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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butane butylene isobutane" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Quantitative Determination of n-Propane, iso-Butane, and n-Butane by Headspace GC-MS in Intoxications by Inhalation of Lighter Fluid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......2-butanol, tetrahydrofuran, 1-bromopropane, n-heptane, 1,2-dichloroethane...due to toxic effects ofn-bu- tane inhalation and considered accidental in nature...in a 14-year-old boy after butane inhalation. Ir. Med. J.92(4): 344 (1999......

Marie-Paule L.A. Bouche; Willy E. Lambert; Jan F.P. Van Bocxlaer; Michel H. Piette; André P. De Leenheer

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

EIA-802  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greater than 500 ppm sulfur 467 CODE 466 PADD 4 * Includes propane, propylene, ethane, ethylene, normal butane, butylene, isobutane, isobutylene, and pentanes plus. PADD 3 PADD...

3

Efficient Energy Usage in Butane Splitters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PEN*ANE + I n-BUTANE ISOMERISATION i/n-BUTANE FLOW DIAGRAM 2 ALKYLATE PROCESS PROPANE n?BUTANE i/n?BUTANE I * Incorporates C4 Splitter With environmental pressure to remove lead from gas oline expected to continue, the use of MTBE, TBA... ALKYLATION I I I . n?BUTANE FRACTIONATION ISOMERISATION 1sPEL AJKYLATI ACID CONVENTIONAL FRACTIONATOR Fllctionetor Reboil_ n?C4 Prod... 783 ESL-IE-82-04-142 Proceedings from the Fourth Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April...

Barnwell, J.; Morris, C. P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Toughened blends of poly(butylene terephthalate) and BPA polycarbonate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The morphologies of melt blends of poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT) and bisphenol A polycarbonate (PC) toughened with a core/shell impact modifier have been characterized by transmission and scanning electro...

S. Y. Hobbs; M. E. J. Dekkers; V. H. Watkins

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Toughened blends of poly(butylene terephthalate) and BPA polycarbonate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The toughening mechanisms of blends of poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT) and bisphenol-A polycarbonate (PC) toughened with core/shell impact modifier have been studied by transmission electron microscopy, not...

M. E. J. Dekkers; S. Y. Hobbs; V. H. Watkins

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Isobutane oxidation in the presence of a soluble propylene glycol/vanadium catalyst  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for oxidizing isobutane with an oxygen-containing material in the presence of an effective amount of a soluble propylene glycol/vanadium catalyst.

Sanderson, J.R.; Marquis, E.T.

1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

The morphology and deformation behavior of poly(butylene terephthalate)/BPA polycarbonate blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this communication the results of a series of recent studies of the morphology and deformation behavior of toughened poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT)/BPA polycarbonate (PC) blends are briefly summarized....

S. Y. Hobbs; M. E. J. Dekkers; V. H. Watkins

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Thermodynamics of Gaseous Hydrocarbons: Ethane, Ethylene, Propane, Propylene, n?Butane, Isobutane, 1?Butene, Cis and Trans 2?Butenes, Isobutene, and Neopentane (Tetramethylmethane)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is pointed out that the assumption of completely free internal rotation in the simpler hydrocarbon molecules is probably responsible for the discrepancies between the results of previous statistical mechanical calculations and the experimental data. Using the formulas and tables of the preceding paper calculations are presented which show that for reasonable values of rotation restricting potentials complete agreement can be obtained with all experimental results. The uncertainty as to the exact height and shape of these potential barriers together with the possible errors in estimated vibration frequencies make highly precise calculations of thermodynamic functions out of the question at present. Nevertheless the general agreement with experiment indicates that the potentials and frequencies selected must be approximately correct. These molecular structure data together with the available values of heats of combustion and hydrogenation are then employed in calculations which yield thermodynamic constants and the free energy of formation as a function of the temperature in the range from 300 to 1500°K. The various calculations have been made for all of the hydrocarbons listed in the title.

Kenneth S. Pitzer

1937-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Plant Net Stocks Natural Gas Plant Net Stocks Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Butylene (C4H8) An olefinic hydrocarbon recovered from refinery processes. Ethane (C2H6) A normally gaseous straight-chain hydrocarbon. It is a colorless paraffinic gas that boils at a temperature of -127.48º F. It is extracted from natural gas and refinery gas streams. Isobutane (C4H10) A normally gaseous branch-chain hydrocarbon. It is a colorless paraffinic gas that boils at a temperature of 10.9º F. It is extracted from natural gas or refinery gas streams. Liquefied Petroleum Gases (LPG) A group of hydrocarbon-based gases derived from crude oil refining or nautral gas fractionation. They include: ethane, ethylene, propane, propylene, normal butane, butylene, isobutane, and isobutylene. For convenience of transportation, these gases are liquefied through pressurization.

10

Saving Energy and Reducing Emissions from the Regeneration Air System of a Butane Dehydrogenation Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Petrochemicals operates a butane dehydrogenation unit producing MTBE for reformulated gasoline that was originally constructed when energy was cheap and prior to environmental regulation. The process exhausts 900,000 pounds per hour of air...

John, T. P.

11

TABLE27.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. 7. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD District, January 1998 Crude Oil a ....................................................................... 0 1,168 0 0 5,978 7,146 231 Natural Gas Liquids ...................................................... 24 752 885 6 451 2,118 68 Pentanes Plus ............................................................. 1 455 0 5 (s) 461 15 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ......................................... 24 297 885 (s) 450 1,657 53 Ethane/Ethylene ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Propane/Propylene ................................................. 20 96 637 (s) 149 904 29 Normal Butane/Butylene ......................................... 3 201 248 0 301 753 24 Isobutane/Isobutylene ............................................ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Other Liquids ..................................................................

12

The determination of compressibility factors of gaseous butane-nitrogen mixtures in the gas phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE DETERMINATION OF COMPRESSIBILITY FACTORS OF GASEOUS BUTANE-NITROGEN MIXTURES IN THE GAS PHASE A D issertation By Robert Buckner Evans, III Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of^ 'ent Advisor) June 1955... ?-; i'i i ; A R y ? 'A 'Gi- Or- T EX AS THE DETERMINATION OF COMHIESSIBILITI FACTORS OF GASEOUS BUTANE-NITROGEN MIXTURES IN THE GAS PHASE A D issertation By ROBERT BUCKNER EVANS, III Submitted' to the Graduate School of the Agricultural...

Evans, Robert Buckner

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Cometabolic transformation of cis-1,2-dichloroethylene and cis-1,2-dichloroethylene epoxide by a butane-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by transformation of c- DCE was actively trans- formed by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b expressing soluble methane by a butane- grown mixed culture Y. Kim* and L. Semprini** *Department of Environmental Engineering, Korea cometabolism of cis-1,2-dichloroethylene (c-DCE) by a butane-grown mixed culture was evaluated in batch kinetic

Semprini, Lewis

14

Insertion Mechanism of a Poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(butylene oxide) Block Copolymer into a DPPC Monolayer  

SciTech Connect

Interactions between amphiphilic block copolymers and lipids are of medical interest for applications such as drug delivery and the restoration of damaged cell membranes. A series of monodisperse poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(butylene oxide) (EOBO) block copolymers were obtained with two ratios of hydrophilic/hydrophobic block lengths. We have explored the surface activity of EOBO at a clean interface and under 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) monolayers as a simple cell membrane model. At the same subphase concentration, EOBO achieved higher equilibrium surface pressures under DPPC compared to a bare interface, and the surface activity was improved with longer poly(butylene oxide) blocks. Further investigation of the DPPC/EOBO monolayers showed that combined films exhibited similar surface rheology compared to pure DPPC at the same surface pressures. DPPC/EOBO phase separation was observed in fluorescently doped monolayers, and within the liquid-expanded liquid-condensed coexistence region for DPPC, EOBO did not drastically alter the liquid-condensed domain shapes. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) quantitatively confirmed that the lattice spacings and tilt of DPPC in lipid-rich regions of the monolayer were nearly equivalent to those of a pure DPPC monolayer at the same surface pressures.

Leiske, Danielle L.; Meckes, Brian; Miller, Chad E.; Wu, Cynthia; Walker, Travis W.; Lin, Binhua; Meron, Mati; Ketelson, Howard A.; Toney, Michael F.; Fuller, Gerald G. (Stanford); (SLAC); (UC); (Alcan)

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

15

Refinery & Blender Net Production of Total Finished Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Blender Net Production & Blender Net Production Product: Total Finished Petroleum Products Liquefied Refinery Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethane Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Isobutane Isobutylene Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Other Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual Fuel Less Than 0.31 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Residual Fuel Greater Than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha For Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils For Petro. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Petroleum Coke Catalyst Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Processing Gain(-) or Loss(+) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

16

Effect of Nanoclay Loading on the Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Biodegradable Polylactide/Poly[(butylene succinate)-co-adipate] Blend Composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Polylactide/poly[(butylene succinate)-co-adipate] (PLA/PBSA)-organoclay composites were prepared via melt compounding in a batch mixer. The weight ratio of PLA to PBSA was kept at 70:30, while the weight fraction of the organoclay was varied from 0 to 9%. ...

Vincent Ojijo; Suprakas Sinha Ray; Rotimi Sadiku

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

17

Structural and morphological development in poly(ethylene-co-hexene) and poly(ethylene-co-butylene) blends due to the competition between  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural and morphological development in poly(ethylene-co-hexene) and poly(ethylene 30 November 2004; accepted 12 January 2005 Abstract Isothermal crystallization behavior of poly(ethylene-co-hexene) (PEH) and the 50/50 blend (H50) of PEH with amorphous poly(ethylene- co-butylene) (PEB) was studied

Wang, Howard "Hao"

18

A Multidimensional Gas Chromatographic Method for Analysis of n-Butane Oxidation Reaction Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......laboratory-scale reactor systems. The...lection of the reactor product gas and subsequent analysis. This method...high degree of reliability using unattended...typical on-line analysis of a butane...catalyst. The reactor feed gas for......

P.L. Mills; W.E. Guise; Jr.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Observations of nonmethane organic compounds during ARCTAS - Part 1: Biomass burning emissions and plume enhancements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOGA WAS Isobutane WAS Propane WAS Ethane TOGA WAS ButaneButane i-Butane Propene Propane Ethyne Ethene Ethane globallight alkanes against propane determined using the WAS data,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Formative time of breakdown modeled for the ignition of air and n-butane mixtures using effective ionization coefficients  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that simulations of ignition by electric arc discharge in n-butane and air mixtures have interesting features, which deviate from results obtained by simple extension of calculations based on methanelike fuels. In particular, it is demonstrated that lowering the temperature of the n-butane-air mixture before ignition under certain conditions will actually decrease the ignition stage time as well as the required electric field.

Kudryavtsev, A. A.; Popugaev, S. D. [St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 198904 (Russian Federation); Demidov, V. I. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Adams, S. F. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Jiao, C. Q. [ISSI Inc., Dayton, Ohio 45440-3638 (United States)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butane butylene isobutane" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

22

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

23

U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Total 559,639 599,643 591,916 616,905 613,451 578,101 1981-2013 Liquefied Refinery Gases 24,599 26,928 25,443 26,819 25,951 19,023 1981-2013 Ethane/Ethylene 464 426 407 441 487 379 1981-2013 Ethane 317 277 283 312 332 232 1993-2013 Ethylene 147 149 124 129 155 147 1993-2013 Propane/Propylene 16,840 17,792 16,966 17,839 18,063 17,254 1981-2013 Propane 8,051 8,949 8,756 9,002 9,153 8,816 1995-2013 Propylene 8,789 8,843 8,210 8,837 8,910 8,438 1993-2013 Normal Butane/Butylene 7,270 8,876 8,122 8,676 7,664 1,738 1981-2013 Normal Butane 7,447 9,044 8,314 8,832 8,067 1,743 1993-2013 Butylene -177 -168 -192 -156 -403 -5 1993-2013 Isobutane/Isobutylene

24

U.S. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propylene (Nonfuel Use) Normal Butane/Butylene Refinery Grade Butane Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Comp. Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Gasoline, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petro. Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products

25

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,980 842 4,204 1,948 672 -339 187 3,995 240 4,886 ,980 842 4,204 1,948 672 -339 187 3,995 240 4,886 Crude Oil 1,472 - - - - 1,839 556 -359 17 3,416 76 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 508 -17 115 63 -14 - - 75 105 71 404 Pentanes Plus 63 -17 - - 0 98 - - -18 37 53 72 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 444 - - 115 63 -112 - - 93 68 18 332 Ethane/Ethylene 163 - - - 0 -100 - - 11 - - 52 Propane/Propylene 186 - - 104 49 -22 - - 66 - 7 244 Normal Butane/Butylene 52 - - 16 5 5 - - 22 17 11 29 Isobutane/Isobutylene 43 - - -4 8 5 - - -6 50 - 7 Other Liquids - - 858 - - 12 -143 127 346 474 40 -6 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 858 - - 5 -547 -8 11 271 26 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 23 - - 23 0 - -

26

table07.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

558 558 - 893 -73 1,935 -111 0 3,387 38 0 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ....... 283 89 116 - 9 -210 - 123 24 558 Pentanes Plus .................................. 37 - 1 - 17 7 - 25 15 9 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............. 246 89 115 - -8 -217 - 98 10 550 Ethane/Ethylene ........................... 94 0 (s) - -71 -4 - 0 0 26 Propane/Propylene ....................... 100 116 86 - 31 -155 - 0 3 485 Normal Butane/Butylene .............. 37 -27 16 - 18 -48 - 74 6 12 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 15 (s) 13 - 14 -10 - 24 0 27 Other Liquids .................................... 24 - 0 - 38 40 - 46 (s) -24 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates .... 45 - 0 - 0 7 - 37 (s) 0 Unfinished Oils ................................. - - 0 - -4 17 - 3 0 -24 Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. .......... -21 - 0 - 42 16 - 6 (s) 0 Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. ....... - - 0 - 0 -1 - 1 0 0 Finished Petroleum Products .......... 71 3,648 9 - 646 154

27

TABLE13.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. 3. PAD District V - Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum (Thousand Barrels per Day) January 1998 Crude Oil ............................................ 2,165 - 440 154 -73 101 0 2,393 193 0 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ........ 93 43 (s) - 0 -51 - 98 15 75 Pentanes Plus ................................... 51 - 0 - 0 (s) - 42 (s) 9 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............. 42 43 (s) - 0 -51 - 56 15 66 Ethane/Ethylene ............................ (s) 0 0 - 0 0 - 0 0 (s) Propane/Propylene ....................... 12 47 (s) - 0 -26 - 0 5 80 Normal Butane/Butylene ............... 21 -8 0 - 0 -25 - 43 10 -15 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 10 5 0 - 0 (s) - 13 0 2 Other Liquids ..................................... 87 - 71 - 24 87 - 73 3 19 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates ..... 109 - 28 - 0 14 - 121 3 0 Unfinished Oils ................................. - - 43 - 0 32 - -8 0 19 Motor

28

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

562 822 4,163 1,839 735 -69 52 3,955 244 4,801 562 822 4,163 1,839 735 -69 52 3,955 244 4,801 Crude Oil 1,116 - - - - 1,730 800 -87 62 3,442 55 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 446 -16 121 74 -25 - - -12 105 111 395 Pentanes Plus 50 -16 - - 1 82 - - -4 31 101 -12 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 396 - - 121 73 -107 - - -8 74 11 407 Ethane/Ethylene 163 - - - 0 -108 - - -2 - - 58 Propane/Propylene 156 - - 108 59 -24 - - -3 - 2 300 Normal Butane/Butylene 48 - - 11 9 10 - - -4 29 9 45 Isobutane/Isobutylene 29 - - 2 6 14 - - 1 46 - 5 Other Liquids - - 838 - - 5 -258 -159 8 408 25 -16 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 838 - - 3 -565 4 1 257 21 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 22 - - 22 0 - -

29

TABLE18.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8. 8. Refinery Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, January 1998 Crude Oil .................................................................... 14,835 511 15,346 8,591 1,779 2,386 12,756 Petroleum Products .................................................. 53,526 2,604 56,130 37,545 10,689 14,376 62,610 Pentanes Plus .......................................................... 0 0 0 4 209 225 438 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ...................................... 1,482 13 1,495 2,085 308 672 3,065 Ethane/Ethylene ................................................... 0 0 0 3 0 0 3 Propane/Propylene ............................................... 564 5 569 1,196 16 332 1,544 Normal Butane/Butylene ....................................... 584 6 590 608 205 232 1,045 Isobutane/Isobutylene ...........................................

30

table05.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

27 27 - 1,721 -65 -3 170 0 1,511 0 0 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ....... 27 18 40 - 153 -28 - 8 1 257 Pentanes Plus .................................. 3 - 0 - 0 (s) - 0 (s) 2 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............. 24 18 40 - 153 -28 - 8 1 254 Ethane/Ethylene ............................ 8 0 0 - 0 0 - 0 0 8 Propane/Propylene ........................ 11 54 39 - 149 -8 - 0 1 261 Normal Butane/Butylene ............... 4 -27 1 - 3 -18 - 5 (s) -7 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 1 -9 0 - 0 -2 - 3 0 -8 Other Liquids .................................... -9 - 183 - 11 17 - 234 1 -67 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates ..... 64 - 22 - 0 7 - 79 1 0 Unfinished Oils ................................. - - 34 - 0 -2 - 104 0 -68 Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. ........... -72 - 126 - 11 12 - 54 (s) 0 Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. ....... - - 0 - 0 1 - -2 0 1 Finished Petroleum Products .......... 76 1,798 771 - 2,918 -104 - - 63 5,603 Finished

31

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

124 22 3,585 1,761 3,291 117 -137 3,532 241 5,264 124 22 3,585 1,761 3,291 117 -137 3,532 241 5,264 Crude Oil 34 - - - - 897 1 113 -43 1,084 3 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 90 0 25 32 86 - - 16 27 15 174 Pentanes Plus 15 0 - - - - - - 0 - 10 4 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 75 - - 25 32 86 - - 16 27 5 169 Ethane/Ethylene 1 - - 0 - - - - 0 - - 1 Propane/Propylene 51 - - 36 27 83 - - 24 - 4 168 Normal Butane/Butylene 16 - - -11 3 3 - - -8 17 1 0 Isobutane/Isobutylene 8 - - 0 2 - - - -1 9 - 0 Other Liquids - - 22 - - 555 1,614 193 -31 2,421 5 -10 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 22 - - 25 273 -19 -35 332 5 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 4 - - 4 0 - - Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol)

32

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,164 20 3,171 1,425 308 193 28 2,990 349 2,914 1,164 20 3,171 1,425 308 193 28 2,990 349 2,914 Crude Oil 1,104 - - - - 1,209 - 140 10 2,443 - 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 61 0 66 4 - - - 36 59 13 22 Pentanes Plus 26 0 - - - - - - 5 18 3 -1 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 34 - - 66 4 - - - 30 41 10 23 Ethane/Ethylene 0 - - - - - - - - - - 0 Propane/Propylene 14 - - 49 4 - - - 12 - 10 45 Normal Butane/Butylene 5 - - 15 0 - - - 13 19 0 -11 Isobutane/Isobutylene 15 - - 1 - - - - 5 22 - -12 Other Liquids - - 20 - - 107 252 94 -71 488 13 43 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 20 - - 19 143 37 -2 219 3 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 47 - - 47 0 - - Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol)

33

table09.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3,434 3,434 - 5,080 -9 -1,729 230 0 6,546 0 0 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ....... 1,272 347 65 - -68 -208 - 229 29 1,566 Pentanes Plus .................................. 188 - 33 - -5 30 - 66 0 119 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............. 1,084 347 31 - -63 -238 - 163 29 1,446 Ethane/Ethylene ........................... 503 24 18 - 112 -52 - 0 0 709 Propane/Propylene ....................... 363 301 4 - -158 -120 - 0 21 610 Normal Butane/Butylene .............. 76 3 6 - -11 -89 - 100 8 54 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 142 19 4 - -6 22 - 63 0 73 Other Liquids .................................... 172 - 223 - -73 82 - 216 65 -41 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates .... 149 - 1 - 0 6 - 97 46 0 Unfinished Oils ................................. - - 221 - 4 72 - 195 0 -41 Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. .......... 23 - 1 - -77 4 - -76 19 0 Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. ....... - - 0 - 0 (s) - (s) 0 0 Finished Petroleum Products

34

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1,173 16 2,988 1,321 324 106 21 2,811 344 2,751 1,173 16 2,988 1,321 324 106 21 2,811 344 2,751 Crude Oil 1,111 - - - - 1,160 2 62 4 2,331 0 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 61 0 50 5 - - - 1 66 15 35 Pentanes Plus 28 0 - - - - - - 0 21 3 4 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 33 - - 50 5 - - - 1 45 12 31 Ethane/Ethylene 0 - - - - - - - - - - 0 Propane/Propylene 12 - - 46 4 - - - 1 - 10 51 Normal Butane/Butylene 6 - - 6 1 - - - 0 26 1 -14 Isobutane/Isobutylene 15 - - -2 0 - - - 0 20 - -7 Other Liquids - - 16 - - 74 245 103 11 414 13 1 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 16 - - 7 138 37 2 193 3 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 43 - - 43 0 - - Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) - - - - 1 1 0

35

TABLE11.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. 1. PAD District IV-Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum (Thousand Barrels per Day) January 1998 Crude Oil ........................................... 356 - 204 52 -131 -1 0 483 0 0 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ........ 131 (s) 17 - -93 (s) - 19 (s) 35 Pentanes Plus .................................. 25 - 4 - -11 (s) - 5 (s) 12 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............. 106 (s) 14 - -82 (s) - 14 (s) 23 Ethane/Ethylene ........................... 31 0 0 - -41 0 - 0 0 -10 Propane/Propylene ....................... 48 9 8 - -23 -2 - 0 (s) 43 Normal Butane/Butylene ............... 18 -7 6 - -10 1 - 11 0 -5 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 9 -3 0 - -8 1 - 2 0 -4 Other Liquids .................................... 11 - 0 - 0 18 - -5 0 -2 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates .... 3 - 0 - 0 -1 - 4 0 0 Unfinished Oils ................................. - - 0 - 0 3 - -1 0 -2 Motor Gasoline

36

table03.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. 3. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 1998 Crude Oil ............................................... 6,541 - 8,339 60 389 0 14,319 231 0 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ........... 1,805 497 238 - -497 - 478 68 2,492 Pentanes Plus .................................... 303 - 38 - 37 - 138 15 151 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ................ 1,502 497 200 - -534 - 340 53 2,340 Ethane/Ethylene ............................ 636 24 18 - -55 - 0 0 734 Propane/Propylene ........................ 533 527 137 - -310 - 0 29 1,478 Normal Butane/Butylene ............... 155 -65 28 - -179 - 234 24 39 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 178 11 17 - 11 - 106 0 89 Other Liquids ........................................ 285 - 476 - 244 - 564 69 -116 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates ...... 369 - 51 - 33 - 337 50 0 Unfinished Oils ...................................

37

TABLE35.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Thousand Thousand Barrels) January 1998 Crude Oil .................................................................. 344 433 -89 62,087 2,094 59,993 Petroleum Products ................................................ 103,659 8,121 95,538 34,597 13,141 21,456 Pentanes Plus ....................................................... 0 0 0 678 159 519 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ................................... 4,737 0 4,737 6,111 6,365 -254 Ethane/Ethylene ............................................... 0 0 0 773 2,988 -2,215 Propane/Propylene ........................................... 4,630 0 4,630 3,760 2,792 968 Normal Butane/Butylene ................................... 107 0 107 1,086 515 571 Isobutane/Isobutylene ...................................... 0 0 0 492 70 422 Unfinished Oils ......................................................

38

U.S. Refinery  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 354,918 353,802 345,413 343,062 345,025 342,763 1993-2013 Crude Oil 98,082 97,563 90,880 93,075 97,586 90,778 1981-2013 All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) 256,836 256,239 254,533 249,987 247,439 251,985 1993-2013 Pentanes Plus 947 867 828 805 708 856 1993-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 12,896 14,096 15,761 16,662 18,296 18,683 1993-2013 Ethane/Ethylene 281 321 261 242 205 171 1993-2013 Propane/Propylene 2,692 2,994 3,569 3,518 4,099 4,104 1993-2013 Normal Butane/Butylene 7,627 8,451 9,511 10,757 11,921 12,147 1993-2013 Isobutane/Butylene 2,296 2,330 2,420 2,145 2,071 2,261 1993-2013 Other Hydrocarbons 19 43 49 33 26 21 2009-2013 Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) 116 99 100 82 71 78 2009-2013

39

U.S. Refinery  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 346,915 338,782 331,615 339,907 336,327 341,211 1993-2012 Crude Oil 89,070 86,598 90,944 88,982 90,640 88,781 1981-2012 All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) 257,845 252,184 240,671 250,925 245,687 252,430 1993-2012 Pentanes Plus 949 997 1,006 971 895 884 1993-2012 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 13,161 12,456 12,611 14,896 14,429 15,934 1993-2012 Ethane/Ethylene 31 185 118 220 223 214 1993-2012 Propane/Propylene 4,120 3,293 3,577 4,278 4,087 4,574 1993-2012 Normal Butane/Butylene 6,320 6,482 6,478 7,818 7,794 8,774 1993-2012 Isobutane/Butylene 2,690 2,496 2,438 2,580 2,325 2,372 1993-2012 Other Hydrocarbons 29 20 41 42 2009-2012 Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) 47 24 58 112 2009-2012

40

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Comp. Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Gasoline, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petro. Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butane butylene isobutane" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

U.S. Total Stocks  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 1,665,345 1,736,739 1,776,375 1,794,099 1,750,087 1,807,777 1956-2012 Crude Oil 983,046 1,027,663 1,051,795 1,059,975 1,026,630 1,060,764 1913-2012 All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) 682,299 709,076 724,580 734,124 723,457 747,013 1993-2012 Pentanes Plus 10,278 13,775 10,481 12,510 17,596 12,739 1981-2012 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 95,592 113,134 102,147 108,272 111,778 140,529 1967-2012 Ethane/Ethylene 14,869 27,591 20,970 24,323 22,892 35,396 1967-2012 Propane/Propylene 52,007 55,408 50,140 49,241 54,978 67,991 1967-2012 Normal Butane/Butylene 21,862 23,031 24,149 27,652 26,779 28,574 1981-2012 Isobutane/Butylene 6,854 7,104 6,888 7,056 7,129 8,568 1981-2012 Other Hydrocarbons 29 20 41 42 2009-2012

42

Syngas Production from Catalytic Partial Oxidation of n-Butane: Comparison between Incipient Wetness and Sol?gel Prepared Pt/Al2O3  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Syngas Production from Catalytic Partial Oxidation of n-Butane: Comparison between Incipient Wetness and Sol?gel Prepared Pt/Al2O3 ... (30, 31) To start the reaction, a Bunsen burner was used to heat the catalyst bed to its ignition temperature. ... for fuel-efficient, lean-burn vehicles, both diesel and spark-ignited. ...

Rainer J. Bass; Timothy M. Dunn; Yu-Chuan Lin; Keith L. Hohn

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

43

Thermal stability of working fluids for organic Rankine cycles: An improved survey method and experimental results for cyclopentane, isopentane and n-butane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work we present an improved survey method for the evaluation of the thermal stability of working fluids for organic Rankine cycles. The method presented here represents an improvement of a test methodology already used in literature, based on the analysis of temperature and pressure measurements of a fluid subjected to increasing thermal stress temperatures. Compared to the already known methodology, the survey technique presented in this work offers a different evaluation of the measured vapor pressure deviations and a different estimation method of the decomposition rates. After the description of the experimental apparatus and of the test methodology, we present and discuss some experimental results of the thermal stability of three fluids of interest for organic Rankine cycle applications, namely Cyclopentane, Isopentane and n-Butane, in the temperature range between 220 °C and 350 °C.

Marco Pasetti; Costante M. Invernizzi; Paolo Iora

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Host cells and methods for producing 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, and 3-methyl-butan-1-ol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides for a method for producing a 5-carbon alcohol in a genetically modified host cell. In one embodiment, the method comprises culturing a genetically modified host cell which expresses a first enzyme capable of catalyzing the dephosphorylation of an isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) or dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP), such as a Bacillus subtilis phosphatase (YhfR), under a suitable condition so that 5-carbon alcohol is 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol and/or 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol is produced. Optionally, the host cell may further comprise a second enzyme capable of reducing a 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol to 3-methyl-butan-1-ol, such as a reductase.

Chou, Howard H. (Berkeley, CA); Keasling, Jay D. (Berkeley, CA)

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

45

Partial miscibility behavior of the ternary systems methane-propane-n-octane, methane-n-butane-n-octane, and methane-carbon dioxide-n-octane  

SciTech Connect

The phase behavior of three ternary systems (methane-propane-n-octane, methane-n-butane-n-octane, methane-carbon dioxide-n-octane) was studied in their regions of L/sub 1/-L/sub 2/-V immiscibility. Liquid-phase composition and molar volume data for both liquid phases are presented as a function of temperature and pressure in the three-phase region. The boundaries of the three-phase regions, locl of K points (L/sub 1/-L/sub 2/ = V), LCST points (L/sub 1/ = L/sub 2/-V), and Q points (S-L/sub 1/-L/sub 2/-V) are detailed. A detailed study of the immiscibility behavior of the binary system carbon dioxide-n-octane is also presented.

Hottovy, J.D.; Kohn, J.P.; Luks, K.D.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

U.S. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

96,229 107,478 106,354 120,656 114,693 108,925 1981-2013 96,229 107,478 106,354 120,656 114,693 108,925 1981-2013 Crude Oil 3,965 3,863 3,591 3,029 2,052 2,975 1920-2013 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 12,522 14,761 10,699 17,203 15,796 13,937 1981-2013 Pentanes Plus 3,327 4,292 1,655 7,308 5,315 2,989 1984-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 9,194 10,468 9,044 9,895 10,481 10,947 1981-2013 Ethane/Ethylene 1981-1992 Propane/Propylene 8,363 9,542 8,057 8,407 9,125 10,040 1981-2013 Normal Butane/Butylene 832 927 987 1,488 1,356 907 1981-2013 Isobutane/Isobutylene 1984-1992 Other Liquids 7,489 6,277 6,728 7,063 5,570 6,579 1991-2013 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/ Other Hydrocarbons 2,897 3,520 3,180 3,430 4,056 3,543 1991-2013 Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol)

47

U.S. Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

302,265 311,620 293,713 317,538 316,119 299,380 1981-2013 302,265 311,620 293,713 317,538 316,119 299,380 1981-2013 Crude Oil 231,793 239,848 231,900 250,207 251,054 237,344 1920-2013 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 5,268 5,261 4,667 4,819 3,708 4,020 1981-2013 Pentanes Plus 1,366 2,222 730 1,461 316 772 1981-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 3,902 3,039 3,937 3,358 3,392 3,248 1981-2013 Ethane 1993-2006 Ethylene 9 12 8 12 12 9 1993-2013 Propane 2,585 1,818 2,474 2,105 1,901 1,875 1995-2013 Propylene 728 680 814 595 722 728 1993-2013 Normal Butane 181 121 149 106 272 194 1995-2013 Butylene 143 241 162 153 146 139 1993-2013 Isobutane 256 167 330 387 339 303 1995-2013 Isobutylene 1993-2010 Other Liquids 43,066 47,595 40,206 44,400 38,927 40,118 1981-2013

48

table06.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,308 7,308 - 27,686 -2,263 59,993 -3,449 0 105,005 1,168 0 70,132 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ......... 8,763 2,756 3,599 - 265 -6,499 - 3,820 752 17,310 23,020 Pentanes Plus ................................... 1,146 - 42 - 519 214 - 769 455 269 1,988 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ............... 7,617 2,756 3,557 - -254 -6,713 - 3,051 297 17,041 21,032 Ethane/Ethylene ............................ 2,909 0 12 - -2,215 -110 - 0 0 816 2,868 Propane/Propylene ....................... 3,095 3,602 2,661 - 968 -4,799 - 0 96 15,029 13,173 Normal Butane/Butylene ............... 1,156 -837 486 - 571 -1,497 - 2,303 201 369 3,305 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 457 -9 398 - 422 -307 - 748 0 827 1,686 Other Liquids ..................................... 738 - 0 - 1,171 1,228 - 1,429 11 -759 26,014 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates ..... 1,380 - 0 - 0 225 - 1,144 11 0 2,175 Unfinished Oils ..................................

49

table02.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. 2. U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 1998 Crude Oil ............................................... 202,756 - 258,506 1,851 12,065 0 443,902 7,146 0 880,184 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ............ 55,963 15,419 7,378 - -15,412 - 14,810 2,118 77,244 79,784 Pentanes Plus .................................... 9,388 - 1,185 - 1,137 - 4,282 461 4,693 6,852 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ................ 46,575 15,419 6,193 - -16,549 - 10,528 1,657 72,551 72,932 Ethane/Ethylene ............................ 19,726 751 556 - -1,715 - 0 0 22,748 17,192 Propane/Propylene ........................ 16,528 16,343 4,241 - -9,623 - 0 904 45,831 34,422 Normal Butane/Butylene ................ 4,818 -2,023 880 - -5,547 - 7,256 753 1,213 12,826 Isobutane/Isobutylene .................... 5,503 348 516 - 336 - 3,272 0 2,759 8,492

50

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25,966 7,956 1,280,301 725,573 1,191,766 9,116 -19,377 1,260,324 25,966 7,956 1,280,301 725,573 1,191,766 9,116 -19,377 1,260,324 90,720 1,909,011 152,389 Crude Oil 9,418 - - - - 316,140 4,126 8,405 -1,574 336,230 3,434 0 8,328 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 16,548 -84 14,202 18,043 26,704 - - -1,588 7,264 3,052 66,685 6,377 Pentanes Plus 2,828 -84 - - 185 -19 - - 12 63 315 2,520 43 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 13,720 - - 14,202 17,858 26,723 - - -1,600 7,201 2,737 64,165 6,334 Ethane/Ethylene 174 - - 93 - - - - 0 - - 267 - Propane/Propylene 9,223 - - 12,922 16,074 26,601 - - -793 - 1,230 64,383 5,184 Normal Butane/Butylene 2,091 - - 1,435 616 122 - - -866 3,435 1,507 188 837 Isobutane/Isobutylene 2,232 - - -248 1,168 - - - 59 3,766 - -673 313

51

U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

556,591 575,071 561,721 590,423 591,817 573,483 1981-2013 556,591 575,071 561,721 590,423 591,817 573,483 1981-2013 Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 1981-2013 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs 68,909 64,655 64,147 67,242 66,924 69,929 1981-2013 Pentanes Plus 1,561 1,486 3,400 -1,627 474 3,432 1981-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 67,349 63,170 60,747 68,869 66,450 66,498 1981-2013 Ethane/Ethylene 27,620 28,821 26,806 29,847 29,153 30,817 1981-2013 Propane/Propylene 34,429 28,651 29,365 32,619 32,108 32,780 1981-2013 Normal Butane/Butylene 3,899 4,288 2,546 4,356 3,201 2,347 1981-2013 Isobutane/Isobutylene 1,400 1,409 2,030 2,047 1,988 554 1981-2013 Other Liquids 1,994 3,096 713 5,708 -1,348 5,977 1981-2013 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/ Other Hydrocarbons 0 0 0 0 0 0 1991-2013

52

East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Type: Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Type: Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Type Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 96,936 96,489 98,076 99,950 102,408 98,737 1981-2013 Crude Oil -533 -654 -152 -479 -42 20 1981-2013 Petroleum Products 97,469 97,143 98,228 100,429 102,450 98,717 1986-2013 Pentanes Plus -2 1987-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,739 1,357 1,555 1,342 1,959 2,568 1981-2013 Ethane/Ethylene 1989-2002 Propane/Propylene 2,739 1,357 1,555 1,342 1,959 2,483 1989-2013 Normal Butane/Butylene 85 1989-2013 Isobutane/Isobutylene 1989-2013

53

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,707 661 107,540 52,842 98,737 3,513 -4,105 105,957 7,218 3,707 661 107,540 52,842 98,737 3,513 -4,105 105,957 7,218 157,931 153,902 Crude Oil 1,020 - - - - 26,908 20 3,378 -1,285 32,517 94 0 10,326 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 2,687 -11 747 945 2,568 - - 471 798 453 5,214 6,541 Pentanes Plus 443 -11 - - - - - - 2 - 300 130 82 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,244 - - 747 945 2,568 - - 469 798 153 5,084 6,459 Ethane/Ethylene 27 - - 9 - - - - 6 - - 30 15 Propane/Propylene 1,517 - - 1,078 813 2,483 - - 724 - 126 5,041 4,442 Normal Butane/Butylene 474 - - -333 80 85 - - -246 523 27 2 1,673 Isobutane/Isobutylene 226 - - -7 52 - - - -15 275 - 11 329 Other Liquids - - 672 - - 16,653 48,432 5,798 -936 72,642 156 -307 61,003

54

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

429,215 5,872 1,093,588 483,473 118,666 38,688 7,789 1,028,754 429,215 5,872 1,093,588 483,473 118,666 38,688 7,789 1,028,754 126,026 1,006,933 150,671 Crude Oil 406,791 - - - - 424,639 598 22,523 1,445 853,106 0 0 56,432 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 22,424 -123 18,260 1,933 - - - 404 24,108 5,319 12,663 4,734 Pentanes Plus 10,215 -123 - - - - - - -20 7,565 1,094 1,453 51 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 12,209 - - 18,260 1,933 - - - 424 16,543 4,225 11,210 4,683 Ethane/Ethylene 34 - - - - - - - - - - 34 - Propane/Propylene 4,422 - - 16,669 1,593 - - - 335 - 3,714 18,635 1,915 Normal Butane/Butylene 2,360 - - 2,258 332 - - - 129 9,346 512 -5,037 2,249 Isobutane/Isobutylene 5,393 - - -667 8 - - - -40 7,197 - -2,423 519

55

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

302,630 5,088 230,918 121,366 -164,290 -11,531 4,472 221,774 5,269 302,630 5,088 230,918 121,366 -164,290 -11,531 4,472 221,774 5,269 252,667 39,043 Crude Oil 163,870 - - - - 115,845 -53,264 -13,771 3,101 209,575 5 0 18,928 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 138,760 -110 3,391 3,503 -119,108 - - 94 6,946 4,261 15,135 1,470 Pentanes Plus 18,508 -110 - - - -13,355 - - 14 2,156 3,795 -922 194 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 120,252 - - 3,391 3,503 -105,753 - - 80 4,790 466 16,057 1,276 Ethane/Ethylene 63,265 - - - - -61,214 - - -6 - - 2,057 400 Propane/Propylene 36,541 - - 3,406 3,155 -28,078 - - 7 - 12 15,005 363 Normal Butane/Butylene 15,114 - - 294 255 -9,019 - - 88 2,241 455 3,860 366 Isobutane/Isobutylene 5,332 - - -309 93 -7,442 - - -9 2,549 - -4,866 147

56

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

315,006 29,943 578,101 299,380 14,453 11,088 543,388 108,925 315,006 29,943 578,101 299,380 14,453 11,088 543,388 108,925 573,483 1,831,621 Crude Oil 233,810 - - - - 237,344 8,334 7,688 468,825 2,975 0 1,067,149 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 81,196 -552 19,023 4,020 - - 3,027 16,794 13,937 69,929 189,672 Pentanes Plus 11,167 -552 - - 772 - - -700 5,666 2,989 3,432 18,036 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 70,029 - - 19,023 3,248 - - 3,727 11,128 10,947 66,498 171,636 Ethane/Ethylene 30,015 - - 379 9 - - -414 - - 30,817 34,444 Propane/Propylene 25,545 - - 17,254 2,603 - - 2,582 - 10,040 32,780 67,782 Normal Butane/Butylene 6,893 - - 1,738 333 - - 999 4,711 907 2,347 58,942 Isobutane/Isobutylene 7,576 - - -348 303 - - 560 6,417 - 554 10,468

57

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8,897 964 18,564 10,598 335 158 17,505 3,205 18,490 8,897 964 18,564 10,598 335 158 17,505 3,205 18,490 Crude Oil 6,489 - - - - 8,527 144 93 14,999 67 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 2,408 -18 630 170 - - 65 509 314 2,301 Pentanes Plus 317 -18 - - 29 - - -13 174 118 50 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,091 - - 630 141 - - 79 335 196 2,251 Ethane/Ethylene 974 - - 18 0 - - 34 - - 958 Propane/Propylene 712 - - 553 116 - - 36 - 171 1,175 Normal Butane/Butylene 179 - - 56 15 - - 5 143 26 77 Isobutane/Isobutylene 225 - - 3 9 - - 4 192 - 41 Other Liquids - - 981 - - 1,257 53 51 1,997 214 28 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 981 - - 40 151 5 1,050 116 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 190 - - 190 0 - -

58

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

71 22 3,498 1,982 3,256 25 -53 3,444 248 5,216 71 22 3,498 1,982 3,256 25 -53 3,444 248 5,216 Crude Oil 26 - - - - 864 11 23 -4 919 9 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 45 0 39 49 73 - - -4 20 8 182 Pentanes Plus 8 0 - - 1 0 - - 0 0 1 7 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 37 - - 39 49 73 - - -4 20 7 175 Ethane/Ethylene 0 - - 0 - - - - 0 - - 1 Propane/Propylene 25 - - 35 44 73 - - -2 - 3 176 Normal Butane/Butylene 6 - - 4 2 0 - - -2 9 4 1 Isobutane/Isobutylene 6 - - -1 3 - - - 0 10 - -2 Other Liquids - - 22 - - 717 1,611 114 -5 2,505 10 -47 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 22 - - 29 291 -9 3 324 6 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 4 - - 4 0 - - Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) - - - - 0 - 0 0

59

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

60

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

34,932 594 95,116 42,741 9,239 5,791 830 89,707 10,470 87,406 34,932 594 95,116 42,741 9,239 5,791 830 89,707 10,470 87,406 142,840 Crude Oil 33,114 - - - - 36,279 - 4,213 311 73,295 - 0 52,719 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 1,818 -8 1,970 134 - - - 1,076 1,782 396 660 8,270 Pentanes Plus 794 -8 - - - - - - 163 552 92 -21 314 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1,024 - - 1,970 134 - - - 913 1,230 304 681 7,956 Ethane/Ethylene 3 - - - - - - - - - - 3 - Propane/Propylene 420 - - 1,475 124 - - - 374 - 299 1,346 2,272 Normal Butane/Butylene 158 - - 451 10 - - - 378 556 5 -320 5,110 Isobutane/Isobutylene 443 - - 44 - - - - 161 674 - -348 574 Other Liquids - - 602 - - 3,200 7,556 2,809 -2,126 14,630 387 1,276 46,625

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butane butylene isobutane" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Refinery Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Ether* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Reformulated Blended with Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil, 15 ppm and Under Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Less than 0.31 Percent Sulfur 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Greater than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Units: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

62

table04.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. 4. PAD District I-Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 1998 Crude Oil ........................................... 824 - 53,357 -2,000 -89 5,262 0 46,830 0 0 16,235 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ........ 829 569 1,233 - 4,737 -869 - 252 24 7,961 5,223 Pentanes Plus ................................ 79 - 0 - 0 7 - 0 1 71 19 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ............ 750 569 1,233 - 4,737 -876 - 252 24 7,889 5,204 Ethane/Ethylene ........................ 262 0 0 - 0 0 - 0 0 262 0 Propane/Propylene .................... 334 1,689 1,206 - 4,630 -262 - 0 20 8,101 4,043 Normal Butane/Butylene ............ 116 -843 27 - 107 -548 - 162 3 -210 821 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................ 38 -277 0 - 0 -66 - 90 0 -263 340 Other Liquids .................................... -272 - 5,668 - 350 537 - 7,268 17 -2,076 19,354 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates ... 1,973

63

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

59,397 25,268 126,131 58,449 20,168 -10,157 5,610 119,848 7,211 59,397 25,268 126,131 58,449 20,168 -10,157 5,610 119,848 7,211 146,586 280,571 Crude Oil 44,167 - - - - 55,181 16,673 -10,758 505 102,476 2,282 0 102,610 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 15,230 -515 3,462 1,887 -432 - - 2,252 3,146 2,129 12,105 58,830 Pentanes Plus 1,896 -515 - - 6 2,928 - - -549 1,119 1,599 2,146 7,743 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 13,334 - - 3,462 1,881 -3,360 - - 2,801 2,027 530 9,959 51,087 Ethane/Ethylene 4,901 - - - 9 -3,013 - - 339 - - 1,558 4,694 Propane/Propylene 5,587 - - 3,111 1,470 -650 - - 1,991 - 199 7,328 24,444 Normal Butane/Butylene 1,561 - - 475 162 156 - - 651 514 331 858 20,078 Isobutane/Isobutylene 1,285 - - -124 240 147 - - -180 1,513 - 215 1,871

64

East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Net Receipts by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending w/ Ether* MGBC - Reformulated GTAB* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Renewable Fuels Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Greater than Ed55 Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and Under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products

65

U.S. Product Supplied for Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

18,553 18,551 18,724 19,046 19,091 19,116 1963-2013 18,553 18,551 18,724 19,046 19,091 19,116 1963-2013 Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 1981-2013 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs 2,297 2,086 2,138 2,169 2,159 2,331 1981-2013 Pentanes Plus 52 48 113 -52 15 114 1981-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,245 2,038 2,025 2,222 2,144 2,217 1973-2013 Ethane/Ethylene 921 930 894 963 940 1,027 1981-2013 Propane/Propylene 1,148 924 979 1,052 1,036 1,093 1973-2013 Normal Butane/Butylene 130 138 85 141 103 78 1981-2013 Isobutane/Isobutylene 47 45 68 66 64 18 1981-2013 Other Liquids 66 100 24 184 -43 199 1981-2013 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/ Other Hydrocarbons 0 0 0 0 0 0 1991-2013 Unfinished Oils 67 100 24 184 -43 199 1981-2013 Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. 0 0 0 0 0 0 1981-2013

66

TABLE12.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. 2. PAD District V-Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, January 1998 Crude Oil ............................................ 67,121 - 13,641 4,786 -2,251 3,132 0 74,187 5,978 0 63,808 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ........ 2,884 1,346 5 - 0 -1,591 - 3,038 451 2,337 3,315 Pentanes Plus ................................... 1,572 - 0 - 0 -1 - 1,293 (s) 280 23 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............. 1,312 1,346 5 - 0 -1,590 - 1,745 450 2,058 3,292 Ethane/Ethylene ............................ 2 0 0 - 0 0 - 0 0 2 0 Propane/Propylene ....................... 358 1,447 5 - 0 -805 - 0 149 2,466 1,676 Normal Butane/Butylene ............... 639 -241 0 - 0 -771 - 1,348 301 -480 1,111 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 313 140 0 - 0 -14 - 397 0 70 505 Other Liquids ..................................... 2,710 - 2,197 - 734 2,707 - 2,248 94 592 36,195 Other

67

table08.chp:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

106,453 106,453 - 157,490 -279 -53,603 7,143 0 202,918 0 0 717,193 Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs ........ 39,438 10,759 2,005 - -2,109 -6,438 - 7,105 885 48,541 46,872 Pentanes Plus .................................. 5,820 - 1,031 - -167 925 - 2,057 0 3,702 4,603 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............. 33,618 10,759 974 - -1,942 -7,363 - 5,048 885 44,839 42,269 Ethane/Ethylene ........................... 15,603 751 544 - 3,485 -1,605 - 0 0 21,988 14,111 Propane/Propylene ....................... 11,268 9,321 136 - -4,893 -3,707 - 0 637 18,902 15,091 Normal Butane/Butylene ............... 2,346 107 176 - -356 -2,748 - 3,088 248 1,685 7,266 Isobutane/Isobutylene ................... 4,401 580 118 - -178 697 - 1,960 0 2,264 5,801 Other Liquids .................................... 5,321 - 6,903 - -2,255 2,536 - 6,692 2,021 -1,280 65,913 Other Hydrocarbons/Oxygenates .... 4,613 - 22

68

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Exports Exports Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Biomass-Based Diesel Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils Petro. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

69

U.S. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total 522,879 659,392 738,803 858,685 1,089,848 1,172,965 1981-2012 Crude Oil 10,006 10,464 15,985 15,198 17,158 24,693 1870-2012 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 25,584 36,951 50,681 59,842 90,968 115,054 1981-2012 Pentanes Plus 4,776 12,393 14,337 11,792 36,837 43,136 1984-2012 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 20,809 24,558 36,344 48,050 54,131 71,918 1981-2012 Ethane/Ethylene 1983-1992 Propane/Propylene 15,501 19,264 30,925 39,860 45,243 62,490 1981-2012 Normal Butane/Butylene 5,308 5,294 5,419 8,189 8,888 9,428 1981-2012 Isobutane/Isobutylene 1984-1992 Other Liquids 32,049 23,477 23,625 44,514 67,981 78,359 1991-2012 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/ Other Hydrocarbons

70

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10,500 998 19,270 9,979 482 370 18,113 3,631 19,116 10,500 998 19,270 9,979 482 370 18,113 3,631 19,116 Crude Oil 7,794 - - - - 7,911 278 256 15,628 99 0 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 2,707 -18 634 134 - - 101 560 465 2,331 Pentanes Plus 372 -18 - - 26 - - -23 189 100 114 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,334 - - 634 108 - - 124 371 365 2,217 Ethane/Ethylene 1,001 - - 13 0 - - -14 - - 1,027 Propane/Propylene 852 - - 575 87 - - 86 - 335 1,093 Normal Butane/Butylene 230 - - 58 11 - - 33 157 30 78 Isobutane/Isobutylene 253 - - -12 10 - - 19 214 - 18 Other Liquids - - 1,015 - - 1,337 296 304 1,926 219 199 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons - - 1,015 - - 75 121 -36 1,129 118 0 Hydrogen - - - - - - 208 - - 208 0 - -

71

Product Supplied for Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Liquids and LRGs Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petro. Feed Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Petroleum Coke - Marketable Petroleum Coke - Catalyst Asphalt and Road Oil Still Gas Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

72

Coke profile and effect on methane/ethylene conversion process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

balance in catalytic cracking. It is also extremely important in the dehydrogenation of butane to butadiene, because coke formation limits the cycle time before regeneration of the catalyst is needed. There are many add that equally important examples..., methane, ethane, ethylene, propane, iso-butane, butane, iso-pentane, pentane and hexanes. Also, the flow rate of the effluent stream is measured using the bubble meter. The mole percentages of methane and ethylene are subtracted of the effluent stream...

Al-Solami, Bandar

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Phase behavior of carbon dioxide in admixture with n-butane, n-decane, n-butylcyclohexane, and n-butylbenzene at 344 K and approximately 9600 kPa  

SciTech Connect

Bubble point pressure data were acquired at 344 K and about 9600 kPa on ternary mixtures of carbon dioxide and n-butane with paraffinic (n-decane), naphthenic (n-butylcyclohexane), and aromatic (n-butylbenzene) compounds to determine what effect differences in compound type might have on carbon dioxide-hydrocarbon miscibility of such systems. The data on carbon dioxide-n-butane-n-decane, when compared with those from the literature, showed good agreement. This suggests that the remaining data reported here are reliable. The data were regressed by using the Soave-Redlich-Kwong equation of state to determine interaction coefficient sets for phase behavior prediction. These sets of interaction coefficients were used to calculate carbon dioxide-hydrocarbon miscibility. No significant difference in miscibility was found as the heavy hydrocarbon compound was changed from paraffinic to naphthenic to aromatic type.

Cramer, H.C.; Swift, G.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Bimetallic Ni-Rh catalysts with low amounts of Rh for the steam and autothermal reforming of n-butane for fuel-cell applications.  

SciTech Connect

Mono-metallic nickel and rhodium catalysts and bimetallic Ni-Rh catalysts supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeZrO{sub 2} and CeMgOx were prepared and evaluated for catalyzing the steam and autothermal reforming of n-butane. The binary Ni-Rh supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts with low weight loading of rhodium exhibited higher H{sub 2} yields than Ni or Rh alone. The Ni-Rh/CeZrO{sub 2} catalyst exhibited higher performance and no coke formation, compared to the same metals on other supports. A NiAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase was obtained on all Ni and Ni-Rh catalysts supported on La-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The presence of rhodium stabilized the spinel phase as well as NiOx species upon reforming while Ni alone was mostly reduced into metallic species. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure analysis showed evidence of Ni-Rh alloy during preparation and even further after an accelerated aging at 900C in a H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O atmosphere.

Ferrandon, M.; Kropf, A. J.; Krause, T.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

ADSORPTION/DESORPTION STUDIES ON SOLID ACID ALKYLATION CATALYSTS USING A TAPERED ELEMENT OSCILLATING MICROBALANCE (TEOM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the first time the adsorption/desorption characteristics of alkylation reactants and products on these zeolites and some mesoporous materials. Equilibrium adsorption isotherms were obtained on these catalysts using n-butane, isobutane, and propane....2.1. Zeolites 72 4.2.2. Mesoporous Materials 78 4.2.3. Chemicals 79 vi 4.3. Equilibrium Adsorption Isotherms of n-Butane, Isobutane, and Propane on b- zeolite and USY-zeolite 79 4.4. Equilibrium Adsorption Isotherms of CO2 on b-zeolite and USY-zeolite 89 4...

Gong, Kening

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

76

Reaction of Cp*(CO)2ReRe(CO)2Cp* with Dimethyl Acetylenedicarboxylate Produces a 3,4-Dimetallacyclobutene Which Undergoes Photochemical Isomerization to a 2,4-Dimetallabicyclo[1.1.0]butane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reaction of Cp*(CO)2ReRe(CO)2Cp* with Dimethyl Acetylenedicarboxylate Produces a 3,4-Dimetallacyclobutene Which Undergoes Photochemical Isomerization to a 2,4-Dimetallabicyclo[1.1.0]butane ... The reaction of Cp*(CO)2ReRe(CO)2Cp* (1) with dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate (DMAD) produced the 3,4-dimetallacyclobutene Cp*(CO)2Re(?-?1,?1-CH3O2CCCCO2CH3)Re(CO)2Cp* (2). ... Photochemical rearrangement of 2 produced Cp*(CO)2Re(?-?2,?2-CH3O2CC?CCO2CH3)Re(CO)2Cp* (3), in which both Cp*(CO)2Re units are coordinated to the alkyne. ...

Charles P. Casey; Ronald S. Cariño; Randy K. Hayashi; Kurt D. Schladetzky

1996-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

77

Kinetics simulation for natural gas conversion to unsaturated C? hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

value. The usual chemical composition range of natural gas is shown in Table I. l. Table 1. 1 Natural Gas Composition Component Methane Ethane Pro ane iso-Butane normal-Butane iso-Pentane normal-Pentane Hexane s lus Nitro en Carbon Dioxide... Acetylene Carbon Ethylene Hydrogen Methane Water Carbon Dioxide CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Challenge for Natural Gas Natural Gas (NG), which is comprised priinarily of methane, is found throughout the world, burns cleanly, and processes a high caloric...

Yang, Li

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

untitled  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Plus 32 - 0 0 - 8 22 2 0 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 36 68 2 0 - 23 36 15 32 EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 PropanePropylene 14 58 1 0 - 11 0 14 47 Normal ButaneButylene...

79

PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Pentanes Plus 37 - 0 0 - 0 28 1 8 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 40 68 2 0 - 0 39 18 53 EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 PropanePropylene 13 56 2 0 - 0 0 15 56 Normal ButaneButylene...

80

untitled  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Plus 37 - 0 0 - 0 25 1 11 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 40 69 2 0 - 0 38 18 55 EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 PropanePropylene 13 56 2 0 - 0 0 15 56 Normal ButaneButylene...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butane butylene isobutane" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

untitled  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Plus 38 - 0 0 - 1 26 1 11 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 40 77 3 0 - 9 34 19 58 EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 PropanePropylene 13 56 2 0 - 3 0 15 53 Normal ButaneButylene...

82

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pentanes Plus 3 - 0 0 - 0 0 0 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 14 13 56 88 - -8 5 1 174 EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 1 PropanePropylene 9 45 50 88 - 1 0 0 191 Normal ButaneButylene...

83

Roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of alkanes.  

SciTech Connect

CASPT2 calculations predict the existence of roaming radical pathways for the decomposition of propane, n-butane, isobutane and neopentane. The roaming radical paths lead to the formation of an alkane and an alkene instead of the expected radical products. The predicted barriers for the roaming radical paths lie {approx}1 kcal/mol below the corresponding radical asymptotes.

Harding, L. B.; Klippenstein, S. J. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Transport of Injected Isobutane by Thermal Groundwater in Long...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

uses of isotopes have led to novel interpretations of the evolution of fluid and rock chemistry over time. New modelling techniques have allowed elucidation of multi-component...

85

Nanocomposites Derived from Sulfonated Poly(butylene terephthalate)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bret J. Chisholm ,*† Robert B. Moore ,*‡ Grant Barber ,‡ Farid Khouri ,† Anne Hempstead ,† Michael Larsen ,† Eric Olson ,† Jim Kelley ,† Gary Balch ,† and Joel Caraher † ...

Bret J. Chisholm; Robert B. Moore; Grant Barber; Farid Khouri; Anne Hempstead; Michael Larsen; Eric Olson; Jim Kelley; Gary Balch; Joel Caraher

2002-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

86

TABLE17.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. 7. Refinery Net Production of Finished Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, January 1998 Liquefied Refinery Gases ........................................... 576 -7 569 2,415 -51 392 2,756 Ethane/Ethylene ..................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Ethane ............................................................... W W W W W W W Ethylene ............................................................ W W W W W W W Propane/Propylene ................................................ 1,656 33 1,689 2,645 329 628 3,602 Propane ............................................................. W W W 1,979 W W W Propylene .......................................................... W W W 666 W W W Normal Butane/Butylene ........................................ -804 -39 -843 -320 -337 -180 -837 Normal Butane ..................................................

87

Crystalline mesoporous zirconia catalysts having stable tetragonal pore wall structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are disclosed for the preparation of new sulfated mesoporous zirconia materials/catalysts with crystalline pore walls of predominantly tetragonal crystal structure, characterized by nitrogen physical sorption measurement, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and catalytic tests using n-butane isomerization to iso-butane and alkylation of 1-naphthol with 4-tert-butylstyrene as probe reactions. Sulfate deposition is preferred for the transformation of a mesoporous precursor with amorphous pore walls into a material with crystalline pore walls maintaining the mesoporous characteristics. 17 figs.

Sachtler, W.M.H.; Huang, Y.Y.

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

88

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Imports by Area of Entry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Area of Entry by Area of Entry Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Ethylene Propane Propylene Normal Butane Butylene Isobutane Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Biomass-Based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Conventional Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene-Type Bonded Aircraft Fuel Other Bonded Aircraft Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Bonded, 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Other, 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Bonded, Greater than 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Other, Greater than 2000 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, 0.31 to 1.00% Sulfur Residual F.O., Bonded Ship Bunkers, Greater than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

89

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 December 2011 Alcohol. The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH3-(CH2)n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate. The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gasoline. Alkylation. A refining process for chemically combining isobutane with olefin hydrocarbons (e.g., propylene, butylene) through the control of temperature and pressure in the presence of an acid catalyst,

90

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 September 2013 Alcohol. The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH3-(CH2)n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate. The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gasoline. Alkylation. A refining process for chemically combining isobutane with olefin hydrocarbons (e.g., propylene, butylene) through the control of temperature and pressure in the presence of an acid catalyst,

91

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Butane (C4H10) A normally gaseous straight-chain or branch-chain hydrocarbon extracted from natural gas or refinery gas streams. It includes isobutane and normal butane and is designated in ASTM Specification D1835 and Gas Processors Association Specifications for commercial butane.

92

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts Receipts by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge Between PAD Districts Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Butane (C4H10) A normally gaseous straight-chain or branch-chain hydrocarbon extracted from natural gas or refinery gas streams. It includes isobutane and normal butane and is designated in ASTM Specification D1835 and Gas Processors Association Specifications for commercial butane.

93

PC-based control system complements NGL heat-recovery project  

SciTech Connect

Valero Hydrocarbons has employed a PC-based control system to realize the energy-savings potential of a heat-recovery project at its Corpus Christi, Tex., NGL fractionator (CCF). Valero Hydrocarbons' CCF was originally placed on-line in 1966. The operation of CCF as an isobutane-butane-natural gasoline fractionation complex started in 1982 after the plant's recovery section was replaced by the cryogenic unit at the nearby Shoup plant. The plant is still a significant Gulf Coast NGL processor, having a rated throughput of 10,000 b/d of the isobutane and heavier feedstock. The plant has operated successfully, however, at rates up to 11,300 b/d.

Young, R.M.

1988-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

94

Extended Catalyst Longevity via Supercritical Isobutane Regeneration of a Partially Deactivated USY Alkylation Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Box 1625, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415-2208, and Marathon?Ashland Petroleum, LLC, P.O. ... 2 These processes present serious safety and environmental concerns arising from the need to transport and store the concentrated liquid acids, as well as from the need to dispose of acid?oil sludges produced as byproducts of the processes. ...

David N. Thompson; Daniel M. Ginosar; Kyle C. Burch; David J. Zalewski

2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

95

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 September 2013 Table 32. Blender Net Inputs of Petroleum Products by PAD District, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 - East Coast PAD District 2 - Midwest East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri Total Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ....................................................... 308 5 313 45 44 345 434 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... - - - - 2 75 77 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 308 5 313 45 42 270 357 Normal Butane .................................................. 308 5 313 45 42 270 357 Isobutane .......................................................... - - - - - - - Other Liquids ..........................................................

96

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.PDF 0.PDF Table 20. Blender Net Inputs of Petroleum Products by PAD Districts, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 - East Coast PAD District 2 - Midwest East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri Total Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ....................................................... 158 5 163 47 18 168 233 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... 5 - 5 - - 5 5 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 153 5 158 47 18 163 228 Normal Butane .................................................. 153 5 158 47 18 163 228 Isobutane .......................................................... - - - - - - - Other Liquids ..........................................................

97

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Blender Net Inputs of Petroleum Products by PAD Districts, 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD District 1 - East Coast PAD District 2 - Midwest East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri Total Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ....................................................... 1,744 80 1,824 345 324 2,161 2,830 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... 63 - 63 - - 87 87 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 1,681 80 1,761 345 324 2,074 2,743 Normal Butane .................................................. 1,681 80 1,761 345 324 2,074 2,743 Isobutane .......................................................... - - - - - - - Other Liquids ..........................................................

98

TABLE16.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6. 6. Refinery Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, January 1998 Crude Oil ................................................................... 44,047 2,783 46,830 70,320 12,891 21,794 105,005 Natural Gas Liquids ................................................. 252 0 252 2,613 131 1,076 3,820 Pentanes Plus ....................................................... 0 0 0 202 45 522 769 Liquefied Petroleum Gases ................................... 252 0 252 2,411 86 554 3,051 Ethane ............................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Propane ............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Normal Butane .................................................. 162 0 162 1,792 76 435 2,303 Isobutane ..........................................................

99

An investigation of the correlation of core analysis data with original core saturations in the Kelly-Snyder Field, Scurry County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the oil ?as obtained, a copy of which is included as Table I' GAS ANALYSES Gas From Line 0 Keli - der Field A 8c M Colic e sll Ro~ %el Mo Aver s vsrage Mo Gas Used in Ex rijasnta vsr 8 Mo Carbon Diomide Nitrogen Methane Ethane Propane Iso-Butane... Normal-Butane Iao-Pentane Normal Pentane Heaanes plus . 26 4-99 54. 58 lg 80 1*23 3+33 . 28 ~ 27 1-75 5. 60 . 80 1, $9 . 63 1. 0$ lP. O) 51. 31 19~?7 19 ' 3Q 17. 68 16. @ 93 30 1. 69 ~ 27 ~ 07 66 51. 25 19 gO 28. 83 100 00 100...

Van Meter, Orville Everett, Jr

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The Research and Motor octane numbers of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an experimental study of the Research (RON) and Motor (MON) octane numbers of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG). A comprehensive set of RON and MON data for mixtures of propane, propylene (propene), n-butane and iso-butane are presented, using a method that is consistent with the currently active ASTM Research and Motor test methods for liquid fuels. Empirical models which relate LPG composition to its RON and MON are then developed, such that the simplest relationships between the constituent species’ mole fractions and the mixture octane rating are achieved. This is used to determine the degree of non-linearity between the composition and the RON and MON of different LPG mixtures. Finally, implications for LPG fuel quality standards are discussed briefly, as part of a suggested, more substantial undertaking by the community which also revisits the standard test procedures for measuring the RON and MON of LPG.

Kai J. Morganti; Tien Mun Foong; Michael J. Brear; Gabriel da Silva; Yi Yang; Frederick L. Dryer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butane butylene isobutane" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

@Title = Definitions of Petroleum Products and Other Terms  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Definitions of Petroleum Products and Other Terms (Revised January 2010) Alcohol. The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH 3 - (CH 2 )n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate. The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gasoline. Alkylation. A refining process for chemically combining isobutane with olefin hydrocarbons (e.g., propylene, butylene) through the control of temperature and pressure in the presence of an acid catalyst, usually sulfuric acid or hydrofluoric acid. The product, alkylate, an

102

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Plant Field Production Plant Field Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Butylene (C4H8) An olefinic hydrocarbon recovered from refinery processes. Ethane (C2H6) A normally gaseous straight-chain hydrocarbon. It is a colorless paraffinic gas that boils at a temperature of -127.48º F. It is extracted from natural gas and refinery gas streams. Field Production Represents crude oil production on leases, natural gas liquids production at natural gas processing plants, new supply of other hydrocarbons/oxygenates and motor gasoline blending components, and fuel ethanol blended into finished motor gasoline. Isobutane (C4H10) A normally gaseous branch-chain hydrocarbon. It is a colorless paraffinic gas that boils at a temperature of 10.9º F. It is extracted from natural gas or refinery gas streams.

103

Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

petroleum petroleum Alcohol: The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH(3)-(CH(2))n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate: The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high-octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gasoline. Alkylation: A refining process for chemically combining isobutane with olefin hydrocarbons (e.g., propylene, butylene) through the control of temperature and pressure in the presence of anacid catalyst, usually sulfuric acid or hydrofluoric acid. The product alkylate, an isoparaffin, has high octane value and is blended with motor and aviation gasoline to

104

Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Natural Gas Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Propane Normal Butane Isobutane Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Product: Natural Gas Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Propane Normal Butane Isobutane Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 74,056 76,732 74,938 79,040 82,376 81,196 1981-2013 PADD 1 1,525 1,439 2,394 2,918 2,821 2,687 1981-2013 East Coast 1993-2008 Appalachian No. 1 1,525 1,439 2,394 2,918 2,821 2,687 1993-2013 PADD 2 12,892 13,208 13,331 13,524 15,204 15,230 1981-2013 Ind., Ill. and Ky. 1,975 1,690 2,171 1,877 2,630 2,746 1993-2013

105

Natural Gas Plant Stocks of Natural Gas Liquids  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Natural Gas Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Propane Normal Butane Isobutane Period: Monthly Annual Product: Natural Gas Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Propane Normal Butane Isobutane Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 5,419 6,722 6,801 5,826 6,210 6,249 1993-2013 PADD 1 122 121 115 189 246 248 1993-2013 East Coast 1993-2010 Appalachian No. 1 122 121 115 189 246 248 1993-2013 PADD 2 959 891 880 1,129 1,104 1,041 1993-2013 Ind., Ill. and Ky. 311 300 298 308 262 260 1993-2013 Minn., Wis., N. Dak., S. Dak. 56 64 58 60 51 64 1993-2013 Okla., Kans., Mo. 592 527 524 761 791 717 1993-2013 PADD 3 3,810 5,007 5,032 3,817 4,246 4,272 1993-2013

106

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 September 2013 Table 49. Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD District, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels) Commodity PAD Districts U.S. Total 1 2 3 4 5 Total Daily Average Crude Oil 1 ............................................................ 94 2,282 598 1 - 2,975 99 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases ................................................... 453 2,129 10,579 380 396 13,937 465 Pentanes Plus .................................................. 300 1,599 652 346 92 2,989 100 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .............................. 153 530 9,927 34 304 10,947 365 Ethane/Ethylene ........................................... - - - - - - - Propane/Propylene ....................................... 126 199 9,412 4 299 10,040 335 Normal Butane/Butylene ...............................

107

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Measurement of organic compounds in Karaha- Telaga Bodas and Coso fluid inclusions shows there are strong relationships between H2 concentrations and alkane/alkene ratios and benzene concentrations. Inclusion analyses that indicate H2 concentrations > 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and butane > butylene. There are three end member fluid compositions: type 1 fluids in which alkane compounds predominate, type 2 fluids that have ethane and propylene and no

108

Production of biodiesel using expanded gas solvents  

SciTech Connect

A method of producing an alkyl ester. The method comprises providing an alcohol and a triglyceride or fatty acid. An expanding gas is dissolved into the alcohol to form a gas expanded solvent. The alcohol is reacted with the triglyceride or fatty acid in a single phase to produce the alkyl ester. The expanding gas may be a nonpolar expanding gas, such as carbon dioxide, methane, ethane, propane, butane, pentane, ethylene, propylene, butylene, pentene, isomers thereof, and mixtures thereof, which is dissolved into the alcohol. The gas expanded solvent may be maintained at a temperature below, at, or above a critical temperature of the expanding gas and at a pressure below, at, or above a critical pressure of the expanding gas.

Ginosar, Daniel M [Idaho Falls, ID; Fox, Robert V [Idaho Falls, ID; Petkovic, Lucia M [Idaho Falls, ID

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

109

E. In Situ Polymerization of Cyclic Butylene Terephthalate(CBT) Oligomers with Conductive fillers for Thermal Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

copolymers with Thermal conductivity Composites This research is funded by Honeywell Corporation and the Florida High Tech Corridor. NOTE: Honeywell and Julie Harmon have signed an agreement with Cyclics Corp; these materials exhibit an intrinsic fiber TC as high as 913 W/mK (51). Earlier work with Honeywell focused

Harmon, Julie P.

110

Effects of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on the Shear-Induced Crystallization Behavior of Poly(butylene terephthalate)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to disperse particles and to generate composition uniformity and is ac- complished using twin screw extruders

Fisher, Frank

111

Total Blender Net Input of Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Input Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquid Petroleum Gases Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Oxygenates/Renewables Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

112

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2013 | Release Date: May 16, 15, 2013 | Release Date: May 16, 2013 | Next Release: May 23, 2013 Previous Issues Week: 12/29/2013 (View Archive) JUMP TO: In The News | Overview | Prices/Demand/Supply | Storage In the News: Natural gas liquids price information added to the Natural Gas Weekly Upd Starting today, the Natural Gas Weekly Update will include a graph and a brief text overview of natural gas liquids (NGL) spot prices for five products: ethane, propane, butane, isobutane, and natural gasoline, as well as a volume-weighted composite of these prices. The natural gas plant liquids (NGPL) composite price is calculated by applying the proportionate yield of liquids produced at natural gas processing plants to the daily spot prices. Next week's Natural Gas Weekly Update will feature the NGL

113

EIA-816  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6281 6281 Receipts During Month Inputs During Month Production During Month Shipments During Month Plant Fuel Use & Losses 247 Pentanes Plus Isobutane Normal Butane 249 Month 220 243 Ethane Propane Stocks End of Month Product Code Stocks Beginning of Month FORM EIA-816 MONTHLY NATURAL GAS LIQUIDS REPORT A completed form must be received by the 20th calendar day following the end of the report month. This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly to make to any Agency or Department of the United States any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements as to any matter within its jurisdiction. See Instructions for further details on

114

Total Refinery Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Crude Oil & Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Hydrogen Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components (net) Alaskan Crude Oil Receipts Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

115

RPT_PERIOD","R_S_NAME","LINE_NUM","PROD_CODE","PROD_NAME","PORT_CODE","PORT_CITY  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

RPT_PERIOD","R_S_NAME","LINE_NUM","PROD_CODE","PROD_NAME","PORT_CODE","PORT_CITY","PORT_STATE","PORT_PADD","GCTRY_CODE","CNTRY_NAME","QUANTITY","SULFUR","APIGRAVITY","PCOMP_RNAM","PCOMP_SNAM","PCOMP_STAT","STATE_NAME","PCOMP_PADD" RPT_PERIOD","R_S_NAME","LINE_NUM","PROD_CODE","PROD_NAME","PORT_CODE","PORT_CITY","PORT_STATE","PORT_PADD","GCTRY_CODE","CNTRY_NAME","QUANTITY","SULFUR","APIGRAVITY","PCOMP_RNAM","PCOMP_SNAM","PCOMP_STAT","STATE_NAME","PCOMP_PADD" 41547,"AEROPRES CORP ",1,253,"Isobutane/Ngl",3402,"NOYES, MN","MINNESOTA",2,260,"CANADA",2,0,0,,,,," " 41547,"AEROPRES CORP ",2,252,"Normal Butane/Ngl",3402,"NOYES, MN","MINNESOTA",2,260,"CANADA",5,0,0,,,,," "

116

Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Crude Oil & Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Hydrogen Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components (net) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

117

Comparison of CO and NO Emissions from Propane, n-Butane, and Dimethyl Ether Premixed Flames  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements were made with a water-cooled stainless steel sampling probe situated above the visible reaction zone of a co-flow burner. ... Dehydration is satisfactory for DME production geared toward current demand but it is not cost-effective for the mass production of DME required for widespread fuel use.10 The recent and intense interest in DME as a transportation fuel has arisen from development of new methods to produce DME on a larger scale from natural gas10 and from syngas in a one-step slurry phase process. ...

Christopher A. Frye; André L. Boehman; Peter J. A. Tijm

1999-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

118

Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of 0-A12O3- Supported Vanadium Oxide Catalysts for Butane Dehydrogenation  

SciTech Connect

This chapter contains sections titled: Introduction; Structure of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Supported Vanadia Catalysts; Quantification of Surface VOx Species on Supported Vanadia Catalysts; Conclusion; Acknowledgements; and References.

Wu, Zili [ORNL; Kim, Hack-Sung [Northwestern University, Evanston; Stair, Peter [Northwestern University, Evanston

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

==================== !"#$%&'()*+,-+./,0)12 Development of Micro Ejector for Butane Catalytic Combustor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combustion of the fuel then takes place in the ceramic chamber, and heat generated is used in various micro Combustor, Convergent-divergent Nozzle, Ejector, Back pressure. Fig. 1 Configuration of micro heat generation system. 1. Introduction In order to produce portable power generating devices from hydrocarbon

Kasagi, Nobuhide

120

Thermochemistry of radicals formed by hydrogen abstraction from 1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, and butanal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and alternative-fuel com- bustion, where they are important as intermediates. Therefore reliable prediction with sparsely available group additivity data, and trends in enthalpy and free energy as a function of radical center are discussed for the isomeric radicals. © 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http

Truhlar, Donald G

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butane butylene isobutane" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

METHANE AND n-BUTANE OXIDATION WITH CO2 UNDER RADIOFREQUENCY PLASMAS OF MODERATE PRESSURES (*)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

de 35 MHz sous une pression de 20 torr en variant, vitesses de flux (6-301 (TPS) min.-1), et- ponding to the kinetic gas temperature. Spectroscopic investigations [4a, b], carried out under similarW of STEL, Massy, France) by means of two external annular electrodes of copper, 3.5 cm high, set at a fixed

Boyer, Edmond

122

U.S. Refinery Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total 5,383,494 5,119,100 4,676,865 4,568,301 4,484,600 4,395,128 2005-2012 Liquefied Refinery Gases 238,904 230,431 227,470 240,454 225,992 230,413 2005-2012 Ethane/Ethylene 7,323 6,671 7,069 7,228 7,148 6,597 2005-2012 Ethane 5,145 4,608 5,229 5,200 5,105 4,835 2005-2012 Ethylene 2,178 2,063 1,840 2,028 2,043 1,762 2005-2012 Propane/Propylene 205,179 190,020 196,011 204,223 201,492 202,309 2005-2012 Propane 120,596 114,268 106,177 102,913 98,508 100,933 2005-2012 Propylene 84,583 75,752 89,834 101,310 102,984 101,376 2005-2012 Normal Butane/Butylene 24,285 30,887 24,148 30,281 17,449 20,580 2005-2012 Normal Butane 25,715 33,092 25,825 32,094 19,263 22,965 2005-2012

123

U.S. Refinery and Blender Net Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total 6,567,929 6,641,293 6,527,069 6,735,067 6,815,590 6,794,407 1981-2012 Liquefied Refinery Gases 238,904 230,431 227,470 240,454 225,992 230,413 1981-2012 Ethane/Ethylene 7,323 6,671 7,069 7,228 7,148 6,597 1981-2012 Ethane 5,145 4,608 5,229 5,200 5,105 4,835 1993-2012 Ethylene 2,178 2,063 1,840 2,028 2,043 1,762 1993-2012 Propane/Propylene 205,179 190,020 196,011 204,223 201,492 202,309 1981-2012 Propane 120,596 114,268 106,177 102,913 98,508 100,933 1995-2012 Propylene 84,583 75,752 89,834 101,310 102,984 101,376 1993-2012 Normal Butane/Butylene 24,285 30,887 24,148 30,281 17,449 20,580 1981-2012 Normal Butane 25,715 33,092 25,825 32,094 19,263 22,965 1993-2012

124

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Plant Processing Plant Processing Definitions Key Terms Definition Extraction Loss The reduction in volume of natural gas due to the removal of natural gas liquid constituents such as ethane, propane, and butane at natural gas processing plants. Natural Gas Processed Natural gas that has gone through a processing plant. Natural Gas Processing Plant A facility designed to recover natural gas liquids from a stream of natural gas which may or may not have passed through lease separators and/or field separation facilities. These facilities also control the quality of the natural gas to be marketed. Cycling plants are classified as natural gas processing plants. For definitions of related energy terms, refer to the EIA Energy Glossary. Sources Natural Gas Processed, Total Liquids Extracted, and Extraction Loss Volume: Form EIA-64A, "Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production" . Estimated Heat Content of Extraction Loss: Estimated, assuming the makeup to total liquids production as reported on Form EIA-64A for each State was proportional to the components and products ultimately separated in the States as reported on the 12 monthly reports on Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report," and applying the following conversion factors to the individual component and product production estimates (million Btu extraction loss per barrel of liquid produced): ethane - 3.082; propane - 3.836; normal butane - 4.326; isobutane - 3.974; pentanes plus - 4.620.

125

Dynamics of H abstraction from alcohols (CH3OH, C2H5OH and 2-C3H7OH) using velocity map imaging in crossed molecular beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigation of the reactions with propane, isobutane,selectively deuterated propane and also methane. State-ratios were very similar for propane and isobutane. Andresen

Ahmed, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Fluid catalytic cracking feed hydrotreatment and its severity impact on product yields and quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the effect of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) feed hydrotreatment and its severity increase on product yields and quality obtained in a commercial and a laboratory MAT FCC units. The hydrotreatment of Ural heavy vacuum gas oil reduces not only sulfur, nitrogen, Conradson carbon and metals content in the FCC feed but also increases the mononuclear aromatic hydrocarbons content by 8% absolute at almost no change in the total aromatics content. Regardless of this 8% increase of the mononuclear aromatics in the hydrotreated FCC feed the conversion increase in both commercial and laboratory MAT units was only 2%. The severity increase in the FCC feed hydrotreater leads to a higher conversion in the FCC, higher hydrogen transfer rate that results in higher isobutane/butylenes ratio, lower gasoline olefins content, and higher gasoline motor octane number. The hydrotreatment of the Ural heavy vacuum gas oil exhibited the same changes in FCC catalyst selectivities: lower coke and LCO selectivities and higher gasoline selectivity in both commercial riser FCC unit that has between 2 and 3 s time on stream, and the fixed bed reactor MAT unit, that has 30 s time on stream.

Dicho S. Stratiev; Ivelina K. Shishkova; Dimitar S. Dobrev

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Vehicular emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from a tunnel study in Hong Kong  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ethene toluene n-butane propane i-pentane i-butane propeneethene, toluene, n-butane, propane and i-pentane. These fiveVOCs emitted. The high propane and n-butane emissions were

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Vehicular fuel composition and atmospheric emissions in South China: Hong Kong, Macau, Guangzhou, and Zhuhai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comprised mainly of n-butane, propane and i-butane. Trafficthat the relative amount of propane, i-butane, and n- butanein LPG fueled vehicles. Propane to butanes ra- tios were

Tsai, W. Y; Chan, L. Y; Blake, D. R; Chu, K. W

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Studies on Mechanical Properties, Thermal Degradation, and Combustion Behaviors of Poly(1,4-butylene terephthalate)/Glass Fiber/Cerium Hypophosphite Composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the GRPBT composite with 15 wt % of CHP, the storage modulus value at 30 °C was 3 times that of GRPBT. ... Yang, W.; Hu, Y.; Tai, Q. L.; Lu, H. D.; Song, L.; Yuen, R. K. K.Fire and mechanical performance of nanoclay reinforced glass-fiber/PBT composites containing aluminum hypophosphite particles Composites, Part A 2011, 42, 794– 800 ...

Wei Yang; Ningning Hong; Lei Song; Yuan Hu; Richard K. K. Yuen; Xinglong Gong

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

130

Vanadium Mesoporous Silica Catalyst Prepared by Direct Synthesis as High Performing Catalyst in Oxidative Dehydrogenation of n-Butane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The catalytic oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of light alkanes has great potential to be used for production of alkenes instead classically used dehydrogenation. We report successful direct synthesis of vanadi...

Michal Setni?ka; Pavel ?i?manec; Roman Bulánek; Arnošt Zukal…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

East Coast (PADD 1) Net Receipts of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Type: Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Type: Net Receipts Receipts Shipments Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Type Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 1,009,989 959,458 1,099,509 1,131,797 1,168,599 1,191,766 1981-2012 Crude Oil -3,860 -5,544 8,672 5,983 5,106 4,126 1981-2012 Petroleum Products 1,013,849 965,002 1,090,837 1,125,814 1,163,493 1,187,640 1986-2012 Pentanes Plus -590 -452 -113 -19 1991-2012 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 32,846 32,207 20,384 34,725 33,545 26,723 1981-2012 Ethane/Ethylene 1989-2002 Propane/Propylene 32,199 31,673 19,415 33,585 33,025 26,601 1989-2012 Normal Butane/Butylene

132

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3,256,148 352,785 6,794,407 3,878,852 122,574 57,691 6,406,693 3,256,148 352,785 6,794,407 3,878,852 122,574 57,691 6,406,693 1,172,965 6,767,418 1,807,777 Crude Oil 2,374,842 - - - - 3,120,755 52,746 34,134 5,489,516 24,693 0 1,060,764 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 881,306 -6,534 230,413 62,192 - - 23,894 186,270 115,054 842,159 153,268 Pentanes Plus 116,002 -6,534 - - 10,680 - - -4,857 63,596 43,136 18,273 12,739 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 765,304 - - 230,413 51,512 - - 28,751 122,674 71,918 823,886 140,529 Ethane/Ethylene 356,592 - - 6,597 115 - - 12,504 - - 350,800 35,396 Propane/Propylene 260,704 - - 202,309 42,460 - - 13,013 - 62,490 429,970 67,991 Normal Butane/Butylene 65,555 - - 20,580 5,567 - - 1,795 52,246 9,428 28,233 28,574

133

Intramolecular condensation reactions of {alpha}, {omega}- bis(triethoxy-silyl)alkanes. Formation of cyclic disilsesquioxanes  

SciTech Connect

Under acidic sol-gel polymerization conditions, 1,3-bis(triethoxysilyl)-propane (1) and 1,4-bis(triethoxysilyl)butane (2) were shown to preferentially form cyclic disilsesquioxanes 3 and 4 rather than the expected 1,3-propylene- and 1,4-butylene-bridged polysilsesquioxane gels. Formation of 3 and 4 is driven by a combination of an intramolecular cyclization to six and seven membered rings, and a pronounced reduction in reactivity under acidic conditions as a function of increasing degree of condensation. The ease with which these relatively unreactive cyclic monomers and dimers are formed (under acidic conditions) helps to explain the difficulties in forming gels from 1 and 2. The stability of cyclic disilsesquioxanes was confirmed withe the synthesis of 3 and 4 in gram quantities; the cyclic disilsesquioxanes react slowly to give tricyclic dimers containing a thermodynamically stable eight membered siloxane ring. Continued reactions were shown to perserve the cyclic structure, opening up the possibility of utilizing cyclic disilsesquioxanes as sol-gel monomers. Preliminary polymerization studies with these new, carbohydrate-like monomers revealed the formation of network poly(cyclic disilsesquioxanes) under acidic conditions and polymerization with ring-opening under basic conditions.

Loy, D.A.; Carpenter, J.P.; Myers, S.A.; Assink, R.A.; Small, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Greaves, J.; Shea, K.J. [California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

U.S. Total Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period: Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast (PADD 5) Period: Annual (as of January 1) Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 View History Total 765,593 758,619 710,413 -- -- -- 1982-2013 Crude Oil 180,830 179,471 180,846 -- -- -- 1985-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 34,772 32,498 33,842 -- -- -- 1982-2013 Propane/Propylene 10,294 8,711 8,513 -- -- -- 1982-2013 Normal Butane/Butylene 24,478 23,787 25,329 -- -- -- 1982-2013 Other Liquids 95,540 96,973 96,157 -- -- -- 1982-2013 Oxygenates 1,336 1,028 1,005 -- -- -- 1994-2013

135

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

571,552 300,900 1,523,608 673,109 268,869 -25,130 18,853 1,447,490 571,552 300,900 1,523,608 673,109 268,869 -25,130 18,853 1,447,490 89,370 1,757,194 287,201 Crude Oil 408,314 - - - - 633,223 292,624 -31,767 22,602 1,259,826 19,966 0 115,743 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 163,238 -6,037 44,417 27,019 -9,288 - - -4,496 38,476 40,729 144,640 43,693 Pentanes Plus 18,229 -6,037 - - 213 29,889 - - -1,599 11,319 36,827 -4,253 6,686 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 145,009 - - 44,417 26,806 -39,177 - - -2,897 27,157 3,902 148,893 37,007 Ethane/Ethylene 59,649 - - - 115 -39,435 - - -716 - - 21,045 3,590 Propane/Propylene 57,022 - - 39,605 21,464 -8,812 - - -1,114 - 580 109,813 22,020 Normal Butane/Butylene 17,564 - - 4,181 3,156 3,807 - - -1,354 10,449 3,322 16,291

136

Role of nanoclay in determining microfibrillar morphology development in PP/PBT blend nanocomposite fibers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to study the effect of organically modified montmorillonite (Cloisite 30B) on the microfibril formation of poly (butylene terephthalate) droplets in polypropylene/poly (butylene terephthal...

Ahmad Bigdeli; Hossein Nazockdast; Abosaeed Rashidi…

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

U.S. Refinery & Blender Net Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Total 526,996 566,851 559,032 581,600 578,456 543,388 1981-2013 Crude Oil 445,937 474,296 474,991 497,241 489,887 468,825 1981-2013 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 12,805 11,759 12,769 13,227 13,760 16,794 1981-2013 Pentanes Plus 4,949 4,341 4,752 4,734 5,331 5,666 1981-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 7,856 7,418 8,017 8,493 8,429 11,128 1981-2013 Ethane 1981-1992 Normal Butane 2,668 1,880 1,998 2,014 2,083 4,711 1981-2013 Isobutane 5,188 5,538 6,019 6,479 6,346 6,417 1981-2013 Other Liquids 68,254 80,796 71,272 71,132 74,809 57,769 1981-2013 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/ Other Hydrocarbons 32,667 34,665 34,097 35,446 36,356 33,881 1981-2013

138

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Natural Gas Liquids 74,056 76,732 74,938 79,040 82,376 81,196 1981-2013 Pentanes Plus 9,772 10,464 10,689 11,270 11,542 11,167 1981-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 64,284 66,268 64,249 67,770 70,834 70,029 1981-2013 Ethane 27,647 28,274 26,311 27,829 30,063 30,015 1981-2013 Propane 23,332 24,191 24,157 25,425 25,974 25,545 1981-2013 Normal Butane 5,876 6,383 6,543 6,399 6,508 6,893 1981-2013 Isobutane 7,429 7,420 7,238 8,117 8,289 7,576 1981-2013 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions, Sources, and Notes link above for more information on this table.

139

U.S. Refinery & Blender Net Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total 6,204,500 6,277,893 6,169,893 6,345,372 6,422,710 6,406,693 1981-2012 Crude Oil 5,532,097 5,361,287 5,232,656 5,374,094 5,404,347 5,489,516 1981-2012 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 184,383 177,559 177,194 161,479 178,884 186,270 1981-2012 Pentanes Plus 64,603 55,497 59,100 56,686 63,385 63,596 1981-2012 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 119,780 122,062 118,094 104,793 115,499 122,674 1981-2012 Ethane 1981-1992 Normal Butane 48,292 50,024 48,509 43,802 47,571 52,246 1981-2012 Isobutane 71,488 72,038 69,585 60,991 67,928 70,428 1981-2012 Other Liquids 488,020 739,047 760,043 809,799 839,479 730,907 1981-2012 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/ Other Hydrocarbons

140

U.S. Blender Net Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Input 1,184,435 1,522,193 1,850,204 2,166,784 2,331,109 2,399,318 2005-2012 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 3,445 5,686 6,538 7,810 10,663 2008-2012 Pentanes Plus 2,012 474 1,808 1,989 2,326 4,164 2005-2012 Liquid Petroleum Gases 2,971 3,878 4,549 5,484 6,499 2008-2012 Normal Butane 2,943 2,971 3,878 4,549 5,484 6,499 2005-2012 Isobutane 2005-2006 Other Liquids 1,518,748 1,844,518 2,160,246 2,323,299 2,388,655 2008-2012 Oxygenates/Renewables 234,047 274,974 286,837 295,004 2009-2012 Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) 2005-2006 Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) 234,047 274,974 286,837 295,004 2009-2012 Fuel Ethanol 131,810 182,772 232,677 273,107 281,507 287,433 2005-2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butane butylene isobutane" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 Table 5.10 Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Finished Petroleum Products 1 Liquefied Petroleum Gases Pentanes Plus 4 Total Ethane 2 Isobutane Normal Butane 3 Propane 2,3 Total 1949 53 8 11 61 74 155 223 430 1950 66 12 13 69 101 195 238 499 1955 68 34 30 120 205 390 313 771 1960 47 51 45 161 291 549 333 929 1965 41 92 67 185 390 734 434 1,210 1970 25 201 84 248 561 1,095 540 1,660 1975 7 337 90 237 552 1,217 409 1,633 1976 6 365 82 227 521 1,195 403 1,604 1977 5 397 81 223 513 1,214 399 1,618 1978 3 406 75 210 491 1,182 382 1,567 1979 26 400 104 212 500 1,216 342 1,584 1980 23 396 105 210 494 1,205 345 1,573 1981 18 397 117 224 519 1,256 334 1,609 1982 11 426 109 204 519 1,258 282 1,550 1983 12 456 100 217 541 1,314 233 1,559 1984 4 505 99 203 527 1,334 292 1,630 1985 14 493 127 171 521 1,313 282 1,609 1986 4 485 128 157 508 1,277

142

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Natural Gas Liquids 650,794 652,822 697,124 757,019 808,865 881,306 1981-2012 Pentanes Plus 95,899 96,530 98,904 101,155 106,284 116,002 1981-2012 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 554,895 556,292 598,220 655,864 702,581 765,304 1981-2012 Ethane 258,682 256,713 280,590 317,180 337,972 356,592 1981-2012 Propane 185,099 187,340 199,398 213,782 230,227 260,704 1981-2012 Normal Butane 46,833 48,976 49,528 56,655 57,399 65,555 1981-2012 Isobutane 64,281 63,263 68,704 68,247 76,983 82,453 1981-2012 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: See Definitions, Sources, and Notes link above for more information on this table.

143

U.S. Blender Net Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Total Input 206,541 217,867 212,114 216,075 219,783 208,203 2005-2013 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 891 352 376 196 383 1,397 2008-2013 Pentanes Plus 261 301 313 67 287 393 2005-2013 Liquid Petroleum Gases 630 51 63 129 96 1,004 2008-2013 Normal Butane 630 51 63 129 96 1,004 2005-2013 Isobutane 2005-2006 Other Liquids 205,650 217,515 211,738 215,879 219,400 206,806 2008-2013 Oxygenates/Renewables 25,156 26,576 26,253 26,905 27,788 25,795 2009-2013 Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) 2005-2006 Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) 25,156 26,576 26,253 26,905 27,788 25,795 2009-2013 Fuel Ethanol 24,163 25,526 24,804 25,491 25,970 24,116 2005-2013

144

Characterization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Asian and north American pollution plumes during INTEX-B: identification of specific Chinese air mass tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1,2-DCE), ethane, ethyne, propane, butanes, i-pentane, andDCE Ethane Ethene Ethyne Propane i-Butane n-Butane i-PentaneDCE Ethane Ethene Ethyne Propane i-Butane n-Butane i-Pentane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Finding the missing stratospheric Bry: a global modeling study of CHBr3 and CH2Br2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C-130 T0 T1 G1 Ethane Propane i-Butane n-Butane i-Pentane n-ppbv) Ethane Ethene Ethyne Propane Propene i-Butane n-Butanee.g. , ethane, ethene, propane, propane, methanol, ethanol,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Characterization of trace gases measured over Alberta oil sands mining operations: 76 speciated C2-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CH4, CO, NO, NO2, NOy, O3 and SO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3. Continued. SO 2 NO Ethene Propane n- Butane n- Heptanebetween CH 4 , ethane and propane suggest low levels ofa n/a n/a Alkanes Ethane Propane i-Butane n-Butane i-Pentane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Concurrent observations of air pollutants at two sites in the Pearl River Delta and the implication of regional transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ethylbenzene (b) i-butane to propane at TC and WQS H. Guo etto ethylbenzene (b) i-butane to propane at TC and WQS duringto ethylbenzene (b) i-butane to propane at TC and WQS during

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Gas-Phase Reactions of Doubly Charged Lanthanide Cations with Alkanes and Alkenes. Trends in Metal(2+) Reactivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alkanes (methane, ethane, propane, n-butane) and alkenes (and 9, respectively). With propane and n-butane, all the Lnin the reactions of La 2+ with propane and n-butane, and the

Gibson, John K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C-130 T0 T1 G1 Ethane Propane i-Butane n-Butane i-Pentane n-ppbv) Ethane Ethene Ethyne Propane Propene i-Butane n-Butanee.g. , ethane, ethene, propane, propane, methanol, ethanol,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Boreal forest fire emissions in fresh Canadian smoke plumes: C1-C10 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), CO2, CO, NO2, NO, HCN and CH3CN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

propene, acetone, benzene, propane and ?-pinene (Table 1).cyanide Acetonitrile Ethane Propane i-Butane n-Butane i-= Ethane Ethane Ethane Ethane Propane Propane Propane ARCTAS

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

DOE/EIA-0340(98)/2 Distribution Category UC-950 Petroleum Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

difference between total movements into and total movements out of each PAD District by pipeline, tanker, and barge. Normal Butane. See Butane. OPEC. The acronym for the...

152

Selective oxidation of n-butane over Fe-promoted vanadyl pyrophosphate prepared from modification of nano-sized interlayer of lamellar vanadyl benzylphosphate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel approach for the preparation of promoted vanadyl pyrophosphate in well-defined structure was examined. Lamellar vanadyl benzylphosphate (LVBP) was used as a host material and iron acetylacetonate as a gue...

Kannan Srinivasan; Hironaka Kanbe; Takuya Ohkura…

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Site-Directed Amino Acid Substitutions in the Hydroxylase ? Subunit of Butane Monooxygenase from Pseudomonas butanovora: Implications for Substrates Knocking at the Gate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...intricacies of the leucine gate influence catalysis at...opening the leucine gate and shifting the geometry...where green is carbon, red is oxygen, blue is nitrogen...is through the leucine gate toward the diiron center...H. Shim, and T. K. Wood. 2002. Directed evolution...

Kimberly H. Halsey; Luis A. Sayavedra-Soto; Peter J. Bottomley; Daniel J. Arp

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Statistical thermodynamics of 1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-propanol, and butanal Prasenjit Seal, Ewa Papajak, Tao Yu, and Donald G. Truhlar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are in excellent agree- ment with experimental data taken from the Thermodynamics Research Center data series- tant roles in alternative-fuel combustion.1­5 Therefore, accu- rate estimation of the thermodynamic the group additivity values. In other cases, where experimental data (but not group additivity values

Truhlar, Donald G

155

Thermodynamic Analysis of the Possibility of Hydrogen Production by Oxidation of n-Butane, n-Pentane, and Carbon by Oxygen-Containing Nitrogen Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A thermodynamic analysis is performed to study the reactions of hydrogen production by oxidation of hydrocarbons of natural gas ... analysis suggests the possibility of developing a new hydrogen production method

A. M. Alekseev; Z. V. Komova; L. L. Klinova…

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Cyclization Phenomena in the Sol-Gel Polymerization of a,w-Bis(triethoxysilyl)alkanes and Incorporation of the Cyclic Structures into Network Silsesquioxane Polymers  

SciTech Connect

Intramolecular cyclizations during acid-catalyzed, sol-gel polymerizations of ct,co- bis(tietioxysilyl)aWmes substintidly lengtien gelties formonomers witietiylene- (l), propylene- (2), and butylene-(3)-bridging groups. These cyclizations reactions were found, using mass spectrometry and %i NMR spectroscopy, to lead preferentially to monomeric and dimeric products based on six and seven membered disilsesquioxane rings. 1,2- Bis(triethoxysilyl)ethane (1) reacts under acidic conditions to give a bicyclic drier (5) that is composed of two annelated seven membered rings. Under the same conditions, 1,3- bis(triethoxysilyl)propane (2), 1,4-bis(triethoxysilyl)butane (3), and z-1,4- bis(triethoxysilyl)but-2-ene (10) undergo an intramolecular condensation reaction to give the six membemd and seven membered cyclic disilsesquioxanes 6, 7, and 11. Subsequently, these cyclic monomers slowly react to form the tricyclic dirners 8,9 and 12. With NaOH as polymerization catalyst these cyclic silsesquioxanes readily ~aeted to afford gels that were shown by CP MAS z%i NMR and infr=d spectroscopes to retain some cyclic structures. Comparison of the porosity and microstructwe of xerogels prepared from the cyclic monomers 6 and 7 with gels prepared directly from their acyclic precursors 2 and 3, indicate that the final pore structure of the xerogels is markedly dependent on the nature of the precursor. In addition, despite the fact that the monomeric cyclic disilsesquioxane species can not be isolated from 1-3 under basic conditions due to their rapid rate of gelation, spectroscopic techniques also detected the presence of the cyclic structures in the resulting polymeric gels.

Alam, T.M.; Carpenter, J.P.; Dorhout, P.K.; Greaves, J.; Loy, D.A.; Shaltout, R.; Shea, K.J.; Small, J.H.

1999-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

157

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

926,785 32,969 2,665,992 1,875,331 -1,415,011 111,431 45,954 926,785 32,969 2,665,992 1,875,331 -1,415,011 111,431 45,954 2,448,351 861,579 1,841,613 1,178,473 Crude Oil 1,386,449 - - - - 1,630,908 -244,084 67,355 8,560 2,830,779 1,288 0 861,333 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 540,336 -180 150,143 11,694 101,692 - - 29,480 109,476 61,693 603,036 96,994 Pentanes Plus 66,222 -180 - - 10,282 -16,515 - - -3,264 42,493 1,105 19,475 5,765 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 474,114 - - 150,143 1,412 118,207 - - 32,744 66,983 60,588 583,561 91,229 Ethane/Ethylene 233,470 - - 6,504 - 100,649 - - 13,226 - - 327,397 31,406 Propane/Propylene 153,496 - - 129,707 174 10,289 - - 14,578 - 56,954 222,134 38,509 Normal Butane/Butylene 28,426 - - 12,412 1,208 5,090 - - 3,798 26,775 3,633 12,930

158

U.S. Refinery Net Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Total 320,455 348,984 346,918 365,525 358,673 335,185 2005-2013 Crude Oil 445,937 474,296 474,991 497,241 489,887 468,825 2005-2013 Natural Gas Plant Liquids 11,914 11,407 12,393 13,031 13,377 15,397 2005-2013 Pentanes Plus 4,688 4,040 4,439 4,667 5,044 5,273 2005-2013 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 7,226 7,367 7,954 8,364 8,333 10,124 2005-2013 Normal Butane 2,038 1,829 1,935 1,885 1,987 3,707 2005-2013 Isobutane 5,188 5,538 6,019 6,479 6,346 6,417 2005-2013 Other Liquids -137,396 -136,719 -140,466 -144,747 -144,591 -149,037 2005-2013 Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/ Other Hydrocarbons 7,511 8,089 7,844 8,541 8,568 8,086 2005-2013 Hydrogen 5,792 6,200 6,050 6,477 6,520 6,226 2009-2013

159

EARTH SCIENCES DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT 1977.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as pure isobutane; turbine efficiency, 85%; generator, 98%;routine. Overall turbine efficiency may be computed as acomputes Off-Design turbine efficiency for changing mass

Witherspoon, P.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Sandia National Laboratories: Synchrotron photoionization measurements...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

photoionization measurements of fundamental autoignition reactions: Product formation in low-temperature isobutane oxidation Two CRF Papers Named "Distinguished" for 34th...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butane butylene isobutane" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

e-Polymers 2008, no. 033 http://www.e-polymers.org  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene block copolymer (SEBS) added as a compatibilizer between the two main because of lower densities, easy maintenance and inexpensive prices [1]. Among a large variety of PBMs [2 polymers. A block copolymer SEBS (styrene- ethylene/butylene-styrene) contains in each segment two styrene

North Texas, University of

162

A Generalised and Easily Adoptable Gas Chromatographic Method for the Analysis of Gaseous Hydrocarbons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......2-Methylbutene-2. the case of ethane and ethylene, which were, however, com...Methane, (2) Ethane, (3) Ethylene, (4) Propane, (5) Isobutane...phases, whose relatively high price may be more than compensated...Stationary Phases. Hydrocarbon Ethylene Acetylene Propylene Isobutane......

N.C. Saha; S.K. Jain; R.K. Dua

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Critical temperatures and pressures for hydrocarbon mixtures from an equation of state with renormalization-group-theory corrections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mixtures: Methane-Ethane-Propane System, J. Chern. Eng. DataEquilibrium in the Ethane-Propane-n-Butane System, FluidLNG), i.e. methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, n-pentane and

Jiang, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Binary vapor-liquid equilibrium data without measurement of composition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

magnetic densimeter. In this work, Hall and Eubank's method is applied to a carbon dioxide-normal butane mixture, studied by Olds, et al (15). Since the apparatus used by these investigators was not a Burnett-Isochoric apparatus, a simulation program.... . . . . . . . C. Isochcres f' or Feed. Composition of 16. 93 molg n-Butane. . . . . ~ . . . . . . . . . . 61 D. Isochores for Feed Composition of 33. 35 mol& n-Butane. E. Isochores for Feed Composition of 65 49. 84 molg n Butane...

Nehzat, Mohammad Sadegh

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

3.System Design Basis 2) MODELING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BOG compressors with butane storage system is modelled for this report. 4) Modelling have been storage system except heat load and this level of detail was not required for dynamic simulation.(Refe to table 4.3.1) #12;9) One butane separator, pump and control system for many butane tanks boil off

Hong, Deog Ki

166

Polyurethane Binders for Condensed High-Energy-Content Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A procedure was developed for preparing poly(ethylene, butylene) glycol adipate urethane plasticized with 1,5-diazido-3-nitrazapentane. The correlation between the conditions of the polymer synthesis and its phys...

V. V. Bestuzheva; N. K. Nalimova; I. V. Tselinskii

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A BRIEF HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL CATALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

More recently, Air Products and Chemicals Corporation hasProcess Division of Air Products & Chemicals, Inc. HC Q)air oxidation of isobutane. T-butyl alcohol is a co- product

Heinemann, Heinz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Methods Development for On-Line Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......contractual specifications. Used to determine value and sale price of product. Monitors liquid or gas effluent wastes for loss...vinyl chloride on dioctylsebacate and Car- bowax 550. (A) ethylene, (B) propane, (C) propylene, (D) isobutane, (E......

Richard Villalobos

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

741 317 245 1,303 IsobutaneIsobutylene 206 7 213 155 55 184 394 Other HydrocarbonsHydrogenOxygenates 512 0 512 29 18 0 47 Other HydrocarbonsHydrogen 0 0 0 28 0 0 28...

170

untitled  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

741 317 267 1,325 IsobutaneIsobutylene 206 7 213 155 55 170 380 Other HydrocarbonsHydrogenOxygenates 512 0 512 29 18 0 47 Other HydrocarbonsHydrogen 0 0 0 28 0 0 28...

171

Direct contact, binary fluid geothermal boiler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Energy is extracted from geothermal brines by direct contact with a working fluid such as isobutane which is immiscible with the brine in a geothermal boiler. The geothermal boiler provides a distributor arrangement which efficiently contacts geothermal brine with the isobutane in order to prevent the entrainment of geothermal brine in the isobutane vapor which is directed to a turbine. Accordingly the problem of brine carry-over through the turbine causes corrosion and scaling thereof is eliminated. Additionally the heat exchanger includes straightening vanes for preventing startup and other temporary fluctuations in the transitional zone of the boiler from causing brine carryover into the turbine. Also a screen is provided in the heat exchanger to coalesce the working fluid and to assist in defining the location of the transitional zone where the geothermal brine and the isobutane are initially mixed.

Rapier, Pascal M. (Richmond, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methane Ethane Propane I-butane N 2 CO 2 MN Wobbe number HHVMethane Number determined via California Air Recourses Board (CARB) calculations 36 ; Wobbe Number = HHV/

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Natural gas treatment process using PTMSP membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for separating C{sub 3}+ hydrocarbons, particularly propane and butane, from natural gas. The process uses a poly(trimethylsilylpropyne) membrane. 6 figs.

Toy, L.G.; Pinnau, I.

1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

174

Natural gas treatment process using PTMSP membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for separating C.sub.3 + hydrocarbons, particularly propane and butane, from natural gas. The process uses a poly(trimethylsilylpropyne) membrane.

Toy, Lora G. (San Francisco, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Investigation of the Atmospheric Ozone Impacts of Methyl Iodide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

known amounts of ethylene, propane, propylene, n-butane, n-3 ppm -1 min -1 . (Primarily propane) ALK3 Alkanes and other

Carter, W P L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Airborne measurement of OH reactivity during INTEX-B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plus OH sign), reactiv- propane ing different gases gases atisoprene (plus sign), propane (star) and propene (triangle).NMHC includes ethane, ethene, propane, propene, i-butane, n-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Measurements of volatile organic compounds at a suburban ground site (T1) in Mexico City during the MILAGRO 2006 campaign: measurement comparison, emission ratios, and source attribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon monoxide (Table 3). Propane, n- butane and i- butaneof vehicle traffic and liquid propane gas (LPG) emissionshicles, the use of liquid propane gas and the production of

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Role of convection in redistributing formaldehyde to the upper troposphere over North America and the North Atlantic during the summer 2004 INTEX campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with a few excep- tions (propane and the butanes were 2 to 3the same reactivity as propane (k OH = 9.3 Â 10 À13 ) would

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Petrochemical Industry - An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

feedstocks such as ethane, propane, butane, naphtha oruse mainly ethane and propane for steam cracking, availablecracking of ethane and propane (Oil and Gas Journal, 2006a).

Neelis, Maarten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Prediction of heptanes-plus equilibrium ratios from empirical correlations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at 251 deg. F Hydrocarbon Analysis of Produced Gas Phase (mole percent) Pressure (psig) Component Carbon Dioxide Nitrogen Methane Ethane Propane i-Butane n-Butane i-Pentane n-Pentane Hexane Heptanes-plus Totals Heptanes-plus mol. wt... 6590 305 247 0. 862 low 600 3225 158 149 0. 787 8055 313 212 0. 841 low sOV 2375 127 108 0. 746 TABLE 3-PHYS ICAL AND CRITICAL PROPERTIES Component methane ethane propane i-butane n-butane i-pentane n-pentane hexane (1b...

McKenna, Martin James

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butane butylene isobutane" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A new comprehensive semiempirical approach to calculate three-phase water/hydrocarbons equilibria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et a/. ' worked on n-butane and water systems in both two- and three-phase regions. McKetta and Katz '' investigated the mutual solubility of a methane/n-butane/water system in two-phase and three-phase regions. Kobayashi and Katz" worked... on propane and water in both two- and three-phase regions. Wehe and McKetta reported the mutual solubility of an n-butane/i-butane/water system. Anthony and McKetta" provided similar data on the propane/propylene/water system. Roof" investigated the vapor...

Tandia, Bagus Krisna

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

lubricants; asphalt; ethane, propane, and butane; and many other products used for their energy or chemical content. Crude oil is considered as either domestic or im- ported...

183

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic microbial microcosm Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

de recherche en amnagement et dveloppement, Universit Laval Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 2 Bioaugmentation of butane-utilizing...

184

E-Print Network 3.0 - alicyclic compounds Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

associated with the aerobic microbial oxidation of methane, ethane, propane and butane Summary: prove useful in further studying the microbial oxi- dation of these compounds...

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - aromatic sulfonic acids Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

examples: Methane sulfonic... acid Ethane sulfonic acid 1-Propane sulfonic acid 1-Butane ... Source: Wikswo, John - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University...

186

NATURAL GAS VARIABILITY IN CALIFORNIA: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND DEVICE PERFORMANCE EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

roughly 5.8% ethane, 3.0% propane, and 1.1% butanes  with a were 12% ethane, 1.6% propane, and  86.4% methane (1420 hydrocarbons (such as ethane, propane, and butanes).    The 

Singer, Brett C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Measurement of flammability in a closed cylindrical vessel with thermal criteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experiments, but not with the results of counterflow apparatus experiments. The current results show that Le Chatelier�s rule describes the mixture results adequately. Minimum oxygen concentrations also were determined for methane, butane, and methane-butane...

Wong, Wun K.

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

188

The nature and formation of coke in the reaction of methanol to hydrocarbons over chabazite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Reactant: methanol t-butanol 1-heotanol Reaction conditions Temp. (K) LHSV (hr ) 644 1. 0 644 1. 0 644 0. 7 Conversion (g) 1 00 100 99. 9 Hydrocarbon distribution (wt g) methane ethane ethylene propane propylene i-butane n-butane bu...

McLaughlin, Kenneth Woot

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Biodegradation 12: 1122, 2001. 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field; p-MMO ­ particulate methane monooxygenase ; s-MMO ­ soluble methane monooxygenase; TCE Bioaugmentation of butane-utilizing microorganisms to promote cometabolism of 1,1,1-trichloroethane in groundwater October 2000 Key words: 1,1,1 trichloroethane, bioaugmentation, butane-utilizers, cometabolism, DNA

Semprini, Lewis

190

APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Jan. 2009, p. 337344 Vol. 75, No. 2 0099-2240/09/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/AEM.01758-08  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by evolutionarily unrelated methane monooxygenases. Propane and butane can be oxidized by CYP enzymes engineered based on their preferred substrates (30). The soluble and particulate methane monooxygenases (sMMO and p. In Vivo Evolution of Butane Oxidation by Terminal Alkane Hydroxylases AlkB and CYP153A6 Daniel J. Koch,1

Arnold, Frances H.

191

e-Polymers 2008, no. 034 http://www.e-polymers.org  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: 6 March, 2008) Abstract: Styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) block copolymer was used prices [2]. Mechanics of PBMs is relatively well understood [3, 4]. However, perhaps even more needed. There are many kinds of PBMs available in the market with a wide range in properties and prices. Polypropylene

North Texas, University of

192

Amphiphilic diblock copolymer gels: the relationship between structure and rheology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...phase behavior of poly(ethylene oxide){poly(propylene oxide){poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymers...Padget, J. C., Price, C. & Booth, C. 1993...Ali-Adib, Z., Price, C. & Booth, C. 1998...triblock copolymer of ethylene oxide and 1,2-butylene...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Silica nanocasting of lyotropic surfactant phases and organized organic matter: material science or an analytical tool?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of polymers, such as poly(ethylene oxide), poly(methyl methacrylate...relevant templates with a very low price, polymer dispersions or latexes...systems far beyond water: poly(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (KLE-polymers...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Input to Flowsheet Simulation This appendix contains the input that was entered for alkylation model in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-D C-607 Isobuatane Accumulator Pot C-614A Suction Trap C-614B Flash Drum C-615 Refrigerant Accumulator Isobutane chiller E-634-56 Refrigerant Partial Condenser E-640 Economizer Feed Cooler E-641-44 Depropanizer Charge Condenser E-695 Alky Deisobutanizer Reboiler E-696 Alky Deisobutanizer Side Reboiler E-6XX

Pike, Ralph W.

195

Limits to Power Growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...isobutane to drive turbines (Hammond, 1972a...effective conservation strategy would be for the...percent), natural gas (now approximately...progress are the development of cryogenic tankers...so that natural gas can be transported...high-temperature gas turbines or magnetohydrodynamic...

196

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,361 415 768 2,544 IsobutaneIsobutylene 151 4 155 99 62 164 325 Other HydrocarbonsHydrogenOxygenates 553 0 553 20 28 0 48 Other HydrocarbonsHydrogen 0 0 0 19 0 0 19...

197

Table 39. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by State as of January 1, 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State/Refiner/Location Alkylates Aromatics State/Refiner/Location Alkylates Aromatics Isobutane Lubricants Isomers Isopentane and Isohexane Asphalt and Road Oil Marketable Petroleum Coke Hydrogen (MMcfd) Sulfur (short tons per day) Table 4. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by State as of January 1, 2013 (Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) Isooctane a

198

Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol.

Bhinde, Manoj V. (Boothwyn, PA); Bierl, Thomas W. (West Chester, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Catalytic oxidation of light alkanes in presence of a base  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The presence of a base in the reaction mixture in a metal-ligand catalyzed partial oxidation of alkanes results in sustained catalyst activity, and in greater percent conversion as compared with oxidation in the absence of base, while maintaining satisfactory selectivity for the desired oxidation, for example the oxidation of isobutane to isobutanol. 1 fig.

Bhinde, M.V.; Bierl, T.W.

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

200

Limits to Power Growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...billion barrels are either offshore or in Alaska, finding them...to heat isobutane to drive turbines (Hammond, 1972a) and water...incorporation of high-temperature gas turbines or magnetohydrodynamic installations...1972b, 1972c; Berg, 1973), wind, and oceanic thermal gradients...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butane butylene isobutane" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

CHEMISTRY 3311, Fall 1998 Professor Walba  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

more heat of combustion? d) Estimate, in units of "gauche butane interactions," the magnitude of the difference in heats of combustion of A and B. e) Draw one perspective chair picture for each

Walba, David

202

"Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogenolysis of Ethane, Propane, n-Butane and iso-Butanethe Hydroformylation of Propane over Silica-supported Groupproduct and small amount of propane, which is likely to be

Yamada, Yusuke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Feasibility of reconstructing paleoatmospheric records of selected alkanes, methyl halides, and sulfur gases from Greenland ice cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study of ethane and propane oxidation in the tropo- sphere,alkanes (ethane, C 2 H 6 ; propane, C 3 H 8 ; n-butane, n-Cfluid contamination. 4.1.2. Propane [ 24 ] Propane levels in

Aydin, M.; Williams, M. B; Saltzman, E. S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

to a tax of 0.16 per diesel gallon equivalent. Compressed natural gas, butane, and propane are subject to a tax of 0.16 per gasoline gallon equivalent. The tax does not apply...

205

Layer-by-Layer Nanocoatings with Flame Retardant and Oxygen Barrier Properties: Moving Toward Renewable Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) clay to create a renewable flame retardant nanocoating for polyurethane foam. This coating system completely stops the melting of a flexible polyurethane foam when exposed to direct flame from a butane torch, with just 10 bilayers (~ 30 nm thick...

Laufer, Galina 1985-

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

206

Development of electronic nose for measurement of agricultural odors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this experiment. This included fatty acids (butyric, isobutyric, valeric, and isovaleric acids), alcohols (p-cresol and isoamyl alcohol), sulfides (dimethyl sulfide and dimethyl disulfide), and butanal. Using ANOVA and PCA techniques, it was determined...

Bausch, Carrie Lynn

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Gas Viscosity at High Pressure and High Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Although viscosity of some pure components such as methane, ethane, propane, butane, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and binary mixtures of these components at low-intermediate pressure and temperature had been studied intensively and been understood thoroughly...

Ling, Kegang

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

208

Natural Gas Hydrate Dissociation by Presence of Ethylene Glycol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrate Dissociation by Presence of Ethylene Glycol ... solids that form from mixts. of water and light natural gases such as methane, carbon dioxide, ethane, propane and butane. ... Pulse Combustion Characteristics of Various Gaseous Fuels ...

Shuanshi Fan; Yuzhen Zhang; Genlin Tian; Deqing Liang; Dongliang Li

2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

209

Determination of Volatile Organic and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Crude Oil with Efficient Gas-Chromatographic Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......in crude oil samples showed little change after 3 months of storage in glass bottles. Calibration for 2-methyl butane, n-pentane...determination HPLC for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in seawater samples and its application to Japan Sea. Chemical Pharmaceutical......

Haijing Wang; Helmut Geppert; Thomas Fischer; Wolfgang Wieprecht; Detlev Möller

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

942 Inorganic Chemistry, Vol. 10, No. 5, 1971 solid (mp 43" with slight decomposition), which is sensitive to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is sensitive to air and water. I t is soluble in carbon tetrachloride, trichloro- fluoromethane, and benzene but insoluble in butane. The infrared spectrum (4000-200 cm-l) in carbon tetrachloride showed the following

Bodner, George M.

211

A study on the solubility of heavy hydrocarbons in liquid methane and methane containing mixtures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The solubilities of the hydrocarbons n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, n-octane, and n-nonane in liquid methane and of n-hexane in the mixed solvents of methane and ethane… (more)

Brew, T. C. L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Costs of Growing Broilers Under Cotract.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and early spring. This usually in- volved approx,imately half the broilers raised. No heat was provided for chicks going into the houses during warm weather. Natural gas, butane and electricity were the sources of heat used by different growers... and early spring. This usually in- volved approx,imately half the broilers raised. No heat was provided for chicks going into the houses during warm weather. Natural gas, butane and electricity were the sources of heat used by different growers...

Magee, A. C. (Aden Combs); Stone, B. H.; Wormeli, B. C. (Ben C.)

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Experimental measurements and modeling prediction of flammability limits of binary hydrocarbon mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of methane in air using thermal criterion?????..50 4.8 Determination of LFL of ethylene in air using thermal criterion???...??..51 4.9 Lower flammability limits of methane and n-butane mixtures in air at standard conditions...????????????????????..56 4.14 Upper flammability limits of methane and n-butane mixtures in air at standard conditions?????????????..???????57 4.15 Upper flammability limits of methane and ethylene mixtures in air at standard conditions...

Zhao, Fuman

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY SABIC INNOVATIVE PLASTICS FOR WAIVER OF U.S.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SABIC INNOVATIVE PLASTICS FOR WAIVER OF U.S. SABIC INNOVATIVE PLASTICS FOR WAIVER OF U.S. AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN AN IDENTIFIED INVENTION, DOE DOCKET NO . S-109,544 MADE UNDER DOE AWARD NO. DE-FC36-03G013000, SUBCONTRACT 60105 WITH GENERAL ELECTRIC. W(l)-08-009; CH- 1453 S-109 ,544 "SYNTHESIS OF POL Y(BUTYLENE-CO-ISOSORBIDE TEREPHTHALA TE) AND ITS PROPERTIES" The Petitioner, SABIC Innovative Plastics IP B.V. ("SABIC"), has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights in the subject invention entitled "SYNTHESIS OF POL Y(BUTYLENE-CO-ISOSORBIDE TEREPHTHALA TE) AND ITS PROPERTIES." The invention relates to copolymers made from biological materials. The invention was made under the above identified subcontract with General Electric Plastics (GE). GE was subsequently purchased by SABIC

215

democrite-00023416,version1-10Dec2004 DAPNIA 04-79  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/10, Ar/Isobutane : 95/5, Ar/CF4 : 97/3. The drift field was 120 V/cm in the first case and 200 V for a Micromegas TPC are presented. In particular, using simulations and measurements, it is shown that an Argon-CF4 mixture is optimal for operation at a future Linear Collider. 1 Introduction The European TESLA

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

216

Raft River binary-cycle geothermal pilot power plant final report  

SciTech Connect

The design and performance of a 5-MW(e) binary-cycle pilot power plant that used a moderate-temperature hydrothermal resource, with isobutane as a working fluid, are examined. Operating problems experienced and solutions found are discussed and recommendations are made for improvements to future power plant designs. The plant and individual systems are analyzed for design specification versus actual performance figures.

Bliem, C.J.; Walrath, L.F.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Advanced binary cycles: Optimum working fluids  

SciTech Connect

A computer model (Cycle Analysis Simulation Tool, CAST) and a methodology have been developed to perform value analysis for small, low- to moderate-temperature binary geothermal power plants. The value analysis method allows for incremental changes in the levelized electricity cost (LEC) to be determined between a baseline plant and a modified plant. Thermodynamic cycle analyses and component sizing are carried out in the model followed by economic analysis which provides LEC results. The emphasis of the present work is on evaluating the effect of mixed working fluids instead of pure fluids on the LEC of a geothermal binary plant that uses a simple Organic Rankine Cycle. Four resources were studied spanning the range of 265 F to 375 F. A variety of isobutane and propane based mixtures, in addition to pure fluids, were used as working fluids. This study shows that the use of propane mixtures at a 265 F resource can reduce the LEC by 24% when compared to a base case value that utilizes commercial isobutane as its working fluid. The cost savings drop to 6% for a 375 F resource, where an isobutane mixture is favored. Supercritical cycles were found to have the lowest cost at all resources.

Gawlik, K.; Hassani, V. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environmental Regulations and Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale Contents * Introduction * Motor Gasoline Summer Volatility (RVP) Regulations o Table 1. Summer Volatility Regulations for Motor Gasoline o Table 2. Refinery Inputs and Production of Normal Butane o Figure 1. Refinery Inputs and Production of Normal Butane o Table 3. Price Relationship Between Normal Butane and Motor Gasoline o Table 4. Market Price Premium for Low Vapor Pressure (RVP) Gasoline * Oxygenate Content of Motor Gasoline o Figure 2. Oxygenate Content of Motor Gasoline o Table 5. Oxygenated and Conventional Motor Gasoline Price Relationship o Table 6. Reformulated and Conventional Motor Gasoline Price Relationship o Figure 3. Price Differences Between RFG or MTBE and Conventional Gasoline

219

Batch polymerization of styrene and isoprene by n-butyl lithium initiator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-20). Analysis of products consists of determining the point at which no free lithium alkyl remains. Thus if a butyl lithium initiated polymerization were terminated with water, butane would be evolved as long as the initiator were present. The butane...? agent were evaporated under a hood. Finally the polymer. was dried in a vacuum oven at about 50'C and under a vacuum of 30 inches of gg for about 30 hours. The weight of polymer formed was determined by final weighing. 25 The monomer conversion...

Hasan, Sayeed

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Energy Conservation and BP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRESSURE PILOT AIR PRESSURE MAIN COMBUSTION AIR FLOIol PREHEATED COMBUSTION AIR RECOMMENDED ?. 40"/0 RECOMMENDED ?. 40"/0 MAXIMUM TO BLOW-OFF POINT AMBIENT TO 300?C 3 CROSS LIGHTING PILOT TO MAIN BURNER NATURAL GAS BUTANE HEAVY FUEL OIL... refinery conditions under which the burner is likely to operate in terms of: - fuel gas quality (natural gas (NG), butane) - fuel oil quality (gas oil, 3500 sec, vacuum residue) low excess air (5%) flame stability at high turn down (4:1) low...

Partridge, R. W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butane butylene isobutane" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Developmental of a Vapor Cloud Explosion Risk Analysis Tool Using Exceedance Methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cloud explosions [4]. Lenoir and Davenport [5] have presented a review of many major incidents involving vapor cloud explosions worldwide from 1921 to 1991. Hydrocarbon materials such as ethane, ethylene, propane, and butane, which have been involved... are typically either in the form of gas, liquid, or two-phase. Examples of hydrocarbon gas releases are methane through butane, while liquid releases could be crude oil, diesel, jet fuel, or others. An example of a two-phase leak is condensate since it is a...

Alghamdi, Salem

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

222

Some Economic Effects of Adjusting to a Changing Water Supply, Texas High Plains.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. the following categories. Shifting from butane (L. P. gas) to natural gas Areas not particularly affected by water-lev4 for pump engine fuel is another significant eco- decline include about 194,000 acres, or 5.4 percr:!:: nomic adjustment... the decline in water level and decI:rs- from butane to natural gas for pumping fuel. induced adjustments have seriously depietd ::x Elimination or of transmission losses water supply, sharply increased the investms:: :r pcrrticulcrrly has had a effect...

Hughes, William F.; Magee, A. C.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

filled by one or more gases. In marine sediments gas hydrates are found in regions where high pressure, low temperature and gas in excess of solubility are present. Low molecular weight hydrocarbons (LMWH), I. e. methane through butane, carbon dioxide... loop at a helium carrier flow of 12 ml/min with an elution order of methane, ethane, carbon dioxide and propane. Each fraction was trapped in a U- shaped Porpak-Q filled glass tube immersed in LN2. Butanes and heartier weight gases were trapped...

Cox, Henry Benjamin

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 12 Modelled maturity variations in g10013C of methane through butane, relative to g10013C of total source kerogen .......................................................... 29 13 Diagrams showing various processes and resulting compositional... gas contains methane (CH4) as a major constituent (70-100%), ethane (C2H6) (1-10%), lower percentages of higher hydrocarbons ?propane (C3H8), butane (C4H10), pentane (C5H12)? through hexanes (C6H14), and traces up through nonanes (C9H20) (Tissot...

Ozgul, Ercin

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

Model hydrodesulfurization reactions: saturated C/sub 4/S molecules on Mo(110)  

SciTech Connect

The reactions of tetrahydrothiophene and 1-butanethiol on Mo(110) have been investigated by using temperature-programmed reaction spectroscopy, isotopic exchange reactions, and Auger electron spectroscopy. At low exposures, tetrahydrothiophene decomposes below 400 K to gaseous dihydrogen and surface carbon and sulfur. Higher tetrahydrothiophene exposures also result in reaction limited formation of butane and butene at 350 and 380 K, respectively. Preadsorption of a saturation coverage of hydrogen or deuterium atoms decreases the temperature at which butane is formed by 50 K and increases the yield of butane by a factor of approximately 6 at reaction saturation. The butene formation peak is unaffected by the presence of excess surface hydrogen. Reversible desorption of molecularly bound tetrahydrothiophene from the Mo(110) surface is observed at 310 K. In the absence of preadsorbed hydrogen, approximately 25% of the tetrahydrothiophene that reacts forms hydrocarbons, as measured by Auger electron spectroscopy. An irreversibly bound hydrocarbon fragment is present on the surface which decomposes at 565 K to produce gaseous dihydrogen. The butane, butene, and dihydrogen incorporate surface deuterium. The proposed mechanism for this reaction is initial hydrogenation of one of the ..cap alpha..-carbon atoms with accompanying C-S bond scission.

Roberts, J.T.; Friend, C.M.

1986-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

226

Interaction of Plastics in Mixed-Plastics Pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The pyrolysis of mixed-plastic waste has been proposed as a means of recycling to produce petrochemical feedstock. ... The main gases produced from the individual plastics were hydrogen, methane, ethane, ethene, propane, propene, butane, and butene and for the PET plastic carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. ...

Paul T. Williams; Elizabeth A. Williams

1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

227

Antibacterial action of 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol (bronopol).  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...butan-l-ol-glacial acetic acid- water (60:15:25). Plates...measured immediately after recovery from this bacteriostasis...cystine to pyruvic acid and the condensation of pyruvic acid with a molecule...Thiazolidine formation by condensation of pyruvic acid and cysteine...

J A Shepherd; R D Waigh; P Gilbert

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Photochemical dimerization of a fluorinated di­benzyl­ideneacetone in chloro­form solution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(1E,4E)-1,5-Bis(2,6-di­fluoro­phen­yl)penta-1,4-dien-3-one dimerizes under sunlight in chloro­form solution to form the corresponding cyclo­butane derivative. The dimer shows the `truxillic acid'-type arrangement of crystallographic centres of inversion, with cell dimensions closely related to those of the monomer.

Schwarzer, A.

2014-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

229

Method for measuring the effectiveness of gaseous-contaminant removal filters  

SciTech Connect

The report presents a brief review of the gas-adsorption kinetics theory applicable to adsorption of gaseous contaminants by filter media, and an algorithm for assessing the effectiveness of filtering devices with flow bypass. It briefly describes the selected testing technique for measuring the effectiveness of filter media, and presents experimental data for adsorption of n-butane, toluene, and carbon monoxide.

Mahajan, B.M.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

A thermally self-sustained micro-power plant with integrated micro-solid oxide fuel cells, micro-reformer and functional  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thermally self-sustained micro-power plant with integrated micro-solid oxide fuel cells, micro Micro-solid oxide fuel cell Thin films Butane reformation Chemical micro-reactors Thermally independent 2014 Accepted 8 February 2014 Available online xxx a b s t r a c t Low temperature micro-solid oxide

Daraio, Chiara

231

Taxonomy of ?: A Review of Definitions and Estimation Approaches Targeted to Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...approaches may be most suitable for estimating host region kappa 0s (but...an extension would strongly benefit the study of kappa. For instance...elastic media using staggered grid finite differences, Bull...condition: An example from the SMART 1 array, Lotung, Taiwan...

Olga?Joan Ktenidou; Fabrice Cotton; Norman A. Abrahamson; John G. Anderson

232

MICROBIOLOGY IN THE PETROLEUM INDUSTRY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...butane. While a true knowledge of "soil wax" was admittedly lacking, he maintained...and lowlands of Ohio, six inch welded pipelines lasted only seven years, on the average...stray-current electrolysis as a cause of pipeline failure. 4. Remedies for bacterial corrosion...

John B. Davis; David M. Updegraff

1954-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Optimal Model-Based Production Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrotreatment Gasoline blending Distillate blending Gas oil blending Cat Crack CDU crude1 crude2 butane Fuel gas Premium Reg. Distillate GO Treated Residuum SR Fuel gas SR Naphtha SR Gasoline SR Distillate SR GO SR Gasoline SR Distillate SR GO SR Residuum backoutletCDUfrontoutletCDUfeedfeedCDUoutlet bbFaF ,,,,, * ++= #12

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

234

Optimal Model-Based Production Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrotreatment Gasoline blending Distillate blending Gas oil blending Cat Crack CDU crude1 crude2 butane Fuel gas Premium Reg. Distillate GO Treated Residuum SR Fuel gas SR Naphtha SR Gasoline SR Distillate SR GO SR Feedstock Heavy Naphtha 13 9 Refinery Production Fuel Gas 13 17 LPG 18 20 Light Naphtha 6 6 Premium Gasoline

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

235

Integration of Nonlinear CDU Models in Refinery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrotreatment Distillate blending Gas oil blending Cat Crack CDU Crude1, ... Crude2, .... butane Fuel gas Prem. Gasoline Reg. Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil Treated Residuum SR Fuel gas SR Naphtha SR Gasoline SR Distillate SR GO SR Residuum Product Blending 4 #12;Planning Model Example Information Given Refinery

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

236

Optimal Model-Based Production Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasoline blending Distillate blending Gas oil blending Cat Crack CDU crude1 crude2 butane Fuel gas Premium 17 LPG 18 20 Light Naphtha 6 6 Premium Gasoline 20 20 Reg. Gasoline 80 92 Gas Oil 163 170 Fuel Oil Reg. Distillate Treated Residuum SR Fuel gas SR Naphtha SR Gasoline SR Distillate SR GO SR Residuum

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

237

Optimal Model-Based Production Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrotreatment Gasoline blending Distillate blending Gas oil blending Cat Crack CDU crude1 crude2 butane Fuel gas Premium Reg. Distillate GO Treated Residuum SR Fuel gas SR Naphtha SR Gasoline SR Distillate SR GO SR Naphtha SR Gasoline SR Distillate SR GO SR Residuum #12;7 Complexity of CDU CDU depends on steam stripping

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

238

Optimal Model-Based Production Planning for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Statement Cat Ref Hydrotreatment Gasoline blending Distillate blending Gas oil blending Cat Crack CDU crude1 and simplicity Taxes, 20% Dist. & Marketin g, 9% Refining, 18.10% Crude, 53% 2005 Retail Gasoline Price crude2 butane Fuel gas Premium Reg. Distillate GO Treated Residuum SR Fuel gas SR Naphtha SR Gasoline SR

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

239

Optimal Model-Based Production Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrotreatment Gasoline blending Distillate blending Gas oil blending Cat Crack CDU crude1 crude2 butane Fuel gas Premium Reg. Distillate GO Treated Residuum SR Fuel gas SR Naphtha SR Gasoline SR Distillate SR GO SR crude2 SR Fuel gas SR Naphtha SR Gasoline SR Distillate SR GO SR Residuum backoutlet

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

240

PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

424 2,395 7 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1,039 3,426 8,005 185 6,684 19,338 53 EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 PropanePropylene 206 544 7,332 12 5,589 13,683 37 Normal Butane...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butane butylene isobutane" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Acidity and catalytic activity of zeolite catalysts bound with silica and alumina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Micropore surface area and micropore volume are reduced by about 19% and 18%, respectively, indicating some micropores of ZSM-5 are blocked on binding with silica. SiO2-bound ZSM-5 catalysts have less catalytic activity for butane transformation (cracking...

Wu, Xianchun

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

242

A kinetic model for the liquefaction of lignite in a continuous stirred tank reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and catalytic cracking of paraffins and other constituents to compounds in the methane to butane (Cl ? C4) range. To account for the loss of oils by cracking an oils ~ C ? C step with 1 4 rate constant kOG was added. Philip and Anthony (1978) reported...

Culpon, Douglas Holmes

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

A PCS simple prediction method for the thermodynamics properties of dilute solutions with comparison to experiment and other predictive methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The Upper Curve is for Cyclopentane +1, 4 Dioxane. The Middle Curve is for Pentane + 1, 4 Dioxane and the Lower Curve is for 2-Methy'butane + 1, 4 Dioxane , 56 8. Determination of the Excess Volume Derivatives of Cycloheptane (1)+ Cyclohexanol (2...

Kim, Eue Sook

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Development of a Thermodynamic Model for Fluids Confined in Spherical Pores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for n-propane adsorbed in zeolite A at 423.15 K (Grande and Gigola)24 ................................................................... 40 Figure 14: Calculated versus experimental results for n-butane adsorbed in zeolite A at 308.15 K (Glessner... and Myers)23 ................................................................. 41 Figure 15: Calculated versus experimental results for carbon dioxide adsorbed in zeolite A at 303.15 K (Sievers)21...

D'Lima, Michelle Lynn

2014-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

245

PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Plus 3 - 0 0 - 0 0 0 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 14 41 64 101 - -4 5 3 217 EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 1 PropanePropylene 9 47 56 99 - -4 0 1 214 Normal Butane...

246

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Plus 27 - 1 -12 - 0 6 1 8 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 127 -4 16 -92 - -4 9 0 43 EthaneEthylene 46 0 0 -51 - 0 0 0 -5 PropanePropylene 49 7 14 -20 - -7 0 0 56 Normal Butane...

247

untitled  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Plus 30 - 0 -17 - 0 7 0 6 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 173 5 12 -141 - 0 11 1 36 EthaneEthylene 84 0 0 -78 - 0 0 0 6 PropanePropylene 56 9 10 -40 - 2 0 0 32 Normal Butane...

248

PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Plus 30 - 1 -17 - 0 6 1 6 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 172 4 9 -141 - 0 9 1 34 EthaneEthylene 82 0 0 -76 - 0 0 0 6 PropanePropylene 57 8 7 -39 - 0 0 0 33 Normal Butane...

249

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

265 - 47 - 2 184 7 119 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1,444 575 318 - 16 250 53 2,019 EthaneEthylene 646 20 0 - 10 0 0 657 PropanePropylene 497 541 226 - 7 0 37 1,220 Normal Butane...

250

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

244 - 55 - 25 176 5 92 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1,232 393 342 - 12 258 43 1,653 EthaneEthylene 542 16 1 - 95 0 0 463 PropanePropylene 433 466 255 - 124 0 32 997 Normal Butane...

251

untitled  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Plus 35 - 0 0 - -2 26 0 10 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 40 19 0 0 - -67 54 18 55 EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 0 PropanePropylene 13 61 0 0 - -19 0 18 76 Normal Butane...

252

PSA Vol 1 Tables Revised Ver 2 Print.xls  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

266 - 47 - 2 188 7 116 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 1,451 573 328 - 15 253 53 2,030 EthaneEthylene 649 20 1 - 10 0 0 660 PropanePropylene 499 540 233 - 6 0 37 1,229 Normal Butane...

253

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Plus 30 - 0 -18 - 0 6 1 5 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 176 6 7 -147 - 0 9 1 32 EthaneEthylene 85 0 0 -80 - 0 0 0 5 PropanePropylene 57 8 6 -41 - 0 0 0 30 Normal Butane...

254

untitled  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Pentanes Plus 3 - 0 0 - 0 0 0 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 14 54 55 90 - 0 4 3 204 EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 1 PropanePropylene 9 49 48 89 - -5 0 1 199 Normal Butane...

255

untitled  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Plus 3 - 0 0 - 0 0 0 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 14 41 60 101 - -4 5 3 214 EthaneEthylene 0 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 1 PropanePropylene 9 47 52 99 - -4 0 1 211 Normal Butane...

256

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Plus 3 - 0 0 - 0 0 0 3 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 15 10 103 160 - -52 6 1 332 EthaneEthylene 1 0 0 0 - 0 0 0 1 PropanePropylene 10 39 96 153 - -40 0 1 337 Normal Butane...

257

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Plus 30 - 1 -17 - 0 6 1 5 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 171 4 8 -140 - 0 9 1 34 EthaneEthylene 82 0 0 -77 - 0 0 0 5 PropanePropylene 56 8 7 -38 - 0 0 0 33 Normal Butane...

258

INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF MICROMECHANICS AND MICROENGINEERING J. Micromech. Microeng. 16 (2006) S198S205 doi:10.1088/0960-1317/16/9/S05  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mobile power generation systems such as gas turbine engine [2], thermoelectric generator [3. Microeng. 16 (2006) S198­S205 doi:10.1088/0960-1317/16/9/S05 Development of a micro catalytic combustor fueled by butane was investigated. High-precision ceramic tape-casting technology was adopted

Tokyo, University of

259

Supplementary Information Solubility and Molecular Conformations of n-Alkane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from standard literature expressions, as described in the main text. Methane (C1) through n-butane (C4Supplementary Information Solubility and Molecular Conformations of n-Alkane Chains in Water Andrew for a 25mer composed of methane-like monomers with a harmonic bond stretching potential, a harmonic bond

Ferguson, Andrew

260

Chem 115Lithium-Halogen ExchangeMyers RLi + R'X RX + R'Li  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chem 115Lithium-Halogen ExchangeMyers RLi + R'X RX + R'Li Lithium-halogen exchange reactions are essentially inert. 2 t-BuLi t-BuI + RLi t-BuLi isobutene + isobutane + LiI Lithium-halogen exchange reactions, and lithium iodide. H OEtBr H H OEtLi H1.1 eq n-BuLi Et2O, !80 °C Lau, K. S.; Schlosser, M. J. Org. Chem. 1978

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butane butylene isobutane" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

MTBE Prices Responded to Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: On top of the usual factors impacting gasoline prices, natural gas has had some influence recently. MTBE is an oxygenate used in most of the RFG consumed in the U.S. Generally, it follows gasoline prices and its own supply/demand balance factors. But this winter, we saw it respond strongly to natural gas prices. MTBE is made from methanol and isobutylene, which in turn come from methane and butane. Both methane and butane come from natural gas streams. Until this year, the price of natural gas has been so low that it had little effect. But the surge that occurred in December and January pulled MTBE up . Keep in mind that about 11% MTBE is used in a gallon of RFG, so a 30 cent increase in MTBE is only about a 3 cent increase in the price of RFG. While we look ahead at this summer, natural gas prices should be

262

Retrofit of Tehran City Gate Station C.G.S. No. 2 by Using Turboexpander  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methane C 1 89.80 3 Carbon Dioxide CO 2 1.10 4 Ethane C 2 3.70 5 Propane C 3 0.98 6 Iso Butane IC 4 0.22 7 Normal Butane NC 4 0.29 8 Iso pentane IC 5 0.10 9 Normal pentane NC 5 0.07 10 Hexane C 6 0.04 Total 100.00 Tab. 1. Chemical... of Technology Select case study The chemical compounds of gas that is passed through the C.G.S. No. 2 of Tehran are as table: Mole Percent Chemical Compounds No. Chemical FormulaName 3.70N2Nitrogen1 89.80CH4Methane2 1.10CO2 Dioxide Carbon3 3.70C2H...

Seresht, R. T.; Ja, H. K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Process for using preferential physical solvents for selective processing of hydrocarbon gas streams  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for the removal of hydrocarbon gas liquids, comprising hydrocarbons heavier than methane, from a hydrocarbon gas stream, wherein a need exists for recovering to any selected degree and at extremely high recoveries a selected hydrocarbon component and heavier hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbons are within the group consisting of ethane, propane, butane, and pentane without the need simultaneously to recover hydrocarbons lighter than the selected hydrocarbon component from the hydrocarbon gas stream, The improvement of selectively extracting the hydrocarbon gas liquids from the hydrocarbon gas stream with a preferential physical solvent is described here. The method provides selective capability for recovery according to the selected degree of (a) ethane in amounts ranging from 2-98%, (b) propane in amounts ranging from 2-99%, (c) butane in amounts ranging from 2-100%, or (d) pentanes and higher molecular weight hydrocarbons in amounts ranging up to 100%.

Mehra, Y.R.

1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

264

Extended use of photovoltaic solar panels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of photovoltaic solar panels (and related generation of electric power) can be extended to a 24 hours per day under any environmental condition by equipping them with an artificial source of light with emitting wavelengths matched to the photovoltaic solar panels to be turned on in the absence of sunlight. This source of light can be obtained by heating a mantle to an incandescent temperature via the efficient low polluting combustion of Natural Gas Butane Propane or other gaseous Hydrocarbon fuel.

Guido E. Guazzoni; M. Frank Rose

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Economics of Water Management for Cotton and Grain Sorghum Production, High Plains.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effects of cool nights, cold winds, blowing sand and seedling diseases. Low yields on late-planted cotton and the relatively short cotton-growing season make it undesirable to delay cotton plant- ing; consequently, there is little or no room... Tables 2 and 3, adjusted for requirements of various man- agement systems. 'Seed and insecticides. "ncludes fuel. oil and repair costs on typical 540 gpm, engine equipped, butane fueled pumping plant. management units in systems 1 to 4 consist of 1...

Hughes, Wm. F.; Magee, A. C.; Jones, Don; Thaxton, Earnest L. Jr.

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Design and Fabrication of Nanochannel Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Stage 2 can be shifted horizontally to x-direction by rotating the handle. Butane torch is placed under the tubing to heat it up. The inset shows the deformation of the tubing under the heat and stretching??????? ..29 Fig. 12 SEM images... pace. In 1990s, a research interest in fluid handling microchannel devices boosted because of their genomics application and potential capability in bio/chemical agent detection. Now the fabrication techniques have pushed those devices down...

Wang, Miao

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

267

The effect of the volume of liquid injected on recovery in solvent slug flooding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the effect of slug size on oil recovered. A series of verti. cal displacements was performed on a kerosene- and-water saturated core 10 feet in length, using butane as the solvent and methane as the inert dksplacing medium. Breakthrough recovery was fo... storage problem, it mrght be ea, sily possible to solve two difficultres 11 simultaneously, as suggested by Kennedy. The LPG is easily recovered following the displacement by the srmple expedient of blowing down the reservoir, Much interest has...

Bowman, Charles Hay

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Origin of gaseous hydrocarbons in east-central Texas groundwaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

increases. Calculations suggest addition of isotopically heavy carbon dioxide (as high as +10'%%do), COs probably coproduced with CH4 by acetate dissimilation. The isotopic difference in 5 C of Queen City-Sparta and Yegua-Cook Mountain gaseous.... Thermocatalytic gases form from the alteration of organic matter at an optimum temperature of about 12?C (Philippi, 1965). In general they have a 8' C values greater than -50'%%do and contain appreciable amounts of Cz+ (ethane, propane, butane, etc...

Coffman, Bryan Keith

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

An investigation of convergence pressure methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, nitrogen, hydrocarbons having molecular weights from methane through hexane, and the remainder of the hydrocarbons are lumped into a single pseudocomponent G7+. Butane and pentane are further split into iso and normal... of Mixtures Versus Saturation Pressure Number of Mixtures Versus Temperature 55 56 10 Number of Mixtures Versus Mole Fraction of Carbon Dioxide 57 Number of Mixtures Versus Mole Fraction of Hydrogen Sulfide 12 Number of Mixtures Versus Mole Fraction...

Wattenbarger, Robert Chick

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Headspace profiles of modified atmosphere packaged fresh red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) by gas liquid chromatography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

activity. Typical components found in the headspace were, butanal, ethanol, hexanal, dimethylamine and trimethylamine. During storage at 4 C, the microbial population within the packages containing C02 tended to shift from an initial gram negative... dioxide (CO2) enriched atmospheres and vacuum packaging have become important new technologies that will improve the quality and shelf-life of fresh seafood products. This type of packaging not only extends the shelf-life of seafoods, it also makes...

Scorah, Craig Darrell Allen

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Accurate Thermodynamic Properties from the BACKONE Equation for the Processing of Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fractionation processes are done to clean the natural gas from low-boiling gases (e.g., nitrogen) or heavy hydrocarbons (pentane, etc.) and to separate side products such as ethane, propane, or butane. ... Results for the speed of sound, in pure and mixed gaseous methane and ethane, are shown in Figure 2. ... Figure 16 Sketch of a natural gas liquefaction plant (according to Phillips optimized cascade process116). ...

Martin Wendland; Bahaa Saleh; Johann Fischer

2004-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

272

Catalytic pyrolysis of straight-run gasoline on a promoted vanadium catalyst  

SciTech Connect

Over the years the catalytic pyrolysis has been studied of various hydrocarbon materials - from gaseous (ethane, propane and n-butane) to heavy petroleum fractions with an end boiling point higher than 500/sup 0/C. The process indices for all the raw materials studied were significantly better than those from thermal pyrolysis. Improvement of operational properties for the vanadium catalyst for pyrolysis involved the selecting a better acceptor and the use of promotor additives which inhibit coke formation.

Chernykh, S.P.; Adel'son, S.V.; Rudyk, E.M.; Zhagfarov, F.G.; Motorina, I.A.; Nikonov, V.I.; Mukhina, T.N.; Barabanov, N.L.; Pyatiletov, V.I.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

ETBE Synthesis via Reactive Distillation. 1. Steady-State Simulation and Design Aspects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To validate the simulation results without experimental data, Smith's MTBE column was simulated for the case described in his patent application (Smith, 1980) using both Pro/II and SpeedUp. ... The maximum conversion in a 10-stage ETBE reactive distillation column (Figure 5) and a 30-stage ETBE reactive distillation column based on a commercial MTBE column (Simulation Sciences, 1995) (where the co-objective is to essentially eliminate butylenes from the ether product) was determined for varying isobutylene concentrations in the hydrocarbon feed to the primary reactor, by simulations using Pro/II. ... 11.?Determine?column?diameter?from?simulation?data?for?vapor?and?liquid?loadings?and?column?height?from?stage?efficiency? estimates,?including?appropriate?allowances?for?uncertainties?in?flooding?factor?and?stage?efficiency. ...

Martin G. Sneesby; Moses O. Tadé; Ravindra Datta; Terence N. Smith

1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

274

Preparation of synthetic hydrocarbon lubricants  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for preparing synthetic lubricating materials which process comprises: (a) reacting (i) at least a portion of a reaction product of the liquid phase oligomerization of propylene, butylene or mixtures thereof containing a C/sub 6/ olefin component, (ii) a linear olefin reactant having an average carbon number ranging from about 10 to about 18 in the presence of a catalyst, (b) separating from the reaction mixture of (a) hydrocarbons which distill at a temperature above about 660/sup 0/ F. (316/sup 0/ C.), and (c) hydrogenating the reaction product of (b) by contact with hydrogen with or without a catalyst at a temperature ranging from about 25/sup 0/ C. to about 300/sup 0/ C.

Johnson, T.H.

1986-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

275

PSADEFS.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions Definitions of Petroleum Products and Other Terms Alcohol. The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH 3 - (CH 2 )n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate. The product of an alkylation reaction. It usu- ally refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gaso- line. Alkylation. A refining process for chemically combining isobutane with olefin hydrocarbons (e.g., propylene, buty- lene) through the control of temperature and pressure in the presence of an acid catalyst, usually sulfuric acid or hydrofluoric acid. The product, alkylate, an isoparaffin, has high octane value and is blended with motor and aviation gasoline to improve the antiknock

276

Performances of linseed oil-free bakelite RPC prototypes with cosmic ray muons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparative study has been performed on Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) made of two different grades of bakelite paper laminates, produced and commercially available in India. The chambers, operated in the streamer mode using argon, tetrafluroethane and isobutane in 34:59:7 mixing ratio, are tested for the efficiency and the stability with cosmic rays. A particular grade of bakelite (P-120, NEMA LI-1989 Grade XXX), used for high voltage insulation in humid conditions, was found to give satisfactory performance with stable efficiency of > 96% continuously for more than 130 days. A thin coating of silicone fluid on the inner surfaces of the bakelite RPC is found to be necessary for operation of the detector.

Biswas, S; Bose, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Saha, S; Sharan, M K; Viyogi, Y P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Process for producing gasoline of high octane number, in particular lead-free gasoline  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for producing gasoline of high octane number from C/sub 3/ and C/sub 4/ olefinic cuts, such as those obtained by fractional distillation of a C/sub 3/ / C/sub 4/ catalytic cracking cut. It includes the steps of: (A) oligomerizing propylene of the C/sub 3/ cut to obtain a first gasoline fraction, (B) reacting the isobutene of the C/sub 4/ cut with methanol to produce methyl tert.-butyl ether which is separated from the unreacted C/sub 4/ hydrocarbons to form a second gasoline fraction, (C) alkylating said unreacted C/sub 4/ hydrocarbons with isobutane in the presence of an alkylation catalyst such as hydrofluoric acid, to form a third gasoline fraction, and (D) admixing, at least partially, said first, second and third gasoline fractions, so as to obtain gasoline of high octane number.

Chauvin, Y.; Gaillard, J.; Hellin, M.; Torck, B.; Vu, Q.D.

1981-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

278

Long duration hard X-ray transatlantic payload  

SciTech Connect

The HXR80M large-area hard X-ray experiment, to be flown aboard a transatlantic balloon, is described. The detectors are two multiwire spectroscopic proportional counters (MWSPC) with a 2700-sq-cm sensitive area each. The two detectors are filled with an extremely pure xenon-isobutane mixture at high pressure (3-6 atm) in order to obtain good spectral resolution and high efficiency. The onboard data handling is performed by microprocessor-controlled electronics. The scientific aim of the experiment is the survey of the sky belt around the 38th parallel and in particular the observation of faint galactic objects and galactic binary systems in the 15-200 keV range.

La Padula, C.D.; Bazzano, A.; Boccaccini, L.; Mastropietro, M.; Patriarca, R.; Polcaro, V.F.; Ubertini, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Simulations of EUPHORE and field experiments using a master chemical mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper, we describe the evaluation of the MCM both through smog chamber and field experiments. Smog chamber work In order to test various aspects of a recently developed a-pinene mechanism, chamber experiments were carried out in the EUropean PHOtochemical REactor (EUPHORE) at Valencia. Two experimental systems were studied as followed: NOx/ethene/toluene/n-butane and NOx/ethene/toluene/n-butane/a-pinene, the object being to investigate the effect on the final ozone concentration of the addition of a-pinene to the experimental system. The systems were then modelled using the MCM, with diurnally varying photolysis rates calculated for the latitude of Valencia, (39.5 o N), and the appropriate day of the year using the UVFLUX model 2 (Hayman, 1997; Jenkin et al., 1997b). The initial concentrations and conditions of the two experimental runs are summarised below in Table 1. Table 1 - Summary of initial concentrations and conditions used in the EUPHORE chamber no a-pinene with a-pinene Start time 08:40 08:15 End time 16:29 16:05 Average temperature ( o C) 24 25.1 Maximum temperature ( o C) 26.5 27.3 Pressure (mbar) 1004 1001 Initial concentrations (ppb): [NO] 177 178 [NO 2 ]2016 [C 2 H 4 ] 254 246 [n-C 4 H 10 ] 257 248 [toluene] 73 68 [a-pinene] 028 The results from the simulation are shown in Figures 1 and 2 (the smog chamber data are preliminary and have been provided by Dr. Lars Ruppert of the University of Wuppertal). Figure 1 - Results from the simulation of the NOx/ethene/toluene/n-butane system. The measurements are indicated by symbols and the MCM results by solid lines

Nicola Carslaw; Michael J. Pilling; Michael E. Jenkin; Garry D. Hayman

280

Feedstock Economics for Global Steam Crackers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, butane, wide range naphtha, and atmospheric gas oil. The 10 regions considered in the study are the US Gulf Coast, Brazil, Western Canada, China, Indonesia, Japan, Saudi Arabia, 54 South Korea, Taiwan. and West Ger-many. lhe business climate... fabricated, while those in Saudi Arabia have a hJgh cont~nt of foreign shop fabrication into modules, and local assembly of the various modules. Location Factor Country 0.85 South k'orea 0.90 Taiwan 0.96 West Germany 1.00 US Gulf Coast 1.12 Japan...

McCormack, G.; Pavone, T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butane butylene isobutane" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Silicon Based Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Chip for Portable Consumer Electronics -- Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

LSI’s fuel cell uses efficient Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (“SOFC”) technology, is manufactured using Micro Electrical Mechanical System (“MEMS”) fabrication methods, and runs on high energy fuels, such as butane and ethanol. The company’s Fuel Cell on a Chip™ technology enables a form-factor battery replacement for portable electronic devices that has the potential to provide an order-of-magnitude run-time improvement over current batteries. Further, the technology is clean and environmentally-friendly. This Department of Energy funded project focused on accelerating the commercialization and market introduction of this technology through improvements in fuel cell chip power output, lifetime, and manufacturability.

Alan Ludwiszewski

2009-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

282

Influence of propane on CO2/CH4 and N2/CH4 separations in CHA zeolite membranes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Two types of CHA zeolite membranes (SAPO-34, SSZ-13) were used for CO2/CH4, N2/CH4, and CO2/i-butane separations at both low (270 and 350 kPa) and high (1.73 MPa) pressures. The SSZ-13 membranes were more selective, with CO2/CH4 separation selectivities as high as 280 and N2/CH4 separation selectivities of 12 at 270 kPa feed pressure. For both types of membranes, selectivities and permeances decreased as the feed pressure increased. The CO2/i-butane separation selectivities were greater than 500,000 for SAPO-34 membranes, indicating extremely low densities of defects because i-butane is too large to enter the CHA pores. The CO2/i-butane selectivities were smaller for SSZ-13 membranes (2,800–20,000), in part because the SSZ-13 layer was on the outside of the porous mullite tubes and sealing the membrane on the zeolite surface was more difficult than for the SAPO-34 membranes that were grown on the inside of glazed alumina tubes. Propane, in feed concentrations from 1 to 9%, significantly influenced separations by decreasing permeances in most cases. The effect was larger for N2/CH4 than for CO2/CH4 mixtures, apparently because the more strongly-adsorbing CO2 competes better than N2 with propane for adsorption sites. Although propane caused permeances to decrease significantly over time, selectivities decreased much less. Propane decreased permeances more for SAPO-34 membranes than for SSZ-13 membranes at 350 kPa, and at high pressure propane even increased CO2 permeances and decreased CH4 permeances in SSZ-13 membranes, thus significantly increasing CO2/CH4 selectivities. Propane permeances reached steady state relatively quickly because its permeation was mostly through defects, but CO2, N2, and CH4 permeances did not stabilize in the presence of propane, even after seven days. The effects of propane were reversible when it was removed from the feed and the membranes were heated.

Ting Wu; Merritt C. Diaz; Yihong Zheng; Rongfei Zhou; Hans H. Funke; John L. Falconer; Richard D. Noble

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Future perspectives of using hollow fibers as structured packings in light hydrocarbon distillation  

SciTech Connect

Olefin and paraffin are the largest chemical commodities. Furthermore, they are major building blocks for the petrochemical industry. Each year, petroleum refining, consumes 4,500 TBtu/yr in separation energy, making it one of the most energy-intensive industries in the United States). Just considering liquefied petroleum gas (ethane/propane/butane) and olefins (ethylene and propylene) alone, the distillation energy consumption is about 400 TBtu/yr in the US. Since petroleum distillation is a mature technology, incremental improvements in column/tray design will only provide a few percent improvements in the performance. However, each percent saving in net energy use amounts to savings of 10 TBtu/yr and reduces CO{sub 2} emissions by 0.2 MTon/yr. In practice, distillation columns require 100 to 200 trays to achieve the desired separation. The height of a transfer unit (HTU) of conventional packings is typical in the range of 36-60 inch. Since 2006, we had explored using several non-selective membranes as the structured packings to replace the conventional packing materials used in propane and propylene distillation. We obtained the lowest HTU of < 8 inch for the hollow fiber column, which was >5 times shorter than that of the conventional packing materials. In 2008, we also investigated this type of packing materials in iso-/n-butane distillation. Because of a slightly larger relative volatility of iso-/n-butane than that of propane/propylene, a wider and a more stable operational range was obtained for the iso-/n-butane pair. However, all of the experiments were conducted on a small scale with flowrate of < 25 gram/min. Recently, we demonstrated this technology on a larger scale (<250 gram/min). Within the loading range of F-factor < 2.2 Pa{sup 0.5}, a pressure drop on the vapor side is below 50 mbar/m, which suggests that the pressure drop of hollow fibers packings is not an engineering barrier for the applications in distillations. The thermal stability study suggests that polypropylene hollow fibers are stable after a long time exposure to C{sub 2} - C{sub 4} mixtures. The effects of packing density on the separation efficiency will be discussed.

Yang, Dali [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Orler, Bruce [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tornga, Stephanie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Welch, Cindy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

284

Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons. 8 figures.

Senum, G.I.; Dietz, R.N.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

285

Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons.

Senum, Gunnar I. (Patchogue, NY); Dietz, Russell N. (Patchogue, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Process for restoring membrane permeation properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for restoring the selectivity of high-flee-volume, glassy polymer membranes for condensable components over less-condensable components or non-condensable components of a gas mixture. The process involves exposing the membrane to suitable sorbent vapor, such as propane or butane, thereby reopening the microvoids that make up the free volume. The selectivity of an aged membrane may be restored to 70-100% of its original value. The selectivity of a membrane which is known to age over time can also be maintained by keeping the membrane in a vapor environment when it is not in use.

Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Toy, Lora G. (San Francisco, CA); Casillas, Carlos G. (San Jose, CA)

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

287

Process for restoring membrane permeation properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for restoring the selectivity of high-free-volume, glassy polymer membranes for condensable components over less-condensable components or non-condensable components of a gas mixture. The process involves exposing the membrane to suitable sorbent vapor, such as propane or butane, thereby reopening the microvoids that make up the free volume. The selectivity of an aged membrane may be restored to 70--100% of its original value. The selectivity of a membrane which is known to age over time can also be maintained by keeping the membrane in a vapor environment when it is not in use. 8 figs.

Pinnau, I.; Toy, L.G.; Casillas, C.G.

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

288

The effect of composition on equilibrium vaporization ratios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and presented K-values for various convergence pressures and temperatures. Organick and Brown used a correlating pressure and molal average 12 boiling points to determine K-values. Brinkman and Sicking developed a method for determining K-values for 13..., hexane, and pentane into the cell under vacuum. Then the other constituents including a propane-butane mixture, ethane gas, and Texas natural gas were measured by displacement with mercury into the bottom of the storage cell while the cell was rocking...

Wiesepape, Cordell Floyd

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

289

Photoacoustic gas sensing with a commercial external cavity-quantum cascade laser at 10.5 ?m  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We report the implementation of a commercial external cavity-quantum cascade laser emitting at 10.5 ?m in a photoacoustic spectrometer. This spectrometer enables measurements on broad spectral range up to 60 cm?1 which means that spectra of complex molecules can be recorded as well as a whole absorption band of a small molecule. The wide tuning range of the source of this photoacoustic spectrometer demonstrates the possibility to detect small and complex molecules such as carbon dioxide and butane.

D. Mammez; C. Stoeffler; J. Cousin; R. Vallon; M.H. Mammez; L. Joly; B. Parvitte; V. Zéninari

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Glow Discharge Enhanced Chemical Reaction: Application in Ammonia Synthesis and Hydrocarbon Gas Cleanup  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies, such as the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) methods have been studied for the cleaning of diesel engine exhaust. The SCR system, in which ammonia is used as a reducing agent, is thought to be one of the most promising methods for emissions... of methane, it can also include ethane, propane, butane and pentane. The composition of natural gas can vary widely, but Table 1 below outlines the typical makeup of natural gas before it is refined. 3 Table 1. Typical composition of natural gas...

Ming, Pingjia

2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

291

An investigation of the displacement of oil by a miscible slug followed by water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis of this sand is represented in Table I. For the sake of uniformity in packing and the assurance of a water-wet matrix the sand was packed under water with continuous percussion blows applied along the lengths of the cores. By knowing the core... (46' SPI) commercial grade hav4ng a viscosity of i. 27 cp. at a temperature of 78'F. The water was ordinary tap ~ster. The LPG was a 60-40 mixture of butane and propane having a vapor pressure of 83 psi. The LPG was contained in a five gallon...

Startzman, Richard Albert

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

The catalytic oxidation of ethylene and butenes with air: total aldehyde production and selectivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of startup, variation in ca. talyst composition, or by pretreat- ment of tl e catalyst, inadvertently, with a deactivating agent. Pretreate. ent of the catalyst with hydrogen gas be- fore a run proved to have an adverse effect on the forma- tion... for epoinp;, these investi- . gators concluded tliat hydroxylation is not an important factor in the oxidation of 2-butane under tne conditions considered. At 375 0 a slow reaction occurred and the r te of oxidation' increased at l. i, her tcr...

Burns, John Cunningham

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Catalytic oxidation of propylene with air at temperatures near 500° FCatalytic oxidation of propylene with air at temperatures near 500°F?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(9 ), propane was relatively difficult to oxidise. Using an arbitrary scale where the ease of oxidation of pentane equals 1 , the following values were reported} ethane, 0 .0 0 1 1; propane, 0 .1 ; butane, 0 .5 ; hexane, 7 .5 * *hs numbers refer.... They reported a 15 percent conversion to acrolein and a U peroent conversion to carbon dioxide. This was the lowest temperature at which the oxidation was reported to have been accomplished, and it appeared that the work of the present thesis in the region...

Dunlop, Donald Dunwody

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

A parametric study of factors affecting oil recovery efficiency from carbon dioxide injection using a compositional reservoir model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% OOIP. The reservoir and fluid information for the pilot area is located in Table 2. 1. 5. Injection of a 338 of pore volume slug of carbon 15 dioxide, methane, and n-butane began in January of 1981. The project consisted of one updip injector...A PARAMETRIC STUDY OF FACTORS AFFECTING OIL RECOVERY EFFICIENCY FROM CARBON DIOXIDE INJECTION USING A COMPOSITIONAL RESERVOIR MODEL A THESIS by GREGORY ALLEN BARNES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University...

Barnes, Gregory Allen.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Diffusion in associated and non-associated homologous series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and carbon dioxide and of the alkanes n-octane, n ? decane, n-dodecane, n-tetradecane, and n-hexadecane in the solvents n ? heptane, n-dodecane, and n-hexadecane. Values of Vn and P for each solute-solvent pair were determined. For the dissolved gases, Vn... consisted of methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, n-pentane, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, cycloheptane, methylcyclopentane, and cycloheptane. The data were interpreted using the Wilke-Chang diffusivity equation. Haluska and Clover (1971) used a...

Alhamid, Khalid A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A study of new mixture combining rules for prediction of vapor-liquid equilibria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geometric mean of Eq. 63 for methane and n- o ))an butane. 29 b. Propane (1) and Carbon Dioxide (2) In this system, experimental data for B12 are used as taken from Dymond and Smith(1980). Figure 7 is the fitting diagram of Bin for this system. The y... Dioxide (2). c. Carbon Dioxide (I) and Methanol (2). . d. Ethanol (I) and Benzene (2). . e. Propane (I) and Methanol (2). . f. Methanol (1) and Benzene (2). . g. Ethanol (1) and Water (2)? 15 15 17 20 20 29 29 30 30 38 57 V. DISCUSSIONS...

Shyu, Guor-Shiarn

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Solvent-refined-coal (SRC) process: molecular sieve drier tests on PDU P-99. Interim report, April-August 1981. [High pressure recycle gas exiting the lean oil and amine scrubbers  

SciTech Connect

A molecular sieve (Type 3A) drier system was installed on PDU P-99 for confirmatory testing. During 70 h of continuous operation, three drying and two regeneration cycles were completed. The drier processed bleed off-gas at unit pressure and ambient temperature in tandem with the butane scrubber. High pressure hydrogen was used to regenerate the molecular sieve adsorbent at 500/sup 0/F. Although the tests should be considered preliminary because of uncertainties in the moisture and gas rate measurements, the results were in good agreement with the predicted performance, and the apparatus operated with minimum difficulty.

Gray, J.A.; Iantorno, J.G.; Gall, W.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Table A1 Molar mass, gas constant, and critical-point properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2 7.39 0.0943 Carbon monoxide CO 28.011 0.2968 133 3.50 0.0930 Carbon tetrachloride CCl4 153.82 0 of carbon dioxide, CO2 Table A­21 Ideal-gas properties of carbon monoxide, CO Table A­22 Ideal.0520 584 10.34 0.1355 n-Butane C4H10 58.124 0.1430 425.2 3.80 0.2547 Carbon dioxide CO2 44.01 0.1889 304

Kostic, Milivoje M.

299

PROPERTY TABLES AND CHARTS (SI UNITS) Table A1 Molar mass, gas constant, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.0943 Carbon monoxide CO 28.011 0.2968 133 3.50 0.0930 Carbon tetrachloride CCl4 153.82 0.05405 556.4 4.56 0 Table A­20 Ideal-gas properties of carbon dioxide, CO2 Table A­21 Ideal-gas properties of carbon.1355 n-Butane C4H10 58.124 0.1430 425.2 3.80 0.2547 Carbon dioxide CO2 44.01 0.1889 304.2 7.39 0

Kostic, Milivoje M.

300

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Inputs & Utilization Inputs & Utilization Definitions Key Terms Definition All Other Motor Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas (e.g. straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, xylene) used for blending or compounding into finished motor gasoline. Includes receipts and inputs of Gasoline Treated as Blendstock (GTAB). Excludes conventional blendstock for oxygenate blending (CBOB), reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending, oxygenates (e.g. fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether), butane, and pentanes plus. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Blending Plant A facility which has no refining capability but is either capable of producing finished motor gasoline through mechanical blending or blends oxygenates with motor gasoline.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butane butylene isobutane" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Development of miscibility in four-component CO[sub 2] floods  

SciTech Connect

A rigorous tie-line extension criterion for the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) is derived for dispersion-free, 1D displacements in four-component systems in which CO[sub 2] displaces oil containing dissolved methane. The key tie-lines required for application of the MMP criterion are obtained by a simple graphical construction. A simplified technique for construction of solutions is demonstrated for the CO[sub 2]/methane/butane/decane system. The new technique makes solution of certain four-component problems not much more difficult than solution of a Buckley-Leverett displacement of oil by water.

Orr, F.M.Jr.; Johns, R.T.; Dindoruk, B. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Environment - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

environment environment Carbon Dioxide Emissions Coefficients Release Date: February 14, 2013 | Also available in spreadsheet Carbon Dioxide Emissions Coefficients by Fuel Pounds CO2 Kilograms CO2 Pounds CO2 Kilograms CO2 Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Factors: Per Unit of Volume or Mass Per Unit of Volume or Mass Per Million Btu Per Million Btu For homes and businesses Propane 12.7/gallon 5.8/gallon 139.0 63.1 Butane 14.8/gallon 6.7/gallon 143.2 65.0 Butane/Propane Mix 13.7/gallon 6.2/gallon 141.1 64.0 Home Heating and Diesel Fuel 22.4/gallon 10.2/gallon 161.3 73.2 Kerosene 21.5/gallon 9.8/gallon 159.4 72.3 Coal (All types) 4,631.5/short ton 2,100.8/short ton 210.2 95.3 Natural Gas 117.1/thousand cubic feet 53.1/thousand cubic feet 117.0 53.1

303

Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

The experimental study of coal swelling ratios have been determined with a wide variety of solvents. Only marginal levels of coal swelling were observed for the hydrocarbon solvents, but high levels were found with solvents having heteroatom functionality. Blends were superior to pure solvents. The activity of various catalyst precursors for pyrene hydrogenation and coal conversion was measured. Higher coal conversions were observed for the S0{sub 2}-treated coal than the raw coal, regardless of catalyst type. Coal conversions were highest for Molyvan-L, molybdenum naphthenate, and nickel octoate, respectively. Bottoms processing consists of a combination of the ASCOT process coupling solvent deasphalting with delayed coking. Initial results indicate that a blend of butane and pentane used near the critical temperature of butane is the best solvent blend for producing a yield/temperature relationship of proper sensitivity and yet retaining an asphalt phase of reasonable viscosity. The literature concerning coal swelling, both alone and in combination with coal liquefaction, and the use of dispersed or unsupported catalysts in coal liquefaction has been updated.

Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Gutterman, C. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

304

Design process of LNG heavy hydrocarbons fractionation: Low LNG temperature recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The liquefied natural gas (LNG) includes light hydrocarbons heavier than methane, such as ethane, propane and butane, which not only may increase the calorific values of the natural gas beyond specification limits, but also may have greater market values. During the gasification of the LNG, the energy invested in it during liquefaction process may be recovered and re-used. This paper relates to two regasification processes for separating natural gas liquids from liquefied natural gas using the low LNG temperature to produce natural gas meeting pipeline or other commercial specifications. From the two processes studied, the fractionated methane-rich stream is pressurized to pipeline pressure by pumps instead of compressors and the liquefied ethane, propane and butane are obtained directly at atmospheric pressure. Among the processes studied, the low pressure process sounds economically attractive with a saving in TAC of 4.6% over the high pressure process; however the high pressure process is more preferable for the cases where the space is limited.

Hosanna Uwitonze; Sangil Han; Choi Jangryeok; Kyu Suk Hwang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Catalytic ignition of fuel/oxygen/nitrogen mixtures over platinum  

SciTech Connect

Ignition of fuel/oxygen/nitrogen mixtures over platinum wire is experimentally studied by using microcalorimetry and by restricting the flow to the low Reynolds number range so that axisymmetry prevails. The fuels studied are propane, butane, propylene, ethylene, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen. Parameters investigated include flow velocity, fuel type and concentration, and oxygen concentration. The catalytic ignition temperatures of the various fuels are accurately determined over extensive ranges of fuel/oxygen/nitrogen concentrations. Results show two distinctly opposite ignition trends depending on the nature of the fuel. That is, the ignition temperature of lean propane/air and butane/air mixtures decreases as their fuel concentration is increased, while the reverse trend is observed for lean mixtures of propylene, ethylene, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen with air. Furthermore, the ignition of propane depends primarily on fuel concentration, while the ignition of carbon monoxide depends on fuel and oxygen concentrations to a comparable extent. These results are explained on the basis of hierarchical surface adsorption strengths of the different reactants in effecting catalytic ignition. Additional phenomena of interest are observed and discussed.

Cho, P.; Law, C.K.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Splitting a C-O bond in dialkylethers with bis(1,2,4-tri-t-butylcyclopentadienyl) cerium-hydride does not occur by a sigma-bond metathesis pathway: a combined experimental and DFT computational study  

SciTech Connect

Addition of diethylether to [1,2,4(Me3C)3C5H2]2CeH, abbreviated Cp'2CeH, gives Cp'2CeOEt and ethane. Similarly, di-n-propyl- or di-n-butylether gives Cp'2Ce(O-n-Pr) and propane or Cp'2Ce(O-n-Bu) and butane, respectively. Using Cp'2CeD, the propane and butane contain deuterium predominantly in their methyl groups. Mechanisms, formulated on the basis of DFT computational studies, show that the reactions begin by an alpha or beta-CH activation with comparable activation barriers but only the beta-CH activation intermediate evolves into the alkoxide product and an olefin. The olefin then inserts into the Ce-H bond forming the alkyl derivative, Cp'2CeR, that eliminates alkane. The alpha-CH activation intermediate is in equilibrium with the starting reagents, Cp'2CeH and the ether, which accounts for the deuterium label in the methyl groups of the alkane. The one-step sigma-bond metathesis mechanism has a much higher activation barrier than either of the two-step mechanisms.

Werkema, Evan; Yahia, Ahmed; Maron, Laurent; Eisenstein, Odile; Andersen, Richard

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

307

Simple rules help select best hydrocarbon distillation scheme  

SciTech Connect

Separation economics depend mainly on investment for major equipment and energy consumption. This relationship, together with the fact that, in most cases, many alternative schemes will be proposed, make it essential to find an optimum scheme that minimizes overall costs. Practical solutions are found by applying heuristics -- exploratory problem-solving techniques that eliminate alternatives without applying rigorous mathematical procedures. These techniques have been applied to a case study. In the case study, a hydrocarbon mixture will be transported through a pipeline to a fractionation plant, where it will be separated into commercial products for distribution. The fractionation will consist of a simple train of distillation columns, the sequence of which will be defined by applying heuristic rules and determining the required thermal duties for each column. The facility must separate ethane, propane and mixed butanes, natural gasoline (light straight-run, or LSR, gasoline), and condensate (heavy naphtha). The ethane will be delivered to an ethylene plant as a gaseous stream, the propane and butanes will be stored in cryogenic tanks, and the gasoline and heavy naphtha also will be stored.

Sanchezllanes, M.T.; Perez, A.L.; Martinez, M.P.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Rosal, R. del (Inst. Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico City (Mexico))

1993-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

308

High-pressure/high-temperature gas-solubility study in hydrogen-phenanthrene and methane-phenanthrene systems using static and chromatographic techniques  

SciTech Connect

The design and discovery of sources for alternative energy such as coal liquefaction has become of major importance over the past two decades. One of the major problems in such design in the lack of available data, particularly, for gas solubility in polycyclic aromatics at high temperature and pressure. Static and gas-liquid partition chromatographic methods were used for the study of hydrogen-phenanthrene and methane-phenanthrene systems. The static data for these two binaries were taken along 398.2, 423.2, 448.2, and 473.2 K isotherms up to 25.23 MPa. Gas-liquid partition chromatography was used to study the infinite dilution behavior of methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, and carbon dioxide in the hydrogen-phenanthrene system as well as hydrogen, ethane, n-butane, and carbon dioxide in the methane-phenanthrene binary. The principle objective was to examine the role of the elution gas. Temperatures were along the same isotherms as the static data and up to 20.77 MPa. With the exception of carbon dioxide, Henry's constants were calculated for all systems. Expressions for the heat of solution as a function of pressure were derived for both binary and chromatographic data. Estimates of delta H/sub i/sup sol/ at high pressure were presented.

Malone, P.V.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

High pressure/high temperature vapor liquid equilibrium study of light gases in hydrogen-coal liquid model compound systems using perturbation chromatography  

SciTech Connect

Perturbation chromatography or gas-liquid partition chromatography (GLPC) provides a powerful tool for making physicochemical measurements. In this investigation GLPC was applied to study the vapor-liquid equilibrium behavior of light gases in nonvolatile coal liquid model compound solvents at high temperatures and high pressures. Improvements made in existing GLPC techniques include: the use of a high pressure tandem proportioning pump to give precise control of the carrier gas flow rate and low pressure drops; a high pressure ionization chamber to detect the injection of very dilute radioactive sample gases; and the use of a microcomputer to provide instantaneous integration and very precise retention times of the chromatographic peaks. Infinite dilution K-values for methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen sulfide in hydrogen-dibenzofuran systems were obtained at 100 and 125 C and up to 800 psia. Infinite dilution K-values for the same light gases in hydrogen-9-methylanthracene systems were obtained at 100, 125, 150, 175, and 200 C and up to 3000 psia. Henry's constants were determined for the light gases in 9-methylanthracene. Second cross virial coefficients and vapor phase infinite dilution fugacity coefficients were calculated for methane, ethane, propane, and n-butane in hydrogen. These results were combined with the experimental K-value measurements to obtain Henry's constants in hydrogen-9-methylanthracene mixtures of fixed liquid compositions. Infinite dilution heats of solution of the solute gases in the mixtures were calculated.

Kragas, T.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Photooxidation and Photodesorption in the Photochemistry of Isobutene on TiO2(110)  

SciTech Connect

The photochemistry of isobutene was examined on the rutile TiO2(110) surface as a function of the surface pretreatment condition and irradiation temperature using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and photon stimulated desorption (PSD). Isobutene adsorbs molecularly on the clean TiO2(110) surface without detectable thermal decomposition. Preadsorption of oxygen, either as atoms or chemisorbed molecules, did not promote thermal reactions with isobutene, but instead blocked isobutene adsorption sites. Ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation of isobutene adsorbed on the clean surface led to depletion through photodesorption without significant photodecomposition. Isobutene PSD yields increased with increasing surface temperature suggesting that activated molecules sample their physisorbed potential energy surface during photodesorption. Preadsorption of oxygen promoted partial photooxidation of adsorbed isobutene to acetone, methacrolein and isobutanal. Acetone was only detected when molecular oxygen was present, indicating that O2 addition occurred across the C=C bond. In contrast, results from use of D6-isobutene indicated that coadsorption with either O adatoms or O2 molecules led to photochemical production of methacrolein (and likely isobutanal) through C-H bond cleavage on a methyl group. Irradiation an adlayer comprised of isobutene isolated from the surface by 1 ML of preadsorbed O2 showed the most photoconversion of isobutene, which suggests that photoactivation of adsorbed O2 is a key step in partial photooxidation of isobutene. Comparison of the isobutene PSD and oxidation product yields as a function of surface temperature between 20 and 120 K indicates a competition between photooxidation and photodesorption that varies with temperature. ‘Direct’ charge transfer events between isobutene and the surface, favored at higher temperature, compete with partial oxidation pathways initiated by ‘indirect’ activation of isobutene by O2, which is favored at low temperature. Access of O2 to the surface is critical to achieving desired isobutene photooxidation rates and products, and isobutene photodesorption may provide a means of regulating the isobutene surface coverage. Work reported here was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Science, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, and performed in the Williams R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL), a Department of Energy user facility funded by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by the Battelle Memorial Institute under contract DEAC05-76RL01830.

Henderson, Michael A.

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

311

Correlation between gas-phase and solution-phase reactivities of hydroxyl radicals toward saturated organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

The gas-phase and aqueous-solution-phase reactivities of hydroxyl radicals with a wide variety of organic compounds are compared. When kinetic data are available for the same reaction occurring in both phases, this comparison provides useful information about the reaction mechanism. Through this comparison the authors can demonstrate a linear correlation between the gas/solution-phase OH reactivities for numerous saturated organic compounds. This empirical relationship can be used together with mechanistic information to estimate the OH reactivity in one phase from the measured rate constant in the other. In order to develop and extend the correlation, they have used the flash photolysis resonance fluorescence technique to measure rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with methanol-d/sub 4/, ethanol-d/sub 6/, 2-chloroethanol, 2,2,2-trichloroethanol, 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, acetone-d/sub 6/, 1,1,1-trifluoroacetone, and 1,2-butylene oxide at 298 K. These results are reported herein.

Wallington, T.J.; Dagaut, P.; Kurylo, M.J.

1988-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

312

Effect of surfactants on the interfacial tension and emulsion formation between water and carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

The lowering of the interfacial tension ({gamma}) between water and carbon dioxide by various classes of surfactants is reported and used to interpret complementary measurements of the capacity, stability, and average drop size of water-in-CO{sub 2} emulsions. {gamma} is lowered from {approximately}20 to {approximately}2 mN/m for the best poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide) (PPO-b-PEO-b-PPO) and PeO-b-PPO-b-PEO Pluronic triblock copolymers, 1.4 mN/m for a poly(butylene oxide)-b-PEO copolymer, 0.8 mN/m for a perfluoropolyether (PEPE) ammonium carboxylate and 0.2 mN/m for PDMS{sub 24}-g-EO{sub 22}. The hydrophilic-CO{sub 2}-philic balance (HCB) of the triblock Pluronic and PDMS-g-PEO-PPO surfactants is characterized by the CO{sub 2}-to-water distribution coefficient and V-shaped plots of log {gamma} vs wt % EO. A minimum in {gamma} is observed for the optimum HCB. As the CO{sub 2}-philicity of the surfactant tail is increased, the molecular weight of the hydrophilic segment increases for an optimum HCB. The stronger interactions on both sides of the interface lead to a lower {gamma}. Consequently, more water was emulsified for the PDMS-based copolymers than either the PPO- or PBO-based copolymers.

Rocha, S.R.P. da; Harrison, K.L.; Johnston, K.P. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

313

FCC Tail Gas olefins conversion to gasoline via catalytic distillation with aromatics  

SciTech Connect

The goal of every refiner is to continually improve profitability by such means as increasing gasoline production, increasing gasoline octane pool and in cases where fuel balance becomes a problem, decreasing refinery fuel gas production. A new refinery process is currently being developed which accomplish these goals. Chemical Research and Licensing Company (CR and L) developed Catalytic Distillation technology in 1978 to produce MTBE. They have since used the Catalytic Distillation technique to produce cumene. CR and L has further developed this technology to convert olefin gases currently consumed as refinery fuel, to high octane gasoline components. The process, known as CATSTILL, alkylates olefin gases such as ethylene, propylene and butylene, present in FCC Tail Gas with light aromatics such as benzene, toluene and xylene, present in reformate, to produce additional quantities of high octane gasoline components. A portable CATSTILL demonstration plant has been constructed by Brown and Root U.S.A., under an agreement with CR and L, for placement in a refinery to further develop data necessary to design commercial plants. This paper presents current data relative to the CATSTILL development.

Partin, E.E. (Brown and Root U.S.A., Inc., Houston, TX (US))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Laser ultrasonic furnace tube coke monitor. Quarterly technical progress report No. 1, May 1--August 1, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The overall aim of the project is to demonstrate the performance and practical use of a laser ultrasonic probe for measuring the thickness of coke deposits located within the high temperature tubes of a thermal cracking furnace. This aim will be met by constructing an optical probe that will be tested using simulated coke deposits that are positioned inside of a bench-scale furnace. Successful development of the optical coke detector will provide industry with the only available method for on-line measurement of coke deposits. The optical coke detector will have numerous uses in the refining and petrochemical sectors including monitoring of visbreakers, hydrotreaters, delayed coking units, vacuum tower heaters, and various other heavy oil heating applications where coke formation is a problem. The coke detector will particularly benefit the olefins industry where high temperature thermal crackers are used to produce ethylene, propylene, butylene and other important olefin intermediates. The ethylene industry requires development of an on-line method for gauging the thickness of coke deposits in cracking furnaces because the current lack of detailed knowledge of coke deposition profiles introduces the single greatest uncertainty in the simulation and control of modern cracking furnaces. The laser ultrasonic coke detector will provide operators with valuable new information allowing them to better optimize the decoking turnaround schedule and therefore maximize production capacity.

NONE

1998-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Glycothermal Synthesis of Scheelite-Type LiEuW2O8 Nanophosphors and Their Structural Characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The formation of LiEuW2O8 from a tungsten source and acetates of lithium and europium(III) by autoclave treatment in 1,4-butylene glycol, i.e., by a glycothermal reaction, was studied to explore a novel low-temperature wet chemical synthesis of scheelite-type tungstate compounds with WO4 units. When dodecatungstophosphoric acid hexahydrate (DPA) was chosen as a tungsten source, a glycothermal reaction at 300 ?C produced crystalline scheelite-type LiEuW2O8 (LEW) nanophosphors in a single phase. In contrast, phase-pure crystalline LEW was not obtained using the other tungsten sources. According to the results obtained by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, infrared absorption spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy, the DPA-derived sample contained PO4 groups, which had probably substitutionally replaced WO4. PO4 groups could play a significant role in the nucleation of scheelite-type LEW, which is composed of WO4 groups. We also discuss the nonstoichiometric structural properties of the crystalline scheelite-type LEW. LEW nanophosphors, which are an alternative for organic dyes, may be one of promising materials because of their optical function of color conversion from near UV and blue to red.

Ryo Kasuya; Tetsuhiko Isobe; Shinobu Yamao

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Different process schemes for converting light straight run and fluid catalytic cracking naphthas in a FCC unit for maximum propylene production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Light straight run (LSR) and fluid catalytic cracking (FCCN) naphthas were cracked in a transported bed reactor (MicroDowner) and in a fixed bed reactor (MAT) over a commercial Y zeolite based catalyst, over a commercial ZSM-5 zeolite based additive, and over a mixture of both at selected conditions. Based on the mechanisms through which naphtha hydrocarbons are converted, we evaluated the best alternatives for processing these streams to produce light olefins and/or to reduce olefins content in commercial gasoline. The experimental set-up allowed us to simulate the cracking behaviour of the different naphtha streams in a fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) unit by different processing schemes. Results indicate that LSR only cracks at high severity, yielding large amounts of dry gas. Despite its high olefins content, FCCN practically does not crack when it is fed together with gas oil feed. When cracking FCCN alone at typical gas oil cracking conditions, olefins are transformed preferentially into naphtha-range isoparaffins and aromatics, and when cracking FCCN at high severity, olefins are transformed preferentially into propylene and butylenes. Finally, cracking naphtha in the stripper produces some propylene and increases the aromatics in the remaining gasoline.

Avelino Corma; FranciscoV Melo; Laurent Sauvanaud; F.J Ortega

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Recovery of energy from geothermal brine and other hot water sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process and system for recovery of energy from geothermal brines and other hot water sources, by direct contact heat exchange between the brine or hot water, and an immiscible working fluid, e.g. a hydrocarbon such as isobutane, in a heat exchange column, the brine or hot water therein flowing countercurrent to the flow of the working fluid. The column can be operated at subcritical, critical or above the critical pressure of the working fluid. Preferably, the column is provided with a plurality of sieve plates, and the heat exchange process and column, e.g. with respect to the design of such plates, number of plates employed, spacing between plates, area thereof, column diameter, and the like, are designed to achieve maximum throughput of brine or hot water and reduction in temperature differential at the respective stages or plates between the brine or hot water and the working fluid, and so minimize lost work and maximize efficiency, and minimize scale deposition from hot water containing fluid including salts, such as brine. Maximum throughput approximates minimum cost of electricity which can be produced by conversion of the recovered thermal energy to electrical energy.

Wahl, III, Edward F. (Claremont, CA); Boucher, Frederic B. (San Juan Capistrano, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Characterization of a Spherical Proportional Counter in argon-based mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Spherical Proportional Counter is a novel type of radiation detector, with a low energy threshold (typically below 100 eV) and good energy resolution. This detector is being developed by the network NEWS, which includes several applications. We can name between many others Dark Matter searches, low level radon and neutron counting or low energy neutrino detection from supernovas or nuclear reactors via neutrino-nucleus elastic scattering. In this context, this works will present the characterization of a spherical detector of 1 meter diameter using two argon-based mixtures (with methane and isobutane) and for gas pressures between 50 and 1250 mbar. In each case, the energy resolution shows its best value in a wide range of gains, limited by the ballistic effect at low gains and by ion-backflow at high gains. Moreover, the best energy resolution shows a degradation with pressure. These effects will be discussed in terms of gas avalanche properties. Finally, the effect of an electrical field corrector in th...

Iguaz, F J; Castel, J F; Irastorza, I G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Development of linseed oil-free bakelite resistive plate chambers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we would like to present a few characteristics of the Resistive Plate Chambers (RPC) made of a particular grade of bakelite paper laminates (P-120, NEMA LI-1989 Grade XXX), produced and commercially available in India. This particular grade is used for high voltage insulation in humid conditions. The chambers are tested with cosmic rays in the streamer mode using argon, tetrafluroethane and isobutane in 34:59:7 mixing ratio. In the first set of detectors made with such grade, a thin coating of silicone fluid on the inner surfaces of the bakelite was found to be necessary for operation of the detector. Those silicone coated RPCs were found to give satisfactory performance with stable efficiency of >90% continuously for a long period as reported earlier. Results of the crosstalk measurement of these silicone coated RPC will be presented in this paper. Very recently RPCs made with the same grade of bakelite but having better surface finish, are found to give equivalent performance even without any ...

Biswas, S; Bose, S; Chattopadhyay, S; Saha, S; Viyogi, Y P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

GAMMA-RAY DETECTION WITH PbO GLASS CONVERTERS IN MWPC: ELECTRON CONVERSION EFFICIENCY AND TIME RESOLUTION  

SciTech Connect

The development of glass tubing converters for efficient gamma-ray detection in multiwire proportional chambers (MWPC) has led to an investigation on the improvement of conductivity on glass surfaces and to an investigation of gas mixtures which will improve on the electron conversion efficiency and electron transit time within the tubes. Efforts to establish uniform electric field lines within small diameter tubes has resulted in an improved H{sub 2} reducing treatment. For a 0.91 mm I.D., 1.10 mm O.D., 2 cm thick converter the electron conversion efficiency {epsilon} was measured to be 9.0% and 10.4% at 511 keV, using Ar mixtures containing 10% CF{sub 4} and 30% isobutane, respectively. The effects of gas mixtures on {epsilon} and on {tau}, the mean transit time on conversion electrons within the converter, and the projection of these results on the performance of a modified MWPC positron camera will be presented.

Lum, G.K.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Sleaford, B.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butane butylene isobutane" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Carbon isotope separation by absorptive distillation. [Data between 77. 4 and 114. 3 K; Henry's law behavior  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of separating carbon isotopes by absorptive distillation has been studied for CO absorption by cryogenic solvents. Phase equilibrium, isotopic separation, and mass transfer data were taken between 77.4 and 114.3 K for the following solvents: propane, propylene, 1:1 propane-propylene, 1-butene, isobutane and nitrogen. Carbon monoxide solubility followed Henry's Law, with a maximum experimental solubility of 6.5 mole per cent. Isotopic separation between CO in the gas and liquid phases using hydrocarbon solvents was several times that for pure CO vapor-liquid equilibrium. The maximum observed isotopic separation factor was 1.029 at 77.4 K with the propane-propylene solvent mixture. Mass transfer measurements yielded calculated HTU's of 2 to 5 cm for a possible separation system. An attempt has been made to correlate isotopic separation data using Hildebrand's theory of solutions. The differential absorption of isotopic CO species is expressed as a difference in solubility of the isotopic CO molecules. Data for propane, propylene, and 1-butene show approximately the same behavior at varying temperatures.

Mills, T.R.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Exergy analysis of zeotropic mixtures as working fluids in Organic Rankine Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The thermodynamic performance of non-superheated subcritical Organic Rankine Cycles (ORCs) with zeotropic mixtures as working fluids is examined based on a second law analysis. In a previous study, a mixture selection method based on a first law analysis was proposed. However, to assess the performance potential of zeotropic mixtures as working fluids the irreversibility distributions under different mixtures compositions are calculated. The zeotropic mixtures under study are: R245fa–pentane, R245fa–R365mfc, isopentane–isohexane, isopentane–cyclohexane, isopentane–isohexane, isobutane–isopentane and pentane–hexane. The second law efficiency, defined as the ratio of shaft power output and input heat carrier exergy, is used as optimization criterion. The results show that the evaporator accounts for the highest exergy loss. Still, the best performance is achieved when the condenser heat profiles are matched. An increase in second law efficiency in the range of 7.1% and 14.2% is obtained compared to pure working fluids. For a heat source of 150 °C, the second law efficiency of the pure fluids is in the range of 26.7% and 29.1%. The second law efficiency in function of the heat carrier temperature between 120 °C and 160 °C shows an almost linear behavior for all investigated mixtures. Furthermore, between optimized \\{ORCs\\} with zeotropic mixtures as working fluid the difference in second law efficiency varies less than 3 percentage points.

S. Lecompte; B. Ameel; D. Ziviani; M. van den Broek; M. De Paepe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

ASPEN modeling of the Tri-State indirect liquefaction process  

SciTech Connect

The ASPEN process simulator has been used to model an indirect liquefaction flowsheet patterned after that of the Tri-State project. This flowsheet uses Lurgi moving-bed gasification with synthesis gas conversion to methanol followed by further processing to gasoline using the Mobil MTG process. Models developed in this study include the following: Lurgi gasifier, Texaco gasifier, synthesis gas cooling, Rectisol, methanol synthesis, methanol-to-gasoline, CO-shift, methanation, and naphtha hydrotreating. These models have been successfully developed in modular form so that they can be used to simulate a number of different flowsheets or process alternatives. Simulations of the Tri-State flowsheet have been made using two different coal feed rates and two types of feed coal. The overall simulation model was adjusted to match the Tri-State flowsheet values for methanol, LPG, isobutane, and gasoline. As a result of this adjustment, the MTG reactor yield structure necessary to match the flowsheet product rates was determined. The models were exercised at different flow rates and were unaffected by such changes, demonstrating their range of operability. The use of Illinois No. 6 coal, with its lower ash content, resulted in slightly higher production rates for each of the products as compared to use of the Kentucky coal.

Begovich, J.M.; Clinton, J.H.; Johnson, P.J.; Barker, R.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

ASPEN modeling of the Tri-State indirect-liquefaction process  

SciTech Connect

The ASPEN process simulator has been used to model an indirect-liquefaction flowsheet patterned after that of the Tri-State project. This flowsheet uses Lurgi moving-bed gasification with synthesis-gas conversion to methanol folowed by further processing to gasoline using the Mobil MTG process. Models developed in this study include the following: Lurgi gasifier, Texaco gasifier, synthesis gas cooling, Rectisol, methanol synthesis, methanol-to-gasoline, CO-shift, methanation, and naphtha hydrotreating. These models have been successfully developed in modular form so that they can be used to simulate a number of different flowsheets or process alternatives. Simulations of the Tri-State flowsheet have been made using two different coal-feed rates and two types of feed coal. The overall simulation model was adjusted to match the Tri-State flowsheet values for methanol, LPG, isobutane, and gasoline. As a result of this adjustment, the MTG reactor yield structure necessary to match the flowsheet product rates was determined. The models were exercised at different flow rates and were unaffected by such changes, demonstrating their range of operability. The use of Illinois No. 6 coal, with its lower ash content, resulted in slightly higher production rates of each of the products as compared to use of the Kentucky coal.

Barker, R.E.; Begovich, J.M.; Clinton, J.H.; Johnson, P.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Alkylate  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Day) Day) Product: Alkylate Aromatics Asphalt & Road Oil Isomers Isobutane Isopentane & Isohexane Isooctane Lubricants Marketable Petroleum Coke Hydrogen Sulfur Period: Annual (as of January 1) Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 View History U.S. 1,260,985 1,260,923 1,248,514 1,262,443 1,246,875 1,269,361 1982-2013 PAD District 1 110,229 110,229 95,500 108,629 79,429 91,429 1982-2013 Delaware 11,729 11,729 0 11,729 11,729 11,729 1982-2013 Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2013 Georgia 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006-2013 Maryland 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2013 New Jersey 40,200 40,200 36,200 37,200 37,200 37,200 1982-2013

326

Prediction of refrigerant-lubricant viscosity using the general PC-SAFT friction theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work, a friction theory (f-theory) viscosity model founded on the perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) equation of state (EoS) was used to calculate the viscosity of refrigerant-oil mixtures. The model, which links viscosity to the repulsive and attractive pressure terms of the PC-SAFT EoS, can provide satisfactory viscosity predictions of mixtures of carbon dioxide (R-744) and two synthetic lubricants, namely, a polyolester (POE) ISO VG 68 and an alkylbenzene (AB) ISO VG 32, as well as mixtures of isobutane (R-600a) and two other synthetic lubricants, a POE ISO VG 7 and an AB ISO VG 5. The root-mean square (RMS) deviations related to the viscosity prediction were 0.69% (R-600a/POE ISO 7), 0.99% (R-600a/AB ISO VG 5), 3.16% (R-744/POE ISO VG 68) and 3.18% (R-744/AB ISO VG 32).

Moisés A. Marcelino Neto; Jader R. Barbosa Jr.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Area of Entry Area of Entry Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates.

328

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Stocks Total Stocks Definitions Key Terms Definition All Other Motor Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas (e.g. straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, xylene) used for blending or compounding into finished motor gasoline. Includes receipts and inputs of Gasoline Treated as Blendstock (GTAB). Excludes conventional blendstock for oxygenate blending (CBOB), reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending, oxygenates (e.g. fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether), butane, and pentanes plus. Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton.

329

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Stocks by Type Stocks by Type Definitions Key Terms Definition Alaskan in Transit Alaskan crude oil stocks in transit by water between Alaska and the other States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates.

330

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Imports by Country of Origin U.S. Imports by Country of Origin Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates.

331

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Refinery Stocks Refinery Stocks Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates.

332

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Blender Net Inputs and Blender Net Inputs Definitions Key Terms Definition Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Blending Plant A facility which has no refining capability but is either capable of producing finished motor gasoline through mechanical blending or blends oxygenates with motor gasoline. Conventional Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (CBOB) Motor gasoline blending components intended for blending with oxygenates to produce finished conventional motor gasoline.

333

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Supply and Disposition Balance Supply and Disposition Balance Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates.

334

Word Pro - A  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Thermal Conversion Factor Thermal Conversion Factor Source Documentation Approximate Heat Content of Petro- leum and Natural Gas Plant Liquids Asphalt. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) adopted the thermal conversion factor of 6.636 million British thermal units (Btu) per barrel as estimated by the Bureau of Mines and first published in the Petro- leum Statement, Annual, 1956. Aviation Gasoline. EIA adopted the thermal conversion factor of 5.048 million Btu per barrel as adopted by the Bureau of Mines from the Texas Eastern Transmission Corporation publication Competition and Growth in Ameri- can Energy Markets 1947-1985, a 1968 release of histori- cal and projected statistics. Butane. EIA adopted the Bureau of Mines thermal conver- sion factor of 4.326 million Btu per barrel as published in

335

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Products Supplied Products Supplied Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates.

336

PriceTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ASTM: The American Society for Testing and Materials. Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifi- cations are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specifica- tion MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components: Naphthas that will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates. Barrel (petroleum): A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Biomass Waste:

337

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Weekly Supply Estimates Weekly Supply Estimates Definitions Key Terms Definition All Other Motor Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas (e.g. straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, xylene) used for blending or compounding into finished motor gasoline. Includes receipts and inputs of Gasoline Treated as Blendstock (GTAB). Excludes conventional blendstock for oxygenate blending (CBOB), reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending, oxygenates (e.g. fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether), butane, and pentanes plus. Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton.

338

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species Atmospheric Measurements of Climate-Relevant Species CDIAC's data collection includes measurements of the following climate-relevant chemical species. A summary of recent greenhouse gas concentrations is also available. To determine how compounds are named, see the CDIAC "Name that compound" page. Butane (C4H10) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Isotopes Carbon Monoxide (CO) Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl4) Chlorofluorocarbons Chloroform (CHCl3) Deuterium (2H) Ethane (C2H6) Ethyl Nitrate (C2H5ONO2) Ethyne (C2H2) Fluoroform (CHF3) Halogenated Compounds (modern records) Halons (fluorocarbons) Hydrogen (H2) Hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) i-Propyl Nitrate (C3H7ONO2) Methane (CH4) Methyl Bromide (CH3Br) Methyl Chloride (CH3Cl) Methyl Chloroform (CH3CCl3)

339

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Imports & Exports Imports & Exports Definitions Key Terms Definition All Other Motor Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas (e.g. straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, xylene) used for blending or compounding into finished motor gasoline. Includes receipts and inputs of Gasoline Treated as Blendstock (GTAB). Excludes conventional blendstock for oxygenate blending (CBOB), reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending, oxygenates (e.g. fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether), butane, and pentanes plus. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Conventional Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (CBOB) Motor gasoline blending components intended for blending with oxygenates to produce finished conventional motor gasoline. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock.

340

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

PAD District Imports by Country of Origin PAD District Imports by Country of Origin Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butane butylene isobutane" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Imports by Destination Imports by Destination Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates.

342

untitled  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 404 line, diesel and jet fuels; lubricants; asphalt; ethane, propane, and butane; and many other products used for their energy or chemical content. Crude oil is considered as either domestic or im- ported according to the following: 1. Domestic Crude Oil: Crude oil produced in the United States or from its "outer continen- tal shelf" as defined in 43 U.S.C. 1331. 2. Imported Crude Oil: Crude oil produced out- side the United States and brought into the United States. 3. First purchase volume and cost data for crude oil are classified in accordance with what the product was sold as, regardless of the actual specifications. Hence, its volumes may in- clude some of the excluded liquids discussed above. Crude Oil Acquisitions (unfinished oil acquisi- tions): The volume of crude oil either (1) acquired by the respondent for processing for its own account in accordance with accounting

343

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

recover/recycle recover/recycle or dispose of an identified inventory of legacy Compressed Gas Cylinders that contain, but not limited to: acetylene, argon, boron trifluoride, butane, carbon dioxide, Freon, helium, hydrogen, krypton, liquid nitrogen, methane, mixed, neon, nitrogen, oxygen, P-10, propane, sulfur hexafluoride, tetrafluoro methane. The Cylinders are to be turned over to a Gas vendor or destroyed by the sub-contractor. The subcontractor will provide all equipment and services necessary to accomplish this off-site at an approved location. All tanks are to be decontaminated prior any inspection or disposition. All unknown cylinders will be sampled as required. Compressed Gas Cylinders (4491) Y-12 Site Office Oak Ridge Tennessee Jan 5, 2010 Pamela L. Gorman Digitally signed by Pamela L. Gorman DN: cn=Pamela L. Gorman, o=NEPA Compliance Officer, ou=Y-12 Site Office, email=GormanPL@yso.doe.gov, c=US

344

State Home Oil Weatherization (SHOW) Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Oil Weatherization (SHOW) Program Home Oil Weatherization (SHOW) Program State Home Oil Weatherization (SHOW) Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Manufacturing Maximum Rebate $500/household Program Info State Oregon Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Blower-door test - 100% of the cost up to $100. All other technologies are 25% of the total cost, up to $150 or $500, depending on the upgrade. Provider Oregon Department of Energy Oregon homeowners and renters who heat with oil, wood, propane, kerosene, or butane are eligible for home weatherization rebates of up to $500. A

345

Getting Energized  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Getting Energized Elementary School Curriculum Created by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Click on the links below to take you to the Chapter heading: Materials list Activity Guide Energy Sources Energy Uses/Limits Energy Conversion Energy Conservation Energy for the Future Student Assessments Student Evaluation Getting Energized Equipment and Materials List Item/Activity Number Activity 1 Butane Lighter Coal (Bituminous) Amount Where to find 1-Demo Discount /Grocery (Target, Wal-mart, Kmart or similar) 1-Demo **See next line http://www.sciencekit.com/category.asp?c=365904 Cost $6.95 (Prices may change) Electrical Appliance 1-Demo Teacher Energy Source Posters & Puzzles Pieces 8-Display **See next line http://www.nef1.org/Merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=CTGY&Category_Code=P

346

ConsumTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Note: Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. ASTM: American Society for Testing and Materials Aviation Gasoline (Finished): A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifi- cations are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specifica- tion MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components: Naphthas that will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes ox- ygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are re- ported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates. Barrel

347

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Exports by Destination Exports by Destination Definitions Key Terms Definition Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton. Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates.

348

Catalytic hydrodesulfurization by molybdenum nitride  

SciTech Connect

High surface area molybdenum nitride (up to 108 m{sup 2}/g) was synthesized, characterized, and tested for thiophene desulfurization activity. The surface area was found to depend on synthesis temperature profile, mass transfer, and passivation procedure. Passivated and sulfided catalysts retained the bulk structure of face-centered-cubic Mo{sub 2}N. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy showed no evidence for MoO{sub 3} or MoS{sub 2} formation in fresh catalysts or catalysts sulfided at 673 K. Thiophene desulfurization activity was measured over a broad range Mo{sub 2}N surface areas and reactor condition. Small amounts of tetrahydrothiophene were formed during desulfurization and low-conversion data at 673 K indicate that butane is one of the initial products of the thiophene desulfurization reaction, in addition to butadiene and the butenes.

Markel, E.J.; Van Zee, J.W. (Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Effect of molecular solutes on the electron drift velocity in liquid Ar, Kr, and Xe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of the electron drift velocity in liquid argon, krypton, and xenon were performed in an electric field up to 100 kV cm-1. At higher field strengths saturation velocities were observed in agreement with other authors. The addition of a small concentration of molecular solutes leads to an increase of the electron drift velocity above the saturation value of the pure liquid. The drift velocity either reaches a higher constant value or passes through a maximum at field strengths greater than 104 V cm-1. This effect was investigated as a function of solute concentration for N2, H2, methane, ethane, propane, and butane. Inelastic energy losses in collisions of electrons and solute molecules are assumed and by means of the Cohen-Lekner theory the energy dependence of the loss processes is derived.

K. Yoshino; U. Sowada; W. F. Schmidt

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Beowawe Bottoming Binary Unit - Final Technical Report for EE0002856  

SciTech Connect

This binary plant is the first high-output refrigeration based waste heat recovery cycle in the industry. Its working fluid is environmentally friendly and as such, the permits that would be required with a butane based cycle are not necessary. The unit is modularized, meaning that the unit’s individual skids were assembled in another location and were shipped via truck to the plant site. This project proves the technical feasibility of using low temperature brine The development of the unit led to the realization of low temperature, high output, and environmentally friendly heat recovery systems through domestic research and engineering. The project generates additional renewable energy for Nevada, resulting in cleaner air and reduced carbon dioxide emissions. Royalty and tax payments to governmental agencies will increase, resulting in reduced financial pressure on local entities. The major components of the unit were sourced from American companies, resulting in increased economic activity throughout the country.

McDonald, Dale Edward

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

351

A molecular dynamics investigation of the unusual concentration dependencies of Fick diffusivities in silica mesopores  

SciTech Connect

Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to determine the self-diffusivitiy, D{sub i,self}, the Maxwell–Stefan diffusivity, Ð{sub i}, and the Fick diffusivity, D{sub i}, for methane (C1), ethane (C2), propane (C3), n-butane (nC4), n-pentane (nC5), n-hexane (nC6), n-heptane (nC7), and cyclohexane (cC6) in cylindrical silica mesopores for a range of pore concentrations. The MD simulations show that zero-loading diffusivity Ð{sub i}(0) is consistently lower, by up to a factor of 20, than the values anticipated by the classical Knudsen formula. The concentration dependence of the Fick diffusivity, D{sub i} is found to be unusually complex, and displays a strong minimum in some cases; this characteristic can be traced to molecular clustering.

Krishna, Rajamani; van Baten, Jasper M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Minutes of the tenth meeting of the centers for the analysis of thermal/mechanical energy conversion concepts  

SciTech Connect

The agenda, list of participants, and minutes of the meeting are presented. Included in the appendices are figures, data, outlines, etc. from the following presentations: 500 kW Direct-Contact Heat Exchanger Pilot Plant; LBL/EPRI Heat Exchanger Field Test, Critical Temperature and Pressure Comparisons for n-Butane/n-Pentane Mixtures; Second Law Techniques in the Correlation of Cost-Optimized Binary Power Plants; Outline of Chapter on Geothermal Well Logging; Outline and Highlights from Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program Annual Progress: October 1979-September 1980; Geothermal Well Stimulation; World Update on Installed Geothermal Power Plants; Baca No. 1 Demonstration Flask Plant: Technical and Cost Data; Heber Binary Project; 45 mw Demonstration Plant; Raft River 5 mw Geothermal Dual-Boiling-Cycle Plant; Materials Considerations in the Design of Geothermal Power Plants; Raft River Brine Treatment for Tower Make-up; and Site Photographs of Raft River Valley.

DiPippo, R.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Anion effects in the extraction of lanthanide 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone complexes into an ionic liquid  

SciTech Connect

The extraction of trivalent lanthanides from an aqueous phase containing 1 M NaClO{sub 4} into the room temperature ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium nonafluoro-1-butane sulfonate by the beta-diketone extractant 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (Htta) was studied. Radiotracer distribution, absorption spectroscopy, time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, and X-ray absorption fine structure measurements point to the extraction of multiple lanthanide species. At low extractant concentrations, fully hydrated aqua cations of the lanthanides are present in the ionic liquid phase. As the extractant concentration is increased 1:2 and 1:3 lanthanide:tta species are observed. In contrast, 1:4 Ln:tta complexes were observed in the extraction of lanthanides by Htta into 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide. (authors)

Jensen, Mark P.; Beitz, James V.; Rickert, Paul G. [Argonne Natl Lab, Chem Sci and Engn Div, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Borkowski, Marian [Argonne Natl Lab, Chem Sci and Engn Div, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Los Alamos Natl Lab, Earth and Environm Sci Div, Carlsbad, NM, (United States); Laszak, Ivan [Argonne Natl Lab, Chem Sci and Engn Div, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Commisariat Energie Atom, DEN DPC SERC LANIE, Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Dietz, Mark L. [Argonne Natl Lab, Chem Sci and Engn Div, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Wisconsin-Milwaukee Univ, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Milwaukee, WI, (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

A Texas project illustrates the benefits of integrated gasification  

SciTech Connect

Gasification can be an attractive option for converting a variety of petroleum feedstocks to chemicals. Natural gas is commonly sued to produce acetic acid, isocyanates, plastics, and fibers. But low-cost, bottom-of-the-barrel feeds, such as vacuum resid, petroleum coke, and asphaltenes, also can be used. In any case, gasification products include synthesis gas, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, steam, carbon dioxide, and power. The more a gasification facility is integrated with utilities and other non-core operations of a production complex, the more economical the products are for all consumers. The paper discusses gasification of natural gas, light hydrocarbons (ethane, propanes, and butanes), and heavy hydrocarbons (distillates, heavy residues, asphalts, coals, petroleum coke). The paper then describes a Texas City Gasification Project, which gasifies methane to produce carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and alcohol. The plant is integrated with a cogeneration plant. Economics are discussed.

Philcox, J. [Praxair Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Fenner, G.W. [Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States)

1997-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

355

Palladacycles with Palladium-Bonded Stereogenic Carbons: Tools for Exploring Reaction Pathways in Organometallic Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. catalyst/catalytic (CD 3 ) 2 CO acetone (deuterated) CH 3 CN acetonitrile CH 3 COCl acetyl chloride CHIRAPHOS (2S,3S)-(?)-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane cm centimeter COD 1,5-cyclooctadiene xiii COE cyclooctene Cy... elimination to give 2.6. Scheme 2.2 H 2 CCH 2 PdCl 2 ClH 2 CCH 2 PdCl CO reductive elimination O Cl Mechanism A: Mechanism B: PdCl 2 CO O Cl PdCl ethylene carbopalladation ClH 2 CCH 2 Pd O Cl reductive elimination 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.5 2.6 ethylene...

Hershberger, John Charles

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Mass Spectroscopic Determination of Photoionization Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A radio?frequency mass spectrometer of the Bennett type has been utilized to measure the mass of ions formed by photoionization of several gases by the ultraviolet radiation of a hydrogen discharge. Investigations were performed up to 11.4 electron volts the LiF cutoff. The mass spectra were found to be very simple and usually consisted of only one peak representing the mass of the whole molecule. This has been found to be true for acetone butadiene butene carbon disulfide methyl?ethyl ketone nitric oxide propylene and toluene. Only in the case of butane ethyl acetate and isopropyl alcohol fragment ions have been found. Some of them are even more intense than the parent ions. Undesirable ``secondary spectra '' reported by Lossing and Tanaka can be avoided by grounding of the lithium fluoride window.

Richard F. Herzog; Frederick F. Marmo

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Use of look-ahead modeling in pipeline operations  

SciTech Connect

Amoco Canada Petroleum Company, Ltd. operates the Cochin pipeline system. Cochin pumps batched liquid ethane, propane, ethylene, butane, and NGL. Operating and scheduling this pipeline is very complex. There are safety considerations, especially for ethylene, which cannot be allowed to drop below vapor pressure. Amoco Canada needs to know where batches are in the line, what pressure profiles will look like into the future, and when batches arrive at various locations along the line. In addition to traditional instrumentation and SCADA, Amoco Canada uses modeling software to help monitor and operate the Cochin pipeline. Two important components of the modeling system are the Estimated Time of Arrival (ETA) and Predictive Model (PM) modules. These modules perform look ahead modeling to assist in operating the Cochin pipeline. The modeling software was first installed for the Cochin system in February of 1994, and was commissioned on August 1, 1994. This paper will discuss how the look ahead modules are used for the Cochin pipeline.

Wray, B.; O`Leary, C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

358

Petroleum Supply Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8.PDF 8.PDF Table 18. Refinery Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, January 2012 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Commodity PAD District 1 - East Coast PAD District 2 - Midwest East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri Total Crude Oil ................................................................. 22,762 2,792 25,554 70,449 14,098 23,700 108,247 Natural Gas Plant Liquids ...................................... 544 - 544 2,607 144 644 3,395 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... - - - 689 5 267 961 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 544 - 544 1,918 139 377 2,434 Normal Butane ..................................................

359

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 September 2013 Table 30. Refinery Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, September 2013 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Commodity PAD District 1 - East Coast PAD District 2 - Midwest East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri Total Crude Oil ................................................................. 29,611 2,906 32,517 67,983 12,033 22,460 102,476 Natural Gas Plant Liquids ...................................... 485 - 485 1,969 56 687 2,712 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... - - - 777 - 265 1,042 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 485 - 485 1,192 56 422 1,670 Normal Butane ..................................................

360

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Input Input Definitions Key Terms Definition Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Naphthas which will be used for blending or compounding into finished aviation gasoline (e.g., straight-run gasoline, alkylate, reformate, benzene, toluene, and xylene). Excludes oxygenates (alcohols, ethers), butane, and pentanes plus. Oxygenates are reported as other hydrocarbons, hydrogen, and oxygenates. Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Conventional Blendstock for Oxygenate Blending (CBOB) Motor gasoline blending components intended for blending with oxygenates to produce finished conventional motor gasoline. Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butane butylene isobutane" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum and Natural Gas Plant Liquids Asphalt. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) adopted the thermal conversion factor of 6.636 million British thermal units (Btu) per barrel as estimated by the Bureau of Mines and first published in the Petroleum Statement, Annual, 1956. Aviation Gasoline. EIA adopted the thermal conversion factor of 5.048 million Btu per barrel as adopted by the Bureau of Mines from the Texas Eastern Transmission Corporation publication Competition and Growth in American Energy Markets 1947-1985, a 1968 release of historical and projected statistics. Butane. EIA adopted the Bureau of Mines thermal conversion factor of 4.326 million Btu per barrel as published in the California Oil World and Petroleum

362

untitled  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by PAD and Refining Districts, 2012 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Commodity PAD District 1 - East Coast PAD District 2 - Midwest East Coast Appalachian No. 1 Total Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky Minnesota, Wisconsin, North and South Dakota Oklahoma, Kansas, Missouri Total Crude Oil ................................................................. 302,582 33,648 336,230 808,927 164,619 286,280 1,259,826 Natural Gas Plant Liquids ...................................... 5,440 - 5,440 25,630 984 9,032 35,646 Pentanes Plus ...................................................... - - - 7,891 53 3,288 11,232 Liquefied Petroleum Gases .................................. 5,440 - 5,440 17,739 931 5,744 24,414 Normal Butane ..................................................

363

Copolymer SAFT modeling of phase behavior in hydrocarbon-chain solutions: Alkane oligomers, polyethylene, poly(ethylene-co-olefin-1), polystyrene, and poly(ethylene-co-styrene)  

SciTech Connect

The copolymer SAFT equation of state is found to represent phase transitions in the normal-alkane and methyl-alkane solutions in methane, ethane, propane, and n-hexane, the polyethylene and poly(ethylene-co-olefin-1) solutions in propane, and the polystyrene solutions in n-butane. The pure-solute parameters are all estimated on the basis of the molecular weight and structure only, and the one temperature-independent and system-independent (within each class of solutes) binary parameter is set equal to a constant. The segment energy of the methyl branches is found to be around 160 K, which is lower than the corresponding backbone energy, while the segment energy of the benzene branches is found to be around 222 K for polystyrene, which is higher than the corresponding backbone energy. The alkyl branches are found to promote the polymer miscibility while the benzene branches are found to inhibit the polymer miscibility in propane.

Pan, C.; Radosz, M. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)] [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Phase behavior and minimum miscibility pressure for nitrogen miscible displacement  

SciTech Connect

Nitrogen (N/sub 2/) has been successfully used as a displacing gas for light oil recovery. The information of the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) and phase behavior for N/sub 2/ with light oils is important for the screening of this oil recovery method. Phase behavior studies were performed on N/sub 2/-hydrocarbon mixtures at high pressure (above 4,000 psia) to help interpret the results of the slim tube experiments. Synthetic oil systems of methane + n-butane (nC/sub 4/) + n-decane (nC/sub 10/) were studied to determine the approximate phase behavior of crude oil with nitrogen and to investigate the effect of the presence of methane (C/sub 1/) on phase behavior and the MMP of N/sub 2/. The resulting phase diagram shows that methane can lower the miscibility pressure of nitrogen.

Chung, F.T.H.; Llave, F.M.; Louvier, R.W.; Hudgins, D.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

LNG liquid-liquid immiscibility  

SciTech Connect

Although natural gas species rarely exhibit liquid-liquid immiscibility in binary systems, the presence of additional components can extend the domain of immiscibility in those few binary systems where it already exists or produce immiscibility in binary systems where it had not existed. If the solute has the proper molecular relation to the solvent mixture background, liquid-liquid-vapor (LLV) behavior will occur; such phenomena greatly complicate the design of LNG processing equipment. To aid LNG engineers, researchers mapped the thermodynamic behavior of four ternary LLV systems and examined the effects of the second solvents - ethane, propane, n-butane, and CO/sub 2/ - on the binary methane + n-octane system.

Luks, K.D.; Kohn, J.P.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Crude butadiene to styrene process  

SciTech Connect

One of the natural by-products of ethylene manufacture is a mixture of C4`s containing butadiene, butenes and butane. This C4 stream is the predominant feed stock for producing pure butadiene by an extraction process. The demand growth for ethylene far exceeds that for butadiene resulting in a world wide surplus of butadiene. The ethylene producer has a number of options available to process the crude C4 stream if the market price does not justify isolation of the pure butadiene. The first option is recycle the crude C4 stream back to the ethylene cracker and co-crack with fresh feed. A second option that has become popular in the last few years has been the partial or complete hydrogenation of the butadiene and butenes in the crude C4 stream. Partial or selective hydrogenation is preferred when there is a market for iso-butene which finds use in MTBE manufacture. Full hydrogenation is used when cracker feed stock is limited, there is excess hydrogen and no cost effective outlets exist for butenes. Full hydrogenation produces butanes that are excellent crack feed stock. Both selective and full hydrogenation require low to moderate capital expenditure. Both of these options are currently being practiced to remove excess butadiene from the market. The crude C4 to styrene process developed by Dow offers an attractive, high value alternative to an olefins producer. This process selectively upgrades butadiene in C4 streams to styrene monomer and produces raffinate-1 as a by-product. The process is currently being operated at the 18--40 lb/hr scale in a Dow Texas pilot plant.

Dixit, R.S.; Murchison, C.B. [Dow Chemical Co., Midland, MI (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

Power production from a moderate temperature geothermal resource with regenerative Organic Rankine Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Much remains to be done in binary geothermal power plant technology, especially for exploiting low-enthalpy resources. Due to the great variability of available resources (temperature, pressure, chemical composition), it is really difficult to “standardize the technology”.The problem involves many different variables: working fluid selection, heat recovery system definition, heat transfer surfaces sizing and auxiliary systems consumption. Electricity generation from geothermal resources is convenient if temperature of geothermal resources is higher than 130 °C. Extension of binary power technology to use low-temperature geothermal resources has received much attention in the last years. This paper analyzes and discusses the exploitation of low temperature, water-dominated geothermal fields with a specific attention to regenerative Organic Rankine Cycles (ORC). The geothermal fluid inlet temperatures considered are in the 100–130 °C range, while the return temperature of the brine is assumed to be between 70 and 100 °C. The performances of different configurations, two basic cycle configurations and two recuperated cycles are analyzed and compared using dry organic fluids as the working fluids. The dry organic fluids for this study are R134a, isobutane, n-pentane and R245fa. Effects of the operating parameters such as turbine inlet temperature and pressure on the thermal efficiency, exergy destruction rate and Second Law efficiency are evaluated. The possible advantages of recuperated configurations in comparison with basic configurations are analyzed, showing that in a lot of cases the advantage in terms of performance increase is minimal but significant reductions in cooling systems surface area can be obtained (up to 20%).

Alessandro Franco

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Development of a catalyst for conversion of syngas-derived materials to isobutylene  

SciTech Connect

The initial objective of this program was to develop a catalyst and process for the conversion of synthesis gas to isobutylene via the isosynthesis process. Preliminary work directed at identifying potential catalysts for this reaction did not have promising results. Therefore, the objectives of this program were revised to the development of a catalyst and process for the conversion of synthesis gas to isobutanol. Two approaches have been investigated in this area: the direct conversion of synthesis gas to higher alcohols and indirect conversion via methanol produced using conventional methanol synthesis technology. The isosynthesis reaction for the conversion of synthesis gas to branched hydrocarbons was pioneered by German workers during World War II The primary products of this reaction are either isobutane or isobutylene depending on the catalyst system used. Thoria-based catalysts were found to give the highest yields, but virtually all of the products were alkanes. More recently, there have been several reports of olefin production using ZrO{sub 2}-based. The preliminary work in this program focussed on the evaluation of ZrO{sub 2} and modified ZrO{sub 2} catalysts for the direct conversion of CO/H{sub 2} to isobutylene via the isosynthesis reaction. All of the catalysts and conditions evaluated in this work gave isobutylene yields of less than 4% which is far below that required for an economically viable process. A summary of the key results from this portion of the project is given in Section 3.6. In view of the poor performance of these catalysts and the lack any encouraging results from other research groups working in the isosynthesis area, this approach was abandoned in favor of approaches related to higher alcohols synthesis.

Barger, P.T.; Spehlmann, B.C.; Gajda, G.J.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Production Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included; Small amounts of nonhydrocarbons produced with the oil, such as sulfur and various metals; Drip gases, and liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Liquids produced at natural gas processing plants are excluded. Crude oil is refined to produce a wide array of petroleum products, including heating oils; gasoline, diesel and jet fuels; lubricants; asphalt; ethane, propane, and butane; and many other products used for their energy or chemical content.

370

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Reserves Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Reserves Definitions Key Terms Definition Crude Oil A mixture of hydrocarbons that exists in liquid phase in natural underground reservoirs and remains liquid at atmospheric pressure after passing through surface separating facilities. Depending upon the characteristics of the crude stream, it may also include: Small amounts of hydrocarbons that exist in gaseous phase in natural underground reservoirs but are liquid at atmospheric pressure after being recovered from oil well (casinghead) gas in lease separators and are subsequently commingled with the crude stream without being separately measured. Lease condensate recovered as a liquid from natural gas wells in lease or field separation facilities and later mixed into the crude stream is also included; Small amounts of nonhydrocarbons produced with the oil, such as sulfur and various metals; Drip gases, and liquid hydrocarbons produced from tar sands, gilsonite, and oil shale. Liquids produced at natural gas processing plants are excluded. Crude oil is refined to produce a wide array of petroleum products, including heating oils; gasoline, diesel and jet fuels; lubricants; asphalt; ethane, propane, and butane; and many other products used for their energy or chemical content.

371

Mechanisms of thiophene hydrodesulfurization on model molybdenum catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Hydrodesulfurization (HDS) activities and selectivities were measured for thiophene, tetrahydrothiophene (THT), and 1-butanethiol on silica-supported molybdenum catalysts at a pressure of 1 atm and temperatures ranging from 530 to 795 K. The model catalysts, which were previously characterized, feature isolated molybdenum atoms in the +2, +4, and +6 oxidation states and molybdenum dimers with each molybdenum atom in the +4 oxidation state. Silica-supported MoS{sub 2} was used for reference. Activities for thiophene and THT HDS correlate with oxidation state. Mo(II) is most active among dispersed catalysts. 1-Butanethiol activities were much larger than thiophene or THT activities and were roughly equal on all dispersed catalysts. Apparent activation energies of 43.4 and 48.5 kJ/mol were determined for thiophene HDS on Mo(II) and MoS{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}, respectively. Dihydrothiophene, THT and 1-butanethiol were formed in thiophene HDS over Mo(II) and MoS{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}. The major products of thiophene and THT HDS were 1-butene, 2-butene, and n-butene. Butadiene, i-butane, i-butene, methane, ethane, ethene, propane, and propene were formed in small amounts. Butadiene is thought to be the initial product of thiophene and THT desulfurization and undergoes subsequent hydrogenation and isomerization to yield the observed products. A common mechanism for HDS of thiophene and THT with 2,5-DHT as an intermediate is discussed.

Sullivan, D.L.; Ekerdt, J.G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1998-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Introducing sustainability assessment and selection (SAS) into chemical engineering education  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assessment of a sustainable process design centres on the three pillars of sustainability. However, satisfying all criteria is sometimes difficult. Nevertheless, it is important to have an effective and systematic tool for a concrete and justifiable decision. Introduction of such tool into chemical engineering education would be beneficial as students will encounter situations in making decision which may imply deciding on the best process design, suppliers, supply chain, etc. In light of this matter, we introduce a concept called sustainability assessment and selection (SAS) into Computer Aided Plant Design (CAPD) course at Technical University of Berlin. The idea of the methodology is to assess process designs and select one which is most sustainable. Within the framework of this course, a 1-day lecture has been conducted that touch on the methods to assess sustainable process design. It is also aimed to introduce systematic multi-criteria decision making methodology called analytic hierarchy process (AHP). A practical example in choosing n-butane isomerization process designs is illustrated. From the class evaluation we found that the response towards the idea was very promising. We believed the method would add an extra edge to the students especially in performing sustainability assessment and systematically solving multi optional problems that they may encounter in their career.

M.R. Othman; L. Hady; J.-U. Repke; G. Wozny

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Determination of characteristic alterations of the mass transfer process of thermodynamically nonequilibrium hydrocarbon systems  

SciTech Connect

The results of research on hydrocarbon mixture sorption in porous medium showed that adsorbent activity with regard to separate components of a gas mixture changes in partial dependence on pressure. The alteration of vented gas content will take place not only in gas condensate fields, when this effect is conditioned by the losses of condensate in the stratum, but also in gas fields, by methods connected with desorption processes. At the same time, gas composition is the basis for different process calculations, such as separation, gas transport, gas filtration in porous medium, and others. Thus the determination of characteristic alterations of gas mixture composition in thermodynamically nonequilibrium hydrocarbon systems mass transfer process becomes important. The binary (methane + pentane) and tricomponent (methane + butane + pentane) systems composed of individual gases of high purity have been researched. Then with help of mathematical methods of experimental data processing the moment of the more characteristic changes of the mass transfer process was discovered. Processing of experimental data for tricomponent system by statistical differentiation allowed the discovery of a pressure below of which lightening of the vented gas was observed.

Ramazanova, E.E.; Nurmamedova, Z.A. [Azerbaijan State Oil Academy, Baku (Azerbaijan). Geotechnological Research Inst. of Oil, Gas, and Chemistry

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Influence of adsorption on the diffusion selectivity for mixture permeation across mesoporous membranes  

SciTech Connect

Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to determine the self-diffusivities, D{sub 1,self}, and D{sub 2,self} for a variety of binary mixtures: methane (C1)–ethane (C2), C1–propane (C3), C1–n-butane (nC4), C1–n-hexane (nC6), C2–nC4, C2–nC6, Ar–C1, Ar–C2, Ar–C3, Ar–nC4, Ar–nC6, and Ar - Kr in a cylindrical silica mesopores. The diffusion selectivity, defined by (D {sub 1,self}/D {sub 2,self}) was found to be significantly different from the Knudsen selectivity, {radical}M{sub 2}/M{sub 1}, where M {sub I} is the molar mass of species i . For mixtures in which component 2 is more strongly adsorbed than component 1, (D{sub 1,self}/D{sub 2,self})/{radical}M{sub 2}/M{sub 1} has values in the range 1.5–4; the departures from the Knudsen selectivity increased with increasing differences in adsorption strengths of the constituent species.

Krishna, Rajamani; van Baten, Jasper M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Method and apparatus for controlling fuel/air mixture in a lean burn engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The system for controlling the fuel/air mixture supplied to a lean burn engine when operating on natural gas, gasoline, hydrogen, alcohol, propane, butane, diesel or any other fuel as desired. As specific humidity of air supplied to the lean burn engine increases, the oxygen concentration of exhaust gas discharged by the engine for a given equivalence ratio will decrease. Closed loop fuel control systems typically attempt to maintain a constant exhaust gas oxygen concentration. Therefore, the decrease in the exhaust gas oxygen concentration resulting from increased specific humidity will often be improperly attributed to an excessive supply of fuel and the control system will incorrectly reduce the amount of fuel supplied to the engine. Also, the minimum fuel/air equivalence ratio for a lean burn engine to avoid misfiring will increase as specific humidity increases. A relative humidity sensor to allow the control system to provide a more enriched fuel/air mixture at high specific humidity levels. The level of specific humidity may be used to compensate an output signal from a universal exhaust gas oxygen sensor for changing oxygen concentrations at a desired equivalence ratio due to variation in specific humidity specific humidity. As a result, the control system will maintain the desired efficiency, low exhaust emissions and power level for the associated lean burn engine regardless of the specific humidity level of intake air supplied to the lean burn engine.

Kubesh, John Thomas (San Antonio, TX); Dodge, Lee Gene (San Antonio, TX); Podnar, Daniel James (San Antonio, TX)

1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

376

Chemical kinetics of cetane number improving agents  

SciTech Connect

The increasing demand for diesel fuels has resulted in the use of greater percentage of cracked distillates having poor ignition properties. The ignition properties of diesel fuels can be rated in terms of their cetane number and diesel fuels having low cetane number may have poor ignition properties such as diesel knock, difficulties to start engines in the cold weather and so on. Such diesel fuels need cetane number improving agents. In the 1940s and 1950s alkyl nitrates, alkyl nitrites and organic peroxides were found to be effective cetane number improving additives. Our recent study suggests that free radicals produced from thermal decomposition just before ignition should have an important role to improve their ignition properties. However no studies on the reaction mechanism for improving effect of these additives have been attempted because of complex nature of spontaneous ignition reaction of hydrocarbons. In order to clarify the reaction mechanism for improving effects of cetane number improving agents. We here have attempted to simulate the spontaneous ignition of n-butane as a model compound in the presence of alkyl nitrites as cetane number improving agents.

Hashimoto, K.; Akutsu, Y.; Arai, M.; Tamura, M. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

Studies on Cu/CeO{sub 2}: A new NO reduction catalyst  

SciTech Connect

Fine particle and large surface area Cu/CeO{sub 2} catalysts of crystallite sizes in the range of 100--200 {angstrom} synthesized by the solution combustion method have been investigated for NO reduction. Five percent Cu/CeO{sub 2} catalyst shows nearly 100% conversion of NO by NH{sub 3} below 300 C, whereas pure ceria and Zr, Y, and Ca doped ceria show 85--95% NO conversion above 600 C. Similarly NO reduction by CO has been observed over 5% Cu/CeO{sub 2} with nearly 100% conversion below 300 C. Hydrocarbon (n-butane) oxidation by NO to CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O has also been demonstrated over this catalyst below 350 C making Cu/CeO{sub 2} a new NO reduction catalyst in the low temperature window of 150--350 C. Kinetics of NO reduction over 5% Cu/CeO{sub 2} have also been investigated. The rate constants are in the range of 1.4 {times} 10{sup 4} to 2.3 {times} 10{sup 4} cm{sup 3}/g s between 170 and 300 C. Cu/CeO{sub 2} catalysts are characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy where Cu{sup 2+} ions are shown to be dispersed on the CeO{sub 2} surface.

Bera, P.; Aruna, S.T.; Patil, K.C.; Hegde, M.S. [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India)] [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India)

1999-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Synthesis of new energetic materials. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Work on the synthesis of new hydrocarbon fuel systems involved: (a) a study of the synthesis and acid-promoted rearrangement of PCU-derived pinacols; (b) synthesis of an HCTD-derived pinacol; (c) a study of the generation and trapping of a PCU-derived vinylidenecarbene; (d) synthesis of `homosecohexaprismane- 10,13-dione`; (e) synthesis and thermal rearrangement of pentacyclo6.5.0.0 (4,12).0(5,10).0 (9,13)trideca-2,6-diene; (f) a study of the acid and base promoted reararrangements of hexacyclo11.2.1.0 (2,12).0(5,10).0 (5,15).0(10,14)hexadeca- 6,8-diene-4,11-dione. The results of studies that were performed in collaboration with investigators in four external laboratories are described. In addition, two new syntheses of TNAZ were developed, both of which proceed by way of an intermediate 1-azabicyclo1.1.0butane. Finally, X-ray crystal structures have been determined for a variety of cage hydrocarbons.

Marchand, A.P.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Methane-derived hydrocarbons produced under upper-mantle conditions  

SciTech Connect

There is widespread evidence that petroleum originates from biological processes. Whether hydrocarbons can also be produced from abiogenic precursor molecules under the high-pressure, high-temperature conditions characteristic of the upper mantle remains an open question. It has been proposed that hydrocarbons generated in the upper mantle could be transported through deep faults to shallower regions in the Earth's crust, and contribute to petroleum reserves. Here we use in situ Raman spectroscopy in laser-heated diamond anvil cells to monitor the chemical reactivity of methane and ethane under upper-mantle conditions. We show that when methane is exposed to pressures higher than 2 GPa, and to temperatures in the range of 1,000-1,500 K, it partially reacts to form saturated hydrocarbons containing 2-4 carbons (ethane, propane and butane) and molecular hydrogen and graphite. Conversely, exposure of ethane to similar conditions results in the production of methane, suggesting that the synthesis of saturated hydrocarbons is reversible. Our results support the suggestion that hydrocarbons heavier than methane can be produced by abiogenic processes in the upper mantle.

Kolesnikov, Anton; Kutcherov, Vladimir G.; Goncharov, Alexander F.; (CIW); (RITS)

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

380

Theoretical studies of high-order harmonic generation: Effects of symmetry, degeneracy, and orientation  

SciTech Connect

Using a quantum-mechanical three-step model, we present numerical calculations of the high-order harmonic generation from four polyatomic molecules. Ethylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) serves as an example where orbital symmetry directly affects the harmonic yield. We treat the case of methane (CH{sub 4}) to address the high-order harmonic generation resulting from a molecule with degenerate orbitals. To this end we illustrate how the single-orbital contributions show up in the total high-order harmonic signal. This example illustrates the importance of adding coherently the amplitude contributions from the individual degenerate orbitals. Finally, we study the high-order harmonic generation from propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) and butane (C{sub 4}H{sub 10}). These two molecules, being extended and far from spherical in structure, produce harmonics with nontrivial orientational dependencies. In particular, propane can be oriented so that very high-frequency harmonics are favored, and thus the molecule contains prospects for the generation of uv attosecond pulses.

Madsen, C. B.; Madsen, L. B. [Lundbeck Foundation Theoretical Center for Quantum System Research, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "butane butylene isobutane" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Inter-staple Dithiol Crosslinking in Au25(SR)18 Nanomolecules: A Combined Mass Spectrometric and Computational Study  

SciTech Connect

A systematic study of cross-linking chemistry of the Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18} nanomolecule by dithiols of varying chain length, HS-(CH{sub 2}){sub n}-SH where n = 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, is presented here. Monothiolated Au{sub 25} has six [RSAuSRAuSR] staple motifs on its surface, and MALDI mass spectrometry data of the ligand exchanged clusters show that propane (C3) and butane (C4) dithiols have ideal chain lengths for interstaple cross-linking and that up to six C3 or C4 dithiols can be facilely exchanged onto the cluster surface. Propanedithiol predominately exchanges with two monothiols at a time, making cross-linking bridges, while butanedithiol can exchange with either one or two monothiols at a time. The extent of cross-linking can be controlled by the Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18} to dithiol ratio, the reaction time of ligand exchange, or the addition of a hydrophobic tail to the dithiol. MALDI MS suggests that during ethane (C2) dithiol exchange, two ethanedithiols become connected by a disulfide bond; this result is supported by density functional theory (DFT) prediction of the optimal chain length for the intrastaple coupling. Both optical absorption spectroscopy and DFT computations show that the electronic structure of the Au{sub 25} nanomolecule retains its main features after exchange of up to eight monothiol ligands.

Dass, Amala [University of Mississippi, The; Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Jupally, Vijay [University of Mississippi, The; Kota, Rajesh [University of Mississippi, The; Mattern, Daniell [University of Mississippi, The; Tschumper, Gregory [University of Mississippi, The; Van Dornshuld, Eric [University of Mississippi, The

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Interstaple Dithiol Cross-Linking in Au(25)(SR)(18) Nanomolecules: A Combined Mass Spectrometric and Computational Study  

SciTech Connect

A systematic study of cross-linking chemistry of the Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18} nanomolecule by dithiols of varying chain length, HS-(CH2)n-SH where n = 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, is presented here. Monothiolated Au{sub 25} has six [RSAuSRAuSR] staple motifs on its surface, and MALDI mass spectrometry data of the ligand exchanged clusters show that propane (C3) and butane (C4) dithiols have ideal chain lengths for interstaple cross-linking and that up to six C3 or C4 dithiols can be facilely exchanged onto the cluster surface. Propanedithiol predominately exchanges with two monothiols at a time, making cross-linking bridges, while butanedithiol can exchange with either one or two monothiols at a time. The extent of cross-linking can be controlled by the Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18} to dithiol ratio, the reaction time of ligand exchange, or the addition of a hydrophobic tail to the dithiol. MALDI MS suggests that during ethane (C2) dithiol exchange, two ethanedithiols become connected by a disulfide bond; this result is supported by density functional theory (DFT) prediction of the optimal chain length for the intrastaple coupling. Both optical absorption spectroscopy and DFT computations show that the electronic structure of the Au{sub 25} nanomolecule retains its main features after exchange of up to eight monothiol ligands.

Jiang, Deen [ORNL; Dass, Amala [University of Mississippi, The; Tschumper, Gregory [University of Mississippi, The; Mattern, Daniell [University of Mississippi, The; Van Dornshuld, Eric [University of Mississippi, The; Kota, Rajesh [University of Mississippi, The; Jupally, Vijay [University of Mississippi, The

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

AN ESTIMATE OF THE CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF TITAN's LAKES  

SciTech Connect

Hundreds of radar-dark patches interpreted as lakes have been discovered in the north and south polar regions of Titan. We have estimated the composition of these lakes by using the direct abundance measurements from the Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer aboard the Huygens probe and recent photochemical models based on the vertical temperature profile derived by the Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument. Thermodynamic equilibrium is assumed between the atmosphere and the lakes, which are also considered nonideal solutions. We find that the main constituents of the lakes are ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) (approx76%-79%), propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) (approx7%-8%), methane (CH{sub 4}) (approx5%-10%), hydrogen cyanide (HCN) (approx2%-3%), butene (C{sub 4}H{sub 8}) (approx1%), butane (C{sub 4}H{sub 10}) (approx1%), and acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) (approx1%). The calculated composition of lakes is then substantially different from what has been expected from models elaborated prior to the exploration of Titan by the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft.

Cordier, Daniel [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Rennes, CNRS, UMR 6226, Avenue du General Leclerc, CS 50837, 35708 Rennes Cedex 7 (France); Mousis, Olivier; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Lavvas, Panayotis [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Vuitton, Veronique, E-mail: daniel.cordier@ensc-rennes.f [Universite Joseph Fourier, Laboratoire de Planetologie de Grenoble, CNRS/INSU (France)

2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

384

Transition metal ion-assisted photochemical generation of alkyl halides and hydrocarbons from carboxylic acids  

SciTech Connect

Near-UV photolysis of aqueous solutions of propionic acid and aqueous Fe3+ in the absence of oxygen generates a mixture of hydrocarbons (ethane, ethylene and butane), carbon dioxide, and Fe2+. The reaction becomes mildly catalytic (about five turnovers) in the presence of oxygen which converts a portion of alkyl radicals to oxidizing intermediates that reoxidize Fe2+. The photochemistry in the presence of halide ions (X? = Cl?, Br?) generates ethyl halides via halogen atom abstraction from FeXn3?n by ethyl radicals. Near-quantitative yields of C2H5X are obtained at ?0.05 M X?. Competition experiments with Co(NH3)5Br2+ provided kinetic data for the reaction of ethyl radicals with FeCl2+ (k = (4.0 ± 0.5) × 106 M?1 s?1) and with FeBr2+ (k = (3.0 ± 0.5) × 107 M?1 s?1). Photochemical decarboxylation of propionic acid in the presence of Cu2+ generates ethylene and Cu+. Longer-chain acids also yield alpha olefins as exclusive products. These reactions become catalytic under constant purge with oxygen which plays a dual role. It reoxidizes Cu+ to Cu2+, and removes gaseous olefins to prevent accumulation of Cu+(olefin) complexes and depletion of Cu2+. The results underscore the profound effect that the choice of metal ions, the medium, and reaction conditions exert on the photochemistry of carboxylic acids.

Carraher, Jack; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

385

Micro Computers: An Industrial Energy Conservation Tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8" 8" of dr,. rue' MOISTURE ".00 ETHANE C2 H. ".97 3 ...m HYDROGEN 2 ..... m0 ... 08 "ETHANE CH' 99.43 ~O\\. 40 7:1.64 1.25 PROPANE C3 H8 l.~o\\ 0.~0 CARBON OXYGEN 0.00 li!!I.QUil' N-BUTANE H,a 1.7Gl1 0.~11I C' CARBON DI-OXIDE ca2 L~4 0....00 1iII.01l1 SULFUR 0.1lI0 0.01 CARBON DIOXIDE , .54 SuLFUR DIOXIDE iii. 00 NITROGEN N2 Q'l.82 0.:5Q1 NITROGEN IlI.B'2 l1I.0'lA:H COMeUST[ON CONSTANT K- 89.8:3 HHV- 2:3.14" LHV-20.Q70 eTu/Le H20 1n CO""bustlO,", pRODUCTS? 2.1~ LB/La ,"uel cp...

Harriz, J. T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

The Internal Molecular Potential Between the Substituent Groups in a Benzene Ring as Derived from the Heats of Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that differences in the observed heats of combustion of isomeric benzene derivatives can be interpreted as the internal molecular potential existing between their substituent groups. A like interpretation can be given for the differences between the values observed for the heats of combustion of certain nonisomeric benzene derivatives and those calculated by the rule of additivity. This internal potential, to which the attractive and repulsive forces between the groups are due, results from the electrostatic potential of the group moments (dipole effect), the polarization of the substituents and of the ring (induction effect), the dispersion effect, and from steric hindrance. We have, therefore, a new and direct method of measuring the internal potential, which determines both the internal motion of groups within an organic molecule and its most stable configuration. The values thus measured are in good agreement with values theoretically evaluated from the above intermolecular (van der Waals) forces. From the data derived by this method we conclude in the case of o-xylene that valence angles of 120° between the C—CH3 bond and the aromatic C—C bonds are extremely stable, for the energy required to distort these angles through 10° is greater than 2 K cal/mole. We find, also, very restricted rotation for the butane molecule, from which it follows that saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons in the gaseous state tend to form zigzag chains. Such restricted rotation is found for the ether molecule as well.

H. A. Stuart

1931-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Low temperature iron- and nickel-catalyzed reactions leading to coalbed gas formation  

SciTech Connect

Hydrocarbon hydrogenolysis and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation in the presence of Fe/SiO{sub 2} and Ni/SiO{sub 2} catalysts were evaluated as potential mechanisms contributing to natural gas formation in coalbeds. The hydrocarbons used as reactants in hydrogenolysis included butane, octane, 1-octene, and 1-dodecene. The reactions carried out in a laboratory batch reactor produced gas that contained methane concentrations greater than 90%, which resembles the composition of natural gas. Reaction temperatures were selected to resemble natural coalbed conditions. Evidence is presented to show that iron and nickel minerals, which can be present in coals at levels of 2,000 and 10 ppm, respectively, can become active under geologic conditions. The oxides (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiO) used as precursors of the active catalysts (Fe and Ni metals) were reduced at 200 C under a hydrogen atmosphere. Moessbauer spectroscopy showed that ca. 6% of the iron oxide was converted to the metal; in the case of nickel, oxygen titration showed that the extent of reduction to the metal was ca. 29%. The resultant fractions of the active metals in coals are adequate to catalyze generation of appreciable amounts of methane over geologic time.

Medina, J.C.; Butala, S.J.; Bartholomew, C.H.; Lee, M.L.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Thermal chemistry of copper(I)-N,N '-di-sec-butylacetamidinate on Cu(110) single-crystal surfaces  

SciTech Connect

The surface chemistry of copper(I)-N,N'-di-sec-butylacetamidinate on Cu(110) single-crystal surfaces has been characterized under ultrahigh vacuum by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A series of thermal stepwise conversions were identified, starting with the partial dissociative adsorption of the copper acetamidinate dimers into a mixture of monomers and dimers on the surface. An early dissociation of a C-N bond leads to the production of N-sec-butylacetamidine, which is detected in TPD experiments in three temperature regimes, the last one centered around 480 K. Butene, and a small amount of butane, is also detected above approximately 500 K, and hydrogen production, an indication of dehydrogenation of surface fragments, is observed at 460, 550 and 670 K. In total, only about 10% of the initial copper(I)-N,N'-di-sec-butylacetamidinate adsorbed monolayer decomposes, and only about {approx}3% of carbon is left behind on the surface after heating to high temperatures. The implications of this surface chemistry to the design of chemical film growth processes using copper acetamidinates as precursors are discussed.

Ma Qiang; Zaera, Francisco; Gordon, Roy G. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Studying the Internal Ballistics of a Combustion Driven Potato Cannon using High-speed Video  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A potato cannon was designed to accommodate several different experimental propellants and have a transparent barrel so the movement of the projectile could be recorded on high-speed video (at 2000 frames per second). Both combustion chamber and barrel were made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC). Five experimental propellants were tested: propane (C3H8), acetylene (C2H2), ethanol (C2H6O), methanol (CH4O), and butane (C4H10). The amount of each experimental propellant was calculated to approximate a stoichometric mixture and considering the Upper Flammability Limit (UFL) and the Lower Flammability Limit (LFL), which in turn were affected by the volume of the combustion chamber. Cylindrical projectiles were cut from raw potatoes so that there was an airtight fit, and each weighed 50 (+/- 0.5) grams. For each trial, position as a function of time was determined via frame by frame analysis. Five trials were taken for each experimental propellant and the results analyzed to compute velocity and acceleration as functions...

Courtney, E D S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Forecast of U. S. Refinery Demand for NGL's (natural gas liquids) in 1978-1985  

SciTech Connect

A forecast of U.S. Refinery Demand for NGL's (Natural Gas Liquids) in 1978-1985 is based on a predicted 1.4%/yr decline in motor gasoline consumption from 7.4 to 6.7 million bbl/day (Mbd), including a 2.6%/yr reduction from 5.3 to 4.4 Mbd for automobiles and a 1.3%/yr growth from 2.1 to 2.3 Mbd for trucks, because of slow growth rates in the U.S. automobile fleet (1.1%/yr) and average annual miles driven (0.9%/yr), a 3.9%/yr growth in average mileage from 14.2 to 18.6 mpg, and diesel penetration to the automobile market which should increase from 0.3 to 3.3%. Leaded gasoline's share is expected to decline from 68% of the market (5.1 Mbd, including 0.8 Mbd leaded premium) to 24% (1.7 Mbd, leaded regular only), including a drop from 56 to 6% for automobiles and from approx. 100 to 60% for trucks. This will require increased production of clean-octane reformates and alkylates and reduce the need for straight-run gasolines, but because of the decline in the total gasoline demand, these changes should be minimal. Butane demand from outside-refinery production should decrease by 5-6%/yr, and natural gasoline will be consumed according to available production as an isopentane source.

Laskosky, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

8 Modern refining concepts-an update on naphtha-isomerization to modern gasoline manufacture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses several major refinery processes to improve RON. These include naphtha-isomerization, reforming, addition of FCC-Naphtha, alkylation, addition of oxygenates or polygas or butanes. Naphtha isomerization is a simple and very cost effective technology for octane replacement. Isomerization of light naphtha streams rich in C5's and C6's typically results in an increase of 10 to 20 octane numbers. The octane increase depends upon the feed composition and the octane need of the refiner. Proper selection of the isomerization technology is an assurance against lack of octane and surplus of benzene in the gasoline pool. Normal C5's and C6's typically are abundant in streams from gas condensate units, light raffinate from aromatics extraction units, and light straight-run naphtha from atmospheric distillation. Even benzene containing feedstocks became potential sources for isomerization as modern catalysts help to manage the benzene surplus through saturation and ring opening reactions to high octane product. This conversion of benzene is an added benefit of isomerization to refiners' economics, especially in those countries where extra credit is given for benzene reduction in the gasoline pool. The isomerization reaction takes place over a catalyst under relatively mild conditions in the presence of hydrogen.

Hartmut Weyda; Ernst Köhler

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Role of dopant counter-anion functionality in polyaniline salts/blends and implications to morphology  

SciTech Connect

Polyanilines are of particular current interest primarily due to their relative ease of synthesis, low cost and stable conductivity in air. The insulating, polyaniline emeraldine base (PANI-EB) form becomes electrically conducting by preferential protonation or doping the imine nitrogen sites to yield an electrically conducting polyaniline emeraldine salt (PANI-ES). In this paper, wide and small angle X-ray scattering techniques (i.e., WAXS and SAXS) and light microscopy are used to characterize the influence of the dopant`s structure on the morphology of both polyaniline salt and blend. In an attempt to modify the morphology of the PANI-ES, the authors have evaluated a number of doping acids (i.e., methane sulfonic acid (HMSA), butane sulfonic acid (HBSA), dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid (HDBSA) and camphor sulfonic acid (HCSA)) that vary in size and polarity to better understanding the role of the acid in PANI-ES`s morphology and the resulting electrical conductivity. The other goal was to investigate the effect of the counter-anion structure on the nature of the phase separated PANI-ES network. The shape of the PANI-ES network in the host polycaprolactam has important implications on the nature of conduction behavior and the final electrical conductivity of the blend.

Hopkins, A.R.; Rasmussen, P.G. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Basheer, R.A. [General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, MI (United States). Polymers Dept.; Annis, B.K.; Wignall, G.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

High P/T phase and volumetric behavior of coal liquid constituents. (Quarterly technical progress report), January 1-April 1, 1984. [6 gases in hydrogen-dibenzofuran and in hydrogen-g-methylanthracene  

SciTech Connect

A sophisticated perturbation chromatography technique has been used to study the vapor-liquid equilibrium behavior of six light gases in two hydrogen-coal liquid model compounds systems. Infinite-dilution K values are reported for methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide in: (1) hydrogen-dibenzofuran system at 373.2 and 398.2/sup 0/K and up to 6 MPa; and (2) hydrogen-g-methylanthracene systems at 373.2, 398.2, 423.2, 448.2 and 473.2/sup 0/K and up to 21 M Pa. Henry's constants were determined for the light gases in 9-methylanthracene. Second cross virial coefficients and vapor-phase infinite-dilution fugacity coefficients were calculated for the hydrocarbon gases in hydrogen. The results were combined with the experimental K-value measurements to obtain Henry's constants in hydrogen-9-methylanthracene mixtures of fixed liquid composition. The constants thus obtained show a significant dependence of hydrogen solubility. 1 reference.

Kobayshi, R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Preparation and evaluation of novel hydrous metal oxide (HMO)-supported noble metal catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Hydrous Metal Oxides (HMOs) are chemically synthesized materials that, because of their high cation exchange capacity, possess a unique ability to allow the preparation of highly dispersed supported-metal catalyst precursors with high metal loadings. This study evaluates high weight loading Rh/HMO catalysts with a wide range of HMO support compositions, including hydrous titanium oxide (HTO), silica-doped hydrous titanium oxide (HTO:Si), hydrous zirconium oxide (HZO), and silica-doped hydrous zirconium oxide (HZO:Si), against conventional oxide-supported Rh catalysts with similar weight loadings and support chemistries. Catalyst activity measurements for a structure-sensitive model reaction (n-butane hydrogenolysis) as a function of catalyst activation conditions show superior activity and stability for the ZrO{sub 2}, HZO, and HZO:Si supports, although all of the Rh/HMO catalysts have high ethane selectivity indicative of high Rh dispersion. For the TiO{sub 2}-, HTO-, and HTO:Si supported Rh catalysts, a significant loss of both catalyst activity and Rh dispersion is observed at more aggressive activation conditions, consistent with TiO{sub x} migration associated with SMSI phenomena. Of all the Rh/HMO catalysts, the Rh/HZO:Si catalysts appear to offer the best tradeoff in terms of high Rh dispersion, high activity, and high selectivity.

Gardner, T.J.; McLaughlin, L.I.; Evans, L.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Catalysis and Chemical Technologies Dept.; Datye, A.K. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Role of dopant counter-anion functionality in polyaniline salts/blends and implications to morphology  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, wide and small angle X-ray scattering techniques (i.e., WAXS and SAXS) and light microscopy are used to characterize the influence of the dopant`s structure on the morphology of both polyaniline salt and blend. In an attempt to modify the morphology of the PANI-ES, the authors have evaluated a number of doping acids (i.e., methane sulfonic acid (HMSA), butane sulfonic acid (HBSA), dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid (HDBSA) and camphor sulfonic acid (HCSA)) that vary in size and polarity to better understand the role of the acid in PANI-ES`s morphology and the resulting electrical conductivity. These salts were solution blended with polycaprolactam using hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP) as a solvent. The other goal was to investigate the effect of the counter-anion structure on the nature of the phase separated PANI-ES network. The shape of the PANI-ES network in the host polycaprolactam has important implications on the nature of conduction behavior and the final electrical conductivity of the blend.

Hopkins, A.R.; Rasmussen, P.G. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Basheer, R.A. [General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, MI (United States). Polymers Dept.; Annis, B.K.; Wignall, G.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Phase identification and interfacial transitions in ternary polymer blends by ToF-SIMS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Phase identification and the study of the interphase region in multi-component polymer blends with a chemically similar structure using conventional techniques is a challenge. In this work, the detailed morphological analysis of such systems is examined. A ternary blend comprised of poly butylene succinate (PBS); poly lactic acid (PLA); and polycaprolactone (PCL) with a partial wetting morphology is carefully selected since all three components are polyesters with low interfacial tensions. It will be shown that a novel technique by applying multivariate analysis (MVA) on time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) data can effectively identify the complex phase structure, especially in blends with chemically similar components. Furthermore, for the first time for such systems, this technique provides detailed information about interfacial thicknesses and transitions. By employing the principal component analysis (PCA) method on the ToF-SIMS data of pure polymers, specific peaks with a certain molecular ion mass related to each polymer are determined. Using overlaid mappings on the surface of the blend by ToF-SIMS and selected ion masses to identify each polymer results in the differentiation of the various phases represented as a morphological image. In a second step, the multivariate curve resolution (MCR) method is used as a “self modeling curve resolution” for the recovery of pure components from a multi-component mixture when little or no prior information is available. Total pseudo-color RGB images of PBS/PLA/PCL show that PLA droplets unambiguously partially wet the PBS and PCL phases. Since each pixel from the analysis in the high lateral resolution image represents a 200 nm diameter, the interfacial transitions can also be studied for both PLA/PBS and PLA/PCL interfaces. The results show the concentration variation of phases across the interfaces. A complete trace line across the two interfaces (PLA/PBS and PLA/PCL) allows for the quantitative determination of interfacial thickness for the first time for such systems.

Sepehr Ravati; Suzie Poulin; Konstantinos Piyakis; Basil D. Favis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

A study on coalbed methane reserve of Shanxi: Hedong coalfield reserve and its utilization  

SciTech Connect

Coalbed gas, i.e. coalbed methane, is considered an unconventional gas, formed during coal accumulation and preserved in coal seams. In the past, coalbed gas was considered a major hazard factor to the safety of mining and caused countless explosive events and great losses to the enterprises and even to the country. Early in 1960s and 70s, it was recognized that coalbed gas could be utilized as an energy resource and collected through tunnels in China. In 1995, the output of tunnel gas reached 500Mm{sup 3}, however, surface pumping is still at its beginning stage, test and appraisal; so far, no commercial development is being carried out in China. Hedong coalfield, situated in the west of Shanxi province and bordered by the Yellow River in the northwest and outcrop seams in the southeast, is 540km long (N-S) and 10--40 km wide (E-W) and covers an area of 17,000 km{sup 2} across 13 counties of Xinzou, Luliang, Linfen and Yuncheng prefectures. It is the No. 2 coalfield in Shanxi province and the well-known base of excellent coking coal and power coal in China. Hedong coalfield is not only rich in coal resource, but also in coalbed methane. This paper describes the geology of the coalfield (including structure, magmatic activity, coal seams and coal grade); the regularity of coalbed methane occurrence in the Hedong coalfield; the calculation of coalbed methane resource; and the use of coalbed methane for motor fuels and chemicals production. The total resource is 1468.93Gm{sup 3}. The production of motor fuels can be realized by the following processes: (a) synthetic methanol as substitute of gasoline; (b) F-T synthesis for synthetic gasoline and diesel oil; (c) Compressed natural gas as motor fuel; and (d) Liquefied natural gas as motor fuel. The production of organic chemicals is suggested with the following technology: (a) Two-stage steam reforming to convert methane to synthetic gas various organic chemicals can be produced therefrom; (b) Partial oxidation of methane to produce synthesis gas and acetylene; (c) Coalbed methane to produce hydrogen cyanide and chloromethanes; and (d) Coalbed methane to produce acrylonitrile, acetylene, ethylene, propylene and butylenes.

Kong, X.; Fan, R.; Hu, Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, M.; Chen, Z.; Li, M.; Peng, S. [Taiyuan Ke-jin Technology Development Service (China)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

New Design Methods And Algorithms For High Energy-Efficient And Low-cost Distillation Processes  

SciTech Connect

This project sought and successfully answered two big challenges facing the creation of low-energy, cost-effective, zeotropic multi-component distillation processes: first, identification of an efficient search space that includes all the useful distillation configurations and no undesired configurations; second, development of an algorithm to search the space efficiently and generate an array of low-energy options for industrial multi-component mixtures. Such mixtures are found in large-scale chemical and petroleum plants. Commercialization of our results was addressed by building a user interface allowing practical application of our methods for industrial problems by anyone with basic knowledge of distillation for a given problem. We also provided our algorithm to a major U.S. Chemical Company for use by the practitioners. The successful execution of this program has provided methods and algorithms at the disposal of process engineers to readily generate low-energy solutions for a large class of multicomponent distillation problems in a typical chemical and petrochemical plant. In a petrochemical complex, the distillation trains within crude oil processing, hydrotreating units containing alkylation, isomerization, reformer, LPG (liquefied petroleum gas) and NGL (natural gas liquids) processing units can benefit from our results. Effluents from naphtha crackers and ethane-propane crackers typically contain mixtures of methane, ethylene, ethane, propylene, propane, butane and heavier hydrocarbons. We have shown that our systematic search method with a more complete search space, along with the optimization algorithm, has a potential to yield low-energy distillation configurations for all such applications with energy savings up to 50%.

Agrawal, Rakesh

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

399

Soil Iodine Determination in Deccan Syneclise, India: Implications for Near Surface Geochemical Hydrocarbon Prospecting  

SciTech Connect

The association of iodine with organic matter in sedimentary basins is well documented. High iodine concentration in soils overlying oil and gas fields and areas with hydrocarbon microseepage has been observed and used as a geochemical exploratory tool for hydrocarbons in a few studies. In this study, we measure iodine concentration in soil samples collected from parts of Deccan Syneclise in the west central India to investigate its potential application as a geochemical indicator for hydrocarbons. The Deccan Syneclise consists of rifted depositional sites with Gondwana-Mesozoic sediments up to 3.5 km concealed under the Deccan Traps and is considered prospective for hydrocarbons. The concentration of iodine in soil samples is determined using ICP-MS and the values range between 1.1 and 19.3 ppm. High iodine values are characteristic of the northern part of the sampled region. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soil samples range between 0.1 and 1.3%. The TOC correlates poorly with the soil iodine (r{sup 2} < 1), indicating a lack of association of iodine with the surficial organic matter and the possibility of interaction between the seeping hydrocarbons and soil iodine. Further, the distribution pattern of iodine compares well with two surface geochemical indicators: the adsorbed light gaseous hydrocarbons (methane through butane) and the propane-oxidizing bacterial populations in the soil. The integration of geochemical observations show the occurrence of elevated values in the northern part of the study area, which is also coincident with the presence of exposed dyke swarms that probably serve as conduits for hydrocarbon microseepage. The corroboration of iodine with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data suggests its efficacy as one of the potential tool in surface geochemical exploration of hydrocarbons. Our study supports Deccan Syneclise to be promising in terms of its hydrocarbon prospects.

Mani, Devleena, E-mail: devleenatiwari@ngri.res.in [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India); Kumar, T. Satish [Oil India Limited (India); Rasheed, M. A.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.; Rao, T. Gnaneshwar; Balaram, V. [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Computational Capabilities for Predictions of Interactions at the Grain Boundary of Refractory Alloys  

SciTech Connect

New high performance refractory alloys are critically required for improving efficiency and decreasing CO2 emissions of fossil energy systems. The development of these materials remains slow because it is driven by a trial-and-error experimental approach and lacks a rational design approach. Atomistic Molecular Dynamic (MD) design has the potential to accelerate this development through the prediction of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of new materials. The success of MD simulations depends critically on the fidelity of interatomic potentials. This project, in collaboration with Penn State, has focused on developing and validating high quality quantum mechanics based reactive potentials, ReaxFF, for Ni-Fe-Al-Cr-O-S system. A larger number of accurate density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to generate data for parameterizing the ReaxFF potentials. These potentials were then used in molecular dynamics (MD) and molecular dynamics-Monte Carlo (MD-MC) for much larger system to study for which DFT calculation would be prohibitively expensive, and to understand a number of chemical phenomena Ni-Fe-Al-Cr-O-S based alloy systems . These include catalytic oxidation of butane on clean Cr2O3 and pyrite/Cr2O3, interfacial reaction between Cr2O3 (refractory material) and Al2O3 (slag), cohesive strength of at the grain boundary of S-enriched Cr compared to bulk Cr and Ssegregation study in Al, Al2O3, Cr and Cr2O3 with a grain structure. The developed quantum based ReaxFF potential are available from the authors upon request. During this project, a number of papers were published in peer-reviewed journals. In addition, several conference presentations were made.

Sengupta, Debasis; Kwak, Shaun; Vasenkov, Alex; Shin, Yun Kyung; Duin, Adri van

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Extractive stripping of inert-rich hydrocarbon gases with a preferential physical solvent  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for treating a natural gas stream containing methane, heavier hydrocarbons, and an inert gas, an improvement comprising: selectivity extracting natural gas liquids from the natural gas stream with a preferential physical solvent which provides selective capability for recovery according to the selected degree of: (a) ethane in amounts ranging from 2-98%, (b) propane in amounts ranging from 2-99%, (c) butanes in amounts ranging from 2-100%, or (d) pentanes and higher molecular weight hydrocarbons in amounts ranging up to 100%, the improvement comprising the following steps: A. selecting the preferential physical solvent which is selective for ethane and heavier hydrocarbon components of the gas stream such that: (1) relative volatility of methane over ethane is at least 5.0 and the hydrocarbon loading capacity, defined as solubility of ethane in the solvent, is at least 0.25 standard cubic feet of ethane per gallon of the solvent, or (2) the preferential factor, determined by the multiplication of relative volatility of methane over ethane by the solubility of ethane in solvent, in standard cubic feet of ethane per gallon of solvent, is at least 1.25; B. selectively extracting and stripping the natural gas stream with the physical solvent to produce an inert gas stream and a rich solvent stream containing methane and the hydrocarbons heavier than methane; and C. distilling the rich solvent stream to produce a stream vent to form a solution having a molar ratio of silicon alkoxide to water in the range of about 1 to about 10.

Mehra, Y.R.

1987-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

402

Kinetic inhibition of natural gas hydrates in offshore drilling, production, and processing operations. Annual report, January 1--December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas hydrates are solid crystalline compounds which form when molecules smaller than n-butane contact molecules of water at elevated pressures and reduced temperatures, both above and below the ice point. Because these crystalline compounds plug flow channels, they are undesirable. In this project the authors proposed an alternate approach of controlling hydrate formation by preventing hydrate growth into a sizeable mass which could block a flow channel. The authors call this new technique kinetic inhibition, because while it allows the system to exist in the hydrate domain, it prevents the kinetic agglomeration of small hydrate crystals to the point of pluggage of a flow channel. In order to investigate the kinetic means of inhibiting hydrate formation, they held two consortium meetings, on June 1, 1990 and on August 31, 1990. At subsequent meetings, the authors determined the following four stages of the project, necessary to reach the goal of determining a new hydrate field inhibitor: (1) a rapid screening method was to be determined for testing the hydrate kinetic formation period of many surfactants and polymer candidates (both individually and combined), the present report presents the success of two screening apparatuses: a multi-reactor apparatus which is capable of rapid, high volume screening, and the backup screening method--a viscometer for testing with gas at high pressure; (2) the construction of two high, constant pressure cells were to experimentally confirm the success of the chemicals in the rapid screening apparatus; (3) in the third phase of the work, Exxon volunteered to evaluate the performance of the best chemicals from the previous two stages in their 4 inch I.D. Multiphase flow loop in Houston; (4) in the final phase of the work, the intention was to take the successful kinetic inhibition chemicals from the previous three stages and then test them in the field in gathering lines and wells from member companies.

NONE

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

Process for using alkyl substituted C8-C10 aromatic hydrocarbons as preferential physical solvents for selective processing of hydrocarbon gas streams  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for the removal of hydrocarbon gas liquids, comprising hydrocarbons heavier than methane, from a hydrocarbon gas stream. The improvement consists of selectively extracting the hydrocarbon gas liquids from the hydrocarbon gas stream with a preferential physical solvent which provides selective capability for recovery according to the selected degree of (a) ethane in amounts ranging from 2-98%, (b) propane in amounts ranging from 2-99%, (c) butane in amounts ranging from 2-100%, or (d) pentanes and higher molecular weight hydrocarbons in amounts ranging up to 100% which comprises: A. selectively extracting and stripping the hydrocarbon gas stream with the physical solvent to produce a residue hydrocarbon gas stream of pipeline specifications and a rich solvent stream containing ethane and heavier hydrocarbon components, the preferential physical solvent being: (1) rich in C/sub 8/-C/sub 10/ aromatic compounds having methyl, ethyl, or propyl aliphatic groups and (2) selective for ethane and heavier hydrocarbon components of the gas stream such that: (a) the relative volatility of methane over ethane is at least 5.0 and the hydrocarbon loading capacity, defined as solubility of ethane in solvent, is at least 0.25 standard cubic feet of ethane per gallon of solvent, or (b) the preferential factor determined by the multiplication of relative volatility of methane over ethane by the solubility of ethane in solvent, in standard cubic feet of ethane per gallon of solvent, of at least 1.25; and B. distilling the rich solvent to produce the hydrocarbon gas liquids and the physical solvent.

Mehra, Y.R.

1987-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

404

Conversion of lean oil absorption process to extraction process for conditioning natural gas  

SciTech Connect

In an absorption process for the removal of C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons from a natural gas stream by absorbing the C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons with a lean oil to produce a residue gas stream of pipeline quality and a rich oil from which the C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons are recovered, this patent describes the improvement which comprises providing the capability, of selectively extracting the C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons from the gas stream with a lean preferential physical solvent according to the maximum recoveries and to the selected degrees of (a) ethane in amounts ranging up to 95%, (b) propane in amounts ranging up to 100%, (c) butane in amounts ranging up to 100%, or (d) pentanes and higher molecular weight hydrocarbons in amounts ranging up to 100% by: A. selecting an absorber plant, which is used for recovering maximum quantities of the C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons from the gas stream while using lean oils as solvent for the C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons; B. selecting a preferential physical solvent which is selective for ethane and heavier hydrocarbon components of the gas stream ; C. replacing the oils in the selected absorber plant with a selected volume of the selected preferential physical solvent; and D. while using the equipment in extraction mode, contacting the gas stream with the lean preferential physical solvent at a selected flow rate within the range of 0.001-0.5 gallon of lean solvent per standard cubic foot of the gas stream to produce a residue gas stream of pipeline specifications and a rich solvent stream containing the ethane and heavier hydrocarbon components.

Mehra, Y.R.

1987-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

405

Experimental measurements of the diffusion parameters of light hydrocarbons in water-saturated sedimentary rocks: II. Results and geochemical significance  

SciTech Connect

Diffusion parameters (diffusion coefficient, diffusion permeability, solubility coefficient) for methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, methylpropane and 2,2-dimethylpropane were measured on 21 samples of water-saturated sedimentary rocks at different temperatures (30, 50, and 70 C). The rock samples include sandstones, siltstones, and claystones with porosities ranging from 0.4 to 16.5% and permeabilities from <0.005 to 33.4 millidarcy. Experimental diffusion coefficients ranged from c. 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} to 9 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} m{sup 2}/s, solubility coefficients covered a range from c. 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}1} to 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}, and diffusion permeabilities lay between c. 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} and 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}14} m{sup 2}/s. Diffusion coefficients decrease with increasing molecular weight of the hydrocarbon compound, the decrease depending on the petrophysical properties and the mineralogy of the rocks and being most drastic in shales. None of the petrophysical parameters examined in this study (porosity, permeability, formation resistivity factor) gave a good correlation with the nonsteady-state diffusion coefficient, D. An excellent correlation was found between the formation resistivity factor, F, and the steady-state diffusion permeability. P. A possibly useful-though less significant-relation bearing some resemblance with Archie's law appears to exist between the porosity and the diffusion permeability. The temperature dependence of the diffusion parameters was determined on two calcareous sandstones. Based on an activated diffusion model activation energies for the diffusion process ranging around 50 kJ/mol were calculated for all hydrocarbons examined.

Krooss, B.M.; Leythaeuser, D. (Institute of petroleum and Organic Geochemistry, Juelich (Germany, F.R.))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

A study of the radical-radical reaction dynamics of O({sup 3}P)+t-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}{yields}OH+iso-C{sub 4}H{sub 8}  

SciTech Connect

The radical-radical reaction dynamics of ground-state atomic oxygen [O({sup 3}P)] with t-butyl radicals (t-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}) in the gas phase were investigated using high-resolution laser spectroscopy in a crossed-beam configuration, together with ab initio theoretical calculations. The radical reactants, O({sup 3}P) and t-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}, were produced by the photodissociation of NO{sub 2} and the supersonic flash pyrolysis of the precursor, azo-t-butane, respectively. A new exothermic channel, O({sup 3}P)+t-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}{yields}OH+iso-C{sub 4}H{sub 8}, was identified and the nascent rovibrational distributions of the OH (X {sup 2}{pi}:{upsilon}{sup ''}=0,1,2) products were examined. The population analyses for the two spin-orbit states of F{sub 1}({sup 2}{pi}{sub 3/2}) and F{sub 2}({sup 2}{pi}{sub 1/2}) showed that the {upsilon}{sup ''}=0 level is described by a bimodal feature composed of low- and high-N{sup ''} rotational components, whereas the {upsilon}{sup ''}=1 and 2 levels exhibit unimodal distributions. No noticeable spin-orbit or {lambda}-doublet propensities were observed in any vibrational state. The partitioning ratio of the vibrational populations (P{sub {upsilon}{sup ''}}) with respect to the low-N{sup ''} components of the {upsilon}{sup ''}=0 level was estimated to be P{sub 0}:P{sub 1}:P{sub 2}=1:1.17{+-}0.24:1.40{+-}0.11, indicating that the nascent internal distributions are highly excited. On the basis of the comparison of the experimental results with the statistical theory, the reaction mechanism at the molecular level can be described in terms of two competing dynamic pathways: the major, direct abstraction process leading to the inversion of the vibrational populations, and the minor, short-lived addition-complex process responsible for the hot rotational distributions. After considering the reaction exothermicity, the barrier height, and the number of intermediates along the addition reaction pathways on the lowest doublet potential energy surface, the formation of CH{sub 3}COCH{sub 3}(acetone)+CH{sub 3} was predicted to be dominant in the addition mechanism.

Nam, Mi-Ja; Youn, Sung-Eui; Choi, Jong-Ho [Department of Chemistry and Center for Electro and Photo Responsive Molecules, Korea University, 1, Anam-dong, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

407

Water-Soluble 2-Hydroxyisophthalamides for Sensitization of Lanthanide Luminescence  

SciTech Connect

A series of octadentate ligands featuring the 2-hydroxyisophthalamide (IAM) antenna chromophore (to sensitize Tb(III) and Eu(III) luminescence) has been prepared and characterized. The length of the alkyl amine scaffold that links the four IAM moieties has been varied in order to investigate the effect of the ligand backbone on the stability and photophysical properties of the Ln(III) complexes. The amine backbones utilized in this study are N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetrakis-(2-aminoethyl)-ethane-1,2-diamine [H(2,2)-], N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetrakis-(2-aminoethyl)-propane-1,3-diamine [H(3,2)-] and N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetrakis-(2-aminoethyl)-butane-1,4-diamine [H(4,2)-]. These ligands also incorporate methoxyethylene [MOE] groups on each of the IAM chromophores to increase their water solubility. The aqueous ligand protonation constants and Tb(III) and Eu(III) formation constants were determined from solution thermodynamic studies. The resulting values indicate that at physiological pH, the Eu(III) and Tb(III) complexes of H(2,2)-IAM-MOE and H(4,2)-IAM-MOE are sufficiently stable to prevent dissociation at nanomolar concentrations. The photophysical measurements for the Tb(III) complexes gave overall quantum yield values of 0.56, 0.39, and 0.52 respectively for the complexes with H(2,2)-IAM-MOE, H(3,2)-IAM-MOE and H(4,2)-IAM-MOE, while the corresponding Eu(III) complexes displayed significantly weaker luminescence, with quantum yield values of 0.0014, 0.0015, and 0.0058, respectively. Analysis of the steady state Eu(III) emission spectra provides insight into the solution symmetries of the complexes. The combined solubility, stability and photophysical performance of the Tb(III) complexes in particular make them well suited to serve as the luminescent reporter group in high sensitivity time-resolved fluoroimmunoassays.

Samuel, Amanda P. S.; Moore, Evan G.; Melchior, Marco; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N.

2008-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

408

Conceptual Approach For Estimating Potential Air Toxics And Radionuclide Airborne Emissions From A Temporary Exhaust System For The 216-Z-9 Crib Removal Action  

SciTech Connect

The 216-Z-9 Crib, located at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in southeastern Washington State, was the site of a successful mining effort to recover plutonium from the contaminated soils at the disposal site. A CERCLA Action Memorandum (AM) issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires the removal of the buildings associated with this mining effort to facilitate a remedial action planned for the near future. The decontamination and demolition of the 216 Z-9 Crib facilities is required under a consent order between the DOE, the U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). Removal of the buildings located on and near the concrete cover slab over the 216-Z-9 Crib will require removal of the large soil-packaging glovebox located inside the 216-Z- 9A Building. Prior to cleaning out the glovebox, it will be necessary to provide active filtered ventilation capability to ensure a negative pressure exists between the glovebox and the adjacent airspace while hands-on work proceeds within. The glovebox floor is open to the Z-9 crib cavern environment below. For this reason the crib and glovebox currently share a common airspace. The functional requirements for safely conducting work within the glovebox include provision of a negative pressure in the box of about 0.5 inches of water gage (nominal) less than the interior of the building. In addition, the building surrounding the glovebox will be maintained at a slight negative pressure with respect to outdoor ambient pressure. In order to assess the relevant and appropriate clean air requirements for the new temporary ventilation system and associated emissions monitoring, it was necessary to reliably predict the nature of the exhaust air stream. Factors used to predict the presence and concentrations of certain radionuclide particulates and certain gases considered to be air toxics, included reliability parameters, flow rates, radionuclide content, and off-gas compositions. Radionuclide content includes transuranic isotopes, primarily of plutonium and americium. Air toxics include carbon tetrachloride, butane, methanol, acetone and toluene. Flow rate prediction was based on available design and test data and considered equipment sizes, glovebox negative pressure requirements, and filter flow characteristics. The approach used to predict the off-gas composition from the crib required experience-based predictive analysis combined with crib head space analytical results. Input information for emission estimates included: (1) gas composition sample data obtained from recent samples taken within the crib head space during static conditions, and (2) air in-leakage/dilution estimates based on physical characteristics of both the crib and the new temporary ventilation system. The conceptual approach combined measurement-based data with conservative assumptions, and provides the estimates necessary to determine relevance and appropriateness of substantive requirements under federal and state laws and regulations. (authors)

Hopkins, A.; Sutter, C.; O'Brien, P.; Bates, J.; Klos, B. [Fluor Hanford Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Teal, J. [Fluor Federal Services, Richland, WA (United States); Oates, L. [Environmental Quality Management, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Five new Zn(II) and Cd(II) coordination polymers constructed by 3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid: Syntheses, crystal structures, network topologies and luminescent properties  

SciTech Connect

Five Zn(II) and Cd(II) coordination polymers, [Zn{sub 2}(BOABA)(bpp)(OH)]{center_dot}0.5H{sub 2}O (1), [Cd{sub 3}(BOABA){sub 2}(bpp){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (2), [Cd{sub 3}(BOABA){sub 2}(2,2 Prime -bipy){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{center_dot}5.5H{sub 2}O (3), [CdNa(BOABA)(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (4) and [Cd{sub 2}(BOABA)(bimb)Cl(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (5) (H{sub 3}BOABA=3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid, bpp=1,3-bi(4-pyridyl)propane, 2,2 Prime -bipy=2,2 Prime -bipyridine, bimb=1,4-bis(imidazol-1 Prime -yl)butane), have been solvothermally synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analyses, IR spectra and TG analyses. 1 is an uninodal 4-connected 2D square grid network based on binuclear zinc clusters. 2 is 2D wavelike layer structure and further linked by hydrogen bonds into the final 3D (5,6,6)-connected topology network. 3 is 3-connected 2D topology network and the 2,2 Prime -bipy ligands decorate in two different types. 4 is a (4,8)-connected 2D topology network with heterocaryotic {l_brace}Cd{sub 2}Na{sub 2}{r_brace} clusters and BOABA{sup 3-} ligands. 5 can be rationalized as a (3,10)-connected 3D topology network with tetranuclear {l_brace}Cd{sub 4}Cl{sub 2}{r_brace} clusters and BOABA{sup 3-} ligands. Meanwhile, photoluminescence studies revealed that these five coordination polymers display strong fluorescent emission bands in the solid state at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Five new d{sup 10} metal(II) coordination polymers based on H{sub 3}BOABA ligand were obtained and characterized. They display different topological structures and luminescent properties. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Five d{sup 10} metal(II) polymers based on 3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid were obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polymers were structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polymers 1-5 display different topological structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They show strong fluorescent emission bands in the solid state.

Jiang Xianrong; Yuan Hongyan [Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Reactive Chemistry on Solid Surfaces, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China); Feng Yunlong, E-mail: sky37@zjnu.edu.cn [Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Reactive Chemistry on Solid Surfaces, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua, Zhejiang 321004 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF GAS-ASSISTED GRAVITY DRAINAGE (GAGD) PROCESS FOR IMPROVED LIGHT OIL RECOVERY  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the progress of the project ''Development And Optimization of Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) Process for Improved Light Oil Recovery'' for the duration of the thirteenth project quarter (Oct 1, 2005 to Dec 30, 2005). There are three main tasks in this research project. Task 1 is a scaled physical model study of the GAGD process. Task 2 is further development of a vanishing interfacial tension (VIT) technique for miscibility determination. Task 3 is determination of multiphase displacement characteristics in reservoir rocks. Section I reports experimental work designed to investigate wettability effects of porous medium, on secondary and tertiary mode GAGD performance. The experiments showed a significant improvement of oil recovery in the oil-wet experiments versus the water-wet runs, both in secondary as well as tertiary mode. When comparing experiments conducted in secondary mode to those run in tertiary mode an improvement in oil recovery was also evident. Additionally, this section summarizes progress made with regard to the scaled physical model construction and experimentation. The purpose of building a scaled physical model, which attempts to include various multiphase mechanics and fluid dynamic parameters operational in the field scale, was to incorporate visual verification of the gas front for viscous instabilities, capillary fingering, and stable displacement. Preliminary experimentation suggested that construction of the 2-D model from sintered glass beads was a feasible alternative. During this reporting quarter, several sintered glass mini-models were prepared and some preliminary experiments designed to visualize gas bubble development were completed. In Section II, the gas-oil interfacial tensions measured in decane-CO{sub 2} system at 100 F and live decane consisting of 25 mole% methane, 30 mole% n-butane and 45 mole% n-decane against CO{sub 2} gas at 160 F have been modeled using the Parachor and newly proposed mechanistic Parachor models. In the decane-CO{sub 2} binary system, Parachor model was found to be sufficient for interfacial tension calculations. The predicted miscibility from the Parachor model deviated only by about 2.5% from the measured VIT miscibility. However, in multicomponent live decane-CO{sub 2} system, the performance of the Parachor model was poor, while good match of interfacial tension predictions has been obtained experimentally using the proposed mechanistic Parachor model. The predicted miscibility from the mechanistic Parachor model accurately matched with the measured VIT miscibility in live decane-CO2 system, which indicates the suitability of this model to predict miscibility in complex multicomponent hydrocarbon systems. In the previous reports to the DOE (15323R07, Oct 2004; 15323R08, Jan 2005; 15323R09, Apr 2005; 15323R10, July 2005 and 154323, Oct 2005), the 1-D experimental results from dimensionally scaled GAGD and WAG corefloods were reported for Section III. Additionally, since Section I reports the experimental results from 2-D physical model experiments; this section attempts to extend this 2-D GAGD study to 3-D (4-phase) flow through porous media and evaluate the performance of these processes using reservoir simulation. Section IV includes the technology transfer efforts undertaken during the quarter. This research work resulted in one international paper presentation in Tulsa, OK; one journal publication; three pending abstracts for SCA 2006 Annual Conference and an invitation to present at the Independents Day session at the IOR Symposium 2006.

Dandina N. Rao; Subhash C. Ayirala; Madhav M. Kulkarni; Thaer N.N. Mahmoud; Wagirin Ruiz Paidin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z