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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Atmospheric chemistry of diethyl ether and ethyl tert-butyl ether  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanisms for the Cl-initiated and OH-initiated atmospheric oxidation of diethyl ether and ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) have been determined. For diethyl ether the products are ethyl formate and formaldehyde and its atmospheric oxidation can be represented by C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OC{sub 2}H{sub 5} + OH + 2NO {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OC(O)H + HCHO + 2NO{sub 2} + HO{sub 2}. The mechanism for the atmospheric oxidation of ETBE is more complex, with 80% of the reaction being accounted for in terms of tert-butyl formate and formaldehyde. The remaining 20% the authors ascribe to 2-ethoxy-2-methylpropanal. The atmospheric oxidation of ETBE can be represented by ETBE + OH + 1.8NO {yields} 0.8HCOOC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} + 0.2C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OC(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CHO + HO{sub 2} + 0.8HCHO + 1.8NO{sub 2}. THe subsequent atmospheric chemistry of 2-ethoxy-2-methylpropanal the authors estimate to be represented by C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OC(CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CHO + OH + 3NO {yields} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}CO + C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OC(O)CH{sub 3} + HO{sub 2} + 3NO{sub 2}. These results are discussed in terms of the reactivity of these compounds in urban atmospheres.

Wallington, T.J.; Japar, S.M. (Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Control Study of Ethyl tert-Butyl Ether Reactive Distillation Muhammad A. Al-Arfaj  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-butyl ether (ETBE) for gasoline blending as a replacement for methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) because and be blended with ETBE in the gasoline pool. Even for neat operation, if the conversion is low, the unconverted

Al-Arfaj, Muhammad A.

3

State Restrictions on Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

By the end of 2005, 25 states had barred, or passed laws banning, any more than trace levels of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in their gasoline supplies, and legislation to ban MTBE was pending in 4 others. Some state laws address only MTBE; others also address ethers such as ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE) and tertiary amyl methyl ether (TAME). Annual Energy Outlook 2006 assumes that all state MTBE bans prohibit the use of all ethers for gasoline blending.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Separation of methyl t-butyl ether from close boiling C[sub 5] hydrocarbons by extractive distillation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for recovering methyl t-butyl ether from a mixture of methyl t-butyl ether and 1-pentene which comprises distilling a mixture of methyl t-butyl ether and 1-pentene in the presence of about one part of an extractive agent per part of methyl t-butyl ether -- 1-pentene mixture, recovering the 1-pentene as overhead product and obtaining the methyl t-butyl ether and the extractive agent from the still pot, wherein said extractive agent consists of one material selected from the group consisting of sulfolane, nitroethane, t-butanol, ethylene glycol diacetate, 1-methoxy-2-propanol acetate, methyl isoamyl ketone, ethylene glycol methyl ether, propylene glycol phenyl ether and diethyl malonate.

Berg, L.

1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

5

IDENTIFYING THE USAGE PATTERNS OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) AND OTHER OXYGENATES IN GASOLINE USING GASOLINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDENTIFYING THE USAGE PATTERNS OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) AND OTHER OXYGENATES IN GASOLINE USING GASOLINE SURVEYS By Michael J. Moran, Rick M. Clawges, and John S. Zogorski U.S. Geological Survey 1608 Mt. View Rapid City, SD 57702 Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is commonly added to gasoline

6

Whole-Genome Analysis of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether-Degrading Beta-Proteobacterium Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sato, and N. Kato. 2003. Propane monooxygenase and NAD + -alcohol dehydrogenase in propane metabolism by Gordonia sp.tert-butyl ether by propane-grown Mycobacterium vaccae JOB5.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Dynamic Simulation of Startup in Ethyl tert-Butyl Ether Reactive Distillation with Input Multiplicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dynamic Simulation of Startup in Ethyl tert-Butyl Ether Reactive Distillation with Input Multiplicity ... However, smaller internal rates inside the column that result from lower reboiler and condenser duty could increase the potential risk of flooding in the column and reduce the availability of reactants in the reactive section. ... Column simulations performed using both Pro/II and SpeedUp showed excellent agreement with previously published exptl. ...

Budi H. Bisowarno; Moses O. Tadé

2000-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

8

Detection and Quantification of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether-Degrading Strain PM1 by Real-Time TaqMan PCR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...purification Fresh Water microbiology Geologic...Polymerase metabolism Water Pollution, Chemical...bioremediation detection ethers ground water hydrocarbons methyl tert-butyl...pollutants pollution remediation sampling water resources...

Krassimira R. Hristova; Christian M. Lutenegger; Kate M. Scow

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic com-pound (VOC) derived from natural gas that is added to gas-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic com- pound (VOC) derived from natural gas Water in Urban and Agricultural Areas made from methanol, which is derived primarily from natural gas that is added to gas- oline either seasonally or year round in many parts of the United States to increase

10

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkyl-tert alkyl ethers Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

> >> 1 7198 J. Org. Chem. 1995,60, 7198-7208 Gas Phase Decomposition of Conjugate Acid Ions of Simple Summary: of ProtonatedAlkyl tert-ButylEthers RO(H)C(CH&+ (To.6 Values in meV...

11

Reaction Pathways and Energetics of Etheric C?O Bond Cleavage Catalyzed by Lanthanide Triflates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient and selective cleavage of etheric C?O bonds is crucial for converting biomass into platform chemicals and liquid transportation fuels. In this contribution, computational methods at the DFT B3LYP level of theory are employed to understand the efficacy of lanthanide triflate catalysts (Ln(OTf)3, Ln = La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Yb, and Lu) in cleaving etheric C?O bonds. In agreement with experiment, the calculations indicate that the reaction pathway for C?O cleavage occurs via a C?H ? O?H proton transfer in concert with weakening of the C?O bond of the coordinated ether substrate to ultimately yield a coordinated alkenol. The activation energy for this process falls as the lanthanide ionic radius decreases, reflecting enhanced metal ion electrophilicity. Details of the reaction mechanism for Yb(OTf)3-catalyzed ring opening are explored in depth, and for 1-methyl-d3-butyl phenyl ether, the computed primary kinetic isotope effect of 2.4 is in excellent agreement with experiment (2.7), confirming that etheric ring-opening pathway involves proton transfer from the methyl group alpha to the etheric oxygen atom, which is activated by the electrophilic lanthanide ion. Calculations of the catalytic pathway using eight different ether substrates indicate that the more rapid cleavage of acyclic versus cyclic ethers is largely due to entropic effects, with the former C?O bond scission processes increasing the degrees of freedom/particles as the transition state is approached.

Assary, Rajeev S.; Atesin, Abdurrahman C.; Li, Zhi; Curtiss, Larry A.; Marks, Tobin J.

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

E-Print Network 3.0 - anhydride-vinyl methyl ether Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4-Methyl-2-pentanol Other secondary alcohols... - quire handling with precautions. Acrolein tert-Butyl methyl ether Di(1-propynl) ether n... Methoxy-1,3,5,7- cyclooctatetraene...

13

Ditertiary butyl peroxide recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is described wherein a feed material comprising significant amounts of tertiary butyl hydroperoxide and tertiary butyl alcohol and minor amounts of ditertiary butyl peroxide and other impurities is charged to a reactor together with propylene and a soluble epoxidation catalyst. At least a portion of the tertiary butyl hydroperoxide is reacted in the reactor with the propylene to form a reaction product composed of unreacted feed components, propylene oxide, an additional quantity of tertiary butyl alcohol, and impurities, including a minor amount of ditertiary butyl peroxide. The improvement for recovering substantially pure ditertiary butyl peroxide from the reaction product after the reaction product is discharged from the reactor comprises the steps of: charging the reaction product to a first distillation zone and separating therein a first unreacted propylene distillate recycle fraction, charging the remaining heavier components of the reaction product from the first distillation zone to a second distillation zone and separating a second propylene oxide distillate product fraction therein charging the heavier components from the second distillation zone to a third distillation zone and separating a third distillate fraction comprising a major amount of tertiary butyl alcohol and a minor amount of ditertiary butyl peroxide, and recovering the second propylene oxide distillate fraction, the heavier tertiary butyl alcohol product fraction and the ditertiary butyl peroxide raffinate fraction.

Sanderson, J.R.; Meyer, R.A.; Smith, W.A.; Marquis, E.T.

1989-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

14

Thermodynamic properties of organic oxygen compounds XLIII. Vapour pressures of some ethers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vapour pressures of methyl propyl, isopropyl methyl, butyl methyl, ethyl propyl, t-butyl methyl, dipropyl, di-isopropyl, di-t-butyl, and decyl methyl ethers were measured at pressures up to 205 kPa. The measured values were fitted by Antoine and by Chebyshev equations, values already published from this laboratory for three aromatic ethers were recomputed uniformly with the present results, and published values for four additional compounds were incorporated in a scheme for correlation of the vapour pressures of ethers. Estimates were made of the vapour pressures of 10 other ethers. Between 5 and 200 kPa the vapour pressures of ethers may be represented by a single equation in which carbon number or an effective carbon number is a parameter. Chebyshev equations are given for interpolation between the upper bounds of the measurements and the critical pressures of 11 ethers for which this property has been previously determined.

D Ambrose; J.H Ellender; C.H.S Sprake; R Townsend

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Production of methyl tert-alkyl ethers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transition to the use of unleaded gasolines has required the replacement of tetraethyl lead by oxygen-containing compounds such as methanol, ethanol, and ethers, which are termed {open_quotes}oxygenates{close_quotes} in the technical literature. These may be used in commercial gasolines in amounts of 10-15% by volume, equivalent to 2% oxygen by weight. When methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is used, the oxygen content may amount to 2.7% by weight. This oxygenate gives a significant improvement of knock resistance of naphtha fractions, the greatest effects being observed for straight-run naphthas and reformer naphthas produced under normal conditions; the MTBE also improves the engine power and economy characteristics and lowers the carbon monoxide content in the exhaust by 15-30% and the hydrocarbon content by 7-8%. This paper describes methods for the production of MTBE and also methyl tert-alkyl ethers.

Trofimov, V.A.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Mechanisms of gas permeation through polymer membranes. Progress report, July 1, 1985-May 31, 1986. [CH/sub 4/, C/sub 2/H/sub 6/, n-C/sub 4/H/sub 10/, CO/sub 2/ in poly(n-butyl methacrylate)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work described is concerned with the significant changes in these mechanisms in the glass-transition range. Permeability, diffusion, and solubility coefficients for CH/sub 4/, C/sub 2/H/sub 4/, C/sub 2/H/sub 6/, and n-C/sub 4/H/sub 10/ in poly(n-butyl methacrylate) (PnBMA) were determined at pressures up to 25 atm and from -14/sup 0/ to 50/sup 0/C. Solubility was also determined for CO/sub 2/ in PnBMA at pressures up to 25 atm and at -10/sup 0/ and 30/sup 0/C. No significant changes were observed in the pressure (or concentration) and temperature dependence of the permeability, diffusion, and solubility coefficients for CH/sub 4/, C/sub 2/H/sub 6/, and n-C/sub 4/H/sub 10/ in the glass-transition range of PnBMA, or when the temperature was lowered below T/sub g/. Moreover, these gas/polymer systems do not exhibit below T/sub g/ the usual ''dual-mode'' sorption behavior of gases in glassy polymers. The solubility isotherm for CO/sub 2/ in PnBMA at -10/sup 0/C and lower pressures suggests incipient dual-mode sorption. Results are exceptions to dual-mode sorption behavior and may be due to small difference in the coefficients of thermal expansion of PnBMA above and below T/sub g/. This indicates that the unrelaxed domains in glassy PnBMA are very small. A ''free-volume'' mechanism describes the dependence of C/sub 2/H/sub 6/ permeability on P, T both above and below the glass transition of PnBMA. Adsorption/desorption kinetics are Fickian.

Stern, S.A.; Vakil, U.; Zhou, S.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Propenyl ether monomers for photopolymerization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Propenyl ether monomers of formula A(OCH{double_bond}CHCH{sub 3}){sub n} wherein n is an integer from one to six and A is selected from cyclic ethers, polyether and alkanes are disclosed. The monomers are readily polymerized in the presence of cationic photoinitiators, when exposed to actinic radiation, to form poly(propenyl ethers) that are useful for coatings, sealants, varnishes and adhesives. Compositions for preparing polymeric coatings comprising the compounds of the above formula together with particular cationic photoinitiators are also disclosed, as are processes for making the monomers from allyl halides and readily available alcohols. The process involves rearranging the resulting allyl ethers to propenyl ethers.

Crivello, J.V.

1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

18

Use of superconductor type catalysts in the preparation of tertiary butyl alcohol from tertiary butyl hydroperoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a method wherein a solution of a tertiary butyl hydroperoxide charge stock in tertiary butyl alcohol is brought into contact with a catalytically effective amount of a hydroperoxide decomposition catalyst in a hydroperoxide decomposition reaction zone in liquid phase with agitation to convert said tertiary butyl hydroperoxide to decomposition products, principally tertiary butyl alcohol, the improvement is described which comprises: (a) using a superconductor as said hydroperoxide decomposition catalyst, and (b) recovering tertiary butyl alcohol from the products of said hydroperoxide decomposition reaction.

Sanderson, J.R.; Stockton, M.E.

1993-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

19

Process for producing high purity isoolefins and dimers thereof by dissociation of ethers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Alkyl tertiary butyl ether or alkyl tertiary amyl ether is dissociated by vapor phase contact with a cation acidic exchange resin at temperatures in the range of 150 to 250 F at LHSV of 0.1 to 20 to produce a stream consisting of unreacted ether, isobutene or isoamylene and an alcohol corresponding to the alkyl radical. After the alcohol is removed, the ether/isoolefin stream may be fractionated to obtain a high purity isoolefin (99+%) or the ether/isoolefin stream can be contacted in liquid phase with a cation acidic exchange resin to selectively dimerize the isoolefin in a highly exothermic reaction, followed by fractionation of the dimerization product to produce high purity diisoolefin (97+%). In the case where the alkyl is C[sub 3] to C[sub 6] and the corresponding alcohol is produced on dissociation of the ether, combined dissociation-distillation may be carried out such that isoolefin is the overhead product and alcohol the bottom. 2 figs.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Jones, E.M. Jr.; Hearn, D.

1984-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

20

Atmospheric and combustion chemistry of dimethyl ether  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated that dimethyl ether (DME) is an ideal diesel fuel alternative. DME, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}, combines good fuel properties with low exhaust emissions and low combustion noise. Large scale production of this fuel can take place using a single step catalytic process converting CH{sub 4} to DME. The fate of DME in the atmosphere has previously been studied. The atmospheric degradation is initiated by the reaction with hydroxyl radicals, which is also a common feature of combustion processes. Spectrokinetic investigations and product analysis were used to demonstrate that the intermediate oxy radical, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 2}O, exhibits a novel reaction pathway of hydrogen atom ejection. The application of tandem mass spectrometry to chemi-ions based on supersonic molecular beam sampling has recently been demonstrated. The highly reactive ionic intermediates are sampled directly from the flame and identified by collision activation mass spectrometry and ion-molecule reactions. The mass spectrum reflects the distribution of the intermediates in the flame. The atmospheric degradation of DME as well as the unique fuel properties of a oxygen containing compound will be discussed.

Nielsen, O.J.; Egsgaard, H.; Larsen, E.; Sehested, J. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Wallington, T.J. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Accelerated aging of EPDM and butyl elastomers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was composed of three parts: a post cure study to optimize final properties of an ethylene-propylene-diene (EPDM) formulation, an accelerated aging study to compare the stress relaxation behavior of a butyl and an EPDM elastomer under compression, and a cursory evaluation of a new 70 Shore A EPDM. The optimum postcure for the EPDM was found to be 2 to 4 hours at 182{degrees}C in a vacuum. The EPDM was also shown to have superior aging characteristics compared to the butyl and is recommended for use instead of the butyl material. The physical properties for new 70 Shore A EPDM are satisfactory, and the stress relaxation behavior was only slightly inferior to the other EPDM.

Wilson, M.H.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Use of ethers as high-octane components of gasolines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article reports on a study of the possible utilization of methyl tert-amyl ether (MTAE) as an automotive gasoline component, both by itself and in combination with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). The naphtha used in these studies consisted of 80% reformer naphtha produced under severe conditions and 20% straight-run IBP-62/sup 0/C cut. The physicochemical properties of the MTAE, the MTBE, and the naphtha base stock are given. It is determined that MTAE, which has a slightly poorer knock resistance than MTBE, is fully equal to MTBE in all other respects and can be used as an automotive gasoline component; that a gasoline blend prepared from 89% naphtha base stock, 5.5% MTAE, and 5.5% MTBE meets all of the requirements of the standard GOST 2084-77 for Grade AI-93 gasoline; and that the use of MTAE offers a means for expanding the resources of high-octane components, lowering the toxicity of the gasolines and the exhaust gas (in comparison with organometallic antiknock agents), and bringing non-petroleum raw materials into the fuel production picture.

Gureev, A.A.; Baranova, G.N.; Korotkov, I.V.; Levinson, G.I.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkyl tert-butyl ether Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

> >> 1 7198 J. Org. Chem. 1995,60, 7198-7208 Gas Phase Decomposition of Conjugate Acid Ions of Simple Summary: .S.Patent 5,091,590,1992. 0 1995American Chemical Society...

24

Treatment of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Vapors in Biotrickling Filters. 1.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

because of its low cost and blending characteristics. Depending on the season, reformulated gasoline of reactor per hour, a value comparable to other gasoline constituents. Such high performance could enhancer in gasoline. The use of MTBE increased rapidly after the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments required

25

Environmental Microbiology (2001) 3(6), 407416 Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) degradation by a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tank (LUFT) remediation programme. A recent USGS study has estimated that as many as 9000 community, remediation actions are implemented at costs usually 10± 30% higher than those at sites without MTBE contamina- tion. The evaluation of innovative and cost-effective treatment such as bioremediation for MTBE spills

26

Biodegradation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether by a Pure Bacterial Culture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...identify cost-effective remediation technologies. Relatively...treated with ENV735 as a remediation biocatalyst, but the strain...through the Small Business Innovative Research program (grant...situ bioaugmentation for remediation of chlorinated solvents in...

Paul B. Hatzinger; Kevin McClay; Simon Vainberg; Marina Tugusheva; Charles W. Condee; Robert J. Steffan

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Treatment of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Contaminated Water Using a Dense  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discharge of organic compounds require that new, innovative tech- nologies and methods of remediation dioxide, making the DMP reactor a promising tool in the future remediation of water. Chemical and physical is transformed into a more toxic material or a substance that is more difficult to remediate, the treatment

Dandy, David

28

High octane ethers from synthesis gas-derived alcohols. Final technical report, September 25, 1990--December 24, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the research was to develop the methodology for the catalytic synthesis of ethers, primarily methyl isobutyl ether (MIBE) and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), directly from alcohol mixtures that are rich in methanol and 2-methyl-1-propanol (isobutanol). The overall scheme involves gasification of coal, purification and shifting of the synthesis gas, higher alcohol synthesis, and direct synthesis of ethers. The last stage of the synthesis involves direct coupling of synthesis gas-derived methanol and isobutanol that has been previously demonstrated by us to occur over superacid catalysts to yield MIBE and smaller amounts of MTBE at moderate pressures and a mixture of methanol and isobutene at low pressures. A wide range of organic resin catalysts and inorganic oxide and zeolite catalysts have been investigated for activity and selectivity in directly coupling alcohols, principally methanol and isobutanol, to form ethers and in the dehydration of isobutanol to isobutene in the presence of methanol. All of these catalysts are strong acids, and it was found that the organic and inorganic catalysts operate in different, but overlapping, temperature ranges, i.e. mainly 60--120{degrees}C for the organic resins and 90--175{degrees}C for the inorganic catalysts. For both types of catalysts, the presence of strong acid centers is required for catalytic activity, as was demonstrated by lack of activity of fully K{sup +} ion exchanged Nafion resin and zirconia prior to being sulfated by treatment with sulfuric acid.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Catalytic distillation for the synthesis of tertiary butyl alcohol.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Catalytic Distillation for the synthesis of tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) is investigated in this thesis. The solvent, ethylene glycol, is proposed as a means of… (more)

Safinski, Tomasz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Near-Infrared Electrochromism in Electroactive Pentacenediquinone-Containing Poly(aryl ether)s  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-Infrared Electrochromism in Electroactive Pentacenediquinone-Containing Poly(aryl etherVed October 21, 2005 The synthesis and near-infrared electrochromic properties of pentacenediquinone-infrared electrochromic properties of pentacenediquinone-containing poly(aryl ether)s were studied

Wan, Xin-hua

31

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammoniated glycyrrhizin butylated Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ammoniated glycyrrhizin butylated Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ammoniated glycyrrhizin butylated Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1...

32

Crown Ethers in Graphene Bring Strong, Selective Binding | ornl...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Characterization Crown Ethers in Graphene Bring Strong, Selective Binding November 14, 2014 Schematic showing a graphene sheet containing an array of ideal crown ethers....

33

Ethers have good gasoline-blending attributes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of their compatibility with hydrocarbon gasoline-blending components, their high octane blending values, and their low volatility blending values, ethers will grow in use as gasoline blending components. This article discusses the properties of ethers as blending components, and environmental questions.

Unzelman, G.H.

1989-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

34

Purification of aqueous cellulose ethers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manufacture of cellulose ethers usually involves high amounts of salt by-products. For application of the product, salt must be removed. In this work, we have studied the injection of high-pressure CO{sub 2} into an aqueous polymer-salt solution; we find that upon addition of isopropanol in addition to CO{sub 2}, the solution separates into two phases. One phase is rich in polymer and water, and the other phase contains mostly isopropanol, water and CO{sub 2}. The salt distributes between the two phases, thereby offering interesting possibilities for development of a new purification process for water-soluble polymers. This work presents experimental phase-equilibrium data for hydroxyethyl cellulose and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose with sodium acetate and potassium sulfate, respectively, in the region 40{degree}C and 30 to 80 bar. Based on these data, we suggest a process for the manufacture and purification of water-soluble cellulose ethers. 15 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

Bartscherer, K.A.; de Pablo, J.J.; Bonnin, M.C.; Prausnitz, J.M.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Introduction - This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: -Drum payload assembly -Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly -Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2003-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

36

Impacts of Ethanol on Anaerobic Production of Tert-Butyl Alcohol (TBA) from Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) in Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project title: Impacts of Ethanol on Anaerobic Production oftert-butanol (TBA). As ethanol is being promoted as ainvestigate the effect of ethanol release on existing MTBE

Scow, K M; MacKay, Douglas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

CH Packaging Operations Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the CH Packaging Drum payload assembly, Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly, Abnormal Operations and ICV and OCV Preshipment Leakage Rate Tests on the packaging seals, using a nondestructive Helium (He) Leak Test.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

38

Biodegradation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether and Other Fuel Oxygenates by a New Strain, Mycobacterium austroafricanum IFP 2012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and the O2 consumption rate was measured with a 12-mm...France). The measured rates were corrected for endogenous...Cells were broken by three passes through a French press...from 105 to 200C at a rate of 10C/min. Helium...flushed with a Spectra-Physics SCM 400 vacuum flusher...

Alan François; Hugues Mathis; Davy Godefroy; Pascal Piveteau; Françoise Fayolle; Frédéric Monot

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Induction of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE)-Oxidizing Activity in Mycobacterium vaccae JOB5 by MTBE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...directly from the culture vessels. In experiments that followed...time course of organic acid consumption as well as MTBE oxidation...determine the extent of MTBE consumption and the accumulation of TBA...detectable growth or MTBE consumption occurred when cells were incubated...

Erika L. Johnson; Christy A. Smith; Kirk T. O'Reilly; Michael R. Hyman

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Enhancing Transport of Hydrogenophaga flava ENV735 for Bioaugmentation of Aquifers Contaminated with Methyl tert-Butyl Ether  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...column was washed with the surfactant solution. d The sand was prewashed with the surfactant solution, and the cells...washed with BSM without surfactant. This work was supported...bacteria through a sandy soil. Appl. Environ. Microbiol...

Sheryl H. Streger; Simon Vainberg; Hailiang Dong; Paul B. Hatzinger

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Treatment of methyl t-butyl ether contaminated water using a dense medium plasma reactor, a mechanistic and kinetic investigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, a mechanistic and kinetic investigation Derek C. Johnson1 , Vasgen A. Shamamian2 , John H. Callahan2 , Ferencz S in the future remediation of water. Chemical and physical mechanisms, together with carbon balances, are used

Dandy, David

42

Effects of Gasoline Formulation on Methyl tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) Contamination in Private Wells near Gasoline Stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New York State Department of Health, Bureau of Environmental Exposure Investigation, 547 River Street, Room 300, Troy, New York 12180, and New York State Department of Health, Wadsworth Center for Laboratories and Research, P.O. ... Wells with contamination of ?20 ?g/L were scheduled for periodic or follow-up sampling by local county health departments or scheduled for remedial action, as appropriate. ... (13)?Delzer, G. C.; Zogorski, J. S.; Lopes, T. J.; Bosshart, R. L. Occurrence of the gasoline Oxygenate MTBE and BTEX compounds in urban stormwater in the United States, 1991?1995; U.S. Geologic Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report, WRIR 96-4145, Rapid City, SD, 1996. ...

Daniel P. Lince; Lloyd R. Wilson; Gordon A. Carlson; Anthony Bucciferro

2001-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

43

Enhancing Transport of Hydrogenophaga flava ENV735 for Bioaugmentation of Aquifers Contaminated with Methyl tert-Butyl Ether  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...National Science Foundation Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program (award no...Ontario, Canada. Ground Water Monit. Remediation 18: 113-122. 52 Scholl, M. A...evaluation of in situ bioaugmentation for remediation of chlorinated solvents in groundwater...

Sheryl H. Streger; Simon Vainberg; Hailiang Dong; Paul B. Hatzinger

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Measurement of Trihalomethanes and Methyl Tertiary-Butyl Ether in Tap Water Using Solid-Phase Microextraction GC-MS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......ductive age living in Corpus Christi, Texas and Cobb...micro extraction with gas chromatography-mass...determinations using gas chromatog- raphy...of fulvic acids in natural waters. Env. Sci...trihalomethane by headspace-gas chromatog- raphy......

Frederick L. Cardinali; David L. Ashley; John C. Morrow; Deborah M. Moll; Benjamin C. Blount

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

The Thermal Decomposition of Diethyl Ether. V. The Production of Ethanol from Diethyl Ether and the Pyrolysis of Ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The Thermal Decomposition of Diethyl Ether. V. The Production of Ethanol from Diethyl Ether and the Pyrolysis of Ethanol G. R. Freeman The two modes of decomposition of ethanol at 525 degrees C, namely dehydration and dehydrogenation, are affected...

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Process for making propenyl ethers and photopolymerizable compositions containing them  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Propenyl ether monomers of formula A(OCH{double_bond}CHCH{sub 3}){sub n} (V) wherein n is an integer from one to six and A is selected from cyclic ethers, polyether, and alkanes are disclosed. The monomers are readily polymerized in the presence of cationic photoinitiators, when exposed to actinic radiation, to form poly(propenyl ethers) that are useful for coatings, sealants, varnishes and adhesives. Compositions for preparing polymeric coatings comprising the compounds of formula V together with particular cationic photoinitiators are also disclosed, as are processes for making the monomers from allyl halides and readily available alcohols. The process involves rearranging the resulting allyl ethers to propenyl ethers.

Crivello, J.V.

1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

47

Atmospheric chemistry of automotive fuel additives: Diisopropyl ether  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To quantify the atmospheric reactivity of diisopropyl ether (DIPE), we have conducted a study of the kinetics and mechanism of reaction 1: OH + DIPE {r_arrow} products. Kinetic measurements of reaction 1 were made using both relative (at 295 K) and absolute techniques (over the temperature range 240-440 K). Rate data from both techniques can be represented by the following: k{sub 1} = (2.2{sub -0.8}{sup +14}) x 10{sup -12} exp[(445 {plus_minus} 145)/T] cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1}. At 298 K, k{sub 1} = 9.8 x 10{sup -12} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1}s{sup -1}. The products of the simulated atmospheric oxidation of DIPE were identified using FT-IR spectroscopy; isopropyl acetate and HCHO were the main products. The atmospheric oxidation of DIPE can be represented by i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}O-i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7} + OH + 2NO {r_arrow} HCHO + i-C{sub 3}H{sub 7}OC(O)CH{sub 3} + HO{sub 2} + 2NO{sub 2}. Our kinetic and mechanistic data were incorporated into a 1-day simulation of atmospheric chemistry to quantify the relative incremental reactivity of DIPE. Results are compared with other oxygenated fuel additives. 30 refs., 9 figs.

Wallington, T.J.; Andino, J.M.; Potts, A.R. [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States)] [and others

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Crown Ethers Flatten in Graphene for Strong, Specific Binding...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Crown Ethers Flatten in Graphene for Strong, Specific Binding ORNL discovery holds potential for separations, sensors, batteries, biotech and more This sheet of graphene contains...

49

Ch 16 Electric Charge &Ch 16. Electric Charge & Electric Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ch 16 Electric Charge &Ch 16. Electric Charge & Electric Field Liu UCD Phy1B 2012 #12;I Basic ConceptsI. Basic Concepts Static electricity: charges at rest Electric charge Like charges repel Unlike charges attract Liu UCD Phy1B 2012 #12;Electric ChargeElectric Charge Electron charge: -eElectron charge

Yoo, S. J. Ben

50

Laplace Transforms (Ch. 7) LAPLACE TRANSFORMS (Ch. 7)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laplace Transforms (Ch. 7) LAPLACE TRANSFORMS (Ch. 7) ? restart; ? with( plots ): ? with( DEtools ): The Laplace transform is a very common, and useful, technique for solving and analyz­ ing the solution of the Laplace transform is that derivatives are transformed into powers; thus, the differential equation

Meade, Douglas B.

51

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

54

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codesand corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

56

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

58

CH-TRU Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

62

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

63

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH TRUCON)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

marchand@cui.unige.ch Collection Guiding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

marchand@cui.unige.ch Collection Guiding: Multimedia Collection Browsing and Visualization Stéphane Marchand-Maillet Viper ­ CVML ­ University of Geneva marchand@cui.unige.ch http://viper.unige.ch marchand Perspectives marchand@cui.unige.ch © http://viper.unige.ch ­ December 2004 3 Collection Guiding: Browsing

Genève, Université de

66

Densities and isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria for the mixtures formed by four butyl esters and 1-butanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Densities of 298.15 K and the vapor-liquid equilibria for 1-butanol + butyl methanoate, + butyl ethanoate, + butyl propanoate, and + butyl butanoate have been measured at 101.32 kPa in small capacity ebulliometer. All results were found to be thermodynamically consistent with a point-to-point test. The mixtures containing butyl methanoate and butyl ethanoate show azeotropes at T = 379.14 K, x = 0.871 and T = 389.64 K, x = 0.222, respectively. Different group-contribution methods were applied to these mixtures.

Gonzalez, E.; Ortega, J. [Univ. of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)] [Univ. of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

CH E 2421 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics I CH E 3322 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics PHYS 4312 Nuclear and Particle Physics Other Engineering Electives #12;CH E 2421 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics I CH E 3322 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics II CH E 3330 Engineering Materials Science CH E 4342 Polymer Physics

Zhang, Yuanlin

68

Solvent Effects on Metal Complexation with Crown Ethers from Liquid to Supercritical Fluids (DE-FG07-98ER 149 13)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to study the salvation effects of metal-crown ether complexation in different solvents. It has been suggested in the literature that supercritical fluid carbon dioxide (SF-CO2) is a tunable solvent because its salvation environment can be varied with the fluid density. In this project, spectroscopic techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) were used to evaluate salvation effects of metal crown complexation in organic solvents and in SF-CO2. In most solvent extraction systems, water is often involved in the extraction processes. We have carried out extensive studies of water-crown ether interactions in different solvents and in SF-CO2 using NMR and FTIR techniques. Water molecules can be attached to crown ethers through hydrogen bonding of H-0-H to the oxygen atoms of crown ether cavities. This type of interaction is like a Lewis acid-Lewis base complexation. During the course of this project, we noticed that some CO2 soluble Lewis base such as tri-n-butyl-phosphate (TBP) can also form such Lewis acid-Lewis base complexes with water and other inorganic acids including nitric acid and hydrochloric acid. Inorganic acids (e.g. nitric acid) are normally not soluble in SF-CO2. However, because TBP is highly soluble in SF-CO2, an inorganic acid bound to TBP via hydrogen bonding becomes CO2 soluble. This Lewis acid-Lewis base complex approach provides a method of introducing inorganic acids into supercritical fluid CO2 for chemical reactions.

Wai, C.M.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Crown Ethers in Nonaqueous Electrolytes for Lithium/Air Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of three crown ethers, 12-crown-4, 15-crown-5, and 18-crown-6, as additives and co-solvents in non-aqueous electrolytes on the cell performance of primary Li/air batteries operated in a dry air environment were investigated. Crown ethers have large effects on the discharge performance of non-aqueous electrolytes in Li/air batteries. A small amount (normally less than 10% by weight or volume in electrolytes) of 12-Crown-4 and 15-crown-5 reduces the battery performance and a minimum discharge capacity appears at the crown ether content of ca. 5% in the electrolytes. However, when the content increases to about 15%, both crown ethers improve the capacity of Li/air cells by about 28% and 16%, respectively. 15-Crown-5 based electrolytes even show a maximum discharge capacity in the crown ether content range from 10% to 15%. On the other hand, the increase of 18-crown-6 amount in the electrolytes continuously lowers of the cell performance. The different battery performances of these three crown ethers in electrolytes are explained by the combined effects from the electrolytes’ contact angle, oxygen solubility, viscosity, ionic conductivity, and the stability of complexes formed between crown ether molecules and lithium ions.

Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Deyu; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Jiguang

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

70

Shear viscosity measurements in the binary mixture butyl cellosolve-water near its upper and lower critical consolute points  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has been measured for a two-component critical liquid system, butyl cellosolve-water, in the region to report measurements of the shear viscosity of critical binary mixture butyl cello- solve (2-n353 Shear viscosity measurements in the binary mixture butyl cellosolve-water near its upper

Boyer, Edmond

71

Properties Investigation of Sulfonated Poly(ether ether ketone)/Polyacrylonitrile Acid–Base Blend Membrane for Vanadium Redox Flow Battery Application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acid–base blend membrane prepared from sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone) (SPEEK) and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was detailedly evaluated for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) application. SPEEK/PAN blend membrane exhibited dense and homogeneous cross-...

Zhaohua Li; Wenjing Dai; Lihong Yu; Le Liu; Jingyu Xi; Xinping Qiu; Liquan Chen

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Advances in the design of co-poly(ether-imide) membranes for CO2 separations. Influence of aromatic rigidity on crystallinity, phase segregation and gas transport  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In our previous works, it was observed a clear relationship between the structure and the properties for different copoly(ether-imide)s, besides a good relation was found between SAXS characterization and permeability results. Here, a series of aliphatic aromatic copoly(ether-imide)s, based on an aromatic diamine (ODA), a diamine terminated poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO2000) of a molecular weight of 2000 g/mol and different aromatic dianhydrides (BPDA, BKDA (or BTDA) and PMDA) has been synthesized and characterized. The permeability for O2, N2, CO2 and CH4, increased with the rigidity of the monomers (BKDA CO2/N2 separation. This work gives indications on how to design advanced materials for this separation with the increasing possibilities of controlled structure and properties.

Alberto Tena; Ángel Marcos-Fernández; Mónica de la Viuda; Laura Palacio; Pedro Prádanos; Ángel E. Lozano; Javier de Abajo; Antonio Hernández

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

www.sprachenzentrum.uzh.ch Language Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Zurich and ETH Zurich Rämistrasse 71 CH-8006 Zurich Phone +41 44 634 52 81 Fax +41 44 634 82 89 wwwwww.sprachenzentrum.uzh.ch Language Center University of Zurich Language Center of the University

Zürich, Universität

74

DISCOVERY OF THE METHOXY RADICAL, CH{sub 3}O, TOWARD B1: DUST GRAIN AND GAS-PHASE CHEMISTRY IN COLD DARK CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the discovery of the methoxy radical (CH{sub 3}O) toward the cold and dense core B1-b based on the observation, with the IRAM 30 m radio telescope, of several lines at 3 and 2 mm wavelengths. Besides this new molecular species we also report on the detection of many lines arising from methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}SH), formic acid (HCOOH), propynal (HCCCHO), acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO), dimethyl ether (CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}), methyl formate (CH{sub 3}OCOH), and the formyl radical (HCO). The column density of all these species is {approx_equal}10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}, corresponding to abundances of {approx_equal}10{sup -11}. The similarity in abundances for all these species strongly suggest that they are formed on the surface of dust grains and ejected to the gas phase through non-thermal desorption processes, most likely cosmic rays or secondary photons. Nevertheless, laboratory experiments indicate that the CH{sub 3}O isomer released to the gas phase is CH{sub 2}OH rather than the methoxy one. Possible gas-phase formation routes to CH{sub 3}O from OH and methanol are discussed.

Cernicharo, J.; Jimenez-Escobar, A.; Munoz Caro, G. M. [Department of Astrophysics, CAB, INTA-CSIC, Crta Torrejon, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Marcelino, N. [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22902 (United States); Roueff, E. [Luth, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR8102, Place J. Janssen F-92190 Meudon (France); Gerin, M., E-mail: jcernicharo@cab.inta-csic.es [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR8112 and Ecole Normale Superieure, 61 avenue de l'observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

75

Kinetic mechanism of dimethyl ether production process using syngas from integrated gasification combined cycle power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a 1-step synthesis gas-to-dimethyl ether process, synthesis gas is converted into dimethyl ether (DME) in a single reactor. Three reactions are involved in this process: methanol synthesis, methanol dehydra...

Hee-Woo Park; Jin-Kuk Ha; Euy Soo Lee

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Hydrogen Generation from Dimethyl Ether for Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen Generation from Dimethyl Ether for Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units ... Vehicle manufacturers are rushing ahead with research into alternative fuels such as dimethyl ether (DME), biodiesel, methanol, ethanol, and hydrogen. ...

Marita Nilsson; Lars J. Pettersson; Bård Lindström

2006-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

77

SC-CH FACTS Customer Service  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SC-CH FACTS SC-CH FACTS Customer Service Office of Communications P (630) 252-2110 F (630) 252-9473 Address 9800 South Cass Ave. Argonne, Illinois 60439 Websites Chicago Office www.ch.doe.gov Office of Science http://science.energy.gov/ U.S. Department of Energy http://energy.gov/ CH Factoids Who We Are ... Our Mission The Office of Science - Chicago Office (SC-CH) is a field office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a Cabinet-level agency with

78

Effects of simulant mixed waste on EPDM and butyl rubber  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have developed a Chemical Compatibility Testing Program for the evaluation of plastic packaging components which may be used in transporting mixed waste forms. In this program, they have screened 10 plastic materials in four liquid mixed waste simulants. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer (Nitrile) rubber, cross-linked polyethylene, epichlorohydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene (EPDM) rubber, fluorocarbons (Viton and Kel-F{trademark}), polytetrafluoro-ethylene (Teflon), high-density polyethylene, isobutylene-isoprene copolymer (Butyl) rubber, polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene (SBR) rubber. The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The screening testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to approximately 3 kGy of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste simulants at 60 C. The rubber materials or elastomers were tested using Vapor Transport Rate measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. The authors have developed a chemical compatibility program for the evaluation of plastic packaging components which may be incorporated in packaging for transporting mixed waste forms. From the data analyses performed to date, they have identified the thermoplastic, polychlorotrifluoroethylene, as having the greatest chemical compatibility after having been exposed to gamma radiation followed by exposure to the Hanford Tank simulant mixed waste. The most striking observation from this study was the poor performance of polytetrafluoroethylene under these conditions. In the evaluation of the two elastomeric materials they have concluded that while both materials exhibit remarkable resistance to these environmental conditions, EPDM has a greater resistance to this corrosive simulant mixed waste.

Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Single-Step Syngas-to-Dimethyl Ether Processes for Optimal Productivity, Minimal Emissions, and Natural Gas-Derived Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Single-step conversion of synthesis gas (syngas, H2/CO mixture) to dimethyl ether (DME, CH3OCH3) is very attractive as a route for indirect coal liquefaction, natural gas utilization, and production of synthetic liquid fuels, fuel additives, and chemicals. ... The main driving force for developing a single-step syngas-to-DME process is to produce DME at a cost lower than that from the commercially available two-step process, namely, syngas-to-methanol followed by methanol dehydration in sequential reactors. ... Furthermore, the composition of most commercially available syngas (except that produced by a CO2?methane reformer) is not the optimal composition (1:1 H2:CO) for the syngas-to-DME reactor. ...

X. D. Peng; A. W. Wang; B. A. Toseland; P. J. A. Tijm

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

80

The Effect of the Di-Tertiary Butyl Peroxide (DTBP) additive on HCCI Combustion of Fuel Blends of Ethanol and Diethyl Ether  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ignition Using Isooctane, Ethanol and Natural Gas - AModel for High Temperature Ethanol Oxidation," Internationalof Bio-Derived Carbon from Ethanol-in-Diesel Blends in the

Mack, John Hunter; Buchholz, Bruce A; Flowers, Daniel L; Dibble, Robert W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

RELATIONS BETWEEN THE DETECTION OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) IN SURFACE AND GROUND WATER AND ITS CONTENT IN GASOLINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND ITS CONTENT IN GASOLINE By Michael J. Moran, Mike J. Halde, Rick M. Clawges and John S. Zogorski U in the United States as an octane enhancer and oxygenate in gasoline. Octane enhancement began in the late 1970's with the phase-out of tetraethyl lead from gasoline. The use of oxygenates was expanded

82

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP)

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

83

Project: UAF Utilities Waste Line Repairs Ch6 to Ch13 Project No: 2013101 UTWH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project: UAF Utilities Waste Line Repairs Ch6 to Ch13 Project No: 2013101 UTWH Subject: Project Schedule Project Duration: May 27 to August 10, 2014 The sewer line will be constructed in phases

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

84

Frontside versus backside reactivity in electron transfer to oriented tert butyl bromide and methyl bromide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by bimolecular nucleophilic substitution (SN2) reactions, such as Cl CH3BrClCH3 Br . 1 These reactions proceedH9Br. © 2002 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.1496477 I. INTRODUCTION Chemical reaction decreases the reaction rate by orders of magnitude because the larger CH3 groups impede the inversion

Brooks, Philip R.

85

Synthesis of Medium Ring Ethers. 5. The Synthesis of (+)-Laurencin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The eight-membered medium ring ether natural product (+)-laurencin 1 is the prototypical member of a growing family of marine natural product cyclic ethers isolated from red algae and those marine organisms which feed on Laurencia species. ... The reaction mixture immediately became yellow and gradually turned dark red as gas was evolved. ... We thank the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) UK for a research grant, Pfizer Central Research, and Corpus Christi College Cambridge for the award of a studentship and a Junior Research Fellow ship (J.W.B.), the Cambridge European Overseas Trust, Ciba (Novartis) and the Swiss Foundation for Gifted Students (scholarship to S.D.), and the Commission of the European Communities (TMR award to T.C.S.) for generous financial support. ...

Jonathan W. Burton; J. Stephen Clark; Sam Derrer; Thomas C. Stork; Justin G. Bendall; Andrew B. Holmes

1997-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

86

Dimethyl Ether Autoignition at Engine-Relevant Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

† Key Laboratory for Power Machinery and Engineering of M.O.E., Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, People’s Republic of China ... The autoignition of dimethyl ether (DME), an alternative diesel engine fuel, has been studied at elevated pressures. ... In addition to studies aimed at ascertaining the performance of compression–ignition internal combustion engines fuel with DME,(2, 3) there have been a number of studies focused on experimental characterization of fundamental combustion properties for DME. ...

Zhenhua Li; Weijing Wang; Zhen Huang; Matthew A. Oehlschlaeger

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

2' and 3' Carboranyl uridines and their diethyl ether adducts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is disclosed a process for preparing carboranyl uridine nucleoside compounds and their diethyl ether adducts, which exhibit a tenfold increase in boron content over prior art boron containing nucleoside compounds. Said carboranyl uridine nucleoside compounds exhibit enhanced lipophilicity and hydrophilic properties adequate to enable solvation in aqueous media for subsequent incorporation of said compounds in methods for boron neutron capture therapy in mammalian tumor cells.

Soloway, Albert H. (Worthington, OH); Barth, Rolf F. (Columbus, OH); Anisuzzaman, Abul K. (Columbus, OH); Alam, Fazlul (Anaheim, CA); Tjarks, Werner (Columbus, OH)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Palladium/Tris(tert-butyl)phosphine-Catalyzed Suzuki Cross-Couplings in the Presence of Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dipalladiumtris(dibenzylideneacetone)/tris(tert-butyl)phosphonium tetrafluoroborate/potassium fluoride dihydrate [Pd2(dba)3/[HP(t-Bu)3]BF4/KF?2?H2O] serves as a mild, robust, and user-friendly method for the efficient ...

Lou, Sha

89

The interactions of water and perfluorodiethyl ether on Ru(100)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the interactions of water and perfluorodiethyl ether on Ru(100) in order to model the effects of surface structure and humidity on the bonding and decomposition of perfluoroalkyl ether lubricants with metal surfaces. In order to understand the interactions on Ru(100), we have first investigated the interactions of each of these adsorbates alone on the clean surface. The interactions of water with Ru(100) have been studied using both thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). From these studies we conclude that a small amount of water dissociates on this surface (5--10% of a monolayer), but water is adsorbed in a predominantly molecular form on this surface with an increasing degree of hydrogen-bonding with increasing coverage. The effects of hydrogen and oxygen coadsorption on the interactions of water with this surface have also been studied using TDS. Finally, the interactions of coadsorbed water and perfluorodiethyl ether on Ru(100) have been investigated using TDS.

Leavitt, P.

1990-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

90

Thermodynamics of Hydrogen Production from Dimethyl Ether Steam Reforming and Hydrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermodynamic analyses of producing a hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feed from the process of dimethyl ether (DME) steam reforming were investigated as a function of steam-to-carbon ratio (0-4), temperature (100 C-600 C), pressure (1-5 atm), and product species: acetylene, ethanol, methanol, ethylene, methyl-ethyl ether, formaldehyde, formic acid, acetone, n-propanol, ethane and isopropyl alcohol. Results of the thermodynamic processing of dimethyl ether with steam indicate the complete conversion of dimethyl ether to hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide for temperatures greater than 200 C and steam-to-carbon ratios greater than 1.25 at atmospheric pressure (P = 1 atm). Increasing the operating pressure was observed to shift the equilibrium toward the reactants; increasing the pressure from 1 atm to 5 atm decreased the conversion of dimethyl ether from 99.5% to 76.2%. The order of thermodynamically stable products in decreasing mole fraction was methane, ethane, isopropyl alcohol, acetone, n-propanol, ethylene, ethanol, methyl-ethyl ether and methanol--formaldehyde, formic acid, and acetylene were not observed. The optimal processing conditions for dimethyl ether steam reforming occurred at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 1.5, a pressure of 1 atm, and a temperature of 200 C. Modeling the thermodynamics of dimethyl ether hydrolysis (with methanol as the only product considered), the equilibrium conversion of dimethyl ether is limited. The equilibrium conversion was observed to increase with temperature and steam-to-carbon ratio, resulting in a maximum dimethyl ether conversion of approximately 68% at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 4.5 and a processing temperature of 600 C. Thermodynamically, dimethyl ether processed with steam can produce hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feeds--with hydrogen concentrations exceeding 70%. This substantiates dimethyl ether as a viable source of hydrogen for PEM fuel cells.

T.A. Semelsberger

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc, - September...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc, - September 6, 2007 Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc, - September 6, 2007 September 6, 2007 Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc.,...

92

E-Print Network 3.0 - allyl glycidyl ether Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science 15 () Trichloromethane ()1,1,2,2-1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane Summary: ;() Acrolein () Acrylic acid () Allyl zlcohol () Allyl chloride () Allyl glycidyl ether(AGE) ()2-...

93

POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS AND POLYBROMINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS IN GALAPAGOS SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS WOLLEBAEKI)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p- dioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) repre- sent persistent

Gobas, Frank

94

Development of a Dimethyl Ether (DME)-Fueled Shuttle Bus | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Alternative Fuels lDimethyl Ether Rheology and Materials Studies Liquid Fuels from Biomass BiodieselFuelManagementBestPracticesReport.pdf...

95

NMR Study of the Dynamics of ILs with -CH2Si(CH3)3 vs CH2C(CH3)3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magnetic Resonance Study of the Dynamics of Imidazolium Ionic Magnetic Resonance Study of the Dynamics of Imidazolium Ionic Liquids with -CH2Si(CH3)3 vs CH2C(CH3)3 Substituents S. H. Chung, R. Lopato, S. G. Greenbaum, H. Shirota, E. W. Castner, Jr. and J. F. Wishart J. Phys. Chem. B 111, 4885-4893 (2007). [Find paper at ACS Publications] or use ACS Articles on Request Abstract: Trimethylsilylmethyl (TMSiM)-substituted imidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (NTf2-), and tetrafluoroborate (BF4-) ionic liquids (ILs) have lower room-temperature viscosities by factors of 1.6 and 7.4, respectively, than isostructural neopentylimidazolium ILs. In an attempt to account for the effects of silicon substitution in imidazolium RTILs and to investigate the ion dynamics, we report nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of 1H (I = 1/2) and 19F (I = 1/2)

96

Secondary kinetics of methanol decomposition : theoretical rate coefficients for {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + OH, {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + {sup 3}CH{sub 2}, and {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + CH{sub 3}.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct variable reaction coordinate transition state theory (VRC-TST) rate coefficients are reported for the {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + OH, {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + {sup 3}CH{sub 2}, and {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + CH{sub 3} barrierless association reactions. The predicted rate coefficient for the {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + OH reaction ({approx} 1.2 x 10{sup -10} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} for 300-2500 K) is 4-5 times larger than previous estimates, indicating that this reaction may be an important sink for OH in many combustion systems. The predicted rate coefficients for the {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + CH{sub 3} and {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + {sup 3}CH{sub 2} reactions are found to be in good agreement with the range of available experimental measurements. Product branching in the self-reaction of methylene is discussed, and the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} + 2H and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} + H{sub 2} products are predicted in a ratio of 4:1. The effect of the present set of rate coefficients on modeling the secondary kinetics of methanol decomposition is briefly considered. Finally, the present set of rate coefficients, along with previous VRC-TST determinations of the rate coefficients for the self-reactions of CH{sub 3} and OH and for the CH{sub 3} + OH reaction, are used to test the geometric mean rule for the CH{sub 3}, {sup 3}CH{sub 2}, and OH fragments. The geometric mean rule is found to predict the cross-combination rate coefficients for the {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + OH and {sup 3}CH{sub 2} + CH{sub 3} reactions to better than 20%, with a larger (up to 50%) error for the CH{sub 3} + OH reaction.

Jasper, A. W.; Klippenstein, S. J.; Harding, L. B.; Chemistry

2007-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

97

Polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants in the antarctic environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the historical record of dioxins, PCBs and DDTs in the same cores showed a decreasing trend. At present, PBDEs are recognized as a worldwide pollution problem since they have reached remote areas such as the deep ocean, the Arctic and Antarctica (de Boer et al... that cheerful and warm Brazilian spirit. You are my Aggie family! viii NOMENCLATURE #1; critical value of a statistical test used to reject the null hypothesis ANOVA Analysis of Variance BDE Brominated Diphenyl Ether BFR Brominated Flame Retardant DC...

Yogui, Gilvan Takeshi

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Extraction of Plutonium into 30 Percent Tri-Butyl Phosphate from Nitric Acid Solution Containing Fluoride, Aluminum, and Boron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work consists of experimental batch extraction data for plutonium into 30 volume-percent tri-butyl phosphate at ambient temperature from such a solution matrix and a model of this data using complexation constants from the literature.

Kyser, E.A.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

99

Structure and Reactivity of Alkyl Ethers Adsorbed on CeO2(111) Model Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of surface hydroxyls on the adsorption of ether on ceria was explored. Adsorption of dimethyl ether (DME) and diethyl ether (DEE) on oxidized and reduced CeO{sub 2}(111) films was studied and compared with Ru(0001) using RAIRS and sXPS within a UHV environment. On Ru(0001) the ethers adsorb weakly with the molecular plane close to parallel to the surface plane. On the ceria films, the adsorption of the ethers was stronger than on the metal surface, presumably due to stronger interaction of the ether oxygen lone pair electrons with a cerium cation. This interaction causes the ethers to tilt away from the surface plane compared to the Ru(0001) surface. No pronounced differences were found between oxidized (CeO{sub 2}) and reduced (CeOx) films. The adsorption of the ethers was found to be perturbed by the presence of OH groups on hydroxylated CeOx. In the case of DEE, the geometry of adsorption resembles that found on Ru, and in the case of dimethyl ether DME is in between that one found on clean CeOx and the metal surface. Decomposition of the DEE was observed on the OH/CeOx surface following high DEE exposure at 300 K and higher temperatures. Ethoxides and acetates were identified as adsorbed species on the surface by means of RAIRS and ethoxides and formates by s-XPS. No decomposition of dimethyl ether was observed on the OH/CeOx at these higher temperatures, implying that the dissociation of the C-O bond from ethers requires the presence of {beta}-hydrogen.

F Calaza; T Chen; D Mullins; S Overbury

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Structure and Reactivity of Alkyl Ethers Adsorbed on CeO(2)(111) Model Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of surface hydroxyls on the adsorption of ether on ceria was explored. Adsorption of dimethyl ether (DME) and diethyl ether (DEE) on oxidized and reduced CeO{sub 2}(111) films was studied and compared with Ru(0001) using RAIRS and sXPS within a UHV environment. On Ru(0001) the ethers adsorb weakly with the molecular plane close to parallel to the surface plane. On the ceria films, the adsorption of the ethers was stronger than on the metal surface, presumably due to stronger interaction of the ether oxygen lone pair electrons with a cerium cation. This interaction causes the ethers to tilt away from the surface plane compared to the Ru(0001) surface. No pronounced differences were found between oxidized (CeO{sub 2}) and reduced (CeOx) films. The adsorption of the ethers was found to be perturbed by the presence of OH groups on hydroxylated CeOx. In the case of DEE, the geometry of adsorption resembles that found on Ru, and in the case of dimethyl ether DME is in between that one found on clean CeOx and the metal surface. Decomposition of the DEE was observed on the OH/CeOx surface following high DEE exposure at 300 K and higher temperatures. Ethoxides and acetates were identified as adsorbed species on the surface by means of RAIRS and ethoxides and formates by s-XPS. No decomposition of dimethyl ether was observed on the OH/CeOx at these higher temperatures, implying that the dissociation of the C-O bond from ethers requires the presence of {beta}-hydrogen.

Calaza, Florencia C [ORNL; Chen, Tsung-Liang [ORNL; Mullins, David R [ORNL; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Aging of Weapon Seals – An Update on Butyl O-ring Issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During testing under the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign in 2001, preliminary data detected a previously unknown and potentially serious concern with recently procured butyl o-rings on several programs. All butyl o-rings molded from a proprietary formulation throughout the period circa 1999 through 2001 had less than a full cure. Engineering judgment was that under curing is detrimental and could possibly lead to sub-optimum performance or, in the worst case, premature seal failure. An aging study was undertaken to ensure that suspect o-rings installed in the stockpile will retain sufficient sealing force for a minimum ten-year service life. A new prediction model developed for this study indicates suspect o-rings do not need to be replaced before the ten-year service life. Long-term testing results are reported on a yearly basis to validate the prediction model. This report documents the aging results for the period September 2002 to January 2011.

Wilson, Mark H.

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

102

Reverse osmosis performance with solutions containing tri-n-butyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tests were conducted to determine whether the reverse osmosis (RO) units at the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at the Savannah River could be made to process solutions containing tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP). It was desired to test whether operation at a feed pH other than neutral would improve performance. Test results are discussed in this report and indicate that little improvement in the water flux can be expected at other pH values.

Siler, J.L.

1991-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

103

Batch polymerization of styrene initiated by n-butyl lithium in a cyclohexane solvent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

anionic mechanism. A mathematical model is de- veloped and the predicted values are compared with their corresponding experimental values. Initiator and monomer concentrations are varied and their conversion time profiles are studied. A G&el... and Storage Vessels Purification of Monomer Purification of Solvent Polymerization Reaction Scavenger Level Analysis o f Butyl Lithium Analysis of Molecular Weight Distributions by the Use of Gel Permeation Technique 10 19 19 ZO Zl ZZ 24 25 25...

Landon, Thomas Rodman

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Decomposition of Ethanol and Dimethyl Ether During Chemical Vapour deposition Synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Decomposition of Ethanol and Dimethyl Ether During Chemical Vapour deposition Synthesis of Single-phase thermal decomposition of ethanol and dimethyl ether (DME) at typical SWNT growth conditions using to the predicted decomposition mechanism. Signature peak intensities indicated concentrations of both ethanol

Maruyama, Shigeo

105

Composition and Digestibility of the Ether Extract of Hays and Fodders.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

556-712-5m TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS. BULLETIN NO . 150 AUGUST , 1912. Division o f Chemistry TECHNICAL BULLETIN Composition and Digestibility of the Ether Extract of Hays and Fodders By G S. FRAPS and J. B. RATHER POSTOFFICE... Digestibility of the Constituents............................................................. 23 Summary and Conclusions.......................................................................29 BLANK PAGE IN ORIGINAL Composition and Digestibility of the Ether...

Fraps, G. S.; Rather, J. B.

1912-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Proton-conducting polymer electrolyte membranes based on fluoropolymers incorporating perfluorovinyl ether sulfonic acids and fluoroalkenes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

acids. A novel synthetic route describing the preparation of perfluorovinyl ether monomer containing. The radical (co) and terpolymerization of 4-[(,,-trifluorovinyl)oxy]benzene sulfonyl chloride (TFVOBSC) with 1,1-difluoroethylene (or vinylidene fluoride, VDF), hexafluoropropene (HFP), and perfluoromethyl vinyl ether (PMVE

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

107

Modelling the fate of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) during the municipal sewage treatment process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sewage treatment plants (STPs) are an important source to the environment for many chemicals of concern (COCs). Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are one such group of COCs of present day concern for which studies on fate and transport during the ... Keywords: chemical fate and transport, mass balance model, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, risk assessment, sewage treatment, water and wastewater management

Kerry N. McPhedran; Rajesh Seth

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

2013 CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUMDUAL BS CHE/CH MAJOR (leading to BS ChE w/ 2 majors) Revised 6-25-13 CSB CH 101 (4) Spring -FRESH Fall -SOPH Spring -SOPH Fall -JR Spring -JR Fall -SR Spring -SR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2013 CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUMDUAL BS CHE/CH MAJOR (leading to BS ChE w/ 2 majors) Revised 6-25-13 CSB CH 101 (4) Spring - FRESH Fall - SOPH Spring - SOPH Fall - JR Spring - JR Fall - SR Spring - SR (CH 117) (CH 118) CH 101 (4) CH 102 (4) CH 231 (3) CH 223 (4) CH 461 (3) c CH

Carver, Jeffrey C.

109

Comb-shaped single ion conductors based on polyacrylate ethers and lithium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comb-shaped single ion conductors based on polyacrylate ethers and lithium Comb-shaped single ion conductors based on polyacrylate ethers and lithium alkyl sulfonate Title Comb-shaped single ion conductors based on polyacrylate ethers and lithium alkyl sulfonate Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2005 Authors Sun, Xiao-Guang, Jun Hou, and John B. Kerr Journal Electrochimica Acta Volume 50 Pagination 1139-1147 Keywords ionic conductivity, plasticizer, polyacrylate ethers, single ion conductor Abstract Comb-shaped single ion conductors have been synthesized by sulfonation of small molecule chloroethyleneglycols, which, after ion exchange to the Li+ salt were then converted to the acrylate by reaction with acryloyl chloride and copolymerized with polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether acrylate (Mn = 454, n = 8) (PAE8-co-E3SO3Li);

110

Kinetic measurements of the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with hydroxy ethers, hydroxy ketones, and keto ethers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Absolute rate constants were determined for the gas-phase reactions of hydroxyl radicals with a series of hydroxy ethers as well as the simplest hydroxy ketone and keto ether with use of the flash photolysis resonance fluorescence technique. At 298 K, the measured rate constants were as follows (in units of 10{sup {minus}12} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}): 2-methoxyethanol, 12.5 {plus minus} 0.7; 2-ethoxyethanol, 18.7 {plus minus} 2.0; 2-butoxyethanol, 23.1 {plus minus} 0.9; 3-ethoxy-1-propanol, 22.0 {plus minus} 1.3; 3-methoxy-l-butanol, 23.6 {plus minus} 1.6; acetol, 3.0 {plus minus} 0.3; and methoxyacetone, 6.8 {plus minus} 0.6. The kinetic data for 2-methoxyethanol obtained between 240 and 440 K were used to derive the following Arrhenius expression: k{sub 1} = (4.5 {plus minus} 1.4) {times} 10{sup {minus}12} exp((325 {plus minus} 100)/T) (cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}). The results for all seven reactants are discussed in terms of the prediction of OH rate constants for oxygenated organic compounds.

Dagaut, P.; Liu, R.; Wallington, T.J.; Kurylo, M.J. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

1989-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

111

J. Am. Chem. SOC.1994,116, 7815-7826 7815 Conversion of CH4 to CH3OH: Reactions of COO+with CH4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Am. Chem. SOC.1994,116, 7815-7826 7815 Conversion of CH4 to CH3OH: Reactions of COO+with CH4 a half century because of its great economic and scientific importance.' Although this oxidation reaction of providing fundamental information regarding this process is to study a prototypical gas-phase reaction MO

Clemmer, David E.

112

Test of Orientation/Stretch-Induced Reduction of Friction via Primitive Chain Network Simulations for Polystyrene, Polyisoprene, and Poly(n-butyl acrylate)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Test of Orientation/Stretch-Induced Reduction of Friction via Primitive Chain Network Simulations for Polystyrene, Polyisoprene, and Poly(n-butyl acrylate) ...

Yuichi Masubuchi; Yumi Matsumiya; Hiroshi Watanabe

2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

113

Synthesis and Evaluation of 3',5'-Di-tert-butyl-4'-hydroxyflavones as Potential Inhibitors of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Synthesis and Evaluation of 3',5'-Di-tert-butyl-4'-hydroxyflavones as Potential Inhibitors of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Oxidation ...

Guy Lewin; Yves Rolland; Sylvie Privat; Christine Breugnot; Albert Lenaers; Jean Paul Vilaine; Jean-Pierre Baltaze; Jacques Poisson

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Monodisperse porous polymer particles containing macrocyclic ether as a new class of sorbent for SR(II) separation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strontium{sup 90} is one of the typical fission products that may be found in high level liquid waste (HLLW). Separation of Sr{sup 90} prior to the vitrification is beneficial to the final treatment of solid radioactive waste. In this study, a new class of sorbent for Sr(II) was developed by loading the macrocyclic ether DtBuCH18C6 into the monodisperse porous polymer particles (MPPPs). The MPPPs are well-known as a promising chromatographic material due to the uniform particle size, porous morphology, good compatibility with organic extractants, and rigid matrix. The structure and micro-morphology of the sorbent particles were characterized. The adsorption behavior towards Sr(II) in HNO{sub 3} media was investigated by both batch and column experiments. High adsorption efficiency and selective separation of Sr(II) was obtained. The sorbent particles can be recycled for at least several times before obvious lose of the adsorption ability. This kind of sorbent possesses the potential to be used for strontium separation in radioactive liquid waste.

Leng, Yuxiao; Bai, Feifei [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Faculty of Chemical Science and Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 100084 (China); Ye, Gang; Wei, Jichao; Wang, Jianchen; Chen, Jing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Synergistic effect of mixing dimethyl ether with methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene fuels on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and soot formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and soot formation in counterflow diffusion flames of methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene fuels mixed with dimethyl ether (DME) have been investigated. Planar laser-induced incandescence and fluorescence techniques were employed to measure relative soot volume fractions and PAH concentrations, respectively. Results showed that even though DME is known to be a clean fuel in terms of soot formation, DME mixture with ethylene fuel increases PAH and soot formation significantly as compared to the pure ethylene case, while the mixture of DME with methane, ethane, and propane decreases PAH and soot formation. Numerical calculations adopting a detailed kinetics showed that DME can be decomposed to produce a relatively large number of methyl radicals in the low-temperature region where PAH forms and grows; thus the mixture of DME with ethylene increases CH{sub 3} radicals significantly in the PAH formation region. Considering that the increase in the concentration of O radicals is minimal in the PAH formation region with DME mixture, the enhancement of PAH and soot formation in the mixture flames of DME and ethylene can be explained based on the role of methyl radicals in PAH and soot formation. Methyl radicals can increase the concentration of propargyls, which could enhance incipient benzene ring formation through the propargyl recombination reaction and subsequent PAH growth. Thus, the result substantiates the importance of methyl radicals in PAH and soot formation, especially in the PAH formation region of diffusion flames. (author)

Yoon, S.S. [Corporate Research and Development Division, Hyundai-Kia Motors, Gyeonggi-do 445-706 (Korea); Anh, D.H. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon 305-380 (Korea); Chung, S.H. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Life cycle study of coal-based dimethyl ether as vehicle fuel for urban bus in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology, a life cycle model of coal-based dimethyl ether (CBDME) as a vehicle fuel is established for China. Its life cycle from well to wheel are divided into three phases. They are feedstock extraction, fuel production and fuel consumption in vehicle. The primary energy consumption (PEC) and global warming potential (GWP) of CBDME pathway are analyzed and compared with coal-based diesel (CBD) as a latent rival to replace conventional petroleum-based diesel (CPBD). This study demonstrates that the LCA methodology is very suitable and effective for the choice of vehicle fuels. One result is that the greenhouse gases (GHGs) emission of coal-based vehicle fuel pathways is usually concentrated on fuel production stage. The percentages of CBDME and CBD pathways both exceed 60%. The application of carbon capture and storage (CCS) is helpful for coal-based vehicle fuel pathways to improve their global warming effect dramatically. Compared with CBD pathway, CBDME pathway consumes less PEC and emits less \\{GHGs\\} emission as well. Even though the CCS and CH4-fired generation are used, the advantages of CBDME are still kept. For saving petroleum energy and reducing global warming effect, CBDME has greater potential than CBD to substitute CPBD under current fuel synthesis technologies. If the hurdles such as the maturity of engine and vehicle technologies, corresponding regulations and standards and infrastructures are reliably solved, CBDME will have better prospect in China.

Liang Zhang; Zhen Huang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

CH353 Physical Chemistry I Summer 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CH353 Physical Chemistry I Summer 2012 OUTLINE AND SCHEDULE This course will be team taught by Prof. Robert Wyatt and Lauren Webb Text: P. Atkins and J. de Paula, Physical Chemistry, 9th edition This course-T phase diagrams 2. Sublimation curve, vaporization curve, melting curve, triple point, critical point 3

118

COST 526 Project CH4 Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COST 526 ­ Project CH4 Final Report Modelling, Simulating and Analysing EQ-Casting and Quenching. Remark: Due to the delay of the funding of the proposed investment casting project we change the focus of the project. The development of an Open Source optimization tool (see collaboration) was a relevant

119

Last revised: December 2011 CH 153K  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-volume reference tool such as the CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics. It mightLast revised: December 2011 CH 153K Finding Physical and Chemical Property be electronic versions of printed books (e.g. the CRC Handbook), or they may

120

Batch polymerization of styrene and isoprene by n-butyl lithium initiator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-20). Analysis of products consists of determining the point at which no free lithium alkyl remains. Thus if a butyl lithium initiated polymerization were terminated with water, butane would be evolved as long as the initiator were present. The butane...? agent were evaporated under a hood. Finally the polymer. was dried in a vacuum oven at about 50'C and under a vacuum of 30 inches of gg for about 30 hours. The weight of polymer formed was determined by final weighing. 25 The monomer conversion...

Hasan, Sayeed

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria in the system methyl propanoate + n-butyl alcohol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria were determined at 74.66, 101.32, and 127.99 kPa for binary mixtures containing methyl propanoate + n-butyl alcohol by using a dynamic still with vapor and liquid circulation. No azeotrope was detected. The data were found to be thermodynamically consistent according to the point to point test. Application of the group-contribution models ASOG, UNIFAC, and modified UNIFAC to the activity coefficients at the three pressures studied gives average errors of less than 10%, 11%, and 3%, respectively.

Susial, P.; Ortega, J. (Univ. de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain). Lab. de Termodinamica y Fisicoquimica)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid-labile cholesterol-vinyl ether-peg...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Crystallization of Recombinant Crithidia fasciculata Tryparedoxin Summary: of 30% polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether (PEG MME) 2000, 0.1 M TrisHCl, pH 8.2, 1% dimethyl Source:...

123

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in combusted residues and soils from an open burning site of electronic wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants due to their extensive use. Combusted residue from electronic waste (e-waste) combustion is one of the contamination sources ... tr...

Qian Luo; Ming Hong Wong; Zijian Wang; Zongwei Cai

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Solvent Effects on Cesium Complexation with Crown Ethers from Liquid to Supercritical Fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques were used to study crown ether-water interactions in solvents of low dielectric constants such as chloroform and carbon tetrachloride. Water forms a 1:1 complex with a number of crown ethers including 12-crown-4, 15-crown-5, 18-crown-6, dicyclohexano-18=crown-6, dicyclohexano-24-crown 8, and dibenzl-24-crown-8 in chloroform. Among these crown ethers, the 18-crown-6-H2 complex has the largest equilibrium constant (K=545) and 97% of the crown is complexed to water in chloroform. Addition of carbon tetrachloride to chloroform lowers the equilibrium constants of the crown-water complexes. The partition coefficients of crown ethers (D=crown in water/crown in solvent) between water and organic solvent also vary with solvent composition.

Chien M. Wai; Anne Rustenholtz; Shaofen Wang; Su-Chen Lee; Jamie Herman; Richard A. Porter

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

People's Physics Book Ch 8-1 The Big Idea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

People's Physics Book Ch 8-1 The Big Idea When any two bodies in the universe interact, they can components are conserved. #12;People's Physics Book Ch 8-2 Key Concepts · Impulse is how momentum

California at Santa Cruz, University of

126

CH-ANL Report.indd  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 2.0 STATUS AND RESULTS ..................................................................... 1 3.0 CONCLUSIONS .................................................................................... 5 4.0 RATING ................................................................................................. 5 5.0 OPPORTUNITIES FOR IMPROVEMENT .......................................... 6 APPENDIX A: SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION ................................... 7 APPENDIX B: SITE-SPECIFIC FINDINGS ................................................. 8 Abbreviations Used in This Report ANL Argonne National Laboratory CH Offi ce of Science Chicago Offi ce CIC Classifi cation and Information Control DOE U.S. Department of Energy NNSA National Nuclear Security Administration

127

JASPERSE CHEM 350 TEST 2 VERSION 1 Ch. 4 The Study of Chemical Reactions; Ch. 5 Stereochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nucleophile that you could use to make the following by SN2. (3 points) OCH2CH3 3. For the structure shown, (3JASPERSE CHEM 350 TEST 2 VERSION 1 Ch. 4 The Study of Chemical Reactions; Ch. 5 Stereochemistry Ch of the following is true regarding an SN1 reaction? a. It would be faster at 25° than 50° b. It would be faster

Jasperse, Craig P.

128

Nonlinear viscoelastic response of carbon black-filled butyl rubber and implications for o-ring aging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Butyl rubber, unfortunately, has pronounced nonlinear viscoelastic behavior, which may be modelled by a separable KBKZ formalism. While these effects seem to have minimal impact on accelerated sealing force measurements, they do severely impact compression set tests. Therefore, a new test is suggested for evaluating field-return o-rings which is free from such confounding effects.

Adolf, D.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Rate dependent finite deformation stressstrain behavior of an ethylene methacrylic acid copolymer and an ethylene methacrylic acid butyl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rate dependent finite deformation stress­strain behavior of an ethylene methacrylic acid copolymer and an ethylene methacrylic acid butyl acrylate copolymer S. Deschanel a,*, B.P. Greviskes a , K. Bertoldi a , S dependence a b s t r a c t The large strain deformation behaviors of an ethylene methacrylic acid (EMAA

130

Liquid phase oxidation of thiophene compounds by tert-butyl hydroperoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxidative instability problems in both shale and petroleum-derived middle distillate fuels are related to the presence of hydroperoxides. Although a good body of knowledge exists concerning the formation of peroxides in the liquid phase, relatively little is known about the reaction/decomposition pathways when other functional groups are present. One of the significant and undesirable problems is the formation of solid deposits which can plug nozzles and filters and coal heat exchanger surfaces. Deposit formation in fuels is triggered by autoxidation reactions and is closely associated with elemental oxygen and/or hydroperoxide concentration. This paper reports on the reaction between a primary autoxidation product, a hydroperoxide, and sulfur compounds of the type present in petroleum-derived middle distillate fuels. Specifically, we examine the t-butyl hydroperoxide oxidation of thiophene, 2, 5-dimethylthiophene, tetrahydrothiophene and benzothiophene in a deaerated model fuel, tetradecane, at 120{degree}C.

Mushrush, G.W.; Watkins, J.M. Jr.; Hazlett, R.N.; Hardy, D.R.; Eaton, H.G. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (USA))

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Fuel instability studies; Liquid phase oxidation of tetrahydrothiophene by tert-butyl hydroperoxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reactions that lead to fuel instability are the subject of conflicting reports in the literature. Confusion results from the difficulty in relating differences in fuel composition, temperature, surface effects and dissolved oxygen content that comprise the multitude of reported studies. Model studies offer a means by chic the mechanism of an individual reaction can be related to a simple system and then extended to the more complex fuel media. This paper reports a model oxidation study of a species, t-butyl hydroperoxide under mild reaction conditions, 120{degrees}C, in a tetradecane model fuel. The major oxidation product was tetrahydrothiophene sulfoxide from the sulfide and t-butanol from the hydroperoxide. The complete suite of products is reported.

Mushrush, G.W.; Pellenbarg, R.E.; Hazlett, R.N.; Morris, R.E.; Hardy, D.R. (Fuels Section, Code 6180, Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (US))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Tests for mutagenic effects of ammoniated glycyrrhizin, butylated hydroxytoluene, and gum arabic in roden germ cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ammoniated glycyrrhizin, butylated hydroxytoluene, and gum Arabic are generally recognized as safe (GRAS) substances that are used primarily as additives in foods. These substances were incorporated into rodent diets and fed to male rats and mice for 10 and 8 wk, respectively. The treated male mice and rats were then tested for dominant lethal effects. The mice were also tested for induced heritable translocation. Results of the rat studies indicated a statistically significant dominant lethal effect of each of the compounds tested; however, the biological significance of this response is not known. Results of the mouse dominant lethal and heritable translocation studies, on the other hand, indicated no adverse effects of the compounds tested.

Sheu, C.W.; Cain, K.T.; Rushbrook, C.J.; Jorgenson, T.A.; Generoso, W.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Butyl rubber O-ring seals: Revision of test procedures for stockpile materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive testing showed little correlation between test slab and O-ring performance. New procedures, comparable to those used with the traditional test slabs, were defined for hardness, compression set, and tensile property testing on sacrificial O-ring specimens. Changes in target performance values were made as needed and were, in one case, tightened to reflect the O-ring performance data. An additional study was carried out on O-ring and slab performance vs cure cycle and showed little sensitivity of material performance to large changes in curing time. Aging and spectra of certain materials indicated that two sets of test slabs from current vendor were accidently made from EPDM rather than butyl rubber. Random testing found no O-rings made from EPDM. As a result, and additional spectroscope test will be added to the product acceptance procedures to verify the type of rubber compound used.

Domeier, L.A.; Wagter, K.R.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Initiation Temperature for Runaway Tri-n-Butyl Phosphate/Nitric Acid Reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a review of the safety basis for solvent extraction processes at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site, a question was raised concerning the safety margin associated with a postulated accident involving a runaway tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/nitric acid reaction due to the inadvertent heating of a tank. The safety margin was based on studies which showed the maximum temperature would not exceed 128 degrees Celsius compared to 130 degrees Celsius, the minimum initiation temperature for runaway reaction established in the 1950's following damaging incidents at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. The reviewers were concerned the minimum temperature was not conservative since data for solutions containing 20 wt percent dissolved solids showed initiation temperatures at or below 130 degrees Celsius and process solutions normally contain some dissolved solids.

Rudisill, T.S.

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

135

A thermodynamic model of nitric acid extraction by tri-n-butyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermodynamic model is presented for nitric acid extraction by tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP). This model is based on the formation of the organic phase species: TBP.HNO/sub 3/ and (TBP)/sub 2/.HNO/sub 3/. The model works successfully at TBP concentrations of 5 to 100 vol% and was found to be effective at predicting the extraction of HNO/sub 3/ from HNO/sub 3//NaNO/sub 3/ and HNO/sub 3//LiNO/sub 3/ solutions. Within the TBP concentration range of 5 to 30%, a single set of extraction constants was sufficient to fit extraction data. Stoichiometric activity coefficients of nitric acid in HNO/sub 3//NaNO/sub 3/ and HNO/sub 3//LiNO/sub 3/ mixtures were calculated using a model developed by Bromley.

Chaiko, D.J.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Unusual reaction paths of SN2 nucleophile substitution reactions CH4+H-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unusual reaction paths of SN2 nucleophile substitution reactions CH4+H- CH4+H- and CH4+F- CH3F for the SN2 nucleophile substitution reactions CH4+H- CH4+H- and CH4+F- CH3F+H- . The calculated gradient of the PES, which is observed for almost all the studied gas phase SN2 reactions [1-18]. However, when

Quapp, Wolfgang

137

DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as, field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. Their strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. The bulk of the efforts over the past year were focused on the conversion of the campus shuttle bus. This process, started in August 2001, took until April 2002 to complete. The process culminated in an event to celebrate the launching of the shuttle bus on DME-diesel operation on April 19, 2002. The design of the system on the shuttle bus was patterned after the system developed in the engine laboratory, but also was subjected to a rigorous failure modes effects analysis (FMEA, referred to by Air Products as a ''HAZOP'' analysis) with help from Dr. James Hansel of Air Products. The result of this FMEA was the addition of layers of redundancy and over-pressure protection to the system on the shuttle bus. The system became operational in February 2002. Preliminary emissions tests and basic operation of the shuttle bus took place at the Pennsylvania Transportation Institute's test track facility near the University Park airport. After modification and optimization of the system on the bus, operation on the campus shuttle route began in early June 2002. However, the work and challenges continued as it has been difficult to maintain operability of the shuttle bus due to fuel and component difficulties. In late June 2002, the pump head itself developed operational problems (loss of smooth function) leading to excessive stress on the magnetic coupling and excessive current draw to operate. A new pump head was installed on the system to alleviate this problem and the shuttle bus operated successfully on DME blends from 10-25 vol% on the shuttle bus loop until September 30, 2002. During the period of operation on the campus loop, the bus was pulled from service, operated at the PTI test track and real-time emissions measurements were obtained using an on-board emissions analyzer from Clean Air Technologies International, Inc. Particulate emissions reductions of 60% and 80% were observed at DME blend ratios of 12 vol.% and 25 vol.%, respectively, as the bus was operated over the Orange County driving cycle. Increases in NOx, CO and HC emissions were observed, however. In summary, the conversion of the shuttle bus was successfully accomplished, particulate emissions reductions were observed, but there were operational challenges in the field. Nonetheless, they were able to demonstrate reliable operation of the shuttle bus on DME-diesel blends.

Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Jennifer Stefanik; Howard Glunt; Andre L. Boehman; Allen Homan; David Klinikowski

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Synthesis of Methanol and Dimethyl Ether from Syngas over Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was developed for the synthesis of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas. Studied were temperatures of operation ranging from 250°C to 380°C. High temperatures (e.g. 380°C) are necessary when combining methanol and DME synthesis with a methanol to gasoline (MTG) process in a single reactor bed. A commercial Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst, utilized industrially for the synthesis of methanol at 220-280°C, suffers from a rapid deactivation when the reaction is conducted at high temperature (>320°C). On the contrary, a Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was found to be highly stable for methanol and DME synthesis at 380°C. The Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was thus further investigated for methanol and DME synthesis at P=34-69 bars, T= 250-380°C, GHSV= 5 000-18 000 h-1, and molar feeds H2/CO= 1, 2, and 3. Selectivity to DME increased with decreasing operating temperature, and increasing operating pressure. Increased GHSV’s and H2/CO syngas feed ratios also enhanced DME selectivity. Undesirable CH4 formation was observed, however, can be minimized through choice of process conditions and by catalyst design. By studying the effect of the Pd loading and the Pd:Zn molar ratio the formulation of the Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst was optimized. A catalyst with 5% Pd and a Pd:Zn molar ratio of 0.25:1 has been identified as the preferred catalyst. Results indicate that PdZn particles are more active than Pdº particles for the synthesis of methanol and less active for CH4 formation. A correlation between DME selectivity and the concentration of acid sites of the catalysts has been established. Hence, two types of sites are required for the direct conversion of syngas to DME: 1) PdZn particles are active for the synthesis of methanol from syngas, and 2) acid sites which are active for the conversion of methanol to DME. Additionally, CO2 formation was problematic as PdZn was found to be active for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction, under all the conditions evaluated.

Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Dagle, Robert A.; Kovarik, Libor; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; King, David L.; Palo, Daniel R.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - January 2011 Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - January 2011 January 2011 Review of the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Unreviewed Safety Question Procedure [ARPT-RL-2011-003] The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security, during a site visit from January 10-14, 2011, presented the results of a technical review of the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (PRC) Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) Procedure. Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - January 2011 More Documents & Publications CX-009415: Categorical Exclusion Determination Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - January 2011

140

Ab initio calculations of various protonation sites in perfluorodiethyl ether: Models for high temperature lubricant decomposition?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although perfluoropolyether (PFPE) lubricants have found successful application in spacecraft mechanisms and computer hard drives, there eventual breakdown is irksome, and the mechanism of decomposition is the subject of much scrutiny. However, very little notice is taken of the monomer ethers on which the polymer lubricants are based. Recently, concerted studies of the Lewis base properties of various fluorinated ethers have been performed, both from an experimental and a theoretical viewpoint. As an extension of the theoretical work, this study presents ab initio theoretical consideration of the multiple potential basic sites within perfluorodiethyl ether, (CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}){sub 2}O, by way of the proton affinity of the molecule at various possible protonation sites (i.e., oxygen and fluorine atoms). The results indicate that although protonation at the oxygen is more energetically favored, protonation at the fluorine is not much higher in energy and provides for formation of an excellent leaving group, HF.

Ball, D.W. [Cleveland State Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Ch. VII, Temperature, heat flow maps and temperature gradient...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ch. VII, Temperature, heat flow maps and temperature gradient holes Author T. G. Zacharakis Editor T. G. Zacharakis Published Colorado Geological Survey in Cooperation with the...

142

Ch. VI, The geophysical environment around Waunita Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ch. VI, The geophysical environment around Waunita Hot Springs Author A. L. Lange Editor T. G. Zacharakis Published Colorado Geological Survey in Cooperation with the U.S....

143

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

144

CH Packaging Operations for High Wattage Waste at LANL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: Drum payload assembly Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

145

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Chicago Operations Office (CH)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Chicago Operations Office (CH) (See Science APS).

146

Unusual reaction paths of SN2 nucleophile substitution reactions CH4 + H? ? CH4 + H? and CH4 + F? ? CH3F + H?: Quantum chemical calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Quantum chemical (CCSD(full)/6-311++G(3df,3pd), CCSD(T)(full)/6-311++G(3df,3pd)) and density function theory (B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,3pd)) calculations were performed for the SN2 nucleophile substitution reactions CH4 + H? ? CH4 + H? and CH4 + F? ? CH3F + H?. The calculated gradient reaction pathways for both reactions have an unusual behavior. An unusual stationary point of index 2 lies on the gradient reaction path. Using Newton trajectories for the reaction path, we can detect VRI point at which the reaction path branches.

Ruslan M. Minyaev; Wolfgang Quapp; Benjamin Schmidt; Ilya V. Getmanskii; Vitaliy V. Koval

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Catalyst system and process for benzyl ether fragmentation and coal liquefaction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Dibenzyl ether can be readily cleaved to form primarily benzaldehyde and toluene as products, along with minor amounts of bibenzyl and benzyl benzoate, in the presence of a catalyst system comprising a Group 6 metal, preferably molybdenum, a salt, and an organic halide. Although useful synthetically for the cleavage of benzyl ethers, this cleavage also represents a key model reaction for the liquefaction of coal; thus this catalyst system and process should be useful in coal liquefaction with the advantage of operating at significantly lower temperatures and pressures.

Zoeller, Joseph Robert (Kingsport, TN)

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Total Fatty Acids and Other Ether-Soluable Constituents of Feedstuffs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

586-914-10m TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 169 SEPTEMBER, 19I4 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY The Total Fatty Acids and Other Ether-Soluble Constituents of Feedstuffs BY J. B. RATHER Assistant Chemist POSTOFFICE COLLEGE STATION... IS T .* In previous publications of this Experiment Station (Fraps and Bather, Bulletins Nos. 150 and 162) it has been shown that the un? saponifiable matter in the ether extract of hays and fodders averages about 58 per cent. Of the total extract, and is of much...

Rather, J. B. (James Burness)

1914-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Toxicity of polychlorinated diphenyl ethers in Hydra attenuata and in rat whole embryo culture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TOXICITY OF POLYCHLORINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS IN HYDRA A?TENUATA AND IN RAT WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE A Thesis by MARION CAROL BECKER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8cM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Toxicology TOXICITY OF POLYCHLORINATED DIPHENYL ETHERS IN HYDRA A1TENUATA AND IN RAT WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE by MARION CAROL BECKER Approved as to style and content by: Stephen H. S (Ca...

Becker, Marion Carol

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

150

Hydrolysis of cellulose to produce glucose with solid acid catalysts in 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride ([bmIm][Cl]) with sequential water addition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Selective glucose production by cellulose hydrolysis with initial or sequential water addition in the presence of solid acid catalysts in 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium chloride ([bmIm][Cl]) under microwave irra...

Kaori Ishida; Shiho Matsuda; Masaru Watanabe…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Anhydrous aluminum chloride as an alkylation catalyst: identification of mono- and dialkyl-benzenes from the condensation of tertiary butyl alcohol with benzene.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIBRARY a a w c"I. I. SI - O~ TI:YAf ANHYDROUS ALUMINUM CHLORIDE AS AN ALKYLATION CATALYST: IDENTIFICATION OF MONO- AND DIALKYIZENZENES FROM THE CONDENSATION QF TERTIARY BUTYL ALCOHOL WITH BENKENE IACEY EUGENE SCOGGINS 4 A Thesis Submitted...: IDENTIFICATION OF MONO- AND DI~NZZNES FROM THE CONDENSATION OF TERTIARY BUTYL ALCOHOL WITH BENZENE A Thesis By LACEY EUGENE SCOGGINS Approved as to style and content hy: Chairman of Committee Head of Chemistry Department 1959 ACKNOWLEDGME1VTS The author...

Scoggins, Lacey E

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Changing concentrations of CO, CH4, C5H8, CH3Br, CH3I, and dimethyl sulfide during the Southern Ocean Iron Enrichment Experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...important sink for atmospheric CH 3 Br, a result...half of the atmospheric organobromine burden...delay the recovery of stratospheric...from ocean waters is a major source of cloud condensation nuclei...above the atmospheric boundary layer...

Oliver W. Wingenter; Karl B. Haase; Peter Strutton; Gernot Friederich; Simone Meinardi; Donald R. Blake; F. Sherwood Rowland

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

People's Physics Book Ch 7-1 The Big Idea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

People's Physics Book Ch 7-1 The Big Idea The universe has many remarkable qualities, among them. This is the second of the five fundamental conservation laws in physics. The other four are conservation of energy;People's Physics Book Ch 7-2 as just the two cars. In this case, internal forces include

California at Santa Cruz, University of

154

Initiation Temperature for Runaway Tri-n-Butyl Phosphate/Nitric Acid Reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During a review of the H-Canyon authorization basis, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) staff members questioned the margin of safety associated with a postulated tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)/nitric acid runaway reaction due to the inadvertent heating of a canyon tank containing greater than 3000 lbs (1362 kg) of TBP. The margin of safety was partially based on experiments and calculations performed by the Actinide Technology Section (ATS) to support deletion of indication of tank agitation as a Safety Class System. In the technical basis for deletion of this system, ATS personnel conservatively calculated the equilibrium temperature distribution of a canyon tank containing TBP and nitric acid layers which were inadvertently heated by a steam jet left on following a transfer. The maximum calculated temperature (128 degrees C) was compared to the minimum initiation temperature for a runaway reaction (greater than 130 degrees C) documented by experimental work in the mid 195 0s. In this work, the initiation temperature as a function of nitric acid concentration was measured for 0 and 20 wt percent dissolved solids. The DNFSB staff members were concerned that data for 0 wt percent dissolved solids were not conservative given the facts that data for 20 wt percent dissolved solids show initiation temperatures at or below 130 degrees C and H-Canyon solutions normally contained a small amount of dissolved solids.

Rudisill, T.S.

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

155

Thorium ions transport across Tri-n-butyl phosphate-benzene based supported liquid membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transport of Th(IV) ions across tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) benzene based liquid membranes supported in microporous hydrophobic polypropylene film (MHPF) has been studied. Various parameters such as variation of nitric acid concentration in the feed, TBP concentration in the membrane, and temperature on the given metal ions transport have been investigated. The effects of nitric acid and TBP concentrations on the distribution coefficient were also studied, and the data obtained were used to determine the Th ions-TBP complex diffusion coefficient in the membrane. Permeability coefficients of Th(IV) ions were also determined as a function of the TBP and nitric acid concentrations. The optimal conditions for the transport of Th(IV) ions across the membrane are 6 mol{sm_bullet}dm{sup -3} HNO{sub 3} concentration, 2.188 mol {center_dot} dm{sup -3} TBP concentration, and 25{degrees}C. The stoichiometry of the chemical species involved in chemical reaction during the transport of Th(IV) ions has also been studied.

Rasul, G.; Chaudry, M.A. [Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Chemistry, Islamabad (Pakistan); Afzal, M. [Quaid-I-Azam Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Dimethyl ether (DME) from coal as a household cooking fuel in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies. Given China's rich coal resources, the production and use of coal-derived DME as a cooking fuelDimethyl ether (DME) from coal as a household cooking fuel in China Eric D. Larson Princeton gas (LPG) as a household cooking fuel. As such, DME is an attractive fuel for clean cooking. DME can

157

Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion investigations1 of water retention mechanism by cellulose ethers in mortars2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion investigations1 of water retention mechanism by cellulose : 10.1016/j.cemconres.2012.06.002 #12;2 ABSTRACT22 23 We show how nuclear magnetic spin-lattice relaxation dispersion of protons-water24 (NMRD) can be used to elucidate the effect of cellulose ethers

Boyer, Edmond

158

cwebch3 ICON cweb_ch3.ico cwebch4 ICON cweb_ch4.ico cwebs3 ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cwebch3 ICON cweb_ch3.ico cwebch4 ICON cweb_ch4.ico cwebs3 ICON cweb_s3.ico cwebs4 ICON cweb_s4.ico dvi3 ICON dvi3.ico dvi4 ICON dvi4.ico gf3 ...

159

cwebch1 ICON cweb_ch1.ico cwebch2 ICON cweb_ch2.ico cwebs1 ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cwebch1 ICON cweb_ch1.ico cwebch2 ICON cweb_ch2.ico cwebs1 ICON cweb_s1.ico cwebs2 ICON cweb_s2.ico dvi1 ICON dvi1.ico dvi2 ICON dvi2.ico gf1 ...

160

Perspective on the reactions between F and CH3CH2F: The free energy landscape of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perspective on the reactions between F and CH3CH2F: The free energy landscape of the E2 and SN2 as well as the connecting bottlenecks. The free energy profile and barrier along the E2 and SN2 reaction contribution to the SN2 channel. elimination reaction molecular dynamics substitution reaction umbrella

Nielsen, Steven O.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The influence of propylene glycol ethers on base diesel properties and emissions from a diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The oxygenated additives propylene glycol methyl ether (PGME), propylene glycol ethyl ether (PGEE), dipropylene glycol methyl ether (DPGME) were studied to determine their influence on both the base diesel fuel properties and the exhaust emissions from a diesel engine (CO, NOx, unburnt hydrocarbons and smoke). For diesel blends with low oxygen content (?4.0 wt.%), the addition of these compounds to base diesel fuel decreases aromatic content, kinematic viscosity, cold filter plugging point and Conradson carbon residue. Also, each compound modifies the distillation curve at temperatures below the corresponding oxygenated compound boiling point, the distillate percentage being increased. The blend cetane number depends on the type of propylene glycol ether added, its molecular weight, and the oxygen content of the fuel. The addition of PGME decreased slightly diesel fuel cetane number, while PGEE and DPGME increased it. Base diesel fuel-propylene glycol ether blends with 1.0 and 2.5 wt.% oxygen contents were used in order to determine the performance of the diesel engine and its emissions at both full and medium loads and different engine speeds (1000, 2500 and 4000 rpm). In general, at full load and in comparison with base diesel fuel, the blends show a slight reduction of oxygen-free specific fuel consumption. CO emissions are reduced appreciably for 2.5 wt.% of oxygen blends, mainly for PGEE and DPGME. \\{NOx\\} emissions are reduced slightly, but not the smoke. Unburnt hydrocarbon emissions decrease at 1000 and 2500 rpm, but not at 4000 rpm. At medium load, the effect of the additives is much less significant, due to the fact that the ratio oxygen from additive/oxygen from air is much lower.

F. Gómez-Cuenca; M. Gómez-Marín; M.B. Folgueras-Díaz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Linking Low-Level Stable Isotope Fractionation to Expression of the Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase-Encoding ethB Gene for Elucidation of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether Biodegradation in Aerated Treatment Pond Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...application of CSIA in field investigations to detect biodegradation...52). An alternative remedial strategy could be the use...application of CSIA in field investigations to detect biodegradation may lead to...application of CSIA in field investigations to detect biodegradation...

Sven Jechalke; Mònica Rosell; Paula M. Martínez-Lavanchy; Paola Pérez-Leiva; Thore Rohwerder; Carsten Vogt; Hans H. Richnow

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

163

Gas transport properties of reverse-selective poly(ether-b-amide6)/[Emim][BF4] gel membranes for CO2/light gases separation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present research investigates deeply effect of 1-ethyl-3 methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Emim][BF4]) ionic liquid on separation performance and transport properties of poly(ether-b-amide6)(Pebax1657) at different operating pressures from 2 to 20 bar and temperatures from 25 to 65 °C. [Emim][BF4] showed interesting separation factor for CO2/light gases as a solvent and it was expected that its addition to Pebax1657 leads more amorphous structure, thereby diffusion and permeability of gases increase. [Emim][BF4] was added to the polymer solution up to 100 wt.% of Pebax1657 weight and permeation coefficients of CO2, H2, CH4 and N2 through the prepared membranes were measured. The results showed remarkable increment in permeation of all the tested gases, particularly CO2 and ideal selectivity of CO2/H2 enhanced significantly due to high solubility selectivity of the added compound. Effect of operating conditions on solubility coefficients were also investigated, thus sorption isotherms and activation energies of permeability, solubility and diffusion were calculated. In addition, the membranes were characterized by SEM, DSC, FT-IR spectroscopy and Tensile analysis to inspect changes in their physical and thermal properties, precisely.

Hesamoddin Rabiee; Ali Ghadimi; Toraj Mohammadi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Special Report Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - October...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - October 22, 2001 Special Report Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - October 22, 2001 October 22, 2001 Special Report Order ssued to CH2M Hill...

165

Microsoft Word - SC-CH FTCP TQP WFSA Template-2013-final--10...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SC-CH in support of PNSO oversight of RPL; SC-CH is providing one fire protection engineer, but because of limited technical certifications, SC-CH is acquiring the services of...

166

MTBE Production Economics (Released in the STEO April 2001)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the causes of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) price increases in 2000.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company The Office of Hea1th, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight has evaluated the facts and circumstances of a series of radiological work deficiencies at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and the 105 K-East Reactor Facility (105KE Reactor) by CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). The radiological work deficiencies at PFP are documented in the April 29, 2011, Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) Surveillance Report S-11-SED-CHP~C-PFP-002, Planning and Execution of Radiological Work. S-11-SED-CHPRC-PFP-002 documented four examples where inadequate hazard analysis resulted in airborne radioactivity that exceeded the limits of the controlling radiological work permit.

168

Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill - October 4, 2004 | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Process Research Unit On October 4, 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a nuclear safety Enforcement Letter to CH2M Hill concerning expiration of the company's...

169

Population SAMC, ChIP-chip Data Analysis and Beyond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation research consists of two topics, population stochastics approximation Monte Carlo (Pop-SAMC) for Baysian model selection problems and ChIP-chip data analysis. The following two paragraphs give a brief introduction to each...

Wu, Mingqi

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

170

Comprehensive Research Areas in ChBE Biomedical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& BioprocessingCatalysis, Reaction Kinetics & Reaction EngineeringComplex Fluids & Multiphase Flow EnergyComprehensive Research Areas in ChBE Biomedical Engineering Biotechnology, Bioinformatics & M EM S Nanotechnology Polymers & Materials Science Process Systems Engineering Pulp & Paper

Sherrill, David

171

Article original Diffrenciation par le systme API 50 CH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Article original Différenciation par le système API 50 CH et électrophorèse des mycoplasmes Marcy-l'Ã?toile, France (Reçu le 15 janvier 1991; accepté le 11 juin 1991) Résumé ― Le système API'aspect des colonies lors de l'isolement, ainsi que les résultats fournis par le système API 50 CH ont permis

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

172

Kinetics of liquid phase catalytic dehydration of methanol to dimethyl ether  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the kinetics of the liquid phase catalytic dehydration of methanol to dimethyl ether investigated. The experiments were carried out under low concentrations of feed in a 1-L stirred autoclave, according to a statistical experimental design. The inert liquid phase used for this investigation was a 78:22 blend of paraffinic and naphthenic mineral oils. A complete thermodynamic analysis was carried out in order to determine the liquid phase concentrations of the dissolved species. A global kinetic model was developed for the rate of dimethyl ether synthesis in terms of the liquid phase concentration of methanol. The activation energy of the reaction was found to be 18,830 cal/gmol. Based on a step-wise linear regression analysis of the kinetic data, the order of the reaction which gave the best fit was 0.28 with respect to methanol.

Gogate, M.R.; Lee, B.G.; Lee, S. (Akron Univ., OH (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Kulik, C.J. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Process to convert biomass and refuse derived fuel to ethers and/or alcohols  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for conversion of a feedstock selected from the group consisting of biomass and refuse derived fuel (RDF) to provide reformulated gasoline components comprising a substantial amount of materials selected from the group consisting of ethers, alcohols, or mixtures thereof, comprising: drying said feedstock; subjecting said dried feedstock to fast pyrolysis using a vortex reactor or other means; catalytically cracking vapors resulting from said pyrolysis using a zeolite catalyst; condensing any aromatic byproduct fraction; catalytically alkylating any benzene present in said vapors after condensation; catalytically oligomerizing any remaining ethylene and propylene to higher olefins; isomerizing said olefins to reactive iso-olefins; and catalytically reacting said iso-olefins with an alcohol to form ethers or with water to form alcohols. 35 figs.

Diebold, J.P.; Scahill, J.W.; Chum, H.L.; Evans, R.J.; Rejai, B.; Bain, R.L.; Overend, R.P.

1996-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

174

Process to convert biomass and refuse derived fuel to ethers and/or alcohols  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for conversion of a feedstock selected from the group consisting of biomass and refuse derived fuel (RDF) to provide reformulated gasoline components comprising a substantial amount of materials selected from the group consisting of ethers, alcohols, or mixtures thereof, comprising: drying said feedstock; subjecting said dried feedstock to fast pyrolysis using a vortex reactor or other means; catalytically cracking vapors resulting from said pyrolysis using a zeolite catalyst; condensing any aromatic byproduct fraction; catalytically alkylating any benzene present in said vapors after condensation; catalytically oligomerizing any remaining ethylene and propylene to higher olefins; isomerizing said olefins to reactive iso-olefins; and catalytically reacting said iso-olefins with an alcohol to form ethers or with water to form alcohols.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Scahill, John W. (Evergreen, CO); Chum, Helena L. (Arvada, CO); Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO); Rejai, Bahman (Lakewood, CO); Bain, Richard L. (Golden, CO); Overend, Ralph P. (Lakewood, CO)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Soluble, Infrared-Absorbing Croconate Dyes from 2,6-Di-tert-butyl-4-methylchalcogenopyrylium Salts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 Although many squarylium dyes have limited solubility in organic solvents or in coated organic films, squarylium dyes 1 (Chart 1) derived from 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylchalcogenopyrylium salts (2)3 are soluble and have been coated in organic thin films for a variety of applications. ... The croconates are readily prepared, are soluble in organic solvents, and have absorption maxima that cover a broad range of laser emission lines from gallium?arsenide diode lasers (?820 nm) to the neodinium-YAG laser (1064 nm). ... The reaction mixture was poured into water (50 mL), and the product was extracted with hexanes (3 × 25 mL). ...

Todd P. Simard; Jian H. Yu; Jennifer M. Zebrowski-Young; Neil F. Haley; Michael R. Detty

2000-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

176

Molecular modeling of the morphology and transport properties of two direct methanol fuel cell membranes: phenylated sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone) versus Nafion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine membrane morphology and the transport of water, methanol and hydronium in phenylated sulfonated poly ether ether ketone ketone (Ph-SPEEKK) and Nafion membranes at 360 K for a range of hydration levels. At comparable hydration levels, the pore diameter is smaller, the sulfonate groups are more closely packed, the hydronium ions are more strongly bound to sulfonate groups, and the diffusion of water and hydronium is slower in Ph-SPEEKK relative to the corresponding properties in Nafion. The aromatic carbon backbone of Ph-SPEEKK is less hydrophobic than the fluorocarbon backbone of Nafion. Water network percolation occurs at a hydration level ({lambda}) of {approx}8 H{sub 2}O/SO{sub 3}{sup -}. At {lambda} = 20, water, methanol and hydronium diffusion coefficients were 1.4 x 10{sup -5}, 0.6 x 10{sup -5} and 0.2 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/s, respectively. The pore network in Ph-SPEEKK evolves dynamically and develops wide pores for {lambda} > 20, which leads to a jump in methanol crossover and ion transport. This study demonstrates the potential of aromatic membranes as low-cost challengers to Nafion for direct methanol fuel cell applications and the need to develop innovative strategies to combat methanol crossover at high hydration levels.

Devanathan, Ramaswami; Idupulapati, Nagesh B.; Dupuis, Michel

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

177

2[prime] and 3[prime] Carboranyl uridines and their diethyl ether adducts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for preparing carboranyl uridine nucleoside compounds and their diethyl ether adducts, which exhibit a tenfold increase in boron content over prior art boron containing nucleoside compounds. The carboranyl uridine nucleoside compounds exhibit enhanced lipophilicity and hydrophilic properties adequate to enable solvation in aqueous media for subsequent incorporation of the compounds in methods for boron neutron capture therapy in mammalian tumor cells. No Drawings

Soloway, A.H.; Barth, R.F.; Anisuzzaman, A.K.; Alam, F.; Tjarks, W.

1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Effect of solvents on the radiation-induced polymerization of ethyl and isopropyl vinyl ethers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of solvents on the radiation-induced cationic polymerization of ethyl and isopropyl vinyl ethers (EVE and IPVE, respectively) was investigated. EVE and IPVE polymerizations were carried out in bulk and in solution under superdry conditions in which polar impurities, especially water, have been reduced to negligible levels. This was accomplished by means of a sodium mirror technique using joint free baked out glass equipment and high vacuum. Plots of the monomer conversions and irradiation times were obtained for EVE and IPVE polymerizations in bulk and in benzene solution at constant monomer concentrations. The monomer concentration dependence of the polymerization rate was studied for EVE polymerization in bulk and in benzene, diethlyl ether, diglyme and methylene chloride, and for IPVE polymerization in bulk and in benzene. Solvent effect on the estimated propagating rate constants was examined for EVE and IPVE polymerization in bulk and in solution. The effect of temperature on the polymerization rate was also investigated for EVE polymerization in bulk ad in benzene, diethyl and diisopropyl ethers, methylene chloride and nitromethane, and for IPVE ploymerization in bulk and in benzene.

Hsieh, W.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Seasonal variation of CH4 emissions from central California  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Seasonal variation of CH4 emissions from central California Seasonal variation of CH4 emissions from central California Title Seasonal variation of CH4 emissions from central California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Jeong, Seongeun, Chuanfeng Zhao, Arlyn E. Andrews, Laura Bianco, James M. Wilczak, and Marc L. Fischer Journal Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres Volume 117 Issue D11 Keywords atmospheric transport, emission inventory, greenhouse gas, inverse model, methane Abstract We estimate seasonal variations in methane (CH4) emissions from central California from December 2007 through November 2008 by comparing CH4 mixing ratios measured at a tall tower with transport model predictions based on a global 1° a priori CH4emissions map (EDGAR32) and a 10 km seasonally varying California-specific map, calibrated to statewide by CH4emission totals. Atmospheric particle trajectories and surface footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecasting and Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport models. Uncertainties due to wind velocity and boundary layer mixing depth are evaluated using measurements from radar wind profilers. CH4signals calculated using the EDGAR32 emission model are larger than those based on the California-specific model and in better agreement with measurements. However, Bayesian inverse analyses using the California-specific and EDGAR32 maps yield comparable annually averaged posterior CH4emissions totaling 1.55 ± 0.24 times and 1.84 ± 0.27 times larger than the California-specific prior emissions, respectively, for a region of central California within approximately 150 km of the tower. If these results are applicable across California, state total CH4 emissions would account for approximately 9% of state total greenhouse gas emissions. Spatial resolution of emissions within the region near the tower reveal seasonality expected from several biogenic sources, but correlations in the posterior errors on emissions from both prior models indicate that the tower footprints do not resolve spatial structure of emissions. This suggests that including additional towers in a measurement network will improve the regional specificity of the posterior estimates.

180

Atmospheric chemistry of trimethoxymethane, (CH{sub 3}O){sub 3}CH: Laboratory studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pulse radiolysis technique was used to measure the UV absorption spectra of (CH{sub 3}O){sub 2}CHOCH{sub 2}({center_dot}) [A] and (CH{sub 3}O){sub 2}CHOCH{sub 2}O{sub 2}({center_dot}) [B] radicals derived from trimethoxymethane over the range 220--320 nm. The self-reaction rate constants for these radicals were k{sub 5} = (3.5 {+-} 0.5) {times} 10{sup {minus}11} and k{sub 6 obs} = (1.3 {+-} 0.2) {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 3}/molecule s. Rate constants for reactions of B radicals with NO and NO{sub 2} were k{sub 7} = (9.0 {+-} 1.2) {times} 10{sup {minus}12} and k{sub 8} = (1.0 {+-} 0.2) {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 3}/molecule s, respectively. Rate constants for the reaction of OH radicals and F atoms with trimethoxymethane and the reaction of A radicals with O{sub 2} were k{sub 1} = (6.0 {+-} 0.5) {times} 10{sup {minus}12}, k{sub 3} = (3.0 {+-} 0.7) {times} 10{sup {minus}10}, and k{sub 2} = (9.2 {+-} 1.5) {times} 10{sup {minus}12} cm{sup 3}/molecule s, respectively. Relative rate techniques were used to measure k(Cl + trimethoxymethane) = (1.5 {+-} 0.2) {times} 10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 3}/molecule s. OH-radical-initiated oxidation of trimethoxymethane in air gives dimethyl carbonate in a molar yield of 81 {+-} 10%. These results are discussed with respect to the atmospheric chemistry of automotive fuel additives.

Platz, J.; Sehested, J.; Nielsen, O.J. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark). Atmospheric Chemistry, Plant Biology and Biogeochemistry Dept.] [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark). Atmospheric Chemistry, Plant Biology and Biogeochemistry Dept.; Wallington, T.J. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)] [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

CO2 + CH4 Chemistry over Pd: Results of Kinetic Simulations Relevant to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-component feed gas consisted of CO2 and CH4 with total pressure of 1 bar. The CO2 ­ CH4 partial pressures reactions in certain situations. Even in the gas-phase for example the reaction between CO2 and CH4 yielding reactor employing CO2 and CH4 as the two-component feed gas. We discuss the pred

Spiteri, Raymond J.

182

JASPERSE CHEM 341 TEST 2 VERSION 1 Ch. 5 The Study of Chemical Reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an alkyl bromide and some nucleophile that you could use to make the following by SN2. (3 points) OCH2CH3 31 JASPERSE CHEM 341 TEST 2 VERSION 1 Ch. 5 The Study of Chemical Reactions Ch. 9 Stereochemistry Ch. 10,11 Alkyl Halides and their Reactions: Nucleophilic Substitution and Elimination 1. Predict

Jasperse, Craig P.

183

JASPERSE CHEM 341 TEST 2 VERSION 2 Ch. 5 The Study of Chemical Reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that you could use to make the following by SN2. (3 points each) O CH3 OCH3H 10. Draw all possible1 JASPERSE CHEM 341 TEST 2 VERSION 2 Ch. 5 The Study of Chemical Reactions Ch. 9 Stereochemistry Ch. 10,11 Alkyl Halides and their Reactions: Nucleophilic Substitution and Elimination 1. Rank

Jasperse, Craig P.

184

CH2 Contorhaus Hansestadt Hamburg | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CH2 Contorhaus Hansestadt Hamburg CH2 Contorhaus Hansestadt Hamburg Jump to: navigation, search Name CH2 Contorhaus Hansestadt Hamburg Place Hamburg, Germany Zip 20457 Sector Solar Product Germany-based firm that sets up closed-end funds for investor-capital market products and projects, including solar. Coordinates 53.553345°, 9.992455° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":53.553345,"lon":9.992455,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

185

Influence of propane on CO2/CH4 and N2/CH4 separations in CHA zeolite membranes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Two types of CHA zeolite membranes (SAPO-34, SSZ-13) were used for CO2/CH4, N2/CH4, and CO2/i-butane separations at both low (270 and 350 kPa) and high (1.73 MPa) pressures. The SSZ-13 membranes were more selective, with CO2/CH4 separation selectivities as high as 280 and N2/CH4 separation selectivities of 12 at 270 kPa feed pressure. For both types of membranes, selectivities and permeances decreased as the feed pressure increased. The CO2/i-butane separation selectivities were greater than 500,000 for SAPO-34 membranes, indicating extremely low densities of defects because i-butane is too large to enter the CHA pores. The CO2/i-butane selectivities were smaller for SSZ-13 membranes (2,800–20,000), in part because the SSZ-13 layer was on the outside of the porous mullite tubes and sealing the membrane on the zeolite surface was more difficult than for the SAPO-34 membranes that were grown on the inside of glazed alumina tubes. Propane, in feed concentrations from 1 to 9%, significantly influenced separations by decreasing permeances in most cases. The effect was larger for N2/CH4 than for CO2/CH4 mixtures, apparently because the more strongly-adsorbing CO2 competes better than N2 with propane for adsorption sites. Although propane caused permeances to decrease significantly over time, selectivities decreased much less. Propane decreased permeances more for SAPO-34 membranes than for SSZ-13 membranes at 350 kPa, and at high pressure propane even increased CO2 permeances and decreased CH4 permeances in SSZ-13 membranes, thus significantly increasing CO2/CH4 selectivities. Propane permeances reached steady state relatively quickly because its permeation was mostly through defects, but CO2, N2, and CH4 permeances did not stabilize in the presence of propane, even after seven days. The effects of propane were reversible when it was removed from the feed and the membranes were heated.

Ting Wu; Merritt C. Diaz; Yihong Zheng; Rongfei Zhou; Hans H. Funke; John L. Falconer; Richard D. Noble

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

A laser and molecular beam mass spectrometer study of low-pressure dimethyl ether flames  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The oxidation of dimethyl ether (DME) is studied in low-pressure flames using new molecular beam mass spectrometer and laser diagnostics. Two 30.0-Torr, premixed DME/oxygen/argon flames are investigated with stoichiometries of 0.98 and 1.20. The height above burner profiles of nine stable species and two radicals are measured. These results are compared to the detailed chemical reaction mechanism of Curran and coworkers. Generally good agreement is found between the model and data. The largest discrepancies are found for the methyl radical profiles where the model predicts qualitatively different trends in the methyl concentration with stoichiometry than observed in the experiment.

Andrew McIlroy; Toby D. Hain; Hope A. Michelsen; Terrill A. Cool

2000-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

People's Physics Book Ch 20-1 The Big Ideas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(whether standing still or moving at a fast speed) is WRONG. In fact, the rate at which time passes dependsPeople's Physics Book Ch 20-1 The Big Ideas Einstein believed that the laws of physics do of physics. In other words, if you are on a moving train and drop a ball or if you are standing on a farm

California at Santa Cruz, University of

188

People's Physics Book Ch13-1 The Big Ideas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrical energy into heat and light or an electric motor that converts electric energy into mechanicalPeople's Physics Book Ch13-1 The Big Ideas: The name electric current is given to the phenomenon that occurs when an electric field moves down a wire at close to the speed of light. Voltage is the electrical

California at Santa Cruz, University of

189

AT 351 Lab 3: Seasons and Surface Temperature (Ch. 3)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an important role in an area's local vertical temperature distribution. Below, Figure 1 shows the verticalAT 351 Lab 3: Seasons and Surface Temperature (Ch. 3) Question #1: Seasons (20 pts) A. In your own words, describe the cause of the seasons. B. In the Northern Hemisphere we are closer to the sun during

Rutledge, Steven

190

Lecture Ch. 5a Surface tension (Kelvin effect)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Lecture Ch. 5a · Surface tension (Kelvin effect) ­ Hygroscopic growth (subsaturated humidity Surface Tension · By definition · By 1st Law (modified for surface area change) Kelvin Effect · Force: What happens to condensed H2O? ­ Precipitation processes Surface Thermodynamics · Surfaces require

Russell, Lynn

191

Lecture Ch. 5a Surface tension (Kelvin effect)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Lecture Ch. 5a · Surface tension (Kelvin effect) ­ Hygroscopic growth (subsaturated humidity: · Expansion against pressure difference Surface Tension · By definition · By 1st Law (modified for surface) ­ Saturation · Chemical potential (Raoult effect) · Nucleation ­ Competition between surface and chemical

Russell, Lynn

192

SRP essentials Werner Almesberger !Werner.Almesberger@epfl.ch? 1 ,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SRP essentials Werner Almesberger !Werner.Almesberger@epfl.ch? 1 , Tiziana Ferrari !Tiziana of the design of SRP, a highly scalable resource reservation protocol for Internet traffic. 1 About this paper This paper is a short introduction to the ``Scalable Reservation Protocol'' (SRP). It aims to provide

Almesberger, Werner

193

Molecular Dynamics of Methanol Monocation (CH3OH+ ) in Strong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ultrafast hydrogen migration.7,8 The 38 fs 800 nm pump pulse produced methanol monocation, and a probe pulseMolecular Dynamics of Methanol Monocation (CH3OH+ ) in Strong Laser Fields Bishnu Thapa and H surfaces of methanol neutral, monocation, and singlet and triplet dication were explored using the CBS

Schlegel, H. Bernhard

194

Cloud Computing Ch Zh XCheng-Zhong Xu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Cloud Computing ECE7650 Ch Zh XCheng-Zhong Xu Outline What is cloud computing CharacteristicsCharacteristics (word processing and spreadsheets) Google video for business Google sites (intranet sites and wikis) "It/2010 Autonomic Cloud Management 6 #12;4 Essential Characteristics C. Xu @ Wayne State Cloud Computing 7 Essential

Xu, Cheng-Zhong

195

Lecture Ch. 2a Energy and heat capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Lecture Ch. 2a · Energy and heat capacity ­ State functions or exact differentials ­ Internal energy vs. enthalpy · 1st Law of thermodynamics ­ Relate heat, work, energy · Heat/work cycles (and path integrals) ­ Energy vs. heat/work? ­ Adiabatic processes ­ Reversible P-V work ! define entropy Curry

Russell, Lynn

196

Lecture Ch. 2a Energy and heat capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Lecture Ch. 2a · Energy and heat capacity ­ State functions or exact differentials ­ Internal energy vs. enthalpy · 1st Law of thermodynamics ­ Relate heat, work, energy · Heat/work cycles (and path integrals) ­ Energy vs. heat/work? ­ Adiabatic processes ­ Reversible "P-V" work define entropy Curry

Russell, Lynn

197

Ch 20. Magnetism Liu UCD Phy1B 2012 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ch 20. Magnetism Liu UCD Phy1B 2012 1 #12;I. MagnetI. Magnet Poles of a magnet: magnetic effect is strongest When the magnet is freely suspended North pole: pointing to north South pole: pointing to south Poles always come in pairs Liu UCD Phy1B 2012 2 #12;Magnetic MaterialsMagnetic Materials Magnetite Fe3O4

Yoo, S. J. Ben

198

High octane ethers from synthesis gas-derived alcohols. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results shown in Figures 10 and 11 demonstrate that the formation of butenes was very sensitive to the alcohol partial pressure. A small elevation of the alcohol pressure suppressed the formation of butenes rather drastically at both 90 and 117{degree}C. The synthesis rates of DME, MIBE, and MTBE ethers were not significantly affected at 90{degree}C, although there was a trend to increase the space time yield of DME as the alcohol pressure was increased. At the reaction temperature of 117{degree}C, all of the ethers showed increasing productivities as the pressure of the reactants was increased (Figure 11). An isotope labelling experiment was carried out to provide mechanistic insight into the manner in which methanol and isobutanol react together to form DME, MIBE, and MTBE ethers and to determine if MTBE were derived from MIBE.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Menszak, J.; Johansson, M.A.; Feeley, O.C.; Kim, D.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM DUAL BS CHE/CH DEGREE Revised 2-21-12 CSB CH 101 (4) Spring -FRESH Fall -SOPH Spring -SOPH Fall -JR Spring -JR Fall -SR Spring -SR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM DUAL BS CHE/CH DEGREE Revised 2-21-12 CSB CH 101 (4) Spring - FRESH Fall - SOPH Spring - SOPH Fall - JR Spring - JR Fall - SR Spring - SR (CH 117) (CH 118) CH 16 15 COURSE OFFERING Summer Only Fall Only Spring Only OPTIONAL COURSES GES 100 (1) MA 112 (3) MA

Carver, Jeffrey C.

200

Commercial-scale demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process. Peroxide formation of dimethyl ether in methanol mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic peroxides could form when dimethyl ether in methanol is stored for three to six months at a time. The objective of this work was to determine the level of peroxide formation from dimethyl ether in reagent grade methanol and raw methanol at room temperature under 3 atmospheres (45 psig) of air. Raw methanol is methanol made from syngas by the LPMEOH Process without distillation. Aliphatic ethers tend to react slowly with oxygen from the air to form unstable peroxides. However, there are no reports on peroxide formation from dimethyl ether. After 172 days of testing, dimethyl ether in either reagent methanol or raw methanol at room temperature and under 60--70 psig pressure of air does not form detectable peroxides. Lack of detectable peroxides suggests that dimethyl ether or dimethyl ether and methanol may be stored at ambient conditions. Since the compositions of {approximately} 1.3 mol% or {approximately} 4.5 mol% dimethyl ether in methanol do not form peroxides, these compositions can be considered for diesel fuel or an atmospheric turbine fuel, respectively.

Waller, F.J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Flash photolysis resonance fluorescence investigation of the gas-phase reactions of hydroxyl radicals with cyclic ethers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Absolute rate constants were measured for the gas-phase reactions of hydroxyl radicals with a series of dioxanes and other cyclic ethers by using the flash photolysis resonance fluorescence technique. Kinetic data for 1,3-dioxane and 1,4-dioxane, reactions 1 and 2, over the temperature range 240-440 K were used to derive the Arrhenius expressions. These results are compared to our earlier measurements for aliphatic ethers and are discussed in terms of reaction mechanisms and the prediction of reaction rates for such compounds from group reactivity values.

Dagaut, P.; Liu, R.; Wallington, T.J.; Kurylo, M.J. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

1990-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

202

Calixarene crown ether solvent composition and use thereof for extraction of cesium from alkaline waste solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solvent composition and corresponding method for extracting cesium (Cs) from aqueous neutral and alkaline solutions containing Cs and perhaps other competing metal ions is described. The method entails contacting an aqueous Cs-containing solution with a solvent consisting of a specific class of lipophilic calix[4]arene-crown ether extractants dissolved in a hydrocarbon-based diluent containing a specific class of alkyl-aromatic ether alcohols as modifiers. The cesium values are subsequently recovered from the extractant, and the solvent subsequently recycled, by contacting the Cs-containing organic solution with an aqueous stripping solution. This combined extraction and stripping method is especially useful as a process for removal of the radionuclide cesium-137 from highly alkaline waste solutions which are also very concentrated in sodium and potassium. No pre-treatment of the waste solution is necessary, and the cesium can be recovered using a safe and inexpensive stripping process using water, dilute (millimolar) acid solutions, or dilute (millimolar) salt solutions. An important application for this invention would be treatment of alkaline nuclear tank wastes. Alternatively, the invention could be applied to decontamination of acidic reprocessing wastes containing cesium-137.

Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN); Presley, Derek J. (Ooltewah, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

3-06 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2003-06 August 29, 2003 Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Quality Assurance Issues at the...

204

Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - April 24...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Inc. - April 24, 2001 Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - April 24, 2001 April 24, 2001 Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Nuclear Safety...

205

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Inc - EA-2005-01 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - EA-2005-01 March 10, 2005 Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Radiological and...

206

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL B&W West...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

CH2M HILL B&W West Valley LLC, West Valley Demonstration Project - October 2013 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL B&W West Valley LLC, West Valley Demonstration...

207

Enforcement Letter, CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC - SEL-2012-01 | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge, LLC - SEL-2012-01 Enforcement Letter, CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC - SEL-2012-01 May 4, 2012 Issued to URS CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC, related to a Security Incident involving the...

208

Independent Oversight Review, URS CH2M Oak Ridge - June 2013...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

URS CH2M Oak Ridge - June 2013 Independent Oversight Review, URS CH2M Oak Ridge - June 2013 June 2013 Review of Oak Ridge Environmental Management Radiological Controls Activity...

209

Characterisation of CH3X fluxes from Scottish and high latitude wetlands   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methyl bromide (CH3Br) and methyl chloride (CH3Cl) are two halocarbons that are unique in that they play a significant role in stratospheric ozone destruction, and are mainly produced by natural systems. The current ...

Hardacre, Catherine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc.- EA-2006-06  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Radiological Contamination Events at the Hanford Site Tank Farms

211

DE-AC02-09CH11466  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2-09CH11466 2-09CH11466 copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letter or telegram which includes a reference to the solicitation and amendment numbers. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TO BE RECEIVED AT THE PLACE DESIGNATED FOR THE RECEIPT OF OFFERS PRIOR TO THE HOUR AND DATE SPECIFIED MAY RESULT IN REJECTION OF YOUR OFFER. If by virtue of this amendment you desire to change an offer already submitted, such change may be made by telegram or letter, provided each telegram or letter makes reference to the solicitation and this amendment, and is received prior to the opening hour and date specified. Word Modification PRINCETON NJ 085442020 002484665 TRUSTEES OF PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, THE

212

Title: Decomposition of ethanol and dimethyl-ether during CVD synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ethanol and dimethyl-ether during CVD synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes Author list: Bo Hou (single-walled carbon nanotubes) was investigated. Gas-phase thermal decomposition of ethanol and DME ethanol and DME decomposition, confirming expected reaction trends and primary byproducts. Peak

Maruyama, Shigeo

213

S'eparation des convexes J.Ch. Gilbert, Inria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S'eparation des convexes J.Ch. Gilbert, Inria Th'eor`eme de Hahn­Banach (forme analytique) ffl Soit. ffl Th'eor`eme de Hahn­Banach (forme analytique). Si \\Delta E est un espace vectoriel (non n toujours un f tel que l'on ait 'egalit'e. 1 #12; Th'eor`emes de Hahn­Banach (formes g'eom'etriques) ffl

214

Polarized Infrared Absorption Spectrum of Matrix-Isolated Methylperoxyl Radicals, CH3OO X~ 2A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: October 1, 2001 We have used a tandem pair of supersonic nozzles to produce clean samples of CH3OO matrix. The CH3/O2/20 K argon radical sandwich acts to produce target methylperoxyl radicals: CH3 + O2 f that nucleate all clouds and ice particles.7 In a qualitative manner, an organic aerosol is oxidatively

Ellison, Barney

215

MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE TERRESTRIAL BIOSPHERE;2 #12;MODELING THE EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE (N 20) AND METHANE (CH 4) FROM THE TERRESTRIAL BIOSPHERE cli- mate has on natural emissions of N2 0 and CH4 from the terrestrial biosphere to the atmosphere

216

Interactions between wetlands CH4 emissions and climate at global scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions? Observations Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4 ]atmo Feedback Conclusion #12;[CO2 ]atmo e.g.: Climate (T) CO2 anthropogenic emissions wetlands CH4 emissions Under future climate change, Shindell et al. (2004) => +78% under climate change generated by 2xCO2 Introduction Tool Wetlands emissions [CH4

Canet, Léonie

217

JASPERSE CHEM 341 TEST 2 VERSION 3 Ch. 5 The Study of Chemical Reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

toward SN2 reactions (from most reactive 1 to least reactive 4). Br Br Br I 4. Rank the bond strength1 JASPERSE CHEM 341 TEST 2 VERSION 3 Ch. 5 The Study of Chemical Reactions Ch. 9 Stereochemistry Ch. 10,11 Alkyl Halides and their Reactions: Nucleophilic Substitution and Elimination 1. List

Jasperse, Craig P.

218

JASPERSE CHEM 350 TEST 2 VERSION 3 Ch. 4 The Study of Chemical Reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

toward SN2 reactions (from most reactive 1 to least reactive 4). Br Br Br I 4. Rank the bond strengthJASPERSE CHEM 350 TEST 2 VERSION 3 Ch. 4 The Study of Chemical Reactions Ch. 5 Sterochemistry Ch. 6 the following alkyl halides in order of decreasing reactivity toward SN1/E1 reactions (from most reactive 1

Jasperse, Craig P.

219

JASPERSE CHEM 350 TEST 2 VERSION 2 Ch. 4 The Study of Chemical Reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;9. Show an alkyl bromide and some nucleophile that you could use to make the following by SN2. (3 pointsJASPERSE CHEM 350 TEST 2 VERSION 2 Ch. 4 The Study of Chemical Reactions Ch. 5 Sterochemistry Ch. 6 that is needed in each case) for each of the following reactions. (Minor products or inorganic side products need

Jasperse, Craig P.

220

Near-infrared electronic spectrum of CH2 Jennifer L. Gottfried and Takeshi Okaa)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Near-infrared electronic spectrum of CH2 ¿ Jennifer L. Gottfried and Takeshi Okaa) Department B1( u)X~ 2 A1 electronic transition of CH2 have been observed in the near infrared from 11 000. In this paper, we report the first observation of an elec- tronic transition of CH2 in the near infrared at 0

Oka, Takeshi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

CH 301 8-9:30am TTh Spring 2012 Instructor D. Walker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CH 301 8-9:30am TTh Spring 2012 Instructor D. Walker Syllabus: CH301 Principles of Chemistry I, engineering, chemistry, biochem, textiles, and many other areas. Chemistry is considered the central science Other times by appointment--please schedule in advance via email #12;CH 301 8-9:30am TTh Spring 2012

222

Environmental actions of agrochemicals 2. Histological effects of the herbicide/insecticide dinoseb-acetate (2-sec-butyl-4,6-dinitrophenyl acetate) on the spider miteTetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae) reared on herbicidetreatedPhaseolus vulgaris  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The pure herbicidal compound dinoseb-acetate (2-sec-butyl-4,6-dinitrophenyl acetate) and its commercial formulation Aretit® were tested for their effects on the spider miteTetranychus urticae L. (Acari, Tetranych...

Ursula Mothes-Wagner; Harald K. Reitze…

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Densities and isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria of butyl esters (methanoate to butanoate) with ethanol at 101.32 kPa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vapor-liquid equilibrium and densities at 101.32 kPa have been determined for the binary systems formed by four butyl esters (from methanoate to butanoate) with ethanol. The four systems exhibit positive deviations from ideal behavior, and all data (p-T-x-y) were found to be thermodynamically consistent. The activity coefficients and the dimensionless function G{sup E}/RT of the solution were correlated with its concentration by different equations. Am azeotrope was found in the mixture butyl methanoate (1) + ethanol (2) at T = 350.9 K and x{sub 1} = y{sub 1} = 0.088. The group contribution models ASOG and modified UNIFAC gave fair predictions.

Gonzalez, E.; Ortega, J. [Univ. of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Direct hydro-liquefaction of sawdust in petroleum ether and comprehensive bio-oil products analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effect of temperature, time, hydrogen pressure and amount of catalyst on production distribution and the bio-oil yield obtained from the direct liquefaction of sawdust in the petroleum ether (60–90 °C) are investigated. The highest sawdust conversion obtained was 72.32% with a bio-oil yield of 47.69% were obtained at 370 °C, 40 min and 5wt.% catalyst content with the initial H2 pressure of 3.0 MPa. Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) approach was utilized to analyze the non-volatile fraction. In this study, the composition of bio-oil could be analyzed in an unprecedented detail through a combination of GC–MS and FT-ICR MS techniques.

Dong Liu; Linhua Song; Pingping Wu; Yan Liu; Qingyin Li; Zifeng Yan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Process for the production of ethylidene diacetate from dimethyl ether using a heterogeneous catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a process for producing ethylidene diacetate by the reaction of dimethyl ether, acetic acid, hydrogen and carbon monoxide at elevated temperatures and pressures in the presence of an alkyl halide and a heterogeneous, bifunctional catalyst that is stable to hydrogenation and comprises an insoluble polymer having pendant quaternized heteroatoms, some of which heteroatoms are ionically bonded to anionic Group VIII metal complexes, the remainder of the heteroatoms being bonded to iodide. In contrast to prior art processes, no accelerator (promoter) is necessary to achieve the catalytic reaction and the products are easily separated from the catalyst by filtration. The catalyst can be recycled for 3 consecutive runs without loss in activity.

Ramprasad, D.; Waller, F.J.

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

226

Use of aluminum phosphate as the dehydration catalyst in single step dimethyl ether process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention pertains to a process for the coproduction of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) directly from a synthesis gas in a single step (hereafter, the "single step DME process"). In this process, the synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon oxides is contacted with a dual catalyst system comprising a physical mixture of a methanol synthesis catalyst and a methanol dehydration catalyst. The present invention is an improvement to this process for providing an active and stable catalyst system. The improvement comprises the use of an aluminum phosphate based catalyst as the methanol dehydration catalyst. Due to its moderate acidity, such a catalyst avoids the coke formation and catalyst interaction problems associated with the conventional dual catalyst systems taught for the single step DME process.

Peng, Xiang-Dong (Allentown, PA); Parris, Gene E. (Coopersburg, PA); Toseland, Bernard A. (Allentown, PA); Battavio, Paula J. (Allentown, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Process for the production of ethylidene diacetate from dimethyl ether using a heterogeneous catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a process for producing ethylidene diacetate by the reaction of dimethyl ether, acetic acid, hydrogen and carbon monoxide at elevated temperatures and pressures in the presence of an alkyl halide and a heterogeneous, bifunctional catalyst that is stable to hydrogenation and comprises an insoluble polymer having pendant quaternized heteroatoms, some of which heteroatoms are ionically bonded to anionic Group VIII metal complexes, the remainder of the heteroatoms being bonded to iodide. In contrast to prior art processes, no accelerator (promoter) is necessary to achieve the catalytic reaction and the products are easily separated from the catalyst by filtration. The catalyst can be recycled for 3 consecutive runs without loss in activity.

Ramprasad, Dorai (Allentown, PA); Waller, Francis Joseph (Allentown, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Using Heteropolyacids in the Anode Catalyst Layer of Dimethyl Ether PEM Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, polarization experiments were performed on a direct dimethyl ether fuel cell (DMEFC). The experimental setup allowed for independent control of water and DME flow rates. Thus the DME flow rate, backpressure, and water flow rate were optimized. Three heteropoly acids, phosphomolybdic acid (PMA), phosphotungstic acid (PTA), and silicotungstic acid (STA) were incorporated into the anode catalyst layer in combination with Pt/C. Both PTA-Pt and STA-Pt showed higher performance than the Pt control at 30 psig of backpressure. Anodic polarizations were also performed, and Tafel slopes were extracted from the data. The trends in the Tafel slope values are in agreement with the polarization data. The addition of phosphotungstic acid more than doubled the power density of the fuel cell, compared to the Pt control.

Ferrell III, J. R.; Turner, J. A.; Herring, A. M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Ab initio molecular orbital study on the gas phase SN2 reaction F? + \\{CH3Cl\\} ? CH3F + Cl?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ab-initio molecular orbital (MO) and direct ab initio dynamics calculations have been applied to the gas phase SN2 reaction F? + \\{CH3Cl\\} ? CH3F + Cl?. Several basis sets were examined in order to select the most convenient and best fitted basis set to that of high-quality calculations. The Hartree–Fock (HF) 3?21+G(d) calculation reasonably represents a potential energy surface calculated at the MP2/6?311++G(2df,2pd) level. A direct ab initio dynamics calculation at the HF/3?21+G(d) level was carried out for the SN2 reaction. A full dimensional ab initio potential energy surface including all degrees of freedom was used in the dynamics calculation. Total energies and gradients were calculated at each time step. Two initial configurations at time zero were examined in the direct dynamics calculations: one is a near collinear collision, and the other is a side-attack collision. It was found that in the near collinear collision almost all total available energy is partitioned into two modes: the relative translational mode between the products (?40%) and the C ? F stretching mode (?60%). The other internal modes of CH3F were still in the ground state. The lifetimes of the early- and late-complexes F? … \\{CH3Cl\\} and FCH3 … Cl? are significantly short enough to dissociate directly to the products. On the other hand, in the side-attack collision, the relative translation energy was about 20% of total available energy.

Manabu Igarashi; Hiroto Tachikawa

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Use of ferric sulfate: acid media for the desulfurization of model compounds of coal. [Dibenzothiophene, diphenyl sulfide, di-n-butyl sulfide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work has been to investigate the ability of ferric sulfate-acid leach systems to oxidize the sulfur in model compounds of coal. Ferric iron-acid leach systems have been shown to be quite effective at removal of inorganic sulfur in coal. In this study, the oxidative effect of ferric iron in acid-leach systems was studied using dibenzothiophene, diphenyl sulfide, and di-n-butyl sulfide as models of organic sulfur groups in coal. Nitrogen and oxygen, as well as various transition metal catalysts and oxidants, were utilized in this investigation. Dibenzothiophene was found to be quite refractory to oxidation, except in the case where metavanadate was added, where it appears that 40% oxidation to sulfone could have occurred per hour at 150/sup 0/C and mild oxygen pressure. Diphenyl sulfide was selectively oxidized to sulfoxide and sulfone in an iron and oxygen system. Approximately 15% conversion to sulfone occurred per hour under these conditions. Some of the di-n-butyl sulfide was cracked to 1-butene and 1-butanethiol under similar conditions. Zinc chloride and ferric iron were used at 200/sup 0/C in an attempt to desulfonate dibenzothiophene sulfone, diphenyl sulfone, and di-n-butyl sulfone. Di-n-butyl sulfone was completely desulfurized on one hour and fragmented to oxidized parafins, while dibenzothiophene sulfone and diphenyl sulfone were unaffected. These results suggest that an iron-acid leach process could only selectively oxidize aryl sulfides under mild conditions, representing only 20% of the organic sulfur in coal (8% of the total sulfur). Removal through desulfonation once selective sulfur oxidation had occurred was only demonstrated for alkyl sulfones, with severe oxidation of the fragmented paraffins also occurring in one hour.

Clary, L.R.; Vermeulen, T.; Lynn, S.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Identification of volatile butyl rubber thermal-oxidative degradation products by cryofocusing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical structure and physical properties of materials, such as polymers, can be altered as aging progresses, which may result in a material that is ineffective for its envisioned intent. Butyl rubber formulations, starting material, and additives were aged under thermal-oxidative conditions for up to 413 total days at up to 124 %C2%B0C. Samples included: two formulations developed at Kansas City Plant (KCP) (%236 and %2310), one commercially available formulation (%2321), Laxness bromobutyl 2030 starting material, and two additives (polyethylene AC-617 and Vanax MBM). The low-molecular weight volatile thermal-oxidative degradation products that collected in the headspace over the samples were preconcentrated, separated, and detected using cryofocusing gas chromatography mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS). The majority of identified degradation species were alkanes, alkenes, alcohols, ketones, and aldehydes. Observations for Butyl %2310 aged in an oxygen-18 enriched atmosphere (18O2) were used to verify when the source of oxygen in the applicable degradation products was from the gaseous environment rather than the polymeric mixture. For comparison purposes, Butyl %2310 was also aged under non-oxidative thermal conditions using an argon atmosphere.

Smith, Jonell Nicole; White, Michael Irvin; Bernstein, Robert; Hochrein, James Michael

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Vibronic spectroscopy of unsaturated transition metal complexes: CrC2H, CrCH3 , and NiCH3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to characterize diatomic transition metal oxides, nitrides, and carbides.8­22 In addition to these pure metallicVibronic spectroscopy of unsaturated transition metal complexes: CrC2H, CrCH3 , and NiCH3 Dale J investigation of small transition metal clusters and organo- metallic radicals is that these species serve

Morse, Michael D.

233

Sulfobutyl Ether b-Cyclodextrin (SBE-b-CD) in Eyedrops Improves the Tolerability of a Topically Applied Pilocarpine Prodrug in Rabbits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of a novel, modified ?-cyclodextrin (SBE4-?-CD; a variably substituted sulfobutyl ether with an average degree of substitution of four) on eye irritation and miotic response of an ophthalmically applied pilocarpine ...

Stella, Valentino J.; Jä rvinen, Tomi; Jä rvinen, Kristina; Thompson, Diame; Urtti, Arto

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Julia Fink, CRAFT +41 (0) 21 693 20 61 EPFL, Station 20 julia.fink@epfl.ch NCCR robotics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Julia Fink, CRAFT +41 (0) 21 693 20 61 EPFL, Station 20 julia.fink@epfl.ch NCCR robotics CH-1015 Lausanne http://craft.epfl.ch www.nccr-robotics.ch Contact References Kahn Jr., P.H., Friedman, B., Perez-Granados, D.R., Freier, N.G.: Robotic Pets in the Lives of Preschool Children. Proceedings CHI EA `04, 1449

Dalang, Robert C.

235

Test Plan: WIPP bin-scale CH TRU waste tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program described herein will provide relevant composition and kinetic rate data on gas generation and consumption resulting from TRU waste degradation, as impacted by synergistic interactions due to multiple degradation modes, waste form preparation, long-term repository environmental effects, engineered barrier materials, and, possibly, engineered modifications to be developed. Similar data on waste-brine leachate compositions and potentially hazardous volatile organic compounds released by the wastes will also be provided. The quantitative data output from these tests and associated technical expertise are required by the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) program studies, and for the scientific benefit of the overall WIPP project. This Test Plan describes the necessary scientific and technical aspects, justifications, and rational for successfully initiating and conducting the WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program. This Test Plan is the controlling scientific design definition and overall requirements document for this WIPP in situ test, as defined by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), scientific advisor to the US Department of Energy, WIPP Project Office (DOE/WPO). 55 refs., 16 figs., 19 tabs.

Molecke, M.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office And CH2M HILL Plateau  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CH2M HILL CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Partnering Charter For Partnering Performance Agreement U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office And CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Partnering Charter For Partnering Performance Agreement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) are committed to continuous improvement and will utilize principles of the DOE Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Partnering Policy to enhance teaming to further execute the Plateau Remediation Contract. U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office And CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Partnering Charter For Partnering Performance Agreement More Documents & Publications CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company

237

Department of Justice: CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc. Admits Criminal  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Department of Justice: CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc. Admits Criminal Department of Justice: CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc. Admits Criminal Conduct, Parent Company Agrees to Cooperate in Ongoing Investigation and Pay $18.5 Million to Resolve Civil and Criminal Allegations Department of Justice: CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc. Admits Criminal Conduct, Parent Company Agrees to Cooperate in Ongoing Investigation and Pay $18.5 Million to Resolve Civil and Criminal Allegations March 7, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Justice Department, in conjunction with the U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of Washington, announced today that Colorado-based CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc. (CHG) and its parent company, CH2M Hill Companies Ltd. (CH2M Hill) have agreed that CHG committed federal criminal violations, defrauding the public by engaging in years of widespread time

238

DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its Hanford Site DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its Hanford Site June 19, 2008 - 1:29pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company has been selected as the plateau remediation contractor for DOE's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The contract is a cost-plus award-fee contract valued at approximately $4.5 billion over ten years (a five-year base period with the option to extend it for another five years). CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company is a limited liability company formed by CH2M Hill Constructors, Inc. The team also includes AREVA Federal

239

Structure of Neutral Nanosized Clusters Produced by Coexpansion of CF4 and CH4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

experimentTn (K)p0 (bar)bCF4CH4CF4CH4CF4CH4ACH4/ACF4e ... Carbon 1s photoelectron spectroscopy of CF4 and CO: Search for chemical effects on the carbon 1s hole-state lifetime ... C 1s photoelectron spectra for CF4 and CO were measured at several photon energies near the C 1s threshold. ...

M. Winkler; J. Harnes; K. J. Børve

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

240

Contract No.: DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J Appendix I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contract No.: DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J ­ Appendix I M160 J-I-1 ATTACHMENT J.9 APPENDIX I DOE DIRECTIVES / LIST B Applicable to the Operation of PPPL Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 #12;Modification 0160 Contract No.: DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J ­ Appendix I J-I-2 DOE Directive Date Title ES&H O 150.1A 03

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Contract No.: DE-AC02-09CH11466 ATTACHMENT J.4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contract No.: DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J Appendix D J-D-1 ATTACHMENT J.4 APPENDIX D BUDGET PROGRAM Applicable to the Operation of PPPL Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 #12;Contract No.: DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J Appendix D J-D-2 BUDGET PROGRAM This Appendix implements the clause of this contract entitled

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

242

Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J Appendix G  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J ­ Appendix G M135 J-G-1 ATTACHMENT J.7 APPENDIX G PURCHASING SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS Applicable to the Operation of PPPL Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 #12;Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J ­ Appendix G M135 J-G-2 Appendix G Purchasing System Requirements

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

243

Nitrogen Directed C-H Activation and Functionalization Stoltz Literature Group Meeting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-H Functionalization Chelation Assistance II. C-H/Olefin coupling III. C-H Carbonylation IV. Ru/Rh C-H Arylation V. Pd hydrocarbons, such as those found in gas and oil C HH HH H H H H H H C-H bond strengths . 105 kcal/mol 110 kcal)3 O Si(OEt)3 Murai, Nature. 1993, 366, 529. 93% Success of these reactions is attributed to chelation

Stoltz, Brian M.

244

Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Mound, Inc - December 22, 2004...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Inc - December 22, 2004 December 22, 2004 Issued to CH2M Hill Mound, Inc. related to a Radioactive Contamination Event during Remediation Activities at the Miamisburg Closure...

245

Stoichiometry of CH4 and CO2 flux in a California Rice Paddy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of carbon sequestration by long-term eddyemission versus carbon sequestration, Tellus, Ser. B,which to estimate carbon sequestration from F CH4 data since

McMillan, Andrew M. S.; Goulden, Michael L.; Tyler, Stanley C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Consent Order, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC- WCO-2011-01  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Issued to CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC related to a Hoisting Incident that occurred at the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project at the Idaho National Laboratory

247

Consent Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc.- EA-2000-09  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Quality Problems at the Hanford Site Tank Farms, (EA-2000-09)

248

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc.- NEA-2008-02  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to a Radioactive Waste Spill at the Hanford Site Tank Farms

249

ChIP-seq Identification of Weakly Conserved Heart Enhancers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate control of tissue-specific gene expression plays a pivotal role in heart development, but few cardiac transcriptional enhancers have thus far been identified. Extreme non-coding sequence conservation successfully predicts enhancers active in many tissues, but fails to identify substantial numbers of heart enhancers. Here we used ChIP-seq with the enhancer-associated protein p300 from mouse embryonic day 11.5 heart tissue to identify over three thousand candidate heart enhancers genome-wide. Compared to other tissues studied at this time-point, most candidate heart enhancers are less deeply conserved in vertebrate evolution. Nevertheless, the testing of 130 candidate regions in a transgenic mouse assay revealed that most of them reproducibly function as enhancers active in the heart, irrespective of their degree of evolutionary constraint. These results provide evidence for a large population of poorly conserved heart enhancers and suggest that the evolutionary constraint of embryonic enhancers can vary depending on tissue type.

Blow, Matthew J.; McCulley, David J.; Li, Zirong; Zhang, Tao; Akiyama, Jennifer A.; Holt, Amy; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Shoukry, Malak; Wright, Crystal; Chen, Feng; Afzal, Veena; Bristow, James; Ren, Bing; Black, Brian L.; Rubin, Edward M.; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Solvent Extraction Behavior of Neptunium (IV) Ions between Nitric Acid and Diluted 30% Tri-butyl Phosphate in the Presence of Simple Hydroxamic Acids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Formo- and aceto-hydroxamic acids are very effective reagents for stripping tetravalent actinide ions such as Np(IV) and Pu(IV) ions from a tri-butyl phosphate phase into nitric acid. Distribution data for Np(IV) in the presence of these hydroxamate ions have now been accumulated and trends established. Stability constants for aceto-hydroxamate complexes of Np(IV) and Np(V) ions have also been determined in a perchlorate medium, and these reaffirm the affinity of hydroxamate ligands for actinide (IV) ions over actinyl (V,VI) ions.

Taylor, Robin J.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Choppin, Gregory R.; May, Iain

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

An evaluation of the 3M Organic Vapor Monitor #3500 as a short term exposure limit sampling device for acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, and methyl iso butyl ketone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. An exploded view of the monitor is illustrated in Figure 1. The theory of diffusive sampling considers a concentration gra- dient between the ambient air and the adsorbent to be the driving force for sampling. For the adsorption to be controlled by diffu...AN EVALUATION OF THE 3M ORGANIC VAPOR MONITOR 43500 AS A SHOR'I TERM EXPOSURE LIMIT SAMPLING DEVICE FOR ACETONE, METHYL ETHYL KETONE, AND METHYL ISO BUTYL KETONE A Thesis by LLOYD B. ANDREW III Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM...

Andrew, Lloyd B.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

252

A New Flow Control Technique Using Diluted Epinephrine in the N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate Embolization of Visceral Artery Pseudoaneurysms Secondary to Chronic Pancreatitis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (NBCA) has been used as an effective liquid embolization material, its indication for pseudoaneurysms has seemingly been limited because of the technical difficulties of using NBCA, such as reflux to the parent artery and causing significant infarction. Thus, considerable skill in using NBCA or a device to control blood flow during its polymerization is required to achieve embolization without severe complications. We report our new technique for controlling blood flow using diluted epinephrine in transcatheter arterial NBCA embolization of five pseudoaneurysms in four cases secondary to hemosuccus pancreaticus.

Morishita, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hmorif@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp [Japan Red Cross Kyoto Daiichi Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Yamagami, Takuji [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science (Japan); Takeuchi, Yoshito [National Cancer Center, Division of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Asai, Shunsuke; Masui, Koji [Japan Red Cross Kyoto Daiichi Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Sato, Hideki [Japan Red Cross Kyoto Daiichi Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology (Japan); Taniguchi, Fumihiro [Japan Red Cross Kyoto Daiichi Hospital, Department of Surgery (Japan); Sato, Osamu [Japan Red Cross Kyoto Daiichi Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Japan); Nishimura, Tsunehiko [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science (Japan)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

A PRECESSING JET IN THE CH Cyg SYMBIOTIC SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jets have been detected in only a few symbiotic binaries to date, and CH Cyg is one of them. In 2001, a non-relativistic jet was detected in CH Cyg for the first time in X-rays. We carried out coordinated Chandra, Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and VLA observations in 2008 to study the propagation of this jet and its interaction with the circumbinary medium. We detected the jet with Chandra and HST and determined that the apex has expanded to the south from {approx}300 AU to {approx}1400 AU, with the shock front propagating with velocity <100 km s{sup -1}. The shock front has significantly slowed down since 2001. Unexpectedly, we also discovered a powerful jet in the NE-SW direction, in the X-ray, optical and radio. This jet has a multi-component structure, including an inner jet and a counterjet at {approx}170 AU, and a SW component ending in several clumps extending out to {approx}750 AU. The structure of the jet and the curvature of the outer portion of the SW jet suggest an episodically powered precessing jet or a continuous precessing jet with occasional mass ejections or pulses. We carried out detailed spatial mapping of the X-ray emission and correlation with the optical and radio emission. X-ray spectra were extracted from the central source, inner NE counterjet, and the brightest clump at a distance of {approx}500 AU from the central source. We discuss the initial results of our analyses, including the multi-component spectral fitting of the jet components and of the central source.

Karovska, Margarita; Gaetz, Terrance J.; Raymond, John C.; Lee, Nicholas P. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Carilli, Christopher L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Hack, Warren [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218-2463 (United States)], E-mail: mkarovska@cfa.harvard.edu

2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

254

TransCom model simulations of CH? and related species: linking transport, surface flux and chemical loss with CH? variability in the troposphere and lower stratosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A chemistry-transport model (CTM) intercomparison experiment (TransCom-CH?) has been designed to investigate the roles of surface emissions, transport and chemical loss in simulating the global methane distribution. Model ...

Patra, P. K.

255

Ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase induction of polychlorinated diphenyl ethers in H4IIE cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) induction potencies of 29 polychlorinated diphenyl ethers were determined in the rat hepatoma H4IIE cell bioassay and compared with that of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). Two polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were included as additional reference substances. PCDE congeners tested were PCDEs 47, 66, 77, 85, 99, 105, 118, 126, 128, 137, 138, 140, 147, 153, 154, 156, 157, 167, 170, 180, 181, 182, 190, 194, 195, 196, 197, 203 and 206. The purity of these congeners was > 99%. Because several of these congeners induced EROD activity when tested at high concentrations, the amount of PCDD and PCDF impurities of these active PCDEs was determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The activity of the active PCDEs was concluded to be mainly due to contamination with 2,3,7,8-chloro substituted PCDFS, because after an additional clean-up on a Florisil column, which removes PCDDs and PCDFs, only three PCDEs (156, 180, 194) remained active. The potencies of PCDEs 156, 180 and 194 (TEF {approximately} 10{sup {minus}6}), however, were about 100-fold less than that of PCB 77 (TEF {approximately} 10{sup {minus}4}). The poor induction potencies of the non- and mono-ortho-PCDEs indicates that PCDEs do not have structure-activity relationships analogous to those of PCBs. If the authors use EROD inducing potency in H4IIE cells as a relative measure of potential Ah receptor-mediated toxic potency, the PCDEs in the study would be expected to be less toxic than analogous PCBs and considerably less-toxic than certain PCDDs and PCDFs.

Koistinen, J.; Sanderson, J.T.; Giesy, J.P. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Nevalainen, T.; Paasivirta, J. [Univ. of Jyvaskyla (Finland)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Mechanistic Investigation of Acid-Catalyzed Cleavage of Aryl-Ether Linkages: Implications for Lignin Depolymerization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon-oxygen bonds are the primary inter-monomer linkages lignin polymers in plant cell walls, and as such, catalyst development to cleave these linkages is of paramount importance to deconstruct biomass to its constituent monomers for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. For many decades, acid catalysis has been used to depolymerize lignin. Lignin is a primary component of plant cell walls, which is connected primarily by aryl-ether linkages, and the mechanism of its deconstruction by acid is not well understood, likely due to its heterogeneous and complex nature compared to cellulose. For effective biomass conversion strategies, utilization of lignin is of significant relevance and as such understanding the mechanisms of catalytic lignin deconstruction to constituent monomers and oligomers is of keen interest. Here, we present a comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the acid catalysis of a range of dimeric species exhibiting the b-O-4 linkage, the most common inter-monomer linkage in lignin. We demonstrate that the presence of a phenolic species dramatically increases the rate of cleavage in acid at 150 degrees C. Quantum mechanical calculations on dimers with the para-hydroxyl group demonstrate that this acid-catalyzed pathway differs from the nonphenolic dimmers. Importantly, this result implies that depolymerization of native lignin in the plant cell wall will proceed via an unzipping mechanism wherein b-O-4 linkages will be cleaved from the ends of the branched, polymer chains inwards toward the center of the polymer. To test this hypothesis further, we synthesized a homopolymer of b-O-4 with a phenolic hydroxyl group, and demonstrate that it is cleaved in acid from the end containing the phenolic hydroxyl group. This result suggests that genetic modifications to lignin biosynthesis pathways in plants that will enable lower severity processes to fractionate lignin for upgrading and for easier access to the carbohydrate fraction of the plant cell wall.

Sturgeon, M. R.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Ligand Lone-Pair Influence on Hydrocarbon C-H Activation: A Computational Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mid to late transition metal complexes that break hydrocarbon C?H bonds by transferring the hydrogen to a heteroatom ligand while forming a metal?alkyl bond offer a promising strategy for C?H activation. Here we report a density functional (B3LYP, M06, and X3LYP) analysis of cis-(acac){sub 2}MX and TpM(L)X (M = Ir, Ru, Os, and Rh; acac = acetylacetonate, Tp = tris(pyrazolyl)borate; X = CH{sub 3}, OH, OMe, NH{sub 2}, and NMe{sub 2}) systems for methane C?H bond activation reaction kinetics and thermodynamics. We address the importance of whether a ligand lone pair provides an intrinsic kinetic advantage through possible electronic d{sub ?}?p{sub ?} repulsions for M?OR and M?NR{sub 2} systems versus M?CH{sub 3} systems. This involves understanding the energetic impact of the X ligand group on ligand loss, C?H bond coordination, and C?H bond cleavage steps as well as understanding how the nucleophilicity of the ligand X group, the electrophilicity of the transition metal center, and cis-ligand stabilization effect influence each of these steps. We also explore how spectator ligands and second- versus third-row transition metal centers impact the energetics of each of these C?H activation steps.

Ess, Daniel H; Gunnoe, T. Brent; Cundari, Thomas R; Goddard, William A; Periana, Roy A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

http://www.ied.ethz.ch/pub/index 1 IED Publications List 2007-11-20  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

http://www.ied.ethz.ch/pub/index 1 IED Publications List 2007-11-20 Working Papers ............................................................................................................................................................... 13 Working Papers Schubert, R., Blasch, J., Hoffmann, K. Environmental Protection, Energy Policy and Poverty Reduction ­ Syn- ergies of an Integrated Approach. IED Working Paper No. 1, http://www.ied.ethz.ch/pub/pdf/IED

Fischlin, Andreas

259

Inverse modeling of European CH4 emissions 20012006 P. Bergamaschi,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inverse modeling of European CH4 emissions 2001­2006 P. Bergamaschi,1 M. Krol,2,3,4 J. F. Meirink,5] European CH4 emissions are estimated for the period 2001­2006 using a four dimensional variational (4DVAR/ESRL network. The available observations mainly provide information on the emissions from northwest Europe (NWE

Haak, Hein

260

Joint CO2 and CH4 accountability for global warming Kirk R. Smitha,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

debt index incorporating both methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. We develop national for global perspectives. We include CO2 emissions from fossil sources [CO2(f)], as well as, in a separate by decreasing CH4 emissions by 46% as stopping CO2 emissions entirely, but with substantial differences among

Silver, Whendee

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

SimpleMonitorUSBXPress User Guide Tobi Delbruck, tobi@ini.phys.ethz.ch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SimpleMonitorUSBXPress User Guide Tobi Delbruck, tobi@ini.phys.ethz.ch Allows monitoring AER over at the University of Sevilla and the second by Tobi Delbruck at INI in Zurich. The firmware and host code is written. Last modified 8/20/2005 Under subversion https://svn.ini.unizh.ch/repos/avlsi/CAVIAR/wp5/USBAER

Delbruck, Tobi

262

Torsion?Vibration Coupling in Methanol:? Diabatic Behavior in the CH Overtone Region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The local-mode notation, ?a and ?b, does not apply in the fundamental (vCH = 1) region because the local?local coupling ? splits the three degenerate local CH fundamentals into the normal modes ?3 and {?2, ?9}. ... Support of this work does not constitute endorsement by the DOE of views expressed in this paper. ...

David S. Perry

2007-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

263

4/16/07 R. Henning --UNC-CH 1 The Majorana Neutrinoless  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4/16/07 R. Henning -- UNC-CH 1 The Majorana Neutrinoless Double-beta Decay Experiment Reyco Henning U. of North Carolina -- Chapel Hill #12;4/16/07 R. Henning -- UNC-CH 2 Neutrinoless Double Beta-decay T4.00003 : Henry Primakoff Lecture: Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay, J. Wilkerson · Immediate

Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

264

Page 1/2 www.sprachenzentrum.uzh.ch July 2013 Language Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the University of Zurich and ETH Zurich Rämistrasse 71 CH-8006 Zurich Phone +41 44 634 52 81 Fax +41 44 634 82 89Page 1/2 www.sprachenzentrum.uzh.ch July 2013 Language Center University of Zurich Language Center exams (various schools in the Zurich region, e.g. Volkshochschule, offer such preparation courses

Zürich, Universität

265

Page 1/1 www.sprachenzentrum.uzh.ch March 2014 Language Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the University of Zurich and ETH Zurich Rämistrasse 71 CH-8006 Zurich Phone +41 44 634 52 81 Fax +41 44 634 82 89Page 1/1 www.sprachenzentrum.uzh.ch March 2014 Language Center University of Zurich Language Center programs, at the Faculty of Law of the University of Zurich of 20 August 2012 Elective modules can

Zürich, Universität

266

Nano-Tera.CH: Nano-technologies for Tera-scale Problems Giovanni De Micheli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nano-Tera.CH: Nano-technologies for Tera-scale Problems Giovanni De Micheli EPF Lausanne 1015, Switzerland ABSTRACT -- The Nano-Tera.CH initiative is a broad engineering program in Switzerland for health is rooted in advances in engineering nano-scale materials and their exploitation in a variety of systems

De Micheli, Giovanni

267

Photosynthesis Respiration CH2O + O2 CO2 + H2O  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy and life Photosynthesis Respiration CH2O + O2 CO2 + H2O hv Biomass CO2 + H2O CH2O + O2 ASSOCIATED WITH PHOTOSYNTHESIS) #12;ATP*: the "energy currency" of the cell *Adenosine triphospahte) PHOTOSYNTHESIS Light provides the energy for high energy electrons. The source of electrons is water OXIDATIVE

268

The lightness of being: mass, ether, and unification of the forces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

How can an electron be both a wave and a particle? At the same time? Because it is a quantum field. That key insight seems to be underappreciated, given the awe and mysticism that permeate most nontechnical discussions of modern physics. Perhaps the root of the problem is that most popularizations of quantum mechanics and of particle physics shy away from quantized fields, the natural language for microscopic phenomena. In 'The Lightness of Being: Mass, Ether, and the Unification of Forces', Frank Wilczek confronts quantum field theory head on, demystifying not only wave-particle duality but also the origin of mass for hadrons (that is, everyday matter). Wilczek is the Herman Feshbach Professor of Physics at MIT and a co-recipient of the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics. His research has spanned almost all aspects of theoretical particle physics, with significant forays into condensed-matter physics and dense nuclear matter (condensed quark matter, one might say). Recurring themes are the richness of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the alluring ideas of unification. His breadth and depth make him a sought after speaker for colloquia and public lectures. Wilczek also contributes an occasional Reference Frame column to 'Physics Today'. The material in 'The Lightness of Being' reflects the scope of the author's research. The book consists of three parts: the quantum fields of QCD (the ether that makes mass), gravitation (the ether that feels mass), and unification. Part 1, which traces notions of mass from Isaac Newton's time through theoretical and computational results of the past 40 years, is the most substantial and original; it is rich, modern, and rooted in observed phenomena. Part 2 continues in the same vein as it connects gravity, also an observed phenomenon, to QCD. Part 3 is more conventional, for a popularization of particle physics, in its focus on speculative ideas that (still) await direct experimental tests. Readers of 'Physics Today' will know that Wilczek can write with wit, grace, and an uncanny facility for using lightweight language to express heavy-duty ideas. They will find much of that kind of writing in 'The Lightness of Being'. Wilczek addresses subtle ideas with vim and vigor. He avoids some of the jargon of quantum field theory; for example, he calls the vertex in a Feynman diagram a hub. In more ambitious terminology, he refers to space-filling, everfluctuating quantum fields--be they electrons, quarks, gluons, or gravity--as 'the Grid'. The term is supposed to be short and familiar, evoking the ubiquitous electric grid (and soon-to-beubiquitous computing grid). It also, for the expert, cleverly alludes to lattice gauge theory. Indeed, after vividly explaining how the dynamics of QCD and the constraints of Heisenberg uncertainty conspire to create mass from the Grid, Wilczek emphasizes that the picture is backed by lattice QCD computations of 'heroic' proportions. Unfortunately, too much of 'The Lightness' is laden with clunky affectation: silly names (a pulsed electron accelerator is called the 'ultrastroboscopic nanomicroscope'), sophomoric jokes ('hadron' is 'not a typo'), references to pop culture (Wilczek might have called quantum fields 'the Matrix, but the sequels tarnished that candidate'), and many pointless footnotes. In a public lecture the audience may guffaw at such jokes, but on the printed page they fall flat. Wilczek explains physics so well that the inappropriate humor is the biggest unexplained puzzle of the book. It is fine to be silly, even crude, as long as the reader's path to understanding is made easier. A joke can inform with an unexpected perspective or simply give the mind a pause to refresh. Some of the humor achieves such aims, but too many gags impede the pace of the otherwise fine exposition. Three appendices, a glossary, and a set of endnotes are crisp and sober. They are excellent. 'The Lightness of Being' is not unbearable, but it is weighed down with too much clutter to rank as a masterpiece. It's a pity: Wilczek's best writing--some of it in this book--is l

Kronfeld, Andreas S.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Consent Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2000-09 | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2000-09 M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2000-09 Consent Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2000-09 July 25, 2000 Price-Anderson Enforcement Consent Order issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Quality Problems at the Hanford Site Tank Farms, (EA-2000-09) This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of an internal investigation conducted by CH2M Hill Group, Inc. (CHG) in February 2000. The investigation examined the facts and circumstances surrounding quality problems with the procurement of safety class piping for the W-314 Project at the Tank Farm Waste Remediation System. Consent Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2000-09 More Documents & Publications Consent Order, Fluor Federal Services - EA-2000-10 Special Report Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - October 22, 2001

270

Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - April 24, 2001 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - April 24, 2001 CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - April 24, 2001 Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - April 24, 2001 April 24, 2001 Enforcement Letter issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Nuclear Safety Management at the Hanford Site Tank Farms This letter refers to a recent investigation by the Department of Energy (DOE), regarding potential noncompliances with the requirements of 10 CFR 830, "Nuclear Safety Management," occurring at the Hanford Tank Farms. The investigation reviewed three issues that were reported into the Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS) by CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. Two of the NTS reports involve the failure to perform the Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) for [ ] gas monitoring. The initial potential noncompliance occurred in January 2000, in which a Zip Cord was installed

271

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2003-06  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2003-06 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2003-06 August 29, 2003 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Quality Assurance Issues at the Hanford Site Tank Farms This letter refers to the Department of Energy's Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) investigation of the facts and circumstances concerning quality assurance issues affecting nuclear safety at the Hanford Tank Farms. These issues involve the inadvertent deenergization of annulus leak detectors, dilution tank overfills, and dome loading control, over the period August 2002 to November 2002. Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2003-06 More Documents & Publications

272

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site CH2M Hill Plateau Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - November 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - November 2012 November 2012 Review of the Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Implementation Verification Review Processes This report documents the independent review of implementation verification review (IVR) processes at the Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company that were conducted by the Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), which is within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS). The onsite review was performed by the HSS Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations from August 13 to17, 2012. The objective of this assessment was to evaluate

273

Special Report Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - October 22, 2001 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - October 22, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - October 22, 2001 Special Report Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - October 22, 2001 October 22, 2001 Special Report Order ssued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Multiple Nuclear Safety Issues at the Hanford Site On September 18, 2001, the Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) in coordination with the DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) conducted a review of the actions taken by CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CHG) in response to an Enforcement Letter dated April 24, 2001. This Enforcement Letter referenced three Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS) reports submitted by CHG which collectively suggested weaknesses in your nuclear safety operations related to (1) corrective action management, (2) worker training

274

U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office And CH2M HILL Plateau  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office And CH2M HILL U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office And CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Partnering Charter For Partnering Performance Agreement U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office And CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Partnering Charter For Partnering Performance Agreement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) are committed to continuous improvement and will utilize principles of the DOE Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Partnering Policy to enhance teaming to further execute the Plateau Remediation Contract. U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office And CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Partnering Charter For Partnering Performance Agreement

275

Safety Evaluation Report of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact Handled (CH) Waste Documented Safety Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Safety Evaluation Report (SER) documents the Department of Energy’s (DOE's) review of Revision 9 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Contact Handled (CH) Waste Documented Safety Analysis, DOE/WIPP-95-2065 (WIPP CH DSA), and provides the DOE Approval Authority with the basis for approving the document. It concludes that the safety basis documented in the WIPP CH DSA is comprehensive, correct, and commensurate with hazards associated with CH waste disposal operations. The WIPP CH DSA and associated technical safety requirements (TSRs) were developed in accordance with 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, and DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Direct dynamics simulation of dioxetane formation and decomposition via the singlet ·O–O–CH2–CH2 · biradical: Non-RRKM dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electronic structure calculations and direct chemical dynamics simulations are used to study the formation and decomposition of dioxetane on its ground state singlet potential energy surface. The stationary points for 1O2 + C2H4, the singlet {center_dot}O-O-CH2-CH2{center_dot} biradical, the transition state (TS) connecting this biradical with dioxetane, and the two transition states and gauche {center_dot}O-CH2-CH2-O{center_dot} biradical connecting dioxetane with the formaldehyde product molecules are investigated at different levels of electronic structure theory including UB3LYP, UMP2, MRMP2, and CASSCF and a range of basis sets. The UB3LYP/6-31G* method was found to give representative energies for the reactive system and was used as a model for the simulations. UB3LYP/6-31G* direct dynamics trajectories were initiated at the TS connecting the {center_dot}O-O-CH2-CH2{center_dot} biradical and dioxetane by sampling the TS's vibrational energy levels, and rotational and reaction coordinate energies, with Boltzmann distributions at 300, 1000, and 1500 K. This corresponds to the transition state theory model for trajectories that pass the TS. The trajectories were directed randomly towards both the biradical and dioxetane. A small fraction of the trajectories directed towards the biradical recrossed the TS and formed dioxetane. The remainder formed 1O2 + C2H4 and of these {approx} 40% went directly from the TS to 1O2 + C2H4 without getting trapped and forming an intermediate in the {center_dot}O-O- CH2-CH2{center_dot} biradical potential energy minimum, a non-statistical result. The dioxetane molecules which are formed dissociate to two formaldehyde molecules with a rate constant two orders of magnitude smaller than that predicted by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus theory. The reaction dynamics from dioxetane to the formaldehyde molecules do not follow the intrinsic reaction coordinate or involve trapping in the gauche {center_dot}O-CH2-CH2-O{center_dot} biradical potential energy minimum. Important non-statistical dynamics are exhibited for this reactive system.

Sun, Rui; Park, Kyoyeon; De Jong, Wibe A.; Lischka, Hans; Windus, Theresa L.; Hase, William L.

2012-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

277

Distribution of glycerol ether lipids in the oxygen minimum zone of the Eastern Tropical North Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The distributions of microbial glycerol ether lipids in suspended particulate matter in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Eastern Tropical North Pacific Ocean (ETNP) were investigated. Nine groups of glycerol ether core lipids were detected and quantified: isoprenoid glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) (iso-GDGTs), isoprenoid glycerol dialkanol diethers (iso-GDDs) and hydroxylated isoprenoid \\{GDGTs\\} and \\{GDDs\\} (OH-GDGTs and OH-GDDs) of archaeal origin; branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (br-GDGTs) of bacterial origin and overly branched \\{GDGTs\\} (OB-GDGTs), sparsely branched \\{GDGTs\\} (SB-GDGTs), hybrid isoprenoid/branched \\{GDGTs\\} (IB-GDGTs) and a tentatively assigned H-shaped GDGT (H-1020) of unknown biological origin. The archaeal iso-GDGTs were the most abundant core lipids (89% of total), followed by iso-GDDs (4%), br-GDGTs (2%) and OH-GDGTs (1%). Archaeal intact polar \\{GDGTs\\} (IP GDGTs), including both mono- and diglycosidic iso-GDGTs, had depth profiles similar to OH-GDGTs and OH-GDDs, with a maximum concentration in the upper OMZ and secondary peaks in the mid and lower OMZ, suggesting similar but multiple planktonic sources. Core lipids of iso-GDGTs and other glycerol ethers showed deviating concentration profiles compared with IP \\{GDGTs\\} and OH-GDGTs and were most abundant in the mid OMZ. This is the first report of OH-GDDs, OB-GDGTs, SB-GDGTs, IB-GDGTs and H-1020 in the marine water column and the distribution patterns of these “orphan lipids” suggest that anaerobic planktonic microbes are their main source.

Sitan Xie; Xiao-Lei Liu; Florence Schubotz; Stuart G. Wakeham; Kai-Uwe Hinrichs

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

E-Print Network 3.0 - allyl methacrylate styrene Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tetrachloroethylene () Cyclohexanol () Cyclohexanone ()1- 1-Butyl alcohol ()2... ;() Acrolein () Acrylic acid () Allyl zlcohol () Allyl chloride () Allyl glycidyl ether(AGE) ()2-...

279

TABLE33.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

products are reported by the PAD District of entry. b Includes crude oil imported for storage in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. c Includes ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE),...

280

TABLE34.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

products are reported by the PAD District of entry. b Includes crude oil imported for storage in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. c Includes ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE),...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Independent Oversight Review, Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance- April 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Review of Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance Conduct of Operations

282

New C-H Stretching Vibrational Spectral Features in the Raman Spectra of Gaseous and Liquid Ethanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New C-H Stretching Vibrational Spectral Features in the Raman Spectra of Gaseous and Liquid Ethanol Traditionally, the Raman spectrum of ethanol in the C-H vibrational stretching region between 2800 cm-1 and 3100, and the -CH3 antisymmetric stretching. In this report, new Raman spectral features were observed for ethanol

Liu, Shilin

283

Use of Nonionic Poly(Ethylene glycol) p-Isooctyl-Phenyl Ether (Triton X-100) Surfactant Mobile Phases in the Thin-Layer Chromatography of Heavy-Metal Cations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Article The analytical potential of poly(ethylene glycol) p-isooctyl-phenyl ether...40, March 2002 Use of Nonionic Poly(Ethylene glycol) p-Isooctyl-Phenyl Ether...Bidlingmeyer, S.N. Deming, W.P. Price, B. Sachok, and M. Petrusek. Retention......

Ali Mohammad; Eram Iraqi; Iftkhar Alam Khan

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Process Design, Simulation and Integration of Dimethyl Ether (DME) Production from Shale Gas by Direct and Indirect Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reaction of partial oxidation is exothermic and the residence time is very short (? = 3.6-72 ms). The overall reaction between CH4 and O2 is; CH 4 + 0.5O 2 ? CO + 2H 2 ?H o 298K = ?36 kJ/mol (3... sufficient cooling of reactor to continue healthy reactor conditions because the reactions that occur in reactor are highly exothermic [32]. Type of reactor has significant effect on the final products in reactor. Multitubular fixed-bed reactors...

Karagoz, Secgin

2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

285

Chemical Recycling of Carbon Dioxide to Methanol and Dimethyl Ether: From Greenhouse Gas to Renewable, Environmentally Carbon Neutral Fuels and Synthetic Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical Recycling of Carbon Dioxide to Methanol and Dimethyl Ether: From Greenhouse Gas to Renewable, Environmentally Carbon Neutral Fuels and Synthetic Hydrocarbons ... (1, 3-6) Methanol and derived dimethyl ether (DME) are also excellent fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE) and in a new generation of direct oxidation methanol fuel cells (DMFC), as well as convenient starting materials for producing light olefins (ethylene and propylene) and subsequently practically any derived hydrocarbon product. ... Methanol produced this way was used in the 19th century for lighting, cooking, and heating purposes but was later replaced by cheaper fuels, especially kerosene. ...

George A. Olah; Alain Goeppert; G. K. Surya Prakash

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

286

Experimental investigation on thermal barrier coated diesel engine fueled with diesel-biodiesel-ethanol-diethyl ether blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present work diesel-biodiesel-ethanol (DBE) and diesel-biodiesel-diethyl ether (DBD) fuels are tested with normal diesel engine and the diesel engine coated with the layers of aluminum oxide (Al 2O3) of 0.3?mm and yttria-stabilized zirconia of 0.2?mm. The various performance and emission parameters are analyzed and determined. The experimental work was carried out in a single cylinder water cooled engine coupled with eddy current dynamometer. The AVL make five gas analyzer and smoke meter were used to measure the different exhaust pollutants. The result shows that the brake thermal efficiency of coated engine is more than that of base diesel at high loads. The thermal barrier coated engine using fuel as diesel biodiesel and ethanol (TDBE) produces the lowest carbon monoxide (CO) emissions among all the fuels that are selected. In addition it produces the lowest carbon dioxide (CO2) at higher loads. Both the thermal barrier coated engine using fuel as diesel biodiesel and diethyl ether (TDBD) and TDBE have higher NOx emissions among almost all the fuels used. The TDBE and TDBD have higher smoke emissions at initial loads but eventually show lower smoke emissions at higher loads. The thermal barrier coated diesel engine fueled with DBE and DBD shows an increase in engine power and specific fuel consumption as well as significant improvements in exhaust gas emissions except NOx.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Modeling of the simultaneous extraction of nitric acid and uranyl nitrate with tri-n-butyl phosphate. Application to extraction operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematical model developed for the equilibrium HNO{sub 3}-UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}-tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)-diluent is the basis of the computation of distribution isotherms. The isotherms are used to study the influence of TBP concentration on two chosen operation parameters, distribution coefficients and number of theoretical stages, for the selected flow sheets. It is established that an increase in TBP concentration leads to a decrease in the number of theoretical stages for the extraction flow sheets but to their increase for the striping flow sheets. Given diagrams can be used to determine the efficiency of extraction processes. Agreement with available literature calculations on the number of theoretical stages supports the use of the model in the computation of distribution isotherms, of the system quoted above, in a wide range of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and TBP concentrations.

Comor, J.J.; Tolic, A.S.; Kopecni, M.M.; Petkovic, D.M. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Chemical Dynamics Lab.] [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Yugoslavia). Chemical Dynamics Lab.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Independent Oversight Review, Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and CH2M and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance - April 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance - April 2012 April 2012 Review of Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance Conduct of Operations The purpose of this independent oversight review by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), was to observe and shadow1 a DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) assessment of its contractors at the Hanford Site. The HSS reviewer observed the implementation and effectiveness of the DOE-RL assessment of two of the contractors (CHPRC and

289

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2003-06  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Inc. - Inc. - EA-2003-06 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2003-06 August 29, 2003 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Quality Assurance Issues at the Hanford Site Tank Farms This letter refers to the Department of Energy's Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) investigation of the facts and circumstances concerning quality assurance issues affecting nuclear safety at the Hanford Tank Farms. These issues involve the inadvertent deenergization of annulus leak detectors, dilution tank overfills, and dome loading control, over the period August 2002 to November 2002. Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2003-06 More Documents & Publications Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2006-06

290

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC - CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC - EA-2007-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC - EA-2007-03 June 14, 2007 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC, related to Radiation Protection Program Deficiencies at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex - Accelerated Retrieval Project at the Idaho National Laboratory This letter refers to the investigation of events at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex - Accelerated Retrieval Project (ARP) by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement. The investigation summary report, Multiple Radiological Protection Program Deficiencies and Safety Culture Concerns, was provided to you in a letter dated February 20, 2007. An enforcement conference to discuss these findings was held on March

291

Independent Oversight Review, Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Richland Operations Office and CH2M Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance - April 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance - April 2012 April 2012 Review of Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance Conduct of Operations The purpose of this independent oversight review by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), was to observe and shadow1 a DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) assessment of its contractors at the Hanford Site. The HSS reviewer observed the implementation and effectiveness of the DOE-RL assessment of two of the contractors (CHPRC and

292

800,000-year Ice-Core Records of Atmospheric Methane (CH4)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Methane (CH4) » Ice Cores Methane (CH4) » Ice Cores 800,000-year Ice-Core Records of Atmospheric Methane (CH4) This page introduces ice-core records of methane (CH4) extending back 800,000 years at Dome C, Antarctica and over 400,000 years at the Vostok site. Links are also provided to shorter records from other Antarctic locations. The 2000-year record from Law Dome, Antarctica, has been merged with modern records to create a long-term record to the present. These records are maintained by the World Data Center for Paleoclimatology, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and have graciously been made freely available for access and distribution. The original investigators made the effort to obtain the data and assure their quality. To assure proper credit is given, please follow the citation instructions

293

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - EA-2005-01  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - EA-2005-01 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - EA-2005-01 March 10, 2005 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Radiological and Operational Events at the Hanford Tank Farms This letter refers to the recent investigation by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) at the Hanford Tank Farms of four radiological and operational events occurring during 2003 and 2004. The events included (1) the June 2003 multiple personnel contamination event at the [ ]; (2) the November 2003 Technical Safety Requirement violation during a cross-site waste transfer; (3) the November 2003 valve positioning error during S-112 waste retrieval operations; and

294

Modern Records of Atmospheric Methane (CH4) and a 2000-year Ice-core Record  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(CH4) » Ice Cores (CH4) » Ice Cores Modern Records of Atmospheric Methane (CH4) and a 2000-year Ice-core Record from Law Dome, Antarctica Introduction This page provides an introduction and links to records of atmospheric methane (CH4) over the last 2000 years, emphasizing large data bases each representing currently active stations. Records in recent decades (time period depending on location) have been obtained from samples of ambient-air at remote locations, which represent global atmospheric conditions rather than influences of local sources. The longer (2000-year) record is from the Law Dome ice core in Antarctica. The ice-core record has been merged with modern annual data from Cape Grim, Tasmania to provide a 2000-year record ending with the most recent data. A spline function has

295

JASPERSE CHEM 210 PRACTICE TEST 1 VERSION 3 Ch. 11 Liquids, Solids, and Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 15 The Chemistry of Solutes and Solutions Ch. 13 Chemical Kinetics Constants and/or Formulas Formulas. Which of the following is an exothermic process: a. sublimation b. melting c. condensation d

Jasperse, Craig P.

296

Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - July 8, 2005...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Inc - July 8, 2005 July 8, 2005 Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Neutron Exposure at the Hanford Site On July 8, 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

297

Intern experience at CH?M Hill, Inc.: an internship report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engineers and support staff members, the client's representatives, and representatives of two other consulting engineering firms working on the project. Thus, the internship position at CH?M HILL provided considerable experience...

Winter, William John, 1949-

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

298

Session 4: EER: Extended (or Enhanced) ER Model (CH-2 and 3)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Session 4: EER: Extended (or Enhanced) ER Model (CH-2 and 3) CSCI-585 , Cyrus Shahabi · Example ER to no subclass. EER-to-Relational Mapping · Option 1: One table for superclass + two tables for subclasses (one

Shahabi, Cyrus

299

Infrared radio-frequency double resonance of 13CH3OH  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Infrared radio-frequency double-resonance spectroscopy has been carried out for 13CH3OH. Four K-type doublet transitions have been observed below 1 GHz, using the...

Petersen, J C

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Joint DOE-CH2M HILL News Release Media Contact: For Immediate...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

management and design firm, as ranked by Engineering News-Record and named a leader in sustainability consulting by Verdantix. Visit ch2mhill.com. Project Services Group, LLC...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 CONTRACT CLAUSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section I M152 I-i PART II SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES TABLE THE GOVERNMENT'S INTEREST WHEN SUBCONTRACTING WITH CONTRACT

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

302

The influence of air inflow on CH4 composition ratio in landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When landfill gas is collected, air inflow into the landfill...4 productivity. The decline of CH4 content in landfill gas (LFG) negatively affects energy projects. We...2 was an effective indicator of air inflow ...

Seung-Kyu Chun

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Internal tar/CH4 reforming in a biomass dual fluidised bed gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An internal reformer is developed for in situ catalytic reforming of tar and methane (CH4) in allothermal gasifiers. The study has been performed in the ... 150 kW dual fluidised bed (DFB) biomass gasifier at Mid...

Kristina Göransson; Ulf Söderlind; Till Henschel…

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Enforcement Letter, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho LLC , - May 20...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Idaho LLC , - May 20, 2009 May 20, 2009 Issued to CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC, for Electrical Safety Deficiencies at the Idaho National Laboratory On May 20, 2009, the U.S....

305

Experimental investigations on combustion characteristics of syngas composed of CH4, CO, and H2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The residual gas and remained raw gas in dual gas resources polygeneration system are quite complex in components (mainly CH4, CO, and H2...), and these results to the distinguished differences in combustion reac...

Qingwei Fan; Shien Hui; Qulan Zhou…

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC- EA-2007-03  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Issued to CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC, related to Radiation Protection Program Deficiencies at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex - Accelerated Retrieval Project at the Idaho National Laboratory

307

The adsorption and surface chemistry CH{sub 3} on Pt(111)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adsorption and surface chemistry of methyl radicals on Pt(111) has been studied by temperature programmed desorption (TPD), reflection-adsorption infrared reflection spectroscopy (RAIRS), and isotopic tracer experiments. Methyl radicals were introduced on the surface directly from the gas using a methyl radical source based on the pyrolysis of azomethane, CH{sub 3}NNCH{sub 3}. Methyl radicals adsorb with near-unity sticking probability on clean Pt(111) at 150 K to form surface methyl groups detectable by RAIRS. Between 180 K and 300 K the methyl groups react with surface hydrogen to form CH{sub 4} which desorbs from the surface. The hydrogen is derived from adsorption of H{sub 2} and dehydrogenation of adsorbed CH{sub 3}. At high methyl coverages C-C bond formation is observed which leads to the production of surface ethylidyne, {triple_bond}C-CH{sub 3}. Kinetic modeling of the surface reaction will be discussed.

Fairbrother, D.H.; Peng, X.D.; Stair, P.C. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Fan, J.; Trenary, M. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules March 10, 2005 - 10:44am Addthis Hanford Tank Farm Contractor Faces Fine of more than $300,000 WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today notified the CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M Hill) - that it will fine the company $316,250 for violations of the department's nuclear safety requirements. CH2M Hill is the department's contractor responsible for storage of highly radioactive and hazardous liquid waste at the Hanford Tank Farms near Richland, Wash. The Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) issued today, cites four events that took place in 2003 and 2004. These events include the contamination of several workers while removing equipment from a valve pit

309

Absolute and site-specific abstraction rate coefficients for reactions of Cl with CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH, CH{sub 3}CD{sub 2}OH, and CD{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH between 295 and 600 K  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Absolute rate coefficients for reactions of Cl atoms with selectively deuterated ethanols have been measured between 295 and 600 K by a laser-photolysis/CW infrared absorption method. Yields of HCl are determined by comparison with the Cl + ethane or Cl + propane reaction, permitting site-specific branching fractions to be derived. Smog chamber experiments with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) detection are performed to determine products of the room-temperature Cl + C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH reaction. The rate coefficients for all ethanols display only a slight temperature dependence and can be parameterized by simple Arrhenius expressions: k{sub CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH} = (9.4 {+-} 1.4) x 10{sup {minus}11}e{sup (45 {+-} 32)/T}, k{sub CD{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH} = (6.6 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup {minus}11}e{sup (90 {+-} 40)/T}, and k{sub CH{sub 3}CD{sub 2}OH} = (6.9 {+-} 0.7) x 10{sup {minus}11}e{sup ({minus}76 {+-} 40)/T} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} (error bars {+-}2{sigma}). Combining the results from the present work with literature data, the authors recommend k{sub CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH} = (9.5 {+-} 1.9) x 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} at 298 K. The room-temperature contribution of abstraction at the methyl site is found to be 0.07 & 0.02 from FTIR product analysis of the Cl + CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH reaction and 0.08 {+-} 0.02 from laser photolysis/CW infrared absorption measurements (error bars {+-}2{sigma}). Abstraction of the hydroxyl hydrogen is negligible. A small but significant amount of HCl ({nu} = 1) is produced in the Cl + CD{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH and Cl + CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH reactions at room temperature.

Taatjes, C.A.; Christensen, L.K.; Hurley, M.D.; Wallington, T.J.

1999-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

310

Dopant low-n Rydberg states in CF4 and CH4 near the critical point  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dopant low-n Rydberg states in CF4 and CH4 near the critical point Luxi Li a,b , Xianbo Shi a,b , G States Abstract Dopant low-n Rydberg states perturbed by dense CF4 and CH4 were investigated using vacuum. Evans). 2 #12;ular fluids. We present absorption spectra of the xenon 6s Rydberg state perturbed by CF4

Findley, Gary L.

311

JASPERSE CHEM 210 PRACTICE TEST 1 VERSION 1 Ch. 11 Liquids, Solids, and Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vapor pressure at 25°C? a. C4H10 b. NaCl c. C6H12O6 d. C4H9NH2 2. Arrange CH3OH, NaF, and CO2 in order of increasing boiling point. a. CH3OH CO2 CO2 CO2 CO2 ") corresponds to: a. a pure gas increasing in temperature b. a liquid increasing in temperature c. a solid

Jasperse, Craig P.

312

Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section E M007 i PART I SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE PAGE NO ­ APPLICABLE ONLY TO THE RECOVERY ACT WORK E-1 #12;Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section E M007 E-1 PART I performed under the contract, and the premises where the work is being performed, at all reasonable times

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

313

JASPERSE CHEM 350 TEST 3 VERSION 1 Ch. 7 Structure and Synthesis of Alkenes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SN2 than E2 in the first step. My mistake! #12;3 3 7. A single unknown reacts with O3/Me2S to give1 1 JASPERSE CHEM 350 TEST 3 VERSION 1 Ch. 7 Structure and Synthesis of Alkenes Ch. 8 Reactions of the following reactions or reaction sequences. You needn't bother to show side products or minor products

Jasperse, Craig P.

314

Upper bound of polymeric membranes for mixed-gas CO2/CH4 separations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Membrane polymers with high permeability and high selectivity are preferred for gas separations. However, there exists a trade-off or upper bound, i.e., polymers with higher permeability often exhibit lower selectivity, and vice versa. The upper bound for separation of various gas pairs has been empirically drawn and theoretically rationalized using pure-gas data. However, for CO2/CH4 separation, the high pressure CO2 and non-methane hydrocarbons can plasticize polymers, increasing mixed-gas CO2 permeability and decreasing mixed-gas CO2/CH4 selectivity. This study aims to apply a modified free volume theory to interpret CO2/CH4 separation performance in polymeric membranes. The model satisfactorily describes the pure-gas upper bounds for various gas pairs including CO2/CH4, the effect of high pressure CO2 on mixed-gas CO2/CH4 separation properties, and the practical mixed-gas upper bound for CO2/CH4 separations. The CO2 is found to have an estimated glass transition temperature of 108 K. The assumptions of this model are discussed, and future work to improve this model is proposed.

Haiqing Lin; Milad Yavari

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

(2/94)(2-4,9/95)(7/97)(11,12/98)(1,9,11/99) Neuman Chapter 3 Haloalkanes, Alcohols, Ethers, and Amines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Ethers, and Amines from Organic Chemistry by Robert C. Neuman, Jr. Professor of Chemistry, emeritus://web.chem.ucsb.edu/~neuman/orgchembyneuman/> Chapter Outline of the Book ************************************************************************************** I. Foundations 1. Organic Molecules and Chemical Bonding 2. Alkanes and Cycloalkanes 3. Haloalkanes

Reed, Christopher A.

316

Role of Endocytosis in the Action of Ether Lipids on WEHI-3B, HL60, and FDCP-Mix A4 Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Lipid by WEHI-3B Cells Has an Energy- dependent and an Energy-independent Component. Uptake...protective agents, suggested that the energy-dependent component of ether...of ET-18-OCH., by FDCP-mix A4 cells was measured, it was...

G. W. Bazill and T. M. Dexter

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Direct femtosecond observation of the transient intermediate in the -cleavage reaction of (CH3)2CO to 2CH3 CO: Resolving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

devoted to answer such a question, and the issue in different reactions pericyclic, SN2, elimination, etcDirect femtosecond observation of the transient intermediate in the -cleavage reaction of (CH3)2CO, California 91125 Received 17 April 1995; accepted 2 May 1995 When a reaction involving two equivalent bonds

Kim, Sang Kyu

318

Reactions of 15-crown-5 and bis-15-crown-5 ethers with metal acetylacetonate ions in the gas phase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was carried out on the ion-molecule reactions of ions arising in the dissociation of ferric, cobaltic, chromic, manganous, neodymium(II), gallium(III), and indium(III) acetylacetonates upon electron impact with 15-crown-5 and bis-15-crown-5. The ratio of the yields of (acac)x-1 /SUP M+L/ ions is determined by the case of reduction of M /SUP x+1+/ to M /SUP x+/ and for (acac)/sub 3/M complexes, this ratio decreases in the series Nd, In, GA > Cr > Fe, Co. The rate constant for the formation of acacCoL/sup +/ ions is greater than for acacFeL/sup +/ ions. The possibility of fixing transition metals in unstable oxidation states by crown ethers is demonstrated in the case of nickel.

Timofeev, O.S.; Bogatskii, A.V.; Gren, A.I.; Lobach, A.V.; Nekarsov, Y.S.; Zagorevskii, D.V.

1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

319

Single-Step Syngas-to-Distillates (S2D) Synthesis via Methanol and Dimethyl Ether Intermediates: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the work was to enhance price-competitive, synthesis gas (syngas)-based production of transportation fuels that are directly compatible with the existing vehicle fleet (i.e., vehicles fueled by gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, etc.). To accomplish this, modifications to the traditional methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process were investigated. In this study, we investigated direct conversion of syngas to distillates using methanol and dimethyl ether intermediates. For this application, a Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 (PdZnAl) catalyst previously developed for methanol steam reforming was evaluated. The PdZnAl catalyst was shown to be far superior to a conventional copper-based methanol catalyst when operated at relatively high temperatures (i.e., >300°C), which is necessary for MTG-type applications. Catalytic performance was evaluated through parametric studies. Process conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas-hour-space velocity, and syngas feed ratio (i.e., hydrogen:carbon monoxide) were investigated. PdZnAl catalyst formulation also was optimized to maximize conversion and selectivity to methanol and dimethyl ether while suppressing methane formation. Thus, a PdZn/Al2O3 catalyst optimized for methanol and dimethyl ether formation was developed through combined catalytic material and process parameter exploration. However, even after compositional optimization, a significant amount of undesirable carbon dioxide was produced (formed via the water-gas-shift reaction), and some degree of methane formation could not be completely avoided. Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 used in combination with ZSM-5 was investigated for direct syngas-to-distillates conversion. High conversion was achieved as thermodynamic constraints are alleviated when methanol and dimethyl are intermediates for hydrocarbon formation. When methanol and/or dimethyl ether are products formed separately, equilibrium restrictions occur. Thermodynamic relaxation also enables the use of lower operating pressures than what would be allowed for methanol synthesis alone. Aromatic-rich hydrocarbon liquid (C5+), containing a significant amount of methylated benzenes, was produced under these conditions. However, selectivity control to liquid hydrocarbons was difficult to achieve. Carbon dioxide and methane formation was problematic. Furthermore, saturation of the olefinic intermediates formed in the zeolite, and necessary for gasoline production, occurred over PdZnAl. Thus, yield to desirable hydrocarbon liquid product was limited. Evaluation of other oxygenate-producing catalysts could possibly lead to future advances. Potential exists with discovery of other types of catalysts that suppress carbon dioxide and light hydrocarbon formation. Comparative techno-economics for a single-step syngas-to-distillates process and a more conventional MTG-type process were investigated. Results suggest operating and capital cost savings could only modestly be achieved, given future improvements to catalyst performance. Sensitivity analysis indicated that increased single-pass yield to hydrocarbon liquid is a primary need for this process to achieve cost competiveness.

Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; King, David L.; Zhu, Yunhua; Gray, Michel J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Biddy, Mary J.; Hallen, Richard T.; Wang, Yong; White, James F.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Palo, Daniel R.

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

320

Roles of chemically inequivalent N(CH3)4 ions in phase transition temperatures in [N(CH3)4]2CoCl4 by single-crystal NMR and MAS NMR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The temperature dependences of the 1H and 13C spin–lattice relaxation time in the laboratory frame, T1, and in the rotating frame, T1?, in [N(CH3)4]2CoCl4 were measured by static nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. In the ferroelastic phase, 1H T1? underwent molecular motion according to the Bloembergen–Purcell–Pound theory. Two inequivalent ions, a-N(CH3)4 and b-N(CH3)4, were identified by 13C cross polarization (CP)/MAS NMR. On the basis of the 13C NMR results, the existence of two chemically inequivalent a-N(CH3)4 and b-N(CH3)4 ions in the ferroelectric phase and the existence of the ferroelastic twin structure of the N(CH3)4 ions in the ferroelastic phase were discussed.

Ae Ran Lim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

FlashInformatique.epfl.ch p/a EPFL -Domaine IT -Station 8 -CH 1015 Lausanne -tl. +41 21 69 322 11  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fawal 22 Logiciel libre Arduino, l'autre circuit! R. Timsit 1 Analyse d'image scientifique, le monde.05.12 5 10.05.12 12.06.12 SP 21.06.12 24.07.12 page 22 RAK Arduino, l'autre circuit! Richard.Timsit@epfl.ch, EPFL - Domaine IT, responsable des services réseau Logiciel libre Arduino, an open-source elec- tronic

322

Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc, - September 6, 2007 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Group Inc, - September 6, Group Inc, - September 6, 2007 Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc, - September 6, 2007 September 6, 2007 Enforcement Letter issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Quality Improvement Deficiencies at the Hanford Tank Farms The Department of Energy (DOE) held an Enforcement Conference on August 29, 2006, with CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CHG) to discuss potential violations of nuclear safety requirements described in our Investigation Summary Report dated July 26, 2006. At that time, DOE elected to defer a decision on a potential quality improvement violation related to recurring radiological events and deficiencies in the identification and control of radiological hazards at the Tank Farms. This decision was based upon the fact that CHG senior management had initiated radiological work

323

Enforcement Letter, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho LLC , - May 20, 2009 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

M-Washington Group Idaho LLC , - May 20, M-Washington Group Idaho LLC , - May 20, 2009 Enforcement Letter, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho LLC , - May 20, 2009 May 20, 2009 Enforcement Letter issued to CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC, for Electrical Safety Deficiencies at the Idaho National Laboratory In July 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security's, Office of Enforcement was made aware of numerous, longstanding electrical safety deficiencies associated with electrical equipment located on the east side of the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). The Office of Enforcement is also aware that shortly after electrical safety issues with this equipment were identified by a CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC (CWI) worker in May 2007, CWI completed an Engineering Design File

324

Enforcement Letter, CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC - SEL-2012-01 | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

M Oak Ridge, LLC - SEL-2012-01 M Oak Ridge, LLC - SEL-2012-01 Enforcement Letter, CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC - SEL-2012-01 May 4, 2012 Issued to URS CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC, related to a Security Incident involving the Protection and Control of Classified Information at the East Tennessee Technology Park The Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight has completed its evaluation of a security incident involving the protection and control of classified information at the East Tennessee Teclmology Park (ETTP) (Local Tracking System Report No. II-IOSC-0576-13). Based on this evaluation, the Department of Energy (DOE) identified concerns that warrant management attention by URS CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR), the responsible contractor for ETTP. The specific concerns stem from the number of classified components that

325

Enforcement Letter, CH2M-WG Idaho - NEL-2011-02 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

M-WG Idaho - NEL-2011-02 M-WG Idaho - NEL-2011-02 Enforcement Letter, CH2M-WG Idaho - NEL-2011-02 September 28, 2011 Issued to CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC related to Quality Assurance and Work Control Issues during Construction of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project at the Idaho National Laboratory The Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight conducted an evaluation of the facts and circumstances associated with quality assurance and work control deficiencies that occurred during the construction of the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project (SBWTP) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory. On February 9, 2011, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC (CWI) reported noncompliances associated with these deficiencies in DOE's Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS) in reports NTS-ID--CWI-IWTU-2010-0002

326

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HILL Hanford Group, Inc. - HILL Hanford Group, Inc. - NEA-2008-02 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. - NEA-2008-02 June 5, 2008 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to a Radioactive Waste Spill at the Hanford Site Tank Farms This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) investigation into the facts and circumstances associated with the July 27, 2007, spill of radioactive waste in the vicinity of the S-102 retrieval pump discharge at the Hanford Tank Farm. The results of the onsite investigation were provided in an Investigation Report dated March 5, 2008. Press Release Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. - NEA-2008-02 More Documents & Publications Preliminary Notice of Violation, Bechtel National, Inc. - NEA-2008-04

327

Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - April 24, 2001 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Inc. - April 24, 2001 Inc. - April 24, 2001 Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - April 24, 2001 April 24, 2001 Enforcement Letter issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Nuclear Safety Management at the Hanford Site Tank Farms This letter refers to a recent investigation by the Department of Energy (DOE), regarding potential noncompliances with the requirements of 10 CFR 830, "Nuclear Safety Management," occurring at the Hanford Tank Farms. The investigation reviewed three issues that were reported into the Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS) by CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. Two of the NTS reports involve the failure to perform the Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) for [ ] gas monitoring. The initial potential noncompliance occurred in January 2000, in which a Zip Cord was installed

328

Independent Oversight Review, URS CH2M Oak Ridge - June 2013 | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

URS CH2M Oak Ridge - June 2013 URS CH2M Oak Ridge - June 2013 Independent Oversight Review, URS CH2M Oak Ridge - June 2013 June 2013 Review of Oak Ridge Environmental Management Radiological Controls Activity Level Implementation The purpose of this set of facility specific Independent Oversight targeted reviews is to evaluate the flowdown of occupational radiation protection requirements, as expressed in facility RPPs, to work planning, control, and execution processes, such as radiological work authorizations, including radiological work permits (RWPs) and other technical work documents (TWDs). This targeted review was performed at Oak Ridge during the period of March 3-22, 2013. This report discusses the background, scope, methodology, results, and conclusions of the review, as well as items identified for

329

Consent Order, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC - WCO-2011-01 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

M-WG Idaho, LLC - WCO-2011-01 M-WG Idaho, LLC - WCO-2011-01 Consent Order, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC - WCO-2011-01 October 6, 2011 Consent Order issued to CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC related to a Hoisting Incident that occurred at the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project at the Idaho National Laboratory The Office of Health Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight has completed its investigation into the facts and circumstances associated with the October 4, 2010, hoisting incident that occurred when a telescopic hydraulic gantry system tipped while lifting a 7,800-pound shield plug at the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project (SBWTP) located at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory. The results of the investigation were provided to CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI) in an Investigation Report, dated April 20, 2011, and

330

Observation of CH4 and other Non-CO2 Green House Gas Emissions from California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2006, California passed the landmark assembly bill AB-32 to reduce California's emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to global climate change. AB-32 commits California to reduce total GHG emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, a reduction of 25 percent from current levels. To verify that GHG emission reductions are actually taking place, it will be necessary to measure emissions. We describe atmospheric inverse model estimates of GHG emissions obtained from the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project. In collaboration with NOAA, we are measuring the dominant long-lived GHGs at two tall-towers in central California. Here, we present estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions obtained by statistical comparison of measured and predicted atmospheric mixing ratios. The predicted mixing ratios are calculated using spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and surface footprints, that provide a proportional relationship between the surface emissions and the mixing ratio signal at tower locations. The footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. Integral to the inverse estimates, we perform a quantitative analysis of errors in atmospheric transport and other factors to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated emissions. Regressions of modeled and measured mixing ratios suggest that total CH{sub 4} emissions are within 25% of the inventory estimates. A Bayesian source sector analysis obtains posterior scaling factors for CH{sub 4} emissions, indicating that emissions from several of the sources (e.g., landfills, natural gas use, petroleum production, crops, and wetlands) are roughly consistent with inventory estimates, but livestock emissions are significantly higher than the inventory. A Bayesian 'region' analysis is used to identify spatial variations in CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions within California. Although, only regions near the tower are significantly constrained by the tower measurements, CH{sub 4} emissions from the south Central Valley appear to be underestimated in a manner consistent with the under-prediction of livestock emissions. Finally, we describe a pseudo-experiment using predicted CH{sub 4} signals to explore the uncertainty reductions that might be obtained if additional measurements were made by a future network of tall-tower stations spread over California. These results show that it should be possible to provide high-accuracy estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions as a means to verify future emissions reductions.

Fischer, Marc L.; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Riley, William J.; Andrews, Arlyn C.

2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

331

Effects of CH4, H2 and CO2 Mixtures on SI Gas Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Performance of a four-stroke spark ignition gas engine operated on mixtures of CH4, H2 and CO2 was studied. Experiments were carried out at a constant engine speed of 2,000 rpm and throttle opening of 14% with various equivalence ratios. The results showed that the highest brake power output of 12.5 kW and 35% thermal efficiency were achieved when operated with the mixture of 69.70% CH4, 9.95% H2 and 20.45% CO2 and the equivalence ratios between 1.0 and 0.82.

S. Chuayboon; S. Prasertsan; T. Theppaya; K. Maliwan; P. Prasertsan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Ethynyl terminated ethers. Synthesis and thermal characterization of 2,2 bis (ethynyl-4-phenylcarbonyl-4-phenoxy-4-phenyl) propane and 2,2 bis (ethynyl-4-phenylsulfonyl-4-phenoxy-4-phenyl) propane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two ethynyl end-capped ethers 2,2 Bis [ethynyl-4-phenylsulfonyl-4-phenoxy-4-phenyl] propane and 2,2 Bis [ethynyl-4-phenylcarbonyl-4-phenoxy-4-phenyl] propane have been prepared by a three steps...

Georges Lucotte; Laurent Cormier; Bruno Delfort

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Efficient production of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural through the dehydration of sugars with caprolactam hydrogen sulfate ([CPL]HSO4) ionic liquid catalyst in a water/proprylene glycol monomethyl ether mixed solvent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efficient production of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) through the dehydration of sugars...4) ionic liquid or using metal halide as the co-catalyst in a new water/proprylene glycol monomethyl ether solvent system....

Pingzhen Huang; Aijuan Gu; Jinxing Wang

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Fluctuating micro-heterogeneity in water–tert-butyl alcohol mixtures and lambda-type divergence of the mean cluster size with phase transition-like multiple anomalies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water–tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) binary mixture exhibits a large number of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies. These anomalies are observed at surprisingly low TBA mole fraction, with x{sub TBA} ? 0.03–0.07. We demonstrate here that the origin of the anomalies lies in the local structural changes that occur due to self-aggregation of TBA molecules. We observe a percolation transition of the TBA molecules at x{sub TBA} ? 0.05. We note that “islands” of TBA clusters form even below this mole fraction, while a large spanning cluster emerges above that mole fraction. At this percolation threshold, we observe a lambda-type divergence in the fluctuation of the size of the largest TBA cluster, reminiscent of a critical point. Alongside, the structure of water is also perturbed, albeit weakly, by the aggregation of TBA molecules. There is a monotonic decrease in the tetrahedral order parameter of water, while the dipole moment correlation shows a weak nonlinearity. Interestingly, water molecules themselves exhibit a reverse percolation transition at higher TBA concentration, x{sub TBA} ? 0.45, where large spanning water clusters now break-up into small clusters. This is accompanied by significant divergence of the fluctuations in the size of largest water cluster. This second transition gives rise to another set of anomalies around. Both the percolation transitions can be regarded as manifestations of Janus effect at small molecular level.

Banerjee, Saikat; Furtado, Jonathan; Bagchi, Biman, E-mail: bbagchi@sscu.iisc.ernet.in [SSCU, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)] [SSCU, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

335

Transport study of hafnium(IV) and zirconium(IV) ions mutual separation by using Tri-n-butyl phosphate-xylene-based supported liquid membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Hf transport study through supported liquid membranes has been carried out to determine flux and permeability data for this metal ion. Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP)-xylene-based liquid membranes supported in polypropylene hydrophobic microporous film have been used. These data for hafnium and the previous data for zirconium have furnished the Zr to Hf flux ratio (S) as a function of nitric acid and TBP concentrations of the order of 12 in a single stage at room temperature. Optimum conditions for the separation of these two metal ions appear to 5-6 TBP mol/dm{sup 3} HNO{sub 3}, concentrations {le} 2.93 mol/dm{sup 3}, and 10C. The value of S from an aqueous solution containing 2.4% Hf with respect to Zr has been found to be >125 at 10C and 1.78 mol/dm{sup 3} TBP concentration in the membrane. The technique appears to be feasible for purification of Zr respect to Hf or vice versa.

Chaudry, M.A.; Ahmed, B. (Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Low-temperature CVD of iron, cobalt, and nickel nitride thin films from bis[di(tert-butyl)amido]metal(II) precursors and ammonia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thin films of late transition metal nitrides (where the metal is iron, cobalt, or nickel) are grown by low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition from bis[di(tert-butyl)amido]metal(II) precursors and ammonia. These metal nitrides are known to have useful mechanical and magnetic properties, but there are few thin film growth techniques to produce them based on a single precursor family. The authors report the deposition of metal nitride thin films below 300?°C from three recently synthesized M[N(t-Bu){sub 2}]{sub 2} precursors, where M?=?Fe, Co, and Ni, with growth onset as low as room temperature. Metal-rich phases are obtained with constant nitrogen content from growth onset to 200?°C over a range of feedstock partial pressures. Carbon contamination in the films is minimal for iron and cobalt nitride, but similar to the nitrogen concentration for nickel nitride. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the incorporated nitrogen is present as metal nitride, even for films grown at the reaction onset temperature. Deposition rates of up to 18?nm/min are observed. The film morphologies, growth rates, and compositions are consistent with a gas-phase transamination reaction that produces precursor species with high sticking coefficients and low surface mobilities.

Cloud, Andrew N.; Abelson, John R., E-mail: abelson@illinois.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 201 Materials Science and Engineering Building, 1304 W. Green St., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Davis, Luke M.; Girolami, Gregory S., E-mail: girolami@scs.illinois.edu [School of Chemical Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Ave., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Fluctuating micro-heterogeneity in water - tert-butyl alcohol mixtures and lambda-type divergence of the mean cluster size with phase transition-like multiple anomalies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water - tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) binary mixture exhibits a large number of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies. These anomalies are observed at surprisingly low TBA mole fraction, with $x_{\\text{TBA}} \\approx 0.03 - 0.07$. We demonstrate here that the origin of the anomalies lies in the local structural changes that occur due to self-aggregation of TBA molecules. We observe a percolation transition of the TBA molecules at $x_{\\text{TBA}} \\approx 0.05$. We note that "islands" of TBA clusters form even below this mole fraction, while a large spanning cluster emerges above that mole fraction. At this percolation threshold, we observe a lambda-type divergence in the fluctuation of the size of the largest TBA cluster, reminiscent of a critical point. Alongside, the structure of water is also perturbed, albeit weakly, by the aggregation of TBA molecules. There is a monotonic decrease in the tetrahedral order parameter of water, while the dipole moment correlation shows a weak non-linearity. Interestingly, water molecules themselves exhibit a reverse percolation transition at higher TBA concentration, $x_{\\text{TBA}} \\approx 0.45$, where large spanning water clusters now break-up into small clusters. This is accompanied by significant divergence of the fluctuations in the size of largest water cluster. This second transition gives rise to another set of anomalies around. Both the percolation transitions can be regarded as manifestations of Janus effect at small molecular level.

Saikat Banerjee; Jonathan Furtado; Biman Bagchi

2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

338

Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in U.S. Sewage Sludges and Biosolids: Temporal and Geographical Trends and Uptake by Corn Following Land Application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Robert C. Hale *, Mark J. La Guardia , Ellen Harvey , Da Chen , Thomas M. Mainor , and Drew R. Luellen , ... An internal standard (decachlorodiphenyl ether) was added and the final extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with electron-capture negative chemical ionization (EC-NCI). ... This work surveyed PBDE in spruce needles and air (gaseous and particle-bound) over an annual cycle to model PBDE accumulation in vegetation. ...

Robert C. Hale; Mark J. La Guardia; Ellen Harvey; Da Chen; Thomas M. Mainor; Drew R. Luellen; Lakhwinder S. Hundal

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

339

Design and synthesis of the next generation of crown ethers for waste separations: An inter-laboratory comprehensive proposal. 1998 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'The purpose of this task is to undertake the design, synthesis, and characterization of the next generation of crown ethers for metal-ion separations applicable to USDOE''s environmental needs. Target problems include: Li{sup +} ions leaching from burial sites at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant; fission products 90 Sr and {sup 137}Cs contaminating high-level tank wastes at Hanford, INEEL, and Savannah River; and radium in wastes at the Niagara Falls Storage Site. Unfortunately, the technologies needed to address these problems either do not exist or exhibit substantial deficiencies. Separation techniques such as solvent extraction and ion exchange promise to play a strong role, especially as enhanced with highly selective crown ethers and calixarenes. This project is midway through year 2 of a 3-year effort. Below is given a summary of progress in the approximate period September, 1997, to May, 1998, for each of the four co-investigators at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the University of Tennessee (UTK). The overall approach entails utilization of theory and molecular modeling (PNNL), organic synthesis of novel crown compounds (ORNL), solvent extraction studies (ORNL and ANL), and studies of polymer-immobilized crown ethers (UTK).'

Moyer, B.A.; Hay, B.P.; Dietz, M.L.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Sachleben, R.A.; Chiarizia, R.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

A facility design for repackaging ORNL CH-TRU legacy waste in Building 3525  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the last 25 years, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has conducted operations which have generated solid, contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste. At present the CH-TRU waste inventory at ORNL is about 3400 55-gal drums retrievably stored in RCRA-permitted, aboveground facilities. Of the 3400 drums, approximately 2600 drums will need to be repackaged. The current US Department of Energy (DOE) strategy for disposal of these drums is to transport them to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico which only accepts TRU waste that meets a very specific set of criteria documented in the WIPP-WAC (waste acceptance criteria). This report describes activities that were performed from January 1994 to May 1995 associated with the design and preparation of an existing facility for repackaging and certifying some or all of the CH-TRU drums at ORNL to meet the WIPP-WAC. For this study, the Irradiated Fuel Examination Laboratory (IFEL) in Building 3525 was selected as the reference facility for modification. These design activities were terminated in May 1995 as more attractive options for CH-TRU waste repackaging were considered to be available. As a result, this document serves as a final report of those design activities.

Huxford, T.J.; Cooper, R.H. Jr.; Davis, L.E.; Fuller, A.B.; Gabbard, W.A.; Smith, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Guay, K.P. [S. M. Stroller Corp. (United States); Smith, L.C. [United Energy Services Corp. (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Re-evaluation of the lifetimes of the major CFCs and CH3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Re-evaluation of the lifetimes of the major CFCs and CH3 CCl3 using atmospheric trends* M. Rigby, R interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess uncertainty in economic, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended

342

Temperature Dependence of Scott Thermomagnetic Torque in N2, Ch4, and Hd  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements in MBBA, cf. Ref. 9. 'E. Dubois-Violette, thesis, (Orsay, 1971)(unpublished). C. Williams and P. Cladis, Solid State Commun. ~10 357 (1972); R. Meyer and I. Hailer (private communica- tion). 9Ch, Gahwiller, Phys. Letters 36A, 311 (1971)."0.5x...

Adair, Thomas W.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Your Next Mobile Phone! Distributed Computing, ETH Zurich, www.disco.ethz.ch Roger Wattenhofer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Your Next Mobile Phone! Distributed Computing, ETH Zurich, www.disco.ethz.ch Roger Wattenhofer #12 Touch screen #12;[Fahrni et al., 2011] [Sommer et al., 2012] #12;The future of mobile phones? #12;#12;It's the software... #12;#12;Participatory Sensing = Web 2.0 Mobile #12;#12;#12;Monday #12;Monday #12;Monday #12

344

http://www.ied.ethz.ch/pub/index 1 IED Publications List 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

http://www.ied.ethz.ch/pub/index 1 IED Publications List 2009 Working Papers.............................................................................................................................................................................................................................8 Working Papers El Benni, N. Geographical Indications: Discussion and Negotiations about Protection. The Complexities of Decentralization in a Globalizing World, IED Working Paper (Vol. 8). Zurich: ETH, Institute

Fischlin, Andreas

345

CHEM/CH EN 5810 Nanoscience: Where Biology, Chemistry, and Physics Intersect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 CHEM/CH EN 5810 Nanoscience: Where Biology, Chemistry, and Physics Intersect Spring Semester for the course. Canvas Course Website: https://utah.instructure.com/courses/220783 Course Theme: Nanoscience properties that are being discovered every day. Nanoscience is therefore an interdisciplinary research field

Simons, Jack

346

Department of Chemical Engineering ChE 210A University of California, Santa Barbara Fall 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Chemical Engineering ChE 210A University of California, Santa Barbara Fall 2013 event, (b) a trip across the solar system, (c) a trip through a living system (through reversible for the constant-volume heat capacity, *+ (-$ -./ )+,/. d) As we will see in Chapter 14, the infinite state model

Shell, M. Scott

347

Dynamic isotope effect on the product energy partitioning in CH2OH ~CHO H2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic isotope effect on the product energy partitioning in CH2OH ~CHO H2 Young Min Rheea March 1998; accepted 1 July 1998 The deuterium isotope effect on the product energy partitioning. Close inspection of the potential energy surface revealed that the isotope effect on KER and the product

Kim, Myung Soo

348

Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 CONTRACT CLAUSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section I M110 I-i PART II SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES TABLE) .........................................................................................24 Clause I.18 - Far 52.215-8 Order Of Precedence - Uniform Contract Format (Oct 1997

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

349

Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section H M152 H-i PART I SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS .................................................................................................. 8 CLAUSE H.11 - SERVICE CONTRACT ACT OF 1965 (41 U.S.C. 351) ....................................................... 9 CLAUSE H.12 - WALSH-HEALY PUBLIC CONTRACTS ACT (OCT 2010) [M069 ­ 6

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

350

Fax +41 61 306 12 34 E-Mail karger@karger.ch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fax +41 61 306 12 34 E-Mail karger@karger.ch www.karger.com Original Paper Brain Behav Evol DOI: 10.1159/000341161 Brain Evolution across the Puerto Rican Anole Radiation Brian J. Powell Manuel Leal Duke University, Durham, N.C., USA lometry is consistent with concerted brain evolution. How- ever, in the case

Leal, Manuel S.

351

Fax +41 61 306 12 34 E-Mail karger@karger.ch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fax +41 61 306 12 34 E-Mail karger@karger.ch www.karger.com Original Paper Brain Behav Evol 2012;80:170­180 DOI: 10.1159/000341161 Brain Evolution across the Puerto Rican Anole Radiation Brian J. Powell Manuel Leal Duke University, Durham, N.C., USA lometry is consistent with concerted brain evolution. How- ever

Leal, Manuel S.

352

HA' R$,kAW CH EM I CAL CO,M i=ANY A  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

TH Ii ' HA' R,kAW CH EM I CAL CO,M iANY A December 30, 1955 U. S. Atomic Energy Commission Oak Ridge OperationwOfflce Post Office Box "E" Oak Ridge, Tennessee Attention: Mr. T....

353

Liu UCD Phy9B 07 1 Ch15. Mechanical Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liu UCD Phy9B 07 1 Ch15. Mechanical Waves #12;Liu UCD Phy9B 07 2 15-1. Introduction Source: disturbance + cohesive force between adjacent pieces A wave is a disturbance that propagates through space Mechanical wave: needs a medium to propagate Wave pulse #12;Liu UCD Phy9B 07 3 Distinctions Wave velocity vs

Yoo, S. J. Ben

354

UNC-CH TR 00-007 The Design of an API for Particle Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNC-CH TR 00-007 The Design of an API for Particle Systems David K. McAllister Department. What con- structs and abstractions are useful for specifying particle ef- fects? How can the API of our research is the Particle System Application Programmer Interface (API). This is a C++ function

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

355

The microwave spectrum and structure of the CH[sub 3]OH-CO dimer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reaction mechanism involved in the conversion of methanol to gasoline (MTG) over a zeolite catalyst (MTG process) has generated considerable interest, although much controversy still remains over the particular steps which lead to the formation of the first C-C bond. The rotational spectrum of CH[sub 3]OH-CO has been observed in the region 7--18 GHz with a pulsed-beam Fabry-Perot cavity Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer. In order to obtain detailed structural information the spectra of CH[sub 3]OH, CH[sub 3]OD, CD[sub 3]OH, and CD[sub 3]OD combined with CO and [sup 13]CO were examined. Each of the isotopic species studied exhibits two states, which are interpreted as A and E symmetry states arising from internal rotation of the methyl group. The E-state assignments were verified by observing their first-order Stark effect. The structure of the complex is a bent hydrogen bond of the carbon atom of CO at a distance of 2.41 [angstrom] from the hydroxyl hydrogen of methanol and planar heavy atoms. The effective barrier to internal rotation for CH[sub 3]OH-CO, V[sub 3] = 183.0 cm[sup [minus]1], is one-half of the value for the methanol monomer.

Lovas, F.J.; Belov, S.P.; Tretyakov, M.Yu.; Ortigoso, J.; Suenram, R.D. (National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Molecular Physics Division)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

EnvironMEntAl chEMiStry College of Natural Science and Mathematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) aqueous/ environmental geochemistry, and (iii) environmental toxicology and contaminant fate. Students mayEnvironMEntAl chEMiStry College of Natural Science and Mathematics Department of Chemistry; PhD: 32 credits Environmental chemistry focuses on the chemical processes influencing the composition

Hartman, Chris

357

PREPARED FORTHE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DEAC0276CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREPARED FORTHE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE­AC02­76CH03073 PRINCETON PLASMA is posted Department Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Publications Reports web site Calendar PHYSICS LABORATORY PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY PPPL­3567 PPPL­3567 UC­70 Expansion Rate

358

PREPARED FORTHE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DEAC0276CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREPARED FORTHE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE­AC02­76CH03073 PRINCETON PLASMA thereof. Availability report is posted Department Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, R.E. Bell, B.P. LeBlanc, S.S. Medley and NSTX Research Team Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton

359

PREPARED FORTHE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DEAC0276CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREPARED FORTHE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE­AC02­76CH03073 PRINCETON PLASMA is posted Department Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Publications and Reports web site Calendar plasma waves by counter­propagating laser beams Gennady Shvet and Nat haniel Fisch Princeton Plasma

360

ORDER AND DISORDER IN CARBIDES AND NITRIDES Ch. H. DE NOVION and V. MAURICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transition metals, rare earths and actinides react with carbon and nitrogen to form metallic carbides experimental evidence for short and long-range ordering of point defects in metallic transition metal, rareCOMPOUNDS. ORDER AND DISORDER IN CARBIDES AND NITRIDES Ch. H. DE NOVION and V. MAURICE SESI, C

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

CH4 and N2O emissions from Spartina alterniflora and Phragmites australis in experimental mesocosms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy CH4 and N2O emissions from Spartina alterniflora and Phragmites australis emissions from S. alterniflora with those from a native C3 plant, Phragmites australis, by establishing Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Common reed (Phragmites australis); Brackish marsh mesocosms

Chen, Jiquan

362

Horn's problem and semi-stability for quiver representations W. Crawley-Boevey and Ch. Gei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the eigen- values of H, which we list in decreasing order, and repeat each value according to itsHorn's problem and semi-stability for quiver representations W. Crawley-Boevey and Ch. Gei#25; 1 by Derksen and Weyman [2] using properties of semi-invariants for representations of a certain quiver

GeiÃ?, Christof

363

Horn's problem and semi-stability for quiver representations W. Crawley-Boevey and Ch. Gei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Given a Hermitian n n matrix H, we write Eig(H) = f 1; 2;:::; ng for the eigen- values of H, whichHorn's problem and semi-stability for quiver representations W. Crawley-Boevey and Ch. Gei 1 we list in decreasing order, and repeat each value according to its multiplicity. We are interested

Crawley-Boevey, William

364

Promoting effect of polyoxyethylene octylphenol ether on Cu/ZnO catalysts for low-temperature methanol synthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cu/ZnO catalysts were prepared by the co-precipitation method with the addition of OP-10 (polyoxyethylene octylphenol ether) and were chemically and structurally characterized by means of XRD, BET, H2-TPR, CO-TPD and N2O-titration. The effect of OP-10 addition on the activity of Cu/ZnO for the slurry phase methanol synthesis at 150 °C was evaluated. The results showed that Cu/ZnO prepared with addition of 8% OP-10 (denoted as C8) exhibited the promoted activity for the methanol synthesis. The conversion of CO and the STY (space time yield) of methanol were 42.5% and 74.6% higher than those of Cu/ZnO prepared without addition of OP-10 (denoted as C0), respectively. The precursor of C8 contained more aurichalcite and rosasite, and the concerted effect of Cu-Zn in C8 was found to be stronger than that in C0. Compared with C0, C8 showed smaller particle size, lower reduction temperature and larger BET and Cu surface areas.

Ling Liu; Tiansheng Zhao; Qingxiang Ma; Yufang Shen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase induction potency of polychlorinated diphenyl ethers in H4IIE rat hepatoma cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polychlorinated diphenyl ethers (PCDEs) are structurally similar to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and some PCDE congeners have been reported to cause toxic responses similar to those caused by some of the non-ortho-substituted PCBs, which are mediated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Twenty-nine PCDEs were tested for their potency as AhR agonists relative to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) by measuring their ability to induce the cytochrome P-450 1A1-associated enzyme activity, ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), in the H4IIE rat hepatoma cell bioassay. All PCDE congeners tested were found to be inactive as EROD inducers except for PCDE 156, which was a weak EROD inducer with a 2,3,7,8-TCDD equivalency factor of about 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}. During this study the authors determined that small amounts of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) that occurred as impurities in the PCDE preparations were the cause of the apparent EROD induction initially measured in their experiments. Once the PCDF impurities were removed by purification on florisil, little or no activity could be attributed to the PCDEs.

Koistinen, J.; Sanderson, J.T.; Giesy, J.P. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Nevalainen, T.; Paasivirta, J. [Univ. of Jyvaeskylae (Finland). Dept. of Chemistry

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Investigation of HCCI Combustion of Diethyl Ether and Ethanol Mixtures Using Carbon 14 Tracing and Numerical Simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the rapid combustion typically experienced in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), components in fuel mixtures do not ignite in unison or burn equally. In our experiments and modeling of blends of diethyl ether (DEE) and ethanol (EtOH), the DEE led combustion and proceeded further toward completion, as indicated by {sup 14}C isotope tracing. A numerical model of HCCI combustion of DEE and EtOH mixtures supports the isotopic findings. Although both approaches lacked information on incompletely combusted intermediates plentiful in HCCI emissions, the numerical model and {sup 14}C tracing data agreed within the limitations of the single zone model. Despite the fact that DEE is more reactive than EtOH in HCCI engines, they are sufficiently similar that we did not observe a large elongation of energy release or significant reduction in inlet temperature required for light-off, both desired effects for the combustion event. This finding suggests that, in general, HCCI combustion of fuel blends may have preferential combustion of some of the blend components.

Mack, J H; Dibble, R W; Buchholz, B A; Flowers, D L

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

367

Calcitriol inhibits Ether-a go-go potassium channel expression and cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Antiproliferative actions of calcitriol have been shown to occur in many cell types; however, little is known regarding the molecular basis of this process in breast carcinoma. Ether-a-go-go (Eag1) potassium channels promote oncogenesis and are implicated in breast cancer cell proliferation. Since calcitriol displays antineoplastic effects while Eag1 promotes tumorigenesis, and both factors antagonically regulate cell cycle progression, we investigated a possible regulatory effect of calcitriol upon Eag1 as a mean to uncover new molecular events involved in the antiproliferative activity of this hormone in human breast tumor-derived cells. RT real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that calcitriol suppressed Eag1 expression by a vitamin D receptor (VDR)-dependent mechanism. This effect was accompanied by inhibition of cell proliferation, which was potentiated by astemizole, a nonspecific Eag1 inhibitor. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot demonstrated that Eag1 and VDR abundance was higher in invasive-ductal carcinoma than in fibroadenoma, and immunoreactivity of both proteins was located in ductal epithelial cells. Our results provide evidence of a novel mechanism involved in the antiproliferative effects of calcitriol and highlight VDR as a cancer therapeutic target for breast cancer treatment and prevention.

Garcia-Becerra, Rocio [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Diaz, Lorenza, E-mail: lorenzadiaz@gmail.com [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Camacho, Javier [Department of Pharmacology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, San Pedro Zacatenco 07360, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Pharmacology, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional 2508, San Pedro Zacatenco 07360, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Barrera, David; Ordaz-Rosado, David; Morales, Angelica [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ortiz, Cindy Sharon [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Avila, Euclides [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bargallo, Enrique [Department of Breast Tumors, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Breast Tumors, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Arrecillas, Myrna [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Pathology, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Tlalpan 14080, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Halhali, Ali; Larrea, Fernando [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)] [Department of Reproductive Biology, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Vasco de Quiroga No. 15, Tlalpan 14000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Adsorption mechanism of CH3Cl on Si(1 0 0)-2 1 Jun Young Lee, Sehun Kim *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adsorption mechanism of CH3Cl on Si(1 0 0)-2 Ã? 1 Jun Young Lee, Sehun Kim * Department of Chemistry-701, South Korea Abstract The adsorption mechanism of CH3Cl on Si(1 0 0)-2 Ã? 1 has been studied by the experiment and semiempirical cal- culations. For adsorption at room temperature, the existence of a precursor

Kim, Sehun

369

Constraints on Asian and European sources of methane from CH4 -C2H6-CO correlations in Asian outflow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of emissions from coal mining and landfills. 2 #12;1. Introduction Atmospheric methane (CH4) is an importantConstraints on Asian and European sources of methane from CH4 - C2H6-CO correlations in Asian and European methane sources Submitted to J. Geophys. Res.: 22 December 2003 Revised: 9 April 2004 1 #12

Jacob, Daniel J.

370

Deep-Sea Field Test of the CH4 Hydrate to CO2 Hydrate Spontaneous Conversion Hypothesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have carried out a small-scale deep-sea field test of the hypothesis that CH4 gas can be spontaneously produced from CH4 hydrate by injection of a CO2/N2 gas mixture, thereby inducing release of the encaged molecules with sequestration of the injected ...

Peter G. Brewer; Edward T. Peltzer; Peter M. Walz; Elizabeth K. Coward; Laura A. Stern; Stephen H. Kirby; John Pinkston

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

371

BroadPeak: a novel algorithm for identifying broad peaks in dif-fuse ChIP-seq datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 BroadPeak: a novel algorithm for identifying broad peaks in dif- fuse ChIP-seq datasets JianrongIP-seq datasets. We show that BroadPeak is a linear time algorithm that requires only two parame- ters, and we validate its performance on real and simulated histone modification ChIP-seq datasets. BroadPeak calls

Jordan, King

372

Fischer-Tropsch chemistry: structure of a seminal eta/sup 2/-CH cluster derivative, HFe/sub 4/(eta/sup 2/-CH)(CO)/sub 12/  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of x-ray crystallographic studies of the complex HFe/sub 4/(eta/sup 2/-CH)(CO)/sub 12/ are reported. The complex may provide information that relates to intermediates in some metal-surface catalyzed Fischer-Tropsch reactions. The complex was found to contain a butterfly array of four Fe atoms, each with three terminal carbonyl ligands, with the carbidic C atom nestled near the center of the top of the wings of the Fe/sub 4/ array where it forms a strong C-H-Fe interaction. Measurements of the bond distances are given. (BLM)

Beno, M.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL); Williams, J.M.; Tachikawa, M.; Muetterties, E.L.

1980-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

373

Solubility of carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, ethane, and nitrogen in 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium and trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate (eFAP) ionic liquids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The density and viscosity of the ionic liquids 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate [C1C4Pyrro][eFAP] and trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium tris(pentafluoroethyl)trifluorophosphate [P66614][eFAP] were measured as a function of temperature and pressure and as a function of temperature, respectively. These two ionic liquids are more viscous than those based in the same anion associated to imidazolium cations. The effect of the addition of water on the density and viscosity of [P66614][eFAP] was studied at pressures close to atmospheric and as a function of the temperature. This ionic liquid is only partially miscible with water, its solubility being of around X H 2 O = 0.2 in the range of (303 to 315) K. Experimental values of the solubility of carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, ethane, and nitrogen were obtained as a function of temperature and at pressures close to atmospheric. Carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide are the more soluble gases with mole fraction solubilities up to 7 · 10?2. Ethane is four times and 1.3 times less soluble than carbon dioxide in [C1C4Pyrro][eFAP] and [P66614][eFAP], respectively. Nitrogen is one order of magnitude less soluble than the others gases in the two ionic liquids studied. In order to understand behavior of the different gases with these ionic liquids, the thermodynamic functions of solvation such as enthalpy and entropy were calculated from the variation of the Henry’s law constant with temperature. It is shown that the more favorable interactions of the gases with the ionic liquid explain the larger solubility of carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide in [C1C4Pyrro][eFAP]. In the case of [P66614][eFAP], it is the less favorable entropic contribution that explains the lower solubility of ethane in this ionic liquid.

S. Stevanovic; M.F. Costa Gomes

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Ultraviolet absorption spectra and kinetics of the self-reaction of CH sub 2 Br and CH sub 2 BrO sub 2 radicals in the gas phase at 298 K. [Accelerated electrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ultraviolet absorption spectra of CH{sub 2}Br and CH{sub 2}BrO{sub 2} radicals and the kinetics of their self-reactions have been studied in the gas phase at 298 K by using the pulse radiolysis technique. Absorption cross sections were quantified over the wavelength range 220-350 nm. Measured cross sections near the absorption maxima were {sigma}{sub CH{sub 2}Br}(280 nm) = (6.26 {plus minus} 1.15) {times} 10{sup {minus}18} cm{sup 2} molecule{sup {minus} 1}. Errors represent statistical errors (2{sigma}) together with the authors' estimate of potential systematic errors (10%). The absorption cross-sectional data were then used to derive the observed self-reaction rate constants for reactions 1 and 2, defined as {minus}d(R)/dt = 2k{sub obs}(R){sup 2} (R = CH{sub 2}Br or CH{sub 2}BrO{sub 2}) of CH{sub 2}Br + CH{sub 2}BR {yields} products (1), and CH{sub 2}BrO{sub 2} + CH{sub 2}BrO{sub 2} {yields} products (2) k{sub 1} = (2.93 {plus minus} 0.60) {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} and k{sub 2obs} = (3.26 {plus minus} 0.31) {times} 10{sup {minus}11} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} (quoted errors represent 2{sigma}). These results are discussed with respect to previous studies of the absorption spectra and kinetics of peroxy radicals.

Nielsen, O.J.; Munk, J.; Locke, G. (Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)); Wallington, T.J. (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States))

1991-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Summer Research Internships at ETH Zurich The Software Reliability Lab (SRL) (http://www.srl.inf.ethz.ch/) at the department of computer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summer Research Internships at ETH Zurich The Software Reliability Lab (SRL) (http://www.srl.inf.ethz.ch/) at the department of computer science, ETH Zurich (http://www.inf.ethz.ch/), Switzerland has

Kasparian, Azniv

376

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2006-06  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Inc. - Inc. - EA-2006-06 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2006-06 November 16, 2006 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Radiological Contamination Events at the Hanford Site Tank Farms This letter refers to the recent investigation at the Hanford Tank Farms by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement, now within the Office of Health, Safety and Security. The investigation involved (1) the September 2005 Tank C-202 Mobile Retrieval System (MRS) multi-personnel contamination event, (2) the March 2006 ER-311 catch tank camera removal radiological event, and (3) additional radiological contamination events that occurred between 2003-2006 as they relate to quality improvement

377

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY MlCH..t\EL BROCKWELL (INVENTOR) FOR THE W .AJVER  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MlCH..t\EL BROCKWELL (INVENTOR) FOR THE W .AJVER MlCH..t\EL BROCKWELL (INVENTOR) FOR THE W .AJVER OF DOM ESTIC N'l'D FOREIGN RJG HTS TO AN IDENTIFIED INVENTION ENTITLED ''EXOTEN SIONED STRU CTURE AND METHOD FOR CONSTRUCTION," DEVELOPED UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO. DE-AC5-- 06N..-.\25396; DOE INVENTION DISCLOSU RE NO. S- H 2,784; DOE \V"ATVER NO. W(l) 201 1-005 The Petitioner, Midmel BrockweH (Inventor), has requested a waiver of the Government' s domestic and _oreig:n patent rights in an invention entitled "Exotensioned Structure and Method for Construction." The subject invention was conceived by the Inventor (an employee of Los Alamos National Security, LLC). Los Alamos N ational Security, LLC (L.f\:"'\jS) is the M&O Contractor for the Los Alamos Natjonal Laboratory (LANL), a govemment~ovroed, contractor-

378

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC - M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC - EA-2007-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC - EA-2007-03 June 14, 2007 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC, related to Radiation Protection Program Deficiencies at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex - Accelerated Retrieval Project at the Idaho National Laboratory This letter refers to the investigation of events at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex - Accelerated Retrieval Project (ARP) by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement. The investigation summary report, Multiple Radiological Protection Program Deficiencies and Safety Culture Concerns, was provided to you in a letter dated February 20, 2007. An enforcement conference to discuss these findings was held on March

379

DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. for Price-Anderson Violations |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Group, Inc. for Price-Anderson Group, Inc. for Price-Anderson Violations DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. for Price-Anderson Violations June 5, 2008 - 12:51pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) for nuclear safety violations. CHG is the tank operations contractor for the tank farms located at DOE's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The PNOV cites a series of violations that occurred on July 27, 2007, when waste being pumped out of tank S-102 spilled in the vicinity of the tank's retrieval pump. During waste transfer operations, a supply line became over-pressurized with tank waste, causing a rupture in the dilution water supply line and resulted in a spill of approximately 85 gallons of

380

DOE Cites CH2M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations DOE Cites CH2M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations June 14, 2007 - 1:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today notified CH2M-Washington Group Idaho (CWI) that it will fine the company $55,000 for violations of the Department's nuclear safety requirements. CWI is the prime contractor responsible for managing the Idaho Cleanup Project at the Idaho National Laboratory site. The Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) cites violations associated with radiation safety and quality improvement deficiencies identified during a DOE Idaho Operations Office May 2006 assessment of radioactive waste processing activities at the Accelerated Retrieval Project (ARP). The

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - March 10,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Inc - Inc - March 10, 2005 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - March 10, 2005 March 10, 2005 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Radiological and Operational Events at the Hanford Tank Farms This letter refers to the recent investigation by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) at the Hanford Tank Farms of four radiological and operational events occurring during 2003 and 2004. The events included (1) the June 2003 multiple personnel contamination event at the [ ]; (2) the November 2003 Technical Safety Requirement violation during a cross-site waste transfer; (3) the November 2003 valve positioning error during S-112 waste retrieval operations; and

382

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - EA-2005-01  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Inc - Inc - EA-2005-01 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - EA-2005-01 March 10, 2005 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Radiological and Operational Events at the Hanford Tank Farms This letter refers to the recent investigation by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) at the Hanford Tank Farms of four radiological and operational events occurring during 2003 and 2004. The events included (1) the June 2003 multiple personnel contamination event at the [ ]; (2) the November 2003 Technical Safety Requirement violation during a cross-site waste transfer; (3) the November 2003 valve positioning error during S-112 waste retrieval operations; and (4) the July 2004 extremity exposure during hermocouple removal activities.

383

DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford Group for Price-Anderson Violations |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Group for Price-Anderson Violations Group for Price-Anderson Violations DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford Group for Price-Anderson Violations November 17, 2006 - 9:25am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today notified CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CHG) that it will fine the company $82,500 for violations of the Department's nuclear safety requirements. CHG is the prime contractor responsible for managing the storage and retrieval of highly radioactive and hazardous waste at the DOE Hanford Tank Farm site. The Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) issued today cited a series of violations associated with two separate events involving the radioactive contamination of multiple CHG employees. The first event occurred on September 21, 2005, during disassembly and removal of auxiliary equipment

384

Translational/rotational coupling of the hindered CH 3 quantum-rotor in lithium acetate dihydrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The multiplet structure of the rotational-tunneling peaks in the inelastic neutron-scattering spectrum of lithium acetate is widely regarded as evidence of coupled pairs of CH 3 quantum rotors. However our molecular-mechanics study which has no adjustable parameters reveals that rotor/rotor coupling is less important than translational/rotational coupling. In order to remain at a potential-energy minimum during CH 3 group reorientation the center-of-mass of this group follows an almost circular path around its time-average position. The energy levels from this dynamical model reproduce the observed tunneling-transitions reasonably well and the predicted rectangular density distribution of the three methyl H-atoms is in good agreement with that measured by single-crystalneutron diffraction.

P. Schiebel; G. J. Kearley; M. R. Johnson

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Single ionization of CH{sub 4} by bare ions: Fully differential cross sections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical study of fully differential cross sections for the single ionization of CH{sub 4} by collisions with H{sup +}, He{sup 2+}, and C{sup 6+} ions at energies in the order of MeV/amu is presented. We work in terms of the Born-3DW model, which considers a non-Coulomb central potential for the interaction of the active electron with the molecular core. Results obtained with the Born-3DW model are compared to those obtained with the Born-C3 model, which assumes this potential as purely Coulombic. The anisotropic potential of the CH{sub 4} molecule is smoothed through an angular integration, and results are averaged over all the possible orientations of the target molecule. Results for the lesser bound molecular orbitals (1T and 2A{sub 1}) are presented and discussed for different projectile momentum transfers for the coplanar geometry.

Fernandez-Menchero, L. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Dto. de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Avenida Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca-Buenos Aires (Argentina); Atomic Data and Analysis Structure, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde (United Kingdom); Otranto, S. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas and Dto. de Fisica, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Avenida Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca-Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Microwave spectroscopy of Lambda-doublet transitions in the ground state of CH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Lambda-doublet transitions in CH at 3.3 and 0.7 GHz are unusually sensitive to variations in the fine-structure constant and the electron-to-proton mass ratio. We describe methods used to measure the frequencies of these transitions with Hz-level accuracy. We produce a pulsed supersonic beam of cold CH by photodissociation of CHBr3, and we measure the microwave transition frequencies as the molecules propagate through a parallel-plate transmission line resonator. We use the molecules to map out the amplitude and phase of the standing wave field inside the transmission line. We investigate velocity-dependent frequency shifts, showing that they can be strongly suppressed through careful timing of the microwave pulses. We measure the Zeeman and Stark effects of the microwave transitions, and reduce systematic shifts due to magnetic and electric fields to below 1 Hz. We also investigate other sources of systematic uncertainty in the experiment.

Truppe, S; Tokunaga, S K; Hinds, E A; Tarbutt, M R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Volume 2, Chapter 1: A General Discussion on Construction of Ch'in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­780) period of the T'ang dynasty in Shu 2 . His clan included: (Lei) Hsiao (:), Chueh ()), Wen (®), and Hsun Chinesischen Instrumentenbaukunst der T'ang, I and II", Oriens Extremus, XVII (1970), 9­38, and XVIII (1971), 123­33 for a discussion of the Lei clan ch'in­ makers. 4 Cf. Gimm's article p. 12 for Chang Yueh, who

Binkley, Jim

388

General Working Principles of CH3NH3PbX3 Perovskite Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

General Working Principles of CH3NH3PbX3 Perovskite Solar Cells ... Organometal halide perovskite-based solar cells have recently realized large conversion efficiency over 15% showing great promise for a new large scale cost-competitive photovoltaic technology. ... Using impedance spectroscopy measurements we are able to separate the physical parameters of carrier transport and recombination in working devices of the two principal morphologies and compositions of perovskite solar cells, viz. ...

Victoria Gonzalez-Pedro; Emilio J. Juarez-Perez; Waode-Sukmawati Arsyad; Eva M. Barea; Francisco Fabregat-Santiago; Ivan Mora-Sero; Juan Bisquert

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

389

Liu UCD Phy9B 07 1 Ch 19. The First Law of Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liu UCD Phy9B 07 1 Ch 19. The First Law of Thermodynamics #12;Liu UCD Phy9B 07 2 19, also on the path. #12;Liu UCD Phy9B 07 7 19-4. Internal Energy & the First Law of Thermodynamics-particle interactions Recall energy change is Q-W Thus U= Q-W First law of thermodynamics Although Q & W are path

Yoo, S. J. Ben

390

Kinetics of the Selective Reduction of NO with CH4 Over an In-Fe2O3/HZSM-5 Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A kinetic model presented for the selective reduction of NO with CH4 over an In-Fe2O3/HZSM-5 catalyst by considering the process as a combination...2+CH4 (reaction 1) and O2+CH4 (reaction 2). Linear regression ca...

Xiaodong Wang; Weicheng Liu; Tao Zhang…

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

ProClim-Flash | No 57, June 201318 Figure 1: Swiss CH4 fluxes from (a) anthropogenic (agriculture, energy, waste) and (b) natural contributors (wetlands, lakes and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

April 2013 under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and under the Kyoto Protocol layers representing CH4 emissions from wastewater treatment and natural sources and sinks (Figure 1b by the CCES projects ENHANCE, www.cces.ethz.ch/ projects/sulu/ENHANCE, and BioChange, www.cces.ethz.ch/projects/clench/BioChange

392

CO2 CH4 flux Air temperature Soil temperature and Soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska 2013 ver. 1  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

This dataset consists of field measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux, as well as soil properties made during 2013 in Areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux made from June to September (ii) Calculation of corresponding Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and CH4 exchange (transparent minus opaque) between atmosphere and the ecosystem (ii) Measurements of Los Gatos Research (LGR) chamber air temperature made from June to September (ii) measurements of surface layer depth, type of surface layer, soil temperature and soil moisture from June to September.

Margaret Torn

393

Formation and characterization of hydrophobic glass surface treated by atmospheric pressure He/CH4 plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric pressure helium plasmas generated in the open air by 13.56?MHz rf power were applied for the glass surface wettability modification. The plasma gas temperature measured by the spectroscopic method was under 400?K which is low enough to treat the samples without thermal damages. The hydrophobicity of the samples determined by the water droplet contact angle method was dependent on the methane gas content and the plasma exposure time. Adding the methane gas by a small amount of 0.25% the contact angle was remarkably increased from 10° to 83° after the 10 s plasma treatment. From the analysis of the treated surface and the plasma it was shown that the deposition of alkane functional groups such as C-H stretch CH2 bend and CH3 bend was one of the contributing factors for the hydrophobicity development. In addition the hydrophobic properties lasted over 2 months even after the single treatment. From the results the atmospheric pressure plasma treatment promises the fast and low-cost method for the thermally-weak surface modification.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

ch_5  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

44 44 Environmental Consequences 5.2.7 WATER RESOURCES This section presents potential water resource impacts from implement- ing the proposed waste processing alternatives described in Chapter 3. Section 5.2.14 dis- cusses potential impacts to INEEL water resources from accidents or unusual natural phe- nomena such as earth- quakes. Appendix C.9 discusses potential long- term impacts to INEEL water resources from facility closure. Because the Minimum INEEL Processing Alternative would involve shipment of mixed HLW to the Hanford Site for treat- ment, possible impacts to water resources at Hanford were also evalu- ated (see Appendix C.8). Unless otherwise noted, however, the discussion of impacts presented in this section applies specifically to INEEL. 5.2.7.1 Methodology DOE assessed potential impacts by reviewing

395

ch_7  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 7.0 Glossar Glossar y y 7-1 DOE/EIS-0287 Terms in this glossary are defined based on the context in which they are to be used in this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). - New Information - DOE/EIS-0287 7-2 Glossary 100-year flood A flood that occurs, on average, every 100 years (equates to a 1 percent probability of occurring in any given year). 500-year flood A flood that occurs, on average, every 500 years (equates to a 0.2 percent probability of occurring in any given year). accident An unplanned sequence of events that results in undesirable consequences. actinide Any of a series of chemically similar, mostly synthetic, radioactive elements with atomic numbers ranging from 89 (actinium-89) through 103 (lawrencium-103). Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP)

396

ch_4  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

47 47 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS 4.8.2 SUBSURFACE WATER Subsurface water at INEEL occurs in the under- lying Snake River Plain Aquifer and the vadose zone (area of unsaturated soil and material above the aquifer). This section describes the regional and local hydrogeology, vadose zone hydrology, perched water, and subsurface water quality. 4.8.2.1 Regional Hydrogeology INEEL overlies the Snake River Plain Aquifer as shown in Figure 4-12. This aquifer is the major source of drinking water for southeast- ern Idaho and has been desig- nated a Sole Source Aquifer by EPA. The aquifer flows to the south and southwest and covers an area of 9,611 square miles. Water storage in the aquifer is estimated at 2 billion acre-feet, and irrigation wells can yield 7,000 gallons per minute (DOE 1995). Depth to the

397

ch_11  

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0 0 11.0 Response Response to to P P ublic ublic Comment Comment 11-1 DOE/EIS-0287 11.1 Introduction This chapter provides responses from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Idaho to public comments on the Draft Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Environmental Impact Statement (HLW & FD EIS) and identifies where those public comments led to changes to the EIS. The State of Idaho, a cooperating agency in the preparation of the EIS, participated in the process of reviewing, summarizing, and responding to comments. In addition, the State of Idaho responded to the comments that were directed specifically to the State. The following information identifies the opportunities for public comment and response format and provides information on how to find responses to each of the com-

398

ch_4  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1998, INEEL 1998, INEEL contracts paid $1.4 million to the State of Idaho in Idaho sales taxes and an additional $0.9 million in Idaho franchise tax. 4.4 Cultural Resources 4.4.1 CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND CONSULTATION AT INEEL Cultural resources at INEEL include archaeolog- ical and historic resources, such as prehistoric camp sites and historic buildings and trails, as well as the plants, animals, physical locations, and other features of INEEL environment impor- tant to the culture of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes and to national, regional and local history. Several Federal laws, which are described in Chapter 6, govern the protection of archaeologi- cal and historic resources on lands managed by Federal agencies. These and other laws also require consultations among Federal agencies,

399

ch_3  

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0 0 3.0 Alterna Alterna tiv tiv es es 3-1 DOE/EIS-0287 This chapter describes the alternatives for waste processing and facility disposi- tion analyzed in this environmental impact statement (EIS) as well as alter- natives eliminated from detailed analy- sis. As required by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) regula- tions implementing the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), a No Action alternative is also included. This chapter identifies the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Preferred Alternative as well as the State of Idaho's Preferred Alternative, which is different from that identified by DOE. Some of the alternatives include one or more options. The options are described in the context of the alternative(s) they fall under, but could be used or com-

400

ch_5  

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0 0 5.0 E E nvir nvir onmental onmental Consequences Consequences 5-1 DOE/EIS-0287 5.1 Introduction Chapter 5 describes the potential environ- mental consequences of implementing each of the alternatives described in Chapter 3. This Final EIS analyzes the alternatives in the Draft EIS and provides corrections and updates as needed. In addition, it analyzes the State of Idaho's Preferred Alternative, Direct Vitrification, and a new option of the Non-Separations Alternative, the Steam Reforming Option. Furthermore, the Minimum INEEL Processing Alternative has been modified, and other changes have been made to the analyses based on information received during the public comment period. DOE/EIS-0287 5-2 Environmental Consequences Environmental consequences of actions could include direct physical disturbance of resources,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ch_3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3-34 3-34 Alternatives transuranic waste/SBW. The EIS also presents the impacts for a grout facility (see Project P2001 in Appendix C.6) that could be used to treat the waste generated after 2005. For pur- poses of assessing transportation impacts, DOE assumed the grouted waste would be character- ized as remote-handled transuranic waste and transported to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for disposal (see Appendix C.5). 3.2 Facility Disposition Alternatives The waste processing alternatives described in Section 3.1 do not include any specific facility disposition alternatives except for those cases where facility disposition is an integral part of implementation of the option (e.g., disposal of low-level waste Class A or Class C type grout in the Tank Farm and bin sets). However, DOE

402

ch_2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 4 Background 2.1.3 CURRENT MISSION The current INEEL mission is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy advanced engineering technology and systems to improve national competitiveness and security, to make the pro- duction and use of energy more efficient, and to improve the quality of the environment. Areas of primary emphasis at INEEL include waste management and waste minimization, environ- mental engineering and restoration, energy effi- ciency, renewable energy, national security and defense, nuclear technologies, and advanced technologies and methods. INEEL is the lead laboratory for the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Program, which sets standards for developing and maintaining the capability to safely manage DOE's spent nuclear fuel. DOE considers the Environmental Management

403

ch_12  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 12.0 Distribution Distribution List List - New Information - 12-1 DOE/EIS-0287 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) pro- vided copies of this Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to Federal, state, and local elected and appointed officials and agencies of government; Native American groups; national, state, and local environmental and public interest groups; and other organizations and individuals list- ed below. In addition, DOE sent copies of the Final EIS to all persons who comment- ed on the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Draft Environmental Impact Statement; these individuals are list- ed in the Index (Alphabetical List of Commentors by Name) in Chapter 11 of this Final EIS. Other groups that received copies of the Final EIS but are not listed

404

ch_4  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

71 71 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS university research programs and private con- tractors. Ongoing studies by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, also carefully tracks possible health effects from past activities at INEEL. 4.11.1.1 Radiological Health Risk Very low doses of radiation are not known to cause health effects in humans; however, extrapolation of the dose-response relationship from high doses indicates that statistical effects might be observed in large populations. The doses reported in this EIS from INEEL opera- tions are in this very low category. This EIS reports two values: col- lective dose (in person- rem) and the hypothetical number of latent cancer fatalities. For effects on

405

ch_6  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 6.0 Sta Sta tutes tutes , , Regula Regula tions tions , , Consulta Consulta tions tions , , and Other and Other Requir Requir ements ements 6-1 DOE/EIS-0287 This chapter discusses the consultations and coordination the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has had with various agen- cies during the preparation of this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). This chapter also analyzes the complex regulatory issues that arise when consider- ing the various alternatives discussed pre- viously. When reviewing this chapter, it is impor- tant to remember the following: in the Purpose and Need discussion in Chapter 2 of this EIS, DOE has described the chal- lenges it faces with its mixed high-level waste (HLW) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and its additional

406

ch_5  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

22 22 5.2.6 AIR RESOURCES Air pollutant emissions associated with construction and operation of facilities to support the waste processing al- ternatives could affect the air resources in the region of the INEEL. DOE characterized air emission rates and calculated maximum consequences at onsite and offsite locations from projects associated with proposed waste processing alternatives. The assessments include emis- sions from stationary sources (facility stacks); fugitive sources from construction activities; and mobile sources (trucks, cranes, tractors, etc.) that would operate in sup- port of projects under each waste processing alternative. The types of emissions assessed are the same as those in the baseline assessment in Section 4.7, Air Resources, namely, radionuclides, criteria pollutants (carbon

407

ch_5  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

160 160 Environmental Consequences Under Clean Closure, radioactive and hazardous constituents would be removed from the site or treated so that residual contamination is no higher than background levels. This could require removal of all buildings, vaults, tanks, transfer piping, and contaminated soil. No post- closure monitoring would be required because potential sources of contamination would no longer be present. Unrestricted industrial use of clean-closed facilities and sites will be permissi- ble. Impacts to water resources would not be expected from the disposition of new facilities. For Performance-Based Closure, most above- ground structures would be razed and most below-ground structures (tanks, vaults, and transfer piping) would be decontaminated, stabi-

408

ch_3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

47 47 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS has been provided to the public, committed DOE to restoring the existing contaminated groundwater plume outside the INTEC security fence to meet the current drinking water stan- dard of 4 millirem per year. A performance assessment would be developed for each facility or group of facilities under consideration for disposition, to determine which of the three disposition alternatives would be implemented. The performance assessment results would be used to identify the impact on the limited cumulative risk in the INTEC area resulting from residual contami- nation from all facilities. For facilities where a performance assessment is not necessary, resid- ual waste left in place would also be used to identify impacts on the limited cumulative risk

409

ch_2  

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10 10 Background 2.2 High-Level Waste Overview 2.2.1 HIGH-LEVEL WASTE DESCRIPTION According to Section 2(12) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (42 USC 10101), high-level radioac- tive waste means: In July 1999, DOE issued Order 435.1 Radioactive Waste Management. This Order and its associated Manual and Guidance set forth the authorities, responsibilities, and requirements for the management of DOE's inventory of HLW, transuranic waste, and low-level waste. Specific to HLW, DOE uses the Nuclear Waste Policy Act definition but has jurisdictional authority consistent with existing law to deter- mine if the waste requires permanent isolation as the appropriate disposal mechanism. This authority is based on enabling legislation in the Atomic Energy Act, sections 202(3) and 202(4)

410

ch_4  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

20 20 Affected Environment 4.6 Geology and Soils This section describes the geological, mineral resources, seismic, and volcanic characteristics of INEEL, INTEC, and surrounding areas. A more detailed description of geology at INEEL can be reviewed in the SNF & INEL EIS, Volume 2, Part A, Section 4.6 (DOE 1995). 4.6.1 GENERAL GEOLOGY INEEL occupies a relatively flat area on the northwestern edge of the Eastern Snake River Plain. Figure 4-4 shows important geological features of the INEEL area. The area consists of a broad plain that has been built up from the eruptions of multi- ple flows of basaltic lava, which is shown on Figure 4-5. The flows at the surface range in age from 1.2 million to 2,100 years. The Plain is bounded on the north and south by the north-to-north-

411

ch_5  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HLW & FD EIS HLW & FD EIS 5-73 DOE/EIS-0287 tion dose to the nonin- volved worker and maximally exposed offsite individual and the collective dose to the population residing within 50 miles of INTEC. The radiation dose values for the var- ious alternatives were then multiplied by the dose-to-risk conversion factors, which are based on the 1993 Limitations of Exposure to Ionizing Radiation (NCRP 1993). DOE has adopted these risk fac- tors of 0.0005 and 0.0004 latent cancer fatality (LCF) for each person-rem of radiation exposure to the general public and worker popu- lation, respectively, for doses less than 20 rem. The factor for the population is slightly higher due to the presence of infants and children who are more sensitive to radiation than the adult worker population. DOE used radiation dose information provided

412

ch_5  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

45 45 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS 5.3.4.2 Existing Facilities Associated with High-Level Waste Management The facilities in this group are those that have historically been used at the INTEC to generate, treat, and store HLW. Because of the number of facilities involved, DOE has grouped them in functional groups for purposes of analysis (see Table 3-3). DOE analyzed the HLW tanks and bin sets for closure under all five disposition sce- narios; however, facilities that support the Tank Farm and bin sets were analyzed under a single disposition alternative. As shown in Table 3-3, the facility disposition alternative for most sup- porting facilities is Closure to Landfill Standards. (Two exceptions are the Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal Building and

413

ch_4  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

40 40 Affected Environment playas 15 to 20 miles northeast of INTEC, where the water infiltrates. The water in Birch Creek and the Little Lost River is diverted in summer months for irriga- tion prior to reaching INEEL. During periods of unusually high precipitation or rapid snow melt, water from Birch Creek and the Little Lost River may enter INEEL from the northwest and infil- trate the ground, recharging the underlying aquifer. 4.8.1.2 Local Drainage INTEC is located on an alluvial plain approxi- mately 200 feet from the Big Lost River channel near the channel intersection with Lincoln Boulevard on INEEL. INTEC is surrounded by a stormwater drainage ditch system (DOE 1998). Stormwater runoff from most areas of INTEC flows through the ditches to an abandoned gravel

414

ch_13  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 13.0 Index Index 13-1 DOE/EIS-0287 DOE/EIS-0287 13-2 Index A aesthetics - 3-54, 4-18, 4-35, 5-17, 5-18, 5-214, 5-232, 5-233, 9-9, 10-3, 10-7, C.2-4, C.8-13, C.8-32, C.8-46 airborne releases - 4-32, 4-71, 4-72, 5-48, 5-74, 5-87, 5-184, 5-225, C.2-13, C.2-17, C.8-16, C.8-36 aquifer - 2-30, 2-32, 2-33, 4-40, 4-47, 4-48, 4-49, 4-50, 4-51, 4-53, 4-54, 4-55, 4-56, 4-57, 4-72, 4-79, 5-2, 5-20, 5-44, 5-45, 5-107, 5-121, 5-122, 5-161, 5-165, 5-180, 5-212, 5-221, 5-222, 5-225, 5-227, 5-233, 5-234, 5-235, 6-15, 6-31, 6-32, 6-37, 7-3, 7-20, 7-24, 7-27, 7-29, 9-13, 9-14, 9-15, 11-18, 11-23, 11-24, 11-31, 11-54, 11-65, 11-73, 11-78, 11-79, 11-80, 11-82, 11-83, 11-84, 11-85, A-1, A-3, A-4, A-8, A-12, B-4, B-10, C.4-39, C.4-41, C.6-97, C.8-8, C.8-18, C.8-46, C.9-4, C.9-6, C.9-7, C.9-9, C.9-10,

415

ch_9  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 9.0 Re Re f f er er ences ences 9-1 DOE/EIS-0287 DOE/EIS-0287 9-2 References Chapter 1 DOE (U.S. Department of Energy), 1999, Record of Decision Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Operable Unit 3-13, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, DOE/ID-10660, Idaho Operations Office, Idaho Falls, Idaho, October. Kelly, K. B., 1999, State of Idaho, Office of Attorney General, Boise, Idaho, letter to B. Bowhan, U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office, Idaho Falls, Idaho, transmitting "Third Modification to Consent Order," Idaho Code §39-4413, April 20. USDC (U.S. District Court for the District of Idaho), 1995, Public Service Company of Colorado v. Philip E. Batt, Civil No. 91-0035-S-EJL (Lead Case), Consent Order, October

416

ch_3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

13 DOEEIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS except the pillar and panel tanks) would be full of mixed transuranic waste in approximately 2017. Other facilities depending on the capacity of...

417

ch_1  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

would be the liquid generated during the first cycle of a process that extracted fis- sionable nuclear material from dissolved irradiated nuclear reactor fuel. Liquid...

418

ch_9  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by DOE. * Discussion of Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Determination under DOE Order 435.1 has been expanded. The expanded discussion of the procedure is located in the...

419

ch_4  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Antelope Buttes are visible to the northeast. Smaller volcanic buttes dot the natural landscape of INEEL, providing a striking contrast to the relatively flat ground surface. The...

420

ch_4  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Moon National Monument and Wilderness Area, Hell's Half Acre Wilderness Study Area, Black Canyon Wilderness Study Area, Camas National Wildlife Refuge, Market Lake Wildlife...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ch_2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HLW & FD EIS B i r c h C r e ek East Butte Middle Butte Big Southern Butte LAVA Black Canyon Wilderness Study Area Hell's Half Acre Wilderness Study Area C H A L L I S N A T I...

422

ch_4  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

58 58 Affected Environment 4.9.1 PLANT COMMUNITIES AND ASSOCIATIONS INEEL lies within a cool desert ecosystem dom- inated by shrub-steppe vegetation. The area is relatively undisturbed, providing important habi- tat for species native to the region. Vegetation and habitat on INEEL can be grouped into six types: shrub-steppe, juniper woodlands, native grasslands, modified ephemeral playas, lava, and wetland-like areas. Figure 4-16 shows these areas. More than 90 percent of INEEL falls within the shrub-steppe vegetation type. The shrub-steppe vegetation type is dominated by sagebrush (Artemisia spp.), saltbush (Atriplex spp.), and rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus spp.). Grasses found on INEEL include cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Indian ricegrass (Oryzopsis hymenoides), wheatgrass (Agropyron spp.), and

423

ch_5  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

25 25 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS 5.3 Facility Disposition Impacts Section 5.3 presents a discussion of potential impacts associated with the disposition of exist- ing HLW management facilities at INEEL and disposition of new facilities that would be built in support of the proposed waste processing alternatives. The discussion includes (1) the potential impacts of short-term actions in dispo- sitioning new and existing HLW management facilities, (2) the potential long-term impacts from the disposal of the grouted low-level waste fraction in either a new disposal facility at INTEC or in the Tank Farm and bin sets, and (3) the potential long-term impacts of residual con- tamination in closed HLW management facili- ties. The six facility disposition alternatives are

424

U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Office and URS/CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Office and URS/CH2M Oak Ridge, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Office and URS/CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) Contract Partnering Agreement U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Office and URS/CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) Contract Partnering Agreement The Partnering Team will complete the cleanup, reindustrialize ETTP and continue Environmental Management (EM) activities currently ongoing at ORNL and Y-12. This work will be accomplished in a safe and quality manner with a goal of completion under budget and ahead of schedule. U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Office and URS/CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) Contract Partnering Agreement More Documents & Publications Contractor Fee Payments - Oak Ridge Operations

425

Spatial and temporal coupling models for the discovery of binding events in ChIP-Seq data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we will present two methods for identifying binding events in ChIP-Seq data. The motivation of this venture is to propose a complete read generating process under a probabilistic graphical model framework ...

Papachristoudis, Georgios

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Kinetics of the Reduction of CuO/Bentonite by Methane (CH4) during Chemical Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Kinetics of the Reduction of CuO/Bentonite by Methane (CH4) during Chemical Looping Combustion ... The Journal of Physical Chemistry C2014 118 (37), 21532-21540 ...

Esmail R. Monazam; Ranjani Siriwardane; Ronald W. Breault; Hanjing Tian; Lawrence J. Shadle; George Richards; Stephen Carpenter

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

427

A comparative study of CH4 and CF4 rf discharges using a consistent plasma physics and chemistry simulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A self-consistent, one-dimensional simulator for the physics and chemistry of radio frequency (rf) plasmas was developed and applied for CH4 and CF4. The simulator consists of a fluid model for the discharge phys...

Nikolaos V. Mantzaris; Evangelos Gogolides…

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Research Staff Openings in Organic Optoelectronic Devices Contact Person: Dr. Wallace C.H. Choy, Department of Electrical and Electronic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Staff Openings in Organic Optoelectronic Devices Contact Person: Dr. Wallace C.H. Choy the quantum efficiency of organic optoelectronic devices particularly organic solar cells and then organic

Leung, Ka-Cheong

429

The role of CO2 in CH4 exsolution from deep brine: Implications for geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spreading under the shale where gas saturation is higher duecomposition of the gas above the shale is mainly CH 4 , andeffect of the shale remains as higher gas saturations are

Oldenburg, C.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Preparation and Adsorption Performance of GrO@Cu-BTC for Separation of CO2/CH4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomethane production from municipal wastes through anaerobic digestion technology is growing worldwide. ... CO2 is the main undesirable compound present in landfill gas, so CO2/CH4 separation is critical for the production of biomethane from landfill gas. ...

Wenyu Huang; Xin Zhou; Qibin Xia; Junjie Peng; Haihui Wang; Zhong Li

2014-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

431

Ed Jascevsky Safety Division ChIcago Operations Office MIT CONTFACT INFCE"ATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

;/:4,4 (; . 1.; ;/:4,4 (; . 1.; e octo: ' J : 18, 1976 Ed Jascevsky Safety Division ChIcago Operations Office MIT CONTFACT INFCE"ATION During the discussions on October 8, 1976, you iquired about information relative to work done by MIT as background infomation for survey planning. The enclosed information is parephrased frorc an unpublished history of program work carried out by the Process Eevclopncnt Group of the Dl.ti,si.on of Raw Katerids, I believe this work was done under contract nuder AT(30-1)956. Robert IE. Allen Process Facilities Safety Branch Division of Safety, Standards, and Compliance Fnclosure: As stated I I . ..--@q$?.. .... ............................................ ........ ..- .......................... . ... ... .- ................... .._ ................ .... ..__ ..............

432

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and chemists. To realize hydrogen-powered transport, for example, it is necessary to find ways to store hydrogen onboard vehicles efficiently and safely. Nanotechnology in the form of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a candidate storage medium. A U.S., German, and Swedish collaboration led by researchers from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) used ALS Beamline 11.0.2 and SSRL Beamline 5-1 to investigate the chemical interaction of hydrogen with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Their findings demonstrate substantial hydrogen storage is both feasible and reversible.

433

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Wednesday, 28 June 2006 00:00 Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and chemists. To realize hydrogen-powered transport, for example, it is necessary to find ways to store hydrogen onboard vehicles efficiently and safely. Nanotechnology in the form of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a candidate storage medium. A U.S., German, and Swedish collaboration led by researchers from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) used ALS Beamline 11.0.2 and SSRL Beamline 5-1 to investigate the chemical interaction of hydrogen with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Their findings demonstrate substantial hydrogen storage is both feasible and reversible.

434

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and chemists. To realize hydrogen-powered transport, for example, it is necessary to find ways to store hydrogen onboard vehicles efficiently and safely. Nanotechnology in the form of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a candidate storage medium. A U.S., German, and Swedish collaboration led by researchers from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) used ALS Beamline 11.0.2 and SSRL Beamline 5-1 to investigate the chemical interaction of hydrogen with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Their findings demonstrate substantial hydrogen storage is both feasible and reversible.

435

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and chemists. To realize hydrogen-powered transport, for example, it is necessary to find ways to store hydrogen onboard vehicles efficiently and safely. Nanotechnology in the form of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a candidate storage medium. A U.S., German, and Swedish collaboration led by researchers from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) used ALS Beamline 11.0.2 and SSRL Beamline 5-1 to investigate the chemical interaction of hydrogen with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Their findings demonstrate substantial hydrogen storage is both feasible and reversible.

436

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and chemists. To realize hydrogen-powered transport, for example, it is necessary to find ways to store hydrogen onboard vehicles efficiently and safely. Nanotechnology in the form of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a candidate storage medium. A U.S., German, and Swedish collaboration led by researchers from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) used ALS Beamline 11.0.2 and SSRL Beamline 5-1 to investigate the chemical interaction of hydrogen with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Their findings demonstrate substantial hydrogen storage is both feasible and reversible.

437

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and chemists. To realize hydrogen-powered transport, for example, it is necessary to find ways to store hydrogen onboard vehicles efficiently and safely. Nanotechnology in the form of single-walled carbon nanotubes provides a candidate storage medium. A U.S., German, and Swedish collaboration led by researchers from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) used ALS Beamline 11.0.2 and SSRL Beamline 5-1 to investigate the chemical interaction of hydrogen with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNs). Their findings demonstrate substantial hydrogen storage is both feasible and reversible.

438

Negative ion motion in the mixtures of SF6 with CF4 and CH4-Ar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper deals with the measurement of the mobility of negative ions in the mixtures of SF6 with CF4 and the CH4-Ar (50:50) binary mixture with SF6 contents up to 50%. The pulsed Townsend technique was used to observe the integrated ionic avalanches over a range of the density-reduced electric field E/N for which ionization is either negligible or absent, and attachment processes are significant, leading to the formation of mostly SF6-. The E/N range of measurement was from 1 to 70 Td (1 Td=10-17 V cm2), over which the measured mobilities were found to be almost constant. The mobility of the negative ions was also measured for trace amounts of SF6 in CH4 and Ar and 1% CF4, thereby providing a good value of the mobility of SF6- in these pure gases, in order to test the measured mobilities with Blanc’s law. We have found good agreement, within quoted experimental uncertainties, between calculated and measured values.

J. de Urquijo and F. B. Yousif

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

439

CO2 and CH4 Fluxes across Polygon Geomorphic Types, Barrow, Alaska, 2006-2010  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Carbon flux data are reported as Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), Gross Ecosystem Exchange (GEE), Ecosystem Respiration (ER), and Methane (CH4) flux. Measurements were made at 82 plots across various polygon geomorphic classes at research sites on the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO), the Biocomplexity Experiment site on the BEO, and the International Biological Program (IBP) site a little west of the BEO. This product is a compilation of data from 27 plots as presented in Lara et al. (2012), data from six plots presented in Olivas et al. (2010); and from 49 plots described in (Lara et al. 2014). Measurements were made during the peak of the growing seasons during 2006 to 2010. At each of the measurement plots (except Olivas et al., 2010) four different thicknesses of shade cloth were used to generate CO2 light response curves. Light response curves were used to normalize photosynthetically active radiation that is diurnally variable to a peak growing season average ~400 umolm-2sec-1. At the Olivas et al. (2010) plots, diurnal patterns were characterized by repeated sampling. CO2 measurements were made using a closed-chamber photosynthesis system and CH4 measurements were made using a photo-acoustic multi-gas analyzer. In addition, plot-level measurements for thaw depth (TD), water table depth (WTD), leaf area index (LAI), and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) are summarized by geomorphic polygon type.

Tweedie, Craig; Lara, Mark

440

Effects of CH{sub 4} and CO on the reduction of nitric oxide to nitrogen in a discharge reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Additives are often added to enhance the efficiency of NO removal. This study uses a radio frequency (rf) discharge to consider the effect of added CH{sub 4} and CO to simulated NO/N{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O mixtures on the elevation of NO conversion and the reduction of NO into N{sub 2}. The enhancement levels of NO conversion when using various additives were found to be in this order: +CH{sub 4}>+CO>no additive. NO conversion reached 99.3%, 86.2%, and 77.6% when adding CH{sub 4}, CO, and without additive, respectively, at inlet additive/NO molar ratio (R) = 5 and at 120 W. Moreover, the fraction of total N atoms converted from NO into N{sub 2} (F{sub N2}) was very high, reaching 99.4% and 99.5% when adding CH{sub 2}4 and CO, respectively, at R = 1 and at 120 W. The better operating conditions are using CH{sub 4} as the additive at R = 1 and a power of >60 W to reach a higher NO conversion with a higher F{sub N2}. However, it should be noted that this rf plasma approach is not practical at this stage because of its relative low pressure. 25 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Cheng-Hsien Tsai; Lien-Te Hsieh; Juu-En Chang; Yi-Ming Kuo; Ying-I Tsai [National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, Kaohsiung (Taiwan). Department of Chemical and Material Engineering

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Infrared diode laser studies of the products from the reaction CH{sub 2}({tilde X}{sup 3}B{sub 1}) + O{sub 2} and from the near-UV photolysis of CH{sub 3}NCS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Absolute yields of CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}CO formed in reaction of triplet methylene ({tilde X} {sup 3}B{sub 1} {triple_bond} CH{sub 2}) with O{sub 2} were determined using a flash kinetic spectrometer. CH{sub 2} radicals were generated by excimer laser photolysis of ketene and product formation was monitored by time-resolved infrared diode laser absorption. Reaction was carried out in a static gas cell at room temperature at 1--25 torr. Measured product yields were CO, 0.34 {plus_minus} 0.06; CO{sub 2}, 0.40 {plus_minus} 0.08 H{sub 2}CO, 0.16 {plus_minus} 0.04. Rate constants for production of CO and CO{sub 2} were equivalent to the published rate constant for removal of CH{sub 2}. Indirect evidence indicated that yield of OH is 0.30 {plus_minus} 0.05. Ultraviolet spectrum of methyl isothiocyanate (CH{sub 3}NCS {triple_bond} MITC) and quantum yield for dissociation into methyl isocyanide (CH{sub 3}NC) and atomic sulfur at 308 nm, {Phi} 0.98 {plus_minus} 0.24, were measured. MITC is widely used as a fumigant and readily enters the atmosphere during and after application. Results indicate that photodissociation by sunlight is an effective pathway for removal of MITC from atmosphere. A mechanism is proposed to account for the observed formation of methyl isocyanate (CH{sub 3}NCO) as a secondary product in controlled laboratory studies.

Alvarez, R.A.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Ch08 oupTall Tales about Mind and Brain (Typeset by SPi, Delhi) July 12, 2006 18:34 Tall tales on intelligence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ch08 oup­Tall Tales about Mind and Brain (Typeset by SPi, Delhi) July 12, 2006 18:34 Tall tales on intelligence #12;Ch08 oup­Tall Tales about Mind and Brain (Typeset by SPi, Delhi) July 12, 2006 18:34 #12;Ch08 oup­Tall Tales about Mind and Brain (Typeset by SPi, Delhi) July 12, 2006 18:34 Chapter 8 Is bigger

Aberdeen, University of

443

Memorandum, CH2M HG Idaho, LLC, Request for Variance to Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations part 851, "Worker Safety and Health"  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

CH2M HG Idaho, LLC, Request for Variance to Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations part 851, "Worker Safety and Health"

444

C–H Bond Activation by Pd-substituted CeO2: Substituted Ions versus Reduced Species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While large reserves of CH4 exist and considerable portions of these reserves are currently used to heat homes and generate hydrogen for other synthetic processes, it is widely accepted that the conversion of CH4 to liquid hydrocarbon fuels efficiently with an inexpensive and robust catalyst would be a substantial contribution to alternative energy research. ... (40) The usual Fischer–Tropsch strategy requires oxidation to mixtures of CO and H2, which are then converted to higher hydrocarbons. ... While heating any hydrocarbon in the presence of oxygen to high temperatures, combustion products are expected. ...

Lauren M. Misch; Joshua A. Kurzman; Alan R. Derk; Young-Il Kim; Ram Seshadri; Horia Metiu; Eric W. McFarland; Galen D. Stucky

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

445

10 CFR Ch. III (1-1-11 Edition) Pt. 851, App. B  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 CFR Ch. III (1-1-11 Edition) Pt. 851, App. B must meet the applicable electrical safety codes and standards referenced in § 851.23. 11. NANOTECHNOLOGY SAFETY-RESERVED The Department has chosen to reserve this section since policy and procedures for nano- technology safety are currently being devel- oped. Once these policies and procedures have been approved, the rule will be amended to include them through a rulemaking con- sistent with the Administrative Procedure Act. 12. WORKPLACE VIOLENCE PREVENTION- RESERVED The Department has chosen to reserve this section since the policy and procedures for workplace violence prevention are currently being developed. Once these policies and pro- cedures have been approved, the rule will be amended to include them through a rule-

446

MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE ChMBRIDGE'39, MASSACHUSETTS TELEPHONE UNrvn.,,r,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

2, .* 2, .* -' .l-.; . . *' ,. .:, ,-i&CLEAR METALS, INC. MA ,y 155 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE ChMBRIDGE'39, MASSACHUSETTS TELEPHONE UNrvn.,,r, 4-5200 blr. Saul Strauch Technical Liason Division United States Atomic Energy Commission New York Operations Office 70 Columbus Avenue New York 23, New York SUBJECT:- Program for Uranium Recovery (Ref: S. Strauch to A. R. Kaufmnnn, B/30/55) Dear Mr. Strauch: With reference to Mr. K. E. Field's confidential memorandum of August 22, 1956, this is to advise tha.t Nuclea,r l,':etals, Inc., has no facilities for scrap recovery. Also, our reply to Section III of the memorandum must be based .on our operations during the fiscal year recently ended. During that period, normal uranium 3cra.p material3 were returned to the i\'ational Lead Company of Ohio, and enriched scrap materials

447

Ch P cage Operations and Regional Office 9800 South Cass Avenue  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

artment of Energy artment of Energy Ch P cage Operations and Regional Office 9800 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439 OCT 2 1 1980 Ki.lliam E. Mott, Director Environmental Cinttol Technology Division, KC! SUBJECT I PREHIER MANUFACTURING - SPRINGDALE, PEhVSYLVA?UA A visit to Premier Manufacturing, 644 Garfield, Springdalc, Pennsylvania, was made en October 6, 1980, by Edward J. Jascewsky and Art Whitman, Department of Energy, and Walter R. Smith, Argonne National Laboratory. The group met with Edward McClesky, Premier Manufacturing and Bud Schnoor, PPG Industries, Inc. The purpose of the visit was to perform a cursory radiological survey of the facility at the above location. In addition, discussions were held with Mr. Schnoor whose family previously owned the facility and performed the

448

Quantitative Visualization of ChIP-chip Data by Using Linked Views  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most analyses of ChIP-chip in vivo DNA binding have focused on qualitative descriptions of whether genomic regions are bound or not. There is increasing evidence, however, that factors bind in a highly overlapping manner to the same genomic regions and that it is quantitative differences in occupancy on these commonly bound regions that are the critical determinants of the different biological specificity of factors. As a result, it is critical to have a tool to facilitate the quantitative visualization of differences between transcription factors and the genomic regions they bind to understand each factor's unique roles in the network. We have developed a framework which combines several visualizations via brushing-and-linking to allow the user to interactively analyze and explore in vivo DNA binding data of multiple transcription factors. We describe these visualization types and also provide a discussion of biological examples in this paper.

Huang, Min-Yu; Weber, Gunther; Li, Xiao-Yong; Biggin, Mark; Hamann, Bernd

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

449

Final Report for DOE Project DE-FC07-99CH11010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Department of Energy award number DE-FC07-99CH11010, Enhanced Utilization of Corn Based Biomaterials, supported a technology development program sponsored by Cargill Dow LLC from September 30, 1999 through June 30, 2003. The work involved fundamental scientific studies on poly lactic acid (PLA), a new environmentally benign plastic material from renewable resources. DOE funds supported academic research at the Colorado School of Mines and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and industry cost share was directed towards applied research into new product development utilizing the fundamental information generated by the academic partners. Under the arrangement of the grant, the fundamental information is published so that other companies can utilize it in evaluating the applicability of PLA in their own products. The overall project objective is to increase the utilization of PLA, a renewable resource based plastic, currently produced from fermented corn sugar.

Jed Randall; Robert Kean

2003-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

450

Theoretical study on collision dynamics of H{sup +} + CH{sub 4} at low energies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work we make an investigation on collision dynamics of H{sup +} + CH{sub 4} at 30 eV by using time-dependent density functional theory coupled with molecular dynamics approach. All possible reactions are presented based on 9 incident orientations. The calculated fragment intensity is in nice agreement with experimental results. The mechanism of reaction transition for dissociation and proton exchange processes is explained by the intra-molecule energy transfer. However, the energy loss of the proton is in poor agreement with experimental results. The discrepancy is attributed to the mean-field treatment of potential surface. We also studied the dependence on initial velocity of both proton and methane. In addition, we find that for dynamical evolution a different self-interaction correction (SIC) may lead to different results, but with respect to the position of rainbow angle, average-density SIC seems to have reasonable correction.

Gao, Cong-Zhang [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China) [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Laboratoire de Physique Théorique-IRSAMC, Université Paul Sabatier, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex, France and CNRS, UMR5152, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); Wang, Jing [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China) [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Wang, Feng [Laser Micro/Nano Fabrication Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)] [Laser Micro/Nano Fabrication Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang, Feng-Shou, E-mail: fszhang@bnu.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China) [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator of Lanzhou, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

451

Infrared Spectra of M-?2-C2H2, HM–C?CH, and HM–C?CH– Prepared in Reactions of Laser-Ablated Group 3 Metal Atoms with Acetylene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The major HM–C?CH and M-?2-C2H2 products are observed in the matrix infrared spectra from reactions of laser-ablated group 3 metal atoms with acetylene, while the vinylidene product is not detected. These results reveal that coordination of group 3 metal ...

Han-Gook Cho; Lester Andrews

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

452

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073 PRINCETON PLASMA on the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Publications and Reports web site and DOE Contractors can obtain copies of this report from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific

453

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and granite mining operations in South Africa and Europe, has existed for more than 25 years. When miningPREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073 PRINCETON PLASMA commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does

454

Foundation for the Support of Research on Alzheimer's Disease and other Neurodegenerative Diseases Synapsis Foundation, Fabrikstrasse 50, CH-8031 Zrich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Foundation for the Support of Research on Alzheimer's Disease and other Neurodegenerative Diseases Synapsis Foundation, Fabrikstrasse 50, CH-8031 Zürich Tel. +41 (0)44 271 35 11, Fax +41 (0)44 271 35 12 Submission Deadline 31st August, 2011 SYNAPSIS FOUNDATION with its research programme "Alzheimer Research

Richner, Heinz

455

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan m UC Davis, Davis, Cal. n Lawrence Livermore National LaboratoryPREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073 PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY PPPL-3716 PPPL-3716 UC-70 Recent Progress

456

Transport Diffusivities of CH4, CF4, He, Ne, Ar, Xe, and SF6 in Silicalite from Atomistic Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have used atomistic simulations to examine the adsorption isotherms, self diffusivity, and transport diffusivity of seven light gases, CH4, CF4, He, Ne, Ar, Xe, and SF6, adsorbed as single-components in silicalite at room temperature. By using ...

Anastasios I. Skoulidas; David S. Sholl

2002-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

457

The Effect of the Electric Pulse Polarity on CO2 Reforming of CH4 Using Dielectric Barrier Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the CO2 reformation of CH4 using a plasma process to produce synthesis gas, various kinds of electric sources were used such as ac and dc corona discharges,1-4?glow discharge,5-7?or dielectric-barrier discharge. ... Its charge limits the voltage applied to the gas avoiding the transition to arc. ...

Hwaung Lee; Chung-Hun Lee; Jae-Wook Choi; Hyung Keun Song

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

458

Assessment of kinetic modeling for lean H2/CH4/O2/diluent flames at high pressures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and HO2 + H with the main branching reactions. Methane addition is shown to influence the pressure: Hydrogen; Methane; Syngas; Flame speed; Chemical mechanism 1. Introduction The H2/O2 reaction system CO, CO2, H2O, CH4 and other small hydrocarbons (synthetic gas or "syngas") from coal or biomass

Ju, Yiguang

459

Selection of coals of different maturities for CO2 Storage by modelling of CH4 and CO2 adsorption isotherms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this study is to compare and model pure gas sorption isotherms (CO2 and CH4) for well-characterised coals of different maturities to determine the most suitable coal for CO2 storage. Carbon dioxide and methane; Coals; Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption; Modelling isotherms 1. Introduction CO2 is a greenhouse

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

460

O2, CH4 and CO2 gas retentions by acid smectites before and after thermal treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acid smectites in natural condition and after thermal treatment up to 900 °C were studied for their O2, CH4 and CO2 gas retentions at 25 °C and 1 kg/cm2. Two smectites, one dioctahedral and one trioctahedral, wer...

C. Volzone; J. Ortiga

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasmas for these tokamaks have been constructed [1] using the TRANSP plasma analysis code. Neutral beamPREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073 PRINCETON PLASMA of the Neutral-beam-induced Rotation, Radial Electric Field, and Flow Shearing Rate in Next-step Burning Plasmas

462

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasma can be constructed from experimental measurements using a simple model, allowing the neutral gasPREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073 PRINCETON PLASMA of Neutral Gas Transport in the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak Divertor by D.P. Stotler, C.S. Pitcher, C.J. Boswell, B

463

Encoding of SRP packet types in the DS byte Werner Almesberger !Werner.Almesberger@epfl.ch? 1 ,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Encoding of SRP packet types in the DS byte Werner Almesberger !Werner.Almesberger@epfl.ch? 1 We propose an encoding of the packet types used by SRP (Scalable Reservation Protocol) in the DS byte under study by the Differentiated Services working group. 1 Introduction SRP [1] is a light

Almesberger, Werner

464

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy across bodies of water will become very expensive. On a global scale, fusion power regional factors such as the availability of primary energy resources (e.g. solar) will also playPREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073 PRINCETON PLASMA

465

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E is proportional to E3/2 , so the assumption E L does not hold for high energy E. When E = LPREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073 PRINCETON PLASMA Government or any agency thereof. Availability This report is posted on the U.S. Department of Energy

466

Sequential addition of H2O, CH3OH, and NH3 to Al3O3 : A theoretical study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Al3O3 H2O 2 - and Al3O3 CH3OH 2 - , that are produced by the addition of two water or methanol be approximated by collisions between AlxOy - clusters and molecules of water, methanol, and ammonia. Products the photoelectron spectra of anions formed with two but not one molecules of water and methanol resemble

Simons, Jack

467

UNDERGRADUATE MINOR IN "ENERGY ENGINEERING" Available to any UG pursuing a ChE degree in EECE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

students to energy and related concepts in their introductory courses. Basic and Applied Sciences course) EnSt 451 Environmental Policy (Fall) EECE 590 Energy and Environ, Economics and Decision Making & Waste Minimization (Fall) EECE/ChE 439 Advanced Energy Laboratory (Fall) MASE 5422 Solar Energy Thermal

Subramanian, Venkat

468

Single-QCL-based absorption sensor for simultaneous trace-gas detection of CH4 and N2O  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compact multipass gas cell (MGC). This sensor uses a thermoelectrically cooled, continuous wave­8]. A compact mid-infrared absorption spectrometer for N2O and CH4 was developed using thermoelectrically cooled.04 cm-1 ) and N2O (1274.61 cm-1 ) lines at a 1 Hz repetition rate. Wavelength modulation spec- troscopy

469

Multi-Camera Handoff Management for Asset Monitoring in Nuclear Facilities C.-H Chen, A. Koschan, and M. Abidi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the University Research Program in Robotics #12;METHODOLOGY Assume that the arrival of objects with a priorityMulti-Camera Handoff Management for Asset Monitoring in Nuclear Facilities C.-H Chen, A. Koschan Middle Drive, Knoxville, TN 37996 {cchen10, akoschan, and abidi}@utk.edu INTRODUCTION In a nuclear

Abidi, Mongi A.

470

Hybrid Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanics Study of the SN2 Reaction of CH3Cl+OH? in Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SN2 mechanism for the reaction of CH3Cl + OH? in aqueous solution was investigated using combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanics methodology. We analyzed structures of reactant, transition and product states along the reaction pathway. The free energy profile was calculated using the multi-layered representation with the DFT and CCSD(T) level of theory for the quantum-mechanical description of the reactive region. Our results show that the aqueous environment has a significant impact on the reaction process. We find that solvation energy contribution raises the reaction barrier by ~18.9 kcal/mol and the reaction free energy by ~24.5 kcal/mol. The presence of the solvent also induces perturbations in the electronic structure of the solute leading to an increase of 3.5 kcal/mol for the reaction barrier and a decrease of 5.6 kcal/mol for the reaction free energy respectively. Combining the results of two previous calculation results on CHCl3 + OH? and CH2Cl2 + OH? reactions in water, we demonstrate that increase in the chlorination of the methyl group (from CH3Cl to CHCl3) is accompanied by the decrease in the free energy reaction barrier, with the CH3Cl + OH? having the largest barrier among the three reactions.

Yin, Hongyun; Wang, Dunyou; Valiev, Marat

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

471

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073 PRINCETON PLASMA's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Publications and Reports web site in Fiscal Year 2004. The home page, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA Abstract Plasma neutralization of an intense ion beam

472

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073 PRINCETON PLASMA on the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Publications and Reports web site in an expanding plasma A. Dunaevsky and N. J. Fisch Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, Princeton University, P

473

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073 PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY PPPL-3942 PPPL-3942 UC-70 Nonlinear Plasma. Availability This report is posted on the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

474

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073 PRINCETON PLASMA on the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Publications and Reports web site GUIDE Igor D. Kaganovich Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, 08543

475

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073 PRINCETON PLASMA of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Publications and Reports web site in Fiscal Year 2004. Gentile / Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory Erik Perry / Princeton University, Plasma

476

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073 PRINCETON PLASMA with theA joint report with theA joint report with the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (Princeton, NJ USA)Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (Princeton, NJ USA)Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

477

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073 PRINCETON PLASMA on the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Publications and Reports web site. Startsev and R. C. Davidson are with Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543

478

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREPARED FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, UNDER CONTRACT DE-AC02-76CH03073 PRINCETON PLASMA PHYSICS LABORATORY PRINCETON UNIVERSITY, PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY PPPL-3879 PPPL-3879 UC-70 Plasma Science's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Publications and Reports web site in Fiscal Year 2004. The home page

479

APPENDXD.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Report The Form EIA-819, "Monthly Oxygenate Report" provides production data for fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). End-of-month stock data held at ethanol...

480

The feasibility of ethanol production in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural interests across Texas are looking at the possibility of an ethanol industry in Texas. Continued conflict in the Middle East, the ban of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in California, and low commodity prices have all lead...

Herbst, Brian Keith

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butyl ether ch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

CH O Hydrogen Bonds at Protein-Protein Interfaces*S Received for publication, May 8, 2002, and in revised form, July 8, 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CH O Hydrogen Bonds at Protein-Protein Interfaces*S Received for publication, May 8, 2002, a statistical potential has been de- veloped to quantitatively describe the CH O hydrogen bonding interaction-protein interaction studies. The conventional hydrogen bonds of the type X­H Y (where X and Y N or O) have been widely

Luhua, Lai

482

Na2WO4/Co–Mn/SiO2 Catalyst for the Simultaneous Production of Ethylene and Syngas from CH4  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Na2WO4/Co–Mn/SiO2...catalyst was prepared and used for the simultaneous production of ethylene and syngas from CH4. A CH4 conversion of 38% and a yield of 21% for (C2H4 + CO), with a C2H4/CO/H2 ratio of 1/0.7/0.7...

Jingjing Wu; Song Qin; Changwei Hu

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Electrophilic, Ambiphilic, and Nucleophilic C-H bond Activation: Understanding the electronic continuum of C-H bond activation through transition-state and reaction pathway interaction energy decompositions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential energy and interaction energy profiles for metal- and metal?ligand-mediated alkane C?H bond activation were explored using B3LYP density functional theory (DFT) and the absolutely localized molecular orbital energy decomposition analysis (ALMO-EDA). The set of complexes explored range from late transition metal group 10 (Pt and Pd) and group 11 (Au) metal centers to group 7?9 (Ir, Rh, Ru, and W) metal centers as well as a group 3 Sc complex. The coordination geometries, electron metal count (d{sup 8}, d{sup 6}, d{sup 4}, and d{sup 0}), and ligands (N-heterocycles, O-donor, phosphine, and Cp*) are also diverse. Quantitative analysis using ALMO-EDA of both directions of charge-transfer stabilization (occupied to unoccupied orbital stabilization) energies between the metal?ligand fragment and the coordinated C?H bond in the transition state for cleavage of the C?H bond allows classification of C?H activation reactions as electrophilic, ambiphilic, or nucleophilic on the basis of the net direction of charge-transfer energy stabilization. This bonding pattern transcends any specific mechanistic or bonding paradigm, such as oxidative addition, ?-bond metathesis, or substitution. Late transition metals such as Au(III), Pt(II), Pd(II), and Rh(III) metal centers with N-heterocycle, halide, or O-donor ligands show electrophilically dominated reaction profiles with forward charge-transfer from the C?H bond to the metal, leading to more stabilization than reverse charge transfer from the metal to the C?H bond. Transition states and reaction profiles for d{sup 6} Ru(II) and Ir(III) metals with Tp and acac ligands were found to have nearly equal forward and reverse charge-transfer energy stabilization. This ambiphilic region also includes the classically labeled electrophilic cationic species Cp*(PMe{sub 3})Ir(Me). Nucleophilic character, where the metal to C?H bond charge-transfer interaction is most stabilizing, was found in metathesis reactions with W(II) and Sc(III) metal center complexes in reactions as well as late transition metal Ir(I) and Rh(I) pincer complexes that undergo C?H bond insertion. Comparison of pincer ligands shows that the PCP ligand imparts more nucleophilic character to an Ir metal center than a deprotonated PNP ligand. The PCP and POCOP ligands do not show a substantial difference in the electronics of C?H activation. It was also found that Rh(I) is substantially more nucleophilic than Ir(I). Lastly, as a qualitative approximation, investigation of transition-state fragment orbital energies showed that relative frontier orbital energy gaps correctly reflect electrophilic, ambiphilic, or nucleophilic charge-transfer stabilization patterns.

Ess, Daniel H; Goddard, William A; Periana, Roy A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Annual Energy Outlook 2005-Acronyms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AD AD Associated-dissolved (natural gas) AEO2004 Annual Energy Outlook 2004 AEO2005 Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Altos Altos Partners AMT Alternative Minimum Tax ANWR Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Btu British thermal unit CAFE Corporate average fuel economy CAMR Clean Air Mercury Rule CARB California Air Resources Board CBECS Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (EIA) CBO Congressional Budget Office CCCC Climate Change Credit Corporation CH 4 Methane CHP Combined heat and power CO 2 Carbon dioxide CTL Coal-to-liquids DB Deutsche Bank, A.G. E85 Fuel containing a blend of 70 to 85 percent ethanol and 30 to 15 percent gasoline by volume EEA Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. EIA Energy Information Administration EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency EPACT Energy Policy Act of 1992 ETBE Ethyl tertiary butyl ether EVA Energy Ventures Analysis, Incorporated FERC

485

Synthesis, structures, and properties of novel aminodisilanes bearing bulky substituents: 1,2-bis(1,1,2-trimethylpropyl)-1,1,2,2-tetrakis(diethylamino) disilane and 1,2-di-tert-butyl-1,1,2,2-tetrakis(diethylamino) disilane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two novel tetraaminodisilanes, 1,2-bis(1,1,2-trimethylpropyl)-1,1,2,2-tetrakis(diethylamino)disilane (1) and 1,2-di-tert-butyl-1,1,2,2-tetrakis(diethylamino)disilane (2) were synthesized and X-ray crystallography analyses of these compounds were carried out. Reflecting the steric congestion, the Si?Si bonds are very long: 2.539(2) Å for bis(1,1,2-trimethylpropyl)disilane, and 2.4764(9) Å for di-tert-butyl-disilane. UV spectra and oxidation potentials of several tetraaminodialkyldisilanes are compared and discussed. In addition, in the chlorination of 1 with HCl, 1,1,2,2-tetrachloro-1,2-bis(1,1,2-trimethylpropyl)disilane (6) was obtained with a 72% yield.

Masafumi Unno; Mina Saito; Hideyuki Matsumoto

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Thermochemical Insight into the Reduction of CO to CH3OH with [Re(CO)]+ and [Mn(CO)]+ Complexes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To gain insight into thermodynamic barriers for reduction of CO into CH3OH, free energies for reduction of [CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CO)]+ into CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CH2OH) have been determined from experimental measurements. Using model complexes, the free energies for the transfer of H+, H–, and e– have been determined. A pKa of 10.6 was estimated for [CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CHOH)]+ by measuring the pKa for the analogous [CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CMeOH)]+. The hydride donor ability (?G°H–) of CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CH2OH) was estimated to be 58.0 kcal mol–1, based on calorimetry measurements of the hydride transfer reaction between CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CHO) and [CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CHOMe)]+ to generate the methylated analog, CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CH2OMe). Cyclic voltammograms recorded on CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CMeO), CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CH2OMe), and [CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CHOMe)]+ displayed either a quasireversible oxidation (neutral species) or reduction (cationic species). These potentials were used as estimates for the oxidation of CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CHO) or CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CH2OH), or the reduction of [CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CHOH)]+. Combination of the thermodynamic data permits construction of three-dimensional free energy landscapes under varying conditions of pH and PH2. The free energy for H2 addition (?G°H2) to [CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CO)]+ (+15 kcal mol–1) was identified as the most significant thermodynamic impediment for the reduction of CO. DFT computations indicate that ?G°H2 varies by only 4.3 kcal mol–1 across a series of [CpXRe(L)(NO)(CO)]+, while the experimental ?G°H– values for the analogous series of CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CHO) varies by 12.9 kcal mol–1. The small range of ?G°H2 values is attributed to a minimal change in the C–O bond polarization upon modification of the ancillary ligands, as determined from the computed atomic charges. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

Wiedner, Eric S.; Appel, Aaron M.

2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

487

Direct ab initio molecular dynamics study on a SN2 reaction OH? + CH3Cl ? CH3OH + Cl?: Effect of non-zero impact parameter on the reaction dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Direct ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) calculations have been applied to a SN2 reaction OH? + CH3Cl ? CH3OH + Cl?. The collision dynamics with non-zero impact parameters were treated in the present study, and the results are compared with the near collinear collision dynamics previously reported by us [H. Tachikawa, M. Igarashi, T. Ishibashi, J. Phys. Chem. A 106 (2002) 10977]. The collision energy was fixed to 25 kcal/mol. The product state distribution obtained for the non-zero impact parameter collision dynamics was slightly different from that of the collinear collision. The distribution of relative translational energy between products Cl? and CH3OH in the non-zero impact parameter collision dynamics was shifted to higher energy region from that of collinear collision. Also, it was found that the mean translational energy of the product has a maximum at non-zero impact parameter (b = 0.6–1.2 Å). The reaction mechanism is discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

Hiroto Tachikawa; Manabu Igarashi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Polyacetylene, (CH)/sub x/, as an emerging material for solar cell applications. Final technical report, March 19, 1979-March 18, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite great theoretical and technological interest in polyacetylene, (CH)/sub x/, the basic features of its band structure have not been unambiguously resolved. Since photoconductivity and optical absorption data have frequently been used to infer information on the band structure of semiconductors, such measurements were carried out on (CH)/sub x/. The main results of an extensive study of the photoconductivity (..delta.. sigma/sub ph/) and absorption coefficient (..cap alpha..) in (CH)/sub x/ are presented. The absence of photoconductivity in cis-(CH)/sub x/, despite the similarity in optical properties indicates that ..delta.. sigma/sub ph/ in trans-(CH)/sub x/ is induced by isomerization. It is found that isomerization generates states deep inside the gap that act as safe traps for minority carriers and thereby enhance the photoconductivity. Compensation of trans-(CH)/sub x/ with ammonia appears to decrease the number of safe traps, whereas acceptor doping increases their number. Thus, chemical doping can be used to control the photoconductive response. The energy of safe traps inside the gap is independent of the process used to generate them; indicative of an intrinsic localized defect level in trans-(CH)/sub x/. A coherent picture based on the soliton model can explain these results, including the safe trapping.

Heeger, A.J.; MacDiarmid, A.G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Polyacetylene, (CH){sub x}, as an Emerging Material for Solar Cell Applications. Final Technical Report, March 19, 1979 - March 18, 1980  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

Despite great theoretical and technological interest in polyacetylene, (CH){sub x}, the basic features of its band structure have not been unambiguously resolved. Since photoconductivity and optical absorption data have frequently been used to infer information on the band structure of semiconductors, such measurements were carried out on (CH){sub x}. The main results of an extensive study of the photoconductivity (..delta.. sigma{sub ph}) and absorption coefficient (..cap alpha..) in (CH){sub x} are presented. The absence of photoconductivity in cis-(CH){sub x}, despite the similarity in optical properties indicates that ..delta.. sigma/sub ph/ in trans-(CH){sub x} is induced by isomerization. It is found that isomerization generates states deep inside the gap that act as safe traps for minority carriers and thereby enhance the photoconductivity. Compensation of trans-(CH){sub x} with ammonia appears to decrease the number of safe traps, whereas acceptor doping increases their number. Thus, chemical doping can be used to control the photoconductive response. The energy of safe traps inside the gap is independent of the process used to generate them; indicative of an intrinsic localized defect level in trans-(CH){sub x}. A coherent picture based on the soliton model can explain these results, including the safe trapping.

Heeger, A. J.; MacDiarmid, A. G.

1980-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

490

SPME in Environmental Analysis: Biotransformation Pathways  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......SPMEGCMS to study the degradation of ethyl benzene using...methyl-t-butyl ether and its degradation products, t-butyl...food by determining degradation products and other released...Bitumen is a fossil fuel rich in sulfur, which...Aliquots of the cell suspension (2 mL......

Annamaria Halasz; Jalal Hawari

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Enforcement Letter, September 6, 2007, CH2M Hill Hanford Group Potential Violations of Nuclear Safety Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6, 2007 6, 2007 Mr. John Fulton Chief Executive Officer CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. 2440 Stevens Drive Richland, Washington 99352 Dear Mr. Fulton: The Department of Energy (DOE) held an Enforcement Conference on August 29, 2006, with CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CHG) to discuss potential violations of nuclear safety requirements described in our Investigation Summary Report dated July 26, 2006. At that time, DOE elected to defer a decision on a potential quality improvement violation related to recurring radiological events and deficiencies in the identification and control of radiological hazards at the Tank Farms. This decision was based upon the fact that CHG senior management had initiated radiological work improvements but insufficient data was available to assess their effectiveness. On July 12, 2007, Office of Enforcement

492

NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00088 I. Project Title: CH2f"JHill Plateau Remediation Company -  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 Number: 10 Number: NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00088 I. Project Title: CH2f"JHill Plateau Remediation Company - Cleanup Actions, December 2012 to December 2013 II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions. e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Company (PRC) will be conducting cleanup actions on the Hanford Site in accordance with the categorical exclusion (CX) referenced in 10 CFR 1021, B, CX B6.1 ''Cleanup actions". PRC Projects include all those identified Sections . 3 and J.l4 of the PRC Contract, DE-AC06-08RL14788. Small-scale, short-term cleanup actions, under RCRA, Atomic Energy Act, or other

493

THE POSSIBLE INTERSTELLAR ANION CH{sub 2}CN{sup -}: SPECTROSCOPIC CONSTANTS, VIBRATIONAL FREQUENCIES, AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The A {sup 1}B{sub 1} Leftwards-Open-Headed-Arrow X-tilde{sup 1}A' excitation into the dipole-bound state of the cyanomethyl anion (CH{sub 2}CN{sup -}) has been hypothesized as the carrier for one diffuse interstellar band. However, this particular molecular system has not been detected in the interstellar medium even though the related cyanomethyl radical and the isoelectronic ketenimine molecule have been found. In this study, we are employing the use of proven quartic force fields and second-order vibrational perturbation theory to compute accurate spectroscopic constants and fundamental vibrational frequencies for X-tilde{sup 1} A' CH{sub 2}CN{sup -} in order to assist in laboratory studies and astronomical observations.

Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Lee, Timothy J. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States)] [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States); Crawford, T. Daniel, E-mail: Ryan.C.Fortenberry@nasa.gov, E-mail: Timothy.J.Lee@nasa.gov [Department of Chemistry, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

494

Electronic Structure of TiO2/CH3NH3PbI3 Perovskite Solar Cell Interfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The last two decades, the research on different types of mesoscopic solar cells has grown enormously, largely because this family of solar cells can be controlled in many different ways and for their easy production. ... Recently, the use of soluble semiconductors such as organic–inorganic perovskites has shown great promise as light absorbers in solid-state mesoscopic solar cells. ... We report for the first time on a hole conductor-free mesoscopic methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) perovskite/TiO2 heterojunction solar cell, produced by deposition of perovskite nanoparticles from a soln. of CH3NH3I and PbI2 in ?-butyrolactone on a 400 nm thick film of TiO2 (anatase) nanosheets exposing (001) facets. ...

Rebecka Lindblad; Dongqin Bi; Byung-wook Park; Johan Oscarsson; Mihaela Gorgoi; Hans Siegbahn; Michael Odelius; Erik M. J. Johansson; Håkan Rensmo

2014-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

495

Review of the Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Implementation Verification Review Processes, November 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Independent Oversight Review Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Implementation Verification Review Processes November 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope...................................................................................................................................................... 2

496

Review of the Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Implementation Verification Review Processes, November 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Independent Oversight Review Independent Oversight Review of the Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Implementation Verification Review Processes November 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope...................................................................................................................................................... 2

497

Structure determination of three furan-substituted benzimidazoles and calculation of - and C-H inter­action energies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structures of 2-(furan-2-yl)-1-(furan-2-ylmeth­yl)-1H-benzimidazole, its hydro­chloride monohydrate, and the hydro­bromide salt of 5,6-dimethyl-2-(furan-2-yl)-1-(furan-2-ylmeth­yl)-1H-benzimidazole exhibit a combination of - and C-H inter­molecular inter­actions. DFT calculations were used to estimate the strength of these inter­actions.

Geiger, D.K.

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

498

Description of the FCUP code used to compute currents due to recoil protons from CH/sub 2/ foils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer code, FCUP, was developed at EG and G during the period from 1973 to the present to compute proton currents produced by a time- and energy-dependent neutron flux striking a CH/sub 2/ foil and knocking protons into a detector placed at an angle with respect to the target foil and the neutron beam. This report describes the methods of calculation used and the physical assumptions and limitations involved and suggests possibilities for improving the calculations.

Stelts, M.L.; Glasgow, D.W.; Wood, B.E.; Craft, A.D.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Current status and development of membranes for CO2/CH4 separation: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a greenhouse gas found primarily as a main combustion product of fossil fuel as well as a component in natural gas, biogas and landfill gas. The interest to remove CO2 from those gas streams to obtain fuel with enhanced energy content and prevent corrosion problems in the gas transportation system, in addition to CO2 implications to the climate change, has driven the development of CO2 separation process technology. One type of technology which has experienced substantial growth, breakthroughs and advances during past decades is membrane-based technology. The attractive features offered by this technology include high energy efficiency, simplicity in design and construction of membrane modules and environmental compatibility. The objective of this review is to overview the different types of membranes available for use including their working principles, current status and development which form the primary determinants of separation performance and efficiency. The emphasis is toward CO2/CH4 separation, considering its substantial and direct relevance to the gas industry. To this end, discussion is made to cover polymeric gas permeation membranes; CO2-selective facilitated transport membranes, hollow fiber gas–liquid membrane contactors, inorganic membranes and mixed matrix membranes. The market for CO2 separation is currently dominated by polymeric membranes due to their relatively low manufacturing cost and processing ability into flat sheet and hollow fiber configurations as well as well-documented research studies. While there have been immensely successful membrane preparation and development techniques with consequential remarkable performance for each type of membrane. Each type of membrane brings associated advantages and drawbacks related to the characteristic transport mechanism for specific application conditions. Inorganic membranes, for example, are very suitable for high temperature CO2 separation in excess of 400 °C while all other membranes can be applied at lower temperatures. The recent emergence of mixed matrix membranes has allowed the innovative approach to combine the advantages offered by inorganic and polymeric materials.

Yuan Zhang; Jaka Sunarso; Shaomin Liu; Rong Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Room Temperature Copper(II)-Catalyzed Oxidative Cyclization of Enamides to 2,5-Disubstituted Oxazoles via Vinylic C–H Functionalization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A copper(II)-catalyzed oxidative cyclization of enamides to oxazoles via vinylic C–H bond functionalization at room temperature is described. Various 2,5-disubstituted oxazoles bearing aryl, vinyl, alkyl, and heteroaryl ...

Cheung, Chi Wai