,"NA",550,553,574,585.28553 " West North Central ",607,"NA",550,557,592,594.43665 " South",644,"NA",585,566,598,615.25944 " South Atlantic",647,"NA",563,542,601,602.53752

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Investigation of the Effects of Biodiesel-based Na on Emissions Control Components  

SciTech Connect

A single-cylinder diesel engine was used to investigate the impact of biodiesel-based Na on emissions control components using specially blended 20% biodiesel fuel (B20). The emissions control components investigated were a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), a Cu-zeolite-based NH{sub 3}-SCR (selective catalytic reduction) catalyst, and a diesel particulate filter (DPF). Both light-duty vehicle, DOC-SCR-DPF, and heavy-duty vehicle, DOC-DPF-SCR, emissions control configurations were employed. The accelerated Na aging is achieved by introducing elevated Na levels in the fuel, to represent full useful life exposure, and periodically increasing the exhaust temperature to replicate DPF regeneration. To assess the validity of the implemented accelerated Na aging protocol, engine-aged lean NO{sub x} traps (LNTs), DOCs and DPFs are also evaluated. To fully characterize the impact on the catalytic activity the LNT, DOC and SCR catalysts were evaluated using a bench flow reactor. The evaluation of the aged DOC samples and LNT show little to no deactivation as a result of Na contamination. However, the SCR in the light-duty configuration (DOC-SCR-DPF) was severely affected by Na contamination, especially when NO was the only fed NO{sub x} source. In the heavy-duty configuration (DOC-DPF-SCR), no impact is observed in the SCR NO{sub x} reduction activity. Electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) reveals that Na contamination on the LNT, DOC, and SCR samples is present throughout the length of the catalysts with a higher concentration on the washcoat surface. In both the long-term engine-aged DPF and the accelerated Na-aged DPFs, there is significant Na ash present in the upstream channels; however, in the engine-aged sample lube oil-based ash is the predominant constituent.

Brookshear, D. William [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nguyen, Ke [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Howe, Janet E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Formation, stability and mobility of self-trapped excitations in NaI and NaI1-xTIx from first principles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present ab initio calculations studying the formation, mobility, and stability of self trapped excitons (STE) and self trapped holes (STH) and electrons in NaI and NaI(Tl). While previously proposed models assumed a highly mobile STE and a slower STH, we find that both carriers in pure NaI have similar mobilities, with an activation energy of about 0.2 eV. We propose an alternate interpretation of experimental record including a new migration mechanism for the STE. In the Tl-doped material excitons preferentially trap at dopants, inducing off center distortions that have a structure unlike an STE providing a mechanism for light emission at multiple wavelengths. The calculated results are generally in excellent agreement with available data.

Prange, Micah P.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Govind, Niranjan; Gao, Fei

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

223

Site-specific force-distance characteristics on NaCl(001): Measurements versus atomistic simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scanning force microscope was used to measure the frequency shift above various atomic sites on a NaCl(001) surface at 7 K. The data was converted to force and compared to the results of atomistic simulations using model NaCl and MgO tips. We find that the NaCl tip demonstrates better agreement in the magnitude of the forces in experiments, supporting the observation that the tip first came into contact with the sample. Using the MgO tip as a model of the originally oxidized silicon tip, we further demonstrate a possible mechanism for tip contamination at low temperatures.

Lantz, M. A.; Hoffmann, R.; Hidber, H. R. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Foster, A. S. [Laboratory of Physics, Helsinki University of Technology, P.O. Box 1100, 02015 HUT (Finland); Baratoff, A.; Hug, H. J.; Guentherodt, H.-J. [Institute of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); National Center of Competence in Research (NCCR) on Nanoscale Science, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Coupled left-shift of Nav channels: modeling the Na+-loading and dysfunctional excitability of damaged axons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Injury to neural tissue renders voltage-gated Na+ (Nav) channels leaky. Even mild axonal trauma initiates Na+ -loading, leading to secondary Ca2+-loading and white matter degeneration. The nodal isoform is Nav1.6 ... Keywords: Arrhythmia, Diffuse axonal injury, Extracellular space, Hodgkin-Huxley, Myelinated, Na/K-ATPase, Neuropathic pain

Pierre-Alexandre Boucher; Béla Joós; Catherine E. Morris

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Program on Technology Innovation: Advanced Sodium Sulfur (NaS) Battery Energy Storage System - 2006 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although sodium sulfur (NaS) batteries have begun to be commercialized in Japan, market development of NaS batteries in the United States has lacked a full-scale commercial demonstration. This report describes one of the first U.S. commercial NaS application efforts and details its technical aspects.

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

226

High capacity, reversible alloying reactions in SnSb/C nanocomposites for Na-ion battery applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new SnSb/C nanocomposite based on Na alloying reactions is demonstrated as anode for Na-ion battery applications. The electrode can achieve an exceptionally high capacity (544 mA h g{sup -1}, almost double that of intercalation carbon materials), good rate capacity and cyclability (80% capacity retention over 50 cycles) for Na-ion storage.

Xiao, Lifen; Cao, Yuliang; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Wei; Kovarik, Libor; Nie, Zimin; Liu, Jun

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

227

New concept for coal wettability evaluation and modulation. Technical progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This project is concerned concept for coal surface wettability evaluation and modulation. The objective of the work are to study the fundamental surface chemistry feature about the evaluation of the surface of coal, pyrite and coal pyrite, and also establish a new separation strategy which could contribute to the advanced coal cleaning for premium fuel application. In this quarter, the capillary rise of three coals, colorado mineral pyrite, and coal pyrite in butanol, pentanol, and butyl ether have been tested. The test results shown that the kinetic wettability of the five samples in the alcohol homolog are dependent on the carbon chain length, as the length of the carbon chain is shorter, the surface wettability is the better. Another test results shown that the kinetic wettability of coals are better than mineral pyrite and coal pyrite in the butyl ether.

Hu, Weibai

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NNSA for Safety and Health - NA-26  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report Draft as of December 31, 2012 Reporting Office: _NA-26 Office of Fissile Material Disposition at SRS____ Section 1: Current Mission(s) of the Organization and Potential Changes 1. The Office of Fissile Material Disposition (NA-26) is part of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). NA-26 supports NNSA Strategic Plan Goal #2, "Provide technical leadership to limit or prevent the spread of materials, technology, and expertise relating to weapons of mass destruction; advance the technologies to detect the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction worldwide, and eliminate or secure inventories of surplus materials and infrastructure usable for nuclear weapons." The NA-26 organization focuses on the safe and secure disposition of

229

NNSA selects Lindsey VanNess as NA-00 Inaugural Employee of the Year |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

selects Lindsey VanNess as NA-00 Inaugural Employee of the Year | selects Lindsey VanNess as NA-00 Inaugural Employee of the Year | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA selects Lindsey VanNess as NA-00 Inaugural ... NNSA selects Lindsey VanNess as NA-00 Inaugural Employee of the Year Posted By Office of Public Affairs

230

Dynamics and Thermodynamics of a Novel Phase of NaAlH[subscript 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We characterize a novel orthorhombic phase (?) of NaAlH[subscript 4], discovered using first-principles molecular dynamics, and discuss its relevance to the dehydrogenation mechanism. This phase is close in energy to the ...

Wood, Brandon C.

231

Complexation of Am(III) by oxalate in NaClO{sub 4} media  

SciTech Connect

The complexation of Am(III) by oxalate has been investigated in solutions of NaClO{sub 4} up to 9.0 M ionic strength at 25{degrees}C. The dissociation constants of oxalic acid were determined by potentiometric titration, while the stability constants of the Am(III)-oxalate complexation were measured by the solvent extraction technique. A thermodynamic model was constructed to predict the apparent equilibrium constants at different ionic strengths by applying the Pitzer equation using parameters for the Na{sup +}-HOx{sup -}, Na{sup +}-Ox{sup -}, AmOx{sup +}-ClO{sub 4}{sup -}, and Na{sup +}-Am(Ox){sub 2}{sup -} interactions obtained by fitting the data.

Choppin, G.R.; Chen, J.F. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Accuracy of Voluntary Observing Ships' Meteorological Observations-Results of the VSOP-NA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the Voluntary Observing Ships Special Observing Project for the North Atlantic (VSOP-NA), the layout, meteorological instrumentation, and observing practices of 45 voluntary observing ships (VOS) operating in the North Atlantic were ...

Elizabeth C. Kent; Peter K. Taylor; Bruce S. Truscott; John S. Hopkins

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Configurational Entropy and Structure of the Molten NaCl-KCl-ZnCl2 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this context, we examine NaCl-KCl-ZnCl2 molten salts and pay particular attention to characterizing the thermodynamics and structure of these liquids in order ...

234

An Empirical Na-K-Ca Geothermometer For Natural Waters | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Empirical Na-K-Ca Geothermometer For Natural Waters Empirical Na-K-Ca Geothermometer For Natural Waters Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Empirical Na-K-Ca Geothermometer For Natural Waters Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: An empirical method of estimating the last temperature of water-rock interaction has been devised. It is based upon molar Na, K and Ca concentrations in natural waters from temperature environments ranging from 4 to 340°C. The data for most geothermal waters cluster near a straight line when plotted as the function vs reciprocal of absolute temperature, where Β is either or depending upon whether the water equilibrated above or below 100°C. For most waters tested, the method gives better results than the methods suggested by other workers. The ratio

235

Investigation of Ti-doped NaAlH4 by solid-state NMR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years, the development of Ti-doped NaAlH{sub 4} as a hydrogen storage material has gained attention because of its large weight percentage of hydrogen ({approx}5%) compared to traditional interstitial hydrides. The addition of transition-metal dopants, in the form of Ti-halides, such as TiCl{sub 3}, dramatically improves the kinetics of the absorption and desorption of hydrogen from NaAlH{sub 4}. However, the role that Ti plays in enhancing the absorption and desorption of H{sub 2} is still unknown. In the present study, {sup 27}Al, {sup 23}Na, and {sup 1}H MAS (Magic Angle Spinning) NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) has been performed to understand the titanium speciation in Ti-doped NaAlH{sub 4}. All experiments were performed on a sample of crushed single crystals exposed to Ti during growth, a sample of solvent-mixed 4TiCl{sub 3} + 112NaAlH{sub 4}, a reacted sample of solvent-mixed TiCl{sub 3} + {sup 3}NaAlH{sub 4} with THF, and a reacted sample of ball-milled TiCl3 + 3NaAlH{sub 4}. The {sup 27}Al MAS NMR has shown differences in compound formation between solvent-mixed TiCl{sub 3} + 3NaAlH{sub 4} with THF and the mechanically ball-milled TiCl{sub 3} + 3NaAlH{sub 4}. {sup 27}Al MAS NMR of the mechanically ball-milled mixture of fully-reacted TiCl{sub 3} + 3NaAlH{sub 4} showed spectral signatures of TiAl{sub 3} while, the solvent-mixed 4TiCl{sub 3} + 112NaAlH{sub 4}, which is totally reacted, does not show the presences of TiAl{sub 3}, but shows the existence of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

Maxwell, R; Majzoub, E; Herberg, J

2003-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

236

Improved MCFC performance with Li/Na/Ba/Ca carbonate electrolyte.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Earlier electrolyte segregation tests of Li/Na carbonate used chemical analysis such as inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP/AES) of matrix strips wetted with carbonate and exposed to 5- to 20-V potential gradients. A segregation factor was correlated to the Li/Na carbonate composition. While fairly substantial segregation occurs at the eutectic composition of 52% Li, it is minimal at 60% to 75% Li. Such lithium-rich Li/Na carbonates may not be practical because the melting points are too high (i.e., liquidus point is 625 C). By adding calcium and barium to the lithium/sodium carbonates, we were able to lower the melting point and maintain nonsegregating behavior. This work is directed at examining the long-term stability of the quaternary Li/Na/Ba/Ca electrolytes. Electrolyte optimization work evaluates Li/Na ratio and Ba/Ca level to improve cell performance at 320 mA/cm{sup 2} and reduce temperature sensitivity. A number of cells with quaternary Li/Na/Ba/Ca electrolytes ranging from 3 to 5% Ba/Ca have operated well with stable, long-term performance. Congruent melting carbonate is important for commercial development. The best so far is 3.5% Ba/Ca/Na/Li (3.5 mol%/3.5 mol% Ba/Ca) carbonate (m.p. 440 C). Performance at 160 mA/cm{sup 2} is increased up to 150mV as compared with the baseline cell containing the Li/Na eutectic composition. Life stability has been reproduced by a number of bench-scale MCFC test with operations of 2000-4300 h and the electrolyte composition across the matrix little changed.

Centeno, C.-J.; Kaun, T. D.; Krumpelt, M.; Schoeler, A.

1999-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

237

Traduzir o outro oriental:a configuração da figura feminina na literatura portuguesa finissecular:(António Feijó e Wenceslau de Moraes).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??O presente estudo incide sobre a configuração literária da mulher extremo-oriental na obra de dois autores portugueses finisseculares, nomeadamente na recolha de poesias traduzidas que… (more)

Pinto, Marta Pacheco, 1984-

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

O and Na abundance patterns in open clusters of the Galactic disk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims. A global O-Na abundance anti-correlation is observed in globular clusters, which is not present in the Galactic field population. Open clusters are thought to be chemically homogeneous internally. We aim to explore the O and Na abundance pattern among the open cluster population of the Galactic disk. Methods. We combine open cluster abundance ratios of O and Na from high-resolution spectroscopic studies in the literature and normalize them to a common solar scale. We compare the open cluster abundances against the globular clusters and disk field. Results. We find that the different environments show different abundance patterns. The open clusters do not show the O-Na anti-correlation at the extreme O-depletion / Na-enhancement as observed in globular clusters. Furthermore, the high Na abundances in open clusters do not match the disk field stars. If real, it may be suggesting that the dissolution of present-day open clusters is not a significant contribution to building the Galactic disk. Large-scale h...

De Silva, G M; Lattanzio, J; Asplund, M; 10.1051/0004-6361/200912279

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Na and Li ion diffusion in modified ASTM C 1260 test by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)  

SciTech Connect

In the current study, MRI was applied to investigate lithium and sodium ion diffusion in cement paste and mortars containing inert sand and borosilicate glass. Paste and mortars were treated by complying with ASTM C 1260. Lithium and sodium distribution profiles were collected at different ages after different treatments. Results revealed that sodium ions had a greater diffusion rate than lithium ions, suggesting that Na reaches the aggregate particle surface before Li. Results also showed that Na and Li ions had a competitive diffusion process in mortars; soaking in a solution with higher [Li] favored Li diffusion but hindered Na diffusion. In mortars containing glass, a substantial amount of Li was consumed by the formation of ASR products. When [Li] in soaking solution was reduced to 0.37 N, a distinctive Na distribution profile was observed, indicating the free-state Na ions were continuously transformed to solid reaction products by ASR. Hence, in the modified ASTM C 1260 test, [Li] in the storage solution should be controlled at 0.74 N, in order to completely prevent the consumption of Na ions and thus stop ASR.

Feng, X. [Department of Civil Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB (Canada)], E-mail: XFeng@ctlgroup.com; Balcom, B.J. [MRI Center, Department of Physics, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB (Canada); Thomas, M.D.A.; Bremner, T.W. [Department of Civil Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB (Canada)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Two US markets, or one? How the MTBE-gasoline relationship is evolving  

SciTech Connect

This issue of Energy Detente features the price sensitivity of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether. Data is presented for US wholesale gasoline prices vs. MTBE for the 20-month period beginning in June 1994 and ending in January 1996, and the data is discussed. Also contained in this issue is the refining netback data and the fuel price/tax data for the period ending January 5, 1996.

1996-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

An approach to catalytic asymmetric electrocyclization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

petroleum ether 40-60 Ph phenyl ppm parts per million Pr propyl q quartet Rf retention factor rt room temperature s singlet sept septet t triplet t tertiary TBAF tetrabutylammonium fluoride TBS tert... demonstrated by Nelson.73 In this case, we observed the formation of lactone 75 by vinyl nucleophile addition to the corresponding aldehydes 71 and 72. We require a less basic source of vinyl anion, or a bulkier ester such as tert-butyl, to prevent any...

Kothari, Abhishek

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

242

Update of Summer Reformulated Gasoline Supply Assessment for New York and Connecticut  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In October 2003, EIA published a review of the status of the methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) ban transition in New York (NY) and Connecticut (CT) that noted significant uncertainties in gasoline supply for those States for the summer of 2004. To obtain updated information, EIA spoke to major suppliers to the two States over the past several months as the petroleum industry began the switch from winter- to summer-grade gasoline.

Information Center

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Catalytic Effect of Ti for Hydrogen Cycling in NaAlH4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of Ti for Effect of Ti for Hydrogen Cycling in NaAlH 4 Mei-Yin Chou School of Physics Georgia Institute of Technology (DE-FG02-05ER46229) Acknowledgment: Yan Wang, Roland Stumpf Why is NaAlH 4 interesting? A viable candidate for hydrogen-storage material: High theoretical weight-percent hydrogen content of 5.55% and low cost But (before 1997) Dehydrogenation occurs at high temperature; rehydrogenation is difficult. Bogdanovic and Schwickardi, 1997 Hydrogen can be reversibly absorbed and desorbed from NaAlH 4 under moderate conditions by the addition of catalysts (compounds containing Ti, Zr, etc.) High Hydrogen Contents in Complex Hydrides Hydride wt% Hydride wt% Be(BH 4 ) 2 20.8 Mg(AlH 4 ) 2 9.3 LiBH 4 18.2 Ca(AlH 4 ) 2 7.9 Mg(BH 4 ) 2 14.9 KBH 4 7.5 Ca(BH 4 ) 2 11.6 NaAlH 4 7.5 NaBH4 10.7 Ga(AlH

244

The behavior of NaOH at the air-water interface, a computational study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics simulations with a polarizable multi-state empirical valence bond model were carried out to investigate NaOH dissociation and pairing in water bulk and at the air-water interface. It was found that NaOH readily dissociates in the bulk, and the effect of the air-water interface on NaOH dissociation is fairly minor. Also, NaOH complexes were found to be strongly repelled from the air-water interface, which is consistent with surface tension measurements. At the same time, a very strong preference for the hydroxide anion to be oriented towards the air was found that persisted a few angstroms towards the liquid from the Gibbs dividing surface of the air-water interface. This was due to a preference for the hydroxide anion to have its hydrogen pointing towards the air, and the fact that the sodium ion was more likely to be found near the hydroxide oxygen than hydrogen. As a consequence, the simulation results show that surfaces of NaOH solutions should be negatively charged, in agreement with experimental observations, but also that the hydroxide has little surface affinity. This provides the possibility that the surface of water can be devoid of hydroxide anions, but still have a strong negative charge. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Wick, Collin D.; Dang, Liem X.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

245

THE Na 8200 Angstrom-Sign DOUBLET AS AN AGE INDICATOR IN LOW-MASS STARS  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the use of the gravity sensitive neutral sodium (Na I) doublet at 8183 Angstrom-Sign and 8195 Angstrom-Sign (Na 8200 Angstrom-Sign doublet) as an age indicator for M dwarfs. We measured the Na doublet equivalent width (EW) in giants, old dwarfs, young dwarfs, and candidate members of the {beta} Pic moving group using medium-resolution spectra. Our Na 8200 A doublet EW analysis shows that the feature is useful as an approximate age indicator in M-type dwarfs with (V - K{sub s}) {>=} 5.0, reliably distinguishing stars older and younger than 100 Myr. A simple derivation of the dependence of the Na EW on temperature and gravity supports the observational results. An analysis of the effects of metallicity shows that this youth indicator is best used on samples with similar metallicity. The age estimation technique presented here becomes useful in a mass regime where traditional youth indicators are increasingly less reliable, is applicable to other alkali lines, and will help identify new low-mass members in other young clusters and associations.

Schlieder, Joshua E.; Simon, Michal [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Lepine, Sebastien; Rice, Emily [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Fielding, Drummond [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 366 Bloomberg Center, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Tomasino, Rachael, E-mail: michal.simon@stonybrook.edu, E-mail: schlieder@mpia-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: lepine@amnh.org, E-mail: erice@amnh.org, E-mail: dfieldi1@jhu.edu, E-mail: tomas1r@cmich.edu [Department of Physics, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Stripe Correlations in Na{sub 0.75}CoO{sub 2}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a combined high-energy x-ray diffraction and local-density approximation study of the sodium ordering in Na{sub 0.75}CoO{sub 2}. The obtained results rule out previously proposed Na-ordering models and provide strong evidence for the formation of sodium-density stripes in this material. The local-density approximation calculations prove that the sodium-density stripes lead to a sizable dip in the density of the Co states at the Fermi level, pointing to band structure effects as a driving force for the stripe formation. This indicates that the sodium ordering is connected to stripelike charge correlations within the CoO{sub 2} layers, leading to an astonishing similarity between the doped cuprates and the Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} compounds.

Geck, J.; Borisenko, S. V.; Eschrig, H.; Koepernik, K.; Knupfer, M.; Buechner, B. [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Zimmermann, M. v. [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Berger, H. [Institut de Physique de la Matiere Complex (IPMC), EPF Lausannne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

247

At-wavelength interferometry of high-NA diffraction-limited EUV optics  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in all-reflective diffraction-limited optical systems designed for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography have pushed numerical aperture (NA) values from 0.1 to 0.3, providing Rayleigh resolutions of 27-nm. Worldwide, several high-NA EUV optics are being deployed to serve in the development of advanced lithographic techniques required for EUV lithography, including the creation and testing of new, high-resolution photoresists. One such system is installed on an undulator beamline at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source. Sub{angstrom}-accuracy optical testing and alignment techniques, developed for use with the previous generations of EUV lithographic optical systems, are being extended for use at high NA. Considerations for interferometer design and use are discussed.

Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick; Rekawa, Senajith; Denham, Paul; Liddle, J. Alexander; Anderson, Erik; Jackson, Keith; Bokor, Jeffrey; Attwood, David

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Decontamination and decommissioning plan for processing contaminated NaK at the INEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) plan describes the work elements and project management plan for processing four containers of contaminated sodium/potassium (NaK) and returning the Army Reentry Vehicle Facility Site (ARVFS) to a reusable condition. The document reflects the management plan for this project before finalizing the conceptual design and preliminary prototype tests of the reaction kinetics. As a result, the safety, environmental, and accident analyses are addressed as preliminary assessments before completion at a later date. ARVFS contains an earth-covered bunker, a cylindrical test pit and metal shed, and a cable trench connecting the two items. The bunker currently stores the four containers of NaK from the meltdown of the EBR-1 Mark II core. The D&D project addressed in this plan involves processing the contaminated NaK and returning the ARVFS to potential reuse after cleanup.

LaRue, D.M.; Dolenc, M.R.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Decontamination and decommissioning plan for processing contaminated NaK at the INEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This decontamination and decommissioning (D D) plan describes the work elements and project management plan for processing four containers of contaminated sodium/potassium (NaK) and returning the Army Reentry Vehicle Facility Site (ARVFS) to a reusable condition. The document reflects the management plan for this project before finalizing the conceptual design and preliminary prototype tests of the reaction kinetics. As a result, the safety, environmental, and accident analyses are addressed as preliminary assessments before completion at a later date. ARVFS contains an earth-covered bunker, a cylindrical test pit and metal shed, and a cable trench connecting the two items. The bunker currently stores the four containers of NaK from the meltdown of the EBR-1 Mark II core. The D D project addressed in this plan involves processing the contaminated NaK and returning the ARVFS to potential reuse after cleanup.

LaRue, D.M.; Dolenc, M.R.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using NaSICON Ceramic Membrane Salt Splitting Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A family of inorganic ceramic materials, called sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON), has been studied at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to investigate their ability to separate sodium from radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions for treating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tank wastes. Ceramatec Inc. developed and fabricated a membrane containing a proprietary NAS-GY material formulation that was electrochemically tested in a bench-scale apparatus with both a simulant and a radioactive tank-waste solution to determine the membrane performance when removing sodium from DOE tank wastes. Implementing this sodium separation process can result in significant cost savings by reducing the disposal volume of low-activity wastes and by producing a NaOH feedstock product for recycle into waste treatment processes such as sludge leaching, regenerating ion exchange resins, inhibiting corrosion in carbon-steel tanks, or retrieving tank wastes.

Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Pendleton, J.; Balagopal, S.; Quist, M.; Clay, D.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

251

NaK pool-boiler solar receiver durability bench test. Volume 2, Metallurgical analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal materials used in the construction of a NaKbased pool-boiler were analyzed. The device, operated for 7500 hours, accumulated 1000 thermal cycles to a peak temperature of 750{degrees}C. Haynes 230, used to fabricate the pool-boiler vessel, was found to perform satisfactorily. Air-side corrosion of the pool-boiler vessel was insignificant. Internal surface of the alloy exhibited some NaK-induced elemental dissolution; this dissolution was somewhat more extensive where the alloy was exposed to the liquid metal compared to regions exposed only to NaK vapor; however, the corresponding metal loss in all regions was inconsequential, never exceeding more than a few microns. Autogenous seam welds of the alloy responded in a similar fashion, exhibiting only minimal metal loss over the course of the experiment. While there was 50% loss in ductility of the alloy there remained adequate ductility for the anticipated operating environment. An enhanced boiling nucleation surface comprised of stainless steel powder brazed to the vessel ID showed no change in its structure. It remained intact, showing no cracking after repeated thermal cycling. Other materials used in the experiment showed more extensive degradation after exposure to the NaK. IN 600, used to fabricate thermowells, exhibited extensive surface and intergranular dissolution. Grain boundary dissolution was sufficiently severe in one of the thermowells to cause an air leak, resulting in experiment termination. BNi-3, a brazing alloy used to join the pool-boiler vessel, endcaps and thermowells, showed some dissolution where it was exposed to the NaK as well as thermal aging effects. However, all brazes remained structurally sound. A nickel metal ribbon showed catastrophic dissolution, resulting in the formation of deep (> 30 {mu}m) pits and cavities. A zirconium metal foil used to getter oxygen from the NaK became extremely brittle.

Goods, S.H.; Bradshaw, R.W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Towards a study of the {sup 22}Ne(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Na reaction at LUNA  

SciTech Connect

The {sup 22}Ne(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Na reaction is a part of the hydrogen burning NeNa cycle. In second-generation stars hydrogen burning may proceed via this cycle. The rate of the {sup 22}Ne(p,{gamma}){sup 23}Na reaction depends on the strength of several resonances in the energy range of the LUNA 400 kV accelerator which have never been observed in direct experiments. A related study is under preparation at LUNA.

Cavanna, Francesca; Depalo, Rosanna; Menzel, Marie-Luise [Dipartimento di fisica, Universita di Genova, and INFN Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Dipartimento di fisica, Universita di Padova, and INFN Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Collaboration: LUNA Collaboration

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

253

POST-OPERATIONAL TREATMENT OF RESIDUAL NA COOLLANT IN EBR-2 USING CARBONATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the end of 2002, the Experimental Breeder Reactor Two (EBR-II) facility became a U.S. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted site, and the RCRA permit1 compelled further treatment of the residual sodium in order to convert it into a less reactive chemical form and remove the by-products from the facility, so that a state of RCRA 'closure' for the facility may be achieved (42 U.S.C. 6901-6992k, 2002). In response to this regulatory driver, and in recognition of project budgetary and safety constraints, it was decided to treat the residual sodium in the EBR-II primary and secondary sodium systems using a process known as 'carbonation.' In early EBR-II post-operation documentation, this process is also called 'passivation.' In the carbonation process (Sherman and Henslee, 2005), the system containing residual sodium is flushed with humidified carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The water vapor in the flush gas reacts with residual sodium to form sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the CO{sub 2} in the flush gas reacts with the newly formed NaOH to make sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO{sub 3}). Hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}) is produced as a by-product. The chemical reactions occur at the exposed surface of the residual sodium. The NaHCO{sub 3} layer that forms is porous, and humidified carbon dioxide can penetrate the NaHCO{sub 3} layer to continue reacting residual sodium underneath. The rate of reaction is controlled by the thickness of the NaHCO{sub 3} surface layer, the moisture input rate, and the residual sodium exposed surface area. At the end of carbonation, approximately 780 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II primary tank ({approx}70% of original inventory), and just under 190 liters of residual sodium in the EBR-II secondary sodium system ({approx}50% of original inventory), were converted into NaHCO{sub 3}. No bare surfaces of residual sodium remained after treatment, and all remaining residual sodium deposits are covered by a layer of NaHCO{sub 3}. From a safety standpoint, the inventory of residual sodium in these systems was greatly reduced by using the carbonation process. From a regulatory standpoint, the process was not able to achieve deactivation of all residual sodium, and other more aggressive measures will be needed if the remaining residual sodium must also be deactivated to meet the requirements of the existing environmental permit. This chapter provides a project history and technical summary of the carbonation of EBR-II residual sodium. Options for future treatment are also discussed.

Sherman, S.; Knight, C.

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

254

High Thermal Energy Storage Density LiNO3-NaNO3-KNO3-KNO2 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, High Thermal Energy Storage Density LiNO3-NaNO3-KNO3- KNO2 Quaternary Molten Salts for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Generation.

255

O processo de desenvolvimento da fé e a constituição do self na primeira infância, a partir de James William Fowler.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Este trabalho estuda o desenvolvimento da fé e da constituição do self na primeira infância a partir de James W. Fowler. É um estudo psicológico… (more)

Maria Eliane Azevedo da Silva

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Grant Title: WELLS FARGO GRANT PROGRAM Funding Opportunity Number: N/A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grant Title: WELLS FARGO GRANT PROGRAM Funding Opportunity Number: N/A Agency/Department: Wells: Organizations with tax-exempt status under Section 501(c)(3) of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code, as well as qualified tribal and governmental agencies, including public school systems. Summary: Wells Fargo makes

Farritor, Shane

257

The luminescence characteristics of CsI(Na) crystal under {alpha} and X/{gamma} excitation  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we study the effective decay time characteristic of CsI(Na) crystal under {sup 239}Pu alpha particle and {sup 137}Cs gamma-ray excitation using a single photon counting decay time measurement system. The measurement system employs a silicon optical fiber to couple and transit single photon. The slow decay time component of CsI(Na) crystal is 460-550 ns. We observe a 15 ns fast decay component under alpha particle excitation. In addition, we find that the primary stage of the falling edge in the decay time curve is non-exponential and drops rapidly when CsI(Na) crystal is excited by {sup 239}Pu alpha particles. Since the high density of self-trapped-excitons (STEs) is produced in alpha particle excitation process, we propose that the fast falling edge is corresponding to the quenching process of STEs which transit with non-radiation in the case of high excitation density. To prove this proposal, we excited the CsI(Na) crystal with sub-nanosecond intensive pulsed X-ray radiation. Our X-ray impinging results show that the fast falling edge also exists under low energy (average 100 keV) bremsstrahlung X-ray excitation.

Liu Jinliang [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Radiation Detection Research Center, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710024 (China); Liu Fang [Radiation Detection Research Center, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710024 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Ouyang Xiaoping [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Radiation Detection Research Center, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710024 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Liu Bin [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Chen Liang; Ruan Jinlu; Zhang Zhongbing; Liu Jun [Radiation Detection Research Center, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710024 (China)

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

258

Electrical Conductivity of the KF-NaF- AlF3 Molten System at Low ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electrical conductivity of the NaF-KF-AlF3 system at CR=1.3-1.7 was ... Experimental Investigation of Single Bubble Characteristics in a Cold Model of a ... Impact of Amperage Creep on Potroom Busbars and Electrical Insulation: ...

259

Evaluation of NaK as the Primary Coolant for the SNAP II System  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation was made of the use of NaK as the primary coolant for the SNAP-2 system. Pumping-power limitations based on the mercury Rankine cycle are analyzed. Problems pertinent to any design-specification modifications are reviewed.

Wallerstedt, R.

1959-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

260

Temperature induced immiscibility in the NaCl?H[subscript 2]O system at high pressure  

SciTech Connect

High-pressure polymorphs of H{sub 2}O are a major component in many outer planets, extra solar bodies, and icy satellites. This study sought to examine the influence of ionic impurities on the phase stability, thermal expansion, and melting curve of ice VII. Powder diffraction patterns of ice VII formed from pure H{sub 2}O and 5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solutions were taken at room temperature up to 11.1 {+-} 0.3 and 26.6 {+-} 0.4 GPa, respectively. Thermal expansions, {alpha}, of all ice VII samples were recorded and modeled up to the melting point of the samples. Ice VII formed from a NaCl-bearing aqueous solution at pressures greater than 2.2 GPa and less than 500 K can be indexed by ice VII only, whereas at temperatures greater than 500 K, diffraction lines indicative of halite (NaCl) are observed and become more intense with increasing temperature and only disappear at the melting point of the high-pressure ice. This phenomenon was observed in all NaCl-bearing ice samples that were heated to greater than 500 K. The melting curves of ice VII formed from pure H{sub 2}O and a 5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution suggest that the presence of Na{sup +} and Cl{sup -} in the ice VII structure results in a depression of the melting curve by approximately 40 K. The exsolution of halite from the NaCl-doped ice VII and the depression of the ice VII melting curve suggest that the presence of ionic impurities in ice VII may promote the formation of a self-segregating zone deep within ice-rich bodies. This zone could initiate the formation of solute-rich melt pockets that may ascend toward the surface and result in surface manifestations such as solute-bearing aqueous vents, unexplained domes/diapirism, and/or salt-rich regions.

Frank, M.R.; Scott, H.P.; Maglio, S.J.; Prakapenka, V.B.; Shen, G. (NIU); (CIW); (UC); (Indiana)

2008-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF THE ESSENTIAL OIL AND ETHER ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

essential oil from R. rugosum was investigated for further development and application. The chemical and class composition of the oils are presented in Table 1.

262

Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants  

SciTech Connect

An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

263

Direct Dimethyl Ether Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells for Portable Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Kosek, C. Cropley, and A. LaConti, in Proceedings of the 32nd Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering

264

Metastability And Crystal Structure of The Bialkali Complex Metal Hydride NaK(BH4)2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new bialkali borohydride, NaK(BH{sub 4}){sub 2}, was synthesized by mechanical milling of NaBH4 and KBH4 in a 1:1 ratio. The synthesis was conducted based on a prediction from a computational screening of hydrogen storage materials suggesting the potential stability of NaK(BH{sub 4}){sub 2}. The new phase was characterized using X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering and magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The Raman measurements indicated B-H vibrations of the (BH{sub 4}){sup -} anion, while magnetic resonance chemical shifts in {sup 23}Na, and {sup 39}K MAS NMR spectra showed new chemical environments for Na and K resulting from the formation of the new bialkali phase. X-ray diffraction spectra indicated a new crystal structure with rhombohedral symmetry, most likely in the space group R3, distinct from the starting materials NaBH{sub 4}, and KBH{sub 4}. Although in-situ XRD measurements indicated the material to be metastable, decomposing to the starting materials NaBH{sub 4} and KBH{sub 4}, the successful synthesis of NaK(BH{sub 4}){sub 2} demonstrates the ability of computational screening to predict candidates for hydrogen storage materials.

Seballos, L; Zhang, J Z; Ronnebro, E; Herberg, J L; Majzoub, E H

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

265

Sodium (Na)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Ionization state Potential, eV I 5.139 II 47.286 III 71.64 IV 98.91 V 138.39 VI 172.15 VII 208.47 VIII 264.18 IX 299.87 X 1465.091 XI 1648.659...

266

2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NNSA HQ NA-10  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

printed 2/17/2012 2:23:00 PM Page 1 of 8 printed 2/17/2012 2:23:00 PM Page 1 of 8 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report As of December 31, 2011 Reporting Office: NNSA NA-10 HQ (including NA-15 inputs) Section One: Current Mission(s) of the Organization and Potential Changes NNSA Mission: To strengthen United States security through the military application of nuclear energy. NNSA Vision: To be an integrated nuclear security enterprise operating an efficient and agile nuclear weapons complex, recognized as preeminent in technical leadership and program management. Organizational Changes: NNSA is in the final phase of re-organizing. This plan reflects known changes that resulted from the elimination of the ABQ Service Center and re-distribution of the functions and personnel, some of whom were part of the TQP Program. The plan has also

267

MHK Projects/Ocean Navitas NaREC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Navitas NaREC Navitas NaREC < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.1294,"lon":-1.50652,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

268

OFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS NA-1.2 VIDEO LIBRARY Item Title  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

OFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS NA-1.2 OFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS NA-1.2 VIDEO LIBRARY Item # Title # of copies DVD / CD Length Year Publisher 1 A Clear Picture - Harassment in the Public Sector- Una Imagen Clara Acosoen el Sector Publico 1 DVD 2008 Coastal Training Technologies Corp. A Dupont Company 2 Harassment Hurts: It's Personal 1 DVD 16 min 2009 ATS Media 3 Harassment Is .. (government version) 1 DVD 21 min 2005 Coastal Training Technologies Corp. A Dupont Company 4 Harassment Made Simple 1 DVD 6 min 2011 TrainingABC 5 Harassment Training for Supervisors: Let's Face It. Capacitaci ón contra el Hostigamiento para Supervisores Enfrent émoslo 1 DVD 58 min 2007 Coastal Training Technologies Corp. A Dupont Company 6 It's UP to You: Stopping Sexual Harassment for Managers 1 DVD 27 min 2005 ATS Media 7 OpenLines: Exploring Harassment

269

MHK Projects/University of Manchester Phase 1 and 2 NaREC | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

University of Manchester Phase 1 and 2 NaREC University of Manchester Phase 1 and 2 NaREC < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.1294,"lon":-1.50652,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

270

Consistent Data Assimilation of Structural Isotopes: 23Na and 56Fe  

SciTech Connect

A new approach is proposed, the consistent data assimilation, that allows to link the integral data experiment results to basic nuclear parameters employed by evaluators to generate ENDF/B point energy files in order to improve them. Practical examples are provided for the structural materials 23Na and 56Fe. The sodium neutron propagation experiments, EURACOS and JANUS-8, are used to improve via modifications of 23Na nuclear parameters (like scattering radius, resonance parameters, Optical model parameters, Statistical Hauser-Feshbach model parameters, and Preequilibrium Exciton model parameters) the agreement of calculation versus experiments for a series of measured reaction rate detectors slopes. For the 56Fe case the EURACOS and ZPR3 assembly 54 are used. Results have shown inconsistencies in the set of nuclear parameters used so that further investigation is needed. Future work involves comparison of results against a more traditional multigroup adjustments, and extension to other isotope of interest in the reactor community.

Giuseppe Palmiotti

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Spectral Content of 22Na/44Ti Decay Data: Implications for a Solar Influence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a reanalysis of data on the measured decay rate ratio $^{22}$Na/$^{44}$Ti which were originally published by Norman et al., and interpreted as supporting the conventional hypothesis that nuclear decay rates are constant and not affected by outside influences. We find upon a more detailed analysis of both the amplitude and the phase of the Norman data that they actually favor the presence of an annual variation in $^{22}$Na/$^{44}$Ti, albeit weakly. Moreover, this conclusion holds for a broad range of parameters describing the amplitude and phase of an annual sinusoidal variation in these data. The results from this and related analyses underscore the growing importance of phase considerations in understanding the possible influence of the Sun on nuclear decays. Our conclusions with respect to the phase of the Norman data are consistent with independent analyses of solar neutrino data obtained at Super-Kamiokande-I and the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO).

Daniel O'Keefe; Brittany L. Morreale; Robert H. Lee; John B. Buncher; Ephraim Fischbach; Tom Gruenwald; Jere H. Jenkins; Daniel Javorsek II; Peter A. Sturrock

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

272

High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes the motivations, activities and results of the hydrogen storage independent project "High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides" performed by the United Technologies Research Center under the Department of Energy Hydrogen Program, contract # DE-FC36-02AL67610. The objectives of the project were to identify and address the key systems technologies associated with applying complex hydride materials, particularly ones which differ from those for conventional metal hydride based storage. This involved the design, fabrication and testing of two prototype systems based on the hydrogen storage material NaAlH4. Safety testing, catalysis studies, heat exchanger optimization, reaction kinetics modeling, thermochemical finite element analysis, powder densification development and material neutralization were elements included in the effort.

Daniel A. Mosher; Xia Tang; Ronald J. Brown; Sarah Arsenault; Salvatore Saitta; Bruce L. Laube; Robert H. Dold; Donald L. Anton

2007-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

273

Defective graphene as promising anode material for Na-ion battery and Ca-ion battery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have investigated adsorption of Na and Ca on graphene with divacancy (DV) and Stone-Wales (SW) defect. Our results show that adsorption is not possible on pristine graphene. However, their adsorption on defective sheet is energetically favorable. The enhanced adsorption can be attributed to the increased charge transfer between adatoms and underlying defective sheet. With the increase in defect density until certain possible limit, maximum percentage of adsorption also increases giving higher battery capacity. For maximum possible DV defect, we can achieve maximum capacity of 1459 mAh/g for Na-ion batteries (NIBs) and 2900 mAh/g for Ca-ion batteries (CIBs). For graphene full of SW defect, we find the maximum capacity of NIBs and CIBs is around 1071 mAh/g and 2142 mAh/g respectively. Our results will help create better anode materials with much higher capacity and better cycling performance for NIBs and CIBs.

Datta, Dibakar; Shenoy, Vivek B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Honeywell FM&T, LLC Contract No. DE-NA0000622  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

FM&T, LLC FM&T, LLC Contract No. DE-NA0000622 Modification No. 016 Page 2 of 10 1. Part II - Contract Clauses. The following Section I clause is revised and replaced in its entirety as follows: I-11 52.204-4 PRINTED OR COPIED DOUBLE-SIDED ON POSTCONSUMER FIBER CONTENT PAPER (MAY 2011) (a) Definitions. As used in this clause- "Postconsumer fiber" means- (1) Paper, paperboard, and fibrous materials from retail stores, office

275

1 MW / 7.2 MWh NaS Battery Demonstration and Case Study Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The New York Power Authority (NYPA), working together with the Metropolitan Transit Authority Long Island Bus (LIB) Company, has installed an advanced sodium sulfur battery energy storage system (NaS BESS) at the LIB facility located at 700 Commercial Avenue, Garden City, New York. The BESS is capable of providing a nominal 1MW of power to the bus fueling compressor station for 6-8 hours per day, 7 days per week.

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

276

High-statistics measurement of the beta-delayed alpha spectrum of 20Na  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A measurement of the 20Na beta-delayed alpha spectrum with a high-granularity set-up has allowed the decay scheme to be revised on several points. Three new transitions of low intensity are found at low alpha-particle energy. An R-matrix fit of the complete spectrum gives an improved description of the decay and indicates feeding to the broad 2^+ alpha-cluster state close to 9 MeV.

K. L. Laursen; O. S. Kirsebom; H. O. U. Fynbo; A. Jokinen; M. Madurga; K. Riisager.; A. Saastamoinen; O. Tengblad; J. Äysto

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

277

The use Na, Li, K cations for modification of ZSM-5 zewolite to control hydrocarbon cold-start emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of controlling hydrocarbon emissions from cold-start of engines by investigating the adsorbents which could adsorb the hydrocarbons at cold temperatures and hold them to 250-300 ?. The materials, that has been studied, are based on the modification of ZSM-5 (SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} = 35) zeolite with Li, K, Na cations. It has been shown that the introduction of Li, Na and K in an amount that is equivalent to the content of Al in zeolite results in occurrence of toluene temperature desorption peaks at high-temperatures. The toluene temperature desorption curves for 5%Li-ZSM-5 and 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 zeolites are identical and have peak toluene desorption rate between 200 to 400 ?. Upon analysis of toluene adsorption isotherms for 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 and 5%Li-ZSM-5, it was concluded that the toluene diffusion inside of the modified zeolites channels is extremely slow and the sorption capacity of 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 is higher than with 5%Li-ZSM-5. The 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 didn't change toluene temperature programmed desorption (TPD) rate of curve after the treatment in environment with 10% ?{sub 2}? at 750-800 ? for about 28 h. The 2.3%Na-ZSM-5 zeolite is very promising as adsorbent to control the cold-start hydrocarbon emissions.

Golubeva V.; Rohatgi U.; Korableva, A.; Anischenko, O.; Kustov, L.; Nissenbaum, V; Viola, M.B.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

278

Efficiency Calibration Using HEU Standards of 2-Inch by 2-Inch NaI Detector  

SciTech Connect

The Analytical Development Section of SRTC was requested by the Facilities Disposition Division (FDD) to determine the holdup of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the 321-M facility as part of an overall deactivation project of the facility. The 321-M facility was used to fabricate enriched uranium fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the production reactors. The facility also includes the 324-M storage building and the passageway connecting it to 321-M. The results of the holdup assays are essential for determining compliance with the solid waste Waste Acceptance Criteria, Material Control and Accountability, and to meet criticality safety controls. Two measurement systems will be used to determine HEU holdup: One is a portable EG and G Dart system that contains Gamma-Vision software to support a Multichannel Analyzer (MCA) card, high voltage power, and space to store and manipulate multiple 4096-channel gamma-ray spect ra. The other is a 2-inch x 2-inch NaI crystal with an MCA that uses a portable computer with a Canberra NaI plus card installed. This card converts the PC to a full function MCA and contains the ancillary electronics, high voltage power supply and amplifier, required for data acquisition. This report will discuss the calibration of the 2-inch x 2-inch NaI detector.

Dewberry, R. A.

2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

279

NMR Study of the Magnetic and Metal-Insulator Transitions in Na0:5CoO2: A Nesting Scenario J. Bobroff,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NMR Study of the Magnetic and Metal-Insulator Transitions in Na0:5CoO2: A Nesting Scenario J, France (Received 22 July 2005; published 13 March 2006) Co and Na NMR are used to probe the local have performed a 59Co and 23Na NMR study which allows us to differentiate the two Co sites and to give

Paris-Sud 11, Université de

280

Crystal structure of new synthetic Ca,Na carbonate-borate Ca{sub 2}Na(Na{sub x}Ca{sub 0.5-x})[B{sub 3}{sup t}B{sub 2}{sup {delta}}O{sub 8}(OH)(O{sub 1-x}OH{sub x})](CO{sub 3})  

SciTech Connect

New Ca,Na carbonate-borate Ca{sub 2}Na(Na{sub x}Ca{sub 0.5-x}) [B{sub 3}{sup t}B{sub 2}{sup {Delta}}O{sub 8}(OH)(O{sub 1-x}OH{sub x})](CO{sub 3}) crystals (x {approx} 0.4) have been synthesized by the hydrothermal method in the Ca(OH){sub 2}-H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-NaCl-system at t = 250 Degree-Sign C and P = 70-80 atm; the structure parameters are found to be a = 11.1848(3) Angstrom-Sign , b = 6.4727(2) Angstrom-Sign , c = 25.8181(7) Angstrom-Sign , {beta} = 96.364(3) Degree-Sign , V = 1857.60(9) Angstrom-Sign {sup 3}, sp. gr. C2/c, Z = 8, and {rho}{sub calcd} = 2.801 g/cm{sup 3} (Xcalibur S autodiffractometer (CCD), 2663 reflections with I > 2{sigma} (I), direct solution, refinement by the least-squares method in the anisotropic approximation of thermal atomic vibrations, hydrogen localization, R{sub 1} = 0.0387). The structure is based on boron-oxygen layers of pentaborate radicals 5(2{Delta} + 3T). Ca and Na polyhedra and CO{sub 3} triangles are located between the layers. A crystallochemical analysis of the new Ca,Na carbonate-borate has established its similarity to natural Na,Ca pentaborates (heidornite and tuzlaite) and synthetic Na,Ba-decaborate.

Yamnova, N. A., E-mail: natalia-yamnova@yandex.ru; Borovikova, E. Yu.; Gurbanova, O. A.; Dimitrova, O. V.; Zubkova, N. V. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Precision mass measurements of very short-lived, neutron-rich Na isotopes using a radiofrequency spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass measurements of high precision have been performed on sodium isotopes out to $^{30}$Na using a new technique of radiofrequency excitation of ion trajectories in a homogeneous magnetic field. This method, especially suited to very short-lived nuclides, has allowed us to significantly reduce the uncertainty in mass of the most exotic Na isotopes: a relative error of 5\\audi was achieved for $^{28}$Na having a half-life of only 30.5 ms and 9\\audi for the weakly produced $^{30}$Na. Verifying and minimizing binding energy uncertainties in this region of the nuclear chart is important for clarification of a long standing problem concerning the strength of the $N~=~20$ magic shell closure. These results are the fruit of the commissioning of the new experimental program Mistral.

Lunney, M D; Doubre, H; Henry, S; Monsanglant, C; De Saint-Simon, M; Thibault, C; Toader, C F; Borcea, C; Bollen, G

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Electrochemical and structural characterization of titanium-substituted manganese oxides based on Na0.44MnO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by heating them in a molten salt- mixture of 68-mol% LiNOtakes place during the molten salt exchange. Because the850° C. c) prepared by molten salt exchange of Na x Ti y Mn

Doeff, Marca M.; Richardson, Thomas J.; Hwang, Kwang-Taek

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Effect of rare earth ions on the phase transition of Na sub 2 SO sub 4 crystals  

SciTech Connect

The V {r reversible} I phase transition of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} crystals was investigated on a sample of pure Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and on rare-earth ion (Ln{sup 3+} = La{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+})-doped Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} samples in various ambient gases (O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}) with high temperature X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis. On heating in N{sub 2} flow, the initiating temperature for the V {yields} I transition was lowered by doping with Ln{sup 3+} ion and the doping effect was enhanced by an increase in the ionic size ratio r{sub Ln{sup 3+}}/r{sub Na{sup +}}. The low temperature form of the solid solution (LSS) Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and rare earth sulfate, which was a by-product in the preparation of the Ln{sup 3+}-doped samples, transformed to a high temperature form (HSS) after the V {yields} I transition, and the initiating temperature for the LSS {yields} HSS transition was highest in the Eu{sup 3+}-doped sample (r{sub Ln{sup 3+}}/r{sub Na{sup +}} {approx equal} 1).

Ohta, Masatoshi; Sakaguchi, Masakazu (Niigata Univ. (Japan))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Lasing on the D lines of sodium pumped by free{yields}free transitions of Na-Xe collision pairs  

SciTech Connect

Lasing on the D{sub 1} and D{sub 2} lines of Na (589.6 and 589.0 nm, respectively) has been generated simultaneously by photoexciting free{yields}free transitions of thermal Na-Xe collision pairs. Pumping the blue satellite of the Na D{sub 2} line in Na/Xe mixtures ({lambda} Almost-Equal-To 560 nm) selectively interacts with Na-Xe pairs having an instantaneous internuclear separation of {approx}5 A and culminates in the population of both Na (3{sup 2}P{sub J}) fine structure levels. The spectral width of the laser excitation spectrum is 1.3 nm (centered at 560.1 nm) and the 3{sup 2}P{sub 3/2}{yields}3{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} (D{sub 2}) laser linewidth was measured to be 9.2 {+-} 0.6 GHz, which is consistent with a coefficient of 18.4 MHz/Torr for broadening of the D{sub 2} 589.0 nm transition by Xe.

Hewitt, J. D.; Eden, J. G. [Laboratory for Optical Physics and Engineering, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

285

NA-42 TI Shared Software Component Library FY2011 Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The NA-42 TI program initiated an effort in FY2010 to standardize its software development efforts with the long term goal of migrating toward a software management approach that will allow for the sharing and reuse of code developed within the TI program, improve integration, ensure a level of software documentation, and reduce development costs. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked with two activities that support this mission. PNNL has been tasked with the identification, selection, and implementation of a Shared Software Component Library. The intent of the library is to provide a common repository that is accessible by all authorized NA-42 software development teams. The repository facilitates software reuse through a searchable and easy to use web based interface. As software is submitted to the repository, the component registration process captures meta-data and provides version control for compiled libraries, documentation, and source code. This meta-data is then available for retrieval and review as part of library search results. In FY2010, PNNL and staff from the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) teamed up to develop a software application with the goal of replacing the aging Aerial Measuring System (AMS). The application under development includes an Advanced Visualization and Integration of Data (AVID) framework and associated AMS modules. Throughout development, PNNL and RSL have utilized a common AMS code repository for collaborative code development. The AMS repository is hosted by PNNL, is restricted to the project development team, is accessed via two different geographic locations and continues to be used. The knowledge gained from the collaboration and hosting of this repository in conjunction with PNNL software development and systems engineering capabilities were used in the selection of a package to be used in the implementation of the software component library on behalf of NA-42 TI. The second task managed by PNNL is the development and continued maintenance of the NA-42 TI Software Development Questionnaire. This questionnaire is intended to help software development teams working under NA-42 TI in documenting their development activities. When sufficiently completed, the questionnaire illustrates that the software development activities recorded incorporate significant aspects of the software engineering lifecycle. The questionnaire template is updated as comments are received from NA-42 and/or its development teams and revised versions distributed to those using the questionnaire. PNNL also maintains a list of questionnaire recipients. The blank questionnaire template, the AVID and AMS software being developed, and the completed AVID AMS specific questionnaire are being used as the initial content to be established in the TI Component Library. This report summarizes the approach taken to identify requirements, search for and evaluate technologies, and the approach taken for installation of the software needed to host the component library. Additionally, it defines the process by which users request access for the contribution and retrieval of library content.

Knudson, Christa K.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Dorow, Kevin E.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

286

Improved container electrode coatings for Na/S battery systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current sodium sulfur (Na/S) battery systems utilize the fast ion conducting properties of sodium beta{double_prime}-alumina electrolyte (BASE) to create high energy density sodium-sulfur electrochemical cells which can be used as components of secondary batteries. Since the days when these cells were invented at the Ford Motor Company Scientific Laboratory by J.T. Kummer and N. Weber, problems with container electrode corrosion have troubled the Na/S systems that have been developed in the many laboratories. In an unpublished investigation carried out at the Ford Motor Company laboratory, it was shown that titanium nitride films sputter deposited onto aluminum substrates under the appropriate conditions can exhibit excellent resistance to corrosion by sodium polysulfide melts. In the work carried out here, the corrosion resistant properties of TiN coatings sputter deposited on Al substrates have been investigated. TiN sputter coated aluminum samples were tested under static conditions in sodium sulfide melts and in Na/S cells under the range of electrochemical conditions needed for battery operation. The sputter deposited coatings produced in these experiments exhibited satisfactory corrosion resistance in the static tests but degraded under full cell operation. Tests of TiN coatings deposited by reactive ion-plating (IP), a common commercial process, showed excellent corrosion and electrical performance in both static and complete cell testing. Charge/discharge testing of sulfur core cells with IP coatings for over 350 cycles to 70 % depth of discharge has shown only very minor changes in cell performance and the tests are continuing.

Hunt, T.K. [Environmental Research Institute of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Applications Development Dept.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Preparations for EUV interferometry of the 0.3 NA MET optic  

SciTech Connect

An at-wavelength interferometer is being created for the measurement and alignment of the 0.3 numerical aperture Micro Exposure Tool projection optic at EUV wavelengths. The prototype MET system promises to provide early learning from EUV lithographic imaging down to 20-nm feature size. The threefold increase to 0.3 NA in the image-side numerical aperture presents several challenges for the extension of ultra-high-accuracy interferometry, including pinhole fabrication and the calibration and removal of systematic error sources.

Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Denham, Paul E.; Rekawa, Senajith B.; Jackson, Keith H.; Liddle, J. Alexander; Harteneck, Bruce; Gullikson, Eric; Anderson, Erik H.

2003-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

Electronic Reconstruction through the Structural and Magnetic Transitions in Detwinned NaFeAs  

SciTech Connect

We use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to study twinned and detwinned iron pnictide compound NaFeAs. Distinct signatures of electronic reconstruction are observed to occur at the structural (T{sub S}) and magnetic (T{sub SDW}) transitions. At T{sub S}, C{sub 4} rotational symmetry is broken in the form of an anisotropic shift of the orthogonal d{sub xz} and d{sub yz} bands. The magnitude of this orbital anisotropy rapidly develops to near completion upon approaching T{sub SDW}, at which temperature band folding occurs via the antiferromagnetic ordering wave vector. Interestingly, the anisotropic band shift onsetting at T{sub S} develops in such a way to enhance the nesting conditions in the C{sub 2} symmetric state, hence is intimately correlated with the long range collinear AFM order. Furthermore, the similar behaviors of the electronic reconstruction in NaFeAs and Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} suggests that this rapid development of large orbital anisotropy between T{sub S} and T{sub SDW} is likely a general feature of the electronic nematic phase in the iron pnictides, and the associated orbital fluctuations may play an important role in determining the ground state properties.

Yi, M.; Lu, D.H.; Moore, R.G.; Kihou, K; Lee, C-H; Iyo, A.; Eisaki, H.; Yoshida, T; Fujimori, A; Shen, Z-X

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

289

Thermodynamic modeling of neptunium(V)-acetate complexation in concentrated NaCl media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complexation of neptunium(V), Np(V), with the acetate anion, Ac{sup -}, was measured in sodium chloride media to high concentration using an extraction technique. The data were interpreted using the thermodynamic formalism of Pitzer, which is valid to high electrolyte concentrations. A consistent model for the deprotonation constants of acetic acid in NaCl and NaClO{sub 4} media was developed. For the concentrations of acetate expected in a waste repository, only the neutral complex NpO{sub 2}Ac(aq) was important in describing the interactions between the neptunyl ion and acetate. The thermodynamic stability constant log {beta}{sup 0}{sub 101} for the reaction NpO{sub 2}{sup +} + Ac{sup -} {leftrightarrow} NpO{sub 2}Ac was calculated to be 1.46{plus_minus}0.11. This weak complexing behavior between the neptunyl ion and acetate indicates that acetate will not significantly enhance dissolved Np(V) concentrations in ground waters associated with nuclear waste repositories that may contain acetate.

Novak, C.F.; Borkowski, M.; Choppin, G.R.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Thin Porous Metal Sheet-Supported NaA Zeolite Membrane for Water/Ethanol Separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports preparation and separation testing results of water-selective zeolite membrane, such as NaA (or 4A-type), supported on a robust, porous metal sheet of 50um thickness. The thin sheet support is of large potential for development of a low-cost, inorganic membrane module of high surface area packing density. The porous Ni alloy sheet of micrometer or sub-micrometer mean pore size, which was prepared by a proprietary process, is used to evaluate different zeolite membrane deposition methods and conditions. The membranes are characterized by SEM, XRD and water/ethanol separation tests. Quality NaA zeolite membrane at thickness ethanol separation factor of >10,000 and water permeation flux of about 4 kg/(m2•h) at 75ºC with a feed of 10wt% water in ethanol. The membrane is also demonstrated with good stability in 66-hour continuous testing at 75ºC and 90ºC.

Zhang, Jian; Liu, Wei

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Responsive copolymers for enhanced petroleum recovery. Second annual report  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe second year efforts in synthesis, characterization, and rheology to develop polymers with significantly improved efficiency in mobility control and conformance. These advanced polymer systems would maintain high viscosities or behave as virtual gels under low shear conditions and at elevated electrolyte concentrations. At high fluid shear rates, associates would deaggregate yielding low viscosity solutions, reducing problems of shear degradation or face plugging during injection. Polymeric surfactants were also developed with potential for use in higher salt, higher temperature reservoirs for mobilization of entrapped oil. Chapters include: Ampholytic terpolymers of acrylamide with sodium 3-acrylamido-3-methylbutanoate and 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanetrimethylammonium chloride; Hydrophilic sulfobetaine copolymers of acrylamide and 3-(2-acrylamido-methylpropane-dimethylammonio)-1-propanesulfonate; Copolymerization of maleic anhydride and N-vinylformamide; Reactivity ratio of N-vinylformamide with acrylamide, sodium acrylate, and n-butyl acrylate; Effect of the distribution of the hydrophobic cationic monomer dimethyldodecyl(2-acrylamidoethyl)ammonium bromide on the solution behavior of associating acrylamide copolymers; Effect of surfactants on the solution properties of amphipathic copolymers of acrylamide and N,N-dimethyl-N-dodecyl-N-(2-acrylamidoethyl)ammonium bromide; Associative interactions and photophysical behavior of amphiphilic terpolymers prepared by modification of maleic anhydride/ethyl vinyl ether copolymers; Copolymer compositions of high-molecular-weight functional acrylamido water-soluble polymers using direct-polarization magic-angle spinning {sup 13}C NMR; Use of factorial experimental design in static and dynamic light scattering characterization of water soluble polymers; and Porous medium elongational rheometer studies of NaAMB/AM copolymer solutions.

McCormick, C.; Hester, R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Examination and experimental constraints of the stellar reaction rate factor $N_A $ of the $^{18}$Ne($?$,$p$)$^{21}$Na reaction at temperatures of X-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The $^{18}$Ne($\\alpha$,$p$)$^{21}$Na reaction is one key for the break-out from the hot CNO-cycles to the $rp$-process. Recent papers have provided reaction rate factors $N_A $ which are discrepant by at least one order of magnitude. The compatibility of the latest experimental results is tested, and a partial explanation for the discrepant $N_A$ is given. A new rate factor is derived from the combined analysis of all available data. The new rate factor is located slightly below the higher rate factor by Matic {\\it et al.}\\ at low temperatures and significantly below at higher temperatures whereas it is about a factor of five higher than the lower rate factor recently published by Salter {\\it et al.}

P. Mohr; A. Matic

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

293

Methods to study event-by-event fluctuations in the NA61/SHINE experiment at the CERN SPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical calculations locate the critical point (CP) of strongly interacting matter at energies accessible at the CERN SPS. Event-by-event transverse momentum and multiplicity fluctuations are considered as one of the most important tools to search for the CP. Pilot studies of the energy dependence and the system size dependence of both p{sub T} and multiplicity fluctuations were performed by the NA49 experiment. The NA61/SHINE ion program is a continuation of these efforts. After briefly recalling the essential NA49 results on fluctuations we will discuss the technical methods (removing Non-Target interactions) which we plan to apply for future transverse momentum and multiplicity fluctuation analyses.

Cetner, T., E-mail: Tomasz.Cetner@cern.ch; Grebieszkow, K., E-mail: kperl@if.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics (Poland)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

2011 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NNSA HQ NA-70  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report As of December 31, 2011 Reporting Office: NNSA NA-70 Section One: Current Mission(s) of the Organization and Potential Changes 1. DNS is the NNSA line management organization responsible for security direction and program management with respect to prioritization of resources, program evaluation, and funding allocation. Key management areas include security operations, resources, engineering, and technical support to NNSA field elements and facilities. Specific subject matter expertise also includes physical and personnel security, protective forces, nuclear materials control and accountability, classified and sensitive information protection, and technical security programs. DNS evaluates the status of protection programs at all NNSA facilities against National policy and

295

2012 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report - NNSA NA-70  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Annual Workforce Analysis and Staffing Plan Report As of December 31, 2012 Reporting Office: NNSA NA-70 Section One: Current Mission(s) of the Organization and Potential Changes The DNS core mission is to protect NNSA capabilities, facilities, materials, information, and employees. DNS is responsible for managing and funding the security that supports the NNSA missions, with the exception of those missions under the Office of Naval Reactors and the Office of Secure Transportation's (OST) over-the-road operations. DNS also provides unique knowledge and expertise in nuclear security for a broader set of 21st century national security needs that are synergistic with its mission, such as those in nuclear non-proliferation, homeland security, and intelligence. DNS provides the overall

296

Los Alamos National Security, LLC Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Los Alamos National Security, LLC Los Alamos National Security, LLC Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396 Attachment to Modification No. 150 PART III - SECTION J APPENDIX G October 5, 2010 [Modified by Modification No. A009, A015, A018, A019, A021, A027, M033, M041, M042, M046, M056, M062, M069, M078, M103, M133, 150] LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVES In addition to the list of applicable directives listed below, the Contractor shall also comply with supplementary directives, (e.g., manuals) which are invoked by a Contractor Requirements Document (CRD) attached to a directive. Electronic copies of these documents are available at the following Websites: http://directives.doe.gov/cqi-bin/currentchecklist http://www.directives,doe.gov/directives/globesearch-adv.html http://www.nnsa.doe.gov/

297

The Large-Angle Photon Veto System for the NA62 Experiment at CERN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—The branching ratio (BR) for the decay K + ? ? + ? ¯? is a sensitive probe for new physics. The NA62 experiment at the CERN SPS will measure this BR to within about 10%. To reject the dominant background from channels with final state photons, the large-angle vetoes (LAVs) must detect photons of energy as low as 200 MeV with an inefficiency of less than 10 ?4, as well as provide energy and time measurements with resolutions of 10 % and 1 ns for 1 GeV photons. The LAV detectors make creative reuse of lead glass blocks recycled from the OPAL electromagnetic calorimeter barrel. We describe the mechanical design and challenges faced during construction, the characterization of the lead glass blocks and solutions adopted for monitoring their performance, and the development of front-end electronics to allow simultaneous time and energy measurements over an extended dynamic range using the time-over-threshold

F. Ambrosino; B. Angelucci; A. Antonelli; F. Costantini; R. Fantechi; S. Gallorini; S. Giudici; E. Leonardi; I. Mannelli; P. Massarotti; M. Moulson; M. Napolitano; V. Palladino; F. Rafaelli; M. Raggi; G. Saracino; M. Serra; T. Spadaro; P. Valente; S. Venditti; F. Ambrosino; P. Massarotti; M. Napolitano

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Nuclear Sturcture Along the Neutron Dripline: MoNa-LISA and the dinueutron system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclei with extreme neutron-to-proton ratios were found to present different structures from what was known for the stable ones. With the current facilities we can now study nuclei that lie even beyond the neutron drip line. At the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University we use the MoNA/Sweeper setup to perform such studies of neutron unbound nuclei. In a typical experiment, a radioactive beam is employed to produce the nucleus of interest. This unbound nucleus immediately decays into a neutron and a remaining charged fragment, both of which are detected and used to reconstruct the original nucleus and study its properties. In this Colloquium, new exciting findings from recent experiments will be presented. These include the first observation of a dineutron decay from 16Be, the exploration of the “south shore” of the Island of Inversion and the first evidence of the decay of the troubling nucleus 26O.

Spyou, Artemis [Michigan State Univeristy

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

299

High Density Hydrogen Storage Systems Demonstration Using NaAIH4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Density Hydrogen Storage Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH 4 Complex Compound Hydrides D. Mosher, X. Tang, S. Arsenault, B. Laube, M. Cao, R. Brown, S. Saitta, J. Costello United Technologies Research Center East Hartford, Connecticut Report to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Contract Number: DE-FC36-02AL-67610 December 19, 2006 * * Presented to the DOE and the FreedomCAR & Fuel Partnership Hydrogen Storage Tech Team This presentation does not contain proprietary or confidential information 2 Overview Objective: Identify and overcome the critical technical barriers in developing complex hydride based storage systems, especially those which differ from conventional metal hydride systems, to meet DOE system targets. Approach: Design, fabricate and test a sequence of subscale and full scale

300

Discrete Properties of Intrinsic Localized Modes Observed in the High Temperature Vibrational Spectrum of NaI  

SciTech Connect

Inelastic neutron measurements of the high temperature lattice excitations in NaI show surprising features. In thermal equilibrium at 555 K an intrinsic mode, localized in three dimensions, is observed at a single frequency near the center of the spectral phonon gap, polarized along [111]. At higher temperatures mixing between the intrinsic localized mode and the zone boundary TO mode is observed. Higher energy inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering measurements on a room temperature NaI crystal indicate that the creation energy of the ground state of the intrinsic localized mode is 299 meV.

Manley, M E; Sievers, A J; Lynn, J W; Kiselev, S A; Agladze, N I; Chen, Y; Llobet, A; Alatas, A

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 results: 7 results: BibTex RIS RTF XML Sort by: Author Title Type [ Year (Desc) ] Filters: Author is Elton J. Cairns [Clear All Filters] 2008 Shin, Joon Ho, Pratyay Basak, John B. Kerr, and Elton J. Cairns. "Rechargeable Li/LiFePO4 Cells Using N-Methyl-N-butyl pyrrolidinium Bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide-LiTFSI Electrolyte Incorporating Polymer Additives." Electrochimica Acta 54, no. 2 (2008): 410-414. Shin, Joon Ho, and Elton J. Cairns. "N-Methyl-(n-butyl)pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide-LiTFSI-poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether mixture as a Li/S cell electrolyte." Journal of Power Sources 177 (2008): 537-545. 2007 Nakahara, Kentaro, Jiro Iriyama, Shigeyuki Iwasa, Masahiro Suguro, Masaharu Satoh, and Elton J. Cairns. "Al-laminated film packaged organic radical

302

Molecular motions in a viscous organic liquid: ferrocene in cold butyl phthalate  

SciTech Connect

The two main purposes of this work were to learn (a) if rotational diffusion can be seen along with translational, and (b) is (x(T)/sup 2/) unusual as the sample is heated from a glass to a liquid. Our observations show that (a) rotational molecular diffusion is not likely ever to be observed by quadrupole relaxation and (b) that there is indeed a fast increase in (x/sup 2/) above T/sub g/. This increase is correlated with a rapid and linear increase of the number of ''soft modes'' for the liquid above the glass transition temperature.

Ruby, S.L.; Zabransky, B.J.; Flinn, P.A.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Spinning Carbon Fiber Precursors from 1-Butyl-3-Methylimidazolium Chloride Cellulose Solutions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cellulose is an abundant natural renewable polymer that is used in the production of many materials. However, limited processibility and reduced solubility have restricted its… (more)

Gelderloos-Sammons, Rhea J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

X-ray and electron diffraction studies of superlattices and long-range three-dimensional Na ordering in gamma-Na[subscript x]CoO[subscript 2] (x=0.71 and 0.84)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have recently demonstrated that x=0.71 and 0.84 are the two most stable single-phase compounds above x=0.5 in gamma-Na[subscript x]CoO[subscript 2] [G. J. Shu et al., Phys. Rev. B 76, 184115 (2007); F. C. Chou et al., ...

Chou, F. C.

305

Use of the discrete variable representation in the quantum dynamics by a wave packet propagation: Predissociation of NaI(/sup 1/. sigma. /sup +//sub 0/). -->. NaI(0/sup +/). -->. Na(/sup 2/S)+I(/sup 2/P)  

SciTech Connect

Using the Gauss--Chebyshev discrete variable representation (DVR), the dissociative quantum dynamics for a wave packet evolving under the influence of the Hamiltonian for two interacting diabatic states of a diatomic molecule is calculated. The split time evolution operator method is used to obtain the solutions to the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. A specific example of the numerical calculation is shown for the predissociation process of NaI..-->..Na(/sup 2/S)+I(/sup 2/P) from its first excited electronic state (0/sup +/). The numerical results are compared with the experimental observations from the femtosecond laser photofragmentation, recently reported by Zewail and co-workers.

Choi, S.E.; Light, J.C.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Roles of double salt formation and NaNO{sub 3} in Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-promoted MgO absorbent for intermediate temperature CO{sub 2} removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Absorption and desorption of carbon dioxide on Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-promoted MgO have been studied at temperatures compatible with warm gas cleanup (300–470 ?C) from a pre-combustion syngas. The absorbents are synthesized through the formation and activation of the precipitate resulting from the addition of sodium carbonate to an aqueous solution of magnesium nitrate. The absorbent, which comprises MgO, Na{sub 2CO{sub 3} and residual NaNO{sub 3} after activation, forms the double salt Na{sub 2}Mg(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} on exposure to CO{sub 2}. The thermodynamic properties of the double salt, obtained through computational calculation, predict that the preferred temperature range for absorption of CO{sub 2} with the double salt is significantly higher compared with MgO. Faster CO{sub 2} uptake can be achieved as a result of this higher temperature absorption window. Absorption tests indicate that the double salt absorbent as prepared has a capacity toward CO{sub 2} of 15 wt.% (3.4 mmol CO{sub 2}/g absorbent) and can be easily regenerated through both pressure swing and temperature swing absorption in multiple-cycle tests. Thermodynamic calculations also predict an important effect of CO{sub 2} partial pressure on the absorption capacity in the warm temperature range. The impurity phase, NaNO{sub 3}, is identified as a key component in facilitating CO{sub 2} absorption by these materials. The reason for reported difficulties in reproducing the performance of these materials can be traced to specific details of the synthesis method, which are reviewed in some detail.

Keling Zhanga,b, Xiaohong S. Li c, Yuhua Duand, David L. Kingc,?, Prabhakar Singha,b, Liyu Li

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

307

Post-Closure Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 1324-N Surface Impoundment and 1324-NA Percolation Pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1324-N Surface Impoundment and the 1324-NA Percolation Pond, located in the 100-N Area of the Hanford Site, are regulated under the Resource Consevation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Surface and underground features of the facilities have been removed and laboratory analyses showed that soil met the closure performance standards. These sites have been backfilled and revegetated.

Hartman, Mary J.

2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

308

Investigation of superconducting and non-superconducting phases of Na?Ì£?CoO?·1.3H?0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discovery of unconventional superconductivity in hydrated Na?Ì£?CoO?·1.3H?0 has lead to active research work on the material over the last year due to its similarities and possible insight into the high-T[sub]c copper ...

Garcia, Daniel Robert, 1982-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Inputs & Utilization Inputs & Utilization Definitions Key Terms Definition All Other Motor Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas (e.g. straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, xylene) used for blending or compounding into finished motor gasoline. Includes receipts and inputs of Gasoline Treated as Blendstock (GTAB). Excludes conventional blendstock for oxygenate blending (CBOB), reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending, oxygenates (e.g. fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether), butane, and pentanes plus. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Blending Plant A facility which has no refining capability but is either capable of producing finished motor gasoline through mechanical blending or blends oxygenates with motor gasoline.

310

MTBE, Oxygenates, and Motor Gasoline (Released in the STEO October 1999)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into motor gasoline has increased dramatically since it was first produced 20 years ago. MTBE usage grew in the early 1980's in response to octane demand resulting initially from the phaseout of lead from gasoline and later from rising demand for premium gasoline. The oxygenated gasoline program stimulated an increase in MTBE production between 1990 and 1994. MTBE demand increased from 83,000 in 1990 to 161,000 barrels per day in 1994. The reformulated gasoline (RFG) program provided a further boost to oxygenate blending. The MTBE contained in motor gasoline increased to 269,000 barrels per day by 1997.

Information Center

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model (Released in the STEO March 1998)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The blending of oxygenates, such as fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), into motor gasoline has increased dramatically in the last few years because of the oxygenated and reformulated gasoline programs. Because of the significant role oxygenates now have in petroleum product markets, the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) was revised to include supply and demand balances for fuel ethanol and MTBE. The STIFS model is used for producing forecasts in the Short-Term Energy Outlook. A review of the historical data sources and forecasting methodology for oxygenate production, imports, inventories, and demand is presented in this report.

Information Center

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

California's Move Toward E10 (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In AEO2009, E10a gasoline blend containing 10 percent ethanolis assumed to be the maximum ethanol blend allowed in California RFG, as opposed to the 5.7-percent blend assumed in earlier AEOs. The 5.7-percent blend had reflected decisions made when California decided to phase out use of the additive methyl tertiary butyl ether in its RFG program in 2003, opting instead to use ethanol in the minimum amount that would meet the requirement for 2.0 percent oxygen content under the CAA provisions in effect at that time

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Formation of mesoporous materials from silica dissolved in various NaOH concentrations: effect of pH and ionic strength  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the effects of NaOH/SiO2 ratio and pH on the formation of mesoporous materials, which was synthesized via an alkalimetal hydroxide fusion method, from amorphous silica dissolved in NaOH. Physical properties (e.g., specific surface ...

Jayhyun Park; Yosep Han; Hyunjung Kim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Why Sequence Pseudonocardia dioxanivorans?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pseudonocardia dioxanivorans? Pseudonocardia dioxanivorans? Ethers such as 1,4-dioxane, tetrahydrofuran, and methyl tert-butyl ether are widespread contaminants of groundwater resources. 1,4-Dioxane is widely used as a stabilizer for chlorinated solvents such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA). 1,4-Dioxane is a carcinogen, and causes acute toxic effects on the nervous system, liver, and kidneys. One promising approach for remediating 1,4-dioxane-impacted water supplies is in-situ bioremediation using aerobic bacteria. Pseudonocardia dioxanivorans CB1190 is a unique bacterial strain that can grow using 1,4-dioxane as a sole source of carbon and energy. It can degrade several other water contaminants and also fix dinitrogen, making it an attractive bioaugmentation culture even for nitrogen-limited

315

Total Refinery Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Crude Oil & Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Hydrogen Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components (net) Alaskan Crude Oil Receipts Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

316

Catalytic distillation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Catalytic distillation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

Smith, L.A. Jr.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

318

Total Blender Net Input of Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Input Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquid Petroleum Gases Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Oxygenates/Renewables Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

319

Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Crude Oil & Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Hydrogen Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components (net) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

320

Examination of Na-Doped Mo Sputtering for CIGS Devices: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-375  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work has investigated the use of Na doped Mo (MONA) sputtering targets for use in preparing CIGS devices. The Mo:Na material is doped to about 3% Na by weight, implying that a 40 nm layer on top of the standard Mo contact contains sufficient Na to dope a 2.5 ..mu..m CIGS film. The ability to control Na doping independent of both CIGS processing conditions and adhesion is an important gain for industry and research. Manufacturers gain a route to increased manufacturability and performance, while NREL researchers gain a tightened performance distribution of devices and increased process flexibility. Our immediate partner in this work, the Climax Molybdenum Technology Center, gains validation of their product.

Repins, I.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

N/Z and N/A dependence of balance energy as a probe of symmetry energy in heavy-ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the N/Z and N/A dependence of balance energy (E$_{bal}$) for isotopic series of Ca having N/Z (N/A) varying from 1.0 to 2.0 (0.5 to 0.67). We show that the N/Z (N/A) dependence of E$_{bal}$ is sensitive to symmetry energy and its density dependence at densities higher than saturation density and is insensitive towards the isospin dependence of nucleon-nucleon (nn) cross section and Coulomb repulsion. We also study the effect of momentum dependent interactions (MDI) on the N/Z (N/A) dependence of E$_{bal}$. We find that although MDI influences the E$_{bal}$ drastically, the N/Z (N/A) dependence of E$_{bal}$ remains unchanged on inclusion of MDI.

Aman D. Sood

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

322

NA Standards | Refinement Parameters | X-PLOR param file for high  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the file for different bond distances and angles of C2'and C3'-endo the file for different bond distances and angles of C2'and C3'-endo remark K= scale*(kT/sigma**2), scales=Base 0.1875, Sugar 0.566, Phos 1.548 ! removed references to CA, CF, CS, MG, NH3, OS (ATB 12/30/94) ! removed TIP3 water model (ATB 12/30/94) ! mapped NA->NNA, CH3E->CC3E (ATB 12/30/94) ! G.PARKINSON, J.VOJTECHOVSKY, L.CLOWNEY, A.T.BRUNGER ! H.M.BERMAN ! NEW PARAMETERS FOR THE REFINEMENT OF NUCLEIC ACID CONTAINING ! STRUCTURES ! ACTA CRYST.D (1996) v. 52 57-64 set echo=false end !the generic bonds were taken from param11.dna with 3*kq bond C5R OH 876.000 1.4300 ! 5' end bond C5D OH 876.000 1.4300 ! 5' end bond C3R OH 876.000 1.4300 ! 3' end bond C3D OH 876.000 1.4300 ! 3' end bond HHO O2R 1350.000 0.9572 !Mod HO to HHO 05/15/96

323

Short-lived isotopes and 23Na production in low mass AGB Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the synthesis of some short-lived isotopes and of 23Na in thermally pulsing AGB stars with initial mass of 2 Msun and two different metallicities (Z=1.5e-2, corresponding to the metal amount in the Sun, and Z=1e-4), representative of disk and halo stars, respectively. The different nucleosynthesis channels are illustrated in some details. As previously found, the 13C formed after each third dredge up episode is usually completely consumed by alpha captures before the onset of the subsequent thermal pulse, releasing neutrons. This is the most efficient neutron source in low mass AGB stars and the resulting s-process nucleosynthesis is at the origin of the solar main component. However, in the solar metallicity model, we find that the temperature of the first formed 13C pocket remains too low during the interpulse and the 13C is not completely burnt, being partially engulfed in the convective zone generated by the following thermal pulse. Due to the rapid convective mixing in this zone, the 13C is ex...

Cristallo, S; Straniero, O; Piersanti, L; Dominguez, I

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Short-lived isotopes and 23Na production in low mass AGB Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the synthesis of some short-lived isotopes and of 23Na in thermally pulsing AGB stars with initial mass of 2 Msun and two different metallicities (Z=1.5e-2, corresponding to the metal amount in the Sun, and Z=1e-4), representative of disk and halo stars, respectively. The different nucleosynthesis channels are illustrated in some details. As previously found, the 13C formed after each third dredge up episode is usually completely consumed by alpha captures before the onset of the subsequent thermal pulse, releasing neutrons. This is the most efficient neutron source in low mass AGB stars and the resulting s-process nucleosynthesis is at the origin of the solar main component. However, in the solar metallicity model, we find that the temperature of the first formed 13C pocket remains too low during the interpulse and the 13C is not completely burnt, being partially engulfed in the convective zone generated by the following thermal pulse. Due to the rapid convective mixing in this zone, the 13C is exposed to a larger temperature and a nucleosynthesis characterized by a relatively high neutron density develops. The main effect is the strong enhancement of isotopes located beyond some critical branching in the neutron-capture path, like 60Fe, otherwise only marginally produced during a standard s-process nucleosynthesis.

S. Cristallo; R. Gallino; O. Straniero; L. Piersanti; I. Dominguez

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

A comparison of equilibrium and non-equilibrium cycle methods for Na-cooled ATW system.  

SciTech Connect

An equilibrium cycle method, embodied in the REBUS-3[1] code system, has generally been used in conventional fast reactor design activities. The equilibrium cycle method provides an efficient approach for modeling reactor system, compared to the more traditional non-equilibrium cycle fuel management calculation approach. Recently, the equilibrium analysis method has been utilized for designing Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW)[2,3,4] cores, in which a scattered-reloading fuel management scheme is used. Compared with the conventional fast reactors, the ATW core is significantly different in several aspects since its main mission is to incinerate the transuranic (TRU) fuels. The high burnup non-fertile fuel has large variations in composition and reactivity during its lifetime. Furthermore, a relatively short cycle length is utilized in the ATW design to limit the potentially large reactivity swing over a cycle, and consequently 7 or 8-batch fuel management is usually assumed for a high fuel burnup. The validity of the equilibrium analysis method for the ATW core, therefore, needed to be verified. The main objective of this paper is to assess the validity of the equilibrium analysis method for a Na-cooled ATW core[4], which is an alternative core design of the ATW system under development.

Kim, Y.; Hill, R. N.; Taiwo, T. A.

2002-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

326

Comparison of LaBr3:Ce and NaI(Tl) Scintillators for Radio-Isotope Identification Devices  

SciTech Connect

Lanthanum halide (LaBr3:Ce) scintillators offer significantly better resolution (<3 percent at 662 kilo-electron volt [keV]) relative to sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and have recently become commercially available in sizes large enough for the hand-held radio-isotope identification device (RIID) market. There are drawbacks to lanthanum halide detectors, however. These include internal radioactivity that contributes to spectral counts and a low-energy response that can cause detector resolution to be lower than that of NaI(Tl) below 100 keV. To study the potential of this new material for RIIDs, we performed a series of measurements comparing a 1.5?1.5 inch LaBr?3:Ce detector with an Exploranium GR 135 RIID, which contains a 1.5-2.2 inch NaI(Tl) detector. Measurements were taken for short time frames, as typifies RIID usage. Measurements included examples of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), typically found in cargo, and special nuclear materials. Some measurements were noncontact, involving short distances or cargo shielding scenarios. To facilitate direct comparison, spectra from the different detectors were analyzed with the same isotope identification software (ORTEC ScintiVision TM). In general, the LaBr3:Ce detector was able to find more peaks and find them faster than the NaI(Tl) detector. To the same level of significance, the LaBr3:Ce detector was usually two to three times faster. The notable exception was for 40K containing NORM where interfering internal contamination in the LaBr3:Ce detector exist. NaI(Tl) consistently outperformed LaBr3:Ce for this important isotope. LaBr3:Ce currently costs much more than NaI(Tl), though this cost-difference is expected to diminish (but not completely) with time. As is true of all detectors, LaBr3:Ce will need to be gain-stabilized for RIID applications. This could possibly be done using the internal contaminants themselves. It is the experience of the authors that peak finding software in RIIDs needs to be improved, regardless of the detector material.

Milbrath, Brian D.; Choate, Bethany J.; Fast, Jim E.; Hensley, Walter K.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Schweppe, John E.

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Hydrothermal synthesis and the crystal structure of borate cancrinite (Na,Ca){sub 2}[Na{sub 6}(AlSiO{sub 4}){sub 6}](BO{sub 3}) . 2H{sub 2}O  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transparent prismatic single crystals of borate cancrinite (Na,Ca){sub 2}[Na{sub 6}(AlSiO{sub 4}){sub 6}](BO{sub 3}) . 2H{sub 2}O are prepared through hydrothermal crystallization. The parameters of the hexagonal unit cell and intensities of 10806 reflections are measured on an Enraf-Nonius CAD4 automated diffractometer. The compound crystallizes in the hexagonal crystal system with the unit cell parameters a = 12.745(4) A, c = 5.180(2) A, V = 728.6(4) A{sup 3}, and space group P6{sub 3}. The structure is determined by direct methods and refined using the full-matrix least-squares procedure in the anisotropic approximation for the non-hydrogen atoms. The refinement of the structure is performed to the final discrepancy factor R{sub 1} = 0.027 for 2889 unique reflections with I > 2 {sigma} (I). In the structure of the borate cancrinite, the AlO{sub 4} and SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra form a zeolite-like framework in which twelve-membered hexagonal channels are occupied by sodium atoms and BO{sub 3} groups, whereas six-membered channels are filled with sodium and calcium atoms and water molecules. The mean interatomic distances are found to be as follows: (Si-O){sub mean} = 1.614 A and (Al-O){sub mean} = 1.741 A in the AlO{sub 4} and SiO{sub 4} tetrahedra, (Na-O){sub mean} = 2.542 A in the seven-vertex sodium polyhedra, and [(Na,Ca)-O]{sub mean} = 2.589 A in the ditrigonal bipyramids.

Shirinova, A. F. [Baku State University (Azerbaijan)], E-mail: afashf@rambler.ru; Khrustalev, V. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds (Russian Federation); Samedov, H. R. [National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Chemical Problems (Azerbaijan); Chiragov, M. I. [Baku State University (Azerbaijan)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

The electrorheology of suspensions consisting of Na-Fluorohectorite synthetic clay particles in silicon oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under application of an electric field greater than a triggering electric field $E_c \\sim 0.4$ kV/mm, suspensions obtained by dispersing particles of the synthetic clay fluoro-hectorite in a silicon oil, aggregate into chain- and/or column-like structures parallel to the applied electric field. This micro-structuring results in a transition in the suspensions' rheological behavior, from a Newtonian-like behavior to a shear-thinning rheology with a significant yield stress. This behavior is studied as a function of particle volume fraction and strength of the applied electric field, $E$. The steady shear flow curves are observed to scale onto a master curve with respect to $E$, in a manner similar to what was recently found for suspensions of laponite clay [42]. In the case of Na-fluorohectorite, the corresponding dynamic yield stress is demonstrated to scale with respect to $E$ as a power law with an exponent $\\alpha \\sim 1.93$, while the static yield stress inferred from constant shear stress tests exhibits a similar behavior with $\\alpha \\sim 1.58$. The suspensions are also studied in the framework of thixotropic fluids: the bifurcation in the rheology behavior when letting the system flow and evolve under a constant applied shear stress is characterized, and a bifurcation yield stress, estimated as the applied shear stress at which viscosity bifurcation occurs, is measured to scale as $E^\\alpha$ with $\\alpha \\sim 0.5$ to 0.6. All measured yield stresses increase with the particle fraction $\\Phi$ of the suspension. For the static yield stress, a scaling law $\\Phi^\\beta$, with $\\beta = 0.54$, is found. The results are found to be reasonably consistent with each other. Their similarities with-, and discrepancies to- results obtained on laponite-oil suspensions are discussed.

Y. Méheust; K. P. S. Parmar; B. Schjelderupsen; J. O. Fossum

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

A new measurement of the $K^\\pm\\to?^\\pm??$ decay at the NA48/2 experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NA48/2 experiment at CERN collected two data samples with minimum bias trigger conditions in 2003 and 2004. A measurement of the rate and dynamic properties of the rare decay $K^\\pm\\to\\pi^\\pm\\gamma\\gamma$ from these data sets based on 149 decay candidates with an estimated background of $15.5\\pm0.7$ events is reported.

NA48/2 collaboration

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

330

A Distribuição Espacial e Variabilidade Interanual do Fogo na Amazônia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 a 60. 3 a 60. 1 A Distribuição Espacial e Variabilidade Interanual do Fogo na Amazônia Wilfrid Schroeder, 1 Ane Alencar, 2 Eugênio Arima, 3 e Alberto Setzer 4 Evidências a partir de observações de carvão sugerem baixa frequência de eventos de fogo causadores de alteração das florestas amazônicas no período anterior ao século vinte. Entretanto, a distribuição espacial e temporal do fogo mudou drasticamente nas últimas décadas. O fogo tornou-se uma das forças motrizes do uso da terra e da mudança da cobertura vegetal na Amazônia. A crescente intervenção humana na região, juntamente com anomalias climáticas, expuseram as florestas tropicais a um número sem precedentes de fogos em vegetação com consequências importantes para o funcionamento do complexo sistema

331

Nanoscale modulations in (KLa)(CaW)O-6 and (NaLa)(CaW)O-6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complex nanoscale modulations are identified in two new A-site ordered perovskites, (KLa)(CaW)O{sub 6} and (NaLa)(CaW)O{sub 6}. In (KLa)(CaW)O{sub 6}, selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) show an incommensurate nanocheckerboard modulation with {approx}9.4 x 9.4 a{sub p} periodicity (a{sub p} {approx} 4 {angstrom} for the cubic perovskite aristotype). For (NaLa)(CaW)O{sub 6} a one-dimensional modulation is observed with a {approx}16(1 1 0)a{sub p} repeat; the orientation of the nanostripes is different from the stripes observed in other mixed A-site systems. Studies using high temperature x-ray diffraction suggest the formation of the complex modulations is associated with small deviations from the ideal 1:1:1:1 stoichiometry of the (A{sup +}La{sup 3+})(CaW)O{sub 6} phases. Z-contrast images acquired on an aberration-corrected microscope provide evidence for deviations from stoichiometry with a {approx}1:15 periodic arrangement of La{sub 4/3}(CaW)O{sub 6}:(NaLa)(CaW)O{sub 6} nano-phases.

Licurse, Mark [University of Pennsylvania; Borisevich, Albina Y [ORNL; Davies, Peter [University of Pennsylvania

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Electrochemical and structural characterization of titanium-substituted manganese oxides based on Na0.44MnO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of titanium-substituted manganese oxides, Li{sub x}Ti{sub y}Mn{sub 1-y}O{sub 2} (y = 0.11, 0.22, 0.33, 0.44, and 0.55) with the Na{sub 0.44}MnO{sub 2} structure were prepared from Na{sub x}Ti{sub y}Mn{sub 1-y}O{sub 2} (x {approx} 0.44) precursors. The electrochemical characteristics of these compounds, which retain the unique double-tunnel structure during ion exchange, were examined in lithium/polymer electrolyte cells operating at 85 C. All of the substituted cathode materials intercalated lithium reversibly, with Li{sub x}Ti{sub 0.22}Mn{sub 0.78}O{sub 2} exhibiting the highest capacity in polymer cells, about 10-20% greater than that of unsubstituted Li{sub x}MnO{sub 2} made from Na{sub 0.44}MnO{sub 2}. In common with Li{sub x}MnO{sub 2}, the Ti-substituted materials exhibited good capacity retention over one hundred or more cycles, with some compositions exhibiting a fade rate of less than 0.03% per cycle.

Doeff, Marca M.; Richardson, Thomas J.; Hwang, Kwang-Taek

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Hydrothermal synthesis and luminescent properties of NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor  

SciTech Connect

Pompon-like NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphors have been successfully prepared via a hydrothermal method using ammonia as pH value regulator. The hydrothermal process was carried out under aqueous condition without the use of any organic solvent, surfactant, and catalyst. The experimental results demonstrate that the obtained NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphor powders are single-phase scheelite structure with tetragonal symmetry. Moreover, the phosphor under the excitation of 390 and 456 nm exhibited blue emission (486 nm) and yellow emission (574 nm), corresponding to the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}{yields}{sup 6}H{sub 15/2} transition and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}{yields}{sup 6}H{sub 13/2} transition of Dy{sup 3+} ions, respectively. In addition, the yellow-to-blue emission intensity ratio (Y/B) can be changed with the doped concentration of Dy{sup 3+} ions. All chromaticity coordinates of the obtained NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphors are located in the white-light region. The results indicate that this kind of phosphor may has potential applications in the fields of near UV-excited and blue-excited white LEDs. - Graphical abstract: It can be seen from the SEM images that a pompon-like shape was obtained with an average diameter of about 1 {mu}m, and it is composed of many nanoflakes. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pompon-like NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Dy{sup 3+} phosphors have been successfully prepared via a hydrothermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Blue emission at 486 nm and yellow emission at 574 nm were obtained from the samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The yellow-to-blue emission intensity ratio (Y/B) can be changed with the doped concentration of Dy{sup 3+} ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NaLa(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Dy{sup 3+} can be efficiently excited by the blue light and the near ultraviolet light.

Li Linlin; Zi Wenwen; Li Guanghuan; Lan Shi; Ji Guijuan [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China); Gan Shucai, E-mail: gansc@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China); Zou Haifeng [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China); Xu Xuechun [College of Earth Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

The Impact of Na—H+ Exchange on Long-Term Borosilicate Glass Corrosion: Experiments and Field Observations  

SciTech Connect

New insights from laboratory experiments coupled with field observations indicate that pore water solutions that eventually breach containment materials in disposal systems will interact with sodium-excess borosilicate waste glass in an unexpected way. Because many glass waste forms are relatively sodium-rich, they are especially vulnerable to Na+—H+ exchange (ion exchange or simply, IEX). Although the kinetics of this process has been previously investigated for early-stage glass reactions, the implications of IEX for long-term dissolution resistance have not yet been realized. Non-radioactive glass with major- and minor-element chemical compositions similar to Hanford high-Na waste glass were subjected to dissolution experiments to quantify the rates of matrix dissolution and IEX rates. Single-Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) tests quantified the IEX rate at 40°C pH = 8 and silica saturation and showed a dependence upon the fraction of excess sodium in the glass. The equation for the rate (in moles of sodium released per meter squared per second) dependence on excess sodium is: log10rate[mol/(m2?s)] = 0.63R + (-11.0); r2 = 0.86 where R = molar Na+/?(M3+). Further, rates of Na release are slower by ?30% in D2O-based solutions compared to those in H2O. These results are the hallmark of IEX reactions. Our results are compared against those from a lysimeter field experiment consisting of glasses buried in Hanford sand and to dissolution experiments conducted with a Pressurized Unsaturated Flow (PUF) apparatus. These longer-term tests indicate an initial decrease in dissolution rate by a factor of 10×, and then a constant steady-state rate thereafter. Thus, these data show that IEX reactions are important at near-saturation conditions and effectively prevent dissolution rates from falling below a minimum value. In sum, IEX modifies the long-term behavior of glass dissolution and models cannot assume that dissolution of Na-rich borosilicate glass will decrease by a factor of 100× to 1000×, as argued for minerals and less sodic glasses.

Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Na NMR Evidence for Charge Order and Anomalous Magnetism in NaxCoO2 I. R. Mukhamedshin,1,* H. Alloul,1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

23 Na NMR Evidence for Charge Order and Anomalous Magnetism in NaxCoO2 I. R. Mukhamedshin,1,* H are studied by 23Na NMR and SQUID magnetometry. In nominal 0:50 x 0:70 solid state reacted samples,6] with the magnetic prop- erties. In a pioneering work, two 59Co NMR signals attributed to nonmagnetic Co3 sites were

Paris-Sud 11, Université de

336

The effect of Na{sup +} impurities on the conductivity and water uptake of nafion 115 polymer electrolyte fuel cell membranes.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water uptake and ionic conductivities are reported for Nafion 115 membranes as functions of water activity and percentage of sulfonic groups occupied by sodium impurities. Water content was determined gravimetrically under liquid hydration and at 100, 75.3, and 11.3% relative humidity (RH). Water content exponentially decreased from the H{sup +}-form membrane water uptake isotherm to the Na{sup +}-form isotherm when hydrated by water vapor. Ninety percent of this decrease is reached at a substitution level of 0.2Na{sup +}/SO{sub 3}{sup -}. Water uptake under liquid water hydration decreased more gradually, only 50% to completion at 0.2Na{sup +}/SO{sub 3}{sup -}. Four-probe conductivity testing of Nafion 115 membranes, normalized against dry dimensions, revealed that although hydration decreases immediately with the introduction of sodium impurities, ionic conductivity at 100% RH remains constant up to 0.15Na{sup +}/SO{sub 3}{sup -}. Above 0.15Na{sup +}/SO{sub 3}{sup -} an exponential decrease in ionic conductivity is observed with higher sodium content. The dependence of ionic conductivity on water content is also reported for sodium contents of 0, 0.27, 0.62 and 1Na{sup +}/SO{sub 3}{sup -}.

Bendert, J. C.; Papadias, D. D.; Myers, D. J.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

337

High-pressure stability relations, crystal structures, and physical properties of perovskite and post-perovskite of NaNiF{sub 3}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NaNiF{sub 3} perovskite was found to transform to post-perovskite at 16-18 GPa and 1273-1473 K. The equilibrium transition boundary is expressed as P (GPa)=-2.0+0.014 Multiplication-Sign T (K). Structure refinements indicated that NaNiF{sub 3} perovskite and post-perovskite have almost regular NiF{sub 6} octahedra consistent with absence of the first-order Jahn-Teller active ions. Both NaNiF{sub 3} perovskite and post-perovskite are insulators. The perovskite underwent a canted antiferromagnetic transition at 156 K, and the post-perovskite antiferromagnetic transition at 22 K. Magnetic exchange interaction of NaNiF{sub 3} post-perovskite is smaller than that of perovskite, reflecting larger distortion of Ni-F-Ni network and lower dimension of octahedral arrangement in post-perovskite than those in perovskite. - Graphical abstract: Perovskite-post-perovskite transition in NaNiF{sub 3} at high pressure Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NaNiF{sub 3} perovskite (Pv) transforms to post-perovskite (pPv) at 16 GPa and 1300 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The equilibrium transition boundary is expressed as P (GPa)=-2.0+0.014 T (K). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antiferromagnetic transition occurs at 156 K in Pv and 22 K in pPv.

Shirako, Y. [Department of Chemistry, Gakushuin University, 1-5-1 Mejiro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8588 (Japan); Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Shi, Y.G. [Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100190 Beijing (China); Aimi, A.; Mori, D.; Kojitani, H. [Department of Chemistry, Gakushuin University, 1-5-1 Mejiro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8588 (Japan); Yamaura, K. [Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Inaguma, Y. [Department of Chemistry, Gakushuin University, 1-5-1 Mejiro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8588 (Japan); Akaogi, M., E-mail: masaki.akaogi@gakushuin.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Gakushuin University, 1-5-1 Mejiro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8588 (Japan)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Nanoscale modulations in (KLa)(CaW)O{sub 6} and (NaLa)(CaW)O{sub 6}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complex nanoscale modulations are identified in two new A-site ordered perovskites, (KLa)(CaW)O{sub 6} and (NaLa)(CaW)O{sub 6}. In (KLa)(CaW)O{sub 6}, selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) show an incommensurate nanocheckerboard modulation with {approx}9.4 Multiplication-Sign 9.4a{sub p} periodicity (a{sub p} Almost-Equal-To 4 A for the cubic perovskite aristotype). For (NaLa)(CaW)O{sub 6} a one-dimensional modulation is observed with a {approx}16(1 1 0)a{sub p} repeat; the Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 1 0 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket orientation of the nanostripes is different from the Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 0 0 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket stripes observed in other mixed A-site systems. Studies using high temperature x-ray diffraction suggest the formation of the complex modulations is associated with small deviations from the ideal 1:1:1:1 stoichiometry of the (A{sup +}La{sup 3+})(CaW)O{sub 6} phases. Z-contrast images acquired on an aberration-corrected microscope provide evidence for deviations from stoichiometry with a {approx}1:15 periodic arrangement of La{sub 4/3}(CaW)O{sub 6}:(NaLa)(CaW)O{sub 6} nano-phases. - Graphical abstract: Complex nanoscale modulations are identified in two new A-site ordered perovskites, (KLa)(CaW)O{sub 6} and (NaLa)(CaW)O{sub 6}. In (KLa)(CaW)O{sub 6}, selected-area electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy show a two-dimensional, nanocheckerboard modulation. For (NaLa)(CaW)O{sub 6} a one-dimensional modulation is observed; the Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 1 0 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket orientation of the nanostripes is different from the Left-Pointing-Angle-Bracket 1 0 0 Right-Pointing-Angle-Bracket stripes observed in other mixed A-site systems. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two new A-site ordered perovskites were synthesized, (KLa)(CaW)O{sub 6} and (NaLa)(CaW)O{sub 6}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unusual 1D and 2D nanoscale patterns were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tolerance factor shown to be not enough to predict the observed morphologies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High temperature x-ray diffraction data suggests a loss of stoichiometry is related to the modulations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Z-contrast imaging provides direct evidence for non-stoichiometry and a new model.

Licurse, Mark W., E-mail: mlicurse@seas.upenn.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, 3231 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Borisevich, Albina Y., E-mail: albinab@ornl.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Davies, Peter K., E-mail: davies@seas.upenn.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, 3231 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

AlSb thin films as negative electrodes for Li-ion and Na-ion batteries  

SciTech Connect

The electrochemical reactions between Li and Na with amorphous/nanocrystalline AlSb thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering are reported for the first time. The films are composed of AlSb and Sb nanoparticles embedded into an amorphous matrix with an overall Sb/Al ratio of 1.13. The reaction with Li proceeds with an average reaction potential of 0.65 V, a reversible capacity of 750 mAh g-1, and very fast reaction kinetics. For instance, a storage capacity close to 500 mAh g-1, corresponding to 70% of the maximum capacity, is achieved at 125 C-rate. In addition, there is only a small increase in overpotentials with increasing current: ~0.15 V at 12 C and ~0.7 V at 125 C. In contrast, the reaction with Na results in average reaction potential of 0.5 V and a storage capacity of 500 mAh g-1 obtained at low currents. The capacity retention and reaction kinetics are presently not satisfactory with pronounced capacity losses upon cycling and large overpotentials with increasing current. The capacity retention can be improved by using fluoroethylene carbonate additive in the Na-ion electrolyte, which highlights that the Solid Electrolyte Interphase plays an important role for the electrode cycling stability. The reaction kinetics is relatively poor and an increase in overpotentials of about 0.9 V at 2 C is observed (retained capacity of about 350 mAh g-1 or 66% of the maximum). The study of the reaction mechanism on thick films (3-5 m) by X-ray diffraction reveals that the electrode material remains amorphous at all potentials. The presence of broad humps, located at the positions expected for Li-Al and Li-Sb line compounds, suggests that during the reaction with Li the atomic short range ordering is similar to the expected phases.

Baggetto, Loic [ORNL; Marszewski, Michal [Kent State University; Gorka, Joanna [ORNL; Jaroniec, Mietek [Kent State University; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Effects of oxygen cover gas and NaOH dilution on gas generation in tank 241-SY-101 waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory studies are reported of gas generation in heated waste from tank 241-SY-101. The rates of gas generation and the compositions of product gas were measured. Three types of tests are compared. The tests use: undiluted waste, waste diluted by a 54% addition of 2.5 M NaOH, and undiluted waste with a reactive cover gas of 30% Oxygen in He. The gas generation rate is reduced by dilution, increased by higher temperatures (which determines activation energies), and increased by reactions of Oxygen (these primarily produce H{sub 2}). Gases are generated as reduction products oxidation of organic carbon species by nitrite and oxygen.

Person, J.C.

1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Arco chimie focuses on PA at FOS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arco Chimie France (Fos-sur-Mer), at a recent meeting at its southern France manufacturing site, emphasized that future strategy is strongly focused on its propylene oxide (PO) and derivatives activities. The F2.5 billion ($466 million)-Fe billion/year operation manufactures 200,000 m.t./year of PO, about 70% for captive use and the balance for the merchant market; 550,000 m.t./year of methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE); 97,000 m.t./year of polyols; and 70,000 m.t./year of propylene glycols. There has been talk of Arco modifying its Fos MTBE plant to make it flexible for ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) output; the parent company already operates an MTBE/ETBE pilot unit at Corpus Christi, TX. But Arco Chimie notes there is insufficient bioethanol feedstock availability to convert all production to ETBE. The company would also require investment in new storage capacity for ethanol and ETBE. However, France's biofuels program is not yet clearly defined, and it is politically sensitive because it depends heavily on government subsidies offered to farmers. That, says Arco, makes it impossible to have an accurate idea of how much ethanol will be available.

Jackson, D.

1992-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

342

Fuel Ethanol Oxygenate Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Fuel Ethanol Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Merchant Plants Captive Plants Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Product: Fuel Ethanol Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Merchant Plants Captive Plants Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 Oct-13 View History U.S. 27,197 26,722 26,923 26,320 25,564 27,995 1981-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) 628 784 836 842 527 636 2004-2013 Midwest (PADD 2) 25,209 24,689 24,786 24,186 23,810 26,040 2004-2013 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 523 404 487 460 431 473 2004-2013 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) 450 432 430 432 415 429 2004-2013 West Coast (PADD 5)

343

The electrochemical reactions of pure In with Li and Na: anomalous electrolyte decomposition, benefits of FEC additive, phase transitions and electrode performance  

SciTech Connect

Indium thin films are evaluated as an anode material for Li-ion and Na-ion batteries (theoretical capacities of 1012 mAh g-1 for Li and 467 mAh g-1 for Na). The native surface oxides are responsible for the anomalous electrolyte decomposition during the first cycle while oxidized In species are found to be responsible for the electrolyte decomposition during the subsequent cycles. The presence of 5wt% FEC electrolyte additive suppresses the occurrence of the anomalous electrolyte decomposition during the first cycle but is not sufficient to prevent the decomposition upon further cycling from 0 to 2 V. Prevention of the anomalous decomposition can be achieved by restricting the charge cut-off, for instance at 1.1 V, or by using larger amounts of FEC. The In films show moderately good capacity retention with storage capacities when cycled with Li (950 mAh g-1) but significantly less when cycled with Na (125 mAh g-1). XRD data reveal that several known Li-In phases (i.e LiIn, Li3In2, LiIn2 and Li13In3) form during the electrochemical reaction. In contrast, the reaction with Na is severely limited. The largest amount of inserted Na is evidenced for cells short-circuited 40 hrs at 65C, for which the XRD data show the coexistence of NaIn, In, and an unknown phase. During cycling, mechanical degradation due to repeated expansion/shrinkage, evidenced by SEM, coupled with SEI formation is the primary source of the capacity fade. Finally, we show that the In thin films exhibit very high rate capability for both Li (100 C) and Na (30 C).

Hawks, Samantha A [ORNL] [ORNL; Baggetto, Loic [ORNL] [ORNL; Bridges, Craig A [ORNL] [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Branch-shaped NaGdF{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} nanocrystals: Selective synthesis, and photoluminescence properties  

SciTech Connect

The branch-shaped NaGdF{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} nanocrystals (NCs) were synthesized by using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a capping agent in ethylene glycol (EG) solution. The NCs were readily dispersed into water or ethanol to form a relatively stable suspension, which may facilitate their applications in biological fields. Meanwhile, the crystal structures of the NCs were tunable from the mixture of the {alpha}-(cubic) and {beta}-(hexagonal) phases to the pure {beta}-phase by varying the F{sup -}/Ln{sup 3+} molar ratio or the reaction temperature. The pure {beta}-phase NCs were obtained at relatively high F{sup -}/Ln{sup 3+} molar ratio and reaction temperature. In addition, the Eu{sup 3+}-doping concentration-dependent optical properties of the NaGdF{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} NCs were investigated in detail. The result shows that the emissions from high energy level transitions (e.g., {sup 5}D{sub 1}, {sup 5}D{sub 2}, and {sup 5}D{sub 3}) are significantly impaired with increasing the Eu{sup 3+}-doping concentration due to the cross-relaxation process, and the emission at 612 nm is predominant since the doped Eu{sup 3+} ions locate in the crystal fields without inversion center.

Wang Shangbing, E-mail: wsb1978@mail.ustc.edu.cn [School of Metallurgy and Resources, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Anhui University of Technology, Ma'anshan, Anhui, 243002 (China); Li Qing; Pei Lizhai [School of Metallurgy and Resources, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Anhui University of Technology, Ma'anshan, Anhui, 243002 (China); Zhang Qianfeng, E-mail: zhangqf@ahut.edu.cn [School of Metallurgy and Resources, Institute of Molecular Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Anhui University of Technology, Ma'anshan, Anhui, 243002 (China)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

A Expansão da Agricultura Intensiva e Pecuária na Amazônia Brasileira  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

61 a 81. 61 a 81. 1 A Expansão da Agricultura Intensiva e Pecuária na Amazônia Brasileira Robert Walker, 1 Ruth DeFries, 2 Maria Del Carmem Vera-Diaz, 3 Yosio Shimabukuro, 4 e Adriano Venturieri 5 A agropecuária na Amazônia tem, frequentemente, provocado controvérsia em função do imenso valor ecológico do meio ambiente da região. Isso ocorreu, primeiramente, com a pecuária e atualmente com o crescimento acelerado da soja, uso de tratores e criação de gado. Essas atividades têm ocupado terras que, por milênios, sustentaram somente florestas úmidas fechadas, ecossistemas naturais e povos indígenas dispersos. O presente capítulo focaliza a porção brasileira da Bacia Amazônica e trata da expansão da agropecuária nesta região, partindo da premissa de que uma efetiva política de desenvolvimento

346

Energy dependence of identified hadron spectra and event-by-event fluctuations in p+p interactions from NA61/SHINE at the CERN SPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NA61/SHINE at the CERN SPS is a fixed-target experiment pursuing a rich physics program including measurements for heavy ion, neutrino and cosmic ray physics. The main goal of the ion program is to explore the most interesting $T, mu_{B}$ region of the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter. We plan to study the properties of the onset of deconfinement and to search for the signatures of the critical point. The search is performed by varying collision energy (13A-158A GeV/c) and system size (p+p, Be+Be, Ar+Ca, Xe+La). Thanks to its large acceptance and excellent particle identification capability NA61/SHINE is well suited for performing high-precision particle production measurements as well as for studying event-by-event fluctuations in p+p, p+nucleus and nucleus+nucleus collisions. Preliminary results on p+p interactions at 20, 31, 40, 80 and 158 GeV/c are presented. They include inclusive spectra of pi+, pi-, K- and protons as a function of transverse momentum/mass and rapidity as well as event-by-event fluctuations of transverse momentum, azimuthal angle and chemical composition. The new NA61 measurements are compared with the corresponding results of NA49 on central Pb+Pb collisions and with predictions of Monte Carlo models. Finally, the future plans of NA61/SHINE are summarised.

Maciej Rybczynski

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Cross sections for monitor reactions {sup 27}Al((p, x){sup 24}Na, {sup 27}Al(p, x){sup 22}Na, and {sup 27}Al(p, x){sup 7}Be at proton energies in the range 0.04-2.6 GeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cross sections for the monitor reactions {sup 27}Al(p, x){sup 24}Na, {sup 27}Al(p, x){sup 22}Na, and {sup 27}Al(p, x){sup 7}Be at 12 proton energies, 2605, 1598, 1199, 799, 600, 400, 249, 147.6, 97.2, 66.0, 44.6, and 40.8 MeV, have been determined with 72 Multiplication-Sign 72-mm square and 10.5-mm-diameter round aluminum foils. The rates of the reactions of the production of {sup 24}Na, {sup 22}Na, and {sup 7}Be in the foils in each irradiation run have been determined by {gamma} spectrometry, whereas the number of protons transmitted through these foils has been determined using calibrated fast current transformers. The cross sections have been determined as the ratios of the corresponding reaction to the average proton fluence.

Titarenko, Yu. E.; Borovlev, S. P.; Butko, M. A.; Zhivun, V. M.; Pavlov, K. V.; Rogov, V. I.; Titarenko, A. Yu.; Tikhonov, R. S.; Florya, S. N.; Koldobskiy, A. B. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Frustration by competing interactions in the highly-distorted double perovskites La2NaB'O6 (B' = Ru, Os)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The usual classical behaviour of S = 3/2, B-site ordered double perovskites generally results in simple, commensurate magnetic ground states. In contrast, heat capacity and neutron powder diffraction measurements for the S = 3/2 systems La2NaB'O6 (B = Ru, Os) reveal an incommensurate magnetic ground state for La2NaRuO6 and a drastically suppressed ordered moment for La2NaOsO6. This behaviour is attributed to the large monoclinic structural distortions of these double perovskites. The distortions have the effect of weakening the nearest neighbour superexchange interactions, presumably to an energy scale that is comparable to the next nearest neighbour superexchange. The exotic ground states in these materials can then arise from a competition between these two types of antiferromagnetic interactions, providing a novel mechanism for achieving frustration in the double perovskite family.

Aczel, Adam A [ORNL; Bugaris, Dan [University of South Carolina; Li, Ling [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Yan, Jiaqiang [ORNL; Dela Cruz, Clarina R [ORNL; Zur Loye, Hans-Conrad [University of South Carolina; Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Hanford Low Activity Waste (LAW) Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer (FBSR) Na-Al-Si (NAS) Waste Form Qualification C.M. Jantzen and E.M. Pierce November 18, 2010 2 Participating Organizations 3 Incentive and Objectives FBSR sodium-aluminosilicate (NAS) waste form has been identified as a promising supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW Objectives: Reduce the risk associated with implementing the FBSR NAS waste form as a supplemental treatment technology for Hanford LAW Conduct test with actual tank wastes Use the best science to fill key data gaps Linking previous and new results together 4 Outline FBSR NAS waste form processing scales FBSR NAS waste form data/key assumptions FBSR NAS key data gaps FBSR NAS testing program 5 FBSR NAS Waste Form Processing

350

..&rrbt, Chief, Industrial Hy&na Branch, HerlthbrSas8byLaboratoly  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

tf..@ tf..@ ..&rrbt, Chief, Industrial Hy&na Branch, HerlthbrSas8byLaboratoly ;,.; , ' 1 ' @@w-w 3, 1954 P. B. Klevin, Indurtrial Hygiexn J5rantah, Barrlei &'afelky Lab0raM~ : . .A , 3 t :;p,: . NATIONAL LEiD OF OHIO ROLLINO OFERATIONS AT SIHONr>s SAW 6 STEEL- Amm', +I& y9, <: '.. SmBoLt HSHtPBK ' -: - St. Louis Area Office at the Simnds Saw and Steel Co., k&port, NJ., on tha &boVe clrtm, I oblruloed tb Mat;Lonal Uad umu&m and thorium roll- ing operations which were In pogress at the 16" and 10" mills respectively. Althm& hhls+urV8y w&d: ma& wltbout Qte dlx' aet request of the National Lead Co., I am reporting the results for your information. At the W aill whem 38 fh&m ingots were r&lad into lmgthaned rods,

351

Viscosity of NaCl and other solutions up to 350{sup 0}C and 50 MPa pressures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental values for the viscosity of sodium chloride solutions are critically reviewed for application to geothermal energy. Data published recently by Kestin, Los, Pepinov, and Semenyuk as well as earlier data are included. A theoretically based equation for calculating relative viscosity was developed, and used to generate tables of smoothed values over the ranges 20{sup 0}C to 350{sup 0}C, 0 to 5 m and pressures up to 50 MPa. The equation reproduces selected data to an average of better than 2 percent over the entire range of temperatures and pressures. Selected tables of data are included for KCl up to 150{sup 0}C, CaCl{sub 2} solutions up to 100{sup 0}C, and for mixtures of NaCl with KCl and CaCl{sub 2}. Recommendations are given for additional data needs.

Phillips, S.L.; Ozbek, H.; Igbene, A.; Litton, G.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Final Report for the Study on S-Implanted Alloy 22 in 1 M NaCl Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to examine the effects of high levels of S in the near-surface region on the passivity of Alloy 22, a corrosion resistant Ni-Cr-Mo alloy, in deaerated 1 M NaCl solution. Near-surface concentrations of S up to 2 at.% were achieved in Alloy 22 test specimens by implanting them with S. The S-implanted samples were then evaluated in short-term electrochemical tests in the salt solution and subsequently analyzed with X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) for film thickness and composition. Specimens tested included non-implanted and annealed Alloy 22 samples, samples implanted with S, and “blanks” implanted with Ar as an ion that would simulate the “damage” of S implantation without the chemical effect. A sample of S-implanted Alloy 22 was also exposed to solution for 29 days and analyzed for evidence of S accumulation at the surface over longer times.

Windisch, Charles F.; Baer, Donald R.; Jones, R. H.; Engelhard, Mark H.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Evidence for the onset of deconfinement and quest for the critical point by NA49 at the CERN SPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NA49 results on hadron production obtained in PbPb collisions at SPS energies from 20 to 158 A GeV are shown and discussed as evidence for the onset of deconfinement. The primary measures are the pion yield, the kaon-to-pion ratio and the slope parameter of transverse mass distributions. The possible indication of the QCD critical point signatures was investigated in the event-by-event fluctuations of various observables such as the mean transverse momentum, particle multiplicity and azimuthal angle distributions as well as in the particle ratio fluctuations. The energy dependence of these observables was measured in central PbPb collisions in the full SPS energy range while for analysis of the system size dependence data from pp, CC, SiSi, and PbPb collisions at the top SPS energy were used.

Melkumov, G. L., E-mail: georgui.melkoumov@cern.ch [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Anticic, T. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute (Croatia); Baatar, B. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Barna, D. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics (Hungary); Bartke, J. [Polish Academy of Sciences, H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics (Poland); Beck, H. [Fachbereich Physik der Universitaet (Germany); Betev, L. [CERN (Switzerland); Bialkowska, H. [Institute for Nuclear Studies (Poland); Blume, C. [Fachbereich Physik der Universitaet (Germany); Bogusz, M. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics (Poland); Boimska, B. [Institute for Nuclear Studies (Poland); Book, J. [Fachbereich Physik der Universitaet (Germany); Botje, M. [NIKHEF (Netherlands); Buncic, P. [CERN (Switzerland); Cetner, T. [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics (Poland); Christakoglou, P. [NIKHEF (Netherlands); Chung, P. [Stony Brook University (SUNYSB), Department of Chemistry (United States); Chvala, O. [Charles University, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Physics (Czech Republic); Cramer, J. G. [University of Washington, Nuclear Physics Laboratory (United States); Eckardt, V. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Germany); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Density functional theory studies on theelectronic, structural, phonon dynamicaland thermo-stability properties of bicarbonates MHCO3, M D Li, Na, K  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structural, electronic, phonon dispersion and thermodynamic properties of MHCO3 (M D Li, Na, K) solids were investigated using density functional theory. The calculated bulk properties for both their ambient and the high-pressure phases are in good agreement with available experimental measurements. Solid phase LiHCO3 has not yet been observed experimentally. We have predicted several possible crystal structures for LiHCO3 using crystallographic database searching and prototype electrostatic ground state modeling. Our total energy and phonon free energy .FPH/ calculations predict that LiHCO3 will be stable under suitable conditions of temperature and partial pressures of CO2 and H2O. Our calculations indicate that the HCO􀀀 3 groups in LiHCO3 and NaHCO3 form an infinite chain structure through O#1; #1; #1;H#1; #1; #1;O hydrogen bonds. In contrast, the HCO􀀀 3 anions form dimers, .HCO􀀀 3 /2, connected through double hydrogen bonds in all phases of KHCO3. Based on density functional perturbation theory, the Born effective charge tensor of each atom type was obtained for all phases of the bicarbonates. Their phonon dispersions with the longitudinal optical–transverse optical splitting were also investigated. Based on lattice phonon dynamics study, the infrared spectra and the thermodynamic properties of these bicarbonates were obtained. Over the temperature range 0–900 K, the FPH and the entropies (S) of MHCO3 (M D Li, Na, K) systems vary as FPH.LiHCO3/ > FPH.NaHCO3/ > FPH.KHCO3/ and S.KHCO3/ > S.NaHCO3/ > S.LiHCO3/, respectively, in agreement with the available experimental data. Analysis of the predicted thermodynamics of the CO2 capture reactions indicates that the carbonate/bicarbonate transition reactions for Na and K could be used for CO2 capture technology, in agreement with experiments.

Duan, Yuhua; Zhang, Bo; Sorescu, Dan C.; Johnson, Karl; Majzoub, Eric H; Luebke, David R.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

NaK pool-boiler bench-scale receiver durability test: Test results and materials analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pool-boiler reflux receivers have been considered as an alternative to heat pipes for the input of concentrated solar energy to Stirling-cycle engines in dish-Stirling electric generation systems. Pool boilers offer simplicity in design and fabrication. The operation of a full-scale pool-boiler receiver has been demonstrated for short periods of time. However, to generate cost-effective electricity, the receiver must operate Without significant maintenance for the entire system life, as much as 20 to 30 years. Long-term liquid-metal boiling stability and materials compatibility with refluxing NaK-78 is not known and must be determined for the pool boiler receiver. No boiling system has been demonstrated for a significant duration with the current porous boiling enhancement surface and materials. Therefore, it is necessary to simulate the full-scale pool boiler design as much as possible, including flux levels, materials, and operating cycles. On-sun testing is impractical because of the limited test time available. A test vessel was constructed with a porous boiling enhancement surface. The boiling surface consisted of a brazed stainless steel powder with about 50% porosity. The vessel was heated with a quartz lamp array providing about go W/CM2 peak incident thermal flux. The vessel was charged with NaK-78. This allows the elimination of costly electric preheating, both on this test and on fullscale receivers. The vessel was fabricated from Haynes 230 alloy. The vessel operated at 750{degrees}C around the clock, with a 1/2-hour shutdown cycle to ambient every 8 hours. The test completed 7500 hours of lamp-on operation time, and over 1000 startups from ambient. The test was terminated when a small leak in an Inconel 600 thermowell was detected. The test design and data are presented here. Metallurgical analysis of virgin and tested materials has begun, and initial results are also presented.

Andraka, C.E.; Goods, S.H.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Jones, S.A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

High temperature oxidation and NaCl-induced accelerated corrosion of hot-dip aluminized 9Cr-1Mo and 310 stainless steel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The behaviors of high temperature corrosion on hot-dip aluminized on 9Cr-1Mo and 310 stainless steels when catalyzed by NaCl and cyclic heating environment were studied experimentally. The corrosion behavior and morphological development were investigated by weight gain kinetics, metallographs, depths of attack, metal losses, and X-ray analyses. The results of 310SS deposited with salt mixtures show that weight gain kinetics in simple oxidation reveals a steady-state parabolic rate law after 3 hr, while the kinetics with salt deposits display multi-stage growth rates. NaCl is the main corrosive specie in high-temperature corrosion involving mixtures of NaCl/Na2SO4 and is responsible for the formation of internal attack. Uniform internal attack is the typical morphology of NaCl-induced hot corrosion, while the extent of intergranular attack is more pronounced as the content of Na2SO4 in the mixture is increased. The thermal-cycling test results of 310SS deposited NaCl and coated 7wt%Si/93wt%Al show that the aluminized layers have good corrosion resistance during the first four cycles of testing, while degradation occurs after testing for five cycles. The reason for degradation of aluminized layers is attributed to the formation of interconnecting voids caused by aluminum inward diffusion, chloridation/oxidation cyclic reactions and the penetration of molten NaCl through the voids into the alloy substrate. The 9Cr-1Mo steels coated with 7wt%Si/93wt%Al oxidized at 750, 850, and 950°C in static air show that oxidation kinetics followed a parabolic rate law at 750 and 850 °C. The cracks propagated through the FexAly layer due to the growth of brittle FeAl2 and Fe2Al5 at 750 and 850°C. The voids condensed in the interface of intermetallics and substrate are attributed to the Kirkendall effect. At 950°C, the fast growing aluminide layer has a different expansion coefficient than oxide scale, leading to scale cracking, oxygen penetration, and internal oxidized, evidenced by a rapid mass gain.

Tsaur, Charng-Cheng

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Two Homologous Intermetallic Phases in the Na-Au-Zn System with Sodium Bound in Unusual Paired Sites within 1D Tunnels  

SciTech Connect

The Na-Au-Zn system contains the two intermetallic phases Na(0.97(4))Au(2)Zn(4)(I) and Na(0.72(4))Au(2)Zn(2)(II) that are commensurately and incommensurately modulated derivatives of K(0.37)Cd(2), respectively. Compound I crystallizes in tetragonal space group P4/mbm (No. 127), a = 7.986(1) Å, c = 7.971(1) Å, Z = 4, as a 1 × 1 × 3 superstructure derivative of K(0.37)Cd(2)(I4/mcm). Compound II is a weakly incommensurate derivative of K(0.37)Cd(2) with a modulation vector q = 0.189(1) along c. Its structure was solved in superspace group P4/mbm(00g)00ss, a = 7.8799(6) Å, c = 2.7326(4) Å, Z = 2, as well as its average structure in P4/mbm with the same lattice parameters.. The Au-Zn networks in both consist of layers of gold or zinc squares that are condensed antiprismatically along c ([Au(4/2)Zn(4)Zn(4)Au(4/2)] for I and [Au(4/2)Zn(4)Au(4/2)] for II) to define fairly uniform tunnels. The long-range cation dispositions in the tunnels are all clearly and rationally defined by electron density (Fourier) mapping. These show only close, somewhat diffuse, pairs of opposed, ?50% occupied Na sites that are centered on (I)(shown) or between (II) the gold squares. Tight-binding electronic structure calculations via linear muffin-tin-orbital (LMTO) methods, assuming random occupancy of ? ?100% of nonpaired Na sites, again show that the major Hamilton bonding populations in both compounds arise from the polar heteroatomic Au-Zn interactions. Clear Na-Au (and lesser Na-Zn) bonding is also evident in the COHP functions. These two compounds are the only stable ternary phases in the (Cs,Rb,K,Na)-Au-Zn systems, emphasizing the special bonding and packing requirements in these sodium structures

Samal, Saroj L.; Lin, Qisheng; Corbett, John D.

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

358

Optical properties of a solar-absorbing molten salt heat transfer fluid. [Eutectic mixture of KNO3, NaNO2, and NaNO3 with particle suspensions of cobalt oxides or copper oxides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The optical absorption properties of a high temperature molten salt heat transfer fluid were measured from 0.35 ..mu..m to 2.5 ..mu..m using both hemispherical transmission and reflection techniques. This fluid has application as a direct-absorbing working fluid in a high temperature central receiver solar energy facility. The absorption spectrum of the pure molten fluid--a eutectic mixture of KNO/sub 3/, NaNO/sub 2/, and NaNO/sub 3/, known as Hitec (Du Pont trade name)--displays a fundamental absorption edge near 410 nm, which was found to shift to longer wavelength linearly with temperature. Throughout the remainder of the visible spectrum, the fluid is transparent. To enhance its solar absorption, particulate metallic oxides of Co or Cu were introduced into the fluid. Absorption spectra of these oxide particle suspensions in the molten salt were determined as a function of dopant concentration ranging from 0 to 0.1 wt% metal nitrate added to the Hitec. These measurements were carried out at 200/sup 0/C under flow conditions to cause a homogeneous suspension of particles. Special transmission and reflection flow cells were designed and constructed to handle 200/sup 0/C fluids. The suspended particles cause an additional optical absorption throughout the visible spectrum which is characteristic of the particular metallic oxide and closely follows a Beer-Lambert concentration dependence. The solar averaged absorption in a fixed layer thickness was calculated for various concentrations of the fluid-oxide mixtures. The fluid without oxide particles absorbs approximately 8% of the solar spectrum per cm of path length. Addition of 0.1 wt% of Co(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/.6H/sub 2/O increases this absorption to approximately 90% per cm. Of the oxides studied, Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/ particle suspensions offer better solar absorption characteristics than CuO. Effects of particulate scattering on the measurements are discussed.

Drotning, W.D.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Prototype Tests for the Recovery and Conversion of UF6 Chemisorbed in NaF Traps for the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project  

SciTech Connect

The remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site includes the removal of about 37 kg of uranium. Of that inventory, about 23 kg have already been removed from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is being stored in Building 3019. The planned recovery of -11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a chemical form [uranium oxide], which is suitable for long-term storage. This document describes the process that will be used to recover and convert the uranium in the NaF traps into a stable oxide for long-term storage. Included are a description of the process, equipment, test results, and lessons learned. The process was developed for remote operation in a hot cell. Lessons learned from the prototype testing were incorporated into the process design.

Del Cul, G.D.; Icenhour, A.S.; Simmons, D.W.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Prototype Tests for the Recovery and Conversion of UF6Chemisorbed in NaF Traps for the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project  

SciTech Connect

The remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site includes the removal of about 37 kg of uranium. Of that inventory, about 23 kg have already been removed from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is being stored in Building 3019. The planned recovery of {approx}11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a chemical form [uranium oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8})], which is suitable for long-term storage. This document describes the process that will be used to recover and convert the uranium in the NaF traps into a stable oxide for long-term storage. Included are a description of the process, equipment, test results, and lessons learned. The process was developed for remote operation in a hot cell. Lessons learned from the prototype testing were incorporated into the process design.

Del Cul, G.D.

2000-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C4, supplkment au no 4 , Tome 40, avril 1979, page C4-19 Band structures of NaCl structure uranium compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structures of NaCl structure uranium compounds R. Allen and M. S. S. Brooks Commission of the European Karlsruhe 1, F.R.G. R6sum6. -Des calculs de structure de bande ont BtC accomplis pour les monopnictures d'uranium been made for the uranium monopnictides and for the monochalcogenide US. The band structures were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

362

Measurement of the Low Energy Nuclear Response in NaI(Tl) Crystals for Use in Dark Matter Direct Detection Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The response of low energy nuclear recoil in NaI(Tl) is investigated in the following experiment. Such detectors have been used recently to search for evidence of dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). NaI(Tl) crystal response to nuclear recoil energy deposition is a key element in these searches. I discuss the cosmological and experimental motivations for these experiments, followed by an overview of the physics of direct detection and current relevant WIMP search experiments. With the experiment motivations covered, the details of NaI(Tl) detectors are reviewed. The specifics of our experiment are laid out including the neutron production, neutron beam calibration, shielding optimization, experimental design and setup. Then the crystal response calibration studies and Geant4 simulations are discussed followed by the final quenching factor values and uncertainties. This experiment measured quenching factors for sodium recoils in the energy range of (9 keV-40 keV) of 19%-27% QF. These results are similar to current published measurements. Interesting features of the QF measurements include an increase at low energies and a dip in the values at 30 keV, the iodine K-shell absorption edge. The goal of this experiment was to add valuable measurements of nuclear recoils at low energies that are relevant to low-mass WIMP experiments. Future plans will improve and expand on these measurements in order to better understand the response of NaI(Tl) at low energies.

Stiegler, Tyana Michele

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Simulation of the Bishop Steam Foam Pilot by T.W. Patzek and N.A. h4yhiil, Shell Development Co.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,.. SEW SPE 18786 Simulation of the Bishop Steam Foam Pilot by T.W. Patzek and N.A. h4yhiil, Shell a simple model of steam foam transport and apply it to the Shell Kern River Bishop pilot. The only an incremental 5.5 percent OOIP recovery due to steam foam and additional 3 percent OOIP due to infill wells

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

364

Influence of temperature on the extraction of Pu(IV) by tri-n-butyl phosphate from acidic nitrate solutions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The goal of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative program is to efficiently separate and recover actinides in attempts to reprocess irradiated nuclear fuel and reduce the… (more)

[No author

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

The Friction and Wear Behaviors of (quinazolin-4-ones)-3-methyl-butyl Borate as Additive in Liquid Paraffin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been growing concern for the use of mineral oils because of the worldwide interest in environmental issues. This has promoted the use of ash less additives as environmental friendly lubricants. A potential ash less additive containing N, B, ... Keywords: Synthesis, Quinazolin-4-ones, Borate, Additive, Friction and wear behaviors

Ouyang Ping; Zhang Xianming

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Rapid gasification of nascent char in steam atmosphere during the pyrolysis of Na- and Ca-ion-exchanged brown coals in a drop-tube reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several recent studies on in situ steam gasification of coal suggest a possibility of extremely fast steam gasification of char from rapid pyrolysis of pulverized brown coal. The unprecedented rate of char steam gasification can be achieved by exposing nascent char, that is, after tar evolution (temperature range >600{sup o}C), but before devolatilization (coal samples, that is, H-form coal with Na/Ca contents coal with Na content = 2.8 wt % and Ca-form coal with Ca content = 3.2 wt %. These samples were pyrolyzed in an atmospheric drop-tube reactor at a temperature of 900{sup o}C, inlet steam concentration of 50 vol. %, and a particle residence times of 2.8 s. The char yields from the pyrolysis of Na-form and Ca-form coals were as low as 12 and 33% on the respective coal carbon bases, and accounted for only 18 and 53% of the char yields from the full devolatilization of the respective coals at 900{sup o}C. In addition, the pyrolysis also consumed as much as 0.7-1.1 mol of H{sub 2}O per mol of coal C. On the other hand, the nascent char from the H-form coal allowed carbon deposition from the nascent tar, resulting in a char yield as high as 115% of that from the full devolatilization. The chars from the Na-form and Ca-form coals also acted as catalysts for steam reforming of tar, which was evidenced by significant negative synergistic effects of blending of H-form coal with Na-form coal or Ca-form coal on the tar and soot yields. 57 refs., 6 figs.

Ondej Maek; Sou Hosokai; Koyo Norinaga; Chun-Zhu Li; Jun-ichiro Hayashi [Hokkaido University, Kita-ku (Japan). Center for Advanced Research of Energy Conversion Materials

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Thermodynamic Model for SnO2(cr) and SnO2(am) Solubility in the Aqueous Na+-H+ -OH- -Cl- -H2O System  

SciTech Connect

The solubility of SnO2(cassiterite) was studied at 23 ? 2?C as functions of time (7 – 49 days) and pH value (0-14.5). Steady state concentrations were reached in < 7 days. The data were interpreted using the SIT model. The data shows that SnO2(cassiterite) is the stable phase at pH values of < ~11.7. These extensive data provided a log10 K0 value of -64.39 ± 0.30 for the reaction (SnO2(cassiterite) + 2H2O = Sn4+ + 4OH-) and values of 1.86 ± 0.30, ? -0.62, -9.20 ± 0.34, and -20.28 ± 0.34 for the reaction (Sn4+ + nH2O = Sn(OH)n4-n + nH+) with values of “n” equal to 1, 4, 5, and 6 respectively. These thermodynamic hydrolysis constants were used to reinterpret the extensive literature data for SnO2(am) solubility, which provided a log10 K0 value of -61.80 ± 0.29 for the reaction (SnO2(am) + 2H2O = Sn4+ + 4OH-). SnO2(cassiterite) is unstable under highly alkaline conditions (NaOH concentrations > 0.003 mol.dm-3) and transforms to a double salt of SnO2 and NaOH. Although additional well-focused studies will be required for confirmation, the experimental data in the highly alkaline region (0.003 to 3.5 mol.dm-3 NaOH) can be well described with log10 K0 of -5.29 ± 0.35 for the reaction (Na2Sn(OH)6(s) = Na2Sn(OH)6(aq)).

Rai, Dhanpat; Yui, Mikazu; Schaef, Herbert T.; Kitamura, Akira

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Direct Detection of Products from the Pyrolysis of 2-Phenethyl Phenyl Ether Mark W. Jarvis,*,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Pyrolysis." In Biomass Handbook; C. W. Hall, ed. Gordon and Breach: New York, 1989; pp. 379-385. (with Pyrolysis of Biomass Derived Volatile Matter." In Fundamentals of Thermochemical Biomass Conversion; R. P. "Biomass Pyrolysis. A Review of the Literature - Part 1: Carbohydrate Pyrolysis." In Advances in Solar

Dean, Anthony M.

369

Chlorine resistant desalination membranes based on directly sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) copolymers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention provides a membrane, kit, and method of making a hydrophilic-hydrophobic random copolymer membrane. The hydrophilic-hydrophobic random copolymer membrane includes a hydrophilic-hydrophobic random copolymer. The hydrophilic-hydrophobic random copolymer includes one or more hydrophilic monomers having a sulfonated polyarylsulfone monomer and a second monomer and one or more hydrophobic monomers having a non-sulfonated third monomer and a fourth monomer. The sulfonated polyarylsulfone monomer introduces a sulfonate into the hydrophilic-hydrophobic random copolymer prior to polymerization.

McGrath, James E. (Blacksburg, VA); Park, Ho Bum (Austin, TX); Freeman, Benny D. (Austin, TX)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

370

Cleaning Products and Air Fresheners: Emissions and Resulting Concentrations of Glycol Ethers and Terpenoids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include wood framing with plywood underlying the floor, twowith low-VOC paint. The plywood subfloor was covered with

Singer, Brett C.; Destaillat, Hugo; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Nazaroff, William W.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Measurements of flatflame velocities of diethyl ether in air Fiona Gillespiea,b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is being drawn towards bioderived fuels, the most common of which is bioethanol. Bioethanol. %; however, bioethanol is produced primarily from food sources (corn, sugarcane, etc.) and its energy output to allow a sufficient flow of oxygen through the burner plate. Bronkhorst conversion coefficient factors

372

A New Biarylphosphine Ligand for the Pd-Catalyzed Synthesis of Diaryl Ethers under Mild Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new bulky biarylphosphine ligand (L8) has been developed that allows the Pd-catalyzed C–O cross-coupling of a wide range of aryl halides and phenols under milder conditions than previously possible. A direct correlation ...

Salvi, Luca

373

The potential for alcohols and related ethers to displace conventional gasoline components  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy is required by law to determine the feasibility of producing sufficient replacement fuels to replace 30 percent of the projected United States consumption of motor fuels by light duty vehicles in the year 2010. A replacement fuel is a non-petroleum portion of gasoline, including alcohols, natural gas and certain other components. A linear program has been used to study refinery impacts for production of ``low petroleum`` gasolines, which contain replacement fuels. The analysis suggests that high oxygenation is the key to meeting the replacement fuel target, and major contributors to cost increase can include investment in processes to produce olefins for etherification with alcohols. High oxygenation can increase the costs of control of vapor pressure, distillation properties, and pollutant emissions of gasolines. Year-round low petroleum gasoline with near-30 percent non-petroleum might be produced with cost increases of 23 to 37 cents per gallon, with substantial decreases in greenhouse gas emissions in some cases. Cost estimates are sensitive to assumptions about extrapolation of a national model for pollutant emissions, availability of raw materials and other issues. Reduction in crude oil use, a major objective of the low petroleum gasoline program, is 10 to 17 percent in the analysis.

Hadder, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); McNutt, B.D. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Laboratory Test Report for Fujitsu 12RLS and Mitsubishi FE12NA Mini-Split Heat Pumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mini-split heat pumps are being proposed as a new retrofit option to replace resistance heating in the Pacific Northwest. NREL has previously developed a field test protocol for mini-split systems to ensure consistent results from field tests. This report focuses on the development of detailed system performance maps for mini-split heat pumps so that the potential benefits of mini-split systems can be accurately analyzed for different climate regions and housing types. This report presents laboratory test results for two mini-split heat pumps. Steady-state heating and cooling performance for the Fujitsu 12RLS and Mitsubishi FE12NA was tested under a wide range of outdoor and indoor temperatures at various compressor and fan speeds. Cycling performance for each unit was also tested under both modes of operation. Both systems performed quite well under low loads and the experimental test data aligned with manufacturer reported values. Adequate datasets were attained to promote performance modeling of these two systems in the future.

Winkler, J.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Tropospheric Chemistry of Internally Mixed Sea Salt and Organic Particles: Surprising Reactivity of NaCl with Weak Organic Acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical imaging analysis of internally mixed sea salt/organic particles collected on board the Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft during the 2010 Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) was performed using electron microscopy and X-ray spectro-microscopy techniques. Substantial chloride depletion in aged sea salt particles was observed, which could not be explained by the known atmospheric reactivity of sea salt with inorganic nitric and sulfuric acids. We present field evidence that chloride components in sea salt particles may effectively react with organic acids releasing HCl gas to the atmosphere, leaving behind particles depleted in chloride and enriched in the corresponding organic salts. While formation of the organic salts products is not thermodynamically favored for bulk aqueous chemistry, these reactions in aerosol are driven by high volatility and irreversible evaporation of the HCl product from drying particles. These field observations were corroborated in a set of laboratory experiments where NaCl particles mixed with organic acids were found to be depleted in chloride. Combined together, the results indicate substantial chemical reactivity of sea salt particles with secondary organics that has been largely overlooked in the atmospheric aerosol chemistry. Atmospheric aging, and especially hydration-dehydration cycles of mixed sea salt/organic particles may result in formation of organic salts that will modify acidity, hygroscopic and optical properties of aged particles.

Laskin, Alexander; Moffet, Ryan C.; Gilles, Marry K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Wang, Bingbing; Nigge, P.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

376

Na-Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011... friction using nanolubricants between moving parts 3) Transfer: Improved thermal management using nanofluids in heat transfer applications ...

377

The generation of HCl in the system NaCl-KCl-H{sub 2}O-quartz at 600{degrees}C: Implications regarding HCl in natural systems at lower temperatures  

SciTech Connect

In experiments at 600°C in the system NaCI-KCI-H2O, within the analytical uncertainty, stoichiometric quantities of Cl and total alkali metals (Na+K) appear to dissolve in steam coexisting with chloride-rich brine at high pressures in the absence of solid salt. In contrast, at lower pressures, where steam coexists with precipitated salts, significant excess chloride as associated hydrogen chloride (HCI°) dissolves in steam. The HCI° appears to be generated by the reaction of solid NaCl(s) (halite) with steam, producing solid NaOH(s) that diffuses into halite, forming a solid solution. Where HCI° is present highly associated NaOH° as well as associated NaCI° appear to dissolve in steam, and the solubility of each is increased as the mole fraction of NaOH(s) in halite increases. In our quasi-static experiments, compared to dynamic flow-through experiments of others, higher initial ratios of H2O/NaCI have resulted in higher mole fractions of NaOH(s) in solid solution in halite and, accordingly, higher solubilities of NaCI" and NaOH" dissolved in steam. Addition of quartz to the system NaCI-KCI-H2O results in the formation of sodium disilicate by reaction of silica with NaOH(s) and an order of magnitude increase in the concentration of HCl° dissolved in steam. In natural hydrothermal systems at lower temperatures where brine or brine plus steam are present in the absence of precipitated salt, the pH of the brine is controlled mainly by base exchange reactions involving a variety of silicates that fix Na+/H+ and K+/H+ activity ratios. Where feldspars are present pH values generally are near neutral. Where mica, but no feldspar is present pH values may become only moderately acid. High acidity in salt-absent brine systems occurs only where all feldspars and mica have been altered to other minerals (generally pyrophyllite/ kaolinite or alunite). The situation changes significantly when salt precipitates. Hydrolysis produces HCI° by the reaction of water with NaCl when halite is present. The NaOH(s) that is produced as a byproduct is likely to react with quartz plus various alumino-silicates, producing a variety of alteration products and allowing steam to become greatly enriched in HCl° compared to the composition of steam that is attained in the simple system NaCI-KCI-H2O with halite present. Also, when a natural high-temperature hydrothermal system changes from one in which the pore fluid is brine to one in which the pore fluid is dry steam there is a drastic change in Na+/H+ and K+/H+ activity ratios in the pore fluid because the hydrogen ions that were predominantly dissociated species in the brine become predominantly associated species in steam. The net result is the stabilization of alkali feldspars in contact with steam that may contain appreciable HCI° that is produced by the reaction of precipitated salt with the steam.

Fournier, Robert O.; Thompson, J. Michael

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

378

Correlation of the Na/K ratio in geothermal well waters with the thermodynamic properties of low albite and potash feldspar  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Na/K ratio in geothermal well waters provides a better estimate of the relative stability of low albite and potash feldspar than do predictions from calorimetry and high temperature phase equilibria. The calculated saturation indices from field data for low albite, potash feldspar suggest that [Delta]G[sub f,298][sup o] for the latter should be revised to [minus]3748.6[plus minus]3.7 kJ.mol[sup [minus]1].

Apps, J.A.; Chang, G.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C4, supplment au n 4, Tome 40, avril 1979, page C4-77 Shake-up satellites in the U4f E.S.C.A. spectra of NaCl-type uranium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-up satellites in the U4f E.S.C.A. spectra of NaCl-type uranium monocompounds: UN, UP, UAs and US E. Thibaut quatre composés d'uranium, tous de structure NaCl, sont décrits et discutés en vue d'une approche du caractère de la liaison chimique. Abstract. -- The U4f E.S.C.A. spectra of four NaCl-type uranium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

380

Synthesis, characterization, and ion exchange properties of a sodium nonatitanate, Na4Ti9O20.xH2O  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the Cold War, the Hanford Weapons Site in Richland, Washington, produced weapons grade plutonium which first needed to be separated from the other products using the PUREX process (plutonium and uranium extraction). As a by product of this process, millions of cubic meters of highly acidic radioactive waste were produced which are now stored in million gallon tanks at the Hanford site. Over the years, some tanks have been known to leak and some are even in danger of exploding. Because of these problems, the waste needs to be removed from these tanks and given permanent, safe storage. The purpose of this research is to produce a more efficient ion exchanger to separate the highly radioactive isotopes (9oSr, 137 Cs and transuranics) from the large quantities of inert salts. The smaller volume of high level waste produced can then be vitrified in glass and stored, while the low level waste can be poured into less expensive cement and glass. In this work, different parameters of the synthesis of the sodium nonatitanate ion exchanger, Na4Ti9O2OoxH20, such as the Na and Ti reactants, the heating time, oven temperature, Na:Ti mole ratio, and heating method, were altered and their effects on Sr2' ion exchange selectivity were examined. For example, the heating time was varied from I day to 2, 3, 7, and 30 days. Although the crystallinity remained the same from the I day to the 2 day sample, as the heating time further increased, the crystallinity improved. The most Sr selective material was the 2 day sample with a Kd (distribution coefficient) of 1.22x 106 MI/g in O.lM Na/ O.OOIM Sr solution. The Kd's steadily decreased as the sample crystallinity increased with a maximum Kd of only 1.6OxlO5 in O.OIM Na/ O.OO I M Sr solution after a heating time of 30 days. However, in a simulated waste such as NCAW, the 2 day sample gave a Kd of only 1.44x 105 MI/g, while the I day sample gave a value of 2.50x 105 . This indicates that the nonatitanate synthesis needs to be uniquely designed to optimize Sr 2+ removal in each specific type of waste to be remediated.

Graziano, Gina Marie

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Neutron and X-ray diffraction studies on the high temperature phase of Mn{sub 3}(VO{sub 4}){sub 2}, the new isostructural compound NaMn{sub 4}(VO{sub 4}){sub 3} and their mixed crystals Na{sub x}Mn{sub 4.5-x/2}(VO{sub 4}){sub 3} (0{<=}x{<=}1)  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a detailed structure analysis (combined Rietveld analysis of X-ray and neutron powder diffraction data as well as quantum mechanical calculations) of the high temperature phase of Mn{sub 3}(VO{sub 4}){sub 2} (space group I4 Macron 2d). Special attention is directed to the analysis of the local coordination around Mn{sup 2+} ions or vacancies within a stella quadrangula configuration of anions. Furthermore, the new compound NaMn{sub 4}(VO{sub 4}){sub 3} is described as well as a range of mixed crystals between NaMn{sub 4}(VO{sub 4}){sub 3} and Mn{sub 3}(VO{sub 4}){sub 2} (described by the formula Na{sub x}Mn{sub 4.5-x/2}(VO{sub 4}){sub 3}, 0{<=}x{<=}1) which were synthesized by a solid state route. All compounds were shown to be isostructural to the high temperature phase Mn{sub 3}(VO{sub 4}){sub 2}. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structure of the new compound NaMn{sub 4}(VO{sub 4}){sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present neutron and X-ray diffraction studies on high temperature-Mn{sub 3}(VO{sub 4}){sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural details of partly filled stellae quadrangulae positions are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Refined structural parameters and theoretical calculations are compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate the mixed crystal system Mn{sub 3}(VO{sub 4}){sub 2}-NaMn{sub 4}(VO{sub 4}){sub 3}.

Clemens, Oliver [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie und Radiochemie, Am Markt, Zeile 5, 66125 Saarbruecken (Germany)] [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie und Radiochemie, Am Markt, Zeile 5, 66125 Saarbruecken (Germany); Haberkorn, Robert [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Anorganische Festkoerperchemie, Am Markt, Zeile 3, 66125 Saarbruecken (Germany)] [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Anorganische Festkoerperchemie, Am Markt, Zeile 3, 66125 Saarbruecken (Germany); Springborg, Michael [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Campus B2 2, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany)] [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Campus B2 2, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Beck, Horst Philipp, E-mail: hp.beck@mx.uni-saarland.de [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie und Radiochemie, Am Markt, Zeile 5, 66125 Saarbruecken (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

SV_Jurij.qxd 19/07/2002 08:59 Page 1 Podru`ni~na cerkev v Tacnu je posve~ena sv. Juriju, mu~encu.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tronu je cerkveni zavetnik sv. Jurij, rimski vojak, ki s sulico prebada zmaja. Slike za zapiranje trona ni. Ob stenah trona so stirje evangelisti: desno ob njem sv. Marko, na obhodnem loku sv. Matej, levo

Silc, Jurij

383

Local Effects in the X-ray Absorption Spectrum of CaCl2, MgCl2, and NaCl Solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Both first principles molecular dynamics and theoretical X-ray absorption spectroscopy have been used to investigate the aqueous solvation of cations in 0.5 M MgCl{sub 2}, CaCl{sub 2}, and NaCl solutions. We focus here on the species-specific effects that Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, and Na{sup +}, have on the X-ray absorption spectrum of the respective solutions. For the divalent cations, we find that the hydrogen bonding characteristics of the more rigid magnesium first shell water molecules differ from those in the more flexible solvation shell surrounding calcium. In particular, the first solvation shell water molecules of calcium are accessible to forming acceptor hydrogen bonds, and this results in an enhancement of a post-edge peak near 540 eV. The absence of acceptor hydrogen bonds for magnesium first shell water molecules provides an explanation for the experimental and theoretical observation of a lack of enhancement at the post-main-edge peak. For the sodium monovalent cation we find that the broad tilt angle distribution results in a broadening of post-edge features, despite populations in donor-and-acceptor configurations consistent with calcium. We also present the re-averaged spectra of the MgCl{sub 2}, CaCl{sub 2}, and NaCl solutions and show that trends apparent with increasing concentration (0.5 M, 2.0 M, 4.0 M) are consistent with experiment. Finally, we examine more closely both the effect that cation coordination number has on the hydrogen bonding network and the relative perturbation strength of the cations on lone pair oxygen orbitals.

Kulik, H J; Correa Tedesco, A A; Schwegler, E; Prendergast, D; Galli, G

2010-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

384

Crystal and magnetic structures and physical properties of a new pyroxene NaMnGe2O6 synthesized under high pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new pyroxene NaMnGe2O6 has been synthesized at 3 GPa and 800 C, and fully characterized by x-ray single-crystal diffraction and neutron powder diffraction, measurements of magnetization and specific heat. Like other majority sodium pyroxenes, NaMnGe2O6 crystallizes into a monoclinic C2/c structure with unit-cell parameters a = 9.859(2) , b = 8.7507(18) , c = 5.5724(11) , and =105.64(3) at room temperature. The crystal structure is featured by quasi-one-dimensional chains of skew edge-sharing MnO6 octahedra running along the crystallographic c axis; these chains are connected by non-magnetic GeO4 tetrahedra, so as to lead to a low-dimensional magnetism. The highly distorted MnO6 octahedron consisting of three Mn-O bond lengths, i.e. 1.918 , 1.991 , and 2.198 , is consistent with the Jahn-Teller effect at Mn3+ in a cubic crystal field. A long-range cooperative Jahn-Teller distortion is formed by ordering longest Mn-O bonds between two neighboring octahedra along the chain direction. No orbital order-disorder transition has been found up to 750 K as checked by magnetic susceptibility. Like other alkali-metal pyroxenes with S > , NaMnGe2O6 (S = 2) was found to undergo a long-range antiferromagnetic ordering at TN = 7 K at low magnetic field due to the exchange interactions along and between chains. Due to the peculiar structural features and the corresponding magnetic coupling, the weak AF spin ordering gives way to a ferromagnetic-like state at a sufficiently high magnetic field. Specific-heat measurements demonstrated that a large portion of the magnetic entropy, i.e. > 60 %, has been removed above TN as a result of strong spin correlations within the quasi-one-dimensional Mn3+-spin chains. Neutron powder diffraction study suggests a commensurate magnetic structure defined by k = [0 0 0.5] with Mn moments aligned along the c axis. The present study on NaMnGe2O6 completed the evolution of magnetic properties as a function of the d-orbital occupancy from d1 to d5 in the magnetic pyroxenes.

Yan, Jiaqiang [ORNL; Tian, Wei [ORNL; May, Andrew F [ORNL; Cheng, J G [University of Texas, Austin; Zhou, J.-S. [University of Texas, Austin; Garlea, Vasile O [ORNL; Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL; Steinfink, Hugo [University of Texas, Austin; Lynch, V [University of Texas, Austin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Electrochemical corrosion studies on copper-base waste package container materials in unirradiated 0.1 N NaNO{sub 3} at 95{degrees}C  

SciTech Connect

Three candidate materials were investigated in this study in terms of their electrochemical corrosion behavior in unirradiated 0.1 N NaNO{sub 3} solutions at 95{degrees}C. Anodic polarization experiments were conducted to determine the passive current densities, pitting potentials, and other parameters, together with Cyclic Current Reversal Voltammetry tests to evaluate the stability and protectiveness of the passive oxides formed. X-ray diffraction and Auger Electron Spectroscopy were used for identification of the corrosion products as well as Scanning Electron Microscopy for the surface morphology studies. 2 refs., 22 figs., 2 tabs.

Akkaya, M.; Verink, E.D. Jr. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (USA); Van Konynenburg, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

MTBE Production Economics  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MTBE Production MTBE Production Economics Tancred C. M. Lidderdale Contents 1. Summary 2. MTBE Production Costs 3. Relationship between price of MTBE and Reformulated Gasoline 4. Influence of Natural Gas Prices on the Gasoline Market 5. Regression Results 6. Data Sources 7. End Notes 1. Summary Last year the price of MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether) increased dramatically on two occasions (Figure 1) (see Data Sources at end of article.): 1. Between April and June 2000, the price (U.S. Gulf Coast waterborne market) of MTBE rose from $1.00 per gallon to over $1.60 per gallon. This represented an increase in the price premium for MTBE over the wholesale price of conventional gasoline from its normal (1995 though 2000 average) $0.26 per gallon to $0.60 per gallon. The MTBE

387

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Stocks Total Stocks Definitions Key Terms Definition All Other Motor Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas (e.g. straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, xylene) used for blending or compounding into finished motor gasoline. Includes receipts and inputs of Gasoline Treated as Blendstock (GTAB). Excludes conventional blendstock for oxygenate blending (CBOB), reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending, oxygenates (e.g. fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether), butane, and pentanes plus. Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton.

388

Annual Energy Outlook 2005-Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AD AD Associated-dissolved (natural gas) AEO2004 Annual Energy Outlook 2004 AEO2005 Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Altos Altos Partners AMT Alternative Minimum Tax ANWR Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Btu British thermal unit CAFE Corporate average fuel economy CAMR Clean Air Mercury Rule CARB California Air Resources Board CBECS Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (EIA) CBO Congressional Budget Office CCCC Climate Change Credit Corporation CH 4 Methane CHP Combined heat and power CO 2 Carbon dioxide CTL Coal-to-liquids DB Deutsche Bank, A.G. E85 Fuel containing a blend of 70 to 85 percent ethanol and 30 to 15 percent gasoline by volume EEA Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. EIA Energy Information Administration EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPACT Energy Policy Act of 1992 ETBE Ethyl tertiary butyl ether EVA Energy Ventures Analysis, Incorporated FERC

389

Status and Impact of State MTBE Bans  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Status and Impact of State MTBE Bans Status and Impact of State MTBE Bans Background As a result of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90), the year-round use of reformulated gasoline (RFG) has been required in cities with the worst smog problems since 1995 (Figure 1). One of the requirements of RFG specified by CAAA90 is a 2- percent oxygen requirement, which is met by blending "oxygenates," 1 including methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and ethanol, into the gasoline. MTBE is the oxygenate used in almost all RFG outside of the Midwest. Ethanol is currently used in the Midwest as an oxygenate in RFG and as an octane booster and volume extender in conventional gasoline. Several years ago, MTBE was detected in water supplies scattered throughout the country, but predominantly in areas using RFG. MTBE from RFG was apparently

390

MTBE, Oxygenates, and Motor Gasoline  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MTBE, Oxygenates, and MTBE, Oxygenates, and Motor Gasoline Contents * Introduction * Federal gasoline product quality regulations * What are oxygenates? * Who gets gasoline with oxygenates? * Which areas get MTBE? * How much has been invested in MTBE production capacity? * What does new Ethanol capacity cost? * What would an MTBE ban cost? * On-line information resources * Endnotes * Summary of revisions to this analysis Introduction The blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into motor gasoline has increased dramatically since it was first produced 20 years ago. MTBE usage grew in the early 1980's in response to octane demand resulting initially from the phaseout of lead from gasoline and later from rising demand for premium gasoline. The oxygenated gasoline program stimulated an

391

Motor Gasoline Outlook and State MTBE Bans  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Motor Gasoline Outlook Motor Gasoline Outlook and State MTBE Bans Tancred Lidderdale Contents 1. Summary 2. MTBE Supply and Demand 3. Ethanol Supply 4. Gasoline Supply 5. Gasoline Prices A. Long-Term Equilibrium Price Analysis B. Short-Term Price Volatility 6. Conclusion 7. Appendix A. Estimating MTBE Consumption by State 8. Appendix B. MTBE Imports and Exports 9. Appendix C. Glossary of Terms 10. End Notes 11. References 1. Summary The U.S. is beginning the summer 2003 driving season with lower gasoline inventories and higher prices than last year. Recovery from this tight gasoline market could be made more difficult by impending State bans on the blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into gasoline that are scheduled to begin later this year. Three impending State bans on MTBE blending could significantly affect gasoline

392

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Imports & Exports Imports & Exports Definitions Key Terms Definition All Other Motor Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas (e.g. straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, xylene) used for blending or compounding into finished motor gasoline. Includes receipts and inputs of Gasoline Treated as Blendstock (GTAB). Excludes conventional blendstock for oxygenate blending (CBOB), reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending, oxygenates (e.g. fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether), butane, and pentanes plus. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Conventional Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (CBOB) Motor gasoline blending components intended for blending with oxygenates to produce finished conventional motor gasoline. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock.

393

Eliminating MTBE in Gasoline in 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

02/22/2006 02/22/2006 Eliminating MTBE in Gasoline in 2006 Summary In 2005, a number of petroleum companies announced their intent to remove methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) from their gasoline in 2006. Companies' decisions to eliminate MTBE have been driven by State bans due to water contamination concerns, continuing liability exposure from adding MTBE to gasoline, and perceived potential for increased liability exposure due to the elimination of the oxygen content requirement for reformulated gasoline (RFG) included in the Energy Policy Act of 2005. EIA's informal discussions with a number of suppliers indicate that most of the industry is trying to move away from MTBE before the 2006 summer driving season. Currently, the largest use of MTBE is in RFG consumed on the East Coast outside of

394

Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

acronyms.gif (3491 bytes) acronyms.gif (3491 bytes) AD - Associated/dissolved natural gas AEO98 - Annual Energy Outlook 1998 AEO99 - Annual Energy Outlook 1999 AFVs - Alternative-fuel vehicles AGA - American Gas Association API - American Petroleum Institute BTAB - BT Alex Brown CAAA90 - Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 CCAP - Climate Change Action Plan CDM - Clean Development Mechanism CFCs - Chlorofluorocarbons CNG - Compressed natural gas CO - Carbon monoxide CO2 - Carbon dioxide DOE - U.S. Department of Energy DRI - DRI/McGraw-Hill EIA - Energy Information Administration EOR - Enhanced oil recovery EPA - U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPACT - Energy Policy Act of 1992 ETBE - Ethyl tertiary butyl ether EU - European Union FERC - Federal Energy Regulatory Commission GDP - Gross domestic product

395

Why sequence ethene and vinyl chloride-oxidizing Mycobacterium strains?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sequence ethene and vinyl sequence ethene and vinyl chloride-oxidizing Mycobacterium strains? Mycobacteria are known for causing human and animal diseases but they are also important degraders of hard-to-break-down water contaminants such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). So far the handful of bacterial species representing the Mycobacterium genus that have been sequenced all break down PAHs. In this project, researchers focus on the genomes of mycobacterial species isolated from soil, freshwater and marine environments that use the alkene compounds ethene and vinyl chloride as carbon sources. Chlorinated ethene compounds are difficult to remove from contaminated groundwater but necessary because of their toxicity. Additionally these compounds reduce the ozone levels in the atmosphere.

396

Assessment of Summer RBOB Supply for NY & CT  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Update of Summer Reformulated Gasoline Supply Update of Summer Reformulated Gasoline Supply Assessment for New York and Connecticut May 5, 2004 In October 2003, EIA published a review of the status of the methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) ban transition in New York (NY) and Connecticut (CT) 1 that noted significant uncertainties in gasoline supply for those States for the summer of 2004. To obtain updated information, EIA spoke to major suppliers to the two States over the past several months as the petroleum industry began the switch from winter- to summer-grade gasoline. As discussed on our earlier report, the NY and CT bans on MTBE mainly affect reformulated gasoline (RFG), which in recent years has been provided by domestic refineries on the East Coast (PADD 1) and imports. Our recent findings indicate that

397

The efficient use of natural gas in transportation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concerns over air quality and greenhouse gas emissions have prompted discussion as well as action on alternative fuels and energy efficiency. Natural gas and natural gas derived fuels and fuel additives are prime alternative fuel candidates for the transportation sector. In this study, we reexamine and add to past work on energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas fuels for transportation (DeLuchi 1991, Santini et a. 1989, Ho and Renner 1990, Unnasch et al. 1989). We add to past work by looking at Methyl tertiary butyl ether (from natural gas and butane component of natural gas), alkylate (from natural gas butanes), and gasoline from natural gas. We also reexamine compressed natural gas, liquified natural gas, liquified petroleum gas, and methanol based on our analysis of vehicle efficiency potential. We compare the results against nonoxygenated gasoline.

Stodolsky, F.; Santini, D.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The efficient use of natural gas in transportation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concerns over air quality and greenhouse gas emissions have prompted discussion as well as action on alternative fuels and energy efficiency. Natural gas and natural gas derived fuels and fuel additives are prime alternative fuel candidates for the transportation sector. In this study, we reexamine and add to past work on energy efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas fuels for transportation (DeLuchi 1991, Santini et a. 1989, Ho and Renner 1990, Unnasch et al. 1989). We add to past work by looking at Methyl tertiary butyl ether (from natural gas and butane component of natural gas), alkylate (from natural gas butanes), and gasoline from natural gas. We also reexamine compressed natural gas, liquified natural gas, liquified petroleum gas, and methanol based on our analysis of vehicle efficiency potential. We compare the results against nonoxygenated gasoline.

Stodolsky, F.; Santini, D.J.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

APPLICATIONS OF LAYERED DOUBLE HYDROXIDES IN REMOVING OXYANIONS FROM OIL REFINING AND COAL MINING WASTEWATER  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI), in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), conducted a study of using the layered double hydroxides (LDH) as filter material to remove microorganisms, large biological molecules, certain anions and toxic oxyanions from various waste streams, including wastewater from refineries. Results demonstrate that LDH has a high adsorbing capability to those compounds with negative surface charge. Constituents studied include model bacteria, viruses, arsenic, selenium, vanadium, diesel range hydrocarbons, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), mixed petroleum constituents, humic materials and anions. This project also attempted to modify the physical structure of LDH for the application as a filtration material. Flow characterizations of the modified LDH materials were also investigated. Results to date indicate that LDH is a cost-effective new material to be used for wastewater treatment, especially for the treatment of anions and oxyanions.

Song Jin; Paul Fallgren

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

MTBE movements between Texas Gulf Coast plants to be enhanced  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that Texas Eastern Products Pipeline Co. (Teppco), Houston, has begun construction of its shuttle pipeline, a 10-mile, 6 and 8-in. line to move methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) between producers and refiners along the Houston Ship Channel. Funding for the project has been approved, rights-of-way are secured, and procurement of materials is under way, according to Teppco. The line will flow from the western edge of Shell's refinery eastward to storage facilities of Teppco's Baytown terminal. The shuttle pipeline anticipates the US requirement for oxygenated gasolines that takes effect Nov. 1. Approximately 70% of the available US merchant capacity for MTBE is located along the shuttle's path, Teppco says.

Not Available

1992-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Ecological hazards of MTBE exposure: A research agenda  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel oxygenates are used in metropolitan areas across the United States in order to reduce the amount of carbon monoxide released into the atmosphere during the winter. The most commonly used fuel oxygenate is Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). Its widespread use has resulted in releases into the environment. To date there has been only minimal effort to investigate ecological impacts caused by exposure to concentrations of MTBE typically found in environmental media. Research into the potential for MTBE to adversely affect ecological receptors is essential. Acquisition of such baselines data is especially critical in light of continuing inputs and potential accumulation of MTBE in environmental media. A research Agenda is included in this report and addresses: Assessing Ecological Impacts, Potential Ecological Impacts of MTBE (aquatic organisms, terrestrial organisms), Potential Ecological Endpoints, and A Summary of Research Needs.

Carlsen, T.; Hall, L.; Rice, D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Weekly Supply Estimates Weekly Supply Estimates Definitions Key Terms Definition All Other Motor Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas (e.g. straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, xylene) used for blending or compounding into finished motor gasoline. Includes receipts and inputs of Gasoline Treated as Blendstock (GTAB). Excludes conventional blendstock for oxygenate blending (CBOB), reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending, oxygenates (e.g. fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether), butane, and pentanes plus. Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton.

403

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Homepage Homepage ACEEE American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy AD Associated-dissolved (natural gas) AEO Annual Energy Outlook AGA American Gas Association ANWR Arctic National Wildlife Refuge API American Petroleum Institute BRP Blue Ribbon Panel Btu British thermal unit CAAA90 Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 CARB California Air Resources Board CCAP Climate Change Action Plan CDM Clean Development Mechanism CECA Comprehensive Electricity Competition Act CIDI Compression ignition direct injection CO Carbon monoxide DBAB Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown DOE U.S. Department of Energy DRI Standard & PoorÂ’s DRI EIA Energy Information Administration EOR Enhanced oil recovery EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPACT Energy Policy Act of 1992 ETBE Ethyl tertiary butyl ether

404

Appendix A - Acronyms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A - ACRONYMS A - ACRONYMS AASHTO American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials CNG Compressed Natural Gases CVO Commercial Vehicle Operation DOE Department of Energy DOT Department of Transportation E85 85% Ethanol, 15% Gasoline EPA Environmental Protection Agency ExFIRS Excise Files Information Retrieval System ExSTARS Excise Summary Terminal Activity Reporting System FHWA Federal Highway Administration FTA Federation of Tax Administrators GAO General Accounting Office HTF Highway Trust Fund IFTA International Fuel Tax Agreement IM Interstate Maintenance IRS Internal Revenue Service LNG Liquid Natural Gases LPG Liquefied Petroleum Gases M85 85% Methanol, 15% Gasoline MTBE Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether NHS National Highway System ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory STP Surface Transportation Program

405

Structure and temperature-dependent phase transitions of lead-free Bi[subscript 1/2]Na[subscript 1/2]TiO[subscript 3]?Bi[subscript 1/2]K[subscript 1/2]TiO[subscript 3]?K[subscript 0.5]Na[subscript 0.5]NbO[subscript 3] piezoceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structure and phase transitions of (1-y)((1-x)Bi{sub 1/2}Na{sub 1/2}TiO{sub 3}-xBi{sub 1/2}K{sub 1/2}TiO{sub 3})-yK{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}NbO{sub 3} (x; y) piezoceramics (0.1 {le} x {le} 0.4; 0 {le} y {le} 0.05) were investigated by transmission electron microscopy, neutron diffraction, temperature-dependent x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. The local crystallographic structure at room temperature (RT) does not change by adding K{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}NbO{sub 3} to Bi{sub 1/2}Na{sub 1/2}TiO{sub 3}-xBi{sub 1/2}K{sub 1/2}TiO{sub 3} for x = 0.2 and 0.4. The average crystal structure and microstructure on the other hand develop from mainly long-range polar order with ferroelectric domains to short-range order with polar nanoregions displaying a more pronounced relaxor character. The (0.1; 0) and (0.1; 0.02) compositions exhibit monoclinic Cc space group symmetry, which transform into Cc + P4bm at 185 and 130 C, respectively. This high temperature phase is stable at RT for the morphotropic phase boundary compositions of (0.1; 0.05) and all compositions with x = 0.2. For the compositions of (0.1; 0) and (0.1; 0.02), local structural changes on heating are evidenced by Raman; for all other compositions, changes in the long-range average crystal structure were observed.

Anton, Eva-Maria; Schmitt, Ljubomira Ana; Hinterstein, Manuel; Trodahl, Joe; Kowalski, Ben; Jo, Wook; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Rödel, Jürgen; Jones, Jacob L. (TU Darmstadt); (VUW); (Florida)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

406

High performance Na-doped PbTe-PbS thermoelectric materials: electronic density of states modification and shaped-controlled nanostructures.  

SciTech Connect

Thermoelectric heat-to-power generation is an attractive option for robust and environmentally friendly renewable energy production. Historically, the performance of thermoelectric materials has been limited by low efficiencies, related to the thermoelectric figure-of-merit ZT. Nanostructuring thermoelectric materials have shown to enhance ZT primarily via increasing phonon scattering, beneficially reducing lattice thermal conductivity. Conversely, density-of-states (DOS) engineering has also enhanced electronic transport properties. However, successfully joining the two approaches has proved elusive. Herein, we report a thermoelectric materials system whereby we can control both nanostructure formations to effectively reduce thermal conductivity, while concurrently modifying the electronic structure to significantly enhance thermoelectric power factor. We report that the thermoelectric system PbTe-PbS 12% doped with 2% Na produces shape-controlled cubic PbS nanostructures, which help reduce lattice thermal conductivity, while altering the solubility of PbS within the PbTe matrix beneficially modifies the DOS that allow for enhancements in thermoelectric power factor. These concomitant and synergistic effects result in a maximum ZT for 2% Na-doped PbTe-PbS 12% of 1.8 at 800 K.

Girard, S. N.; He, J.; Zhou, X.; Shoemaker, D.; Jaworski, C. M.; Uher, C.; Dravid, V. P.; Heremans, J. P.; Kanatzidis, M. G. (Materials Science Division); (Northwestern Univ.); (Univ. Michigan-Ann Arbor); (Ohio State Univ.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

High-Energy Threshold Reaction Rates on 0.8 GeV Proton-Irradiated Thick W and W-Na Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Threshold activation reaction rates in 12C, 19F, 27Al, 59Co, 63Cu, 65Cu, 64Zn, 93Nb, 115In, 169Tm, 181Ta, 197Au, and 209Bi experimental samples placed along the axis inside and outside the 0.8 GeV proton-irradiated 92-cm thick W-Na and 4-cm thick W targets where measured at the ITEP proton synchrotron. 158 reactions of up to +AH4-0.5 GeV thresholds have been measured in 123 activation samples for W-Na target, and 157 reactions in 36 activation samples for W target. The reaction rates were determined using the gamma-spectrometry method. In total, more than 1000 values of activation reactions were determined in the experiments. In both cases the measured reaction rates were compared with the LAHET code simulated rates and using several nuclear databases for the respective excitation functions, namely, ENDF/B6 for cross section of neutrons at energies below 20 MeV and MENDL2 together with MENDL2P for cross sections of protons and neutrons of 20 to 100 MeV energies. A general satisfactory agreement between simulated and experimental data has been found.

Yu. E. Titarenko; V. F. Batyaev; E. I. Karpikhin; V. M. Zhivun; A. B. Koldobsky; R. D. Mulambetov; S. V. Mulambetova; S. L. Zaitsev; S. G. Mashnik; R. E. Prael

2004-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

408

A first-principles density functional theory study of the electronic structural and thermodynamic properties of M2ZrO3 and M2CO3 (M=Na, K) and their capabilities for CO2 capture  

SciTech Connect

Alkali metal zirconates could be used as solid sorbents for CO{sub 2} capture. The structural, electronic, and phonon properties of Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, K{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} are investigated by combining the density functional theory with lattice phonon dynamics. The thermodynamics of CO{sub 2} absorption/desorption reactions of these two zirconates are analyzed. The calculated results show that their optimized structures are in a good agreement with experimental measurements. The calculated band gaps are 4.339 eV (indirect), 3.641 eV (direct), 3.935 eV (indirect), and 3.697 eV (direct) for Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, K{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, respectively.The calculated phonon dispersions and phonon density of states for M{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and M{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (M = K, Na, Li) revealed that from K to Na to Li, their frequency peaks are shifted to high frequencies due to the molecular weight decreased from K to Li. From the calculated reaction heats and relationships of free energy change versus temperatures and CO{sub 2} pressures of the M{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} (M = K, Na, Li) reacting with CO{sub 2}, we found that the performance of Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} capturing CO{sub 2} is similar to that of Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and is better than that of K{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. Therefore, Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} are good candidates of high temperature CO{sub 2} sorbents and could be used for post combustion CO{sub 2} capture technologies.

Yuhua Duan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Crystal structure and magnetic properties of NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl  

SciTech Connect

A new copper(II) oxide phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], has been synthesized by flux synthesis. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction data show that the title compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P2{sub 1}/c (No. 14), with lattice parameters a=8.392(2) A, b=6.3960(10) A, c=16.670(2) A, {beta}=109.470(10) Degree-Sign , V=843.6(3) A{sup 3}, Z=4. The crystal structure is characterized by a complex chain of copper-centered polyhedra running along [0 1 0] which are connected by phosphate tetrahedra. The resulting three-dimensional polyhedra framework exhibits channels filled by additional copper and sodium atoms. Field and temperature dependent measurements of the specific heat and the magnetic susceptibility reveal low-dimensional magnetic behavior. The compound starts to decompose at 700 K under release of oxygen and evaporation of Cu{sup I}Cl as shown by simultaneous thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structure of the new copper(II) phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], exhibits linear chains of copper tetrahedra which show low-dimensional magnetic behavior proven by specific heat and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new copper(II) oxide phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], has been synthesized by flux synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structure comprises chains of Cu{sub 4}O tetrahedra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low-dimensional behavior has been proven by magnetic and specific heat measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer On heating, Cu{sup I}Cl and oxygen are released shown by simultaneous thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry.

Jin Tengteng [Key Laboratory of Transparent Opto-Functional Inorganic Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dingxi Rd. 1295, Shanghai 200050 (China); Liu Wei [Institute of Science and Engineering of Materials, Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China); Chen Shuang; Prots, Yurii; Schnelle, Walter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Zhao Jingtai [Key Laboratory of Transparent Opto-Functional Inorganic Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dingxi Rd. 1295, Shanghai 200050 (China); Kniep, Ruediger [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Hoffmann, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.hoffmann@cpfs.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Children's residential exposures to flame retardants, pesticides and pesticide degradation products, and the relationship of pesticides with autonomic nervous system functioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

diphenyl ethers: a flame-retardant additive in severaldiphenyl ether (PBDE) flame retardants. Neurotoxicology. 28,diphenyl ethers: a flame-retardant additive in several

Quiros Alcala, Lesliam

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Synthesis and Stability of NaSICON for Sodium-Based Batteries - Dave Ingersoll & Erik Spoerke, SNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

No No c rossover, e liminates c athode---anode m aterials c ompa4bility i ssues * Planar b ipolar s tacks & fl ow d esigns a re p ossible Phosphate G lasses Silicate G lasses Engineered s ol---gel p rocessing a llows f or l ower t emperature p rocessing a nd t ailoring o f NaSICON c omposi4on t o a ddress s econdary Z rO 2 f orma4on. Reducing fi ring t emperature below 1 100 o C o r i ntroducing a small e xcess o f s odium t o t he sol---gel p recursors d rama4cally reduces Z rO 2 f orma4on. !" #!" $!!" $#!" %!!" %#!" &!!" &#!" '!!" ()*+*)",-."%/" 012*)",-."$&/" !!"#$%&#'()*+,-# 3*4*)56" 7*8)56*9:" 35+*9:" ;<52-<5892" ! "#!µ$! !"#$%&'"(% $#))"*+,$% -*.))/% 012*3)#"1%

412

Gamow-Teller strengths in 24Na using the 24Mg(t,3He) reaction at 115 AMeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gamow-Teller transitions from 24Mg to 24Na were studied via the (t,3He) reaction at 115 AMeV using a secondary triton beam produced via fast fragmentation of 150 AMeV 16O ions. Compared to previous (t,3He) experiments at this energy that employed a primary alpha beam, the secondary beam intensity is improved by about a factor of five. Despite the large emittance of the secondary beam, an excitation-energy resolution of ~200 keV is achieved. A good correspondence is found between the extracted Gamow-Teller strength distribution and those available from other charge-exchange probes. Theoretical calculations using the newly developed USDA and USDB sd-shell model interactions reproduce the data well.

M. E. Howard; R. G. T. Zegers; Sam M. Austin; D. Bazin; B. A. Brown; A. L. Cole; B. Davids; M. Famiano; Y. Fujita; A. Gade; D. Galaviz; G. W. Hitt; M. Matos; S. D. Reitzner; C. Samanta; L. J. Schradin; Y. Shimbara; E. E. Smith; C. Simenel

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

First-principles calculations of the electronic structure and optical properties of K{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}TaO{sub 3} (x=0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1)  

SciTech Connect

The first-principles calculations are performed to investigate the cubic phase composite K{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}TaO{sub 3}(x=0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1), by using density functional theory (DFT) with the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. The energy band structures, density of states (DOS), electron density and optical properties are obtained. The results show that Na ion plays an important role in K{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}TaO{sub 3}. With the content of Na ion increasing, the changes of lattice parameters, energy gaps, bond lengths and optical properties of K{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}TaO{sub 3} are regular. Moreover, the dependence of ferroelectric photocatalysis on both optical properties and internal electronic structure are analyzed in detail. It is proposed that the doped materials are promising photocatalytic materials. - Graphical abstract: The density of states (DOS) of K{sub 1-x}Na{sub x}TaO{sub 3} (x=0.5). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first-principles calculations are performed, by using DFT with FP-LAPW method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The changes of internal electronic structure and optical property of doped materials are regular. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dependence of ferroelectric photocatalysis on optical properties is analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dependence of ferroelectric photocatalysis on internal electronic structure is analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The doped materials are promising photocatalytic materials.

Zhao, Na [Department of Physics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China) [Department of Physics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Wang, Yue-Hua, E-mail: wyhxxll@163.com [Department of Physics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China)] [Department of Physics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Wang, Qing-Xi; Hu, Wen-Jing [Department of Physics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China)] [Department of Physics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116 (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Relationship between calcium loading and impaired energy metabolism during Na+, K+ pump inhibition and metabolic inhibition in cultured neonatal rat cardiac myocytes  

SciTech Connect

This study tested the hypothesis that the initiating mechanism is a major determinant of the response to calcium (Ca) accumulation in myocardium. Cultured neonatal rat ventriculocytes were exposed to Na+, K+ pump inhibition with 1 mM ouabain and metabolic inhibition with 20 mM 2-deoxy-D-glucose and 1 mM cyanide (DOG-CN) for up to 2 h. Microspectrofluorometry of myocytes loaded with fura-2 showed that ouabain resulted in a relatively rapid increase in (Ca2+)i up to 2-3 microM (two to threefold above peak systolic level) and that DOG-CN produced an initial decrease and then a relatively slow increase in (Ca2+)i up to peak systolic level. Electron probe x-ray microanalysis (EPMA) showed prominent increases in Na and Ca and decreases in K and Mg in cytoplasm and mitochondria with both interventions, although the increases in Ca were greater with ouabain than DOG-CN. ATP was reduced by 58% after 1 and 2 h of ouabain and by 70 and 90% after 1 and 2 h of DOG-CN, respectively. Thus, ouabain produced greater calcium accumulation and less ATP reduction than DOG-CN. Upon return to normal medium for 30 min, myocytes showed recovery of most electrolyte alterations and resumption of normal Ca2+ transients after 1 h exposure to either ouabain or DOG-CN; however, recovery was less after 2 h of either treatment, with elevated (Ca2+)i maintained in many myocytes. We conclude that the severity of myocyte injury is influenced by the magnitude and duration of both ATP reduction and calcium accumulation.

Morris, A.C.; Hagler, H.K.; Willerson, J.T.; Buja, L.M.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Refinery Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Ether* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Reformulated Blended with Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil, 15 ppm and Under Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Less than 0.31 Percent Sulfur 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Greater than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Units: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

416

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: (1) Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. (2) Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. (3) Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins. During the sixth quarter we completed the construction of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR), conducted initial shake-down experiments in a cold-flow mode, and finalized the selection process of the acid catalysts for conversion of syngas-produced alcohols and isobutylene to MTBE (scheme 2). Tasks 3, 4, and 5 are awaiting complete implementation of the SBCR system.

Marcelin, G.

1992-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

417

Responsive copolymers for enhanced petroleum recovery. Quarterly technical progress report, June 22, 1993 through September 22, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes technical progress on advanced copolymer synthesis and characterization of the molecular structure of copolymers to be used to enhanced recovery of petroleum. Polymers examined are acrylamide/acrylamido-3-methylbutanoic acid/N-(4-butyl)phenylacrylamide (AM/AMBA/BPAM) terpolymers, sodium 2-(acrylamido)-2-methylpropanesulfonate and (2-(acrylamido)-2-methylpropyl)trimethylammonium chloride (NaAMPS/AMPTAC) copolymers, AM/NaAMPS/AMPTAC terpolymers, and AM/APS (APS is 2-(1-pyrenylsulfonamido) ethyl acrylamide) copolymers. Polymer associative behavior and polymer solution behavior is characterized.

McCormick, C.; Hester, R.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Conventional and Stuffed Bergman-Type Phases in the Na-Au-T (T=Ga, Ge, Sn) Systems: Synthesis, Structures, Coloring of Cluster Centers, and Fermi Sphere - Brillouin Zone Interactions  

SciTech Connect

Bergman-type phases in the Na?Au?T (T = Ga, Ge, and Sn) systems were synthesized by solid-state means and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Two structurally related (1/1) Bergman phases were found in the Na? Au?Ga system: (a) a conventional Bergman-type (CB) structure, Na26AuxGa54?x, which features empty innermost icosahedra, as refined with x = 18.1 (3), Im3?, a = 14.512(2) Å, and Z = 2; (b) a stuffed Bergman-type (SB) structure, Na26AuyGa55?y, which contains Gacentered innermost icosahedra, as refined with y = 36.0 (1), Im3?, a = 14.597(2) Å, and Z = 2. Although these two subtypes have considerable phase widths along with respective tie lines at Na ? 32.5 and 32.1 atom %, they do not merge into a continuous solid solution. Rather, a quasicrystalline phase close to the Au-poor CB phase and an orthorhombic derivative near the Au-rich SB phase lie between them. In contrast, only Au-rich SB phases exist in the Ge and Sn systems, in which the innermost icosahedra are centered by Au rather than Ge or Sn. These were refined for Na26Au40.93(5)Ge14.07(5) (Im3?, a = 14.581(2) Å, and Z = 2) and Na26Au39.83(6)Sn15.17(6) (Im3?, a = 15.009(2) Å, and Z = 2), respectively. Occupations of the centers of Bergman clusters are rare. Such centering and coloring correlate with the sizes of the neighboring icosahedra, the size ratios between electropositive and electronegative components, and the values of the average valence electron count per atom (e/a). Theoretical calculations revealed that all of these phases are Hume?Rothery phases, with evident pseudogaps in the density of states curves that arise from the interactions between Fermi surface and Brillouin zone boundaries corresponding to a strong diffraction intensity.

Lin, Qisheng; Smetana, Volodymur; Miller, Gordon J.; Corbett, John D

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

419

Enantiomeric recognition of organic ammonium salts by chiral crown ethers based on the pyridino-18-crown-6 structure  

SciTech Connect

Enantiomeric recognition by several chiral dimethyl-substituted macrocycles of the pyridino-18-crown-6 type for chiral organic ammonium salts has been studied by titration calorimetry in CH/sub 3/OH, temperature-dependent /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy in CD/sub 2/CL/sub 2/, and selective crystallization. Results from the three procedures are consistent in demonstrating either host-guest recognition or nonrecognition in the systems investigated. Futhermore, enaniomeric recognition by one chiral host for a pair of chiral guests is correlated with X-ray crystallographic data for the same system. The chiral dimethyl-substituted ligands used in the study include three dimethyl diester pyridino-18-crown-6 ligands, dimethyl thiono diester pyridino-18-crown-6, and dimethyl-pyridino-18-crown-6 ligands. All of these ligands exhibited chiral recognition. Dimethylpyridino-18-crown-6 in complexation with (R)- and (S)-(..cap alpha..-(1-naphthyl)ethyl)ammonium perchlorate exhibited the largest ratio of ..delta..G/sub c/+ yet observed by the /sup 1/H NMR technique. A diphenyl-substituted diester pyridino-18-crown-6 where the phenyl substituents are in less rigid portion of the macrocycle failed to show chiral recognition.

Davidson, R.B.; Bradshaw, J.S.; Jones, B.A.; Dalley, N.K.; Christensen, J.J.; Izatt, R.M.

1984-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

420

Alkaline-Side Extraction of Cesium from Savannah River Tank Waste Using a Calixarene-Crown Ether Extractant  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented supporting the viability of the alkaline-side CSEX process as a potential replacement for the In-Tank Precipitation process for removal of cesium from aqueous high-level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Under funding from the USDOE Efficient Separations and Crosscutting program, a flowsheet was suggested in early June of 1998, and in the following four months, this flowsheet underwent extensive testing, both in batch tests at ORNL and ANL and in two centrifugal-contactor tests at ANL. To carry out these tests, the initial ESP funding was augmented by direct funds from Westinghouse Savannah River Corporation. The flowsheet employed a solvent containing a calixarene-crown hybrid compound called BoBCalixC6 that was invented at ORNL and can now be obtained commercially for government use from IBC Advanced Technologies. This special extractant is so powerful and selective that it can be used at only 0.01 M, compensating for its expense, but a modifier is required for use in an aliphatic diluent, primarily to increase the cesium distribution ratio D{sub Cs} in extraction. The modifier selected is a relatively economical fluorinated alcohol called Cs3, invented at ORNL and so far available. only from ORNL. For the flowsheet, the modifier is used at 0.2 M in the branched aliphatic kerosene Isopar{reg_sign} L. Testing at ORNL and ANL involved simulants of the SRS HLW. After extraction of the Cs from the waste simulant, the solvent is scrubbed with 0.05 M HNO{sub 3} and stripped with a solution comprised of 0.0005 M HNO{sub 3} and 0.0001 M CsNO{sub 3}. The selection of these conditions is justified in this report, both on the basis of experimental data and underlying theory.

Bonnesen, P.V.; Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Moyer, B.A.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Synthesis and Characterization of Phenylethynyl Terminated Poly(arylene ether sulfone)s as Thermosetting Structural Adhesives and Composite Matrices.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract High temperature, solvent resistant materials which also display good mechanical properties are desired for use as aerospace structural adhesives and polymer matrix/carbon fiber composites.… (more)

Mecham, Sue Jewel

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Aggregation behavior of hexaoxyethyleneglycol myristate and hexaoxyethyleneglycol mono (1-methyltridecane) ether and dynamics of their micelles in aqueous solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The title surfactants have similar critical micelle concentrations and cloud temperatures. Their micellar solutions have been investigated by time resolved fluorescence quenching in the range 2--25 c. The micelle aggregation numbers of both surfactants do not differ much, and increase with temperature. Aggregation numbers are large, suggesting anisotropic micelles, and the results show that the micelles are polydisperse. Fast intermicellar exchange of material becomes detectable on the fluorescence timescale ([approximately]1 [mu]s) above T [approx] 10 C, i.e., some 35--40 C below the cloud temperature of the solution. This exchange probably occurs via micelle collisions with temporary merging. Overall the behavior of these two surfactants is very similar to that of the other ethoxylated nonionic surfactants previously examined.

Alami, E.; Zana, R. (Inst. Charles Sadron, Strasbourg (France)); Van Os, N.M.; Jong, B. de; Kerkhof, F.J.M. (Koninklijke/Shell Lab., Amsterdam, (Netherlands)); Rupert, L.A.M. (Thornton Research Centre, Chester, (United Kingdom))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Experimental Determinations of Henry's Law Constants of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) to Evaluate Exposure to Aquatic Biota  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

correlated to the degree of chlorine substitution, PCB K Hincreased with ortho- chlorine substitution. In contrast,their high abundance. Both chlorine isotopes (amu 35 and 37)

Charles, M. Judith; Destaillats, Hugo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

LBNL-4183E-rev1 N NA AT TU UR RA AL L G GA AS S V VA AR RI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4183E-rev1 4183E-rev1 N NA AT TU UR RA AL L G GA AS S V VA AR RI IA AB BI IL LI IT TY Y I IN N C CA AL LI IF FO OR RN NI IA A: : E EN NV VI IR RO ON NM ME EN NT TA AL L I IM MP PA AC CT TS S A AN ND D D DE EV VI IC CE E P PE ER RF FO OR RM MA AN NC CE E E EX XP PE ER RI IM ME EN NT TA AL L E EV VA AL LU UA AT TI IO ON N O OF F I IN NS ST TA AL LL LE ED D C CO OO OK KI IN NG G E EX XH HA AU US ST T F FA AN N P PE ER RF FO OR RM MA AN NC CE E Brett C. Singer, William W. Delp and Michael G. Apte Indoor Environment Department Atmospheric Sciences Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division July 2011 (Revised February 2012) Disclaimer 1 This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of

425

Testing Buda-Lund hydro model on particle correlations and spectra in NA44, WA93 and WA98 heavy ion experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analytic and numerical approximations to a hydrodynamical model describing longitudinally expanding, cylindrically symmetric, finite systems are fitted to preliminary NA44 data measured in 200 AGeV central $S + Pb$ reactions. The model describes the measured spectra and HBT radii of pions, kaons and protons, simultaneously. The source is characterized by a central freeze-out temperature of T_0 = 154 +/- 8 +/- 11 MeV, a "surface" temperature of T_r = 107 +/- 28 +/- 18 MeV and by a well-developed transverse flow, = 0.53 +/- 0.17 +/- 0.11. The transverse geometrical radius and the mean freeze-out time are found to be R_G = 5.4 +/- 0.9 +/- 0.7 fm and tau_0 = 5.1 +/- 0.3 +/- 0.3 fm/c, respectively. Fits to preliminary WA93 200 AGeV S + Au and WA98 158 AGeV Pb + Pb data dominated by pions indicate similar model parameters. The absolute normalization of the measured particle spectra together with the experimental determination of both the statistical and the systematic errors were needed to obtain successful fits.

A. Ster; T. Csorgo; B. Lorstad

1998-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

426

Boron uptake in tumors, cerebrum and blood from (/sup 10/B)Na/sub 4/B/sub 24/H/sub 22/S/sub 2/  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stable boronated (/sup 10/B-labeled) compound, sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate is infused in the form of the disulfide dimer, (/sup 10/B)Na/sub 4/B/sub 24/H/sub 22/S/sub 2/, at a dose of about 200 ..mu..g /sup 10/B per gm body weight. The infusion is preformed into the blood or peritoneal cavity of the patient slowly over a period of many days, perhaps one week or more, at the rate of roughly 1 ..mu..g /sup 10/B per gm body weight per hour. Use of this particular boronated dimer in the manner or similarly to the manner so described permits radiotherapeutically effective amounts of boron to accumulate in tumors to be treated by boron neutron capture radiation therapy and also permits sufficient retention of boron in tumor after the cessation of the slow infusion, so as to allow the blood concentration of /sup 10/B to drop or to be reduced artificially to a radiotherapeutically effective level, less than one-half of the concentration of /sup 10/B in the tumor. 1 tab.

Slatkin, D.N.; Micca, P.L.; Fairchild, R.G.

1986-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

427

Molecular dynamics simulations of the electrical double layer on smectite surfaces contacting concentrated mixed electrolyte (NaCl-CaCl2)  

SciTech Connect

We report new molecular dynamics results elucidating the structure of the electrical double layer (EDL) on smectite surfaces contacting mixed NaCl-CaCl{sup 2} electrolyte solutions in the range of concentrations relevant to pore waters in geologic repositories for CO{sub 2} or high-level radioactive waste (0.34-1.83 mol{sub c} dm{sup -3}). Our results confirm the existence of three distinct ion adsorption planes (0-, {beta}-, and d-planes), often assumed in EDL models, but with two important qualifications: (1) the location of the {beta}- and d-planes are independent of ionic strength or ion type and (2) 'indifferent electrolyte' ions can occupy all three planes. Charge inversion occurred in the diffuse ion swarm because of the affinity of the clay surface for CaCl{sup +} ion pairs. Therefore, at concentrations 0.34 mol{sub c} dm{sup -3}, properties arising from long-range electrostatics at interfaces (electrophoresis, electro-osmosis, co-ion exclusion, colloidal aggregation) will not be correctly predicted by most EDL models. Co-ion exclusion, typically neglected by surface speciation models, balanced a large part of the clay mineral structural charge in the more concentrated solutions. Water molecules and ions diffused relatively rapidly even in the first statistical water monolayer, contradicting reports of rigid 'ice-like' structures for water on clay mineral surfaces.

Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Latest results from NA48 and NA48/1.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detec- tor consisted of the following principal sub-detectors: a magnetic spectrometer consisting of 4 drift chambers separated by a dipole magnet, a high resolution liquid krypton electromagnetic calorimeter, an iron scintillator hadronic calorimeter... direct and indirect CP violating components, which also interfere. The CP conserving component can be predicted from a measurement of KL ? pi0?? while the indirect CP violating component can be predicted from a measurement of KS ? pi0l+l?. Any measurement...

Slater, M W

429

Extraction of Am(III) from nitric acid by octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide-tri-n-butyl phosphate mixtures  

SciTech Connect

The extraction behavior of Am(III) from nitric acid by octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyphosphine oxides, O0D(IB)CMPO, in the presence of tributylphosphate, TBP, has been studied using diethylbenzene, decalin, and normal aliphatic hydrocarbon diluents. Relative to O0D(IB)CMPO alone, mixtures of TBP and O0D(IB)CMPO show a slight enhancement in the extraction of Am(III) from nitric acid solution above 2 M and a moderate decrease in extraction for lower acid concentrations. The net effect of TBP addition to O0D(IB)CMPO (as well as other selected carbamoylmethylphosphoryl extractants) is a relative insensitivity of the distribution ratio of Am(III) to HNO/sub 3/ concentration in the range of 0.5 M to 6 M and facilitated stripping of Am(III) with dilute acid. Since a continuous variation study of Am(III) extraction using mixtures of O0D(IB)CMPO and TBP at a fixed total concentration revealed no evidence of a mixed complex, the TBP appears to be behaving primarily as a phase modifier. The most significant benefit gained from addition of TBP to O0D(IB)CMPO is the increased metal ion loading capacity and extractant compatibility with alicyclic and aliphatic diluents. The use of TBP to overcome phase compatibility with other bifunctional extractants of the carbamoylmethylphosphoryl type and the use of other phase modifiers with O0D(IB)CMPO have also been investigated. 15 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

Horwitz, E.P.; Kalina, D.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Controlled synthesis, formation mechanism and upconversion luminescence of NaYF{sub 4}: Yb, Er nano-/submicrocrystals via ionothermal approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to deepen the fundamental understanding of IL-mediated synthesis of nano-/submicrostructure, hydrophilic ILs ([Emim][BF{sub 4}], [Bmim][BF{sub 4}] and [Omim][BF{sub 4}]), which act as solvents, templates, as well as fluorine source, have been employed to synthesize rare earth doped NaYF{sub 4} upconversion nano-/submicrocrystals (UC-NMCs). The imidazolium cations provide the capping reagent to prevent the nucleation centers from aggregation and growing, while the tetrafluoroborate anions introduce a new fluorine source according to partial hydrolysis. It is demonstrated that the properties of IL, such as viscosity, polarity, solvency and interfacial tension, extremely affect the dissolution, diffusion and nucleation process of lanthanide ions in IL. Morphology and size of the final products can thus be tailored by synthetical parameters, like imidazolium cations, cosolvents, Ln{sup 3+} and fluoride concentrations, as well as ionothermal time. Based on the experimental results, the possible mechanism of the nucleation and growth of UC-NMCs in IL is discussed. - Graphical abstract: The upconversion nano-/submicrocrystals with diverse morphologies and sizes have been synthesized through ionothermal approach. The possible mechanism is concluded, which strengthens the fundamental understanding of IL-mediated synthesis of nano-/submicrostructure. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The upconversion nano-/submicrocrystals were synthesized through ionothermal approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The as-prepared products exhibited diverse morphologies and sizes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The possible mechanism of the nucleation and growth process in ILs is concluded.

Liu Jia [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Application, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Liu Xiaomin [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Application, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Kong Xiangui, E-mail: xgkong14@ciomp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Application, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Zhan, Hong, E-mail: h.zhang@uva.nl [Van't Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Science Park, PO Box 94157. 1090 GD Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Table 2.6 Household End Uses: Fuel Types, Appliances, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Digital Video Recorder (DVR) NA: NA: NA: NA: NA: NA: NA: NA: NA: NA: NA : NA: 43: NA: Computer. NA: NA: NA: NA: NA: NA: NA: NA: NA: 35: 56 : 68: 76: NA: One. NA: NA ...

432

Synthesis and photoluminescence properties of the high-brightness Eu{sup 3+}-doped M{sub 2}Gd{sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 7} (M=Li, Na) red phosphors  

SciTech Connect

A series of red-emitting phosphors Eu{sup 3+}-doped M{sub 2}Gd{sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 7} (M=Li, Na) have been successfully synthesized at 850 Degree-Sign C by solid state reaction. The excitation spectra of the two phosphors reveal two strong excitation bands at 396 nm and 466 nm, respectively, which match well with the two popular emissions from near-UV and blue light-emitting diode chips. The intensity of the emission from {sup 5}D{sub 0} to {sup 7}F{sub 2} of M{sub 2}(Gd{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x}){sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 7} phosphors with the optimal compositions of x=0.85 for Li or x=0.70 for Na is about five times higher than that of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}. The quantum efficiencies of the entitled phosphors excited under 396 nm and 466 nm are also investigated and compared with commercial phosphors Sr{sub 2}Si{sub 5}N{sub 8}:Eu{sup 2+} and Y{sub 3}A{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce{sup 3+}. The experimental results indicate that the Eu{sup 3+}-doped M{sub 2}Gd{sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 7} (M=Li, Na) phosphors are promising red-emitting phosphors pumped by near-UV and blue light. - Graphical Abstract: The intensity of the red emission of M{sub 2}(Gd{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x}){sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 7} (M=Li, Na) phosphors with the optimal compositions is about five times higher than that of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two novel Eu{sup 3+}-doped red phosphors (Na{sub 2}Gd{sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}, Li{sub 2}Gd{sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 7}) were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Their emission intensities are about five times higher than that of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Their quantum efficiencies are higher than that of commercial red phosphor Sr{sub 2}Si{sub 5}N{sub 8}:Eu{sup 2+}.

Zhao Chengchun [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Yin Xin [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Huang Fuqiang, E-mail: huangfq@mail.sic.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Hang Yin, E-mail: yhang@siom.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

433

Structural phase transitions in the Ag{sub 2}Nb{sub 4}O{sub 11}-Na{sub 2}Nb{sub 4}O{sub 11} solid solution  

SciTech Connect

The phase transitions between various structural modifications of the natrotantite-structured system xAg{sub 2}Nb{sub 4}O{sub 11}-(1-x)Na{sub 2}Nb{sub 4}O{sub 11} have been investigated and a phase diagram constructed as a function of temperature and composition. This shows three separate phase transition types: (1) paraelectric-ferroelectric, (2) rhombohedral-monoclinic and (3) a phase transition within the ferroelectric rhombohedral zone between space groups R3c and R3. The parent structure for the entire series has space group R3{sup Macron }c. Compositions with x>0.75 are rhombohedral at all temperatures whereas compositions with x<0.75 are all monoclinic at room temperature and below. At x=0.75, rhombohedral and monoclinic phases coexist with the phase boundary below room temperature being virtually temperature-independent. The ferroelectric phase boundary extends into the monoclinic phase field. No evidence was found for the R3-R3c phase boundary extending into the monoclinic phase field and it is concluded that a triple point is formed. - Graphical abstract: Phase diagram for xAg{sub 2}Nb{sub 4}O{sub 11}-(1-x)Na{sub 2}Nb{sub 4}O{sub 11} solid solution showing changes in crystal symmetry as a function of temperature and composition. The crystal structure is depicted. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Ferroelectric, rhombohedral Ag{sub 2}Nb{sub 4}O{sub 11} in solid solution with monoclinic Na{sub 2}Nb{sub 4}O{sub 11}. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Three phase boundaries were studied as a function of composition and temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Both rhombohedral and monoclinic variants exhibit ferroelectricity. The parent phase of the series has space group R3{sup Macron }c.

Woodward, David I., E-mail: d.i.woodward@warwick.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Lees, Martin R.; Thomas, Pam A. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Development of the Process for the Recovery and Conversion of {sup 233}UF{sub 6} Chemisorbed in NaF Traps from the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project  

SciTech Connect

The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is being cleaned up and remediated. The removal of {approx}37 kg of fissile {sup 233}U is the main activity. Of that inventory, {approx}23 kg has already been removed as UF{sub 6} from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is in temporary storage while it awaits conversion to a stable oxide. The planned recovery of {approx}11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a uranium oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8}), which is suitable for long-term storage.The conversion of the MSRE material into an oxide presents unique problems, such as criticality concerns, a large radiation field caused by the daughters of {sup 232}U (an impurity isotope in the {sup 233}U), and the possible spread of the high-radiation field from the release of {sup 220}Rn gas. To overcome these problems, a novel process was conceived and developed. This process was specially tailored for providing remote operations inside a hot cell while maintaining full containment at all times to avoid the spread of contamination. This process satisfies criticality concerns, maximizes the recovery of uranium, minimizes any radiation exposure to operators, and keeps waste disposal to a minimum.

Cul, Guillermo D. del; Icenhour, Alan S.; Simmons, Darrell W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

XRD and NMR investigation of Ti-compound formation in solution-doping of sodium aluminum hydrides: Solubility of Ti in NaAlH4 crystals grown in THF  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sodium aluminum hydrides have gained attention due to their high hydrogen weight percent (5.5% ideal) compared to interstitial hydrides, and as a model for hydrides with even higher hydrogen weight fraction. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the Ti-compounds that are formed under solution-doping techniques, such as wet doping in solvents such as tetrahydrofuran (THF). Compound formation in Ti-doped sodium aluminum hydrides is investigated using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). We present lattice parameter measurements of crushed single crystals, which were exposed to Ti during growth. Rietveld refinements indicate no lattice parameter change and thus no solubility for Ti in NaAlH{sub 4} by this method of exposure. In addition, x-ray diffraction data indicate that no Ti substitutes in NaH, the final decomposition product for the alanate. Reaction products of completely reacted (33.3 at. %-doped) samples that were solvent-mixed or mechanically milled are investigated. Formation of TiAl{sub 3} is observed in mechanically milled materials, but not solution mixed samples, where bonding to THF likely stabilizes Ti-based nano-clusters. The Ti in these clusters is activated by mechanical milling.

Majzoub, E H; Herberg, J L; Stumpf, R; Spangler, S; Maxwell, R S

2004-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

436

Task 4.9 -- Value-added products from syngas. Semi-annual report, July 1--December 31, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work on advanced fuel forms in 1996 focused on the synthesis of higher alcohols from mixtures of hydrogen and carbon dioxide (syngas) from coal gasification. Initial work in this project utilized a novel molybdenum sulfide catalyst previously shown to be active for hydrodesulfurization reactions of coal liquids. A pressurized fixed-bed flow-through reactor was constructed, and the MoS{sub 2} catalysts were tested with syngas under a variety of conditions. Unfortunately, the catalysts, even with higher molybdenum loading and addition of promoters, failed to give alcohol products. A batch reactor test of the catalyst was also conducted, but did not produce alcohol products. Group VIII metals have been used previously in catalysts for syngas reactions. Ruthenium and rhodium catalysts were prepared by impregnation of a hydrotalcite support. Tests with these catalysts in flow-through reactors also did not produce the desired alcohol products. The formation of higher alcohols from smaller ones, such as methanol and ethanol, could be commercially important if high selectivity could be achieved. The methanol and ethanol would be derived from syngas and fermentation, respectively. Based on previous work in other laboratories, it was hypothesized that the hydrotalcite-supported MoS{sub 2} or Ru or Rh catalysts could catalyze the formation of butyl alcohols. Although the desired 1-butanol was obtained in batch reactions with the promoted ruthenium catalyst, the reaction was not as selective as desired. Product suitable for a lower-vapor-pressure gasoline oxygenate additive was obtained, but it may not be economical to market such products in competition with methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE). Flow-through catalytic bed reactions were not successful.

Olson, E.S.; Sharma, R.K.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

NaCu(Ta{sub 1-y}Nb{sub y}){sub 4}O{sub 11} solid solution: A tunable band gap spanning the visible-light wavelengths  

SciTech Connect

The new solid-solution NaCu(Ta{sub 1-y}Nb{sub y}){sub 4}O{sub 11} (0{<=}y{<=}0.7) was synthesized by solid-state methods in the form of bulk powders that ranged from light-yellow to brown colored and were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction techniques (Space group R-3c (no. 167); Z=6; a=6.214(1)-6.218(1) Angstrom-Sign and c=36.86(1)-36.94(1) Angstrom-Sign ). Full-profile Rietveld refinements confirmed a site-differentiated ordering of the Cu(I) and Na cations, i.e., occupying the 12c (linear environment) and 18d (seven-coordinate environment) crystallographic sites respectively. Conversely, a statistical mixture of Ta(V) and Nb(V) cations occurred over the 6b (octahedral environment) or the 18e (pentagonal-bipyramidal environment) crystallographic sites, without any preferential segregation. The UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra showed a significant red-shift of the optical bandgap size (indirect) from {approx}2.70 eV to {approx}1.80 eV across the solid solution with increasing Nb(V) content. Electronic-structure calculations using the tight-binding linear-muffin-tin-orbital approach showed that the reduction in bandgap size arises from the introduction of the lower-energy Nb 4d{sup 0} orbitals into the conduction band and consequently a lower energy of the conduction band edge. The lowest-energy bandgap transitions were found to be derived from electronic transitions between the filled Cu(I) and the empty Nb(V) d-orbitals, with a small amount of mixing with the O 2p orbitals. The resulting conduction and valence band energies are found to approximately bracket the redox potentials for water reduction and oxidation, and meeting the thermodynamic requirements for photocatalytic water-splitting reactions. - Graphical Abstract: The NaCu(Ta{sub 1-y}Nb{sub y}){sub 4}O{sub 11} (0{<=}y{<=}0.7) solid solution shows a statistical occupancy of the Ta(V) and Nb(V) cations in both octahedral and pentagonal bipyramidal environments. An increasing Nb(V) content also causes a significant red-shift of the bandgap size from {approx}2.70 eV to {approx}1.80 eV. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Double solid-solution of M(I) (=Cu, Na) and M(V) (=Nb, Ta) crystallographic sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing Nb content leads to tunable bandgap size from {approx}2.70 eV to {approx}1.80 eV across the solid solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Layers of MO{sub 7} (M=Ta, Nb) pentagonal bipyramids and isolated MO{sub 6} octahedra.

Palasyuk, Olena [Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Maggard, Paul A., E-mail: Paul_Maggard@ncsu.edu [Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Direct evidence of a zigzag spin-chain structure in the honeycomb lattice: A neutron and x-ray diffraction investigation of single-crystal Na2IrO3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have combined single crystal neutron and x-ray diffractions to investigate the magnetic and crystal structures of the honeycomb lattice $\\rm Na_2IrO_3$. The system orders magnetically below $18.1(2)$~K with Ir$^{4+}$ ions forming zigzag spin chains within the layered honeycomb network with ordered moment of $\\rm 0.22(1)~\\mu_B$/Ir site. Such a configuration sharply contrasts the N{\\'{e}}el or stripe states proposed in the Kitaev-Heisenberg model. The structure refinement reveals that the Ir atoms form nearly ideal 2D honeycomb lattice while the $\\rm IrO_6$ octahedra experience a trigonal distortion that is critical to the ground state. The results of this study provide much-needed experimental insights into the magnetic and crystal structure crucial to the understanding of the exotic magnetic order and possible topological characteristics in the 5$d$-electron based honeycomb lattice.

Ye, Feng [ORNL; Chi, Songxue [ORNL; Cao, Huibo [ORNL; Chakoumakos, Bryan C [ORNL; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A [ORNL; Custelcean, Radu [ORNL; Qi, Tongfei [University of Kentucky; Korneta, O. B. [University of Kentucky, Lexington; Cao, Gang [University of Kentucky

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Effect of Mo Back Contact on Na Out-Diffusion and Device Performance of Mo/Cu(In,Ga)Se2/CdS/ZnO Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference paper describes the molybdenum thin films that were deposited on soda lime glass (SLG) substrates using direct-current planar magnetron sputtering, with a sputtering power density of 1.2 W/cm2. The working gas (Ar) pressure was varied from 0.6 to 16 mtorr to induce changes in the Mo films' morphology and microstructure. Thin films of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) were deposited on the Mo-coated glass using the 3-stage co-evaporation process. The morphology of both the Mo-coated SLG and the CIGS thin films grown on it was examined using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Na was depth profiled in the Mo and CIGS films by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The device performance was evaluated under standard conditions of 1000 W/m2 and 25 C. Optimum device performance is found for an intermediate Mo sputtering pressure.

Al-Thani, H. A.; Hasoon, F. S.; Young, M.; Asher, S.; Alleman, J. L.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Williamson, D. L.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

U.S. Natural Gas Citygate Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1973 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1974 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1975 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1976 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1977 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1978 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1979 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1980 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1981 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1982 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 1983 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.97 3.91 3.88 1984 3.94 4.02 3.91 3.96 3.98 4.02 4.06 3.69 4.02 3.99 3.92 3.97 1985 3.89 3.94 3.97 3.91 3.89 3.86 3.69 3.70 3.68 3.59 3.46 3.45

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether na" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Legislation & Regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

leg_reg.gif (4810 bytes) Climate Change Action Plan Comprehensive Electricity Competition Act Tier 2 Vehicle Emissions and Gasoline Sulfur Standards California Ban of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether Low-Emission Vehicle Program Introduction Because analyses by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) are required to be policy-neutral, the projections in this Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) are based on Federal, State, and local laws and regulations in effect on July 1, 1999. The potential impacts of pending or proposed legislation, regulations, and standards and sections of existing legislation for which funds have not been appropriated are not reflected in the projections. Federal legislation incorporated in the projections includes the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993, which adds 4.3 cents per gallon to the Federal tax on highway fuels [1]; the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987; the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90); the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT); the Outer Continental Shelf Deep Water Royalty Relief Act of 1995; the Tax Payer Relief Act of 1997; and the Federal Highway Bill of 1998, which includes an extension of the ethanol tax credit. AEO2000 assumes the continuation of the ethanol tax credit through 2020.

442

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - International  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

international energy module (IEM) consists of four submodules (Figure 4) that perform the following functions: international energy module (IEM) consists of four submodules (Figure 4) that perform the following functions: world oil market submodule—calculates the average annual world oil price (imported refiner acquisition cost) that is consistent with worldwide petroleum demand and supply availability crude oil supply submodule—provides im- ported crude oil supply curves for five crude oil quality classes petroleum products supply submodule—pro- vides imported refined product supply curves for eleven types of refined products oxygenates supply submodule—provides imported oxygenates supply curves for methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and methanol. Figure 4. International Energy Module Structure The world oil price that is generated by the world oil market submodule is used by all the modules of NEMS as well as the other submodules of IEM. The import supply curves for crude oils, refined products, and oxygenates are used by the petroleum market module.

443

U.S. Blender Net Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Input 1,184,435 1,522,193 1,850,204 2,166,784 2,331,109 2,399,318 2005-2012 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 3,445 5,686 6,538 7,810 10,663 2008-2012 Pentanes Plus 2,012 474 1,808 1,989 2,326 4,164 2005-2012 Liquid Petroleum Gases 2,971 3,878 4,549 5,484 6,499 2008-2012 Normal Butane 2,943 2,971 3,878 4,549 5,484 6,499 2005-2012 Isobutane 2005-2006 Other Liquids 1,518,748 1,844,518 2,160,246 2,323,299 2,388,655 2008-2012 Oxygenates/Renewables 234,047 274,974 286,837 295,004 2009-2012 Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) 2005-2006 Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) 234,047 274,974 286,837 295,004 2009-2012 Fuel Ethanol 131,810 182,772 232,677 273,107 281,507 287,433 2005-2012

444

What's New in the Computational Biology Section  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's New? What's New? Kane, SR, Chakicherla, AY, Chain, PSG, Schmidt, R, Shin, MW, Legler, TC, Scow, KM, Larimer, FW, Lucas, SM, Richardson, PM, and Hristova, KR. (2007). Whole-Genome Analysis of the Methyl tert-Butyl Ether-Degrading Beta-Proteobacterium Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1. J. Bacteriol. 189(5): 1931-1945. PubMed Scott KM, Sievert SM, Abril FN, Ball LA, Barrett CJ, Blake RA, Boller AJ, Chain PS, Clark JA, Davis CR, Detter C, Do KF, Dobrinski KP, Faza BI, Fitzpatrick KA, Freyermuth SK, Harmer TL, Hauser LJ, Hugler M, Kerfeld CA, Klotz MG, Kong WW, Land M, Lapidus A, Larimer FW, Longo DL, Lucas S, Malfatti SA, Massey SE, Martin DD, McCuddin Z, Meyer F, Moore JL, Ocampo LH, Paul JH, Paulsen IT, Reep DK, Ren Q, Ross RL, Sato PY, Thomas P, Tinkham LE, Zeruth GT. (2006). The Genome of Deep-Sea Vent Chemolithoautotroph Thiomicrospira crunogena XCL-2. PLoS Biol. 4(12): e383. PubMed

445

U.S. Blender Net Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Total Input 206,541 217,867 212,114 216,075 219,783 208,203 2005-2013 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 891 352 376 196 383 1,397 2008-2013 Pentanes Plus 261 301 313 67 287 393 2005-2013 Liquid Petroleum Gases 630 51 63 129 96 1,004 2008-2013 Normal Butane 630 51 63 129 96 1,004 2005-2013 Isobutane 2005-2006 Other Liquids 205,650 217,515 211,738 215,879 219,400 206,806 2008-2013 Oxygenates/Renewables 25,156 26,576 26,253 26,905 27,788 25,795 2009-2013 Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) 2005-2006 Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) 25,156 26,576 26,253 26,905 27,788 25,795 2009-2013 Fuel Ethanol 24,163 25,526 24,804 25,491 25,970 24,116 2005-2013

446

Factors influencing biological treatment of MTBE contaminated ground water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) contamination has complicated the remediation of gasoline contaminated sites. Many sites are using biological processes for ground water treatment and would like to apply the same technology to MTBE. However, the efficiency and reliability of MTBE biological treatment is not well documented. The objective of this study was to examine the operational and environmental variables influencing MTBE biotreatment. A fluidized bed reactor was installed at a fuel transfer station and used to treat ground water contaminated with MTBE and gasoline hydrocarbons. A complete set of chemical and operational data was collected during this study and a statistical approach was used to determine what variables were influencing MTBE treatment efficiency. It was found that MTBE treatment was more sensitive to up-set than gasoline hydrocarbon treatment. Events, such as excess iron accumulation, inhibited MTBE treatment, but not hydrocarbon treatment. Multiple regression analysis identified biomass accumulation and temperature as the most important variables controlling the efficiency of MTBE treatment. The influent concentration and loading of hydrocarbons, but not MTBE, also impacted MTBE treatment efficiency. The results of this study suggest guidelines for improving MTBE treatment. Long cell retention times in the reactor are necessary for maintaining MTBE treatment. The onset of nitrification only occurs when long cell retention times have been reached and can be used as an indicator in fixed film reactors that conditions favorable to MTBE treatment exist. Conversely, if the reactor can not nitrify, it is unlikely to have stable MTBE treatment.

Stringfellow, William T.; Hines Jr., Robert D.; Cockrum, Dirk K.; Kilkenny, Scott T.

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z