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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butch massey tva" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

TVA- Green Power Providers  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and participating power distributors of TVA power offer a performance-based incentive program to homeowners and businesses for the installation of renewable...

2

Sandia National Laboratories: TVA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErikGroundbreakingStandardsTCES Sandia Researchers WinTVA Consortium for

3

TVA- Energy Right Solutions for Business  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

TVA offers the Energy Right Solutions Program to commercial and industrial facilities. In addition to prescriptive rebates for lighting, motors, HVAC, and kitchen equipment, administrators take a...

4

TVA- Energy Right Solutions for Business (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) offers the Energy Right Solutions Program for commercial and industrial facilities. Prescriptive rebates are available for lighting, motors, HVAC, and kitchen...

5

TVA- Energy Right Solutions for Business (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

TVA offers the Energy Right Solutions Program to commercial and industrial facilities. In addition to prescriptive rebates for lighting, motors, HVAC, and kitchen equipment, administrators take a...

6

TVA Partner Utilities- Energy Right Water Heater Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The TVA energy right Water Heater Plan promotes the installation of high efficiency water heaters in homes and small businesses. TVA provides a $50 incentive to local power companies for each...

7

TVA Partner Utilities- Energy Right Water Heater Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) energy right Water Heater Plan promotes the installation of high efficiency water heaters in homes and small businesses. TVA provides a $50 incentive to local...

8

TVA Partner Utilities- Energy Right' Water Heater Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The TVA energy right Water Heater Plan promotes the installation of high efficiency water heaters in homes and small businesses. TVA provides a $50 incentive to local power companies for each...

9

NRC allows TVA to resume construction on unit 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The article very briefly describes the construction status of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Watts Bar Nuclear Plant unit 1. The project was halted by TVA for two years due to quality assurance issues. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved resumption of work, noting that corrective actions were adequate. The status of other TVA reactors is also noted.

NONE

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

TVA Partner Utilities- Energy Right Heat Pump Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) ''energy right'' Heat Pump Plan provides financing to promote the installation of high efficiency heat pumps in homes and small businesses. Installation,...

11

TVA Partner Utilities- Energy Right Heat Pump Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) energy right Heat Pump Plan provides financing to promote the installation of high efficiency heat pumps in homes and small businesses. Installation,...

12

TVA Partner Utilities- In-Home Energy Evaluation Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) ''energy right'' In-Home Energy Evaluation Pilot Program encourages the installation of energy-efficiency improvements in existing single family dwellings. The...

13

TVA- Energy Right Solutions for Business (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

TVA offers the Energy Right Solutions Program to commercial and industrial facilities. In addition to prescriptive rebates for lighting, motors, HVAC, and kitchen equipment, administrators take a...

14

New directions at TVA with special reference to agricultural research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public Support for the Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) fertilizer research and development program in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, ended in fiscal year 1993. TVA`s research center at Muscle Shoals, formerly known as the National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center, is now the TVA Environmental Research Center. Efforts at the Center have diversified to include research and support areas of Agricultural Research and Practices, Atmospheric Sciences, Biotechnology, Waste Management, and Remediation, Environmental Site Remediation, Support Services, Environmental Management, and Technology Transfer. ``We`re building on the expertise and success of our earlier research and focusing our new projects on emerging problems of the 21st century,`` TVA`s Chairman Craven Crowell said in prepared remarks to Congress on March 2, 1994. Agricultural Research in TVA has been aligned with corporate objectives to develop solutions to environmental problems of regional, national and international significance because the agency`s business incorporates a broad mix of responsibilities, including power generation, navigation, flood control, shoreline management, recreation, environmental research, and economic development. Agricultural strategies for watershed protection lie at the core of TVA`s new agricultural research agenda. The major influences for this agenda are TVA`s direct stewardship responsibilities for the 60,000 miles of streams that feed the 652-mile-long Tennessee River; the 11,000 miles of shoreline; and 470,000 acres of TVA-managed public land.

Williams, R.J.; Rylant, K.E.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Stratified Morse Theory: Past and Present David B. Massey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spaces had been defined by Lazzeri in [25], and the density and stability of Morse functions under or on the particular Morse function f. Detailed proofs of these results appeared in the 1988 book Stratified MorseStratified Morse Theory: Past and Present David B. Massey In honor of Robert MacPherson on his 60th

16

TVA Partner Utilities- Energy Right' New Homes Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) ''energy right'' New Homes Plan provides incentives for all-electric, energy-efficient new homes by offering graduated rebates for new homes. Homes built at...

17

TVA Partner Utilities- Energy Right New Homes Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) ''energy right'' New Homes Plan provides incentives for all-electric, energy-efficient new homes by offering graduated rebates for new homes. Homes built at...

18

TVA Partner Utilities- Energy Right New Homes Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) energy right New Homes Plan provides incentives for all-electric, energy-efficient new homes by offering graduated rebates for new homes. Homes built at least 7...

19

TVA- Mid-Sized Renewable Standard Offer Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) now compliments the small generation Green Power Providers Program by providing incentives for mid-sized renewable energy generators between 50kW and 20MW to...

20

TVA Partner Utilities- In-Home Energy Evaluation Pilot Program (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) energy right In-Home Energy Evaluation Pilot Program encourages the installation of energy-efficiency improvements in existing single family dwellings. The...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butch massey tva" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Campbell Creek TVA 2010 First Year Performance Report July 1, 2009 August 31, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project was initiated by TVA in March 2008 and encompasses three houses that are of similar size, design and located within the same community - Campbell Creek, Farragut TN with simulated occupancy. This report covers the performance period from July 1, 2009 to August 31, 2010. It is the intent of TVA that this Valley Data will inform electric utilities future residential retrofit incentive program.

Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Real-time monitoring of the TVA power system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes how the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is experimenting with one of the many concepts for the uses of phasor measurements, that of utilizing phasor measurement units (PMUs) as a state estimation system. However, the term state estimation no longer applies; what is being performed is a state determination in near real-time. The PMU is a transducer that can measure voltage and current with very high accuracy. It has the ability to calculate watts, vars, frequency, and phase angle twelve times per power line cycle. The PMU can be placed in the power system so as to provide time-stamped voltage and current phasors that can be used as state variables. Input from other PMUs throughout the power system can be synchronized to within 1 microsecond via the Global Positioning System (GPS). These real-time state variables provided by the PMUs allow state estimation to be replaced by state determination. The PMUs monitoring the power system can also provide the necessary data to accurately depict events and disturbances. The PMU can be set to be triggered by an event or disturbance. A user-defined table of data, including pretrigger data, which is the sampled data for a specified interval, is stored in the PMU. The data from a single PMU can be retrieved and analyzed by popular data analysis packages to show the performance of control and protection equipment. The tables retrieved from a network of PMUs can be used to determine the system response to these events and disturbances.

Cease, T.W.; Feldhaus, B. (Univ. of Tennessee, Chattanooga, TN (United States))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Preliminary Feasibility Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential for TVA's John Sevier and Kingston Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a preliminary assessment of the potential for geologic carbon sequestration for the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) John Sevier and Kingston power plants. The purpose of this assessment is to make a 'first cut' determination of whether there is sufficient potential for geologic carbon sequestration within 200 miles of the plants for TVA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to proceed with a joint proposal for a larger project with a strong carbon management element. This assessment does not consider alternative technologies for carbon capture, but assumes the existence of a segregated CO{sub 2} stream suitable for sequestration.

Smith, Ellen D [ORNL; Saulsbury, Bo [ORNL

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

SCHEDULING TVA'S RESERVOIRS WITH RIVERWARE Timothy M. Magee, Operations Research Analyst, Center for Advanced Decision Support  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ware's capabilities with TVA's daily operations scheduling models which optimize hydropower value while meeting non and operates 29 conventional hydropower plants and one pumped storage hydropower plant in the Tennessee Valley to hydropower generation, the reservoir system provides other beneficial services throughout the Tennessee

25

TVA`s Cumberland Units 1&2 SO{sub 2} removal system - an update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tennessee Valley Authority`s Cumberland Fossil Plant (CUF) is a Phase I facility listed under the 1990 CAA Amendments. Units 1 & 2 are two 1300 MWe coal fired units which presently bum an eastern bituminous coal containing approximately 2.8% sulfur. The Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system reduces sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions from Units 1 and 2 by means of wet limestone - forced oxidation scrubbing. The absorber modules were provided by ABB Environmental Systems (ABBES) with balance of plant engineering, construction management, and startup provided by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors (RE&C) under a partnership arrangement with TVA. The FGD systems for Unit 1 & 2 were brought on-line October 12, 1994 and December 14, 1994, respectively. This paper will present a brief description of the overall project, the design basis, challenging problems and solutions during construction and initial startup. Specific topics will include: (1) Optimization studies underway; (2) Unique design aspects of the facility; (3) A description of the absorber and supporting systems including the limestone barge unloader, ball mill system for reagent preparation, and draft system upgrades; and (4) Experience gained in management of a large project under the unique partnership agreement.

Buckner, J.H. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, TN (United States); Brodsky, I.S. [Raytheon Engineers & Constructors, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Muraskin, D.J. [ABB Environmental Systems, Birmingham, AL (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Testing erosion-resistant chromium carbide plasma coatings on the TVA Paradise Unit-2 intermediate pressure turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid particle erosion (SPE) is caused by oxide particles in steam. Hard oxide particles exfoliate from the inside surfaces of boiler tubes and steam lines and are carried by the steam to the turbine where they impact and erode stationary and moving turbine parts (nozzles, moving blades, stationary blades, seal strips, and shrouds around the blades). The first stages of the high pressure (HP) and intermediate pressure (IP) turbines experience the greatest amount of SPE. Though many owners experience erosion in the first stages of both HP (main steam) and IP (reheat steam) turbines, TVA's principal erosion experience is in the IP or reheat steam turbines. This report is limited to the first few stages of IP turbines, referred to as ''first reheat stages.'' Hard chromium carbide plasma coatings have been developed. The coating was installed in Paradise Unit-2 IP turbine, 9th and 10th stages. Pretest inspection report is given.

Karr, O.F.; Frank, R.L.; Gaston, D.E. Jr.; Bradford, T.L.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

159.709-2013 Semester 1 Massey University Assignment 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is not quite perfect. Additional Notes on the Technical Specification and Hints: You might generate the 3-d chosen graphics package. It would be particularly impressive if your program has some user interaction that adjusts the flag behaviour ­ for example wind-flow speed, direction. What would the flag look like

Hawick, Ken

28

159.302-2004 Semester 2 Massey University Assignment 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the Romanian road network graph as specified in the file "romania2.dat" · Use the heuristic information network." 4. Develop your code for solving the problem specified in romania2.dat but it should be able to solve similar problems with more cities. (The A* algorithm is sufficient for the Romania problem

Hawick, Ken

29

Energy Management Services for the Industrial Market Segment at TVA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of electricity have also raised the cost of building and operating new generating plants to meet new load requirements. The economies of scale we once enjoyed--where new plants lowered the unit cost of producing electrici ty--have been reversed, and new... provided electric~ty I know you are informed about the benefits and abundantly and inexpensively for deca~es. disadvantages of tradi tional me thods for This cheap, plentiful electricity, ind~ed, generating electricity and about the future helped expand...

Hamby, R. E.; Knight, V. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Microsoft Word - TVA fact sheet Oct 17 2011  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

sites (7 units) 2 diesel-generator sites (9 units) 14 solar energy sites, 1 wind-energy site 1 digestor-gas site 1 biomass-co-firing site. The fossil plants...

31

An extension of Massey scheme for secret sharing Romar dela Cruz, Annika Meyer, and Patrick Sole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the shares, the dealer picks a vector u such that uGi = si for 1 i l. A codeword c = uG is then computed

Guenther, Annika

32

FIA-13-0041 - In the Matter of DeShonne E. Massey, Sr. | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstruction Management14,2 - In the Matter of35 - InEnergy

33

FIA-13-0040 - In the Matter of DeShonne E. Massey Sr. | Department of  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit|Department ofof Energy Offers Training on the FiveEnergy 6605201

34

FIA-13-0051 - In the Matter of DeShonne E. Massey Sr. | Department of  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit|Department ofof Energy Offers Training on the FiveEnergy

35

Operating Experience and Economic Assessment of Commercial and Industrial Cool Storage Systems - TVA Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal storage systems offer utilities a means to change the energy use patterns of both residential and commercial and industrial (C&I) customers by moving water-heating and space-conditioning loads from peak to offpeak periods. Benefits from...

Sieber, R. E.; Dahmus, A. B.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Signal and Information Processing Laboratory Prof. Dr. G.S. Moschytz (Director) / Prof. Dr. J.L. Massey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thesis on "Hybrid Echocompensation with Applications in Digital Data Communications over Copper Wires processing equipment for communications. One very important activity of ISI is to host guests from academic from the USA, UK, Israel, Spain and China. These contacts never fail to stimulate new ideas and, very

37

Abington Abington Pediatrics* 360 Brockton Avenue, Suite 102, MA 02351 Yara Fernandez, MD 781-792-1999 781-792-1990 Laurie Massey, MD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Andrea Reilly, MD Milton Pediatric Associates - MGH 10 Hawthorne Place, Suite 110, MA 02114 JonathanCullough, MD Rebecca Niloff, MD Cara O'Reilly, MD Scott Paul, MD Jonathon Brenner, MD John Robinson, MD Heidi-643-8120 Elizabeth Turnock, MD Pediatric Group Practice 55 Fruit Street, YAW 6D, MA 02114 Ronald Benz, MD 617

Mootha, Vamsi K.

38

China: Future Customer or Competitor in Livestock Markets? Thomas Hertel, Professor; Alejandro Nin, Graduate Research Assistant; Allan Rae, Professor at Massey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

China: Future Customer or Competitor in Livestock Markets? Thomas Hertel, Professor; Alejandro Nin livestock trade, which has been relatively neglected. China is a net exporter of livestock products of total trade reflects a steady deterioration of China's com- parative advantage in pork and poul- try

39

ComputationalComputational ScienceScience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ComputationalComputational ScienceScience KenKen HawickHawick k.a.k.a.hawickhawick@massey.ac.nz@massey.ac.nz Massey UniversityMassey University #12;Computational Science / eScienceComputational Science / eScience Computational Science concerns the application of computer science to physics, mathematics, chemistry, biology

Hawick, Ken

40

SUSANA MARTINEZ Governor JOHN A. SANCHEZ Lieutenant Governor  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BUTCH TONGATE Deputy Secretary RE: REQUEST FOR ADDITIONAL EXTENSION OF THEW ASTE HANDLING BUILDING STORAGE TIME AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT EPA J.D. NUMBER NM4890139088...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butch massey tva" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Mr. John E. Kieling, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DEC 2 9 2014 Mr. Butch T ongate New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, NM 87508-6303 Deputy Secretary and Acting Division Director...

42

Energy Factors, Leasing Structure and the Market Price of Office Buildings in the U.S.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MISO, ERCOT South, Into Entergy, Into Southern and Into TVA.Path 15 Into Cinergy Into Entergy Into Southern Into TVA MidPath 15 Into Cinergy Into Entergy Into Southern Into TVA Mid

Jaffee, Dwight; Stanton, Richard; Wallace, Nancy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Fuels, Photovoltaics, Solar Water Heat TVA Partner Utilities- Energy Right Heat Pump Program The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) ''energy right'' Heat Pump Plan...

44

January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distributi...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

T Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Morris, K Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) National SCADA Test Bed Substation Automation Evaluation Report Kenneth Barnes; Briam Johnson...

45

2010 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of TVA hydroelectric power, and a plentiful water supply.* The operation that was subsequently located

46

Monthly house price indices and their applications in New Zealand : a thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, Department of Economics and Finance, College of Business, Massey University.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Developing timely and reliable house price indices is of interest worldwide, because these measures influence consumer behaviour, inflation targeting, and spot and futures markets. Several (more)

Shi, Song

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Accelerated and out-of-season lamb production in New Zealand : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of this study was to evaluate ewe and lamb performance in an accelerated lamb production system, and to compare the performance and lamb (more)

DeNicolo, Gina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Totara Valley micro-hydro development : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Applied Science in Renewable Energy Engineering, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study focuses on the design, construction and operation of a distributed generation system based on micro-hydro technology. The project is sited in the Totara (more)

Donnelly, David Ronald

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

California's electricity system of the future scenario analysis in support of public-interest transmission system R&D planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TVA. Battery and compressed air energy storage systems haveenergy storage devices/methods include batteries, pumped hydro, and compressed air.

Eto, Joseph; Stovall, John P.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Forest Products Road Manual: A Handbook for Municipal Officials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, organizations and companies for their participation and review of this revised publication: Hunter Carbee, North Country Procurement; Jeff Eames, Fort Mountain Companies; Alan Hanscom, NH Department of Transportation; Butch Leel, UNH Technology Transfer Center; Scott Qualls, New Hampshire Timber Harvesting Council; Sarah

New Hampshire, University of

51

Political Fragmentation and Its Effects on Residential Segregation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, cities became hubs and refuges for a number of newly arriving blacks and immigrants seeking better opportunities than those they encountered in the South and rural areas, for blacks, and abroad for immigrants (Massey and Denton 1993:18). Massey... was gone because of the industrialization of America and the concomitant movement of 8 blacks from farms to cities (Massey and Denton 1993:26). Industrialization in the North created social, economic, and technological changes that promoted...

Amaro, Gabriel Hernandez

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

52

E-Print Network 3.0 - adults fact sheet Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resources, Massey University Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 20 Whooping Cough 2010ToucanEdInc.Allrightsreserved. Summary: Whooping Cough 2010ToucanEdInc.Allrights...

53

E-Print Network 3.0 - australian meat export Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

:marketing-bulletin.massey.ac.nz Export Market Opportunities and Challenges in ASEAN Ismail Ahmad. Various economic developments in ASEAN... have led to strong import...

54

Serre-Course in Arithmetic.pdf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measure Theory. Ramos. A Hilbert Space Problem Book. ... Theory l: Elements of Functional. Analysis. MASSEY. .... 4Density and Dirichlet theorem. Chapter...

55

androgen replacement therapy: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gains, replacement components are typically more energy efficient than older equipment. Life cycle cost analyses encourage... Massey, G. W. 2005-01-01 153 LATTICE PATHS, SAMPLING...

56

arthroplasty replacement hip: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gains, replacement components are typically more energy efficient than older equipment. Life cycle cost analyses encourage... Massey, G. W. 2005-01-01 144 LATTICE PATHS, SAMPLING...

57

alamos computer science: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in the public domain prior to the openness Massey, Thomas N. 4 Computer Science Computer Science? Engineering Websites Summary: Computer Science @ Michigan Life as a CS Student...

58

Computational Science Technical Note CSTN-172 Plasma Visualization in Parallel using Particle Systems on Graphical Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as particle systems that emit light are important in many interesting components of games, computer animated = {April}, publisher = {WorldComp}, institution = {Computer Science, Massey University, Auckland, New Ken Hawick, Computer Science, Massey University, Albany, North Shore 102-904, Auckland, New Zealand

Hawick, Ken

59

Microsoft PowerPoint - Till.ppt  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Company* Duke Energy* Progress Energy Carolinas* American Electric Power* East Kentucky Power Cooperative* Louisville Gas & ElectricKentucky Utilities (E.ON)* TVA Big Rivers...

60

Cherokee Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Cherokee Electric Coop offers loans to residential customers for making energy efficiency improvements. In association with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Energy Right program offers...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butch massey tva" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Notices  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

from surplus plutonium in domestic commercial nuclear power reactors to generate electricity, including five reactors at two specific Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) reactor...

62

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Schools, State Government, Systems Integrator, Tribal Government Savings Category: Photovoltaics TVA- Mid-Sized Renewable Standard Offer Program The Tennessee Valley Authority...

63

Cumberland EMC- Energy Efficient New Homes Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Cumberland Electric Membership Corporation (CEMC), in collaboration with [http://www.tva.gov/ The Tennessee Valley Authority] provides a financial incentive for its customers to build new energy...

64

Middle Tennessee EMC- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Middle Tennessee Electric Membership Corporation (MTEMC) and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) offer incentives for residential customers through the In-Home Energy Evaluation Program. This...

65

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administration (2003). Annual Energy Outlook 2003. DOE/EIA-SP SWAT TVA USDA Annual Energy Outlook American Wind Energyaccording to the 2003 Annual Energy Outlook. Although this

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

A comparative analysis of population growth in China and Egypt : people, policies and prospects : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts (Politics) in the School of People, Environment and Planning at Massey University, Albany campus, New Zealand.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Despite their geographical locations and historical disassociations, China and Egypt face one essential identical issue in common the problem of over population. This study compares (more)

Yu, Yang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

A Survey of Power Plant Designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is mixed with compressed air in the combustion chamber and burned. High-pressure combustion gases spin;Sustainable Energy, MIT 2005. #12;Allen Fossil Plant is on the Mississippi River five miles southwest (TVA), http://www.tva.gov #12;Coal fired Plant Otpco.com Fuel handling (1) Rotary dumper (2) Storage

Ervin, Elizabeth K.

68

The genome and cytoskeleton of Naegleria gruberi, an amoeboflagellate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neurospora crassa, hsa human, tad Trichoplax adherens, mbrID) in family FM1 pra,hsa,ppa,mbr,tad,tps,p te,tbr,gla,tva,cre,ngr FM2 pra,hsa,ppa,mbr,tad,tps,p te,tbr,gla,tva,cre,ngr

Fritz-Laylin, Lillian Kathleen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

ORNL/TM-2008/024 Preliminary Feasibility Assessment of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORNL/TM-2008/024 Preliminary Feasibility Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential FEASIBILITY ASSESSMENT OF GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL FOR TVA'S JOHN SEVIER AND KINGSTON POWER.................................................................................... 1 2.1 EXISTING ANALYSIS OF SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL IN THE TVA REGION

Pennycook, Steve

70

^O l ll ORNL/CON-125 Design Options to Test the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a Utility Conservation Program: TVA'S Heat Pump Water Heater Program Linda Berry How Tsao Eric Hirst #12;r THE EFFECTS OF FINANCIAL INCENTIVES IN A UTILITY CONSERVATION PROGRAM: TVA'S HEAT PUMP WATER HEATER PROGRAM.2 REASONS FOR CHOOSING THE HEAT PUMP WATER HEATER PROGRAM .. . .. .. . . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. 2 1

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

71

Policy Brief Policy Brief 2-13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) TVA could be acquired by a single investor-owned utility (IOU). This scenario is unlikely, especiallyPolicy Brief 1 Policy Brief 2-13 Should the Federal Government Sell TVA? Mary R. English, Ph and the environment, global security, and leadership and governance. Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy 1640

Tennessee, University of

72

Making Space for Urban Girls: A Politics of Geography and Gender  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massey, Doreen. 1994. Space, place, and gender. Minneapolis:Up in School: Politics, Space, Bodies, and Signs in theand Planning D. : Society and Space. Vol. 14: 581-599.

Gleason, Emily

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Aachen RWTH Aarhus University Aberdeen University Adelaide University Alabama University Alberta University Amsterdam University Arizona University Auckland University Australian National University Bath University Beijing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massachusetts University Massey University McGill University McMaster University Melbourne University Michigan State University Michigan University Minnesota University Monash University Montpellier UniversityAachen RWTH Aarhus University Aberdeen University Adelaide University Alabama University Alberta

Tisdell, Chris

74

Updated 5/5/2011 W.V.T. RUSCH ENGINEERING HONORS COLLOQUIUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 5837 W. Adams Blvd., Culver City, CA 90232. 11 "Voyager: 10,000 Days and Counting," Mr. Ed B. Massey "Artificial Intelligence for Space Robotics: How Smart is Smart?" Dr. Ayanna Howard, Senior Robotics

Zhou, Chongwu

75

autonomous vehicle navigation: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with a 6? suspension lift and 35? tires, as well as a commercial drive-by-wire system. The waypoint following... Massey, James Patrick 2006-08-16 26 Design of Autonomous...

76

Biodiesel from microalgae beats Yusuf Chisti  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiesel from microalgae beats bioethanol Yusuf Chisti School of Engineering, Massey University- derived transport fuels, which contribute to global warming and are of limited availability. Biodiesel, biodiesel and bioethanol produced from agricul- tural crops using existing methods cannot sustainably

77

Drive-bys and Trade-ups: The Impact of Crime on Residential Mobility Patterns in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ed. Sage. Drive-bys and Trade-ups Flippen, Chenoa. 2004. "6):975-994. Drive-bys and Trade-ups Massey, Douglas S. , and802. Drive-bys and Trade-ups Sampson, Robert J. , Jeffrey D.

Hipp, John R; Tita, George E; Greenbaum, Robert T

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A History of Duality in Algebraic Topology James C. Becker and ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our main sources are J.P. Dieudonn (1989), and William Massey's article in this ... tions by means of various duality concepts until at last they inspired Dold and...

1999-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

79

Cost of being a Mexican immigrant and being a Mexican non-citizen in California and Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stream of new arrivals (also see Massey, 2001). 2 The continuing influx of newcomers (Lien, 1994) due to the interconnectedness of the U.S. and Mexican economies (Massey and Espinosa, 1997) supports the second condition. However, as Mexican immigrants... and secure jobs compared to older workers (Clogg and Shockey, 1985; Lacy et al., 1989). Further, search theory assumes that relatively inexperienced younger workers, trying to find their most preferred match, are more likely to engage in voluntary...

Takei, Isao

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Katherine Oral History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ALBIN: And how old would that have been happening? Like do you remember what age you were? KATHERINE: That probably started happening when I was around ten, eleven. ALBIN: Wow. KATHERINE: Yeah. ALBIN: They were calling you a butch baby..., purity meant how you use your sexual energy. So we learned a lot about redirecting sexual energy, which has been very helpful (laugh) to me in my life. It's probably one of the best things I learned in the Order was energy management, especially since...

Albin, Tami

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butch massey tva" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1991: Physical and chemical characteristics of water and sediment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the second year of TVA's Reservoir Vital signs Monitoring program, physical/chemical measurements of water and sediment were made on fourteen TVA reservoirs (the nine mainstem Tennessee river reservoirs - Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and five tributary reservoirs - Cherokee, Douglas, Norris, Melton Hill and Tellico). In addition in 1991, limited water quality monitoring was initiated on ten tributary storage impoundments. The objective of the Vital Signs monitoring program is to assess the health or integrity of these aquatic ecosystems. Physical/chemical data collected in 1991 showed the water quality of the majority of TVA's reservoirs to be very good, but pointed out areas for improvement and further investigation.

Meinert, D.L.; Fehring, J.P.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

U.S. Department Of Energy Commends Industry Consortia for Making...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

(NRC). This application marks the second to the NRC in nearly 30 years to build a new nuclear reactor. Specifically, TVA's application seeks approval to build and operate two...

83

Real-Time Security Assessment of Angle Stability Using Synchrophasors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during this project) and Floyd Galvan (Entergy) for their support throughout this project. The project (TVA) · Sujit Mandal (Entergy) · William Mittelstadt (BPA) · Kolluri Sharma (Entergy). We thank all our

84

THE AEROSPACE CORPORATION '  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AZ o TVA, Muscle Shoals, AL o Dow Chemical Company, Walnut Creek, CA e Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO o Havens Lab, Bridgeport Brass, Bridgeport, CT o General Chemical...

85

Retrofitting the Tennessee Valley Authority  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As the flagship of the New Deal, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) was a triumph of regional and environmental design that has since fallen on hard times. When writer James Agee toured the region in 1935, he described ...

Zeiber, Kristen (Kristen Ann)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

of preparing a license application for up to four SMRs at TVA's Clinch River site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Alternative nuclear cases In the AEO2013 Low Nuclear case, uprates...

87

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric)- Commercial Efficiency Advice and Incentives Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (MLGW), in partnership with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), offers a variety of energy efficient incentives to non-residential customers. The program provides...

88

Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Production...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

outside and inside tank to keep rainwater from entering the annular space between the tanks. TVA would conduct tests for radioactivity of the water that would collect in the sump...

89

Helping C&I Customers to Get C.L.E.A.N  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Institute's (EPRI) tailored collaborative, TVA has customized CLEAN -Comprehensive Least Emissions ANalysis --to assist its C&I customers. CLEAN is a database and software tool for calculating the comprehensive emissions from end-use technologies...

Williams, J.; Beames, B.

90

Blue Ridge Mountain Electric Membership Corporation- Water Heater Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Blue Ridge Mountain EMC and TVA, its power supplier, offer the Energy Right and In Home Energy Evaluation programs to qualified members. To qualify for water heater rebates provided by the Energy...

91

1 ^MR "T~fFM DO NOT iI _____i__  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and L. Pignato .................. V TVA'S OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCES WITH HEAT PUMP WATER HEATERS Theodore OF A HEAT PUMP WATER HEATER Kay H. Zimmerman ........................ VII PREDICTED ENERGY SAVINGS. Lovvorn ........................ III WEATHERTRON III - WATER HEATING AND SPACE CONDITIONING HEAT PUMP Alan

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

92

Reservoir monitoring: 1990 summary of vital signs and use impairment monitoring on Tennessee Valley Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) initiated a Reservoir Monitoring Program on 12 TVA reservoirs (the nine main stream Tennessee river reservoirs -- Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary storage reservoirs -- Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris) in autumn 1989. The objective of the Reservoir Monitoring Program is to provide basic information on the ``health`` or integrity of the aquatic ecosystem in each TVA reservoir (``Vital Signs``) and to provide screening level information for describing how well each reservoir meets the swimmable and fishable goals of the Clean Water Act (Use Impairments). This is the first time in the history of the agency that a commitment to a long-term, systematic sampling of major TVA reservoirs has been made. The basis of the Vital Signs Monitoring is examination of appropriate physical, chemical, and biological indicators in three areas of each reservoir. These three areas are the forebay immediately upstream of the dam; the transition zone (the mid-reservoir region where the water changes from free flowing to more quiescent, impounded water); and the inflow or headwater region of the reservoir. The Use Impairments monitoring provides screening level information on the suitability of selected areas within TVA reservoirs for water contact activities (swimmable) and suitability of fish from TVA reservoirs for human consumption (fishable).

Dycus, D.L.; Meinert, D.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Reservoir monitoring: 1990 summary of vital signs and use impairment monitoring on Tennessee Valley Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) initiated a Reservoir Monitoring Program on 12 TVA reservoirs (the nine main stream Tennessee river reservoirs -- Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary storage reservoirs -- Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris) in autumn 1989. The objective of the Reservoir Monitoring Program is to provide basic information on the health'' or integrity of the aquatic ecosystem in each TVA reservoir ( Vital Signs'') and to provide screening level information for describing how well each reservoir meets the swimmable and fishable goals of the Clean Water Act (Use Impairments). This is the first time in the history of the agency that a commitment to a long-term, systematic sampling of major TVA reservoirs has been made. The basis of the Vital Signs Monitoring is examination of appropriate physical, chemical, and biological indicators in three areas of each reservoir. These three areas are the forebay immediately upstream of the dam; the transition zone (the mid-reservoir region where the water changes from free flowing to more quiescent, impounded water); and the inflow or headwater region of the reservoir. The Use Impairments monitoring provides screening level information on the suitability of selected areas within TVA reservoirs for water contact activities (swimmable) and suitability of fish from TVA reservoirs for human consumption (fishable).

Dycus, D.L.; Meinert, D.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Recovery and Blend-Down Uranium for Beneficial use in Commercial Reactors - 13373  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 2001 the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) signed an Interagency Agreement to transfer approximately 33 MT of off-specification (off-spec) highly enriched uranium (HEU) from DOE to TVA for conversion to commercial reactor fuel. Since that time additional surplus off-spec HEU material has been added to the program, making the total approximately 46 MT off-spec HEU. The disposition path for approximately half (23 MT) of this 46 MT of surplus HEU material, was down blending through the H-canyon facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The HEU is purified through the H-canyon processes, and then blended with natural uranium (NU) to form low enriched uranium (LEU) solution with a 4.95% U-235 isotopic content. This material was then transported to a TVA subcontractor who converted the solution to uranium oxide and then fabricated into commercial light water reactor (LWR) fuel. This fuel is now powering TVA reactors and supplying electricity to approximately 1 million households in the TVA region. There is still in excess of approximately 10 to 14 MT of off-spec HEU throughout the DOE complex or future foreign and domestic research reactor returns that could be recovered and down blended for use in either currently designed light water reactors, ?5% enriched LEU, or be made available for use in subsequent advanced 'fast' reactor fuel designs, ?19% LEU. (authors)

Magoulas, Virginia [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Conference for Biomass and Energy, Copenhagen, 1996 published by Elsevier A DYNAMICS-AS-USUAL DEVELOPMENT AS BORDERCONDITION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9th Conference for Biomass and Energy, Copenhagen, 1996 ­ published by Elsevier 1 A DYNAMICS-AS-USUAL DEVELOPMENT AS BORDERCONDITION FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF GLOBAL BIOMASS ENERGY STRATEGIES G. AHAMER* , S.Read@massey.ac.nz ABSTRACT Before envisaging global strategies for enhanced use of biomass for energy, the present

Keeling, Stephen L.

96

642 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY, NOVEMBER 1976 Our Reviewers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Editors as well as our referees. --JAMES L. MASSEY K. Abend J. Aein R. C. Agarwal A. K. Agrawala V. R R. Fang S. M. Farber M. J. Ferguson T. L. Fine P. M. Fishman R. Flake D. H. Foley G. D. Forney, Jr

97

Markus Mller June 14, 2006, Meso 06, Chernogolovka  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOS J. G. Massey and M. Lee, PRL 75, 4266 (1995) Boron-doped silicon matrix 318 100.4 - = cmn ES T T T - #12;Electron glasses: M. Ben-Chorin et al., PRL 84, 3402 (2000) Indium-oxides In2O3-x., PRL 84, 3402 (2000) ( ) 32119 1010 - -= cmn Anomalous field effect Granular Al T. Grenet, EPJ B 32

Fominov, Yakov

98

Computational Science Technical Note CSTN-011 Teaching students how to be Computer Scientists through student projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

educational component of a Computer Science degree. We have enjoyed supervising student computing projects.a.james,k.a.hawick}@massey.ac.nz Abstract Student project work is a vital educational compo- nent of a Computer Science degree. We have a surprising "silence" in the Computing Science Education literature. Keywords: Final year student projects

Hawick, Ken

99

Our acclaimed dance troupe, University Dance eatre, attended the American College Dance Festival and Conference hosted by El  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

we can link your department calendar to the College calendar!) May 3-18: e MFA Lift-O Exhibition Award for Lecturers will be given to: Beverly Mathis-Swanson (Radio,Television, Film, eatre, & Animation Massey (Radio,Television, Film, eatre, & Animation/Illustration). Congratulations to all nominees

Su, Xiao

100

Johannes (Jan) van der Aa Vice Chancellor for Information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IT Manager, Network James Martin IT Administrator III Roger Schwartz IT Administrator III Brian Coats OfficerJudy Johnson Administrative Coordinator I Vikki Massey Project Manager Lisa Hall Executive Director, Computing Systems Billy Barnett IT Administrator IV Jenny Butler IT Administrator IV Jay Leafey

Cui, Yan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butch massey tva" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

El Paso Electric Company, et al., 100 FERC 61,188 (2002). UNITED STATES OF AMERICA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 El Paso Electric Company, et al., 100 FERC ¶ 61,188 (2002). 2 Id. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; William L. Massey, and Nora Mead Brownell. El Paso Electric Company, Enron Power Docket No. EL02 between El Paso Electric Company (El Paso Electric), the California Attorney General (Attorney General

Laughlin, Robert B.

102

Chimeras in networks of planar oscillators Carlo R. Laing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chimeras in networks of planar oscillators Carlo R. Laing IIMS, Massey University, Private Bag 102-904 NSMC, Auckland, New Zealand (Dated: June 25, 2010) Chimera states occur in networks of coupled the remainder are desynchronized. Most chimera states have been observed in networks of phase oscillators

Laing, Carlo R.

103

Chimera states in heterogeneous Kuramoto networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chimera states in heterogeneous Kuramoto networks Carlo R. Laing IIMS, Massey University, Auckland discovered by Kuramoto c. 2002; named "chimeras" by Strogatz. #12;· Identical oscillators, so why coherent/incoherent groups? · This type of solution discovered by Kuramoto c. 2002; named "chimeras" by Strogatz. #12

Laing, Carlo R.

104

The CENTRE for EDUCATION in MATHEMATICS and COMPUTING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, AB Geoffrey Fung Dr. Norman Bethune C.I. Scarborough, ON Glen Martin North Park C.I. Brantford Sinclair S.S. Whitby, ON Pawel Kosicki Vincent Massey S.S. Windsor, ON Andrew Lysyk O'Neill C.V.I. Oshawa Niu Western Canada H.S. Calgary, AB Andrew Rosselet Woburn Collegiate Institute Toronto, ON Aaron

Le Roy, Robert J.

105

A double exponential model for biochemical oxygen demand Ian G. Mason a,*, Robert I. McLachlan b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A double exponential model for biochemical oxygen demand Ian G. Mason a,*, Robert I. McLachlan b , Daniel T. Ge´rard a a Institute of Technology and Engineering, Massey University, Palmerston North, New 2005 Abstract Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) exertion patterns in anaerobically treated farm dairy

McLachlan, Robert

106

Ref:Ref:159235Outline08.doc 1 Format for Paper Outlines -2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to design and implement programs for simple 2d and 3d graphics models. The exam tests understanding OF SCIENCES Paper Number & Title: 159.235 Graphical Programming Credits Value: 15 Semester: S2 Campus: Albany Telephone: 9414 0800 (9532 internal) Office: QA 2.53 Email: K.A.Hawick@massey.ac.nz Other Contributing Staff

Hawick, Ken

107

Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1991: Physical and chemical characteristics of water and sediment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the second year of TVA`s Reservoir Vital signs Monitoring program, physical/chemical measurements of water and sediment were made on fourteen TVA reservoirs (the nine mainstem Tennessee river reservoirs - Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and five tributary reservoirs - Cherokee, Douglas, Norris, Melton Hill and Tellico). In addition in 1991, limited water quality monitoring was initiated on ten tributary storage impoundments. The objective of the Vital Signs monitoring program is to assess the health or integrity of these aquatic ecosystems. Physical/chemical data collected in 1991 showed the water quality of the majority of TVA`s reservoirs to be very good, but pointed out areas for improvement and further investigation.

Meinert, D.L.; Fehring, J.P.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Evaluation of fossil plants versus hydro plants for load frequency control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The economics of using hydroplants with Francis turbines or fossil plants for load frequency control are evaluated. Using data from the TVA Gallatin steam plant and the TVA Cherokee, Wilson, and Fontana hydroplants, a cost comparison of different modes of operation for load frequency control was performed considering two plants at a time. The results showed that when the fossil plant was used for load frequency control instead of a hydro plant a lower system generation cost was incurred. Dynamic responses of fossil and hydro units, improved controls for fossil plants, and maneuvering costs of the Gallatin plant are also considered.

Broadwater, R.P.; Johnson, R.L.; Duckett, F.E.; Boston, W.T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Status of Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the first in a series of reports prepared by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overviews of Cherokee Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports, publications, and data available, and interviews with water resource professionals in various Federal, state, and local agencies and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Performance Testing of Radiant Barriers (RB) with R11, R19, and R30 Cellulose and Rock Wool Insulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lnvestlgated prevlously by ORNL, FSEC, and TVA. In each case, It was found that RBs, especially the RBR. do cause hlgher roof temperatures but that the Increase Is not large. In the worst case, ORNL found increases in roof temperatures of 10F wlth the RBR... Attics Contalnlng Radlant Barrlers." Oak Ridge Natl onal Laboratory. Sponsored by the Department of Energy and TVA. ORNL/CON-200, July 1986. 5. Levins, W. P. and Karnitz, M. A.. "Heating Energy Measurement of Unoccupled Single-Faml ly Houses Wlth...

Hall, J. A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

CERDI, Etudes et Documents, E 2007.17 Document de travail de la srie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.17 Economie politique de la réforme de transition fiscale : le cas du Maroc Jean-François Brun*, Gérard....................................................................................................................... 4 1 Objectifs de la réforme de la TVA au Maroc Maroc. Dans ce pays, les autorités utilisent de nombreux instruments pour agir sur des facteurs d

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

112

Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, Ambient water toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of January 25-February 1, 1994, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0, Poplar Creek Mile 1.0, and Poplar Creek Mile 2.9 on January 24, 26, and 28. Samples were partitioned (split) and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) to fathead minnows; however, toxicity to daphnids (significantly reduced reproduction) was demonstrated in undiluted samples from Poplar Creek Mile 1.0 in testing conducted by TVA based on hypothesis testing of data. Point estimation (IC{sub 25}) analysis of the data, however, showed no toxicity in PCM 1.0 samples.

Simbeck, D.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

State of Solar Photovoltaics in North Carolina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

meets any increase in retail sales x 2012; (2) 20% RE & CHP x 2017 KS: 20% x 2020 OR: 25% x 2025 (large Interconnection #12;· Corporate and personal · 35% of system cost, with $10,500 cap for residential and $2 purchase agreement NC GreenPower #12;· Progress SunSense, commercial and residential PV incentives · TVA

114

OAKRIDGENATIONALLABORATORY MANAGED BY UT-BATTELLE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with solar photovoltaic power production at times feed electricity to the grid when TVA's cost owner a premium rate of $0.15/kWh for all the solar power these houses can produce. Under the Green an airtight envelope (~1 air change per hour at 50 Pascal) of structural insulated panels (SIP), which

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

115

A Study of the Nidana: An Underrated Canonical Text of the Mulasarvastivada-vinaya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s.ad.vim . s atkr tvas caham . s akro bhuvan devanSkt. uktam . bhagavata saptaham adhis.t.haya gantavyam .bhiks.un. a saptaham adhis.t.haya upasakasya karan.

Kishino, Ryoji

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Powerline Conductor Operational Testing Facility (PCOT) The Powerline Conductor Operational Testing Facility (PCOT), currently planned for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, a 9-unit, 1400 MW coal- fired generating power station and switchyard, which is 10 miles to the West, and the TVA Roane 500/161 kV Substation, which is 1.5 miles to the East. At the PCOT site, a double-circuit

117

Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) The Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) is a unique test facility for field testing of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) Overview: The Power Electronics Field Test Facility (TPET) is a unique test facility for field testing of power electronics that will be located at the TVA the testing of power electronics and energy storage technology from laboratory development and testing through

118

ORNL takes energy-efficient housing to a new level  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TVA and the Department of Energy are taking energy-saving research into a West Knox County neighborhood. In the Campbell Creek subdivision, ORNL researchers have helped builders to construct three homes with three different levels of energy-saving features.

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

119

Smart Grid Research At TTU Robert C. Qiu and David Gao  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smart Grid Research At TTU Robert C. Qiu and David Gao Department of Electrical and Computer and definitions for use in Smart Grid #12;Wind Energy Solar Energy (Donated by TVA) A Real-Time Smart Grid Testbed Grid #12;Smart Grid Research at TTU Renewable and clean energy integration into smart grid Wind Power

Qiu, Robert Caiming

120

ANS 2006 WINTER MEETING & Nuclear Technology Expo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; and Embedded Topical Meeting: NPIC&HMIT 2006 Alaron Corporation Ameren UE/Callaway Nuclear Plant Atomic Energy) EXCEL Services Corporation Florida Power & Light GE Nuclear Energy Idaho National Laboratory INVENSYS/Lockheed Martin Sargent & Lundy TVA U.S. Department of Energy, Nuclear Engineering U.S. Nuclear Regulatory

Krings, Axel W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butch massey tva" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Soil Carbon Modeling (Mac Post) A. Rothamsted model carbon pools and processes. Their approximate equivalents for the EBIS sample processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and not a safety hazard. During the summer of 1999, emissions from local waste-incinerators added 14C-CO2 established in 2000 at each of the four sites shown above. Time-zero sampling of organic and mineral horizons and TVA) demonstrate the potential for ecosystem of carbon recycling (S. Trumbore). Objectives 1. Quantify

122

IEEE Copyright Statement: Copyright 2006 IEEE. Reprinted from Proceedings of the IEEE PES General Meeting,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Técnicas) in Argentina; NSF EPNES project, and the Summer TVA in the Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA; he is also with CONICET, Instituto de Energía Eléctrica, Universidad Nacional de San Juan, Argentina; Av. L

Ilic, Marija D.

123

Competition Comments Commentaires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ON Wu Tony Dr. Norman Bethune C.I. Scarborough, ON Xu Yuwei Vincent Massey S.S. Windsor, ON Yeung 63 to 64 Au Andrew North Toronto C.I. Toronto, ON Babnik Curtis Carihi S.S. Campbell River, BC Chan John Fraser S.S. Mississauga, ON Chiang Chi Hang St. Andrew's College Aurora, ON Choi Kurt A.B. Lucas S

Le Roy, Robert J.

124

f a l l 2 0 1 4 | i T H E M A G A Z I N E O F T H E U N I V E R S I T Y O F T E X A S S C H O O L O F L A W f a l l 2 0 1 4 | v o l u m e 1 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

f a l l 2 0 1 4 | i T H E M A G A Z I N E O F T H E U N I V E R S I T Y O F T E X A S S C H O O L O John H. Massey, '66 Alumni Association President Bruce Broillet, '74 ut law magazine Editor Maria FROM THE DEAN L AST YEAR THE LAW school undertook a strategic-planning exercise. We formed a committee

John, Lizy Kurian

125

Solar concentration/destruction of pesticide rinsewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address a growing national problem with generation of wastes and by-products, TVA has been involved for several years with developing and commercializing environmentally responsible practices for eliminating, minimizing, or utilizing various wastes/by-products. In many cases, reducing waste generation is impractical, but the wastes/by-products can be converted into other environmentally sound products. In some instances, conversion to safe, value-added agricultural products is the best or only practical alternative. TVA is currently involved with a diversity of projects converting wastes/by-products into safe, economical, and agriculturally beneficial products. Environmental improvement projects have involved poultry litter, cellulosic wastes, used battery acid, ammonium sulfate fines, lead smelting effluents, deep-welled sulfuric acid/ammonium bisulfate solutions, wood ash, waste magnesium ammonium sulfate slurry from recording tape production, and ammunition plant waste sodium nitrate/ammonium nitrate streams.

Salladay, D.G.; Ash, D.H.; Sullivan, J.M.; Grinstead, J.H. Jr.; Hemmen, J.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Development of technology in the production of fertilizers in ammoniation-granulation plants. Progress report No. 12, September 1980. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work conducted to demonstrate procedures and equipment to conserve about 83% of fuel oil used for drying and generating steam in the ammoniation-granulation plants is reported. The general mechanism of granulation is examined. Conventional ammoniation-granulation plants are described and the new pipe-cross reactor system is described and schematics of their design are presented. Results of some demonstration tests reveal that an average of 785,000 Btu's per ton of production is eliminated with the installation of the TVA pipe-cross reactor process. It also reduces atmospheric emissions. Data on investment cost and payback period of the installation of a pipe-cross reactor in an existing TVA granulation fertilizer plant are presented.

Not Available

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Electric vehicle repairs and modifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This informal report describes the electric vehicle (EV) inspection and the necessary maintenance and repairs required to improve reliable operation of five Volkswagen (VW) Electrotransporter vans and five VW EV buses. The recommendations of TVA, EPRI, GES, Volkswagen, Siemens, and Hoppecke have been carried out in this effort. These modifications were necessary before entering the EPRI/TVA phase II and III continuing program. As new energy storage systems are explored using the VW test-bed vehicles in the battery field testing program, additional modifications may be required. All modifications will be submitted to the vehicle and component manufacturer for general assessment and recommendations. At present three different types of battery systems are being evaluated in six VW vehicles. The two Hoppecke and Exide utilize the modified Hoppecke charging systems. The other batteries being tested require off-board chargers specified by their manufacturer and are separate from the vehicle system.

Buffett, R.K.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Aquatic Plant Management Program current status and seasonal workplan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the TVA Aquatic Plant Management Program is to support in an environmentally and economically responsible manner, the balanced multiple uses of the water resource of the Tennessee Valley. This is accomplished by following an integrated approach to prevent introduction and spread of noxious species, documenting occurrence and spread of existing species, and suppressing or eliminating problems in designated high use areas. It is not the TVA objective, nor is it biologically feasible and prudent to eliminate all aquatic vegetation. Aerial photography, helicopter reconnaissance, and field surveys are used to assess distributions and abundance of various aquatic macrophytes. Water level fluctuations are supplemented by herbicide applications to control undesirable vegetation. Investigations are conducted to evaluate water level fluctuation schemes, as well as biological, mechanical, and alternative chemical control techniques which offer potential for more environmentally compatible and cost-effective management operations.

Burns, E.R.; Bates, A.L.; Webb, D.H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Framing India's Hydraulic Crises The Politics of the Modern Large Dam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Framing India's Hydraulic Crises The Politics of the Modern Large Dam ROHAN D'SOUZA For several University Press, 2006). #12;I N D I A ' S H Y D R A U L I C C R I S I S 1 1 3 commentator on India, declared landscape.4 The TVA model was soon to mark a profound hydraulic departure by kick-starting the post

Sussex, University of

130

Adapting state and national electricity consumption forecasting methods to utility service areas. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the experiences of six utilities (Florida Power and Light Co., Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia, Philadelphia Electric Co., Public Service Co. of Colorado, Sacramento Municipal Utility District, and TVA) in adapting to their service territories models that were developed for forecasting loads on a national or regional basis. The models examined were of both end-use and econometric design and included the three major customer classes: residential, commercial, and industrial.

Swift, M.A.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Generalized Bhattacharyya and Chernoff upper bounds on Bayes error using quasi-arithmetic means  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 = w1(c11 + c21) and a2 = w2(c12 + c22). The identity simplifies for probability of error Pe to Pe to the total variation met- ric distance TV(p, q) = 1 2 |p(x) - q(x)|dx by Be = a1+a2 2 - TV(a1p1, a2p2) with a

Nielsen, Frank

132

Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Fluidized Bed Combustion. Volume 1. Plenary sessions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sixth International Conference on Fluidized Bed Combustion was held at the Atlanta Hilton, Atlanta, Georgia, April 9-11, 1980. The papers in this volume involved presentation of the research and development programs of the US (US DOE, TVA, EPRI and US EPA), United Kingdom, Federal Republic of Germany and the People's Republic of China. Eight papers from Vol. 1 (Plenary Sessions) of the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

none,

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Routine and post-accident sampling in nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Review of the Three Mile Island accident by NRC has resulted in new post-accident-sampling-capability requirements for utilities that operate pressurized water reactors and/or boiling water reactors. Several vendors are offering equipment that they hope will suffice to met both the new NRC regulations and an operational deadline of January 1, 1981. The advantages and disadvantages of these systems and projected future-new-system needs for TVA reactors are being evaluated in light of TMI experience.

Armento, W.J.; Kitts, F.G.; German, G.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1990: Physical and chemical characteristics of water and sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA`s) Reservoir Vital Signs Monitoring program, physical/chemical measurements of water and sediment were made in 1990 on twelve TVA reservoirs (the nine main steam Tennessee river reservoirs - Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary reservoirs - Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris). The objective of this monitoring program is to assess the health or integrity of these aquatic ecosystems. The physical/chemical water quality data collected in 1990 showed the water quality of these reservoirs to be very good. However, hypolimnetic anoxia during the summer months in Watts bars, Douglas, and Cherokee reservoir continues to be a concern. High concentrations of nutrients were measured in the transition zones of Cherokee and Douglas reservoirs, resulting in highly productive and eutrophic conditions in the transition zones of these reservoirs. Fecal coliform organisms were frequently detected in the forebay area of Guntersville reservoir, and higher than expected ammonia nitrogen concentrations were found at the transition zone of Wheeler reservoir. Elevated concentrations of mercury were found in Pickwick and Watts bar reservoir sediment, and high lead concentrations were found in a sediment sample collected from Guntersville reservoir. A TVA Reservoir Water Quality Index (RWQI) was developed and used to summarize water quality conditions on a scale from 0 (worst) to 100 (best).

Meinert, D.L.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1990: Physical and chemical characteristics of water and sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA's) Reservoir Vital Signs Monitoring program, physical/chemical measurements of water and sediment were made in 1990 on twelve TVA reservoirs (the nine main steam Tennessee river reservoirs - Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary reservoirs - Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris). The objective of this monitoring program is to assess the health or integrity of these aquatic ecosystems. The physical/chemical water quality data collected in 1990 showed the water quality of these reservoirs to be very good. However, hypolimnetic anoxia during the summer months in Watts bars, Douglas, and Cherokee reservoir continues to be a concern. High concentrations of nutrients were measured in the transition zones of Cherokee and Douglas reservoirs, resulting in highly productive and eutrophic conditions in the transition zones of these reservoirs. Fecal coliform organisms were frequently detected in the forebay area of Guntersville reservoir, and higher than expected ammonia nitrogen concentrations were found at the transition zone of Wheeler reservoir. Elevated concentrations of mercury were found in Pickwick and Watts bar reservoir sediment, and high lead concentrations were found in a sediment sample collected from Guntersville reservoir. A TVA Reservoir Water Quality Index (RWQI) was developed and used to summarize water quality conditions on a scale from 0 (worst) to 100 (best).

Meinert, D.L.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Third annual Walker Branch Watershed research symposium. Program and abstracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methods and concepts of watershed research, originally applied in an experimental or monitoring mode to relatively small catchments, are increasingly being used at larger scales and for specific applied problems. Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the US Forest Service, and other agencies and institutions participating in this symposium reflects research over a broad range of spatial scales that is being integrated through large-scale experiments along with computer modeling and graphical interfaces. These research projects address the basic atmospheric, geophysical, biogeochemical, and biological processes that regulate the responses of forested ecosystems to natural environmental variation and anthropogenic stresses. Regional and global issues addressed by presentations include emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, and other hydrocarbons; deposition of sulfate, nitrate, and mercury; land-use changes; biological diversity; droughts; and water quality. The reports presented in this symposium illustrate a wide range of methods and approaches and focus more on concepts and techniques than on a specific physical site. Sites and projects that have contributed research results to this symposium include Walker Branch Watershed (DOE), the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory and LTER site (USFS and NSF), Great Smoky Mountains National Park (research funded by NPS, TVA, and EPRI), Imnavait Creek, Alaska (DOE), the TVA-Norris Whole-tree Facility (TVA and EPRI), and DOE`s Biomass Program.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Barge loading facilities in conjunction with wood chipping and sawlog mill, Tennessee River Mile 145. 9R: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental consequences of approving, denying, or adopting reasonable alternatives to a request for barge loading facilities. These facilities would serve a proposed wood chipping and sawlog products operation at Tennessee River Mile (TRM) 145.9, right descending bank, (Kentucky Lake), in Perry County, Tennessee. The site is located between Short Creek and Peters Landing. The applicant is Southeastern Forest Products, L.P. (SFP), Box 73, Linden, Tennessee and the proposed facilities would be constructed on or adjacent to company owned land. Portions of the barge terminal would be constructed on land over which flood easement rights are held by the United States of America and administered by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The US Army Corps of Engineers (CE) and TVA have regulatory control over the proposed barge terminal facilities since the action would involve construction in the Tennessee River which is a navigable water of the United States. The wood chipping and sawlog products facilities proposed on the upland property are not regulated by the CE or TVA. On the basis of the analysis which follows, it has been determined that a modified proposal (as described herein) would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment, and does not require the preparation of an environmental impact statement. 8 refs.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Micronized Coal Reburning Demonstration for NOx Control: A DOE Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program is to furnish the energy marketplace with a number of advanced, more efficient, and environmentally responsible coal utilization technologies through demonstration projects. These projects seek to establish the commercial feasibility of the most promising advanced coal technologies that have developed beyond the proof-of-concept stage. This document serves as a DOE post-project assessment of a project selected in CCT Round IV, the Micronized Coal Reburning (MCR) Demonstration for NO{sub x} Control, as described in a report to Congress (U.S. Department of Energy 1999). The need to meet strict emissions requirements at a minimum cost prompted the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), in conjunction with Fuller Company, Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER), and Fluor Daniel, to submit the proposal for this project to be sited at TVA's Shawnee Fossil Plant. In July 1992, TVA entered into a cooperative agreement with DOE to conduct the study. However, because of operational and environmental compliance strategy changes, the Shawnee site became unavailable.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Respornse of Irrigated Crops to Micronutrients In the Lower Rio Grande Valley.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

increased Zn absorp- tion; whereas, P fertilization reduced Zn uptake. Zinc absorption was also influenced by a signifi- cant Zn-P interaction as shown in Table 12. When spplied alone, Zn caused an increase in Zn up- take; whereas, when Zn was applied.... 22'78, 1963. 11. Gilbert, Frank H. Copper in nutrition. Advances in 17. Agronomy. Academic Press, Inc., N. Y. Vol. 4: 147-177. 1952. 12. Hiatt, A. J. and Massey, J. F. Zinc levels in relation to zinc content and growth of corn. Agron. J. 50: 18...

Burleson, C. A. (Charles Albertis); Gerard, C. J. (Cleveland Joseph); Cowley, W. R. (Walter Raymond)

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A serially concatenated BCH-Turbo code scheme over an Additive White Gaussion Noise channel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, ;q(s', s) P(sls')p(yr-Is' s) 21 DE- INTERLEA VER. e L21 Ip Y MAP DECODER I e 12 N-BIT INTERLEAVER. MAP DECODER 2. e y N-BIT INTERLEAVER. 2p y Fig. 5. Turbo code rlecoder P(uI )p(yk ur) (3. 27) where P() stands for the probability... 3 4 7 9 12 16 17 20 25 25 25 27 29 33 33 35 38 REFERENCES APPENDIX A 41 VITA LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page I Berlckamp-Massey algorithm , 'l l LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page Convolui, ional encoder for s, (2, 1, 2) convolutional...

Ovalekar, Sameer V.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butch massey tva" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Ammonia volatilization from N fertilizers surface applied on bermudagrass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The biological activity was measured by trapping the CO in NaOH (0. 422 N). The NH3 which was volatilized from the urea was trapped in boric acid according to Bremner (1965). Volatilized NH and evolved CO were measured daily by titrating the boric acid and 13... was passed over the soil surface, then bubbled into boric acid to trap volatilized NH (Bremner, 1965). Humidified air was used to prevent rapid soil drying which would retard NH volatilization (Ernst and Massey, 1960). The apparatus is diagrammed in Fig. 1...

Panossian, Jack B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Oxygen and Carbon Isotopes and Coral Growth in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea as Environmental and Climate Indicators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thanks goes to the crew of the M/V Fling; the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS) staff, E. Hickerson, G.P. Schmal, L. Kurjelja; the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary staff, J. Halas, B. Causey, A. Massey; U.S. Geological Survey... OXYGEN AND CARBON ISOTOPES AND CORAL GROWTH IN THE GULF OF MEXICO AND CARIBBEAN SEA AS ENVIRONMENTAL AND CLIMATE INDICATORS A Dissertation by AMY JO WAGNER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University...

Wagner, Amy Jo

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

143

Site plan safety submission for sampling, monitoring, decontamination of GB agent - north plant Rocky Mountain Arsenal. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During TVA's visit and survey of RMA's GB facility, sample points were identified (Table A-1). The sample points initially identified were from Buildings 1501, 1503, 1603, 1506, 1601, 1601A, and 1602. Piping isometrics were produced for each sample point identified and are shown in Appendix B. After a careful review of each sample point and discussions with RMA personnel, 67 of the original sample points were eliminated. The sample points eliminated consisted of all ventilation points and process equipment/piping that is open to the atmosphere.

Not Available

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Radiant Barrier Insulation Performance in Full Scale Attics with Soffit and Ridge Venting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in an attic. Figure 1 shows the methods used to install the foil for the tests reviewed. In a brief review all of the characteristics, results and differences of the tests cannot be discussed. Other than the ORNL Karns house tests, there have been no full... that had natural ventilation rates, (ORNL and TVA) used soffit and gable venting and did not measure the ventilation rate. The other experimenters used forced ventilation and approximated either gable/gable or soffit/ridge venting. Since the roof deck...

Ober, D. G.; Volckhausen, T. W.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Acoustic emission monitoring of hot functional testing: Watts Bar Unit 1 Nuclear Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of selected pressure boundary areas at TVA's Watts Bar, Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant during hot functional preservice testing is described in this report. The report deals with background, methodology, and results. The work discussed here is a major milestone in a program supported by NRC to develop and demonstrate application of AE monitoring for continuous surveillance of reactor pressure boundaries to detect and evaluate growing flaws. The subject work demonstrated that anticipated problem areas can be overcome. Work is continuing toward AE monitoring during reactor operation.

Hutton, P.H.; Dawson, J.F.; Friesel, M.A.; Harris, J.C.; Pappas, R.A.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Microsoft PowerPoint - Till.ppt  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S i DOE Tribal Leader ForumStatus of the U.S.What weTVA

147

Nuclear Reactor Technologies | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJaredOakscience-based, applied engineeringTVA Watts Bar

148

Nuclear Safety Information | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJaredOakscience-based, applied engineeringTVA Watts BarIdaho

149

Nuclear Safety Policy, Guidance & Reports | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJaredOakscience-based, applied engineeringTVA Watts

150

Nuclear Safety | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJaredOakscience-based, applied engineeringTVA WattsOffice of

151

O C T O B E  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJaredOakscience-based, applied engineeringTVA WattsOffice ofC

152

O:\HOMEPAGE\FOIA\report99.PDF | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJaredOakscience-based, applied engineeringTVA WattsOffice

153

OCIO Organization Chart (printable version) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJaredOakscience-based, applied engineeringTVA

154

Anodonta imbecillis QA Test 4, Clinch River - Environmental restoration program (CR-ERP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Toxicity testing of split whole sediment samples using juvenile freshwater mussels (Anodonta imbecillis) was conducted by TVA to provide a quality assurance mechanism for test organism quality and overall performance of the test being conducted by CR-ERP personnel as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments. Testing of sediment samples collected September 8 from Poplar Creek Miles 6.0 and 1.0 was conducted September 13-22, 1994. Results from this test showed no toxicity (survival effects) to fresh-water mussels during a 9-day exposure to the sediments.

Simbeck, D.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Sandia National Laboratories: Taiwan Solid-State Lighting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErikGroundbreakingStandardsTCES Sandia Researchers WinTVA Consortium forTaiwan

156

Sandia National Laboratories: Techno-Economic Modeling, Analysis, and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErikGroundbreakingStandardsTCES Sandia Researchers WinTVA Consortium

157

Sandia National Laboratories: Tennessee Valley Authority  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErikGroundbreakingStandardsTCES Sandia Researchers WinTVA ConsortiumTennessee

158

Sandia National Laboratories: Test Site Operations & Maintenance Safety:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErikGroundbreakingStandardsTCES Sandia Researchers WinTVA

159

Development of biomass as an alternative fuel for gas turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program to develop biomass as an alternative fuel for gas turbines was started at Aerospace Research Corporation in 1980. The research culminated in construction and installation of a power generation system using an Allison T-56 gas turbine at Red Boiling Springs, Tennessee. The system has been successfully operated with delivery of power to the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Emissions from the system meet or exceed EPA requirements. No erosion of the turbine has been detected in over 760 hours of operation, 106 of which were on line generating power for the TVA. It was necessary to limit the turbine inlet temperature to 1450{degrees}F to control the rate of ash deposition on the turbine blades and stators and facilitate periodic cleaning of these components. Results of tests by researchers at Battelle Memorial Institute -- Columbus Division, give promise that deposits on the turbine blades, which must be periodically removed with milled walnut hulls, can be eliminated with addition of lime to the fuel. Operational problems, which are centered primarily around the feed system and engine configuration, have been adequately identified and can be corrected in an upgraded design. The system is now ready for development of a commercial version. The US Department of Energy (DOE) provided support only for the evaluation of wood as an alternative fuel for gas turbines. However, the system appears to have high potential for integration into a hybrid system for the production of ethanol from sorghum or sugar cane. 7 refs., 23 figs., 18 tabs.

Hamrick, J T [Aerospace Research Corp., Roanoke, VA (USA)

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

AFBC Roadbed Project groundwater data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TVA permitted the use of AFBC material in a section of roadbed at Paducah, Kentucky, for the purpose of demonstrating its usability as a roadbed base. To determine if the material would leach and contaminate groundwater, four wells and seven lysimeters were installed beside and in the roadbed base material. In August 1991, TVA Field Engineering visited the AFBC Roadbed Project to collect samples and water quality data. The goal was to collect samples and data from four wells and seven lysimeters. All attempts to collect samples from the lysimeters failed with one exemption. All attempts to collect samples from the groundwater wells were successful. The analytical data from the four wells and one lysimeter are also attached. The well data is typical of groundwater in the Paducah, Kentucky area indicating that it was not affected by the AFBC roadbed material. The analysis of the lysimeter shows concentrations for iron and manganese above normal background levels, however, the data do not reflect significant concentrations of these heavy metals. Also, the difficulty in obtaining the lysimeter samples and the fact that the samples had to be composited to obtain sufficient quantity to analyze would make a qualitative evaluation of the data questionable.

Carpenter, W. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Norris, TN (United States). Engineering Lab.

1992-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butch massey tva" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Statistical Analysis of Abnormal Electric Power Grid Behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing a technique to analyze Phasor Measurement Unit data to identify typical patterns, atypical events and precursors to a blackout or other undesirable event. The approach combines a data-driven multivariate analysis with an engineering-model approach. The method identifies atypical events, provides a plane English description of the event, and the capability to use drill-down graphics for detailed investigations. The tool can be applied to the entire grid, individual organizations (e.g. TVA, BPA), or specific substations (e.g., TVA_CUMB). The tool is envisioned for (1) event investigations, (2) overnight processing to generate a Morning Report that characterizes the previous days activity with respect to previous activity over the previous 10-30 days, and (3) potentially near-real-time operation to support the grid operators. This paper presents the current status of the tool and illustrations of its application to real world PMU data collected in three 10-day periods in 2007.

Ferryman, Thomas A.; Amidan, Brett G.

2010-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

Moltox Chemical Air Separation System-A Progress Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MOLTOX~* CHEMICAL AIR SEPARATION SYSTEM - A PROGRESS REPORT Donald C. Er1ckson Energy Concepts Co. Annapo11s, Maryland W111iam R. Brown and Br1an R. Dunbobb1n A1r Products and Chem1ca1s, Inc. Allentown, Pennsy1van1a Robert G. Massey U....S. Department of Energy Wash1ngton, D.C. ABSTRACT A new low energy route to tonnage oxygen product1on, the HOLTOX~ system, 1s now commenc1ng p110t plant test1ng. The process, 1ts h1story, and potent1a1 app11cat10ns will be descr1bed, 1n add1t1on...

Erickson, D. C.; Brown, W. R.; Dunbobbin, B. R.; Massey, R. G.

163

Fish Health Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008, over 4 million cubic meters of fly ash slurry was released into the Emory River when a dike surrounding a solid waste containment area at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured. One component of TVA's response to the spill is a biological monitoring program to assess short- and long-term ecological responses to the ash and associated chemicals, including studies on fish health and contaminant bioaccumulation. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure to metals and health effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information from other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology information transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash (and related environmental stressors), not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report presents the results of the first two years of the fish health study. To date, fish health and bioaccumulation studies have been conducted from Spring 2009 though Fall 2011 and includes 6 seasonal studies: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, and Fall 2011. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to fish health and bioaccumulation, the Spring investigations also included reproductive integrity studies on the same fish used for bioaccumulation and fish health. In this report, results of the fish health studies from Spring 2009 through Fall 2010 are presented while an associated report will present the fish reproductive studies conducted during Spring 2009 and Spring 2010. A report on fish bioaccumulation was submitted to TVA in June 2011. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health.

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Crystallographic properties of fertilizer compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bulletin is a compilation of crystallographic data collected at NFERC on 450 fertilizer-related compounds. In TVA's fertilizer R and D program, petrographic examination, XRD, and infrared spectroscopy are combined with conventional chemical analysis methods in identifying the individual compounds that occur in fertilizer materials. This handbook brings together the results of these characterization studies and supplemental crystallographic data from the literature. It is in one-compound-per-page, loose-leaf format, ordered alphabetically by IUPAC name. Indexes provided include IUPAC name, formula, group, alternate formula, synonyms, x-ray data, optical data. Tables are given for solids, compounds in commercial MAP and DAP, and matrix materials in phosphate rock.

Frazier, A.W.; Dillard, E.F.; Thrasher, R.D.; Waerstad, K.R.; Hunter, S.R.; Kohler, J.J.; Scheib, R.M.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

NNSA TRITIUM SUPPLY CHAIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Site plays a critical role in the Tritium Production Supply Chain for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The entire process includes: Production of Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods (TPBARs) at the Westinghouse WesDyne Nuclear Fuels Plant in Columbia, South Carolina Production of unobligated Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) at the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC) in Portsmouth, Ohio Irradiation of TPBARs with the LEU at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Watts Bar Reactor Extraction of tritium from the irradiated TPBARs at the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) at Savannah River Site Processing the tritium at the Savannah River Site, which includes removal of nonhydrogen species and separation of the hydrogen isotopes of protium, deuterium and tritium.

Wyrick, Steven [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC, USA; Cordaro, Joseph [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC, USA; Founds, Nanette [National Nuclear Security Administration, Albuquerque, NM, USA; Chambellan, Curtis [National Nuclear Security Administration, Albuquerque, NM, USA

2013-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

166

Environmental management of water projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book is divided in three parts and contains the following: PART I: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTS. Environmental conditions for water resource projects. Characteristics of some large scale reservoirs. Biological parameters of the TVA Eurasian watermilfoil management program. Ecological parameters influencing aquatic plant growth. Biological parameters influencing growth and reproduction of hydrilla. PART II: EVALUATION OF SELECTED AQUATIC HERBICIDES. Technical review of the factors affecting 2,4-D for aquatic use. Technical review of the factors affecting endothall for aquatic use. Technical review of factors affecting diquat for aquatic use. Technical review of the factors affecting use of dicamba. Technical review of the factors affecting aquatic use of dichlobenil. PART III: EVALUATION OF VEGETATION MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS. Strategies for aquatic vegetation management. (A) conversion of factors for U.S. and metric units. (B) Glossary of terms. Index.

Gangstad, E.O.; Stanley, R.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 2009, the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE), through a partnership with the Appalachian Regional Commission, EKPC, Kentucky's Department for Energy Development and Independence, SACE, Tennessee's Department of Environment and Conservation, and TVA, and through a contract with the Department of Energy, established the Tennessee Valley and Eastern Kentucky Wind Working Group (TVEKWWG). TVEKWWG consists of a strong network of people and organizations. Working together, they provide information to various organizations and stakeholders regarding the responsible development of wind power in the state. Members include representatives from utility interests, state and federal agencies, economic development organizations, non-government organizations, local decision makers, educational institutions, and wind industry representatives. The working group is facilitated by the Southern Alliance for Clean Energy. TVEKWWG supports the Department of Energy by helping educate and inform key stakeholders about wind energy in the state of Tennessee.

Katie Stokes

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

168

Research and development of fish passage technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Any fish passage provided at TVA's John Sevier Fossil Plant (JSF) would involve only warmwater species. Although some anadromous (marine) warmwater species (e.g., American shad, blueback herring) are currently passed upstream and downstream through structures deliberately built for that purpose, effectiveness of this technology for passage of adults and young of potential target species (e.g., paddlefish and sauger/walleye) in Cherokee Reservoir is unproven. Downstream passage is by far the larger and more poorly understood subject of fish migration and should be investigated first. Currently, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is conducting research on downstream fish passage (Project RP 2694). It will ultimately be necessary to adapt this information to the target species and site specificity at JSF.

Hackney, P.A.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

USDOE/EPRI BIOMASS COFIRING COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the period of October 1, 1998 through December 31, 1998, significant work was done in direct preparation for several cofiring tests. Major progress was made on several projects including cofiring at Seward (GPU Genco), Allen (TVA), and Bailly (NIPSCO). Most of the work was focused on construction activities at the Seward and Bailly Generating Stations. The conceptual design and feasibility study for gasification-based cofiring at the Allen Fossil Plant was completed. The feasibility study for cofiring at the Pirkey and Northeastern Generating Stations of Central and South West Utilities (C&SW) also was completed. This report summarizes the activities during the fourth calendar quarter in 1998--of the USDOE/EPRI Biomass Cofiring Cooperative Agreement. It focuses upon reporting the results of construction activities and related events.

D. Tillman; E. Hughes

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Effects of Sediment Containing Coal Ash from the Kingston Ash Release on Embryo-Larval Development in the Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas (Rafinesque, 1820)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The largest environmental release of coal ash in U.S. history occurred in December 2008 with the failure of a retention structure at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee. A byproduct of coal-burning power plants, coal ash is enriched in metals and metalloids such as selenium and arsenic with known toxicity to fish including embryonic and larval stages. The effects of contact exposure to sediments containing up to 78 % coal ash from the Kingston spill on the early development of fish embryos and larvae were examined in 7-day laboratory tests with the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). No significant effects were observed on hatching success, incidences of gross developmental abnormalities, or embryo-larval survival. Results suggest that direct exposures to sediment containing residual coal ash from the Kingston ash release may not present significant risks to fish eggs and larvae in waterways affected by the spill.

Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL] [ORNL; Elmore, Logan R [ORNL] [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL] [ORNL; Sherrard, Rick [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)] [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Two-dimensional water quality modeling of Town Creek embayment on Guntersville Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TVA investigated water quality of Town Creek embayment using a branched two-dimensional model of Guntersville Reservoir. Simulation results were compared in terms of algal biomass, nutrient concentrations, and volume of embayment with depleted dissolved oxygen. Stratification and flushing play a significant role in the embayment water quality. Storms introduce large loadings of organics, nutrients, and suspended solids. Dissolved oxygen depletion is most severe after storms followed by low flow that fails to flush the embayment. Embayment water quality responses to potential animal waste and erosion controls were explored. Modeling indicated animal waste controls were much more cost-effective than erosion controls. Erosion controls will decrease embayment suspended solids and thereby increase algal biomass due to greater light penetration. 29 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

Bender, M.D.; Shiao, Ming C.; Hauser, G.E. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Norris, TN (USA). Engineering Lab.); Butkus, S.R. (Tennessee Valley Authority, Norris, TN (USA). Water Quality Dept.)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

The mammals of the Mexican state of Morelos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ 000 ~ ~ ~ see?0 ~ ? ~ ~ 1 ~ ~ ~ 0000 ~ ~ ~ ~ eeoc?1 1?00 1 ~ 0 ~ ~ ~ 0? 1?at IS ~ss tall, , 11 11 dt:tt?s? ~?a 1st ?. . . , ????, ???, ??.??, 24 F1c9ral Ac9soc9it4tionc9 and i3omim24t species ~ 01 ~ ~ oo ~ 000? ~ ~ ?01 ~ 1 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 1 16 d ~pr... litIlldtt ar cs?2tv . . ~ . ?~ 22 '? Arltl ~?t 1 '2 ro A ?alt tva 22 ih?9 TC'~iCS1 DOCCidWC46 FCCC'BSCp ASSCCiRC i&% ~ 0 ~ 1 ~ ~ ~ 1 ~ 00? e 0 ~ ~ 0 1 0 sa3 9@I t)ixsd Fbi ACc5c2c9i24tictcl ~ ~ 1 ~ ? 0 0 1 ~ 1 0 0 0 ~ ? 0 0 0 ~ ? 0? 0 0 1 0 1 ~ 0...

Russell, Robert Julian

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Decentralized electricity, cogeneration, and conservation options. [Conference paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An early evaluation o the Home Insulation Program indicates that it is possible to carry on major conservation programs that result in a substantial saving to Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) customers both from reduced electric bills and from reduction in electric system cost. The evidence from the TVA program strongly indicates that many utilities could realize benefits for themselves and their customers by implementing a comprehensive program for decentralized electricity, load management, cogeneration, and conservation. Of course, any financial benefit to the utility would be contingent on the treatment of costs associated with these programs on the balance sheet, on the income statement, and in allowable rate of return calculations. In particular, utility financing of customer installation of energy conservation and renewable energy systems must be treated in a manner that allows the utility to earn an acceptable rate of return. The Pacific Power and Light (PPL) Residential Energy Efficiency Rider is an example of how this can be handled. The program is beneficial to the utility because the entire cost of the weatherization measure can be added to the rate base with the customer paying the carrying charges on the capital. The customer benefits from the borrowing at the utility's cost of capital until the time of sale, at which time the value of the improvements is realized as a higher sale price for the house. While the value of such programs must be calculated on an individual basis, the authors feel that many utilities, particularly those that are in a position that makes it difficult to add new conventional capacity, could profit from the implementation of these programs. 1 reference, 2 figures, 6 tables.

Hemphill, R.F. Jr.; Maguire, M.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Clean Coal Technology III: 10 MW Demonstration of Gas Suspension Absorption final project performance and economics report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) program is a government and industry co-funded technology development. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the performance of the GSA system in treating a 10 MW slipstream of flue gas resulting from the combustion of a high sulfur coal. This project involves design, fabrication, construction and testing of the GSA system. The Project Performance and Economics Report provides the nonproprietary information for the ``10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) Project`` installed at Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) Shawnee Power Station, Center for Emissions Research (CER) at Paducah, Kentucky. The program demonstrated that the GSA flue-gas-desulfurization (FGD) technology is capable of achieving high SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies (greater than 90%), while maintaining particulate emissions below the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), without any negative environmental impact (section 6). A 28-day test demonstrated the reliability and operability of the GSA system during continuous operation. The test results and detailed discussions of the test data can be obtained from TVA`s Final Report (Appendix A). The Air Toxics Report (Appendix B), prepared by Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EERC) characterizes air toxic emissions of selected hazardous air pollutants (HAP) from the GSA process. The results of this testing show that the GSA system can substantially reduce the emission of these HAP. With its lower capital costs and maintenance costs (section 7), as compared to conventional semi-dry scrubbers, the GSA technology commands a high potential for further commercialization in the United States. For detailed information refer to The Economic Evaluation Report (Appendix C) prepared by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors.

Hsu, F.E.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF FLY ASH EXPOSURE ON FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES: FATHEAD MINNOW EMBRYO-LARVAL TESTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash in an 84-acre complex of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Steam Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits extended as far as 4 miles upstream (Emory River mile 6) of the Plant, and some ash was carried as far downstream as Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}4 miles downstream of the Tennessee River confluence with the Clinch River). A byproduct of coal burning power plants, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be toxic to biological systems. The effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to be the effects of specific ash constituents, especially selenium, on fish early life stages. Uptake by adult female fish of fly ash constituents through the food chain and subsequent maternal transfer of contaminants to the developing eggs is thought to be the primary route of selenium exposure to larval fish (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Lemly 1999, Moscatello and others 2006), but direct contact of the fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash constituents in river water and sediments is also a potential risk factor (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Jezierska and others 2009). To address the risk of fly ash from the Kingston spill to the reproductive health of downstream fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA including: (1) a field study of the bioaccumulation of fly ash constituents in fish ovaries and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill; (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (reported in the current technical manuscript); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence; and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers. These fish reproduction and early life-stage studies are being conducted in conjunction with a broader biological monitoring program administered by TVA that includes a field study of the condition of larval fish in the Emory and Clinch Rivers along with assessments of water quality, sediment composition, ecotoxicological studies, terrestrial wildlife studies, and human and ecological risk assessment. Information and data generated from these studies will provide direct input into risk assessment efforts and will also complement and help support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program. Fish eggs, in general, are known to be capable of concentrating heavy metals and other environmental contaminants from water-borne exposures during embryonic development (Jezierska and others 2009), and fathead minnow embryos in particular have been shown to concentrate methylmercury (Devlin 2006) as well as other chemical toxicants. This technical report focuses on the responses of fathead minnow embryos to simple contact exposures to fly ash in laboratory toxicity tests adapted from a standard fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) 7-d embryo-larval survival and teratogenicity test (method 1001.0 in EPA 2002) with mortality, hatching success, and the incidences of developmental abnormalities as measured endpoints.

Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Elmore, Logan R [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

High Performance Homes That Use 50% Less Energy Than the DOE Building America Benchmark Building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes lessons learned from designing, building, and monitoring five affordable, energy-efficient test houses in a single development in the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) service area. This work was done through a collaboration of Habitat for Humanity Loudon County, the US Department of Energy (DOE), TVA, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).The houses were designed by a team led by ORNL and were constructed by Habitat's volunteers in Lenoir City, Tennessee. ZEH5, a two-story house and the last of the five test houses to be built, provided an excellent model for conducting research on affordable high-performance houses. The impressively low energy bills for this house have generated considerable interest from builders and homeowners around the country who wanted a similar home design that could be adapted to different climates. Because a design developed without the project constraints of ZEH5 would have more appeal for the mass market, plans for two houses were developed from ZEH5: a one-story design (ZEH6) and a two-story design (ZEH7). This report focuses on ZEH6, identical to ZEH5 except that the geothermal heat pump is replaced with a SEER 16 air source unit (like that used in ZEH4). The report also contains plans for the ZEH6 house. ZEH5 and ZEH6 both use 50% less energy than the DOE Building America protocol for energyefficient buildings. ZEH5 is a 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2632 ft2 house with a home energy rating system (HERS) index of 43, which qualifies it for federal energy-efficiency incentives (a HERS rating of 0 is a zero-energy house, and a conventional new house would have a HERS rating of 100). This report is intended to help builders and homeowners build similar high-performance houses. Detailed specifications for the envelope and the equipment used in ZEH5 are compared with the Building America Benchmark building, and detailed drawings, specifications, and lessons learned in the construction and analysis of data gleaned from 94 sensors installed in ZEH5 to monitor electric sub-metered usage, temperature and relative humidity, hot water usage, and heat pump operation for 1 year are presented. This information should be particularly useful to those considering structural insulated panel (SIP) walls and roofing; foundation geothermal heat pumps for space heating and cooling; solar water heaters; and roof-mounted, grid-tied photovoltaic systems. The document includes plans for ZEH6 (adapted from ZEH5), a one-story, high-performance house, as well as projections of how the design might perform in five major metropolitan areas across the TVA service territory. The HERS ratings for this all-electric house vary from 36 (Memphis, Tennessee) to 46 (Bristol, Tennessee).

Christian, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) at Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Department of Energy-National Energy Technologies Laboratory (DOE-NETL) are evaluating and demonstrating integration of terrestrial carbon sequestration techniques at a coal-fired electric power plant through the use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system gypsum as a soil amendment and mulch, and coal fly ash pond process water for periodic irrigation. From January to March 2002, the Project Team initiated the construction of a 40 ha Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) near TVA's Paradise Fossil Plant on marginally reclaimed surface coal mine lands in Kentucky. The CCWESTRS is growing commercial grade trees and cover crops and is expected to sequester 1.5-2.0 MT/ha carbon per year over a 20-year period. The concept could be used to meet a portion of the timber industry's needs while simultaneously sequestering carbon in lands which would otherwise remain non-productive. The CCWESTRS includes a constructed wetland to enhance the ability to sequester carbon and to remove any nutrients and metals present in the coal fly ash process water runoff. The CCWESTRS project is a cooperative effort between TVA, EPRI, and DOE-NETL, with a total budget of $1,574,000. The proposed demonstration project began in October 2000 and has continued through December 2005. Additional funding is being sought in order to extend the project. The primary goal of the project is to determine if integrating power plant processes with carbon sequestration techniques will enhance carbon sequestration cost-effectively. This goal is consistent with DOE objectives to provide economically competitive and environmentally safe options to offset projected growth in U.S. baseline emissions of greenhouse gases after 2010, achieve the long-term goal of $10/ton of avoided net costs for carbon sequestration, and provide half of the required reductions in global greenhouse gases by 2025. Other potential benefits of the demonstration include developing a passive technology for water treatment for trace metal and nutrient release reductions, using power plant by-products to improve coal mine land reclamation and carbon sequestration, developing wildlife habitat and green-space around production facilities, generating Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) credits for the use of process water, and producing wood products for use by the lumber and pulp and paper industry. Project activities conducted during the five year project period include: Assessing tree cultivation and other techniques used to sequester carbon; Project site assessment; Greenhouse studies to determine optimum plant species and by-product application; Designing, constructing, operating, monitoring, and evaluating the CCWESTRS system; and Reporting (ongoing). The ability of the system to sequester carbon will be the primary measure of effectiveness, measured by accessing survival and growth response of plants within the CCWESTRS. In addition, costs associated with design, construction, and monitoring will be evaluated and compared to projected benefits of other carbon sequestration technologies. The test plan involves the application of three levels each of two types of power plant by-products--three levels of FGD gypsum mulch, and three levels of ash pond irrigation water. This design produces nine treatment levels which are being tested with two species of hardwood trees (sweet gum and sycamore). The project is examining the effectiveness of applications of 0, 8-cm, and 15-cm thick gypsum mulch layers and 0, 13 cm, and 25 cm of coal fly ash water for irrigation. Each treatment combination is being replicated three times, resulting in a total of 54 treatment plots (3 FGD gypsum levels X 3 irrigation water levels x 2 tree species x 3 replicates). Survival and growth response of plant species in terms of sequestering carbon in plant material and soil will be the primary measure of effectiveness of each treatment. Additionally, the ability of the site soils and unsaturated zone subsurface m

P. Alan Mays; Bert R. Bock; Gregory A. Brodie; L. Suzanne Fisher; J. Devereux Joslin; Donald L. Kachelman; Jimmy J. Maddox; N. S. Nicholas; Larry E. Shelton; Nick Taylor; Mark H. Wolfe; Dennis H. Yankee; John Goodrich-Mahoney

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Solar-Assisted Electric Vehicle Charging Station Interim Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been awarded $6.8 million in the Department of Energy (DOE) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds as part of an overall $114.8 million ECOtality grant with matching funds from regional partners to install 125 solar-assisted Electric Vehicle (EV) charging stations across Knoxville, Nashville, Chattanooga, and Memphis. Significant progress has been made toward completing the scope with the installation of 25 solar-assisted charging stations at ORNL; six stations at Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); and 27 stations at Nissan's Smyrna and Franklin sites, with three more stations under construction at Nissan's new lithium-ion battery plant. Additionally, the procurement process for contracting the installation of 34 stations at Knoxville, the University of Tennessee Knoxville (UTK), and Nashville sites is underway with completion of installation scheduled for early 2012. Progress is also being made on finalizing sites and beginning installations of 30 stations in Nashville, Chattanooga, and Memphis by EPRI and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The solar-assisted EV charging station project has made great strides in fiscal year 2011. A total of 58 solar-assisted EV parking spaces have been commissioned in East and Middle Tennessee, and progress on installing the remaining 67 spaces is well underway. The contract for the 34 stations planned for Knoxville, UTK, and Nashville should be underway in October with completion scheduled for the end of March 2012; the remaining three Nissan stations are under construction and scheduled to be complete in November; and the EPRI/TVA stations for Chattanooga, Vanderbilt, and Memphis are underway and should be complete by the end of March 2012. As additional Nissan LEAFs are being delivered, usage of the charging stations has increased substantially. The project is on course to complete all 125 solar-assisted EV charging stations in time to collect meaningful data by the end of government fiscal year 2012. Lessons learned from the sites completed thus far are being incorporated and are proving to be invaluable in completion of the remaining sites.

Lapsa, Melissa Voss [ORNL; Durfee, Norman [ORNL; Maxey, L Curt [ORNL; Overbey, Randall M [ORNL

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Fate of As, Se, and Hg in a Passive Integrated System for Treatment of Fossil Plant Wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TVA is collaborating with EPRI and DOE to demonstrate a passive treatment system for removing SCR-derived ammonia and trace elements from a coal-fired power plant wastewater stream. The components of the integrated system consist of trickling filters for ammonia oxidation, reaction cells containing zero-valent iron (ZVI) for trace contaminant removal, a settling basin for storage of iron hydroxide floc, and anaerobic vertical-flow wetlands for biological denitrification. The passive integrated treatment system will treat up to 0.25 million gallons per day (gpd) of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) pond effluent, with a configuration requiring only gravity flow to obviate the need for pumps. The design of the system will enable a comparative evaluation of two parallel treatment trains, with and without the ZVI extraction trench and settling/oxidation basin components. One of the main objectives is to gain a better understanding of the chemical transformations that species of trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in passive treatment system components with differing environmental conditions. This progress report details the design criteria for the passive integrated system for treating fossil power plant wastewater as well as performance results from the first several months of operation. Engineering work on the project has been completed, and construction took place during the summer of 2005. Monitoring of the passive treatment system was initiated in October 2005 and continued until May 18 2006. The results to date indicate that the treatment system is effective in reducing levels of nitrogen compounds and trace metals. Concentrations of both ammonia and trace metals were lower than expected in the influent FGD water, and additions to increase these concentrations will be done in the future to further test the removal efficiency of the treatment system. In May 2006, the wetland cells were drained of FGD water, refilled with less toxic ash pond water, and replanted due to low survival rates from the first planting the previous summer. The goals of the TVA-EPRI-DOE collaboration include building a better understanding of the chemical transformations that trace elements such as arsenic, selenium, and mercury undergo as they are treated in a passive treatment system, and to evaluate the performance of a large-scale replicated passive treatment system to provide additional design criteria and economic factors.

Terry Yost; Paul Pier; Gregory Brodie

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor to continue with the project, the Watts Bar Dam Project was canceled and the Exploranium radiation monitors were removed from the doors of Watts Bar Dam in early 2006. The DHS Domestic Nuclear Detection Office decided to proceed with a Pilot building on the ORNL work performed at the TN and SC weigh stations in the highway sector of the Trusted Corridors project and eventually expanded it to other southern states under the name of Southeastern Corridor Pilot Project (SETCP). Many of the Phase I goals were achieved however real-world test data of private watercraft and barges was never obtained.

Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butch massey tva" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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181

Pilot-plant production of ammonium polyphosphate sulfate suspension fertilizers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TVA is developing a process for production of ammonium polyphosphate sulfate (APPS) suspension fertilizer from merchant-grade wet-process phosphoric acid, 93% sulfuric acid, and anhydrous ammonia. The two acids are simultaneously ammoniated in an ''enlarged'' pipecross reactor; the molten APPS is dissolved in water; and the fluid then is cooled to room temperature in an evaporative cooler. Attapulgite clay is mixed into the APPS fluid to prevent solids from settling during shipment, storage, and use. The process is energy efficient in that the hot APPS fluid provides all the heat required to preheat the phosphoric acid and vaporize the ammonia. Satisfactory suspension grades up to 11-30-0-3S can be made with 50% of the P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ present as polyphosphate. The sulfur present in the product should be useful either to reduce sulfur deficiencies in the soil or to provide maintenance dosages of sulfur. The APPS fluid fertilizer can be either applied directly to the soil or used in preparation of mixed suspension products of various ratios. 9 figs., 1 tab.

Mann, H.C.; McGill, K.E.; Holt, M.T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Precipitation of impurities in 9-32-0 grade fluid fertilizers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For several years TVA has been studying production of 9-32-0 ammonium polyphosphate suspension produced from ammoniated merchant-grade wet-process orthophosphoric acid. Suspensions containing polyphosphate have an advantage over those that contain only orthophosphate in that they can be stored satisfactorily at much lower temperature. However, the introduction of polyphosphate (pyrophosphate anion) complicates the precipitation of impurities and has yielded inconsistent storage characteristics in 9-32-0 fluid fertilizers. Fluorine also has been shown to affect suspension fertilizer properties. The viscosity of 13-38-0 orthophosphate suspension fertilizers is affected by the atomic ratios F:(Al + Fe + Mg). Addition of fluorine prevents sludges and precipitates in ammonium polyphosphate fertilizer solutions - the proper amount of fluorine is related to the amount of each of the metallic impurities present and also to the fraction of the phosphate present as pyrophosphate. Incorporation of polyphosphate or fluorine or both has been shown to have positive effects on ammoniated wet-process phosphoric acid (WPPA), but they do not report the solubility relationships of the cation impurities (Fe, Al, Mg, and Ca) with respect to the anion constituents (PO/sub 4/, P/sub 2/O/sub 7/, and F). Therefore, a factorial study was developed to determine the solubility relationships of the precipitated metal impurities encountered in 9-32-0 fluid fertilizers. 10 refs., 1 fig., 20 tabs.

Dillard, E.F.; Scheib, R.M.; Greenwell, B.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Test and evaluation of the Chloride Spegel S1P108/30 electric vehicle battery charger  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chloride Spegel Model S1P108/30 electric vehicle battery charger was tested by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) as an account of work sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Charger input/output voltage, current, and power characteristics and input waveform distortion were measured; and induced electromagnetic interference was evaluated as the charger recharged a lead-acid battery pack. Electrical quantities were measured with precision volt-ampere-watt meters, frequency counters, a digital-storage oscilloscope, and a spectrum analyzer. THe Chloride charger required 8.5 hours to recharge a 216V tubular plate lead-acid battery from 100 percent depth of discharge (DOD). Energy efficiency was 83 percent, specific power was 37.4 W/kg (17.0 W/lb), input current distortion varied from 22.4 to 34.1 percent, and electromagnetic interference was observed on AM radio. Tests were conducted with the battery at initial DOD of 100, 75, 50, and 25 percent. Charge factor was 1.14 from 100-percent DOD, increasing to 1.39 from 25-percent DOD.

Driggans, R.L.; Keller, A.S.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Annual status report on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This eleventh annual status report summarizes activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project undertaken during Fiscal Year (FY) 1989 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies. Project goals for FY 1990 are also presented. An annual report of this type was a statutory requirement through January 1, 1986, pursuant to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law (PL) 95--604. The DOE will continue to submit an annual report through project completion in order to inform the public of yearly project status. Title I of the UMTRCA authorizes the DOE, in cooperation with affected states and Indian tribes within whose boundaries designated uranium processing sites are located, to provide a program of assessment and remedial action at such sites. The purpose of the remedial action is to stabilize and control the tailings and other residual radioactive materials located on the inactive uranium processing sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner and to minimize or eliminate potential radiation health hazards. Commercial and residential properties in the vicinity of designated processing sites that are contaminated with material from the sites, herein referred to as vicinity properties,'' are also eligible for remedial action. Included in the UMTRA Project are 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties located in 10 states, and the vicinity properties associated with Edgemont, South Dakota, an inactive uranium mill currently owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA).

Not Available

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Annual status report on the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fourteenth annual status report for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office summarizes activities of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Surface (UMTRA-Surface) and Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater (UMTRA-Groundwater) Projects undertaken during fiscal year (FY) 1992 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies. Project goals for FY 1993 are also presented. An annual report of this type was a statutory requirement through January 1, 1986, pursuant to the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law (PL) 95-604. The DOE will continue to submit annual reports to DOE-Headquarters, the states, tribes, and local representatives through Project completion in order to inform the public of the yearly Project status. The purpose of the remedial action is to stabilize and control the tailings and other residual radioactive material (RRM) located on the inactive uranium processing sites in a safe and environmentally sound manner, and to minimize or eliminate potential health hazards. Commercial and residential properties near designated processing sites that are contaminated with material from the sites, herein referred to as ``vicinity properties (VP),`` are also eligible for remedial action. Included in the UMTRA Project are 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated VPs located in 10 states, and the VPs associated with the Edgemont, South Dakota, uranium mill currently owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) (Figure A.1, Appendix A).

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Application of the electromagnetic borehole flowmeter and evaluation of previous pumping tests at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Final report, June 15, 1992--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multi-well pumping tests have been concluded at wells MW79, MW108, and PW1 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) to determine the hydraulic properties of the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). Soil cores suggest that the RGA consists of a thin sandy facies (2 to 6 feet) at the top of a thicker (> 10 feet) gravelly facies. Previous analyses have not considered any permeability contrast between the two facies. To assess the accuracy of this assumption, TVA personnel conducted borehole flowmeter tests at wells MW108 and PW1. Well MW79 could not be tested. The high K sand unit is probably 10 times more permeable than comparable zone in the gravelly portion of the RGA. Previous analyses of the three multi-well aquifer tests do not use the same conceptual aquifer model. Data analysis for one pumping test assumed that leakance was significant. Data analysis for another pumping test assumed that a geologic boundary was significant. By collectively analyzing all three tests with the borehole flowmeter results, the inconsistency among the three pumping tests can be explained. Disparity exists because each pumping test had a different placement of observation wells relative to the high K zone delineating by flowmeter testing.

Young, S.C.; Julian, S.C.; Neton, M.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H-CANYON FACILITY: RECOVERY AND DOWN BLEND URANIUM FOR BENEFICIAL USE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For over fifty years, the H Canyon facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has performed remotely operated radiochemical separations of irradiated targets to produce materials for national defense. Although the materials production mission has ended, the facility continues to play an important role in the stabilization and safe disposition of proliferable nuclear materials. As part of the US HEU Disposition Program, SRS has been down blending off-specification (off-spec) HEU to produce LEU since 2003. Off-spec HEU contains fission products not amenable to meeting the American Society for Testing and Material (ASTM) commercial fuel standards prior to purification. This down blended HEU material produced 301 MT of ~5% enriched LEU which has been fabricated into light water reactor fuel being utilized in Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) reactors in Tennessee and Alabama producing economic power. There is still in excess of ~10 MT of off-spec HEU throughout the DOE complex or future foreign and domestic research reactor returns that could be recovered and down blended for beneficial use as either ~5% enriched LEU, or for use in subsequent LEU reactors requiring ~19.75% enriched LEU fuel.

Magoulas, V.

2013-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

188

Secure Information Exchange Gateway for Electric Grid Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major objectives of the SIEGate project were to improve the security posture and minimize the cyber-attack surface of electric utility control centers and to reduce the cost of maintaining control-room-to-control-room information exchange. Major project goals included the design, development, testing, and commercialization of a single security-hardened appliance that could meet industry needs for resisting cyber-attacks while protecting the confidentiality and integrity of a growing volume of real-time information needed to ensure the reliability of the bulk electric system and interoperating with existing data formats and networking technologies. The SIEGate project has achieved its goals and objectives. The SIEGate Design Document, issued in March 2012, presented SIEGate use cases, provided SIEGate requirements, established SIEGate design principles, and prescribed design functionality of SIEGate as well as the components that make up SIEGate. SIEGate Release Version 1.0 was posted in January 2014. Release Version 1.0.83, which was posted on March 28, 2014, fixed many issues discovered by early adopters and added several new features. Release Candidate 1.1, which added additional improvements and bug fixes, was posted in June 2014. SIEGate executables have been downloaded more than 300 times. SIEGate has been tested at PJM, Entergy, TVA, and Southern. Security testing and analysis of SIEGate has been conducted at PNNL and PJM. Alstom has provided a summary of recommended steps for commercialization of the SIEGate Appliance and identified two deployment models with immediate commercial application.

Robertson, F.; Carroll, J.; Sanders, William; Yardley, Timothy; Heine, Erich; Hadley, Mark; McKinnon, David; Motteler, Barbara; Giri, Jay; Walker, William; McCartha, Esrick

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

Alternatives for physically modifying John Sevier detention dam to allow fish passage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies conducted in the vicinity of John Sevier Steam-Electric Plant (JSF) indicated some modification of the fish assemblage from that expected. By blocking movements of fish between Cherokee Reservoir and the upper Holston River, John Sevier detention dam has affected the fisheries in both systems. Providing passage for river-spawning fish at John Sevier detention dam might improve fish communities and fisheries in Cherokee Reservoir as well as upstream habitats. This would include enhanced reproductive success of river-spawning species found in Cherokee Reservoir (e.g., white bass and possibly striped bass and paddlefish) and repopulation of John Sevier Reservoir and the upper Holston River by several species presently found only downstream of the detention dam. TVA has identified and studied several alternatives that alone or in combination might improve the fisheries. Cost estimates were developed for three alternatives. These three alternatives with cost estimates are discussed briefly along with two other alternatives for which cost estimates have not been made. Merits of the three alternatives which have at least some possibility to improve migratory fish stocks are discussed in detail. 5 references.

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Investigations of the cause of fishkills in fish-rearing facilities in Raven Fork watershed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation was undertaken to determine the cause of fishkills in trout-rearing facilities located adjacent to Raven Fork Creek within the Cherokee Indian Reservation in North Carolina. Approximately 50,000 rainbow trout were lost at the Blankenship trout farm-a commercial facility-following eight storm events between March 31 and December 2, 1981. In addition, 524 trophy-size trout died in three ponds operated by the Cherokee tribe for stocking reservation streams. It was found fishkills in the trout farm could be prevented by adding lime to water from the creek as it was pumped into the facility; this strengthened the assumption acidity (H/sup +/) was responsible for the fishkills. Mortality of trophy trout was stopped by routing water from nearby springs to the ponds during and following rain events. Because of concern that these fishkills might be caused by acid rain, TVA was requested by the Cherokee tribe to assist in determining the cause. Limited studies were conducted during March through August 1982 to test two hypotheses: (1) concentrations of H/sup +/ and soluble aluminum in Raven Fork following storm events were high enough to kill rainbow trout and (2) atmospheric deposition was a greater source of stream H/sup +/ than acid-producing geologic formations or the forest soils.

Jones, H.C.; Noggle, J.C.; Young, R.C.; Kelly, J.M.; Olem, H.; Ruane, R.J.; Pasch, R.W.; Hyfantis, G.J.; Parkhurst, W.J.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Low-Cost, Robust, Threat-Aware Wireless Sensor Network for Assuring the Nation's Energy Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eaton, in partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has completed a project that applies a combination of wireless sensor network (WSN) technology, anticipatory theory, and a near-term value proposition based on diagnostics and process uptime to ensure the security and reliability of critical electrical power infrastructure. Representatives of several Eaton business units have been engaged to ensure a viable commercialization plan. Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), American Electric Power (AEP), PEPCO, and Commonwealth Edison were recruited as partners to confirm and refine the requirements definition from the perspective of the utilities that actually operate the facilities to be protected. Those utilities have cooperated with on-site field tests as the project proceeds. Accomplishments of this project included: (1) the design, modeling, and simulation of the anticipatory wireless sensor network (A-WSN) that will be used to gather field information for the anticipatory application, (2) the design and implementation of hardware and software prototypes for laboratory and field experimentation, (3) stack and application integration, (4) develop installation and test plan, and (5) refinement of the commercialization plan.

Carols H. Rentel

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Water quality investigation of Kingston Fossil Plant dry ash stacking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changing to a dry ash disposal systems at Kingston Fossil Plant (KFP) raises several water quality issues. The first is that removing the fly ash from the ash pond could alter the characteristics of the ash pond discharge to the river. The second concerns proper disposal of the runoff and possibly leachate from the dry ash stack. The third is that dry ash stacking might change the potential for groundwater contamination at the KFP. This report addresses each of these issues. The effects on the ash pond and its discharge are described first. The report is intended to provide reference material to TVA staff in preparation of environmental review documents for new ash disposal areas at Kingston. Although the investigation was directed toward analysis of dry stacking, considerations for other disposal options are also discussed. This report was reviewed in draft form under the title Assessment of Kingston Fossil Plant Dry Ash Stacking on the Ash Pond and Groundwater Quality.'' 11 refs., 3 figs., 18 tabs.

Bohac, C.E.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Relationship between selenium body burdens and tissue concentrations in fish exposed to coal ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston spill site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 2008, 4.1 million m3 of coal ash were released into the Emory and Clinch Rivers by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant. Coal ash contains several contaminants, including the bioaccumulative metalloid selenium (Se). Because Se is predominantly accumulated in aquatic organisms through dietary, rather than aqueous exposure, tissue-based toxicity thresholds for Se are currently being considered. The proposed threshold concentrations range between 4-9 g/g Se (dry wt.) in whole body fish, with a proposed fillet threshold of 11.8 g/g. In the present study we examined the spatial and temporal trends in Se bioaccumulation and examined the relationship between the Se content in fillets and in whole bodies of fish collected around the Kingston spill site to determine whether Se bioaccumulation was a significant concern at the ash spill site. While Se concentrations in fish (whole bodies and fillets) were elevated at sampling locations affected by the Kingston ash spill relative to reference locations, concentrations do not appear to be above risk thresholds and have not been increasing over the five year period since the spill. Our results are not only relevant to guiding the human health and ecological risk assessments at the Kingston ash spill site, but because of current national discussions on appropriate guidelines for Se in fish as well for the disposal of coal combustion wastes, our results are also relevant to the general understanding of Se bioaccumulation in contaminated water bodies.

Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL; Jett, Robert T [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Carriker, Neil [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA); Morris, Jesse G [ORNL; Gable, Jennifer [Environmental Standards, Inc.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Indoor nitrogen dioxide in five Chattangooga, Tennessee public housing developments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes an indoor nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) sampling study conducted during January through March of 1987 in five Chattanooga public housing developments. The origins of this study date to the summer of 1983 when the Piney Woods Community Organization (a citizens action group) expressed concern about toxic industrial air pollution and the effects it might have on their community. In response to these concerns, the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau (Bureau) requested assistance from the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (TDHE) in conducting a community health survey and assistance from the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in conducting a community air quality measurement program. The TDHE community health study did not find any significant differences between the mortality statistics for the Piney Woods community and a demographically similar control group. However, a health survey revealed that Piney Woods residents did not have a statistically significant higher self-reported prevalence of cough, wheezing, phlegm, breathlessness, colds, and respiratory illness.

Parkhurst, W.J.; Harper, J.P. (Tennessee Valley Authority (US)); Spengler, J.D.; Fraumeni, L.P.; Majahad, A.M. (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA (US)); Cropp, J.W. (Chattanooga-Hamilton County Air Pollution Control Bureau, Chattanooga, TN (US))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

State of the art of pressurized fluidized bed combustion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared at the request of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) to clarify the development status of the pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC) and to place in perspective the problems which are yet to be solved before commercialization of the concept is practical. This report, in essence, supersedes the interim report published in 1979, Assessment of the State of the Art of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Systems. A brief overview of the PFBC concept is included citing potential advantages and disadvantages relative to atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) and conventional pulverized coal plants. A survey of existing and developing PFBC experimental facilities is presented in some detail which includes the major accomplishments at the respective facilities. Recent data on plant emissions, turbine/gas cleanup systems, and overall efficiency are provided. Findings of several design studies are also discussed. The results of recent gas turbine and cascade tests have been encouraging although the full assessment of the accomplishments have not been made. The delay in construction of the Grimethorpe plant causes further delay in proof-testing full-size, rotating turbomachinery. Several parameters are recommended for further assessment in design studies including: (1) effect of turbine life on cost of power; and (2) effect of reduced gas turbine inlet temperature and pressure on cost of power.

Graves, R.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

U.S. Energy Flow -- 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy consumption in 1995 increased slightly for the fifth year in a row (from 89 to 91 quadrillion [1015Btu). U.S. economic activity slowed from the fast-paced recovery of 1994, even with the continued low unemployment rates and low inflation rates. The annual increase in U.S. real GDP dropped to 4.6% from 1994?s increase of 5.8%. Energy consumption in all major end-use sectors surpassed the record-breaking highs achieved in 1994, with the largest gains (2.5%) occurring in the residential/commercial sector. Crude oil imports decreased for the first time this decade. There was also a decline in domestic oil production. Venezuela replaced Saudi Arabia as the principal supplier of imported oil. Imports of natural gas, mainly from Canada, continued to increase. The demand for natural gas reached a level not seen since the peak levels of the early 1970s and the demand was met by a slight increase in both natural gas production and imports. Electric utilities had the largest percentage increase of n.atural gas consumption, a climb of 7% above 1994 levels. Although coal production decreased, coal exports continued to make a comeback after 3 years of decline. Coal once again become the primary U.S. energy export. Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) consists of two phases. Phase I (in effect as of January 1, 1995) set emission restrictions on 110 mostly coal-burning plants in the eastern and midwestem United States. Phase II, planned to begin in the year 2000, places additional emission restrictions on about 1,000 electric plants. As of January 1, 1995, the reformulated gasoline program, also part of the CAAA90, was finally initiated. As a result, this cleaner-burning fuel was made available in areas of the United States that failed to meet the Environmental Protection Agency? s (EPA?s) ozone standards. In 1995, reformulated gasoline represented around 28% of total gasoline sales in the United States. The last commercial nuclear power plant under construction in the United States came on line in 1995. The Tennessee Valley Authority? s (TVA) Watts Bar-l received a low-power operating license from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The construction permit was granted in 1972. Also, TVA canceled plans to complete construction of three other nuclear plants. In 1995, federal and state governments took steps to deregulate and restructure the electric power industry. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) unanimously approved a proposal to require utilities to open their electric transmission system to competition from wholesale electricity suppliers. California has been at the forefront in the restructuring of the electric utility industry. Plans authorized by the California Public Utility Commission prepare for a free market in electricity to be established by 1998. In 1990, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began reporting statistics on renewable energy consumption. The types and amounts of renewable energy consumed vary by end-use sector, electric utilities and the industrial sector being the primary consumers since 1990. Renewable energy provided 6.83 quads (7.6I) of the total energy consumed in the United States in 1995, compared to 7.1% in 1994. Increasing concern over the emission of greenhouse gases has resulted in exhaustive analysis of U.S. carbon emissions from energy use. Emissions in the early 1990s have already exceeded those projected by the Clinton Administration? s Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP) released in 1994 that was developed to stabilize U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by the year 2000.

Miller, H.; Mui, N.; Pasternak, A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Evaluating the Effects of the Kingston Fly Ash Release on Fish Reproduction: Spring 2009 - 2010 Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash at the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits from the spill extended 4 miles upstream of the facility to Emory River mile 6 and downstream to Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}8.5 miles downstream of the confluence of the Emory River with the Clinch River, and {approx}4 miles downstream of the confluence of the Clinch River with the Tennessee River). A byproduct of coal combustion, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be harmful to biological systems. The ecological effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to come from elevated levels of certain metals in the ash, particularly selenium, on fish reproduction and fish early life stages (Lemly 1993; Besser and others 1996). The ovaries of adult female fish in a lake contaminated by coal ash were reported to have an increased frequency of atretic oocytes (dead or damaged immature eggs) and reductions in the overall numbers of developing oocytes (Sorensen 1988) associated with elevated body burdens of selenium. Larval fish exposed to selenium through maternal transfer of contaminants to developing eggs in either contaminated bodies of water (Lemly 1999) or in experimental laboratory exposures (Woock and others 1987, Jezierska and others 2009) have significantly increased incidences of developmental abnormalities. Contact of fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash in water and sediments may also pose an additional risk to the early life stages of exposed fish populations through direct uptake of metals and other ash constituents (Jezierska and others 2009). The establishment and maintenance of fish populations is intimately associated with the ability of individuals within a population to reproduce. Reproduction is thus generally considered to be the most critical life function affected by environmental contamination. From a regulatory perspective, the issue of potential contaminant-related effects on fish reproduction from the Kingston fly ash spill has particular significance because the growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life is a specific classified use of the affected river systems. To address the potential effects of fly ash from the Kingston spill on the reproductive health of exposed fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA that include: (1) a combined field study of metal bioaccumulation in ovaries and other fish tissues (Adams and others 2012) and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill (the current report); (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (Greeley and others 2012); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence (unpublished); and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers (unpublished). The current report focuses on the reproductive condition of adult female fish in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers influenced by the fly ash spill at the beginning of the spring 2009 breeding season - the first breeding season immediately following the fly ash release - and during the subsequent spring 2010 breeding season. Data generated from this and related reproductive/early life stage studies provide direct input to ecological risk assessment efforts and complement and support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program associated with the fly ash spill.

Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Adams, Marshall [ORNL; McCracken, Kitty [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Bioaccumulation Studies Associated with the Kingston Fly Ash Spill, Spring 2009 - Fall 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 2008, an ash dike at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Kingston Fossil Plant ruptured, releasing over one billion gallons of coal fly ash into the Emory and Clinch Rivers. Coal fly ash may contain several contaminants of concern, but of these selenium (Se) and arsenic (As) have been highlighted because of their toxicity and tendency to bioaccumulate in aquatic food chains. To assess the potential impact of the spilled fly ash on humans and the environment, a comprehensive biological and environmental monitoring program was established, for which resident aquatic organisms (among other sample media) are collected to determine contaminant exposure and evaluate the risk to humans and wildlife. Studies on bioaccumulation and fish health are major components of the TVA Biological Monitoring Program for the Kingston fly ash project. These studies were initiated in early Spring 2009 for the purposes of: (1) documenting the levels of fly ash-associated metals in various tissues of representative sentinel fish species in the area of the fly ash spill, (2) determining if exposure to fly ash-associated metals causes short, intermediate, or long-term health effects on these sentinel fish species, (3) assessing if there are causal relationships between exposure (to metals) and effects on fish, (4) evaluating, along with information regarding other ecological and physicochemical studies, the nature and route of contaminant transfer though food chains into higher level consumers, (5) providing important information for the Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) for the Kingston fly ash project, and (6) serving as an important technology transfer or model study focused on how to best evaluate the environmental effects of fly ash, not only at the Kingston site, but also at sites on other aquatic systems where coal-fired generating stations are located. This report summarizes the bioaccumulation results from the first two years of study after the fly ash spill, including four seasonal collections: Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, and Fall 2010. Both the Spring and Fall studies have focused on 3-4 sentinel fish species that represent different feeding habits, behaviors, and home ranges. In addition to bioaccumulation studies, the Spring investigations also included evaluation of fish health and reproductive integrity on the same fish used for bioaccumulation. Two associated reports present the fish health (Adams et al 2012) and reproductive studies (Greeley et al 2012) conducted in 2009 and 2010. The fish health study conducted in conjunction with the bioaccumulation and reproductive study is critical for assessing and evaluating possible causal relationships between contaminant exposure (bioaccumulation) and the response of fish to exposure as reflected by the various measurements of fish health. This report emphasizes evaluation of arsenic and selenium bioaccumulation in fish and consists of four related studies (Sections 2-5) including, (1) bioaccumulation in liver and ovaries, (2) bioaccumulation in whole body gizzard shad (Dorosoma cepedianum), (3) bioaccumulation in muscle tissue or fillets, and (4) a reconstruction analysis which establishes the relationship between selenium in muscle tissue and that of the whole body of bluegill (Lepomis machrochirus). Metals other than arsenic and selenium are evaluated separately in Section 6. This report focuses on selenium and arsenic for the following reasons: (1) based on baseline studies conducted in early 2009 in the Emory and Clinch River, only two potentially fly-ash related metals, selenium and arsenic, appeared to be elevated above background or reference levels, (2) selenium and arsenic are two of the metals in coal ash that are known to bioaccumulate and cause toxicity in wildlife, and (3) based on bioaccumulation studies of bluegill and carp (Cyprinus carpio) in the Stilling Pond during Spring 2009, which would represent a worst case situation for metal bioaccumulation, selenium and arsenic were the only two metals consistently elevated above background levels in fish. E

Adams, Marshall [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Fortner, Allison M [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Analysis of Unit-Level Changes in Operations with Increased SPP Wind from EPRI/LCG Balancing Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind power development in the United States is outpacing previous estimates for many regions, particularly those with good wind resources. The pace of wind power deployment may soon outstrip regional capabilities to provide transmission and integration services to achieve the most economic power system operation. Conversely, regions such as the Southeastern United States do not have good wind resources and will have difficulty meeting proposed federal Renewable Portfolio Standards with local supply. There is a growing need to explore innovative solutions for collaborating between regions to achieve the least cost solution for meeting such a renewable energy mandate. The Department of Energy funded the project 'Integrating Midwest Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets' to be led by EPRI in coordination with the main authorities for the regions: SPP, Entergy, TVA, Southern Company and OPC. EPRI utilized several subcontractors for the project including LCG, the developers of the model UPLAN. The study aims to evaluate the operating cost benefits of coordination of scheduling and balancing for Southwest Power Pool (SPP) wind transfers to Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) Balancing Authorities (BAs). The primary objective of this project is to analyze the benefits of regional cooperation for integrating mid-western wind energy into southeast electricity markets. Scenarios were defined, modeled and investigated to address production variability and uncertainty and the associated balancing of large quantities of wind power in SPP and delivery to energy markets in the southern regions of the SERC. DOE funded Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide additional support to the project, including a review of results and any side analysis that may provide additional insight. This report is a unit-by-unit analysis of changes in operations due to the different scenarios used in the overall study. It focuses on the change in capacity factors and the number of start-ups required for each unit since those criteria summarize key aspects of plant operations, how often are they called upon and how much do they operate. The primary analysis of the overall project is based on security-constrained unit commitment (SCUC) and economic dispatch (SCED) simulations of the SPP-SERC regions as modeled for the year 2022. The SCUC/SCED models utilized for the project were developed through extensive consultation with the project utility partners, to ensure the various regions and operational practices are represented as best as possible in the model. SPP, Entergy, Oglethorpe Power Company (OPC), Southern Company, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) actively participated in the project providing input data for the models and review of simulation results and conclusions. While other SERC utility systems are modeled, the listed SERC utilities were explicitly included as active participants in the project due to the size of their load and relative proximity to SPP for importing wind energy.

Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Damodar Valley Corporation, Chandrapura Unit 2 Thermal Power Station Residual Life Assessment Summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The BHEL/NTPC/PFC/TVA teams assembled at the DVC`s Chadrapura station on July 19, 1994, to assess the remaining life of Unit 2. The workscope was expanded to include major plant systems that impact the unit`s ability to sustain generation at 140 MW (Units 1-3 have operated at average rating of about 90 MW). Assessment was completed Aug. 19, 1994. Boiler pressure parts are in excellent condition except for damage to primary superheater header/stub tubes and economizer inlet header stub tubes. The turbine steam path is in good condition except for damage to LP blading; the spar rotor steam path is in better condition and is recommended for Unit 2. Nozzle box struts are severely cracked from the flame outs; the cracks should not be repaired. HP/IP rotor has surface cracks at several places along the steam seal areas; these cracks are shallow and should be machined out. Detailed component damage assessments for above damaged components have been done. The turbine auxiliary systems have been evaluated; cooling tower fouling/blockage is the root cause for the high turbine back pressure. The fuel processing system is one of the primary root causes for limiting unit capacity. The main steam and hot reheat piping systems were conservatively designed and have at least 30 years left;deficiencies needing resolution include restoration of insulation, replacement of 6 deformed hanger clamp/bolts, and adjustment of a few hanger settings. The cold reheat piping system is generally in good condition; some areas should be re-insulated and the rigid support clamps/bolts should be examined. The turbine extraction piping system supports all appeared to be functioning normally.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Inorganic soil and groundwater chemistry near Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Near-surface soils, boreholes, and sediments near the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) were sampled in 1989-91 as were monitoring wells, TVA wells, and privately-owned wells. Most wells were sampled two or three times. The resulting chemical analyses have been published in previous reports and have been previously described (CH2M HILL 1991, 1992; Clausen et al. 1992). The two reports by CH2M HILL are controversial, however, because, the concentrations of some constituents were reported to exceed background levels or drinking water standards and because both on-site (within the perimeter fence at PGDP) and off-site pollution was reported to have occurred. The groundwater samples upon which these interpretations were based may not be representative, however. The CH2M HILL findings are discussed in the report. The purpose of this report is to characterize the inorganic chemistry of groundwater and soils near PGDP, using data from the CH2M HILL reports (1991, 1992), and to determine whether or not any contamination has occurred. The scope is limited to analysis and interpretation of data in the CH2M HILL reports because previous interpretations of these data may not be valid, because samples were collected in a relatively short period of time at several hundred locations, and because the chemical analyses are nearly complete. Recent water samples from the same wells were not considered because the characterization of inorganic chemistry for groundwater and soil requirements only one representative sample and an accurate analysis from each location.

Moore, G.K. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

How can energy-efficient structures compete in an inefficient energy market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The only way resources can be efficiently allocated in our market system is if prices of resources, goods, and services properly reflect their true value to society. However, because of (a) imperfections in the pricing mechanisms that currently influence private-sector decision making; (b) the difference in planning horizons between individuals and government; and (c) the external benefits that would accrue to society from energy-conscious decision making by individuals, it is apparent that there exists a substantial underinvestment in advanced-conservation and renewable-resource building technologies. Even if domestic energy prices were deregulated to reflect world market prices (now determined by OPEC) it is likely that underinvestment in energy-conscious design would still occur. For that reason, the only way that energy-conscious design will be implemented to the extent warranted is if a concerted political commitment is made to such a program at the Federal, state, and local levels. Such a commitment is not without precedent. The experiences of Davis and San Diego, California, and the TVA exemplify the extent to which energy conservation and renewable-resource development can be carried out if political leadership and support is established. It is known that technologies and design solutions for energy-efficient buildings are available today and are cost-effective. What remains to be seen is whether the political leadership of the United States will fully recognize the sensibility of a concerted conservation and renewable-energy-resource program for buildings as opposed to continued attempts at increasing energy production to supply an energy-inefficient-building inventory. 16 references.

Noll, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

SASSE MODELING OF A URANIUM MOLYBDENUM SEPARATION FLOWSHEET  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

H-Canyon Engineering (HCE) is evaluating the feasibility of processing material from the Super Kukla Prompt Burst Reactor, which operated at the Nevada Test Site from 1964 to 1978. This material is comprised of 90 wt % uranium (U) (at approximately 20% 235U enrichment) alloyed with 10 wt % molybdenum (Mo). The objective is to dissolve the material in nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) in the H-Canyon dissolvers and then to process the dissolved material through H-Canyon First and Second Cycle solvent extraction. The U product from Second Cycle will be sent to the highly enriched uranium (HEU) blend down program. In the blend down program, enriched U from the 1EU product stream will be blended with natural U at a ratio of 1 part enriched U per 3.5 parts natural U to meet a reactor fuel specification of 4.95% 235U before being shipped for use by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in its nuclear plants. The TVA specification calls for <200 mg Mo/g U (200 ppm). Since natural U has about 10 mg Mo/g U, the required purity of the 1EU product prior to blending is about 800 mg Mo/g U, allowing for uncertainties. HCE requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) define a flowsheet for the safe and efficient processing of the U-10Mo material. This report presents a computational model of the solvent extraction portion of the proposed flowsheet. The two main objectives of the computational model are to demonstrate that the Mo impurity requirement can be met and to show that the solvent feed rates in the proposed flowsheet, in particular to 1A and 1D Banks, are adequate to prevent refluxing of U and thereby ensure nuclear criticality safety. SASSE (Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction), a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet that supports Argonne National Laboratory's proprietary AMUSE (Argonne Model for Universal Solvent Extraction) code, was selected to model the U/Mo separation flowsheet. SASSE spreadsheet models of H-Canyon First and Second Cycle solvent extraction show that a standard unirradiated fuel flowsheet is capable of separating U from Mo in dissolved solutions of a U/Mo alloy. The standard unirradiated fuel flowsheet is used, except for increases in solvent feed rates to prevent U refluxing and thereby ensure nuclear criticality safety and substitution of higher HNO{sub 3} concentrations for aluminum nitrate (Al(NO{sub 3})){sub 3} in the feed to 1A Bank. (Unlike Savanah River Site (SRS) fuels, the U/Mo material contains no aluminum (Al). As a result, higher HNO3 concentrations are required in the 1AF to provide the necessary salting.) The TVA limit for the final blended product is 200 {micro}g Mo/g U, which translates to approximately 800 mg Mo/g U for the Second Cycle product solution. SASSE calculations give a Mo impurity level of 4 {micro}g Mo/g U in the Second Cycle product solution, conservatively based on Mo organic-to-aqueous distributions measured during minibank testing for previous processing of Piqua reactor fuel. The calculated impurity level is slightly more than two orders of magnitude lower than the required level. The Piqua feed solution contained a significant concentration of Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, which is not present in the feed solution for the proposed flowsheet. Measured distribution data indicate that, without Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} or other salting agents present, Mo extracts into the organic phase to a much lesser extent, so that the overall U/Mo separation is better and the Mo impurities in the Second Cycle product drop to negligible concentrations. The 1DF U concentration of 20 g/L specified by the proposed flowsheet requires an increased 1DX organic feed rate to satisfy H-Canyon Double Contingency Analysis (DCA) guidelines for the prevention of U refluxing. The ranges for the 1AX, 1BS, and 1DX organic flow rates in the proposed flowsheet are set so that the limiting ratios of organic/aqueous flow rates exactly meet the minimum values specified by the DCA.

Laurinat, J

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

EVALUATION OF FLOWSHEET CHANGES FOR THE HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM BLENDDOWN PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

H Canyon is considering a flowsheet change for Plutonium (Pu) Contaminated Scrap (PuCS) material. The proposed change is to route dissolved PuCS material directly to a uranium (U) storage tank. As a result, the PuCS solution will bypass Head End and First U Cycle, and will be purified by solvent extraction in Second U Cycle. The PuCS solution contains appreciable amounts of boron (B) and fluoride (F{sup -}), which are currently at trace levels in the U storage tank. Though unlikely, if the B concentration in the U storage tank were to reach 1.8 g B/g U, the entire contents of the U storage tank would likely require a second pass through Second U Cycle to provide sufficient decontamination to meet the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Blend Grade Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) specification for B, which is 30 {micro}g/g U. In addition, Second U Cycle is expected to provide sufficient decontamination of F{sup -} and Pu regardless of the amount of PuCS solution sent to the storage tank. Though aluminum (Al) is not present in the PuCS solution, B can be credited as a complexant of F{sup -}. Both stability constants from the literature and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) corrosion studies were documented to demonstrate that B complexation of F{sup -} in nitric acid solutions is sufficient to prevent excessive corrosion. Though B and Al complex F{sup -} to a similar degree, neither completely eliminates the presence of free F{sup -} in solution. Therefore, a limited amount of corrosion is expected even with complexed F{sup -} solutions. Tanks maintained at ambient temperature are not expected to experience significant corrosion. However, the Low Activity Waste (LAW) evaporators may be subjected to a corrosion rate of about 25 mils per year (mpy) as they reach their highest F{sup -} concentrations. The feed adjustment evaporator would only be subjected to the corrosion rate of about 25 mpy in the latter stages of the PuCS campaign. An issue that must be addressed as part of the proposed PuCS flowsheet change is that B has limited solubility in concentrated nitric acid solutions. As the proposed PuCS campaign progresses, the B concentration will increase in the U storage tank, in Second U Cycle feed, and in the 1DW stream sent to the LAW evaporators. Limitations on the B concentration in the LAW evaporators will be needed to prevent formation of boron-containing solids.

Crowder, M.; Rudisill, T.; Laurinat, J.; Mickalonis, J.

2007-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

205

Site Characterization Report ORGDP Diffusion Facilities Permanent Shutdown K-700 Power House and K-27 Switch Yard/Switch House  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The K-700 Power House area, initially built to supply power to the K-25 gaseous diffusion plant was shutdown and disassembled in the 1960s. This shutdown was initiated by TVA supplying economical power to the diffusion plant complex. As a result of world wide over production of enriched, reactor grade U{sup 235}, the K-27 switch yard and switch house area was placed in standby in 1985. Subsequently, as the future production requirements decreased, the cost of production increased and the separation technologies for other processes improved, the facility was permanently shutdown in December, 1987. This Site Characterization Report is a part of the FY-88 engineering Feasibility Study for placing ORGDP Gaseous Diffusion Process facilities in 'Permanent Shutdown'. It is sponsored by the Department of Energy through Virgil Lowery of Headquarters--Enrichment and through Don Cox of ORO--Enrichment Operations. The primary purpose of these building or site characterization reports is to document, quantify, and map the following potential problems: Asbestos; PCB containing fluids; Oils, coolants, and chemicals; and External contamination. With the documented quantification of the concerns (problems) the Engineering Feasibility Study will then proceed with examining the potential solutions. For this study, permanent shutdown is defined as the securing and/or conditioning of each facility to provide 20 years of safe service with minimal expenditures and, where feasible, also serving DOE's needs for long-term warehousing or other such low-risk use. The K-700 power house series of buildings were either masonry construction or a mix of masonry and wood. The power generating equipment was removed and sold as salvage in the mid 1960s but the buildings and auxiliary equipment were left intact. The nine ancillary buildings in the power house area use early in the Manhattan Project for special research projects, were left intact minus the original special equipment. During the late 1960s and 1970s, some of the abandoned buildings were used for offices, special projects, and storage. Some of the remaining electrical transformers contain PCBs in concentrations less than 500 ppm. Many of the steam and hot water pipes in the buildings are insulated with asbestos insulation, but none of the equipment or buildings have high counts of surface radioactive contamination. The general conditions of the buildings are from fair to poor. Many should be boarded-up to prevent personnel entry and in some cases demolitions would be the safer alternative.

Thomas R.J., Blanchard R.D.

1988-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

206

Campbell Creek Research Homes FY 2012 Annual Performance Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Campbell Creek project is funded and managed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Technology Innovation, Energy Efficiency, Power Delivery & and Utilization Office. Technical support is provided under contract by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Electric Power Research Institute.The project was designed to determine the relative energy efficiency of typical new home construction, energy efficiency retrofitting of existing homes, and high -performance new homes built from the ground up for energy efficiency. This project will compare three houses that represented the current construction practice as a base case (Builder House CC1); a modified house that could represent a major energy- efficient retrofit (Retrofit House CC2); and a house constructed from the ground up to be a high- performance home (High Performance House CC3). In order tTo enablehave a valid comparison, it was necessary to simulate occupancy in all three houses and heavily monitor the structural components and the energy usage by component. All three houses are two story, slab on grade, framed construction. CC1 and CC2 are approximately 2,400 square feet2. CC3 has a pantry option, that is primarily used as a mechanical equipment room, that adds approximately 100 square feet2. All three houses are all-electric (with the exception of a gas log fireplace that is not used during the testing), and use air-source heat pumps for heating and cooling. The three homes are located in Knoxville in the Campbell Creek Subdivision. CC1 and CC2 are next door to each other and CC3 is across the street and a couple of houses down. The energy data collected will be used to determine the benefits of retrofit packages and high -performance new home packages. There are over 300 channels of continuous energy performance and thermal comfort data collection in the houses (100 for each house). The data will also be used to evaluate the impact of energy -efficient upgrades ton the envelope, mechanical equipment, or demand -response options. Each retrofit will be evaluated incrementally, by both short -term measurements and computer modeling, using a calibrated model. This report is intended to document the comprehensive testing, data analysis, research, and findings within the January 2011 through October 2012 timeframe at the Campbell Creek research houses. The following sections will provide an in-depth assessment of the technology progression in each of the three research houses. A detailed assessment and evaluation of the energy performance of technologies tested will also be provided. Finally, lessons learned and concluding remarks will be highlighted.

Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Khowailed, Gannate A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period October 1, 2001 through March 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub X} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. This is the fifth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During the previous (fourth) period, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant) and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (at both Gavin and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub X} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO{sub 3} removal results were presented in the previous semi-annual technical progress report (April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001). During the current reporting period, additional balance of plant impact information was determined for one of the two tests. These additional balance-of-plant results are presented and discussed in this report. There was no other technical progress to report, because all planned testing as part of this project has been completed.

Gary M. Blythe

2002-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

208

FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. During the current period, American Electric Power (AEP) joined the project as an additional co-funder and as a provider of a host site for testing. This is the fourth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Station. These tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Station), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Station and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70 to 75% sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Station, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. Balance of plant impacts, primarily on the ESP particulate control device, were also determined during both tests. These results are presented and discussed in this report.

Gary M. Blythe

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

209

Compatibility Study of Protective Relaying in a Grid-Connected Fuel Cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 200-kW fuel cell produced by International Fuel Cells (IFC), a United Technologies Company, began operation at the National Transportation Research Center (NTRC) in early June 2003. The NTRC is a joint Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) and University of Tennessee research facility located in Knoxville, Tennessee. This research activity investigated the protective relaying functions of this fully commercialized fuel cell power plant, which uses ''synthesized'' protective relays. The project's goal is to characterize the compatibility between the fuel cell's interconnection protection system and the local distribution system or electric power system (EPS). ORNL, with assistance from the Electric Power Research Institute-Power Electronics Applications Center (EPRI-PEAC) in Knoxville, Tennessee, monitored and characterized the system compatibility over a period of 6 months. Distribution utility engineers are distrustful of or simply uncomfortable with the protective relaying and hardware provided as part of distributed generation (DG) plants. Part of this mistrust is due to the fact that utilities generally rely on hardware from certain manufacturers whose reliability is well established based on performance over many years or even decades. Another source of concern is the fact that fuel cells and other types of DG do not use conventional relays but, instead, the protective functions of conventional relays are simulated by digital circuits in the distributed generator's grid interface control unit. Furthermore, the testing and validation of internal protection circuits of DG are difficult to accomplish and can be changed by the vendor at any time. This study investigated and documented the safety and protective relaying present in the IFC fuel cell, collected data on the operation of the fuel cell, recorded event data during EPS disturbances, and assessed the compatibility of the synthesized protective circuits and the local distribution system. The project also addressed other important and timely issues. For instance, the study includes an evaluation of the effectiveness of the fuel cell's synthesized relay protection scheme relative to the recently issued IEEE 1547 interconnection standard. Together, these activities should serve to reduce the number of unknowns pertaining to unconventional protective circuits, to the benefit of DG manufacturers, vendors, prospective and current users of DG, and electricity suppliers/distributors. Although more grid-connect fuel cell interruptions were encountered in this study than originally anticipated, and the investigation and findings became quite complex, every effort was made to clearly summarize the interconnection causes and issues throughout the report and especially in the summary found in Sect. 4. ORNL's funding of this study is sponsored equally by (1) the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Distributed Energy Resources and (2) the Distributed Generation Technologies program of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA).

Staunton, R.H.

2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

f8nK 2f8nH 2f8nF 2f8nB 2f8nD 1p3iG 1p3aC 1p3aF 1p3aD 1p3oB 1p3bG 1p3pG 1p3fD 1p34B 1p3oF 1p3iD 1p3gD 1p3oD 1p3bH 1p3iC 1p3lH 1p34C 1p3bD 1p3kB 1p3pF 1p3mH 1p3lB 1p34H 1p3mC 1p3gG 1p3mD 1p34D 1p3kD 1p3oG 1p3lF 1p3bC 1p3kH 1p3pH 1p3iH 1p3pB 1p3gH 1p3kC... 02N 2o61A 2o61B 2as5N 2as5M 1gjiA 1gjiB 1nfkA 1nfkB 1s9kC 1owrP 1owrQ 1owrM 1owrN 1svcP 1le5A 1leiB 1le5E 1le9E 1le5B 1le9F 1le5F 1le9B 1le9A 1leiA DNA_pol_lambd_f 3c5fB 3c5gB 3c5fA 3c5gA 1huoB 1huoA 1huzA 1huzB 2i9gA 1tv9A 1tvaA 2fmsA 2fmpA 2fmqA 1...

Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Cindy Zhang, Xiao Y; Dickman, Christopher TD; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa C; Millen, Kathleen J; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Ramos, Oscar HP; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda SC; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Brnice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma DC; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrire, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam WZ; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter J; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Hligon, Christophe

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

211

Local Dynamic Reactive Power for Correction of System Voltage Problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distribution systems are experiencing outages due to a phenomenon known as local voltage collapse. Local voltage collapse is occurring in part because modern air conditioner compressor motors are much more susceptible to stalling during a voltage dip than older motors. These motors can stall in less than 3 cycles (.05s) when a fault, such as on the sub-transmission system, causes voltage to sag to 70 to 60%. The reasons for this susceptibility are discussed in the report. During the local voltage collapse, voltages are depressed for a period of perhaps one or two minutes. There is a concern that these local events are interacting together over larger areas and may present a challenge to system reliability. An effective method of preventing local voltage collapse is the use of voltage regulation from Distributed Energy Resources (DER) that can supply or absorb reactive power. DER, when properly controlled, can provide a rapid correction to voltage dips and prevent motor stall. This report discusses the phenomenon and causes of local voltage collapse as well as the control methodology we have developed to counter voltage sag. The problem is growing because of the use of low inertia, high efficiency air conditioner (A/C) compressor motors and because the use of electric A/C is growing in use and becoming a larger percentage of system load. A method for local dynamic voltage regulation is discussed which uses reactive power injection or absorption from local DER. This method is independent, rapid, and will not interfere with conventional utility system voltage control. The results of simulations of this method are provided. The method has also been tested at the ORNL s Distributed Energy Communications and Control (DECC) Laboratory using our research inverter and synchronous condenser. These systems at the DECC Lab are interconnected to an actual distribution system, the ORNL distribution system, which is fed from TVA s 161kV sub-transmission backbone. The test results are also provided and discussed. The simulations and testing show that local voltage control from DER can prevent local voltage collapse. The results also show that the control can be provided so quickly, within 0.5 seconds, that is does not interfere with conventional utility methods.

Kueck, John D [ORNL; Rizy, D Tom [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Xu, Yan [ORNL; Li, Huijuan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Adhikari, Sarina [ORNL; Irminger, Philip [ORNL

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Demonstration of a Novel Synchrophasor-based Situational Awareness System: Wide Area Power System Visualization, On-line Event Replay and Early Warning of Grid Problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the large North Eastern power system blackout on August 14, 2003, U.S. electric utilities have spent lot of effort on preventing power system cascading outages. Two of the main causes of the August 14, 2003 blackout were inadequate situational awareness and inadequate operator training In addition to the enhancements of the infrastructure of the interconnected power systems, more research and development of advanced power system applications are required for improving the wide-area security monitoring, operation and planning in order to prevent large- scale cascading outages of interconnected power systems. It is critically important for improving the wide-area situation awareness of the operators or operational engineers and regional reliability coordinators of large interconnected systems. With the installation of large number of phasor measurement units (PMU) and the related communication infrastructure, it will be possible to improve the operators situation awareness and to quickly identify the sequence of events during a large system disturbance for the post-event analysis using the real-time or historical synchrophasor data. The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate a novel synchrophasor-based comprehensive situational awareness system for control centers of power transmission systems. The developed system named WASA (Wide Area Situation Awareness) is intended to improve situational awareness at control centers of the power system operators and regional reliability coordinators. It consists of following main software modules: Wide-area visualizations of real-time frequency, voltage, and phase angle measurements and their contour displays for security monitoring. Online detection and location of a major event (location, time, size, and type, such as generator or line outage). Near-real-time event replay (in seconds) after a major event occurs. Early warning of potential wide-area stability problems. The system has been deployed and demonstrated at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and ISO New England system using real-time synchrophasor data from openPDC. Apart from the software product, the outcome of this project consists of a set of technical reports and papers describing the mathematical foundations and computational approaches of different tools and modules, implementation issues and considerations, lessons learned, and the results of lidation processes.

Rosso, A.

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

NOXSO: A no-waste emission control technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NOXSO Process is a dry, regenerable flue gas treatment system that simultaneously removes 90% of the SO{sub 2} and 70-90 % of the NO{sub x} from flue gas generated from the combustion of coal. The process has been successfully tested at small scale (0.017 MW) on high sulfur coal (2.5%) at the TVA Shawnee Steam Plant. The test results are contained in two U.S. Department of Energy reports. Tests of a NOXSO Process Development Unit (PDU, 0.75MW) were conducted at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) under a cooperative research agreement between NOXSO and the Department of Energy (DOE). Testing in the adsorber was done by continuously feeding a batch of sorbent into a fluidized bed adsorber and collecting the spent sorbent from the adsorber overflow. Regeneration took place in a separate batch reactor. The test results were reported by Yeh et al. in 1987, and by Haslbeck et al. in 1988. A Life-Cycle Test Unit (LCTU, 0.06MW) was built at the PETC in 1988 to test the NOXSO Process in an integrated, continuous-operation mode. The LCTU test program was designed to determine long-term effects of the process on the sorbent reactivity and attrition properties. The sorbent was successfully tested for over 2000 hours on flue gas. The test results were published by Ma et al. in 1991, and by Yeh et al. in 1992. The POC test is the last test prior to the full-scale demonstration. The POC test will collect all of the information to design the full-scale NOXSO plant: e.g., data pertaining to materials of construction, process performance and cost, process safety, process control, sorbent activity, sorbent attrition, heat recovery, etc. The POC plant (5 MW) is located at Ohio Edison`s Toronto Station in Toronto, Ohio. Flue gas was first introduced to the plant on November 23, 1991. The current test results and process performance along with a summary of process economics are presented in this paper.

Bolli, R.E.; Woods, M.C. [NOXSO Corp., Library, PA (United States); Madden, D.R. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Full-Scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents and discusses results from Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42778, 'Full-scale Testing of a Mercury Oxidation Catalyst Upstream of a Wet FGD System,' which was conducted over the time-period July 24, 2006 through June 30, 2010. The objective of the project was to demonstrate at full scale the use of solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in pulverized-coal-fired flue gas. Oxidized mercury is removed downstream in wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and collected with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI, the Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA), who also provided the host site, Great River Energy, Johnson Matthey, Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP), the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), NRG Energy, Ontario Power and Westar. URS Group was the prime contractor and also provided cofunding. The scope of this project included installing and testing a gold-based catalyst upstream of one full-scale wet FGD absorber module (about 200-MW scale) at LCRA's Fayette Power Project (FPP) Unit 3, which fires Powder River Basin coal. Installation of the catalyst involved modifying the ductwork upstream of one of three wet FGD absorbers on Unit 3, Absorber C. The FGD system uses limestone reagent, operates with forced sulfite oxidation, and normally runs with two FGD modules in service and one spare. The full-scale catalyst test was planned for 24 months to provide catalyst life data. Over the test period, data were collected on catalyst pressure drop, elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst module, and mercury capture by the downstream wet FGD absorber. The demonstration period began on May 6, 2008 with plans for the catalyst to remain in service until May 5, 2010. However, because of continual increases in pressure drop across the catalyst and concerns that further increases would adversely affect Unit 3 operations, LCRA decided to end the demonstration early, during a planned unit outage. On October 2, 2009, Unit 3 was taken out of service for a fall outage and the catalyst upstream of Absorber C was removed. This ended the demonstration after approximately 17 months of the planned 24 months of operation. This report discusses reasons for the pressure drop increase and potential measures to mitigate such problems in any future application of this technology. Mercury oxidation and capture measurements were made on Unit 3 four times during the 17-month demonstration. Measurements were performed across the catalyst and Absorber C and 'baseline' measurements were performed across Absorber A or B, which did not have a catalyst upstream. Results are presented in the report from all four sets of measurements during the demonstration period. These results include elemental mercury oxidation across the catalyst, mercury capture across Absorber C downstream of the catalyst, baseline mercury capture across Absorber A or B, and mercury re-emissions across both absorbers in service. Also presented in the report are estimates of the average mercury control performance of the oxidation catalyst technology over the 17-month demonstration period and the resulting mercury control costs.

Gary Blythe; Jennifer Paradis

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

215

FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2003 through September, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. This is the eighth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During previous reporting periods, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO{sub 3} removal results were presented in the semi-annual Technical Progress Report for the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. Additional balance of plant impact information for the two tests was reported in the Technical Progress Report for the time period October 1, 2001 through March 30, 2002. Additional information became available about the effects of byproduct magnesium hydroxide injection on SCR catalyst coupons during the long-term test at BMP, and those results were reported in the report for the time period April 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. During the current period, process economic estimates were developed, comparing the costs of the furnace magnesium hydroxide slurry injection process tested as part of this project to a number of other candidate SO{sub 3}/sulfuric acid control technologies for coal-fired power plants. The results of this economic evaluation are included in this progress report.

Gary M. Blythe

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

DOE: Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind power development in the United States is outpacing previous estimates for many regions, particularly those with good wind resources. The pace of wind power deployment may soon outstrip regional capabilities to provide transmission and integration services to achieve the most economic power system operation. Conversely, regions such as the Southeastern United States do not have good wind resources and will have difficulty meeting proposed federal Renewable Portfolio Standards with local supply. There is a growing need to explore innovative solutions for collaborating between regions to achieve the least cost solution for meeting such a renewable energy mandate. The DOE-funded project 'Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets' aims to evaluate the benefits of coordination of scheduling and balancing for Southwest Power Pool (SPP) wind transfers to Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) Balancing Authorities (BAs). The primary objective of this project is to analyze the benefits of different balancing approaches with increasing levels of inter-regional cooperation. Scenarios were defined, modeled and investigated to address production variability and uncertainty and the associated balancing of large quantities of wind power in SPP and delivery to energy markets in the southern regions of the SERC. The primary analysis of the project is based on unit commitment (UC) and economic dispatch (ED) simulations of the SPP-SERC regions as modeled for the year 2022. The UC/ED models utilized for the project were developed through extensive consultation with the project utility partners, to ensure the various regions and operational practices are represented as accurately as possible realizing that all such future scenario models are quite uncertain. SPP, Entergy, Oglethorpe Power Company (OPC), Southern Company, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) actively participated in the project providing input data for the models and review of simulation results and conclusions. While other SERC utility systems are modeled, the listed SERC utilities were explicitly included as active participants in the project due to the size of their load and relative proximity to SPP for importing wind energy. The analysis aspects of the project comprised 4 primary tasks: (1) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with only 7 GW of installed wind capacity in SPP for internal SPP consumption with no intended wind exports to SERC. This model is referred to as the 'Non-RES' model as it does not reflect the need for the SPP or SERC BAs to meet a federal Renewable Energy Standard (RES). (2) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of the Non-RES model for the year 2022 to provide project stakeholders with confidence in the model and analytical framework for a scenario that is similar to the existing system and more easily evaluated than the high-wind transfer scenarios that are analyzed subsequently. (3) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with sufficient installed wind capacity in SPP (approximately 48 GW) for both SPP and the participating SERC BAs to meet an RES of 20% energy. This model is referred to as the 'High-Wind Transfer' model with several different scenarios represented. The development of the High-Wind Transfer model not only included identification and allocation of SPP wind to individual SERC BAs, but also included the evaluation of various methods to allow the model to export the SPP wind to SERC without developing an actual transmission plan to support the transfers. (4) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of several different High-Wind Transfer model scenarios for the year 2022 to determine balancing costs and potential benefits of collaboration among SPP and SERC BAs to provide the required balancing.

Brooks, Daniel, EPRI; Tuohy, Aidan, EPRI; Deb, Sidart, LCG Consulting; Jampani, Srinivas, LCG Consulting; Kirby, Brendan, Consultant; King, Jack, Consultant

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

217

NUCLEAR ISOTOPIC DILUTION OF HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM BY DRY BLENDING VIA THE RM-2 MILL TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE has initiated numerous activities to focus on identifying material management strategies to disposition various excess fissile materials. In particular the INEEL has stored 1,700 Kg of offspec HEU at INTEC in CPP-651 vault facility. Currently, the proposed strategies for dispositioning are (a) aqueous dissolution and down blending to LEU via facilities at SRS followed by shipment of the liquid LEU to NFS for fabrication into LWR fuel for the TVA reactors and (b) dilution of the HEU to 0.9% for discard as a waste stream that would no longer have a criticality or proliferation risk without being processed through some type of enrichment system. Dispositioning this inventory as a waste stream via aqueous processing at SRS has been determined to be too costly. Thus, dry blending is the only proposed disposal process for the uranium oxide materials in the CPP-651 vault. Isotopic dilution of HEU to typically less than 20% by dry blending is the key to solving the dispositioning issue (i.e., proliferation) posed by HEU stored at INEEL. RM-2 mill is a technology developed and successfully tested for producing ultra-fine particles by dry grinding. Grinding action in RM-2 mill produces a two million-fold increase in the number of particles being blended in a centrifugal field. In a previous study, the concept of achieving complete and adequate blending and mixing (i.e., no methods were identified to easily separate and concentrate one titanium compound from the other) in remarkably short processing times was successfully tested with surrogate materials (titanium dioxide and titanium mono-oxide) with different particle sizes, hardness and densities. In the current project, the RM-2 milling technology was thoroughly tested with mixtures of natural uranium oxide (NU) and depleted uranium oxide (DU) stock to prove its performance. The effects of mill operating and design variables on the blending of NU/DU oxides were evaluated. First, NU and DU both made of the same oxide, UO{sub 3}, was used in the testing. Next, NU made up of UO{sub 3} and DU made up of UO{sub 2} was used in the test work. In every test, the blend achieved was characterized by spatial sampling of the ground product and analyzing for {sup 235}U concentration. The test work proved that these uranium oxide materials can be blended successfully. The spatial concentration was found to be uniform. Next, sintered thorium oxide pellets were used as surrogate for light water breeder reactor pellets (LWBR). To simulate LWBR pellet dispositioning, the thorium oxide pellets were first ground to a powder form and then the powder was blended with NU. In these tests also the concentration of {sup 235}U and {sup 232}Th in blended products fell within established limits proving the success of RM-2 milling technology. RM-2 milling technology is applicable to any dry radioactive waste, especially brittle solids that can be ground up and mixed with the non-radioactive stock.

Raj K. Rajamani; Sanjeeva Latchireddi; Vikas Devrani; Harappan Sethi; Roger Henry; Nate Chipman

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z