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Sample records for butte rpd-66 repeat

  1. Delcer Butte Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Butte Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Delcer Butte Geothermal Project Project Location Information...

  2. Butte Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Butte Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Butte Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3...

  3. Butte, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Butte, Montana: Energy Resources (Redirected from Butte, MT) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.003917, -112.534446 Show Map Loading map......

  4. Coffin Butte Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NEEDS 2006 Database Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCoffinButteBiomassFacility&oldid397332" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating...

  5. Sigurd Red Butte No2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sigurd Red Butte No2 Jump to: navigation, search NEPA Document Collection for: Sigurd Red Butte No2 EIS for NA Sigurd to Red Butte No. 2 345kV Transmission Project General NEPA...

  6. Butte County, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    6 Climate Zone Subtype B. Places in Butte County, Idaho Arco, Idaho Butte City, Idaho Moore, Idaho Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleButteCounty,Idaho&oldi...

  7. BUTTS_SBA_8a

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    is Next When You Graduate From the 8(a) Program Cassius F. Butts, Regional Administrator U.S. Small Business Administration 2 Historic Times at SBA Lending FY 2015: * From $19.2 billion to $23.5 billion in approvals under our 7(a) program - an increase of more than 20% * From $57 million to $200 million in small loans under Community Advantage - an 80% jump * Minority lending was up 26.5 percent. * Women's lending was up 19 percent. 3 Historic Times at SBA Counseling SBA & Resource Partners

  8. Multispectral Imaging At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

  9. Aeromagnetic Survey At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aeromagnetic Survey At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration...

  10. Cuttings Analysis At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Cuttings Analysis At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  11. Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  12. EA-1996: Glass Buttes Radio Station, Lake County, Oregon | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: Glass Buttes Radio Station, Lake County, Oregon EA-1996: Glass Buttes Radio Station, Lake County, Oregon SUMMARY The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), with DOE's Bonneville Power...

  13. Butte County, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Companies in Butte County, California FAFCO Inc Sierra Nevada Brewing Company Springboard Biodiesel LLC Energy Generation Facilities in Butte County, California Oroville Biomass...

  14. Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes, Oregon |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes, Oregon Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes, Oregon Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawii & Glass Buttes, Oregon presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. moui_glass_buttes_ormat_peer2013.pdf (1.01 MB) More Documents & Publications Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes, Oregon Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic

  15. Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes, Oregon |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Technologies Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes, Oregon Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes, Oregon Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawii & Glass Buttes, Oregon presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado. maui_glass_buttes_ormat_peer2013.pdf (1.01 MB) More Documents & Publications Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes, Oregon Blind Geothermal System Exploration in

  16. Butte, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Butte is a city in Silver Bow County, Montana. It falls under Montana's At-large congressional district.12 Registered Energy...

  17. Box Butte County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Box Butte County, Nebraska: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.1911471, -103.0817903 Show Map Loading map......

  18. Butts County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number 3 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Butts County, Georgia Flovilla, Georgia Jackson, Georgia Jenkinsburg, Georgia Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  19. Static Temperature Survey At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass...

  20. Pressure Temperature Log At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Pressure Temperature Log At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass...

  1. Dr. Calvin O. Butts, III | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Calvin O. Butts, III About Us Dr. Calvin O. Butts, III - President, State University of New York (SUNY) College at Old Westbury Dr. Calvin O. Butts, III Dr. Calvin O. Butts, III, is President of State University of New York, College at Old Westbury and Pastor of the renowned Abyssinian Baptist Church in New York City. Regularly sought by leaders in politics, business, and the media for his insight and opinions, he has had a pervasive impact across his career on such wide-ranging issues as

  2. FMI Log At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: FMI Log At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

  3. LiDAR At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: LiDAR At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

  4. Slim Holes At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Slim Holes At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  5. Field Mapping At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

  6. Gas Sampling At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Sampling At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

  7. Gas Sampling At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Sampling At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Sampling At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP)...

  8. Ground Gravity Survey At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At Glass Buttes Area...

  9. Flow Test At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass Buttes Area...

  10. Glass Buttes Exploration and Drilling: 2010 Geothermal Technologies Program Peer Review Presentation, Walsh, et al, Ormat

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Zemach, Ezra

    2010-01-01

    Glass Buttes Exploration and Drilling: 2010 Geothermal Technologies Program Peer Review Presentation, Walsh, et al, Ormat

  11. Glass Buttes Exploration and Drilling: 2010 Geothermal Technologies Program Peer Review Presentation, Walsh, et al, Ormat

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Zemach, Ezra

    Glass Buttes Exploration and Drilling: 2010 Geothermal Technologies Program Peer Review Presentation, Walsh, et al, Ormat

  12. Red Butte, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Red Butte is a census-designated place in Natrona County, Wyoming. It falls under Wyoming's...

  13. Butte Falls, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Butte Falls is a town in Jackson County, Oregon. It falls under Oregon's 2nd congressional district.12 References...

  14. Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes, Oregon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes, Oregon Kyle Snyder Ezra Zemach Ormat Nevada Inc. Project Officer: Ava Coy Total Project Funding: Maui-$4.9M, GB- $4.4M April 23rd, 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Ulupalakua, Maui Glass Buttes, Oregon 2 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov Maui Overview * Timeline * Project start date 10/29/2009 * Project end date Q3 2013 * Well sites permitting:

  15. Butt Joint Tool Status: ITER-US-LLNL-NMARTOVETSKY-01312007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martovetsky, N N

    2007-02-01

    Butt joint tool vacuum vessel has been built at C&H Enterprise, Inc. Leak checking and loading tests were taken place at the factory. The conductor could not be pumped down better than to 500 mtorr and therefore we could not check the sealing mechanism of the seal around conductor. But the rest of the vessel, including the flat gasket, one of the difficult seals worked well, no indication of leak at sensitivity 1e-7 l*torr/sec. The load test showed fully functional system of the load mechanism. The conductors were loaded up to 2200 kgf (21560 N) and the pressure between the butts was uniform with 100% of the contact proved by pressure sensitive film. The status of the butt joint tool development is reported.

  16. EIS-0077-S: Bonneville Power Administration Crow Butte Slough Crossing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bonneville Power Administration developed this SEIS to evaluate potential impacts resulting from construction of a 4,700-foot segment of the Ashe-Slatt transmission line at Crow Butte Slough, overhead on towers on the existing right-of-way. This SEIS is a supplement to DOE/EIS-0077, Ashe-Slatt (Pebble Springs) 500-kilovolt Transmission Line, originally filed as FES 75-79.

  17. EA-1996: Glass Butte Radio Station, Lake County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, is preparing an EA that will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct two telecommunications facilities, one of which would provide BPA telecommunications services, on BLM land. Additional information is available at https://www.bpa.gov/efw/Analysis/NEPADocuments/Pages/Glass-Butte.aspx.

  18. The Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO), Butte, Montana. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    The Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO) is a multi-purpose engineering test facility located in Butte, Montana, and is managed by MSE, Inc. WETO seeks to contribute to environmental research by emphasizing projects to develop heavy metals removal and recovery processes, thermal vitrification systems, and waste minimization/pollution prevention technologies. WETO`s environmental technology research and testing activities focus on the recovery of usable resources from waste. In one of WETO`s areas of focus, groundwater contamination, water from the Berkeley Pit, located near the WETO site, is being used in demonstrations directed toward the recovery of potable water and metal from the heavy metal-bearing water. The Berkeley Pit is part of an inactive copper mine near Butte that was once part of the nation`s largest open-pit mining operation. The Pit contains approximately 25 billion gallons of Berkeley Pit groundwater and surface water containing many dissolved minerals. As part of DOE/OST`s Resource Recovery Project (RRP), technologies are being demonstrated to not only clean the contaminated water but to recover metal values such as copper, zinc, and iron with an estimated gross value of more than $100 million. When recovered, the Berkeley Pit waters could benefit the entire Butte valley with new water resources for fisheries, irrigation, municipal, and industrial use. At WETO, the emphasis is on environmental technology development and commercialization activities, which will focus on mine cleanup, waste treatment, resource recovery, and water resource management.

  19. EA-2016: Willow Creek Wind Farm; Butte County, South Dakota | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 2016: Willow Creek Wind Farm; Butte County, South Dakota EA-2016: Willow Creek Wind Farm; Butte County, South Dakota SUMMARY DOE's Western Area Power Administration is preparing an EA that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed Willow Creek Wind Energy Facility in Butte County, South Dakota. The EA reviews the potential environmental impacts of constructing, operating, and maintaining a 103-megawatt (MW) nameplate capacity wind power generating facility

  20. Preliminary geologic map of the Sleeping Butte volcanic centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, B.M.; Perry, F.V.

    1991-07-01

    The Sleeping Butte volcanic centers comprise two, spatially separate, small-volume (<0.1 km{sup 3}) basaltic centers. The centers were formed by mildly explosive Strombolian eruptions. The Little Black Peak cone consists of a main scoria cone, two small satellitic scoria mounds, and associated lobate lava flows that vented from sites at the base of the scoria cone. The Hidden Cone center consists of a main scoria cone that developed on the north-facing slope of Sleeping Butte. The center formed during two episodes. The first included the formation of the main scoria cone, and venting of aa lava flows from radial dikes at the northeast base of the cone. The second included eruption of scoria-fall deposits from the summit crater. The ages of the Little Black Peak and the Hidden Cone are estimated to be between 200 to 400 ka based on the whole-rock K-Ar age determinations with large analytical undertainty. This age assignment is consistent with qualitative observations of the degree of soil development and geomorphic degradation of volcanic landforms. The younger episode of the Hidden Cone is inferred to be significantly younger and probably of Late Pleistocene or Holocene age. This is based on the absence of cone slope rilling, the absence of cone-slope apron deposits, and erosional unconformity between the two episodes, the poor horizon- development of soils, and the presence of fall deposits on modern alluvial surfaces. Paleomagnetic data show that the centers record similar but not identical directions of remanent magnetization. Paleomagnetic data have not been obtained for the youngest deposits of the Hidden Cone center. Further geochronology, soils, geomorphic, and petrology studies are planned of the Sleeping Butte volcanic centers 20 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Ultrasonic inspection of polyethylene butt-fussion joints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    House, L.J.; Day, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Researchers investigated nondestructive pulse-echo, pitch-catch, and spectroscopic ultrasonic methods for determining voids and inclusions, lack of bond, and inadequate fusion in heat-fused polyethylene butt joints in 4-in. gas distribution pipe. The pulse-echo method, using a 2.25-MHz, cylindrically focused transducer, provided the best sensitivity to the joint defects, detecting flaws as small as 0.014 in. in diameter. No correlation was established between the ultrasonic spectroscopy results and the cohesive strength of incompletely fused joints in the 1.2-3.2 MHz frequency range.

  2. The Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO), Butte, Montana, technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This document has been prepared by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities funded through the Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO) in Butte, Montana. Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. WETO`s environmental technology research and testing activities focus on the recovery of useable resources from waste. Environmental technology development and commercialization activities will focus on mine cleanup, waste treatment, resource recovery, and water resource management. Since the site has no record of radioactive material use and no history of environmental contamination/remediation activities, DOE-EM can concentrate on performing developmental and demonstration activities without the demands of regulatory requirements and schedules. Thus, WETO will serve as a national resource for the development of new and innovative environmental technologies.

  3. Development of the Butt Joint for the ITER Central Solenoid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martovetsky, N N

    2006-08-23

    The ITER Central Solenoid (CS) requires compact and reliable joints for its Cable-in-Conduit Conductor (CICC). The baseline design is a diffusion bonded butt joint. In such a joint the mating cables are compacted to a very low void fraction in a copper sleeve and then heat treated. After the heat treatment the ends are cut, polished and aligned against each other and then diffusion bonded under high compression in a vacuum chamber at 750 C. The jacket is then welded on the conductor to complete the joint, which remarkably does not require more room than a regular conductor. This joint design is based on a proven concept developed for the ITER CS Model Coil that was successfully tested in the previous R&D phase.

  4. Dormaier and Chester Butte 2007 Follow-up Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    Follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analyses were conducted on the Dormaier and Chester Butte wildlife mitigation sites in April 2007 to determine the number of additional habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to enhance, and maintain the project sites as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The Dormaier follow-up HEP survey generated 482.92 habitat units (HU) or 1.51 HUs per acre for an increase of 34.92 HUs over baseline credits. Likewise, 2,949.06 HUs (1.45 HUs/acre) were generated from the Chester Butte follow-up HEP analysis for an increase of 1,511.29 habitat units above baseline survey results. Combined, BPA will be credited with an additional 1,546.21 follow-up habitat units from the Dormaier and Chester Butte parcels.

  5. A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackketter, Donald

    2015-06-30

    Executive Summary An innovative 50-ton ground-source heat pump (GSHP) system was installed to provide space heating and cooling for a 56,000 square foot (5,200 square meter) building in Butte Montana, in conjunction with its heating and chiller systems. Butte is a location with winter conditions much colder than the national average. The GSHP uses flooded mine waters at 78F (25C) as the heat source and heat sink. The heat transfer performance and efficiency of the system were analyzed using data from January through July 2014. This analysis indicated that for typical winter conditions in Butte, Montana, the GSHP could deliver about 88% of the building’s annual heating needs. Compared with a baseline natural-gas/electric system, the system demonstrated at least 69% site energy savings, 38% source energy savings, 39% carbon dioxide emissions reduction, and a savings of $17,000 per year (40%) in utility costs. Assuming a $10,000 per ton cost for installing a production system, the payback period at natural gas costs of $9.63/MMBtu and electricity costs of $0.08/kWh would be in the range of 40 to 50 years. At higher utility prices, or lower installation costs, the payback period would obviously be reduced.

  6. Mineral evaluation of part of the Gold Butte district, Clark County, Nevada. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dexter, J.J.; Goodknight, C.S.; Dayvault, R.D.; Dickson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The mineral potential of part of the Gold Butte district, Clark County, Nevada, was investigated to supplement the evaluation of granitic rocks in the area as a probable geologic environment for uranium mineralization. This project is a part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation for the US Department of Energy. A total of 41 stream-sediment samples and 149 rock samples were collected; the stream-sediment samples were analyzed chemically, and most f the rock samples were analyzed chemically and petrographically. The project area was restricted to Precambrian rocks, which comprise a metamorphic complex of early Proterozoic age, charnockitic rocks of early or middle Proterozoic age and ultramafic rocks and the Gold Butte Granite of middle Proterozoic age. Although the project area is not favorable for uranium deposits according to NURE criteria, an area of low resource potential for uranium, thorium, rare-earth elements and yttrium, and niobium-tantalum was assigned to the contact zone of the Gold Butte Granite. Pegmatites and aplites in the zone contain high concentrations of these elements. Two areas of moderate potential for gold and silver in quartz veins are within the project area; small-scale operations may recover these elements profitably. Titanium has a low-to-moderate resource potential, although the deposits are currently subeconomic. The titanium concentrations occur as titaniferous magnetite- and ilmenite-bearing placer sands. One small area has been assigned a low-to-moderate resource potential for vermiculite in altered ultramafic rocks. Tungsten has been assigned a low resource potential in two places within the project area; scheelite-bearing ultramafic bodies are small and scattered. Platinum-group metals and copper have no resource potential in the project area.

  7. Quasi-Rayleigh waves in butt-welded thick steel plate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamas, Tuncay E-mail: victorg@sc.edu Giurgiutiu, Victor E-mail: victorg@sc.edu Lin, Bin E-mail: victorg@sc.edu

    2015-03-31

    This paper discusses theoretical and experimental analyses of weld guided surface acoustic waves (SAW) through the guided wave propagation (GWP) analyses. The GWP analyses have been carried out by utilizing piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) for in situ structural inspection of a thick steel plate with butt weld as the weld bead is ground flush. Ultrasonic techniques are commonly used for validation of welded structures in many in-situ monitoring applications, e.g. in off-shore structures, in nuclear and pressure vessel industries and in a range of naval applications. PWAS is recently employed in such ultrasonic applications as a resonator as well as a transducer. Quasi-Rayleigh waves a.k.a. SAW can be generated in relatively thick isotropic elastic plate having the same phase velocity as Rayleigh waves whereas Rayleigh waves are a high frequency approximation of the first symmetric (S0) and anti-symmetric (A0) Lamb wave modes. As the frequency becomes very high the S0 and the A0 wave speeds coalesce, and both have the same value. This value is exactly the Rayleigh wave speed and becomes constant along the frequency i.e. Rayleigh waves are non-dispersive guided surface acoustic waves. The study is followed with weld-GWP tests through the pitch-catch method along the butt weld line. The tuning curves of quasi-Rayleigh wave are determined to show the tuning and trapping effect of the weld bead that has higher thickness than the adjacent plates on producing a dominant quasi-Rayleigh wave mode. The significant usage of the weld tuned and guided quasi-Rayleigh wave mode is essentially discussed for the applications in the in-situ inspection of relatively thick structures with butt weld such as naval offshore structures. The paper ends with summary, conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  8. Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce exploration risk at glass buttes, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, Patrick; Fercho, Steven; Perkin, Doug; Martini, Brigette; Boshmann, Darrick

    2015-06-01

    The engineering and studies phase of the Glass Buttes project was aimed at reducing risk during the early stages of geothermal project development. The project’s inclusion of high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys allowed Ormat to evaluate the value of these surveys both independently and in combination to quantify the most valuable course of action for exploration in an area where structure, permeability, and temperature are the most pressing questions. The sizes of the thermal anomalies at Glass Buttes are unusually large. Over the course of Phase I Ormat acquired high resolution LIDAR data to accurately map fault manifestations at the surface and collected detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys to map subsurface structural features. In addition, Ormat collected airborne hyperspectral data to assist with mapping the rock petrology and mineral alteration assemblages along Glass Buttes faults and magnetotelluric (MT) survey to try to better constrain the structures at depth. Direct and indirect identification of alteration assemblages reveal not only the geochemical character and temperature of the causative hydrothermal fluids but can also constrain areas of upflow along specific fault segments. All five datasets were merged along with subsurface lithologies and temperatures to predict the most likely locations for high permeability and hot fluids. The Glass Buttes temperature anomalies include 2 areas, totaling 60 km2 (23 mi2) of measured temperature gradients over 165° C/km (10° F/100ft). The Midnight Point temperature anomaly includes the Strat-1 well with 90°C (194 °F) at 603 m (1981 ft) with a 164 °C/km (10°F/100ft) temperature gradient at bottom hole and the GB-18 well with 71°C (160 °F) at 396 m (1300 ft) with a 182°C/km (11°F/100ft) gradient. The primary area of alteration and elevated temperature occurs near major fault intersections associated with Brothers Fault Zone and Basin and Range systems. Evidence for faulting is

  9. The Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO), Butte, Montana. Technology summary (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    This document has been prepared by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Office of Science and Technology (OST) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT&E) activities funded through the Western environmental Technology Office (WETO) in Butte, Montana. Technologies and processes described in this document have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. The information presented in this document has been assembled from recently produced OST documents that highlight technology development activities within each of the OST program elements and Focus Areas. This document presents one in a series for each of DOE`s Operations Office and Energy Technology Centers.

  10. EA-1925: Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates Ormat Nevada, Inc.’s (Ormat’s) proposed geothermal project consists of drilling up to 16 wells for geothermal exploration approximately 70 miles southeast of Bend, Oregon and 50 miles northwest of Burns, Oregon just south of U.S. Highway 20. The proposed project includes three distinct drilling areas. Up to three wells would be drilled on lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Prineville District (Mahogany), up to ten wells would be drilled on lands managed by the BLM Burns District (Midnight Point), and up to three wells would be drilled on private land located adjacent to the federal geothermal leases west of Glass Butte (Private Lands). DOE funding would be associated with three of the sixteen proposed wells. BLM is the lead agency and DOE is participating as a cooperating agency.

  11. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  12. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques for duct leakage using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards. The three duct leak measurement methods assessed in this report are the two duct pressurization methods that are commonly used by many practitioners and the DeltaQ technique. These are methods B, C and A, respectively of the ASTM E1554 standard. Although it would be useful to evaluate other duct leak test methods, this study focused on those test methods that are commonly used and are required in various test standards, such as BPI (2010), RESNET (2014), ASHRAE 62.2 (2013), California Title 24 (CEC 2012), DOE Weatherization and many other energy efficiency programs.

  13. Cohesive zone finite element analysis of crack initiation from a butt joint’s interface corner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reedy, E. D.

    2014-09-06

    The Cohesive zone (CZ) fracture analysis techniques are used to predict the initiation of crack growth from the interface corner of an adhesively bonded butt joint. In this plane strain analysis, a thin linear elastic adhesive layer is sandwiched between rigid adherends. There is no preexisting crack in the problem analyzed, and the focus is on how the shape of the traction–separation (T–U) relationship affects the predicted joint strength. Unlike the case of a preexisting interfacial crack, the calculated results clearly indicate that the predicted joint strength depends on the shape of the T–U relationship. Most of the calculations used a rectangular T–U relationship whose shape (aspect ratio) is defined by two parameters: the interfacial strength σ* and the work of separation/unit area Γ. The principal finding of this study is that for a specified adhesive layer thickness, there is any number of σ*, Γ combinations that generate the same predicted joint strength. For each combination there is a corresponding CZ length. We developed an approximate CZ-like elasticity solution to show how such combinations arise and their connection with the CZ length.

  14. Cohesive zone finite element analysis of crack initiation from a butt joint’s interface corner

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Reedy, E. D.

    2014-09-06

    The Cohesive zone (CZ) fracture analysis techniques are used to predict the initiation of crack growth from the interface corner of an adhesively bonded butt joint. In this plane strain analysis, a thin linear elastic adhesive layer is sandwiched between rigid adherends. There is no preexisting crack in the problem analyzed, and the focus is on how the shape of the traction–separation (T–U) relationship affects the predicted joint strength. Unlike the case of a preexisting interfacial crack, the calculated results clearly indicate that the predicted joint strength depends on the shape of the T–U relationship. Most of the calculations usedmore » a rectangular T–U relationship whose shape (aspect ratio) is defined by two parameters: the interfacial strength σ* and the work of separation/unit area Γ. The principal finding of this study is that for a specified adhesive layer thickness, there is any number of σ*, Γ combinations that generate the same predicted joint strength. For each combination there is a corresponding CZ length. We developed an approximate CZ-like elasticity solution to show how such combinations arise and their connection with the CZ length.« less

  15. Current Activities Assessing Butt Fusion Joint Integrity in High Density Polyethylene Piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Doctor, Steven R.; Denslow, Kayte M.

    2012-09-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, conducted initial studies to evaluate the effectiveness of nondestructive examinations (NDE) coupled with mechanical testing for assessing butt fusion joint integrity in high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe. The work provided insightful information to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the effectiveness of volumetric inspection techniques for detecting lack of fusion (LOF) conditions in the fusion joints. HDPE has been installed on a limited basis in American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Class 3, buried piping systems at several operating U.S. nuclear power plants and has been proposed for use in new construction. A comparison was made between the results from ultrasonic and microwave nondestructive examinations and the results from mechanical destructive evaluations, specifically the high-speed tensile test and the side-bend test, for determining joint integrity. The data comparison revealed that none of the NDE techniques detected all of the lack-of-fusion conditions that were revealed by the destructive tests. Follow-on work has recently been initiated at PNNL to accurately characterize the NDE responses from machined flaws of varying size and location in PE 4710 materials as well as the LOF condition. This effort is directed at quantifying the ability of volumetric NDE techniques to detect flaws in relation to the critical flaw size associated with joint integrity. A status of these latest investigations is presented.

  16. A Methodology for the Assessment of Unconventional (Continuous) Resources with an Application to the Greater Natural Buttes Gas Field, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olea, Ricardo A.; Cook, Troy A.; Coleman, James L.

    2010-12-15

    The Greater Natural Buttes tight natural gas field is an unconventional (continuous) accumulation in the Uinta Basin, Utah, that began production in the early 1950s from the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group. Three years later, production was extended to the Eocene Wasatch Formation. With the exclusion of 1100 non-productive ('dry') wells, we estimate that the final recovery from the 2500 producing wells existing in 2007 will be about 1.7 trillion standard cubic feet (TSCF) (48.2 billion cubic meters (BCM)). The use of estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) per well is common in assessments of unconventional resources, and it is one of the main sources of information to forecast undiscovered resources. Each calculated recovery value has an associated drainage area that generally varies from well to well and that can be mathematically subdivided into elemental subareas of constant size and shape called cells. Recovery per 5-acre cells at Greater Natural Buttes shows spatial correlation; hence, statistical approaches that ignore this correlation when inferring EUR values for untested cells do not take full advantage of all the information contained in the data. More critically, resulting models do not match the style of spatial EUR fluctuations observed in nature. This study takes a new approach by applying spatial statistics to model geographical variation of cell EUR taking into account spatial correlation and the influence of fractures. We applied sequential indicator simulation to model non-productive cells, while spatial mapping of cell EUR was obtained by applying sequential Gaussian simulation to provide multiple versions of reality (realizations) having equal chances of being the correct model. For each realization, summation of EUR in cells not drained by the existing wells allowed preparation of a stochastic prediction of undiscovered resources, which range between 2.6 and 3.4 TSCF (73.6 and 96.3 BCM) with a mean of 2.9 TSCF (82.1 BCM) for Greater Natural Buttes

  17. Implementation of ASME Code, Section XI, Code Case N-770, on Alternative Examination Requirements for Class 1 Butt Welds Fabricated with Alloy 82/182

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-17

    In May 2010, the NRC issued a proposed notice of rulemaking that includes a provision to add a new section to its rules to require licensees to implement ASME Code Case N-770, Alternative Examination Requirements and Acceptance Standards for Class 1 PWR Piping and Vessel Nozzle Butt Welds Fabricated with UNS N06082 or UNS W86182 Weld Filler Material With or Without the Application of Listed Mitigation Activities, Section XI, Division 1, with 15 conditions. Code Case N-770 contains baseline and inservice inspection (ISI) requirements for unmitigated butt welds fabricated with Alloy 82/182 material and preservice and ISI requirements for mitigated butt welds. The NRC stated that application of ASME Code Case N-770 is necessary because the inspections currently required by the ASME Code, Section XI, were not written to address stress corrosion cracking Alloy 82/182 butt welds, and the safety consequences of inadequate inspections can be significant. The NRC expects to issue the final rule incorporating this code case into its regulations in the spring 2011 time frame. This paper discusses the new examination requirements, the conditions that NRC is imposing , and the major concerns with implementation of the new Code Case.

  18. Gravity and magnetic anomalies associated with Tertiary volcanism and a Proterozoic crustal boundary, Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Navajo Nation (Arizona)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan-Ealy, P.F. . Geology Dept.); Hendricks, J.D. )

    1992-01-01

    The Hopi Buttes volcanic field is located in the Navajo Nation of northeastern Arizona, near the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau. Explosive phreatomagmatic eruptions from late Miocene to mid-Pliocene time produced more than 300 maar-diatremes and deposited limburgite tuffs and tuff breccia and monchiquite dikes, necks and flows within a roughly circular 2,500 km[sup 2] area. The volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks make up the middle member of the Bidahochi Formation, whose lower and upper members are lacustrine and fluvial, respectively. The Bidahochi Formation overlies gently dipping Mesozoic sedimentary rocks exposed in the southwestern portion of the volcanic field. Two significant gravity and magnetic anomalies appear within the Hopi Buttes volcanic field that are unlike the signatures of other Tertiary volcanic fields on the Colorado Plateau. A circular 20 mGal negative gravity anomaly is centered over exposed sedimentary rocks in the southwestern portion of the field. The anomaly may be due to the large volume of low density pyroclastic rocks in the volcanic field and/or extensive brecciation of the underlying strata from the violent maar eruptions. The second significant anomaly is the northeast-trending Holbrook lineament, a 5 km-wide gravity and magnetic lineament that crosses the southeastern part of the volcanic field. The lineament reflects substantial gravity and magnetic decreases of 1.67 mGals/km and 100 gammas/km respectively, to the southeast. Preliminary two-dimensional gravity and magnetic modeling suggests the lineament represents a major Proterozoic crustal boundary and may correlate with one of several Proterozoic faults exposed in the transition zone of central Arizona. Gravity modeling shows a 3--5 km step'' in the Moho near the crustal boundary. The decrease in depth of the Moho to the northwest indicates either movement along the fault or magmatic upwelling beneath the volcanic field.

  19. Exploring the Repeat-Protein Universe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exploring the Repeat-Protein Universe Exploring the Repeat-Protein Universe Print Wednesday, 13 April 2016 00:00 Naturally occurring proteins-chains of amino acids that fold into functional, three-dimensional shapes-are believed to represent just a small fraction of the universe of all possible permutations of amino-acid sequences and folds. How can we begin to systematically sift through those permutations to find and engineer from scratch (de novo) proteins with the characteristics desired for

  20. Safety of Repeated Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Louie, John D.; Iagaru, Andrei H.; Goris, Michael L.; Sze, Daniel Y.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Repeated radioembolization (RE) treatments carry theoretically higher risk of radiation-induced hepatic injury because of the liver's cumulative memory of previous exposure. We performed a retrospective safety analysis on patients who underwent repeated RE. Methods: From 2004 to 2011, a total of 247 patients were treated by RE. Eight patients (5 men, 3 women, age range 51-71 years) underwent repeated treatment of a targeted territory, all with resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres; Sirtex, Lane Cove, Australia). Adverse events were graded during a standardized follow-up. In addition, the correlation between the occurrence of RE-induced liver disease (REILD) and multiple variables was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses in all 247 patients who received RE. Results: Two patients died shortly after the second treatment (at 84 and 107 days) with signs and symptoms of REILD. Both patients underwent whole liver treatment twice (cumulative doses 3.08 and 2.66 GBq). The other 6 patients demonstrated only minor toxicities after receiving cumulative doses ranging from 2.41 to 3.88 GBq. All patients experienced objective tumor responses. In the whole population, multifactorial analysis identified three risk factors associated with REILD: repeated RE (p = 0.036), baseline serum total bilirubin (p = 0.048), and baseline serum aspartate aminotransferase (p = 0.043). Repeated RE proved to be the only independent risk factor for REILD in multivariate analysis (odds ratio 9.6; p = 0.002). Additionally, the administered activity per target volume (in GBq/L) was found to be an independent risk factor for REILD, but only in whole liver treatments (p = 0.033). Conclusion: The risk of REILD appears to be elevated for repeated RE. Objective tumor responses were observed, but establishment of safety limits will require improvement in dosimetric measurement and prediction.

  1. Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with Comparisons to Other Source Emissions Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with ...

  2. Webinar-Transcript-Repeat.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Webinar-Transcript-Repeat.pdf Webinar-Transcript-Repeat.pdf (94.89 KB) More Documents & Publications Title Title Slide 1

  3. Repeated interactions in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruneau, Laurent; Joye, Alain; Merkli, Marco

    2014-07-15

    Analyzing the dynamics of open quantum systems has a long history in mathematics and physics. Depending on the system at hand, basic physical phenomena that one would like to explain are, for example, convergence to equilibrium, the dynamics of quantum coherences (decoherence) and quantum correlations (entanglement), or the emergence of heat and particle fluxes in non-equilibrium situations. From the mathematical physics perspective, one of the main challenges is to derive the irreversible dynamics of the open system, starting from a unitary dynamics of the system and its environment. The repeated interactions systems considered in these notes are models of non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics. They are relevant in quantum optics, and more generally, serve as a relatively well treatable approximation of a more difficult quantum dynamics. In particular, the repeated interaction models allow to determine the large time (stationary) asymptotics of quantum systems out of equilibrium.

  4. Exploring the Repeat-Protein Universe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exploring the Repeat-Protein Universe Print Naturally occurring proteins-chains of amino acids that fold into functional, three-dimensional shapes-are believed to represent just a small fraction of the universe of all possible permutations of amino-acid sequences and folds. How can we begin to systematically sift through those permutations to find and engineer from scratch (de novo) proteins with the characteristics desired for medical, environmental, and industrial purposes? To address this

  5. Exploring the Repeat-Protein Universe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exploring the Repeat-Protein Universe Print Naturally occurring proteins-chains of amino acids that fold into functional, three-dimensional shapes-are believed to represent just a small fraction of the universe of all possible permutations of amino-acid sequences and folds. How can we begin to systematically sift through those permutations to find and engineer from scratch (de novo) proteins with the characteristics desired for medical, environmental, and industrial purposes? To address this

  6. Exploring the Repeat-Protein Universe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exploring the Repeat-Protein Universe Print Naturally occurring proteins-chains of amino acids that fold into functional, three-dimensional shapes-are believed to represent just a small fraction of the universe of all possible permutations of amino-acid sequences and folds. How can we begin to systematically sift through those permutations to find and engineer from scratch (de novo) proteins with the characteristics desired for medical, environmental, and industrial purposes? To address this

  7. Exploring the Repeat-Protein Universe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exploring the Repeat-Protein Universe Print Naturally occurring proteins-chains of amino acids that fold into functional, three-dimensional shapes-are believed to represent just a small fraction of the universe of all possible permutations of amino-acid sequences and folds. How can we begin to systematically sift through those permutations to find and engineer from scratch (de novo) proteins with the characteristics desired for medical, environmental, and industrial purposes? To address this

  8. Exploring the Repeat-Protein Universe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exploring the Repeat-Protein Universe Print Naturally occurring proteins-chains of amino acids that fold into functional, three-dimensional shapes-are believed to represent just a small fraction of the universe of all possible permutations of amino-acid sequences and folds. How can we begin to systematically sift through those permutations to find and engineer from scratch (de novo) proteins with the characteristics desired for medical, environmental, and industrial purposes? To address this

  9. Volcanic episodes near Yucca Mountain as determined by paleomagnetic studies as Lathrop Wells, Crater Flat, and Sleeping Butte, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Champion, D.E.

    1991-12-31

    It has been suggested that mafic volcanism in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is both recent (20 ka) and a product of complex {open_quotes}polycyclic{close_quotes} eruptions. This pattern of volcanism, as interpreted by some workers at the Lathrop Wells volcanic complex, comprises a sequence of numerous small-volume eruptions that become more tephra-producing over time. Such sequences are thought to occur over timespans as long as 100,000 years. However, paleomagnetic studies of the tephra and lava flows from mafic volcanoes near Yucca Mountain fail to find evidence of repeated eruptive activity over timespans of 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 5} years, even though samples have been taken that represent approximately 95% of the products of these volcanoes. Instead, the eruptions seem to have occurred as discrete episodes at each center and thus can be considered to be {open_quotes}monogenetic.{close_quotes} Dates of these episodes have been obtained by the proven radiometric-geochronometer methods of K-Ar or {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar dating.

  10. Characterization of Mg/Al butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc filling with Zn29.5Al0.5Ti filler metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Hongyang; Liu, Liming, E-mail: liulm@dlut.edu.cn

    2014-04-01

    The multivariate alloying design of a welding joint is used in the Mg to Al welding process. A Zn29.5Al0.5Ti alloy is added as filler metal in gas tungsten arc welding of Mg and Al alloy joint based on the analysis of Al and Mg alloy characteristics. The tensile strength, microstructure, and phase constitution of the weld seam are analyzed. The formation of brittle and hard MgAl intermetallic compounds is avoided because of the effects of Zn, Al, and Ti. The average tensile strength of the joint is 148 MPa. Al{sub 3}Ti is first precipitated and functions as the nucleus of heterogeneous nucleation during solidification. Moreover, the precipitated AlMgZn{sub 2} hypoeutectic phase exhibited a feather-like structure, which enhances the property of the MgAl dissimilar joint. - Highlights: Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are butt welded by fusion welding. The effect of Ti in filler metal is investigated. The formation of MgAl intermetallic compounds is avoided.

  11. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  12. Power Line Integrity Monitor and Repeater

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-09-30

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed a power system integrity monitor and repeater that provide real time status of the integrity of the physical structure of power poles and transmission towers. It may be applied to other structures, such as pipelines or cell towers, which have multiple segments that can cover hundreds of miles. Sensors and on-board processing provide indication of tampering or impending damage to the structure with information provided to the centralmore » operations center or supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) for mitigative actions. This software runs on a series of small, inexpensive, low power electronic sensor platforms that are mounted on each tower of an electric power transmission or distribution system for the purpose of communicating system integrity to a central location. The software allows each platform to: 1) interface with sensors that monitor tower integrity, 2) record and analyze events, 3) communicate sensor information to other sensor platforms located on adjacent towers or to a central monitoring location, and 4) derive, conserve, and store platform power from the transmission of electric power.« less

  13. Assembly of Repeat Content Using Next Generation Sequencing Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    labutti, Kurt; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor; Copeland, Alex

    2014-03-17

    Repetitive organisms pose a challenge for short read assembly, and typically only unique regions and repeat regions shorter than the read length, can be accurately assembled. Recently, we have been investigating the use of Pacific Biosciences reads for de novo fungal assembly. We will present an assessment of the quality and degree of repeat reconstruction possible in a fungal genome using long read technology. We will also compare differences in assembly of repeat content using short read and long read technology.

  14. Repeat-until-success cubic phase gate for universal continuous...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    phase gate for universal continuous-variable quantum computation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Repeat-until-success cubic phase gate for universal ...

  15. Gordon Butte | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    W 9,000,000,000 mW 0.009 GW Number of Units 6 Commercial Online Date 2012 Wind Turbine Manufacturer GE Energy References AWEA 2012 Market Report1 Loading map......

  16. The Hydrogeologic Character of the Lower Tuff Confining Unit and the Oak Springs Butte Confining Unit in the Tuff Pile Area of Central Yucca Flat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drellack, Jr., Sigmund L.; Prothro, Lance B.; Gonzales, Jose L.; Mercadante, Jennifer M.

    2010-07-30

    ). No welded-tuff (or lava-flow aquifers), referred to as low-porosity, high-permeability zones in Boryta et al. (in review), are present within the LTCU in the Tuff Pile area. Fractures within the LTCU are poorly developed, a characteristic of zeolitic tuffs; and fracture distributions are independent of stratigraphic and lithologic units (Prothro, 2008). Groundwater flow and radionuclide transport will not be affected by laterally extensive zones of significantly higher permeability within the LTCU in the Tuff Pile area. Although not the primary focus of this report, the hydrogeologic character of the Oak Spring Butte confining unit (OSBCU), located directly below the LTCU, is also discussed. The OSBCU is lithologically more diverse, and does include nonwelded to partially welded ash-flow tuffs. However, these older ash-flow tuffs are poorly welded and altered (zeolitic to quartzofeldspathic), and consequently, would tend to have properties similar to a tuff confining unit rather than a welded-tuff aquifer.

  17. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing (Technical Report) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should...

  18. Alu repeats as markers for forensic DNA analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batzer, M.A.; Alegria-Hartman, M.; Kass, D.H.

    1994-01-01

    The Human-Specific (HS) subfamily of Alu sequences is comprised of a group of 500 nearly identical members which are almost exclusively restricted to the human genome. Individual subfamily members share an average of 98.9% nucleotide identity with the HS subfamily consensus sequence, and have an average age of 2.8 million years. We have developed a Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) based assay using primers complementary to the 5 inch and 3 inch unique flanking DNA sequences from each HS Alu that allow the locus to be assayed for the presence or absence of the Alu repeat. The dimorphic HS Alu sequences probably inserted in the human genome after the radiation of modem humans (within the last 200,000-one million years) and represent a unique source of information for human population genetics and forensic DNA analyses. These sites can be developed into Dimorphic Alu Sequence Tagged Sites (DASTS) for the Human Genome Project. HS Alu family member insertions differ from other types of polymorphism (e.g. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat [VNTR] or Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism [RFLP]) in that polymorphisms due to Alu insertions arise as a result of a unique event which has occurred only one time in the human population and spread through the population from that point. Therefore, individuals that share HS Alu repeats inherited these elements from a common ancestor. Most VNTR and RFLP polymorphisms may arise multiple times in parallel within a population.

  19. IMHEX fuel cell repeat component manufacturing continuous improvement accomplishments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakaitis, L.A.; Petraglia, V.J.; Bryson, E.S.

    1996-12-31

    M-C Power is taking a power generation technology that has been proven in the laboratory and is making it a commercially competitive product. There are many areas in which this technology required scale up and refinement to reach the market entry goals for the IMHEX{reg_sign} molten carbonate fuel cell power plant. One of the primary areas that needed to be addressed was the manufacturing of the fuel cell stack. Up to this point, the fuel cell stack and associated components were virtually hand made for each system to be tested. M-C Power has now continuously manufactured the repeat components for three 250 kW stacks. M-C Power`s manufacturing strategy integrated both evolutionary and revolutionary improvements into its comprehensive commercialization effort. M-C Power`s objectives were to analyze and continuously improve stack component manufacturing and assembly techniques consistent with established specifications and commercial scale production requirements. Evolutionary improvements are those which naturally occur as the production rates are increased and experience is gained. Examples of evolutionary (learning curve) improvements included reducing scrap rates and decreasing raw material costs by buying in large quantities. Revolutionary improvements result in significant design and process changes to meet cost and performance requirements of the market entry system. Revolutionary changes often involve identifying new methods and developing designs to accommodate the new process. Based upon our accomplishments, M-C Power was able to reduce the cost of continuously manufactured fuel cell repeat components from the first to third 250 kW stack by 63%. This paper documents the continuous improvement accomplishments realized by M-C Power during IMHEX{reg_sign} fuel cell repeat component manufacturing.

  20. Safety of Repeated Yttrium-90 Radioembolization (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Safety of Repeated Yttrium-90 Radioembolization Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Safety of Repeated Yttrium-90 Radioembolization Purpose: Repeated radioembolization (RE) treatments carry theoretically higher risk of radiation-induced hepatic injury because of the liver's cumulative memory of previous exposure. We performed a retrospective safety analysis on patients who underwent repeated RE. Methods: From 2004 to 2011, a total of 247 patients were treated by RE. Eight

  1. Fuel cell repeater unit including frame and separator plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yamanis, Jean; Hawkes, Justin R; Chiapetta, Jr., Louis; Bird, Connie E; Sun, Ellen Y; Croteau, Paul F

    2013-11-05

    An example fuel cell repeater includes a separator plate and a frame establishing at least a portion of a flow path that is operative to communicate fuel to or from at least one fuel cell held by the frame relative to the separator plate. The flow path has a perimeter and any fuel within the perimeter flow across the at least one fuel cell in a first direction. The separator plate, the frame, or both establish at least one conduit positioned outside the flow path perimeter. The conduit is outside of the flow path perimeter and is configured to direct flow in a second, different direction. The conduit is fluidly coupled with the flow path.

  2. Binary classification of items of interest in a repeatable process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abell, Jeffrey A; Spicer, John Patrick; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Chakraborty, Debejyo

    2015-01-06

    A system includes host and learning machines. Each machine has a processor in electrical communication with at least one sensor. Instructions for predicting a binary quality status of an item of interest during a repeatable process are recorded in memory. The binary quality status includes passing and failing binary classes. The learning machine receives signals from the at least one sensor and identifies candidate features. Features are extracted from the candidate features, each more predictive of the binary quality status. The extracted features are mapped to a dimensional space having a number of dimensions proportional to the number of extracted features. The dimensional space includes most of the passing class and excludes at least 90 percent of the failing class. Received signals are compared to the boundaries of the recorded dimensional space to predict, in real time, the binary quality status of a subsequent item of interest.

  3. Repeatable reference for positioning sensors and transducers in drill pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; Pixton, David S.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy

    2005-05-03

    A drill pipe having a box end having a tapered thread, and an internal shoulder and an external face for engagement with a drill pipe pin end having a tapered mating thread, and an external shoulder and an external face adapted for data acquisition or transmission. The relative dimensions of the box and pin ends are precisely controlled so that when the tool joint is made up, a repeatable reference plane is established for transmitting power and tuning downhole sensors, transducers, and means for sending and receiving data along the drill string. When the power or data acquisition and transmission means are located in the tool joint, the dimensions of the tool joint are further proportioned to compensate for the loss of cross-sectional area in order maintain the joints ability to sustain nominal makeup torque.

  4. The effects of repeated low-dose sarin exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, T.-M. . E-mail: tsungming.a.shih@us.army.mil; Hulet, S.W.; McDonough, J.H.

    2006-09-01

    This project assessed the effects of repeated low-dose exposure of guinea pigs to the organophosphorus nerve agent sarin. Animals were injected once a day, 5 days per week (Monday-Friday), for 2 weeks with fractions (0.3x, 0.4x, 0.5x, or 0.6x) of the established LD{sub 5} dose of sarin (42 {mu}g/kg, s.c.). The animals were assessed for changes in body weight, red blood cell (RBC) acetylcholinesterase (AChE) levels, neurobehavioral reactions to a functional observational battery (FOB), cortical electroencephalographic (EEG) power spectrum, and intrinsic acetylcholine (ACh) neurotransmitter (NT) regulation over the 2 weeks of sarin exposure and for up to 12 days postinjection. No guinea pig receiving 0.3, 0.4 or 0.5 x LD{sub 5} of sarin showed signs of cortical EEG seizures despite decreases in RBC AChE levels to as low as 10% of baseline, while seizures were evident in animals receiving 0.6 x LD{sub 5} of sarin as early as the second day; subsequent injections led to incapacitation and death. Animals receiving 0.5 x LD{sub 5} sarin showed obvious signs of cholinergic toxicity; overall, 2 of 13 animals receiving 0.5 x LD{sub 5} sarin died before all 10 injections were given, and there was a significant increase in the angle of gait in the animals that lived. By the 10th day of injection, the animals receiving saline were significantly easier to remove from their cages and handle and significantly less responsive to an approaching pencil and touch on the rump in comparison with the first day of testing. In contrast, the animals receiving 0.4 x LD{sub 5} sarin failed to show any significant reductions in their responses to an approaching pencil and a touch on the rump as compared with the first day. The 0.5 x LD{sub 5} sarin animals also failed to show any significant changes to the approach and touch responses and did not adjust to handling or removal from the cage from the first day of injections to the last day of handling. Thus, the guinea pigs receiving the 0

  5. Trinucleotide repeats at the FRAXF locus: Frequency and distribution in the general population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, J.J.A.; Walker, M.

    1996-08-09

    FRAXF the third X-chromosomal fragile site to be cloned, has been shown to harbor a polymorphic compound triplet array: (GC-CGTC){sub n} (GCC){sub n}. Expansion and methylation of the GCC-repeat and the neighboring CpG-rich region result in chromosomal fragility. DNAs from 500 anonymous consecutive newborn males were examined to determine the incidence of various repeat numbers. The range of repeats was from 10-38, with the most common alleles having 14 (52.7%), 12 (16.6%), 21 (9.0%), and 22 (5.2%) triplets. Based on the distribution of repeat numbers, we suggest that the 21-repeat allele resulted from hairpin formation involving 7 GCC-repeats in a 14-repeat allele, accompanied by polymerase slippage. Examination of dinucleotide repeats near the FRAXF repeat will be important in testing this hypothesis. Since the clinical phenotype, if any, of FRAXF is unknown, this database will also be valuable for comparisons with repeat numbers in individuals from special populations. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. Study of Sensitivity and Repeatability of Piezoelectric Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, C. E.; Greenaway, M. W.; Proud, W. G.

    2006-07-28

    The sensitivity and repeatability of stress and density measurements obtained using commercially available piezoelectric probes have been studied for high-velocity (> 450 m s-1) gas gun-driven spray experiments. The probes used are Dynasen Piezopins, in which the sensor element is a small ((0.4 {+-} 0.05) mm thick, (1.2 {+-} 0.1) mm diameter) PZT (Lead Zirconate Titanate) disk. The probe gives an output voltage V(t) proportional to the time derivative of the force normal to the poled axis of the PZT. The stress level is obtained using the time-integrated voltage. It is assumed that there is complete momentum transfer between the spray and the Piezopin, therefore the spray density can be found from the stress level. The spray is produced by accelerating aluminum powder (10 {mu}m grain size) in a gas gun. Spray density measurements are compared with values measured from x-ray images, and stress measurements are compared with extrapolated values from the spray densities obtained from the x-ray images.

  7. Glass Buttes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS...

  8. Glass Buttes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEA Development Phase: Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean...

  9. Mitchell Butte Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    120C393.15 K 248 F 707.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 10 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  10. Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... TargetMilestone Archive and re-process historical geophysics Re-process old Puna gravity... State University * Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries * US Department of ...

  11. Methods for sequencing GC-rich and CCT repeat DNA templates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, Donna L.

    2007-02-20

    The present invention is directed to a PCR-based method of cycle sequencing DNA and other polynucleotide sequences having high CG content and regions of high GC content, and includes for example DNA strands with a high Cytosine and/or Guanosine content and repeated motifs such as CCT repeats.

  12. Addendum to Financial Saving From Peer Reviews Analysis: Pairwise Comparison of Ratings for Repeatedly Reviewed Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report is an addendum to financial savings from Peer Reviews Analysis: Pairwise Comparison of Ratings for Repeatedly Reviewed Projects, for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  13. NREL Simulates Shade Conditions in Repeatable Test for Solar Arrays - News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Releases | NREL Simulates Shade Conditions in Repeatable Test for Solar Arrays New protocol finds microinverters can improve performance under shaded conditions more than 12% May 14, 2012 The US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has released a new repeatable test protocol that simulates real shade conditions and can predict with much greater precision the effects of shade on a solar array. The new test demonstrated that under heavy shading conditions

  14. Repeat sequence chromosome specific nucleic acid probes and methods of preparing and using

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Gray, Joe W.

    1995-01-01

    A primer directed DNA amplification method to isolate efficiently chromosome-specific repeated DNA wherein degenerate oligonucleotide primers are used is disclosed. The probes produced are a heterogeneous mixture that can be used with blocking DNA as a chromosome-specific staining reagent, and/or the elements of the mixture can be screened for high specificity, size and/or high degree of repetition among other parameters. The degenerate primers are sets of primers that vary in sequence but are substantially complementary to highly repeated nucleic acid sequences, preferably clustered within the template DNA, for example, pericentromeric alpha satellite repeat sequences. The template DNA is preferably chromosome-specific. Exemplary primers ard probes are disclosed. The probes of this invention can be used to determine the number of chromosomes of a specific type in metaphase spreads, in germ line and/or somatic cell interphase nuclei, micronuclei and/or in tissue sections. Also provided is a method to select arbitrarily repeat sequence probes that can be screened for chromosome-specificity.

  15. Repeat sequence chromosome specific nucleic acid probes and methods of preparing and using

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weier, H.U.G.; Gray, J.W.

    1995-06-27

    A primer directed DNA amplification method to isolate efficiently chromosome-specific repeated DNA wherein degenerate oligonucleotide primers are used is disclosed. The probes produced are a heterogeneous mixture that can be used with blocking DNA as a chromosome-specific staining reagent, and/or the elements of the mixture can be screened for high specificity, size and/or high degree of repetition among other parameters. The degenerate primers are sets of primers that vary in sequence but are substantially complementary to highly repeated nucleic acid sequences, preferably clustered within the template DNA, for example, pericentromeric alpha satellite repeat sequences. The template DNA is preferably chromosome-specific. Exemplary primers and probes are disclosed. The probes of this invention can be used to determine the number of chromosomes of a specific type in metaphase spreads, in germ line and/or somatic cell interphase nuclei, micronuclei and/or in tissue sections. Also provided is a method to select arbitrarily repeat sequence probes that can be screened for chromosome-specificity. 18 figs.

  16. Reducing dislocations in semiconductors utilizing repeated thermal cycling during multistage epitaxial growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, John C. C.; Tsaur, Bor-Yeu; Gale, Ronald P.; Davis, Frances M.

    1992-02-25

    Dislocation densities are reduced in growing semiconductors from the vapor phase by employing a technique of interrupting growth, cooling the layer so far deposited, and then repeating the process until a high quality active top layer is achieved. The method of interrupted growth, coupled with thermal cycling, permits dislocations to be trapped in the initial stages of epitaxial growth.

  17. Reducing dislocations in semiconductors utilizing repeated thermal cycling during multistage epitaxial growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, John C. C.; Tsaur, Bor-Yeu; Gale, Ronald P.; Davis, Frances M.

    1986-12-30

    Dislocation densities are reduced in growing semiconductors from the vapor phase by employing a technique of interrupting growth, cooling the layer so far deposited, and then repeating the process until a high quality active top layer is achieved. The method of interrupted growth, coupled with thermal cycling, permits dislocations to be trapped in the initial stages of epitaxial growth.

  18. Smart repeater system for communications interoperability during multi-agency law enforcement operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crutcher, R.I.; Jones, R.W.; Moore, M.R.; Smith, S.F.; Tolley, A.L.; Rochelle, R.W.

    1996-12-31

    A prototype smart repeater that provides interoperability capabilities for radio communication systems in multi-agency and multi-user scenarios is being developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The smart repeater functions as a deployable communications platform that can be dynamically reconfigured to cross-link the radios of participating federal, state, and local government agencies. This interconnection capability improves the coordination and execution of multi-agency operations, including coordinated law enforcement activities and general emergency or disaster response scenarios. The repeater provides multiple channels of operation in the 30--50, 118--136, 138--174, and 403--512 MHz land mobile communications and aircraft bands while providing the ability to cross-connect among multiple frequencies, bands, modulation types, and encryption formats. Additionally, two telephone interconnects provide links to the fixed and cellular telephone networks. The 800- and 900-MHz bands are not supported by the prototype, but the modular design of the system accommodates future retrofits to extend frequency capabilities with minimal impact to the system. Configuration of the repeater is through a portable personal computer with a Windows-based graphical interface control screen that provides dynamic reconfiguration of network interconnections and formats.

  19. Multi-Institutional Review of Repeat Irradiation of Chest Wall and Breast for Recurrent Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, Andrew O.; Rademaker, Alfred; Kiel, Krystyna D.; Jones, Ellen L.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Croog, Victoria; McCormick, Beryl M.; Hirsch, Arica; Karkar, Ami; Motwani, Sabin B.; Tereffe, Welela; Yu, T.-K.; Sher, David; Silverstein, Joshua; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Kesslering, Christy; Freedman, Gary M.; Small, William

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: To review the toxicity and clinical outcomes for patients who underwent repeat chest wall or breast irradiation (RT) after local recurrence. Methods and Materials: Between 1993 and 2005, 81 patients underwent repeat RT of the breast or chest wall for locally recurrent breast cancer at eight institutions. The median dose of the first course of RT was 60 Gy and was 48 Gy for the second course. The median total radiation dose was 106 Gy (range, 74.4-137.5 Gy). At the second RT course, 20% received twice-daily RT, 54% were treated with concurrent hyperthermia, and 54% received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up from the second RT course was 12 months (range, 1-144 months). Four patients developed late Grade 3 or 4 toxicity. However, 25 patients had follow-up >20 months, and no late Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were noted. No treatment-related deaths occurred. The development of Grade 3 or 4 late toxicity was not associated with any repeat RT variables. The overall complete response rate was 57%. No repeat RT parameters were associated with an improved complete response rate, although a trend was noted for an improved complete response with the addition of hyperthermia that was close to reaching statistical significance (67% vs. 39%, p = 0.08). The 1-year local disease-free survival rate for patients with gross disease was 53% compared with 100% for those without gross disease (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The results of our study have shown that repeat RT of the chest wall for patients with locally recurrent breast cancer is feasible, because it is associated with acceptable acute and late morbidity and encouraging local response rates.

  20. Local chromatin structure of heterochromatin regulates repeatedDNA stability, nucleolus structure, and genome integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Jamy C.

    2007-05-05

    Heterochromatin constitutes a significant portion of the genome in higher eukaryotes; approximately 30% in Drosophila and human. Heterochromatin contains a high repeat DNA content and a low density of protein-encoding genes. In contrast, euchromatin is composed mostly of unique sequences and contains the majority of single-copy genes. Genetic and cytological studies demonstrated that heterochromatin exhibits regulatory roles in chromosome organization, centromere function and telomere protection. As an epigenetically regulated structure, heterochromatin formation is not defined by any DNA sequence consensus. Heterochromatin is characterized by its association with nucleosomes containing methylated-lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me), heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) that binds H3K9me, and Su(var)3-9, which methylates H3K9 and binds HP1. Heterochromatin formation and functions are influenced by HP1, Su(var)3-9, and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. My thesis project investigates how heterochromatin formation and function impact nuclear architecture, repeated DNA organization, and genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster. H3K9me-based chromatin reduces extrachromosomal DNA formation; most likely by restricting the access of repair machineries to repeated DNAs. Reducing extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA stabilizes rDNA repeats and the nucleolus structure. H3K9me-based chromatin also inhibits DNA damage in heterochromatin. Cells with compromised heterochromatin structure, due to Su(var)3-9 or dcr-2 (a component of the RNAi pathway) mutations, display severe DNA damage in heterochromatin compared to wild type. In these mutant cells, accumulated DNA damage leads to chromosomal defects such as translocations, defective DNA repair response, and activation of the G2-M DNA repair and mitotic checkpoints that ensure cellular and animal viability. My thesis research suggests that DNA replication, repair, and recombination mechanisms in heterochromatin differ from those in

  1. Complete chloroplast genome of Trachelium caeruleum: extensiverearrangements are associated with repeats and tRNAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haberle, Rosemarie C.; Fourcade, Matthew L.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Jansen, Robert K.

    2006-01-09

    Chloroplast genome structure, gene order and content arehighly conserved in land plants. We sequenced the complete chloroplastgenome sequence of Trachelium caeruleum (Campanulaceae) a member of anangiosperm family known for highly rearranged chloroplast genomes. Thetotal genome size is 162,321 bp with an IR of 27,273 bp, LSC of 100,113bp and SSC of 7,661 bp. The genome encodes 115 unique genes, with 19duplicated in the IR, a tRNA (trnI-CAU) duplicated once in the LSC and aprotein coding gene (psbJ) duplicated twice, for a total of 137 genes.Four genes (ycf15, rpl23, infA and accD) are truncated and likelynonfunctional; three others (clpP, ycf1 and ycf2) are so highly divergedthat they may now be pseudogenes. The most conspicuous feature of theTrachelium genome is the presence of eighteen internally unrearrangedblocks of genes that have been inverted or relocated within the genome,relative to the typical gene order of most angiosperm chloroplastgenomes. Recombination between repeats or tRNAs has been suggested as twomeans of chloroplast genome rearrangements. We compared the relativenumber of repeats in Trachelium to eight other angiosperm chloroplastgenomes, and evaluated the location of repeats and tRNAs in relation torearrangements. Trachelium has the highest number and largest repeats,which are concentrated near inversion endpoints or other rearrangements.tRNAs occur at many but not all inversion endpoints. There is likely nosingle mechanism responsible for the remarkable number of alterations inthis genome, but both repeats and tRNAs are clearly associated with theserearrangements. Land plant chloroplast genomes are highly conserved instructure, gene order and content. The chloroplast genomes of ferns, thegymnosperm Ginkgo, and most angiosperms are nearly collinear, reflectingthe gene order in lineages that diverged from lycopsids and the ancestralchloroplast gene order over 350 million years ago (Raubeson and Jansen,1992). Although earlier mapping studies

  2. FIRST VERY LOW FREQUENCY DETECTION OF SHORT REPEATED BURSTS FROM MAGNETAR SGR J1550-5418

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Y. T.; Takahashi, T.; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Bertoni, Fernando C. P.; Fagundes, P. R.; Chau, J.; Schuch, N. J.; Hayakawa, M.; Hobara, Y.; Terasawa, T.

    2010-09-20

    We report on the first detection of ionospheric disturbances caused by short repeated gamma-ray bursts from the magnetar SGR J1550-5418. Very low frequency (VLF) radio wave data obtained in South America clearly show sudden amplitude and phase changes at the corresponding times of eight soft gamma-ray repeater bursts. Maximum amplitude and phase changes of the VLF signals appear to be correlated with the gamma-ray fluence. On the other hand, VLF recovery timescales do not show any significant correlation with the fluence, possibly suggesting that the bursts' spectra are not similar to each other. In summary, Earth's ionosphere can be used as a very large gamma-ray detector and the VLF observations provide us with a new method to monitor high-energy astrophysical phenomena without interruption such as Earth occultation.

  3. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Keith Emery Repeats on List of Highly Cited

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers Keith Emery Repeats on List of Highly Cited Researchers May 25, 2016 NREL scientist Keith Emery was again named as one of the World's Most Influential Scientific Minds in Engineering, based on a citation analysis identifying the scientists-as determined by the number of citations-who have made the most significant global impact within their respective field of study. This award reflects the growth and success of the PV industry as well as NREL's important role providing

  4. NREL: Solar Research - Keith Emery Repeats on List of Highly Cited

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Researchers Keith Emery Repeats on List of Highly Cited Researchers May 25, 2016 NREL scientist Keith Emery was again named as one of the World's Most Influential Scientific Minds in Engineering, based on a citation analysis identifying the scientists-as determined by the number of citations-who have made the most significant global impact within their respective field of study. This award reflects the growth and success of the PV industry as well as NREL's important role providing

  5. A Computing Environment to Support Repeatable Scientific Big Data Experimentation of World-Wide Scientific Literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlicher, Bob G; Kulesz, James J; Abercrombie, Robert K; Kruse, Kara L

    2015-01-01

    A principal tenant of the scientific method is that experiments must be repeatable and relies on ceteris paribus (i.e., all other things being equal). As a scientific community, involved in data sciences, we must investigate ways to establish an environment where experiments can be repeated. We can no longer allude to where the data comes from, we must add rigor to the data collection and management process from which our analysis is conducted. This paper describes a computing environment to support repeatable scientific big data experimentation of world-wide scientific literature, and recommends a system that is housed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in order to provide value to investigators from government agencies, academic institutions, and industry entities. The described computing environment also adheres to the recently instituted digital data management plan mandated by multiple US government agencies, which involves all stages of the digital data life cycle including capture, analysis, sharing, and preservation. It particularly focuses on the sharing and preservation of digital research data. The details of this computing environment are explained within the context of cloud services by the three layer classification of Software as a Service , Platform as a Service , and Infrastructure as a Service .

  6. Cell Context Dependent p53 Genome-Wide Binding Patterns and Enrichment at Repeats

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Botcheva, Krassimira; McCorkle, Sean R.

    2014-11-21

    The p53 ability to elicit stress specific and cell type specific responses is well recognized, but how that specificity is established remains to be defined. Whether upon activation p53 binds to its genomic targets in a cell type and stress type dependent manner is still an open question. Here we show that the p53 binding to the human genome is selective and cell context-dependent. We mapped the genomic binding sites for the endogenous wild type p53 protein in the human cancer cell line HCT116 and compared them to those we previously determined in the normal cell line IMR90. We reportmore » distinct p53 genome-wide binding landscapes in two different cell lines, analyzed under the same treatment and experimental conditions, using the same ChIP-seq approach. This is evidence for cell context dependent p53 genomic binding. The observed differences affect the p53 binding sites distribution with respect to major genomic and epigenomic elements (promoter regions, CpG islands and repeats). We correlated the high-confidence p53 ChIP-seq peaks positions with the annotated human repeats (UCSC Human Genome Browser) and observed both common and cell line specific trends. In HCT116, the p53 binding was specifically enriched at LINE repeats, compared to IMR90 cells. The p53 genome-wide binding patterns in HCT116 and IMR90 likely reflect the different epigenetic landscapes in these two cell lines, resulting from cancer-associated changes (accumulated in HCT116) superimposed on tissue specific differences (HCT116 has epithelial, while IMR90 has mesenchymal origin). In conclusion, our data support the model for p53 binding to the human genome in a highly selective manner, mobilizing distinct sets of genes, contributing to distinct pathways.« less

  7. The crystal structure of a partial mouse Notch-1 ankyrin domain: Repeats 4 through 7 preserve an ankyrin fold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubman, Olga Y.; Kopan, Raphael; Waksman, Gabriel; Korolev, Sergey (Birbeck); (St. Louis-MED); (WU-MED)

    2010-07-20

    Folding and stability of proteins containing ankyrin repeats (ARs) is of great interest because they mediate numerous protein-protein interactions involved in a wide range of regulatory cellular processes. Notch, an ankyrin domain containing protein, signals by converting a transcriptional repression complex into an activation complex. The Notch ANK domain is essential for Notch function and contains seven ARs. Here, we present the 2.2 {angstrom} crystal structure of ARs 4-7 from mouse Notch 1 (m1ANK). These C-terminal repeats were resistant to degradation during crystallization, and their secondary and tertiary structures are maintained in the absence of repeats 1-3. The crystallized fragment adopts a typical ankyrin fold including the poorly conserved seventh AR, as seen in the Drosophila Notch ANK domain (dANK). The structural preservation and stability of the C-terminal repeats shed a new light onto the mechanism of hetero-oligomeric assembly during Notch-mediated transcriptional activation.

  8. Piping inspection instrument carriage with precise and repeatable position control and location determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hapstack, M.; Talarek, T.R.; Zollinger, W.T.; Heckendorn, F.M. II; Park, L.R.

    1994-02-15

    An instrument carriage for inspection of piping comprises front and rear leg assemblies for engaging the interior of the piping and supporting and centering the carriage therein, and an instrumentation arm carried by a shaft system running from the front to rear leg assemblies. The shaft system has a screw shaft for moving the arm axially and a spline gear for moving the arm azimuthally. The arm has a pair of air cylinders that raise and lower a plate in the radial direction. On the plate are probes including an eddy current probe and an ultrasonic testing probe. The ultrasonic testing probe is capable of spinning 360[degree] about its axis. The instrument carriage uses servo motors and pressurized air cylinders for precise actuation of instrument components and precise, repeatable actuation of position control mechanisms. 8 figures.

  9. Piping inspection instrument carriage with precise and repeatable position control and location determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hapstack, Mark; Talarek, Ted R.; Zollinger, W. Thor; Heckendorn, II, Frank M.; Park, Larry R.

    1994-01-01

    An instrument carriage for inspection of piping comprises front and rear leg assemblies for engaging the interior of the piping and supporting and centering the carriage therein, and an instrumentation arm carried by a shaft system running from the front to rear leg assemblies. The shaft system has a screw shaft for moving the arm axially and a spline gear for moving the arm azimuthally. The arm has a pair of air cylinders that raise and lower a plate in the radial direction. On the plate are probes including an eddy current probe and an ultrasonic testing probe. The ultrasonic testing probe is capable of spinning 360.degree. about its axis. The instrument carriage uses servo motors and pressurized air cylinders for precise actuation of instrument components and precise, repeatable actuation of position control mechanisms.

  10. hnRNP L binds to CA repeats in the 3'UTR of bcl-2 mRNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Dong-Hyoung; Lim, Mi-Hyun; Youn, Dong-Ye [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 505 Banpo-Dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 505 Banpo-Dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seung Eun [Department of Medical Science, The Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Medical Science, The Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Young Soo [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Brain Research Institute, Department of Pharmacology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Brain Research Institute, Department of Pharmacology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Tsujimoto, Yoshihide [Department of Medical Genetics, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Osaka University Medical School, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Medical Genetics, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Osaka University Medical School, Osaka (Japan); Lee, Jeong-Hwa, E-mail: leejh@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 505 Banpo-Dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 505 Banpo-Dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-08

    We previously reported that the CA-repeat sequence in the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of bcl-2 mRNA is involved in the decay of bcl-2 mRNA. However, the trans-acting factor for the CA element in bcl-2 mRNA remains unidentified. The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L (hnRNP L), an intron splicing factor, has been reported to bind to CA repeats and CA clusters in the 3'UTR of several genes. We reported herein that the CA repeats of bcl-2 mRNA have the potential to form a distinct ribonuclear protein complex in cytoplasmic extracts of MCF-7 cells, as evidenced by RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays (REMSA). A super-shift assay using the hnRNP L antibody completely shifted the complex. Immunoprecipitation with the hnRNP L antibody and MCF-7 cells followed by RT-PCR revealed that hnRNP L interacts with endogenous bcl-2 mRNA in vivo. Furthermore, the suppression of hnRNP L in MCF-7 cells by the transfection of siRNA for hnRNP L resulted in a delay in the degradation of RNA transcripts including CA repeats of bcl-2 mRNA in vitro, suggesting that the interaction between hnRNPL and CA repeats of bcl-2 mRNA participates in destabilizing bcl-2 mRNA.

  11. Geology And A Working Conceptual Model Of The Obsidian Butte...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with a wealth of subsurface information made available for the first time from the databases of present and prior field operators. The Unit 6 sector of the system is hosted by...

  12. EA-1996: Glass Buttes Radio Station, Lake County, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), with DOE’s Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, is preparing an EA that will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct two telecommunications facilities, one of which would provide BPA telecommunications services, on BLM land. Additional information is available at http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/prineville/plans/glassbuttes/.

  13. SWIFT DISCOVERY OF A NEW SOFT GAMMA REPEATER, SGR J1745-29, NEAR SAGITTARIUS A*

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennea, J. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Kouveliotou, C.; Goegues, E.; Kaneko, Y.; Evans, P. A.; Degenaar, N.; Reynolds, M. T.; Miller, J. M.; Wijnands, R.; Mori, K.; Gehrels, N.

    2013-06-20

    Starting in 2013 February, Swift has been performing short daily monitoring observations of the G2 gas cloud near Sgr A* with the X-Ray Telescope to determine whether the cloud interaction leads to an increase in the flux from the Galactic center. On 2013 April 24 Swift detected an order of magnitude rise in the X-ray flux from the region near Sgr A*. Initially thought to be a flare from Sgr A*, the detection of a short hard X-ray burst from the same region by the Burst Alert Telescope suggested that the flare was from an unresolved new Soft Gamma Repeater, SGR J1745-29. Here we present the discovery of SGR J1745-29 by Swift, including analysis of data before, during, and after the burst. We find that the spectrum in the 0.3-10 keV range is well fit by an absorbed blackbody model with kT{sub BB} {approx_equal} 1 keV and absorption consistent with previously measured values from the quiescent emission from Sgr A*, strongly suggesting that this source is at a similar distance. Only one SGR burst has been detected so far from the new source, and the persistent light curve shows little evidence of decay in approximately two weeks of monitoring after outburst. We discuss this light curve trend and compare it with those of other well covered SGR outbursts. We suggest that SGR J1745-29 belongs to an emerging subclass of magnetars characterized by low burst rates and prolonged steady X-ray emission one to two weeks after outburst onset.

  14. Structural analysis of the KRIT1 ankyrin repeat and FERM domains reveals a conformationally stable ARD-FERM interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Rong; Li, Xiaofeng; Boggon, Titus J.

    2015-10-14

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are vascular dysplasias that usually occur in the brain and are associated with mutations in the KRIT1/CCM1, CCM2/MGC4607/OSM/Malcavernin, and PDCD10/CCM3/ TFAR15 genes. Here we report the 2.9 Å crystal structure of the ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) and FERM domain of the protein product of KRIT1 (KRIT1; Krev interaction trapped 1). The crystal structure reveals that the KRIT1 ARD contains 4 ankyrin repeats. There is also an unusual conformation in the ANK4 repeat that is stabilized by Trp-404, and the structure reveals a solvent exposed ankyrin groove. Domain orientations of the three copies within the asymmetric unit suggest a stable interaction between KRIT1 ARD and FERM domains, indicating a globular ARD–FERM module. It resembles the additional F0 domain found N-terminal to the FERM domain of talin. Structural analysis of KRIT1 ARD–FERM highlights surface regions of high evolutionary conservation, and suggests potential sites that could mediate interaction with binding partners. The structure therefore provides a better understanding of KRIT1 at the molecular level.

  15. The La-related protein 1-specific domain repurposes HEAT-like repeats to directly bind a 5'TOP sequence

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lahr, Roni M.; Mack, Seshat M.; Heroux, Annie; Blagden, Sarah P.; Bousquet-Antonelli, Cecile; Deragon, Jean -Marc; Berman, Andrea J.

    2015-07-22

    La-related protein 1 (LARP1) regulates the stability of many mRNAs. These include 5'TOPs, mTOR-kinase responsive mRNAs with pyrimidine-rich 5' UTRs, which encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. We determined that the highly conserved LARP1-specific C-terminal DM15 region of human LARP1 directly binds a 5'TOP sequence. The crystal structure of this DM15 region refined to 1.86 Å resolution has three structurally related and evolutionarily conserved helix-turn-helix modules within each monomer. These motifs resemble HEAT repeats, ubiquitous helical protein-binding structures, but their sequences are inconsistent with consensus sequences of known HEAT modules, suggesting this structure has been repurposed for RNA interactions. Amore » putative mTORC1-recognition sequence sits within a flexible loop C-terminal to these repeats. We also present modelling of pyrimidine-rich single-stranded RNA onto the highly conserved surface of the DM15 region. Ultimately, these studies lay the foundation necessary for proceeding toward a structural mechanism by which LARP1 links mTOR signalling to ribosome biogenesis.« less

  16. The La-related protein 1-specific domain repurposes HEAT-like repeats to directly bind a 5'TOP sequence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lahr, Roni M.; Mack, Seshat M.; Heroux, Annie; Blagden, Sarah P.; Bousquet-Antonelli, Cecile; Deragon, Jean -Marc; Berman, Andrea J.

    2015-07-22

    La-related protein 1 (LARP1) regulates the stability of many mRNAs. These include 5'TOPs, mTOR-kinase responsive mRNAs with pyrimidine-rich 5' UTRs, which encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. We determined that the highly conserved LARP1-specific C-terminal DM15 region of human LARP1 directly binds a 5'TOP sequence. The crystal structure of this DM15 region refined to 1.86 Å resolution has three structurally related and evolutionarily conserved helix-turn-helix modules within each monomer. These motifs resemble HEAT repeats, ubiquitous helical protein-binding structures, but their sequences are inconsistent with consensus sequences of known HEAT modules, suggesting this structure has been repurposed for RNA interactions. A putative mTORC1-recognition sequence sits within a flexible loop C-terminal to these repeats. We also present modelling of pyrimidine-rich single-stranded RNA onto the highly conserved surface of the DM15 region. Ultimately, these studies lay the foundation necessary for proceeding toward a structural mechanism by which LARP1 links mTOR signalling to ribosome biogenesis.

  17. Analytical studies on the impact of using repeated-rib roughness in LMR (Liquid Metal Reactor) decay heat removal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obot, N.T.; Tessier, J.H.; Pedersen, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical study was carried out to determine the effects of roughness on the thermal performance of Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) decay heat removal systems for a range of possible design configurations and operating conditions. The ranges covered for relative rib height (e/D/sub h/), relative pitch (p/e) and flow attack angle were 0.026--0.103, 5--20 and 0--90 degrees, successively. The heat flux was varied between 1.1 and 21.5 kW/m/sup 2/ (0.1 and 2.0 kW/ft/sup 2/). Calculations were made for three cases: smooth duct with no ribs, ribs on both the guard vessel and collector wall, and ribs on the collector wall only. The results indicate that significant benefits, amounting to nearly two-fold reductions in guard vessel and collector wall temperatures, can be realized by placing repeated ribs on both the guard vessel and the collector wall. The magnitudes of the reduction in the reactor vessel temperature are considerably smaller. In general, the level of improvement, be it with respect to temperature or heat flux, is only mildly affected by changes in rib height or pitch but exhibits greater sensitivity to the assumed value for the system form loss. When the ribs are placed only on the collector wall, the heat removal capability is substantially reduced.

  18. Interaction between a plasma membrane-localized ankyrin-repeat protein ITN1 and a nuclear protein RTV1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakamoto, Hikaru; Sakata, Keiko; Kusumi, Kensuke; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Iba, Koh

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ITN1, a plasma membrane ankyrin protein, interacts with a nuclear DNA-binding protein RTV1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear transport of RTV1 is partially inhibited by interaction with ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RTV1 can promote the nuclear localization of ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both overexpression of RTV1 and the lack of ITN1 increase salicylic acids sensitivity in plants. -- Abstract: The increased tolerance to NaCl 1 (ITN1) protein is a plasma membrane (PM)-localized protein involved in responses to NaCl stress in Arabidopsis. The predicted structure of ITN1 is composed of multiple transmembrane regions and an ankyrin-repeat domain that is known to mediate protein-protein interactions. To elucidate the molecular functions of ITN1, we searched for interacting partners using a yeast two-hybrid assay, and a nuclear-localized DNA-binding protein, RTV1, was identified as a candidate. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis revealed that RTV1 interacted with ITN1 at the PM and nuclei in vivo. RTV1 tagged with red fluorescent protein localized to nuclei and ITN1 tagged with green fluorescent protein localized to PM; however, both proteins localized to both nuclei and the PM when co-expressed. These findings suggest that RTV1 and ITN1 regulate the subcellular localization of each other.

  19. Increasing the reliability of the shutdown of 500 - 750-kV overhead lines equipped with shunt reactors in an unsuccessful three-phase automatic repeated closure cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuz'micheva, K. I.; Merzlyakov, A. S.; Fokin, G. G.

    2013-05-15

    The reasons for circuit-breaker failures during repeated disconnection of 500 - 750 kV overhead lines with shunt reactors in a cycle of unsuccessful three-phase automatic reconnection (TARC) are analyzed. Recommendations are made for increasing the operating reliability of power transmission lines with shunt reactors when there is unsuccessful reconnection.

  20. Repeat Courses of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS), Deferring Whole-Brain Irradiation, for New Brain Metastases After Initial SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shultz, David B.; Modlin, Leslie A.; Jayachandran, Priya; Von Eyben, Rie; Gibbs, Iris C.; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Chang, Steven D.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Li, Gordon; Adler, John R.; Hancock, Steven L.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), deferring whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT), for distant intracranial recurrences and identify factors associated with prolonged overall survival (OS). Patients and Methods: We retrospectively identified 652 metastases in 95 patients treated with 2 or more courses of SRS for brain metastases, deferring WBRT. Cox regression analyzed factors predictive for OS. Results: Patients had a median of 2 metastases (range, 1-14) treated per course, with a median of 2 courses (range, 2-14) of SRS per patient. With a median follow-up after first SRS of 15 months (range, 3-98 months), the median OS from the time of the first and second course of SRS was 18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 15-24) and 11 months (95% CI 6-17), respectively. On multivariate analysis, histology, graded prognostic assessment score, aggregate tumor volume (but not number of metastases), and performance status correlated with OS. The 1-year cumulative incidence, with death as a competing risk, of local failure was 5% (95% CI 4-8%). Eighteen (24%) of 75 deaths were from neurologic causes. Nineteen patients (20%) eventually received WBRT. Adverse radiation events developed in 2% of SRS sites. Conclusion: Multiple courses of SRS, deferring WBRT, for distant brain metastases after initial SRS, seem to be a safe and effective approach. The graded prognostic assessment score, updated at each course, and aggregate tumor volume may help select patients in whom the deferral of WBRT might be most beneficial.

  1. Impact of Uncertainty on Loss Estimates for a Repeat of the 1908 Messina-Reggio Calabria Earthquake in Southern Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franco, Guillermo; Shen-Tu, Bing Ming; Bazzurro, Paolo; Goretti, Agostino; Valensise, Gianluca

    2008-07-08

    Increasing sophistication in the insurance and reinsurance market is stimulating the move towards catastrophe models that offer a greater degree of flexibility in the definition of model parameters and model assumptions. This study explores the impact of uncertainty in the input parameters on the loss estimates by departing from the exclusive usage of mean values to establish the earthquake event mechanism, the ground motion fields, or the damageability of the building stock. Here the potential losses due to a repeat of the 1908 Messina-Reggio Calabria event are calculated using different plausible alternatives found in the literature that encompass 12 event scenarios, 2 different ground motion prediction equations, and 16 combinations of damage functions for the building stock, a total of 384 loss scenarios. These results constitute the basis for a sensitivity analysis of the different assumptions on the loss estimates that allows the model user to estimate the impact of the uncertainty on input parameters and the potential spread of the model results. For the event under scrutiny, average losses would amount today to about 9.000 to 10.000 million Euros. The uncertainty in the model parameters is reflected in the high coefficient of variation of this loss, reaching approximately 45%. The choice of ground motion prediction equations and vulnerability functions of the building stock contribute the most to the uncertainty in loss estimates. This indicates that the application of non-local-specific information has a great impact on the spread of potential catastrophic losses. In order to close this uncertainty gap, more exhaustive documentation practices in insurance portfolios will have to go hand in hand with greater flexibility in the model input parameters.

  2. Corrective action report for underground storage tank 2315-U, Pine Ridge East Repeater Station, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohrman, D.E.; Ingram, E.M. )

    1992-11-01

    This document represents the Corrective Action Report for Underground Storage Tank (UST) 2315-U at the Pine Ridge East Repeater Station, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Tank 2315-U was a 64-gallon, asphalt-coated, steel gasoline tank used to supply gasoline to an emergency power generator at the repeater station. Due to its capacity, the tank was initially exempted from regulation under 40 CFR 280 and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rules 1200-1-15-.01 to 1200-1-15-.07. However, due to the presence of a free product sheen discovered during over-excavation activities, the site fell under the revised TDEC release response and corrective action requirements in Rule 1200-1-15-.06, promulgated April 15, 1990. This report summarizes all activities, including initial abatement, Initial Site Characterization (ISC), soil over-excavation activities, and perched water corrective actions conducted to comply with current TDEC requirements.

  3. Towards the Integration of Dark- and Photo-Fermentative Waste Treatment. 4. Repeated Batch Sequential Dark- and Photofermentation using Starch as Substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurinavichene, T. V.; Belokopytov, B. F.; Laurinavichius, K. S.; Khusnutdinova, A. N.; Seibert, M.; Tsygankov, A. A.

    2012-05-01

    In this study we demonstrated the technical feasibility of a prolonged, sequential two-stage integrated process under a repeated batch mode of starch fermentation. In this durable scheme, the photobioreactor with purple bacteria in the second stage was fed directly with dark culture from the first stage without centrifugation, filtration, or sterilization (not demonstrated previously). After preliminary optimization, both the dark- and the photo-stages were performed under repeated batch modes with different process parameters. Continuous H{sub 2} production in this system was observed at a H{sub 2} yield of up to 1.4 and 3.9 mole mole{sup -1} hexose during the dark- and photo-stage, respectively (for a total of 5.3 mole mole{sup -1} hexose), and rates of 0.9 and 0.5 L L{sup -1} d{sup -1}, respectively. Prolonged repeated batch H{sub 2} production was maintained for up to 90 days in each stage and was rather stable under non-aseptic conditions. Potential for improvements in these results are discussed.

  4. Initial site characterization, environmental assessment, and corrective actions for underground storage tank 2315-U, Pine Ridge East Repeater Station, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, J.M.; Ingram, E.M. )

    1991-02-01

    This document presents the Initial Site Characterization Report and information to date regarding environmental assessment and corrective actions for Underground Storage Tank (UST) 2315-U at the Pine Ridge East Repeater Station, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This document was prepared following guidance in US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations promulgated under 40 CFR 280. The Pine Ridge East Repeater Station is located on Pine Ridge, which borders the Y-12 Plant to the north. One 64-gallon, asphalt-coated steel tank was located adjacent to the Repeater Station. This tank was used to store gasoline for the station's emergency power generator. Tank 2315-U was exempted from regulation under 40 CFR 280 and Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) Rules 1200-1-15.-01 through 1200-1-15-.07 due to size and emergency generator exemptions. Because of an identified release discovered during initial corrective actions, TDHE requirements in revised Rule 1200-1-15-.06, promulgated April 15, 1990, regarding release response and corrective actions, apply to the site (TDHE, 1990). This report documents all activities, including initial abatement, initial site characterization, environmental assessment sampling, and corrective actions conducted to comply with TDHE regulations. Initial site characterization sampling data revealed that benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX) concentrations exceeded applicable regulatory guidelines and lead values were elevated above levels expected for clean soils. 17 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. TU-C-12A-05: Repeatability Study of Reduced Field-Of-View Diffusion-Weighted MRI On Human Thyroid Gland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shukla-Dave, A; Lu, Y; Hatzoglou, V; Stambuk, H; Mazaheri, Y; Banerjee, S; Shankaranarayanan, A; Deasy, J

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the repeatability of reduced field-of-view diffusion-weighted imaging (rFOV DWI) in quantifying apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) for human thyroid glands in a clinical setting. Methods: Nine healthy human volunteers were enrolled and underwent 3T MRI exams. For each volunteer, 3 longitudinal exams (2 weeks apart) with 2 repetitive sessions within each exam, including rFOV and conventional full field-of-view (fFOV) DWI scans, were performed. In the acquired DWI images, a fixed-size region of interest (ROI; diameter=8mm) was placed on thyroid glands to calculate ADC. ADC was calculated using a monoexponential function with a noise correction scheme. The repeatability of ADC was assessed by using coefficient variation (CV) across sessions or exams, which was defined to be: r = 1-CV, 0 < r < 1, where CV=STD/m, STD is the standard deviation of ADC, and m is the average of ADC across sessions or exams. An experienced radiologist assessed and scored rFOV and fFOV DW images based on image characteristics (1, nondiagnostic; 2, poor; 3, satisfactory; 4, good; and 5, excellent).Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to compare ADC values, CV of ADC, repeatability of ADC across sessions and exams, and radiologic scores between rFOV and fFOV DWI techniques. Results: There was no significant difference in ADC values across sessions and exams either in rFOV or fFOV DWI. The average CVs of both rFOV and fFOV DWI were less than 13%. The repeatability of ADC measurement between rFOV and fFOV DWI was not significantly different. The overall image quality was significantly higher with rFOV DWI than with fFOV DWI. Conclusion: This study suggested that ADCs from both rFOV and fFOV DWI were repeatable, but rFOV DWI had superior imaging quality for human thyroid glands in a clinical setting.

  6. Site investigation report and corrective action plan for Tank 2310-U at the Pine Ridge West Repeater Station, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, J.M.; Ingram, E.M. )

    1991-04-01

    This Site Investigation Report/Corrective Action Plan (SIR/CAP) for the Pine Ridge West Repeater Station Site, includes the Underground Storage Tank (UST) 2310-U. The site and tank are located at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This report documents the results of investigations of petroleum releases at the Pine Ridge West Repeater Station Site and satisfies the requirements of Rule 1200-1-15-06 of the Rules of the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) which became effective on April 15, 1990. Underlying soils were evaluated to determine the nature and extent of contamination. Results of the site investigation soil analysis indicate that the horizontal extent of contaminant migration appears to be minute. The contamination appears to be limited to the areas directly adjacent to the former Tank 2310-U location. Although the horizontal extent of contamination has been adequately defined, the vertical extent of contaminant migration has not. This information was, however, adequate to conduct a review of corrective action alternatives, although it is apparent that soil permeability testing must be conducted prior to a final determination at the site. If the hydraulic conductivity of the soil is less than 10{sup {minus}4} cm/s no further action is required. Should the hydraulic conductivity be equal to or greater than 10{sup {minus}4} cm/s some corrective action would be required. 24 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. What Is Next When You Graduate From the 8(a) Program - Cassius F. Butts |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    West Coast Port Closure Enforcement Policy West Coast Port Closure Enforcement Policy February 27, 2015 Closures at 29 West Coast marine ports in February 2015 due to a labor dispute have resulted in significant delays for certain goods entering the United States through those ports. DOE issued a policy not to seek civil penalties for violations resulting from those delays if the importers provide certain documentation to DOE by July 1, 2015. Enforcement Policy Statement: West Coast Port

  8. Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce exploration risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Technologies Peer Review - 2010. The primary objective of this project is to combine a suite of high resolution geophysical and geochemical techniques to reduce exploration risk by characterizing hydrothermal alteration, fault geometries and relationships.

  9. Executing scatter operation to parallel computer nodes by repeatedly broadcasting content of send buffer partition corresponding to each node upon bitwise OR operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J.; Ratterman, Joseph D.

    2009-11-06

    Executing a scatter operation on a parallel computer includes: configuring a send buffer on a logical root, the send buffer having positions, each position corresponding to a ranked node in an operational group of compute nodes and for storing contents scattered to that ranked node; and repeatedly for each position in the send buffer: broadcasting, by the logical root to each of the other compute nodes on a global combining network, the contents of the current position of the send buffer using a bitwise OR operation, determining, by each compute node, whether the current position in the send buffer corresponds with the rank of that compute node, if the current position corresponds with the rank, receiving the contents and storing the contents in a reception buffer of that compute node, and if the current position does not correspond with the rank, discarding the contents.

  10. A unique nuclear receptor direct repeat 17 (DR17) is present within the upstream region of Schistosoma mansoni female-specific p14 gene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fantappie, Marcelo Rosado Furtado, Daniel Rodrigues; Rumjanek, Franklin David; LoVerde, Philip T.

    2008-07-11

    The eggs produced by sexually mature female Schistosma mansoni are responsible for the pathogenesis of the disease. The eggshell precursor gene p14 is expressed only in the vitelline cells of sexually mature female worms in response to a yet unidentified male stimulus. Herein, we report the identification of a novel nuclear receptor response element in the upstream region of the p14 gene. This element contains the canonical hexameric DNA core motif, 5'-PuGGTCA, composed of an atypically spaced direct repeat (DR17). Schistosome nuclear receptors SmRXR1 and SmNR1 specifically bound to the p14-DR17 element as a heterodimer. SmRXR1, but not SmNR1, bound to the motif as a monomer. Introduction of mutations in the TCA core sequence completely abolished the binding by SmRXR1/SmNR1 heterodimer. This finding supports our hypothesis that the expression of Schistosoma mansonip14 gene is regulated through the nuclear receptor signaling pathway.

  11. Cooperative control between AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 in a WD40-repeat protein pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Jian -Ping; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Chang, Ying; Jones, Alan M.

    2015-10-13

    HEXOKINASE 1 (AtHXK1) and Regulator of G-protein Signaling 1 (AtRGS1) pathways, mediate D-glucose signaling in Arabidopsis. However, it is not known the degree, if any, that these pathways overlap and how. We show modest signaling crosstalk between these pathways, albeit complex with both epistatic interactions and additive effects that may be indirect. The action of HXK1 on AtRGS1 signaling lies downstream of the primary step in G protein-mediated sugar signaling in which the WD-repeat protein, AGB1, is the propelling signaling element. RHIP1, a previously unknown protein predicted here to have a 3-stranded helical structure, interacts with both AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 in planta and is required for some glucose-regulated gene expression, providing a physical connection between these two proteins in sugar signaling. The rhip1 null mutant displays similar seedling growth phenotypes as rgs1-2 in response to glucose, further suggesting a role for RHIP1 in glucose signaling. Lastly, glucose signaling is a complex hierarchical relationship which is specific to the target gene and sugar phenotype and suggests that there are two glycolysis-independent glucose signaling sensors: AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 that weakly communicate with each other via feed-back and feed-forward loops to fine tune the response to glucose.

  12. Effect of fins and repeated-rib roughness on the performance characteristics of a reactor vessel air cooling system for LMFBR shutdown heat removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, F.B.; Chawla, T.C.; Pedersen, D.R.; Tessier, J.H.; Webb, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    The use of a totally passive cooling system for shutdown heat removal that rejects heat from the reactor vessel by radiation to the guard vessel and from the guard vessel to a circulating air stream driven by natural convection is a key feature of the US Department of Energy's liquid-metal reactor advanced design study concepts. General Electric refers to the system as the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) and Rockwell International as the Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (RACS). The circulating air stream is contained in the annular passage formed with guard vessel wall and the duct wall surrounding the guard vessel. Specifically, the RVACS/RACS is designed to assure adequate cooling of the reactor vessel under abnormal operational conditions associated with loss of heat removal through the normal heat transport path via the steam generator system or the DRACS, if available. To enhance the heat transfer, longitudinal radial fins or repeated ribs can be attached to the duct wall and/or the guard vessel. The purpose of the present paper is to summarize the status of the analytical work on the development of an optimum design configuration for the RVACS/RACS.

  13. Cooperative control between AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 in a WD40-repeat protein pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Jian -Ping; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Chang, Ying; Jones, Alan M.

    2015-10-13

    HEXOKINASE 1 (AtHXK1) and Regulator of G-protein Signaling 1 (AtRGS1) pathways, mediate D-glucose signaling in Arabidopsis. However, it is not known the degree, if any, that these pathways overlap and how. We show modest signaling crosstalk between these pathways, albeit complex with both epistatic interactions and additive effects that may be indirect. The action of HXK1 on AtRGS1 signaling lies downstream of the primary step in G protein-mediated sugar signaling in which the WD-repeat protein, AGB1, is the propelling signaling element. RHIP1, a previously unknown protein predicted here to have a 3-stranded helical structure, interacts with both AtRGS1 and AtHXK1more » in planta and is required for some glucose-regulated gene expression, providing a physical connection between these two proteins in sugar signaling. The rhip1 null mutant displays similar seedling growth phenotypes as rgs1-2 in response to glucose, further suggesting a role for RHIP1 in glucose signaling. Lastly, glucose signaling is a complex hierarchical relationship which is specific to the target gene and sugar phenotype and suggests that there are two glycolysis-independent glucose signaling sensors: AtRGS1 and AtHXK1 that weakly communicate with each other via feed-back and feed-forward loops to fine tune the response to glucose.« less

  14. BURST FLUENCE DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOFT GAMMA REPEATERS 1806-20 AND 1900+14 IN THE ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER PCA ERA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prieskorn, Zachary; Kaaret, Philip, E-mail: prieskorn@psu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2012-08-10

    We study the fluence distributions of over 3040 bursts from SGR 1806-20 and over 1963 bursts from SGR 1900+14 using the complete set of observations available from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer/Proportional Counter Array through 2011 March. Cumulative event distributions are presented for both sources and are fitted with single and broken power laws as well as an exponential cutoff. The distributions are best fitted by a broken power law with exponential cutoff; however the statistical significance of the cutoff is not high and the upper portion of the broken power law can be explained as the expected number of false bursts due to random noise fluctuations. Event distributions are also examined in high and low burst rate regimes and power-law indices are found to be consistent, independent of the burst rate. The contribution function of the event fluence is calculated. This distribution shows that the energy released in the soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts is dominated by the most powerful events for both sources. The power-law nature of these distributions combined with the dominant energy dissipation of the system occurring in the large, less frequent bursts is indicative of a self-organized critical system, as suggested by Gogus et al. in 1999.

  15. Repeated compressive stress increase with 400 [degree]C thermal cycling in tantalum thin films due to increases in the oxygen content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, C. Jr.; Clevenger, L.A.; Schad, R.G. )

    1994-07-01

    Stresses which build up in thin films such as tantalum, during thermal processing, can cause major reliability problems in electronic and x-ray optics applications. We demonstrate that 50--200 nm thick sputtered [beta]-Ta thin films undergo repeated compressive stress increases when thermally cycled to 400 [degree]C (at a rate of 10 [degree]C/min) and back in a purified He ambient because of small amounts of oxygen gettered by the tantalum. The oxygen contamination results from the poor quality of the atmospheric seal on the quartz annealing chamber. As-deposited Ta thin films have a compressive stress ranging from [minus]1 to [minus]4 GPa. The compressive stress buildup was monitored [ital in] [ital situ] and was shown to increase [minus]0.5 GPa on average after each thermal cycle for a final value from [minus]6 to [minus]7 GPa after seven cycles. After being cycled thermally seven times any perturbation of the film such as a four-point probe resistivity measurement can cause the film to instantaneously crack in a serpentine pattern, relieving the large compressive stress. Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling analysis was used to determine that the as-deposited film contained 1 at. % oxygen which increased to 8%--12% after seven thermal cycles with an approximate doubling in resistivity. The [minus]0.5 GPa average compressive stress increase in Ta thin films when cycled to 400 [degree]C is attributed to a 1.3% increase in oxygen concentration leading to a Ta unit cell expansion of 0.6%.

  16. Biophysical Analysis of Anopheles gambiae Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C and Their Interaction with LRIM1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Marni; Summers, Brady J.; Baxter, Richard H. G.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-03-16

    Natural infection of Anopheles gambiae by malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites is significantly influenced by the APL1 genetic locus. The locus contains three closely related leucine-rich repeat (LRR) genes, APL1A, APL1B and APL1C. Multiple studies have reported the participation of APL1A—C in the immune response of A. gambiae to invasion by both rodent and human Plasmodium isolates. APL1C forms a heterodimer with the related LRR protein LRIM1 via a C-terminal coiled-coil domain that is also present in APL1A and APL1B. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer protects A. gambiae from infection by binding the complement-like protein TEP1 to form a stable and active immune complex. We report solution x-ray scatting data for the LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer, the oligomeric state of LRIM1/APL1 LRR domains in solution and the crystal structure of the APL1B LRR domain. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimeric complex has a flexible and extended structure in solution. In contrast to the APL1A, APL1C and LRIM1 LRR domains, the APL1B LRR domain is a homodimer. The crystal structure of APL1B-LRR shows that the homodimer is formed by an N-terminal helix that complements for the absence of an N-terminal capping motif in APL1B, which is a unique distinction within the LRIM1/APL1 protein family. Full-length APL1A1 and APL1B form a stable complex with LRIM1. Our results support a model in which APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C can all form an extended, flexible heterodimer with LRIM1, providing a repertoire of functional innate immune complexes to protect A. gambiae from a diverse array of pathogens.

  17. Biophysical Analysis of Anopheles gambiae Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteins APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C and Their Interaction with LRIM1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Williams, Marni; Summers, Brady J.; Baxter, Richard H. G.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-03-16

    Natural infection of Anopheles gambiae by malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites is significantly influenced by the APL1 genetic locus. The locus contains three closely related leucine-rich repeat (LRR) genes, APL1A, APL1B and APL1C. Multiple studies have reported the participation of APL1A—C in the immune response of A. gambiae to invasion by both rodent and human Plasmodium isolates. APL1C forms a heterodimer with the related LRR protein LRIM1 via a C-terminal coiled-coil domain that is also present in APL1A and APL1B. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer protects A. gambiae from infection by binding the complement-like protein TEP1 to form a stable and active immune complex.more » We report solution x-ray scatting data for the LRIM1/APL1C heterodimer, the oligomeric state of LRIM1/APL1 LRR domains in solution and the crystal structure of the APL1B LRR domain. The LRIM1/APL1C heterodimeric complex has a flexible and extended structure in solution. In contrast to the APL1A, APL1C and LRIM1 LRR domains, the APL1B LRR domain is a homodimer. The crystal structure of APL1B-LRR shows that the homodimer is formed by an N-terminal helix that complements for the absence of an N-terminal capping motif in APL1B, which is a unique distinction within the LRIM1/APL1 protein family. Full-length APL1A1 and APL1B form a stable complex with LRIM1. Our results support a model in which APL1A1, APL1B and APL1C can all form an extended, flexible heterodimer with LRIM1, providing a repertoire of functional innate immune complexes to protect A. gambiae from a diverse array of pathogens.« less

  18. Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    RATTLESNAKE POINT ELLSWORTH CHURCH BORDER HANSON GROVER HULSE COULEE SAKAKAWEA AURELIA ROUND TOP BUTTE GORHAM BUTTE W MARMON MANITOU SHEALEY CLAYTON SERGIS N SADDLE BUTTE HAYLAND ...

  19. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16S_2005 (11 January - 24 February, 2005)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozyr, Alex

    2006-08-30

    This report presents methods, and analytical and quality control procedures for salinity, oxygen, nutrient, inorganic carbon, organic carbon, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC), and bomb 14C system parameters performed during the A16S_2005 cruise, which took place from January 11 to February 24, 2005, aboard research vessel (R/V) Ronald H. Brown under the auspices of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The R/V Ronald H. Brown departed Punta Arenas, Chile, on January 11, 2005, and ended its cruise in Fortaleza, Brazil, on February 24, 2005. The research conducted was one of a series of repeat hydrography sections jointly funded by NOAA and the National Science Foundation as part of the CLIVAR/CO2/repeat hydrography/tracer program. Samples were taken from 36 depths at 121 stations. The data presented in this report include the analyses of water samples for total inorganic carbon (TCO2), fugacity of CO2 (fCO2), total alkalinity (TALK), pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), CFC, 14C, hydrographic, and other chemical measurements. The R/V Ronald H. Brown A16S_2005 data set is available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The NDP consists of the oceanographic data files and this printed documentation, which describes the procedures and methods used to obtain the data.

  20. A fragile X male with a broad smear on southern blot analysis representing 100-500 CGG repeats and no methylation at the EagI site of the FMR-1 gene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lachiewicz, A.M.; Spiridigliozzi, G.A.; McConkie-Rosell, A.

    1996-08-09

    Fragile X DNA studies were carried out on all obligate carriers of a large fragile X family with 10 mentally retarded individuals. One 64-year-old carrier man with an altered FMR-1 allele was not described as being mentally retarded or as having any limitations in function. He was married, raised 8 children, and worked as an auto mechanic. On examination, he had macrocephaly and mild macroorchidism but few of the other typical physical findings of males with fragile X syndrome. His Full Scale IQ is 73, and his Vineland Adaptive Behavior Composite is 73. On the Woodcock-Johnson Psycho-Educational Battery-Revised, he achieved standard scores of 64 in Reading, 55 in Math, and 83 in Knowledge. His DNA findings showed a broad smear on Southern blot analysis of 100-500 CGG repeats and no methylation at the EagI site upstream of the FMR-1 protein coding region. His FMR-1 protein production is 12% of normal. His daughters all have large premutations, with somatic instability in the size of the CGG repeat lengths. They all have evidence of academic underachievement and 2 have physical characteristics frequently described in individuals with fragile X. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Lagoon Seepage Testing Procedures for Central Facilities Area (CFA) Sewage Lagoons at Idaho National Laboratory Butte County, Idaho April 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Giesbrecht

    2014-05-01

    The lagoon seepage testing procedures are documented herein as required by the Wastewater Rules (IDAPA 58.01.16.493). The Wastewater Rules and Wastewater Reuse Permit LA-000141-03 require that the procedure used for performing a seepage test be approved by IDEQ prior to conducting the seepage test. The procedures described herein are based on a seepage testing plan that was developed by J-U-B ENGINEERS, Inc. (J-U-B) and has been accepted by several IDEQ offices for lagoons in Idaho.

  2. Lagoon Seepage Testing Report for Central Facilities Area (CFA) Sewage Lagoons at Idaho National Laboratory, Butte County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridger Morrison

    2014-09-01

    J-U-B ENGINEERS, Inc. (J-U-B) performed seepage tests on the CFA Wastewater Lagoons 1, 2, and 3 between August 26th and September 22nd, 2014. The lagoons were tested to satisfy the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Rules (IDAPA 58.01.16) that require all lagoons be tested at a frequency of every 10 years and the Compliance Activity CA-141-03 in the DEQ Wastewater Reuse Permit for the CFA Sewage Treatment Plant (LA-000141-03). The lagoons were tested to determine if the average seepage rates are less than 0.25 in/day, the maximum seepage rate allowed for lagoons built prior to April 15, 2007. The average seepage rates were estimated for each lagoon and are given in Table-ES1. The average seepage rates for Lagoons 1 and 2 are less than the allowable seepage rate of 0.25 in/day. Lagoon 1 and 2 passed the seepage test and will not have to be tested again until the year 20241. However, the average seepage rate for Lagoon 3 appears to exceed the allowable seepage rate of 0.25 in/day which means the potential source for the excessive leakage should be investigated further.

  3. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho and Component Development and Integration Facility, Butte, Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF), conducted September 14 through October 2, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the INEL and CDIF. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations' carried on at the INEL and the CDIF, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the S A results will be incorporated into the INEL/CDIF Survey findings for inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 90 refs., 95 figs., 77 tabs.

  4. Microstructure evolution of Al/Mg butt joints welded by gas tungsten arc with Zn filler metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Fei; Zhang Zhaodong; Liu Liming, E-mail: liulm@dlut.edu.cn

    2012-07-15

    Based on the idea of alloying welding seam, Gas tungsten arc welding method with pure Zn filler metal was chosen to join Mg alloy and Al alloy. The microstructures, phases, element distribution and fracture morphology of welding seams were examined. The results indicate that there was a transitional zone in the width of 80-100 {mu}m between the Mg alloy substrate and fusion zone. The fusion zone was mainly composed of MgZn{sub 2}, Zn-based solid solution and Al-based solid solution. The welding seam presented distinct morphology in different location owning to the quite high cooling rate of the molten pool. The addition of Zn metal could prevent the formation of Mg-Al intermetallics and form the alloyed welding seam during welding. Therefore, the tensile strengths of joints have been significantly improved compared with those of gas tungsten arc welded joints without Zn metal added. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mg alloy AZ31B and Al alloy 6061 are welded successfully. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zinc wire is employed as a filler metal to form the alloyed welding seam. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An alloyed welding seam is benefit for improving of the joint tensile strength.

  5. Repeat Recipient Reporting in FederalRep...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Status" field as "Fully Completed" and the "Final Report" field is marked yes, "Y", for final. After that, once you've submitted a valid final report, you will no longer get emails ...

  6. Electrostatic Neutralization - A Key to Accurate & Repeatable...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. ...

  7. DMA engine for repeating communication patterns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan G.; Giampapa, Mark E.; Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Vranas, Pavlos

    2010-09-21

    A parallel computer system is constructed as a network of interconnected compute nodes to operate a global message-passing application for performing communications across the network. Each of the compute nodes includes one or more individual processors with memories which run local instances of the global message-passing application operating at each compute node to carry out local processing operations independent of processing operations carried out at other compute nodes. Each compute node also includes a DMA engine constructed to interact with the application via Injection FIFO Metadata describing multiple Injection FIFOs where each Injection FIFO may containing an arbitrary number of message descriptors in order to process messages with a fixed processing overhead irrespective of the number of message descriptors included in the Injection FIFO.

  8. Exploring the Repeat-Protein Universe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heart of Matter Exploring the Heart of Matter February 10, 2016 - 8:53am Addthis To explore the nucleus inside an atom, scientists use giant particle accelerators that act like microscopes. Detectors like this one collect the information for scientists to analyze. | Photo courtesy of Jefferson Lab. To explore the nucleus inside an atom, scientists use giant particle accelerators that act like microscopes. Detectors like this one collect the information for scientists to analyze. | Photo courtesy

  9. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Sections A20_2003 (22 September-20 October 2003) and A22_2003 (23 October-13 November, 2003)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozyr, Alex

    2008-09-30

    This report presents methods, and analytical and quality control procedures for salinity, oxygen, nutrient, inorganic carbon, organic carbon, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC), and bomb carbon-14 system parameters performed during the A20_2003 and A22_2003 cruises, which took place between September 22 and November 13, 2003, aboard research vessel (R/V) Knorr under the auspices of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Science Foundation (NSF). The R/V Knorr departed Woods Hole, Massachusetts, on September 22 for the Repeat Section A20, and ended this line in Port of Spain, Trinidad, on October 20. The Repeat Section A22 started on October 23 in Port of Spain, Trinidad, and finished on November 13, 2003, in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. The research conducted was one of a series of repeat hydrography sections jointly funded by NOAA and NSF as part of the Climate Variability Program (CLIVAR)/CO2/repeat hydrography/tracer program. Samples were taken from 36 depths at 88 stations on section A20 and 82 stations on section A22. The data presented in this report include the analyses of water samples for total inorganic carbon (TCO2), total alkalinity (TALK), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), CFC, carbon-14, hydrographic, and other chemical measurements.

  10. Coiled tubing working life prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, J.

    1995-12-31

    Failure of coiled tubing, due to the repeated bending and plastic deformation of coiled tubing on and off the reel and gooseneck, is of great concern in coiled tubing operations. This paper discusses the coiled tubing working life based on one of the coiled tubing life models published in the literature, and compares the results with other models. Certain agreements are found among these models. A group of curves is presented to illustrate the coiled tubing working life affected by coiled tubing size and wall thickness, internal pressure, yield strength, reel diameter, gooseneck radius, operation condition (corrosion) and butt-welded connection (stress concentration). The results show that coiled tubing life can be greatly increased by increasing CT wall thickness and CT strength, while the coiled tubing working life decreases under high internal pressure, corrosion, and butt-weld conditions. These curves can be easily used in estimating coiled tubing life for the field use.

  11. Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained during the R/Vs Roger Revelle and Thomas Thompson repeat hydrography cruises in the Pacific Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 sections P16S-2005 (9 January - 19 February, 2005) and P16N-2006 (13 February - 30 March, 2006)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozyr, Alex; Feely, R. A.; Sabine, C. L.; Millero, F. J.; Langdon, C.; Dickson, A. G.; Fine, R. A.; Bullister, J. L.; Hansell, D. A.; Carlson, C. A.; Sloyan, B. M.; McNichol, A. P.; Key, R. M.; Byrne, R. H.; Wanninkhof, R.

    2009-05-01

    This report presents methods, and analytical and quality control procedures for salinity, oxygen, nutrients, total carbon dioxide (TCO2), total alkalinity (TALK), pH, discrete CO2 partial pressure (pCO2), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), radiocarbon, δ13C, and underway carbon measurements performed during the P16S-2005 (9 January - 19 February 2005) and P16N-2006 (13 February - 30 March, 2006) cruises in the Pacific Ocean. The research vessel (R/V) Roger Revelle departed Papeete, Tahiti, on January 9, 2005 for the Repeat Section P16S, nominally along 150°W, ending in Wellington, New Zealand, on February 19. During this cruise, samples were taken from 36 depths at 111 CTD stations between 16°S and 71°S. The Repeat Section P16N, nominally along 152°W, consisted of two legs. Leg 1 started on February 13, 2006 in Papeete, Tahiti, and finished on March 3, in Honolulu, Hawaii. The R/V Thomas G. Thompson departed Honolulu for Leg 2 on March 10, 2006 and arrived in Kodiak, Alaska, on March 30. During the P16N cruises, samples were taken from 34 or 36 depths at 84 stations between 17°S and 56.28°N. The research conducted on these cruises was part of a series of repeat hydrography sections jointly funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of the Climate Variability Program (CLIVAR)/CO2 Repeat Hydrography Program. The P16S and P16N data sets are available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The NDP consists of the oceanographic data files and this printed documentation, which describes the procedures and methods used to obtain the data.

  12. Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BICENTENNIAL MEDICINE POLE HILLS BIG STICK ROOSEVELT ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS ...

  13. Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS ...

  14. MyRecipe | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    here) Ingredient Alternative Mustard Pork Butt Sugar warmed to room temp Molasses or honey. none Instructions Prepare rub. Coat butt. Refrigerate overnite. BBQ indirect heat,...

  15. A Demonstration Project for Capturing Geothermal Energy from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Demonstration Project for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT A Demonstration Project for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, ...

  16. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville vicinity, Butte County, Idaho -- Photographs, written historical and descriptive data. Historical American engineering record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-31

    This report describes the history of the Old Waste Calcining Facility. It begins with introductory material on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, the Materials Testing Reactor fuel cycle, and the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. The report then describes management of the wastes from the processing plant in the following chapters: Converting liquid to solid wastes; Fluidized bed waste calcining process and the Waste Calcining Facility; Waste calcining campaigns; WCF gets a new source of heat; New Waste Calcining Facility; Last campaign; Deactivation and the RCRA cap; Significance/context of the old WCF. Appendices contain a photo key map for HAER photos, a vicinity map and neighborhood of the WCF, detailed description of the calcining process, and chronology of WCF campaigns.

  17. Assessment of the Mechanical Stress Improvement Process for Mitigating Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking in Nickel Alloy Butt Welds in Piping Systems Approved for Leak-Before-Break

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of the use of Mechanical Stress Improvement Process to reduce, or decrease, stress-driven degradation, i.e., primary water stress corrosion cracking.

  18. Assessment of Weld Overlays for Mitigating Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking at Nickel Alloy Butt Welds in Piping Systems Approved for Leak-Before-Break

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Edward J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-08-01

    This TLR provides an assessment of weld overlays as a mitigation strategy for PWSCC, and includes an assessment of the WOL-related inspection requirements of Code Case N-770-1, as conditioned in §50.55a.

  19. Property:NEPA EA EIS Report Url | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + http:www.blm.govnmstenprogmorelandsrealtysanjuanbasinenergy.html + Sigurd Red Butte No2 + http:www.blm.govutstenfocedarcityplanningsigurdtoredbutte...

  20. Binary classification of items of interest in a repeatable process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abell, Jeffrey A.; Spicer, John Patrick; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Chakraborty, Debejyo

    2014-06-24

    A system includes host and learning machines in electrical communication with sensors positioned with respect to an item of interest, e.g., a weld, and memory. The host executes instructions from memory to predict a binary quality status of the item. The learning machine receives signals from the sensor(s), identifies candidate features, and extracts features from the candidates that are more predictive of the binary quality status relative to other candidate features. The learning machine maps the extracted features to a dimensional space that includes most of the items from a passing binary class and excludes all or most of the items from a failing binary class. The host also compares the received signals for a subsequent item of interest to the dimensional space to thereby predict, in real time, the binary quality status of the subsequent item of interest.

  1. Ocean Carbon and Repeat Hydrographic CLIVAR Program Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    A systematic and global re-occupation of select hydrographic sections is underway to quantify changes in storage and transport of heat, fresh water, carbon dioxide (CO2) and related parameters. By integrating the scientific needs of the carbon and hydrography/tracer communities, major synergies and cost savings are being achieved. The philosophy is that in addition to efficiency, a coordinated approach will produce scientific advances that exceed those of having individual carbon and hydrographic/tracer programs. These advances will contribute to the following overlapping scientific objectives: • Data for Model Calibration and Validation • Carbon System Studies • Heat and Freshwater Storage and Flux Studies • Deep and Shallow Water Mass and Ventilation Studies • Calibration of Autonomous Sensors Effective management and archival of data is a fundamental requirement for successful scientific research endeavors, and future oceanographic research depends on the availability and clarity of existing data. Two data offices in the US deal with reference-quality global ocean CTD, water sample, and underway data, one (CDIAC) specializing in discrete CO2 and underway surface data, and the other (WHPO/CCHDO) specializing in CTD, hydrographic, and tracer data.

  2. Electrostatic Neutralization- A Key to Accurate & Repeatable PM Filter Weighing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs.

  3. Ocean Carbon and Repeat Hydrographic CLIVAR Program Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Effective management and archival of data is a fundamental requirement for successful scientific research endeavors, and future oceanographic research depends on the availability and clarity of existing data. Two data offices in the US deal with reference-quality global ocean CTD, water sample, and underway data, one (CDIAC) specializing in discrete CO2 and underway surface data, and the other (WHPO/CCHDO) specializing in CTD, hydrographic, and tracer data.

  4. CX-013924: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    license outgrants at Western's Casper Substation and Western's Casper Service Center in ... Wire (OPGW) fiber from RMP's Red Butte Substation (Red Butte) to a new tap on the jointly ...

  5. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 8): Silver Bow Creek/Butte Area NPL site, Warm Springs Ponds Operable Unit, Upper Clark Fork River Basin, MT. (First remedial action), September 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-28

    The Silver Bow Creek site is a mining and processing area in the Upper Clark Fork River Basin, Deer Lodge County, Southwestern Montana. The Record of Decision (ROD) documents the selected interim remedial action for one of eleven operable units for the site, the Warm Springs Ponds operable unit, which covers approximately 2,500 acres just above the beginning of the Clark Fork River. Contamination at the site is the result of over 100 years of mining and process operations in the area. Mining, milling, and smelting waste were dumped directly into Silver Bow Creek and transported downstream to the Clark Fork River with final deposition downstream as far as 130 miles. Principal threats from the site include the possibility of pond berm failure due to flood and earthquake damage that could release millions of cubic yards of tailings and sediment to the river. Furthermore, the creeks are contaminated with dissolved metals, and exposed soil and tailings are contaminated with elevated levels of several metals. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil, sediment, ground water, and surface water are metals including arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc.

  6. Ward Co. Dunn Co. McLean Co. McHenry Co. Mountrail Co. McKenzie Co.

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    WHISKEY JOE WHITE ASH SPRING COULEE DES LACS MAGPIE HARTLAND BEICEGEL CREEK RANCH COULEE WINNER CRAZY MAN CREEK GROS VENTRE BANK W BULLSNAKE UPLAND COULEE REFUGE LARSON GARNET ALKALI CREEK PLUMER RATTLESNAKE POINT ELLSWORTH CHURCH BORDER HANSON GROVER HULSE COULEE SAKAKAWEA AURELIA ROUND TOP BUTTE GORHAM BUTTE W MARMON MANITOU SHEALEY CLAYTON SERGIS N SADDLE BUTTE HAYLAND CEDAR COULEE BOWLINE LITTLE BUTTE LONG CREEK RHOADES HEDBERG FILLMORE EIDSVOLD FAIRFIELD WOLF BAY TOBACCO GARDEN N SPRING

  7. A Demonstration Project for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    beneath Butte, MT | Department of Energy A Demonstration Project for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT A Demonstration Project for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Project objectives. Demonstrate performance of heat pumps in a large HVAC system in a heating-dominated climate. gshp_gilmore_mine_waters.pdf (1.16 MB) More Documents & Publications Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes, Oregon Innovative

  8. ch_4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    18 Affected Environment visual range of the Fort Hall Indian Reservation. The Bitterroot, Lemhi, and Lost River mountain ranges are visible to the north and west of INEEL. East Butte and Middle Butte can be seen near the southern boundary, while Circular and Antelope Buttes are visible to the northeast. Smaller volcanic buttes dot the natural landscape of INEEL, providing a striking contrast to the relatively flat ground surface. The viewscape in general consists of terrain dominated by sage-

  9. Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon Co.

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W

  10. Cascadia Analysis | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PENNEL BUFFALO LITTLE KNIFE FRYBURG MONDAK PLEVNA LOOKOUT BUTTE E ELKHORN RANCH DICKINSON CADY CREEK MEDICINE POLE HILLS BICENTENNIAL ROOSEVELT BIG STICK ROUGH RIDER MONARCH TREE TOP LOOKOUT BUTTE BUCKHORN MEDORA FLAT TOP BUTTE ELAND DEMORES ASH COULEE WHISKEY JOE GAS CITY DAVIS CREEK WINDY RIDGE POKER JIM PLEVNA S KNUTSON STATE LINE BELL BEAR CREEK ELKHORN RANCH N PIERRE CREEK LONE BUTTE ZENITH MANNING SQUAW GAP AMOR STADIUM HEART S HILINE ASH MARY GAYLORD BULL CREEK HALEY SHORT PINE HILLS W

  11. Crystal Structure of the BARD1 Ankyrin Repeat Domain and Its Functional Consequences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox Iii, David N.; Le Trong, Isolde; Rajagopal, Ponni; Brzovic, Peter S.; Stenkamp, Ronald E.; Klevit, Rachel E.

    2008-07-25

    BARD1 is the constitutive nuclear partner to the breast and ovarian cancer specific tumor suppressor BRCA1. Together, they form a heterodimeric complex responsible for maintaining genomic stability through nuclear functions involving DNA damage signaling and repair, transcriptional regulation, and cell cycle control.

  12. Conditional generation of arbitrary single-mode quantum states of light by repeated photon subtractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiurasek, Jaromir; Garcia-Patron, Raul; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2005-09-15

    We propose a scheme for the conditional generation of arbitrary finite superpositions of Fock states in a single mode of a traveling optical field. The setup requires a source of squeezed vacuum states, beam splitters, strong coherent beams, photodetectors with single-photon sensitivity, and a final squeezer. If we want to generate a squeezed superposition of Fock states, which is sufficient in several applications, then the last squeezer is not even needed. The thrust of this method is that it achieves a high fidelity without requiring photodetectors with a high efficiency or a single-photon resolution. The possibility to improve its scaling by using a quantum memory is also discussed.

  13. Structural Insights into the Cooperative Binding of SeqA to a Tandem GATC Repeat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Y.; Brendler, T; Austin, S; Guarne, A

    2009-01-01

    SeqA is a negative regulator of DNA replication in Escherichia coli and related bacteria that functions by sequestering the origin of replication and facilitating its resetting after every initiation event. Inactivation of the seqA gene leads to unsynchronized rounds of replication, abnormal localization of nucleoids and increased negative superhelicity. Excess SeqA also disrupts replication synchrony and affects cell division. SeqA exerts its functions by binding clusters of transiently hemimethylated GATC sequences generated during replication. However, the molecular mechanisms that trigger formation and disassembly of such complex are unclear. We present here the crystal structure of a dimeric mutant of SeqA [SeqA{Delta}(41-59)-A25R] bound to tandem hemimethylated GATC sites. The structure delineates how SeqA forms a high-affinity complex with DNA and it suggests why SeqA only recognizes GATC sites at certain spacings. The SeqA-DNA complex also unveils additional protein-protein interaction surfaces that mediate the formation of higher ordered complexes upon binding to newly replicated DNA. Based on this data, we propose a model describing how SeqA interacts with newly replicated DNA within the origin of replication and at the replication forks.

  14. Reliable Alloy that Refuses to Forget, Repeatedly | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    its shape, despite being transformed over 10 million times, could upgrade solar devices. ... as artificial heart valves, refrigeration components, and solar energy conversion devices. ...

  15. Assessment of Health Hazards of Repeated Inhalation of Diesel Emissions, with Comparisons to Other Source Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: National Environmental Respiratory Center

  16. CX-009210: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Silver Butte Fiber Burial Project CX(s) Applied: B.47 Date: 08/28/2012 Location(s): Montana, Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  17. CX-008884: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rattlesnake Butte Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 08/13/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  18. Directory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY Darryl Butt Distinguished Professor and Associate Director for CAES Materials... (Properties) 52414 11:16 AM 52414 11:16 AM Send Document Link BOISE...

  19. CAES Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calendar Microscopy and Characterization Suite (MaCS) MaCS Contacts Dr. Darryl Butt CAES Co-Associate Director Chair, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Boise...

  20. Natrona County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wyoming Meadow Acres, Wyoming Midwest, Wyoming Mills, Wyoming Powder River, Wyoming Red Butte, Wyoming Vista West, Wyoming Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  1. CX-012813: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Redmond-Pilot Butte #1 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41893 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  2. CX-014368: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Haystack Butte Radio Communication Site CX(s) Applied: B1.19Date: 12/07/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  3. Welcome to the Geothermal Technologies Program 2012 Annual Peer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Glass Buttes, OR (DOE) Welcome to the Geothermal Technologies Program 2012 Annual Peer Review Ava Coy, Project Officer Geothermal Technologies Program Office of Energy ...

  4. MHK Projects/Whiskey Bay | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ","visitedicon":"" Project Profile Project Start Date 112009 Project City Butte la Rose, LA Project StateProvince Louisiana Project Country United States Project Resource...

  5. MHK Projects/Tensas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ","visitedicon":"" Project Profile Project Start Date 112009 Project City Butte la Rose, LA Project StateProvince Louisiana Project Country United States Project Resource...

  6. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Schuler, Daniel ; Butt, Ryan H. ; Dibble, Robert W. Full Text Available March 2016, Elsevier Experimental and numerical investigation of ion signals in boosted HCCI combustion...

  7. CX-012790: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Haystack Butte Radio Site Land Acquisition CX(s) Applied: B1.24Date: 41939 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  8. Property:Geothermal/FundingSource | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + American...

  9. Property:Geothermal/FundingOpportunityAnnouncemt | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co., NV Geothermal Project + DE-FOA-0000109 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + DE-FOA-0000116 +...

  10. Property:Geothermal/TargetsMilestones | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    reservoir models and define drilling targets. A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + Mine waters will...

  11. Property:Geothermal/Impacts | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fluid pathways in fracture-dominated systems. A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + Successful...

  12. Property:Geothermal/AwardeeWebsite | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + http:www.magmaenergycorp.comsHome.asp + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + http:...

  13. Boyd County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Boyd County, Nebraska Anoka, Nebraska Bristow, Nebraska Butte, Nebraska Gross, Nebraska Lynch, Nebraska Monowi, Nebraska Naper, Nebraska Spencer, Nebraska Retrieved from "http:...

  14. Jackson County, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oregon Ashland, Oregon Butte Falls, Oregon Central Point, Oregon Eagle Point, Oregon Gold Hill, Oregon Jacksonville, Oregon Medford, Oregon Phoenix, Oregon Rogue River, Oregon...

  15. Agenda CBS Public Meeting-Tempe

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gholson, Chairman, Timbisha Shoshone Tribe CONSENT- BASED SITING CONSENT-BASED SITING PUBLIC MEETING Phoenix Marriott Tempe at the Buttes 2000 W Westcourt Way Tempe, AZ 85282 June ...

  16. CX-014365: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ferry Butte Communication Facility Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B1.19Date: 12/10/2015 Location(s): IdahoOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  17. Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    BLOOMFIELD SCORIA TRAVERS RANCH HEART RIVER GREEN RIVER CHATEAU DUTCH HENRY BUTTE CABERNET ... Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to ...

  18. Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly - Energy Information...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crow Butte Operation (Nebraska) Lost Creek Project (Wyoming) Nichols Ranch ISR Project (Wyoming) Ross CPP (Wyoming) Smith Ranch-Highland Operation (Wyoming) Willow Creek Project ...

  19. Annual Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Mindat.org and Hudson Institute of Mineralogy, 2016. Schwartzwalder Mine (Ralston Creek Mine), Ralston Buttes District, Jefferson Co., Colorado, USA, web page http:...

  20. Method of pressurizing and stabilizing rock by periodic and repeated injections of a settable fluid of finite gel strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colgate, S.A.

    1983-01-25

    A finite region of overpressure can be created in solid underground formations by the periodic injection of a fluid that has finite gel strength that subsequently, after each injection, partially sets--i.e., equivalently becomes a very much stronger gel. A region of overpressure is a region in which the static, locked in pressure is larger than what was there before. A region of overpressure can be used to prevent a roof of a tunnel from caving by adding compressive stresses in the roof. A sequence of regions of overpressure can be used to lift an arch or dome underground, squeeze off water or gas flows, stabilize dams, foundations, large underground rooms, etc. In general, the stress or pressure distribution in rock can be altered and engineered in a fashion that is more advantageous than what would have been the case without overstressing. 3 figs.

  1. Organogold oligomers: Exploiting iClick and aurophilic cluster formation to prepare solution stable Au4 repeating units

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Xi; Wang, Shanshan; Ghiviriga, Ion; Abboud, Khalil A.; Veige, Adam S.

    2015-05-19

    A novel synthetic method to create gold based metallo–oligomers/polymers via the combination of inorganic click (iClick) with intermolecular aurophilic interactions is demonstrated. Complexes [PEt3Au]4(μ-N3C2C6H5) (1) and [PPhMe2Au]43C2C6H5) (2) and {[PEt3Au]4[(μ-N3C2)2-9,9-dihexyl-9H-fluorene]}n (8) have been synthesized via iClick. The tetranuclear structures of 1 and 2, induced by aurophilic bonding, are confirmed in the solid state through single crystal X-ray diffraction experiments and in solution via variable temperature NMR spectroscopy. The extended 1D structure of 8 is constructed by aurophilic induced self-assembly. 1H DOSY NMR analysis reveals that the aurophilic bonds in 1, 2, and 8 are retained in the solution phase. Themore » degree of polymerization within complex 8 is temperature and concentration dependent, as determined by 1H DOSY NMR. The complex 8 is a rare example of a solution stable higher ordered structure linked by aurophilic interactions.« less

  2. Method of pressurizing and stabilizing rock by periodic and repeated injections of a settable fluid of finite gel strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colgate, Stirling A.

    1983-01-01

    A finite region of overpressure can be created in solid underground formations by the periodic injection of a fluid that has finite gel strength that subsequently, after each injection, partially sets--i.e., equivalently becomes a very much stronger gel. A region of overpressure is a region in which the static, locked in pressure is larger than what was there before. A region of overpressure can be used to prevent a roof of a tunnel from caving by adding compressive stresses in the roof. A sequence of regions of overpressure can be used to lift an arch or dome underground, squeeze off water or gas flows, stabilize dams, foundations, large underground rooms, etc. In general, the stress or pressure distribution in rock can be altered and engineered in a fashion that is more advantageous than what would have been the case without overstressing.

  3. The effects of 5-fluorouracil and doxorubicin on expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panozzo, J.; Akan, E.; Griffiths, T.D.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1996-03-01

    Previous work by many groups has documented induction of the HIV-LTR following exposure of cells to ultraviolet light and other DNA damaging agents. Our experiments set out to determine the relative activation or repression of the HIV-LTR in response to two classes of chemotherapeutic agents: Doxorubicin is a DNA-damage inducing agent, and 5-fluorouracil has an antimetabolic mode of action. Using HeLa cells stably transfected with a construct in which HIV-LTR drives expression of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase reporter gene, we demonstrated an up to 10-fold induction following doxorubicin treatment in 24 h post-treatment. This induction was repressed by treatment with salicylic acid, suggesting a role for prostaglandin/cyclo-oxygenase pathways and/or NFKB in the inductive response. Induction by 5-fluorouracil, in contrast, was more modest (two-fold at most) though it was consistently elevated over controls.

  4. CX-003588: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Synthesis of Renewable Biofuels from BiomassCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 08/24/2010Location(s): Butte, MontanaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  5. CX-008162: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Redmond-Pilot Butte Number 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 04/13/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  6. CX-013627: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Redmond-Pilot Butte #1 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 04/29/2015 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  7. CX-008891: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pilot Butte-La Pine No. 1 Wood Pole Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 07/30/2012 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  8. CX-010593: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pilot Butte-La Pine #1 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/13/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  9. CX-011211: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Box Butte-Chadron 115-Kilovolt Transmission Line Structure Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/26/2013 Location(s): Nebraska, Nebraska Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  10. CX-013311: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rattlesnake Butte Phase 3 Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25Date: 01/06/2015 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  11. CX-010098: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Phoenix to Lone Butte 230 Kilovolt Transmission Line, Bird Diverter Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/08/2013 Location(s): CX: none Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  12. Property:NEPA Resource Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NV-063-EA06-098 NV-EA-030-07-05 North Steens 230kV Transmission O One Nevada S Sigurd Red Butte No2 Sun Valley to Morgan Transmission Line Sunzia Southwest T Tehachapi Renewable...

  13. Property:NEPA PreApplicationMeetingDate | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2010 + NVN-89274 + 26 October 2010 + S San Juan Basin EC + 5 November 2008 + Sigurd Red Butte No2 + 19 December 2008 + Southline Transmission Line + 4 April 2012 + Sun Valley...

  14. Property:NEPA FundingAgencyDocNumber | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + DOEEA-1676 + N NV-020-03-26 + DE-PS07-02ID14264 + O One Nevada + NA + S Sigurd Red Butte No2 + NA + Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:NEPAF...

  15. RAPID/BulkTransmission/Utah | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Administration Current Projects Transwest Express Zephyr Populus to Ben Lomand Sigurd to Red Butte No. 2 345kV Transmission Project Print PDF RAPID-State-Summary Retrieved from...

  16. Property:NEPA EA EIS Report | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    On Line Appendicies Volume.pdf +, ... S San Juan Basin EC + SJBEC DraftEIS.pdf + Sigurd Red Butte No2 + USFS SRB ROD 2012.pdf +, BLM SRB ROD 2012.pdf + Southline Transmission Line...

  17. Notices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    The material was originally obtained by Cameco from Cameco Resources-Crowe Butte Operation pursuant to export license XSOU8798. In accordance with section 131a. of the Atomic ...

  18. CX-003037: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Mercury Removal from Clean Coal Processing Air StreamCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 07/13/2010Location(s): Butte, MontanaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. Domestic Uranium Production Report - Quarterly - Energy Information...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. uranium in-situ-leach plants in production (state) Crow Butte Operation (Nebraska) Lost Creek Project (Wyoming) Nichols Ranch ISR Project (Wyoming) Ross CPP (Wyoming) Smith ...

  20. CX-006263: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Big Eddy-Redmond and Redmond-Pilot Butte Wood Pole ReplacementsCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 07/07/2011Location(s): Wasco County, OregonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  1. CX-008792: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alliance Substation Communication Building Installation Box Butte County, Nebraska CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 08/28/2011 Location(s): Nebraska Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  2. Displaced electrode process for welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heichel, L.J.

    1975-08-26

    A method is described for the butt-welding of a relatively heavy mass to a relatively small mass such as a thin-wall tube. In butt-welding heat is normally applied at the joint between the two pieces which are butt-welded together. The application of heat at the joint results in overheating the tube which causes thinning of the tube walls and porosity in the tube material. This is eliminated by displacing the welding electrode away from the seam toward the heavier mass so that heat is applied to the heavy mass and not at the butt seam. Examples of the parameters used in welding fuel rods are given. The cladding and end plugs were made of Zircalloy. The electrode used was of 2 percent thoriated tungsten. (auth)

  3. CX-012804: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pilot Butte-La Pine #1 Wood Pole Replacements CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41912 Location(s): OregonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  4. CX-013622: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wireless- T-Mobile Mt. Zion/Biddle Butte Wireless Communication Upgrades CX(s) Applied: B4.7Date: 05/06/2015 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  5. Projects at the Western Environmental Technology Office. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    This report contains brief outlines of the multiple projects under the responsibility of the Western Environmental Technology Office in Butte Montana. These projects include biomass remediation, remediation of contaminated soils, mine waste technology, and several other types of remediation.

  6. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    support plates Inconel 625 304 L SS shroud * On January 8, 2010 we found that the butt welding process coated the RF windows. - An error by our vendor of a critical e-beam setting...

  7. CX-011685: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lightspeed Network's Fiber Installation near Pilot Butte Substation CX(s) Applied: B4.7 Date: 01/15/2014 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  8. CX-005579: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Albion Butte Radio Station Communication UpgradeCX(s) Applied: B1.7Date: 04/04/2011Location(s): Nibbs Creek, IdahoOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  9. CX-010097: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Herbicide Application at Lone Butte Substation During Fiscal Year 2013 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/24/2013 Location(s): Arizona Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  10. CX-014326: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lone Butte Substation Erosion Repairs CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 09/22/2015 Location(s): ArizonaOffices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Desert Southwest Region

  11. Carter Co. Harding Co. Perkins Co. Dunn Co. Dawson Co. Fallon...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    SCAIRT WOMAN WILLMEN JIM CREEK TAYLOR SIMON BUTTE SCHEFIELD BULL ... UTM-14, NAD-27. Authors: Samuel H. Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David F. Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin ...

  12. Property:Geothermal/AwardeeCostShare | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + 9,571,873 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + 1,082,753 + A...

  13. Property:Geothermal/TotalProjectCost | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Churchill Co., NV Geothermal Project + 14,571,873 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + 2,155,497 + A...

  14. EA-1925: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-1925: Draft Environmental Assessment Midnight Point and Mahogany Geothermal Exploration Projects, Glass Buttes, Oregon (DOI-BLM-OR-P040-2011-0021-EA; DOEEA-1925) Ormat Nevada, ...

  15. Activities and Events | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    We will be hosting a public meeting in Tempe, Arizona on June 23, 2016 at the Marriott Phoenix Tempe at the Buttes. Meeting Materials: Please click here to read more about the ...

  16. National Center for Appropriate Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Appropriate Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: NCAT Energy Services Address: P.O. BOX 3838 Place: Butte, MT Zip: 59702 Phone Number: 800.ASK.NCAT Website: www.ncat.org...

  17. CX-010585: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Teakean Butte Radio Station Upgrade CX(s) Applied: B1.19, B1.24 Date: 07/03/2013 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Casper-Red Butte Tap License Outgrant and Fiber Optic Installation Natrona County, Wyoming A. Brief Description of Proposal: Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to authorize a request from Rocky Mountain Power (RMP), a subsidiary of PacifiCorp, for license outgrants at Western's Casper Substation and Western's Casper Service Center in Casper, Wyoming. RMP plans to construct a new 115-kV Transmission Line with Optical Ground Wire (OPGW) fiber from RMP's Red Butte Substation (Red

  19. Comparative Genomics of a Plant-Pathogenic Fungus, Pyrenophora tritici-repentis, Reveals Transduplication and the Impact of Repeat Elements on Pathogenicity and Population Divergence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manning, Viola A.; Pandelova, Iovanna; Dhillon, Braham; Wilhelm, Larry J.; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Berlin, Aaron M.; Figueroa, Melania; Freitag, Michael; Hane, James K.; Henrissat, Bernard; Holman, Wade H.; Kodira, Chinnappa D.; Martin, Joel; Oliver, Richard P.; Robbertse, Barbara; Schackwitz, Wendy; Schwartz, David C.; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Turgeon, B. Gillian; Yandava, Chandri; Young, Sarah; Zhou, Shiguo; Zeng, Qiandong; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Ma, Li-Jun; Ciuffetti, Lynda M.

    2012-08-16

    Pyrenophora tritici-repentis is a necrotrophic fungus causal to the disease tan spot of wheat, whose contribution to crop loss has increased significantly during the last few decades. Pathogenicity by this fungus is attributed to the production of host-selective toxins (HST), which are recognized by their host in a genotype-specific manner. To better understand the mechanisms that have led to the increase in disease incidence related to this pathogen, we sequenced the genomes of three P. tritici-repentis isolates. A pathogenic isolate that produces two known HSTs was used to assemble a reference nuclear genome of approximately 40 Mb composed of 11 chromosomes that encode 12,141 predicted genes. Comparison of the reference genome with those of a pathogenic isolate that produces a third HST, and a nonpathogenic isolate, showed the nonpathogen genome to be more diverged than those of the two pathogens. Examination of gene-coding regions has provided candidate pathogen-specific proteins and revealed gene families that may play a role in a necrotrophic lifestyle. Analysis of transposable elements suggests that their presence in the genome of pathogenic isolates contributes to the creation of novel genes, effector diversification, possible horizontal gene transfer events, identified copy number variation, and the first example of transduplication by DNA transposable elements in fungi. Overall, comparative analysis of these genomes provides evidence that pathogenicity in this species arose through an influx of transposable elements, which created a genetically flexible landscape that can easily respond to environmental changes.

  20. On the probability of repeated interactions of leading particles in the interior of a nucleus at energies above 10 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baygubekov, A. S.; Zhunusbekov, M. K.; Zastrozhnova, N. N.; Novolodskaya, O. A. Sadykov, T. Kh.

    2012-01-15

    An analysis of experimental information that comes from cosmic-ray studies and from accelerator experiments leads to the conclusion that the production of new particles is not an instantaneous event, but that it spans a spacetime interval exceeding substantially nucleon-nucleon distances. This means that the production process extended in space and time cannot be reduced to a simple superposition of nucleon-nucleon collisions.

  1. Evaluation of repeated measurements of radon-222 concentrations in well water sampled from bedrock aquifers of the Piedmont near Richmond, Virginia, USA: Effects of lithology and well characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Shelley A. . E-mail: saharris@vcu.edu; Billmeyer, Ernest R.; Robinson, Michael A.

    2006-07-15

    Radon ({sup 222}Rn) concentrations in 26 ground water wells of two distinct lithologies in the Piedmont of Virginia were measured to assess variation in ground water radon concentrations (GWRC), to evaluate differences in concentrations related to well characteristics, lithology, and spatial distributions, and to assess the feasibility of predicting GWRC. Wells were sampled in accordance with American Public Health Association Method 7500 Rn-B, with modifications to include a well shaft profile analysis that determined the minimum purge time sufficient to remove the equivalent of one column of water from each well. Statistically significant differences in GWRC were found in the Trssu (1482{+-}1711 pCi/L) and Mpg (7750{+-}5188 pCi/L) lithologies, however, no significant differences were found among GWRC at each well over time. Using multiple regression, 86% of the variability (R {sup 2}) in the GWRC was explained by the lithology, latitudinal class, and water table elevation of the wells. The GWRC in a majority of the wells studied exceed US Environmental Protection Agency designated maximum contaminant level and AMCL. Results support modifications to sampling procedures and indicate that, in previous studies, variations in GWRC concentrations over time may have been due in part to differences in sampling procedures and not in source water.

  2. Synchrotron-based imaging of chromium and  γ-H2AX immunostaining in the duodenum following repeated exposure to Cr(VI) in drinking water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Chad M.; Seiter, Jennifer; Chappell, Mark A.; Tappero, Ryan V.; Proctor, Deborah M.; Suh, Mina; Wolf, Jeffrey C.; Haws, Laurie C.; Vitale, Rock; Mittal, Liz; Kirman, Christopher R.; Hays, Sean M.; Harris, Mark A.

    2014-10-28

    Current drinking water standards for chromium are for the combined total of both hexavalent and trivalent chromium (Cr(VI) and Cr(III)). However, recent studies have shown that Cr(III) is not carcinogenic to rodents, whereas mice chronically exposed to high levels of Cr(VI) developed duodenal tumors. These findings may suggest the need for environmental standards specific for Cr(VI). Whether the intestinal tumors arose through a mutagenic or non-mutagenic mode of action (MOA) greatly impacts how drinking water standards for Cr(VI) are derived. Herein, X-ray fluorescence (spectro)microscopy (µ-XRF) was used to image the Cr content in the villus and crypt regions of duodena from B6C3F1 mice exposed to 180 mg/l Cr(VI) in drinking water for 13 weeks. DNA damage was also assessed by γ-H2AX immunostaining. Exposure to Cr(VI) induced villus blunting and crypt hyperplasia in the duodenum—the latter evidenced by lengthening of the crypt compartment by ~2-fold with a concomitant 1.5-fold increase in the number of crypt enterocytes. γ-H2AX immunostaining was elevated in villi, but not in the crypt compartment. µ-XRF maps revealed mean Cr levels >30 times higher in duodenal villi than crypt regions; mean Cr levels in crypt regions were only slightly above background signal. Despite the presence of Cr and elevated γ-H2AX immunoreactivity in villi, no aberrant foci indicative of transformation were evident. Lastly, these findings do not support a MOA for intestinal carcinogenesis involving direct Cr-DNA interaction in intestinal stem cells, but rather support a non-mutagenic MOA involving chronic wounding of intestinal villi and crypt cell hyperplasia.

  3. Synchrotron-based imaging of chromium and  γ-H2AX immunostaining in the duodenum following repeated exposure to Cr(VI) in drinking water

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thompson, Chad M.; Seiter, Jennifer; Chappell, Mark A.; Tappero, Ryan V.; Proctor, Deborah M.; Suh, Mina; Wolf, Jeffrey C.; Haws, Laurie C.; Vitale, Rock; Mittal, Liz; et al

    2014-10-28

    Current drinking water standards for chromium are for the combined total of both hexavalent and trivalent chromium (Cr(VI) and Cr(III)). However, recent studies have shown that Cr(III) is not carcinogenic to rodents, whereas mice chronically exposed to high levels of Cr(VI) developed duodenal tumors. These findings may suggest the need for environmental standards specific for Cr(VI). Whether the intestinal tumors arose through a mutagenic or non-mutagenic mode of action (MOA) greatly impacts how drinking water standards for Cr(VI) are derived. Herein, X-ray fluorescence (spectro)microscopy (µ-XRF) was used to image the Cr content in the villus and crypt regions of duodenamore » from B6C3F1 mice exposed to 180 mg/l Cr(VI) in drinking water for 13 weeks. DNA damage was also assessed by γ-H2AX immunostaining. Exposure to Cr(VI) induced villus blunting and crypt hyperplasia in the duodenum—the latter evidenced by lengthening of the crypt compartment by ~2-fold with a concomitant 1.5-fold increase in the number of crypt enterocytes. γ-H2AX immunostaining was elevated in villi, but not in the crypt compartment. µ-XRF maps revealed mean Cr levels >30 times higher in duodenal villi than crypt regions; mean Cr levels in crypt regions were only slightly above background signal. Despite the presence of Cr and elevated γ-H2AX immunoreactivity in villi, no aberrant foci indicative of transformation were evident. Lastly, these findings do not support a MOA for intestinal carcinogenesis involving direct Cr-DNA interaction in intestinal stem cells, but rather support a non-mutagenic MOA involving chronic wounding of intestinal villi and crypt cell hyperplasia.« less

  4. Thermophysical properties of the Zr-0.01 Nb alloy at various heating rates and repeated cycles of heating-cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrova, I.I.; Peletsky, V.E.; Samsonov, B.N.

    1999-07-01

    The results of an experimental study of the heat capacity, enthalpy, electrical resistivity, and spectral emissivity (for the wavelength of 0.65 {micro}m) of the Zr-0.01 Nb alloy in the temperature range from 900 to 2,000 K are presented. The study was carried out using subsecond pulse heating of the samples by passing electrical current through them. Experiments were conducted at different heating rates (10{sup 3} to 10{sup 4} K {center{underscore}dot} s {sup minus}{sup 1}) and a series of experiments consisted of several cycles of pulse heating and subsequent cooling. The effect of these parameters on the temperature dependence of thermophysical properties in the region of the {alpha}-{beta} transition was studied. With an increase in the heating rate, the temperature of the {alpha}-{beta} transition, and the maximum in the heat capacity shifted to higher temperatures. There are significant differences in properties over the temperature range of the {alpha}-{beta} transition for the various heating cycles.

  5. Structure and Function of the Clostridium thermocellum Cellobiohydrolase A X1-Module Repeat: Enhancement Through Stabilization of the CbhA Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunecky, R.; Alahuhta, M.; Bomble, Y. J.; Xu, Q.; Baker, J. O.; Ding, S. Y.; Himmel, M. E.; Lunin, V. V.

    2012-03-01

    The efficient deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass remains a significant barrier to the commercialization of biofuels. Whereas most commercial plant cell-wall-degrading enzyme preparations used today are derived from fungi, the cellulosomal enzyme system from Clostridium thermocellum is an equally effective catalyst, yet of considerably different structure. A key difference between fungal enzyme systems and cellulosomal enzyme systems is that cellulosomal enzyme systems utilize self-assembled scaffolded multimodule enzymes to deconstruct biomass. Here, the possible function of the X1 modules in the complex multimodular enzyme system cellobiohydrolase A (CbhA) from C. thermocellum is explored. The crystal structures of the two X1 modules from C. thermocellum CbhA have been solved individually and together as one construct. The role that calcium may play in the stability of the X1 modules has also been investigated, as well as the possibility that they interact with each other. Furthermore, the results show that whereas the X1 modules do not seem to act as cellulose disruptors, they do aid in the thermostability of the CbhA complex, effectively allowing it to deconstruct cellulose at a higher temperature.

  6. THE EFFECT OF REPEATED COMPRESSIVE DYNAMIC LOADING ON THE STRESS-INDUCED MARTENSITIC TRANSFORMATION IN NiTi SHAPE MEMORY ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. MILLER; W. THISSELL; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    It has been shown that quasi-static, cyclic, isothermal mechanical loading influences the mechanical response of the stress-induced martensitic transformation in fully annealed NiTi Shape Memory Alloys (SMAs). As the cycle number increases, hardening of the stress-strain response during the martensitic phase transformation is seen along with a decrease in the threshold stress for initiation of stress-induced martensite. Also, the amount of plastic strain and detwinned martensitic strain decreases as the cycle number increases. However, NiTi SMAs have not been experimentally explored under high compressive strain rates. This research explores the cyclic near-adiabatic stress-induced martensitic loading using a Split Hopkinskin Pressure Bar (SHPB). The results of the dynamic loading tests are presented with emphasis on the loading rate, stress-strain response, specimen temperature and post-test microstructural evaluation. The results from the high strain rate tests show similarities with the quasi-static results in the hardening of the stress-strain response and shifting of the threshold stress for initiation of stress-induced martensite.

  7. Development of an advanced process for drying fine coal in an inclined fluidized bed: Technical progress report for the second quarter, January 19--March 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boysen, J.E.; Cha, C.Y.; Berggren, M.H.; Jha, M.C.

    1989-05-01

    This research project is for the development of a technically and economically feasible process for drying and stabilizing of fine particles of high-moisture subbituminous coal. Research activities were initiated with efforts concentrating on characterization of the two feed coals: Eagle Butte coal from AMAX Coal Company's mine located in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming; and coal from Usibelli Coal Mine, Inc.'s mine located in central Alaska. Both of the feed coals are high-moisture subbituminous coals with ''as received'' moisture contents of 29% and 22% for the Eagle Butte and Usibelli coals, respectively. However, physical analyses of the crushed coal samples (--28-mesh particle size range) indicate many differences. The minimum fluidization velocity (MFV) of the feed coals were experimentally determined. The MFV for --28-mesh Eagle Butte coal is approximately 1 ft/min, and the MFV for --28-mesh Usibelli coal is approximately 3 ft/min. 2 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Ft. Carson Army Base, Colorado Springs, Colorado | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ft. Carson Army Base, Colorado Springs, Colorado Ft. Carson Army Base, Colorado Springs, Colorado Photo of High-Bay Aviation Maintenance Facility at Butts Army Airfield Fort Carson U.S. Army Base is located south of Colorado Springs, Colorado. It was the first Federal facility to install a "solar wall"-a solar ventilation air preheating system. The solar wall heats Ft. Carson's new high-bay aviation maintenance facility at Butts Army Airfield by pre-warming air as much as 54°F and

  9. Estimate of the allowable dimensions of diagnosed defects in category III and IV welded pipeline joints{sup 1}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grin', E. A.; Bochkarev, V. I.

    2013-01-15

    An approach for estimating the permissible dimensions of technological defects in butt welded joints in category III and IV pipelines is described. The allowable size of a welding defect is determined from the condition of compliance with the specifications on strength for a reference cross section (damaged joint) of the pipeline taking into account its weakening by a given defect.With regard to the fairly widespread discovery of technological defects in butt welded joints during diagnostics of auxiliary pipelines for thermal electric power plants, the proposed approach can be used in practice by repair and consulting organizations.

  10. Method Of Dispensing Microdoses Of A Aqueous Solutions Of S Ubstances Onto A Carrier And A Device For Carrying Out Said Method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ershov, Gennady Moiseevich; Kirillov, Eugenii Vladislavovich; Mirzabekov, Andrei Darievich

    1999-10-05

    A method and a device for dispensing microdoses of aqueous solutions are provided, whereby the substance is transferred by the free surface end of a rodlike transferring element; the temperature of the transferring element is maintained at essentially the dew point of the ambient air during the transfer. The device may comprise a plate-like base to which are affixed a plurality of rods; the unfixed butt ends of the rods are coplanar. The device further comprises a means for maintaining the temperature of the unfixed butt ends of the rods essentially equal to the dew point of the ambient air during transfer of the aqueous substance