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1

King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Final Evaluation Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final technical report compares and evaluates new diesel and diesel hybrid-electric articulated buses operated as part of the King County Metro Transit (KC Metro) fleet in Seattle, Washington. The evaluation lasted 12 months.

Chandler, K.; Walkowicz, K.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

New York City Transit Diesel Hybrid-Electric Buses Final Results: DOE/ NREL  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transit Diesel Hybrid-Electric Buses Final Results: DOE/ NREL Transit Diesel Hybrid-Electric Buses Final Results: DOE/ NREL Transit Bus Evaluation Project Jump to: navigation, search Name New York City Transit Diesel Hybrid-Electric Buses Final Results: DOE/ NREL Transit Bus Evaluation Project Agency/Company /Organization Department of Energy Partner National Renewable Energy Laboratory Batelle"National Renewable Energy Laboratory Batelle" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. Focus Area Transportation Phase Bring the Right People Together, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type Guide/manual Availability Publicly available--Free Publication Date 7/1/2002 Website http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy02o Locality New York City References New York City Transit Diesel Hybrid-Electric Buses Final Results: DOE/ NREL Transit Bus Evaluation Project[1]

3

New York City Transit Hybrid and CNG Transit Buses: Final Evaluation Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the evaluation results for new Orion VII buses at NYCT with CNG propulsion and new hybrid propulsion.

Barnitt, R.; Chandler, K.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

New York City Transit Diesel Hybrid-Electric Buses Final Results...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of facilities, a description of the project start-up process, evaluation results of hybrid buses studied, lessons learned, and recommendations for future alternative fuel...

5

Alternative Fuel Transit Buses: DART's (Dallas Area Rapid Transit) LNG Bus Fleet Final Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1998, Dallas Area Rapid Transit, a public transit agency in Dallas, Texas, began operating a large fleet of heavy-duty buses powered by liquefied natural gas. As part of a $16 million commitment to alternative fuels, DART operates 139 LNG buses serviced by two new LNG fueling stations.

Chandler, K. [Battelle (US); Norton, P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (US); Clark, N.

2000-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

6

King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Interim Evaluation Results  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

King County Metro Transit King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Interim Evaluation Results K. Chandler Battelle K. Walkowicz National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-540-39742 April 2006 King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Interim Evaluation Results K. Chandler Battelle K. Walkowicz National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. FC06.3000 Technical Report NREL/TP-540-39742 April 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

7

Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Evaluation Results Update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an update to the 2007 preliminary results report on hydrogen fuel cell and diesel buses operating at Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Sunline Transit Agency Hydrogen-Powered Transit Buses: Evaluation Results Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update on the evaluation results for hydrogen and CNG-fueled buses opertating at SunLine Transit Agency in California.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

SunLine Transit Agency, Hydrogen Powered Transit Buses: Preliminary Evaluation Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper provides preliminary results from an evaluation by DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory of hydrogen-powered transit buses at SunLine Transit Agency.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San Mateo County Transit District; Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Preliminary Evaluation Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report provides preliminary results from an evaluation of prototype fuel cell transit buses operating at Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) in San Jose, California.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San Mateo County Transit District -- Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Evaluation Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides evaluation results for prototype fuel cell transit buses operating at Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority in San Jose, California.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Preliminary Evaluation Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides an evaluation of three prototype fuel cell-powered transit buses operating at AC Transit in Oakland, California, and six baseline diesel buses similar in design to the fuel cell buses.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

New York City Transit Hybrid and CNG Transit Buses: Interim Evaluation Results  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

New York City Transit Hybrid New York City Transit Hybrid and CNG Transit Buses: Interim Evaluation Results K. Chandler and E. Eberts Battelle L. Eudy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-540-38843 January 2006 New York City Transit Hybrid and CNG Transit Buses: Interim Evaluation Results K. Chandler and E. Eberts Battelle L. Eudy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. FC06.3000 Technical Report NREL/TP-540-38843 January 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

14

New York City Transit Hybrid and CNG Transit Buses: Interim Evaluation Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report focuses on the evaluation of compressed natural gas (CNG) and diesel hybrid electric bus propulsion systems in New York City Transit's transit buses.

Chandler, K.; Eberts, E.; Eudy, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Alternative fuel transit buses: Interim results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Vehicle Evaluation Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transit bus program is designed to provide a comprehensive study of the alternative fuels currently used by the transit bus industry. The study focuses on the reliability, fuel economy, operating costs, and emissions of vehicles running on the various fuels and alternative fuel engines. The alternative fuels being tested are methanol, ethanol, biodiesel and natural gas. The alternative fuel buses in this program use the most common alternative fuel engines from the heavy-duty engine manufacturers. Data are collected in four categories: Bus and route descriptions; Bus operating data; Emissions data; and, Capital costs. The goal is to collect 18 months of data on each test bus. This report summarizes the interim results from the project to date. The report addresses performance and reliability, fuel economy, costs, and emissions of the busses in the program.

Motta, R.; Norton, P.; Kelly, K.J.; Chandler, K.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Transit Buses: Interim Evaluation Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interim technical report compares and evaluates new diesel and diesel hybrid-electric articulated buses operated as part of the King County Metro Transit (KC Metro) fleet in Seattle, Washington.

Chandler, K.; Walkowicz, K.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Alternative Fuel Transit Buses  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

35th St. Craig Ave. Alt Blvd. Colucci Pkwy. Final Results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Vehicle Evaluation Program Final Results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Vehicle Evaluation Program N T Y A U E O F E N E R G D E P A R T M E N I T E D S T A T S O F A E R I C M Produced for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a U.S. DOE national laboratory Transit Buses Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Final Results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Vehicle Evaluation Program by Robert Motta, Paul Norton, and Kenneth Kelly, NREL Kevin Chandler, Battelle Leon Schumacher, University of Missouri Nigel Clark,West Virginia University October 1996 The authors wish to thank all the transit agencies that participated in this program.

18

COMPARISON OF CLEAN DIESEL BUSES TO CNG BUSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using previously published data on regulated and unregulated emissions, this paper will compare the environmental performance of current generation transit buses operated on compressed natural gas (CNG) to current generation transit buses operated on ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (ULSD) and incorporating diesel particulate filters (DPF). Unregulated emissions evaluated include toxic compounds associated with adverse health effects (carbonyl, PAH, NPAH, benzene) as well as PM particle count and size distribution. For all regulated and unregulated emissions, both technologies are shown to be comparable. DPF equipped diesel buses and CNG buses have virtually identical levels of PM mass emissions and particle number emissions. DPF-equipped diesel buses have lower HC and CO emissions and lower emissions of toxic substances such as benzene, carbonyls and PAHs than CNG buses. CNG buses have lower NOx emissions than DPF-equipped buses, though CNG bus NOx emissions are shown to be much more variable. In addition, this paper will compare the capital and operating costs of CNG and DPF-equipped buses. The cost comparison is primarily based on the experience of MTA New York City Transit in operating CNG buses since 1995 and DPF-equipped buses fueled with ULSD since 2001. Published data on the experience of other large transit agencies in operating CNG buses is used to validate the NYCT experience. The incremental cost (compared to ''baseline'' diesel) of operating a typical 200-bus depot is shown to be six times higher for CNG buses than for ''clean diesel'' buses. The contributors to this increased cost for CNG buses are almost equally split between increased capital costs for purchase of buses and installation of fueling infrastructure, and increased operating costs for purchase of fuel, bus maintenance, and fuel station maintenance.

Lowell, D.; Parsley, W.; Bush,C; Zupo, D.

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

19

Charter Buses | Staff Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charter Buses for Tours and Special Events Charter Buses for Tours and Special Events Bus Request: Requests for tours and special events may be made by contacting the Transportation Office at 631-344-2535. Cancellation Policy: All cancellations must be made by phone to 631-344-2535 only during BNL business hours. Reservation must be canceled ten (10) business days prior to avoid penalty. Cancel two (2) to nine (9) business days prior - $150.00 penalty. Cancel within 24 hours - full fee will be charged. Staff Services maintains a contract that includes drivers for the rental of coaches, school buses, and vans for on-site tours and the transportation of large numbers of employees and visitors off-site. Our contract bus service rates are shown below: Hampton Jitney - Coaches Equipment Rates 8 Hour Day 4 Hour

20

Alternative fuel transit buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory; this project was funded by DOE. One of NREL`s missions is to objectively evaluate the performance, emissions, and operating costs of alternative fuel vehicles so fleet managers can make informed decisions when purchasing them. Alternative fuels have made greater inroads into the transit bus market than into any other. Each year, the American Public Transit Association (APTA) surveys its members on their inventory and buying plans. The latest APTA data show that about 4% of the 50,000 transit buses in its survey run on an alternative fuel. Furthermore, 1 in 5 of the new transit buses that members have on order are alternative fuel buses. This program was designed to comprehensively and objectively evaluate the alternative fuels in use in the industry.

Motta, R.; Norton, P.; Kelly, K. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buses final results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NYCT Diesel Hybrid-Electric Buses Program Status Update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program status update focuses on the experiences gathered during New York City Transit's deployment of hybrid electric buses in its fleet. This report is part of an ongoing Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies program to study heavy-duty alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles in the United States. DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is conducting the Transit Bus Evaluation Project to compare alternative fuel or advanced technology and diesel fuel buses. Information for the comparison comes from data collected on the operational, maintenance, performance, and emissions characteristics of alternative fuel or advanced technology buses currently being used in vehicle fleets and comparable diesel fuel buses serving as controls within the same fleet. This report highlights the New York City Transit (NYCT) alternative fuel and advanced technology programs including its diesel hybrid-electric buses. As part of the NREL Transit Bus Evaluation Project, data collection and evaluation of the Orion VI diesel hybrid-electric buses at NYCT are nearly complete. Final reports from the evaluation are being prepared by NREL and Battelle (NREL's support contractor for the project) and will be available in early 2002. If you want to know more about this transit bus program, its components, advanced technology vehicles, or incentive programs, contact any of the following personnel or visit the Web sites listed.

Not Available

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

final results 2011_turkey.pptx  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FINAL RESULTS RESCUE ROBOT LEAGUE 1ST iRAP_JUDY (Thailand) 835 25 2ND MRL (Iran) 430 13 3RD STABILIZE (Thailand) 405 11 ...

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

23

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2005 Final Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dwelling contests winner Solar Decathlon 2005 Final Results The overall winners of the Solar Decathlon and the winners of the ten contests are listed here. For more information...

24

The BEST Experiences with Bioethanol Buses | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The BEST Experiences with Bioethanol Buses The BEST Experiences with Bioethanol Buses Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The BEST Experiences with Bioethanol Buses Agency/Company /Organization: BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.best-europe.org/upload/BEST_documents/info_documents/Best%20report This report summarizes the results of the BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport (BEST) demonstration of bioethanol buses. The conclusion is that bioethanol is a suitable fuel for public transport. Bioethanol has a potential to replace diesel in compression engines. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Avoid - Cut the need for travel Shift - Change to low-carbon modes Improve - Enhance infrastructure & policies

25

To Evaluate Zero Emission Propulsion and Support Technology for Transit Buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides evaluation results for prototype fuel cell transit buses operating at Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) in San Jose, California, in partnership with the San Mateo County Transit District in San Carlos, California. VTA has been operating three fuel cell transit buses in extra revenue service since February 28, 2005. This report provides descriptions of the equipment used, early experiences, and evaluation results from the operation of the buses and the supporting hydrogen infrastructure from March 2005 through July 2006.

Kevin Chandler; Leslie Eudy

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Norcal Prototype LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results  

SciTech Connect

U.S. DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory evaluated Norcal Waste Systems liquefied natural gas (LNG) waste transfer trucks. Trucks had prototype Cummins Westport ISXG engines. Report gives final evaluation results.

Not Available

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

LPG buses in southern California leave the competition at the curb  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that after the first year of a landmark experiment in which LPG has been competing against methanol and CNG in city buses, propane appears to be pulling out in front of the pack. According to Efren Medellin, superintendent of vehicle maintenance at the Orange County Transit Authority, two LPG buses had registered a total of 31,000 moles with relatively little, if any, downtime. The two methanol buses had run a total of 30,000 miles while the two CNG buses had traveled only 5000 miles. Furthermore the methanol and CNG buses have had their share of downtime for new parts and other problems. The propane-powered buses appear to be running consistently well without mechanical difficulties. The only problem that occurred was occasional backfiring. As a result, the electronic controls were replaced and no subsequent complaints were heard.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Non-CFC air conditioning for transit buses  

SciTech Connect

In the United Sates, more than 80% of transit city buses are air conditioned. Vapor compression refrigeration systems are standard for air conditioning buses and account for up to 25% of fuel consumption in the cooling season. Vapor compression devices use chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), chemicals that contributes to Earths`s ozone depletion and to global warming. Currently, evaporative cooling is an economical alternative to CFC vapor compression refrigeration for air conditioning buses. It does not use CFCs but is restricted in use to arid climates. This limitation can be eliminated by dehumidifying the supply air using desiccants. We studied desiccant systems for cooling transit buses and found that the use of a desiccant-assisted evaporative cooling system is feasible and can deliver the required cooling. The weight and the size of the desiccant system though larger than vapor compression systems, can be easily accommodated within a bus. Fuel consumption for naming desiccant systems was about 70% less than CFC refrigeration system, resulting in payback periods of less than 2.5 years under most circumstances. This preliminary study indicated that desiccant systems combined with evaporative cooling is a CFC-free option to vapor compression refrigeration for air conditioning of transit buses. The concept is ready to be tested in a fun prototype scale in a commercial bus.

Pesaran, A.A.; Parent, Y.O.; Bharathan, D.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Non-CFC air conditioning for transit buses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the United Sates, more than 80% of transit city buses are air conditioned. Vapor compression refrigeration systems are standard for air conditioning buses and account for up to 25% of fuel consumption in the cooling season. Vapor compression devices use chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), chemicals that contributes to Earths's ozone depletion and to global warming. Currently, evaporative cooling is an economical alternative to CFC vapor compression refrigeration for air conditioning buses. It does not use CFCs but is restricted in use to arid climates. This limitation can be eliminated by dehumidifying the supply air using desiccants. We studied desiccant systems for cooling transit buses and found that the use of a desiccant-assisted evaporative cooling system is feasible and can deliver the required cooling. The weight and the size of the desiccant system though larger than vapor compression systems, can be easily accommodated within a bus. Fuel consumption for naming desiccant systems was about 70% less than CFC refrigeration system, resulting in payback periods of less than 2.5 years under most circumstances. This preliminary study indicated that desiccant systems combined with evaporative cooling is a CFC-free option to vapor compression refrigeration for air conditioning of transit buses. The concept is ready to be tested in a fun prototype scale in a commercial bus.

Pesaran, A.A.; Parent, Y.O.; Bharathan, D.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A local Clean Cities coalition helped Idaho's Valley Regional Transit switch to compressed natural gas buses, allowing the transit authority to maintain its service while reducing harmful emissions.

31

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2007 Final Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer-generated image of the Technische Universität Darmstadt 2007 Solar Decathlon house. Computer-generated image of the Technische Universität Darmstadt 2007 Solar Decathlon house. First Place: Technische Universität Darmstadt Computer-generated image of the University of Maryland 2007 Solar Decathlon house. Second Place: University of Maryland Computer-generated image of the Santa Clara University 2007 Solar Decathlon house. Third Place: Santa Clara University Solar Decathlon 2007 Final Results The Solar Decathlon challenged 20 college and university teams to compete in 10 contests and design, build, and operate the most attractive and energy-efficient solar-powered home. After two years of preparation and a week of competition, the final scores and standings are in. Overall First Place: Technische Universität Darmstadt This team from Germany came to the Solar Decathlon hoping to have an impact

32

Vehicle Modeling and Verification of CNG-Powered Transit Buses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling and Verification of CNG-Powered Transit BusesModeling and Verification of CNG-Powered Transit Buses.Modeling and Veri?cation of CNG-Powered Transit Buses J.K.

Hedrick, J. K.; Ni, A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Turning research into results, final report  

SciTech Connect

In September 1989, the ACEC Research and Management Foundation (ACEC/RMF) submitted a proposal to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in response to the Existing Buildings Efficiency Program`s Solicitation Number DE-PS01-89CE21034. On May 15, 1990, DOE informed ACEC/RMF that it had been selected for a grant award; the final agreement was signed on July 23, 1990. The purpose of the effort was to develop an information package showing engineering firms that energy services can be sold to owners and developers successfully and profitably, that not every design that goes beyond code results in a lawsuit, that owners can be shown the value of paying for the additional design analysis that energy efficiency design requires. The package was envisioned to include examples of buildings that succeed in terms of energy, cost, and design team benefits. It was further conceptualized as both a technical and marketing resource to provide helpful facts, references to relevant documents, graphic materials to be used during client presentations, and guidance on the latest in useful research results.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Impact of Compressed Natural Gas Fueled Buses on Street Pavements 6. Performing Organization Code 7. Author(s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Federal Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) and the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), together with other state regulations have encouraged or mandated transit systems to use alternative fuels to power bus fleets. Among such fuels, compressed natural gas (CNG) is attractive, although it must be stored in robust, heavy pressurized cylinders, capable of withstanding pressures up to 5,000 psi. Such systems are typically heavier than conventional diesel storage tanks. As a result, this raises gross vehicle weight, sometimes significantly, which then increases the consumption of the pavement over which CNG buses operate. Capital Metro, the Austin, Texas transit authority, is currently evaluating a number of CNG fueled buses. As part of the U.S. DOT Region Six University Transportation Centers Program (UTCP), a study was instigated into the scale of incremental pavement consumption associated with the operation of these buses. The study suggests that replacing current vehicles with CNG powered models utilizing aluminum storage tanks would raise average network equivalent single rehabilitation costs across the network of over four percent. Finally, it recommends that full cost study be undertaken with evaluation of the adoption of

Dingyi Yang; Robert Harrison

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Propane Buses Shuttle Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine on AddThis.com... Oct. 13, 2012 Propane Buses Shuttle Visitors in Maine W atch how travelers in Bar Harbor, Maine, rely on propane-powered shuttle buses. For information about this project, contact Maine Clean Communities.

36

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Save Money for Virginia  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Propane Buses Save Propane Buses Save Money for Virginia Schools to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Save Money for Virginia Schools on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Save Money for Virginia Schools on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Save Money for Virginia Schools on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Save Money for Virginia Schools on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Save Money for Virginia Schools on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Save Money for Virginia Schools on AddThis.com... Feb. 25, 2010 Propane Buses Save Money for Virginia Schools F ind out how Gloucester County Schools' propane buses are quieter and cost

37

Vehicle Technologies Office: Transit Buses: Today's Pioneers in Fuel Cell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transit Buses: Today's Transit Buses: Today's Pioneers in Fuel Cell Transportation to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Transit Buses: Today's Pioneers in Fuel Cell Transportation on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Transit Buses: Today's Pioneers in Fuel Cell Transportation on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Transit Buses: Today's Pioneers in Fuel Cell Transportation on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Transit Buses: Today's Pioneers in Fuel Cell Transportation on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Transit Buses: Today's Pioneers in Fuel Cell Transportation on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Transit Buses: Today's Pioneers in Fuel Cell Transportation on AddThis.com... Transit Buses: Today's Pioneers in Fuel Cell Transportation

38

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Buses Go Green in Virginia  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Buses Go Green School Buses Go Green in Virginia to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Buses Go Green in Virginia on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Buses Go Green in Virginia on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Buses Go Green in Virginia on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Buses Go Green in Virginia on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Buses Go Green in Virginia on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Buses Go Green in Virginia on AddThis.com... Oct. 1, 2011 School Buses Go Green in Virginia " We've taken some important first steps toward lower emissions and reduced dependence on foreign oil. Everybody needs to be doing everything they can

39

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clean Transportation Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses

40

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Requirement for School Buses  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Requirement Requirement for School Buses to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Requirement for School Buses on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Requirement for School Buses on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Requirement for School Buses on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Requirement for School Buses on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Requirement for School Buses on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Requirement for School Buses on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Requirement for School Buses Every school bus that is capable of operating on diesel fuel must be

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buses final results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Help Minnesota Schools Carve  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Propane Buses Help Propane Buses Help Minnesota Schools Carve out Greener Future to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Help Minnesota Schools Carve out Greener Future on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Help Minnesota Schools Carve out Greener Future on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Help Minnesota Schools Carve out Greener Future on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Help Minnesota Schools Carve out Greener Future on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Help Minnesota Schools Carve out Greener Future on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Buses Help Minnesota Schools Carve out Greener Future on AddThis.com...

42

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use in School Buses  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Use in Biodiesel Use in School Buses to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use in School Buses on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use in School Buses on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use in School Buses on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use in School Buses on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use in School Buses on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use in School Buses on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Use in School Buses The South Carolina Department of Education must fuel state school bus fleets with biodiesel when feasible. (Reference South Carolina Code of Laws

43

Barwood CNG Cab Fleet Study: Final Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a fleet study conducted over a 12-month period to evaluate the operation of dedicated compress natural gas (CNG) Ford Crown Victoria sedans in a taxicab fleet. In the study, we assess the performance and reliability of the vehicles and the cost of operating the CNG vehicles compared to gasoline vehicles. The study results reveal that the CNG vehicles operated by this fleet offer both economic and environmental advantages. The total operating costs of the CNG vehicles were about 25% lower than those of the gasoline vehicles. The CNG vehicles performed as well as the gasoline vehicles, and were just as reliable. Barwood representatives and drivers have come to consider the CNG vehicles an asset to their business and to the air quality of the local community.

Whalen, P.; Kelly, K.; John, M.

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

44

Tempe Transportation Division: LNG Turbine Hybrid Electric Buses  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet describes the performance of liquefied natural gas (LNG) turbine hybrid electric buses used in Tempe's Transportation Division.

Not Available

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Transit Users Group Supports Transit Agencies with Natural Gas Buses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fact sheet describes the benefits of the Transit Users Group, which supports transit groups with compressed natural gas (CNG) buses.

Not Available

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Final Technical Report: Results of Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

Arizona Public Service Company (APS) expects that by 2027, renewable energy will account for 6,590 GWh in energy consumption by its customers. While much of this future energy will come from large centrally-located power plants, distributed renewable energy, sited at the point of end-use will also play an important role in meeting the needs of APSâ?? customers and is expected to provide 1,734 GWh. With increasing penetration of residential and commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems at the point of end-use, PV power generation not only offsets the load, but could also cause significant shifts in power flow patterns through the distribution system, and could possibly cause reversal of flow through some branches of a distribution circuit. Significant changes to power flow introduced into existing distribution systems due to the increased amount of PV systems may cause operational issues, including over-voltage on the distribution feeder (loss of voltage regulation) and incorrect operation of control equipment, which may lead to an increase in the number of operations and related equipment wear that could affect equipment reliability and customer power quality. Additionally, connecting generation resources to a distribution feeder can introduce additional sources of short-circuit current to the distribution system. This could potentially result in increased short-circuit currents, potentially reaching damaging levels, causing protection desensitization and a potential loss of protection coordination. These effects may be further compounded by variability of PV production due to shading by clouds. The effects of these phenomena in distributed PV applications are not well understood, and there is a great need to characterize this variability. This project will contribute to understanding the effects of high-penetration solar electricity on the design and operation of distribution systems by demonstrating how a high penetration of PV systems affects grid operations of a working, utility distribution feeder. To address the technical challenges related to the integration of distributed PV when PV penetration levels reach or exceed 30% of the total load, technologies and methods to ensure the stable and safe operation of the feeder will be evaluated. Lessons learned will enable APS to improve the framework for future PV integration on its system and may also aid other utilities across the United States energy sector in accelerating the adoption of distributed photovoltaic generation.

Narang, David, J.; Hambrick, Joshua; Srinivasan, Devarajan; Ayyannar, Raja; O'Brien, Kathleen

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

47

Final Technical Report: Results of Phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Arizona Public Service Company (APS) expects that by 2027, renewable energy will account for 6,590 GWh in energy consumption by its customers. While much of this future energy will come from large centrally-located power plants, distributed renewable energy, sited at the point of end-use will also play an important role in meeting the needs of APS customers and is expected to provide 1,734 GWh. With increasing penetration of residential and commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems at the point of end-use, PV power generation not only offsets the load, but could also cause significant shifts in power flow patterns through the distribution system, and could possibly cause reversal of flow through some branches of a distribution circuit. Significant changes to power flow introduced into existing distribution systems due to the increased amount of PV systems may cause operational issues, including over-voltage on the distribution feeder (loss of voltage regulation) and incorrect operation of control equipment, which may lead to an increase in the number of operations and related equipment wear that could affect equipment reliability and customer power quality. Additionally, connecting generation resources to a distribution feeder can introduce additional sources of short-circuit current to the distribution system. This could potentially result in increased short-circuit currents, potentially reaching damaging levels, causing protection desensitization and a potential loss of protection coordination. These effects may be further compounded by variability of PV production due to shading by clouds. The effects of these phenomena in distributed PV applications are not well understood, and there is a great need to characterize this variability. This project will contribute to understanding the effects of high-penetration solar electricity on the design and operation of distribution systems by demonstrating how a high penetration of PV systems affects grid operations of a working, utility distribution feeder. To address the technical challenges related to the integration of distributed PV when PV penetration levels reach or exceed 30% of the total load, technologies and methods to ensure the stable and safe operation of the feeder will be evaluated. Lessons learned will enable APS to improve the framework for future PV integration on its system and may also aid other utilities across the United States energy sector in accelerating the adoption of distributed photovoltaic generation.

Narang, David, J.; Hambrick, Joshua; Srinivasan, Devarajan; Ayyannar, Raja; O'Brien, Kathleen; Bebic, Jovan; Schelenz, Owen

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

48

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas School Buses Grant  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Compressed Natural Gas Compressed Natural Gas School Buses Grant and Loan Pilot Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas School Buses Grant and Loan Pilot Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas School Buses Grant and Loan Pilot Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas School Buses Grant and Loan Pilot Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas School Buses Grant and Loan Pilot Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas School Buses Grant and Loan Pilot Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Compressed Natural Gas School Buses Grant and Loan Pilot Program on AddThis.com...

49

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Shuttle Buses Offer Free  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hybrid Electric Hybrid Electric Shuttle Buses Offer Free Rides in Maryland to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Shuttle Buses Offer Free Rides in Maryland on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Shuttle Buses Offer Free Rides in Maryland on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Shuttle Buses Offer Free Rides in Maryland on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Shuttle Buses Offer Free Rides in Maryland on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Shuttle Buses Offer Free Rides in Maryland on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Shuttle Buses Offer Free Rides in Maryland on AddThis.com... June 18, 2010

50

Hydrogen-Powered Buses Brochure … 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powered by Powered by Hydrogen EERE Information Center 1-877-EERE-INFO (1-877-337-3463) eere.energy.gov/informationcenter Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. October 2010 Source: NREL, Dennis Schroeder Source: NREL, Dennis Schroeder Hydrogen-Powered Buses Showcase Advanced Vehicle Technologies Visitors to federal facilities across the country may now have the opportunity to tour the sites in a hydrogen- powered shuttle bus. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting the demonstration of hydrogen-powered vehicles and hydrogen infrastructure at federal facilities across the country. Nine facilities will receive fourteen hydrogen- powered buses to demonstrate this market-ready advanced technology. Produced by Ford Motor Company, the

51

Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2011  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This status report, fifth in a series of annual status reports from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), discusses the achievements and challenges of fuel cell propulsion for transit and summarizes the introduction of fuel cell transit buses in the United States. Progress this year includes an increase in the number of fuel cell electric buses (FCEBs), from 15 to 25, operating at eight transit agencies, as well as increased diversity of the fuel cell design options for transit buses. The report also provides an analysis of the combined results from fuel cell transit bus demonstrations evaluated by NREL with a focus on the most recent data through July 2011 including fuel cell power system reliability and durability; fuel economy; roadcall; and hydrogen fueling results. These evaluations cover 22 of the 25 FCEBs currently operating.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.; Gikakis, C.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

School Buses Get Greener in Bluegrass State | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

School Buses Get Greener in Bluegrass State School Buses Get Greener in Bluegrass State School Buses Get Greener in Bluegrass State September 10, 2010 - 11:45am Addthis Ed McNeel, superintendent of Corbin's school district, poses aboard the district's new hybrid-diesel bus. | Photo Courtesy of Susie Hart. Ed McNeel, superintendent of Corbin's school district, poses aboard the district's new hybrid-diesel bus. | Photo Courtesy of Susie Hart. Lindsay Gsell What are the key facts? Kentucky will receive 213 hybrid diesel buses in the next year. The project is funded with nearly $13 million in Clean Cities Recovery Act funding. The new buses will be more than 60% more fuel efficient than traditional vehicles. It's September and traditional school buses are once again on the roads in large numbers. However, throughout Kentucky, a new type of school bus will hit the road

53

Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - Nanyang | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - Nanyang Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - Nanyang Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - Nanyang Agency/Company /Organization: BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.best-europe.org/upload/BEST_documents/info_documents/Best%20report This report addresses the experience of introducing ethanol buses and fuel stations in Nanyang (China). Though the demonstration met initial obstacles, significant data and information was collected. The responses from drivers and passengers show that the ethanol buses were well accepted, and the function and performance of the ethanol buses was satisfactory. How to Use This Tool

54

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Use in School Buses...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Louisiana Legislature. The Board will consider the environmental and economic advantages and disadvantages of using biodiesel in school buses. (Reference House Resolution 72, 201...

55

Case Study: Ebus Hybrid Electric Buses and Trolleys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Evaluation focuses on the demonstration of hybrid electric buses and trolleys produced by Ebus Inc. at the Indianapolis Transportation Corporation and the Knoxville Area Transit.

Barnitt, R.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

COMPARATIVE STUDY ON EXHAUST EMISSIONS FROM DIESEL- AND CNG-POWERED URBAN BUSES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Couple years ago, ADEME engaged programs dedicated to the urban buses exhaust emissions studies. The measures associated with the reduction of atmospheric and noise pollution has particular importance in the sector of urban buses. In many cases, they illustrate the city's environmental image and contribute to reinforcing the attractiveness of public transport. France's fleet in service, presently put at about 14,000 units, consumes about 2 per cent of the total energy of city transport. It causes about 2 per cent of the HC emissions and from 4 to 6 per cent of the NOx emissions and particles. These vehicles typically have a long life span (about 15 years) and are relatively expensive to buy, about 150.000 euros per unit. Several technical solutions were evaluated to quantify, on a real condition cycle for buses, on one hand pollutants emissions, fuel consumption and on the other hand reliability, cost in real existing fleet. This paper presents main preliminary results on urban buses exhaust emission on two different cases: - existing Diesel buses, with fuel modifications (Diesel with low sulphur content), Diesel with water emulsion and bio-Diesel (30% oil ester in standard Diesel fuel); renovating CNG powered Euro II buses fleet, over representative driving cycles, set up by ADEME and partners. On these cycles, pollutants (regulated and unregulated) were measured as well as fuel consumption, at the beginning of a program and one year after to quantify reliability and increase/decrease of pollutants emissions. At the same time, some after-treatment technologies were tested under real conditions and several vehicles. Information such as fuel consumption, lubricant analysis, problem on the technology were following during a one year program. On the overall level, it is the combination of various action, pollution-reduction and renewal that will make it possible to meet the technological challenge of reducing emissions and fuel consumption by urban bus networks.

COROLLER, P; PLASSAT, G

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

57

Experiences from Introduction of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel Station |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Experiences from Introduction of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel Station Experiences from Introduction of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel Station Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Experiences from Introduction of Ethanol Buses and Ethanol Fuel Station Agency/Company /Organization: BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.best-europe.org/upload/BEST_documents/info_documents/Best%20report Ethanol buses were demonstrated within BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport (BEST). This report describes the problems at the sites and how they were solved. The aim of the report is to guide other local transport authorities on how to deal with the questions raised when a bus demonstration begins. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies:

58

Enterprise converting buses to biodiesel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enterprise converting buses to biodiesel Enterprise converting buses to biodiesel Enterprise converting buses to biodiesel April 1, 2010 - 6:48pm Addthis Paul Lester Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Rental car customers may be able to breathe a little easier during their next trip to the airport. Alamo Rent A Car, Enterprise Rent-A-Car, and National Car Rental, all brands operated by the subsidiaries of Enterprise Holdings, are converting their airport shuttle buses to run on biodiesel fuel. The move is a good one for the environment, and will ultimately reduce the company's carbon emissions. "We are saving 420,000 gallons of petroleum diesel," says Lee Broughton, director of corporate identity and sustainability for Enterprise Holdings. Hydrocarbon and particulate matter emissions will plummet, making the air

59

Alternative fuel transit buses: The Pierce Transit Success Story  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pierce transit program for operating mass transit buses on compressed natural gas (CNG) is described. Cost, reliability, fuel efficiency, emission of combustion products, and future trends are discussed.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

New Yellow School Buses Harness the Sun in Wisconsin | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to the charge gained from the solar array, the buses also recharge their batteries using regenerative braking, just like traditional hybrid vehicles. The school bus-with the need...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buses final results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Life-cycle Energy and Emissions Inventories for Motorcycles, Diesel Automobiles, School Buses, Electric Buses, Chicago Rail, and New York City Rail  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buses,andMetropolitanRail MikhailChesterandArpadBuses,andMetropolitanRail MikhailChesterandArpad2005,Metra(2005)] MetraRail,2005. AvailableDaily

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Evaluation of Orion/BAE Hybrid Buses and Orion CNG Buses at New York City Transit: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper prepared for the 2005 American Public Transportation Association Bus & Paratransit Conference discusses the NREL/DOE evaluation of hybrid electric transit buses operated by New York City Transit.

Eudy, L.; Barnitt, R.; Chandler, K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glacier-Waterton Park Powers Buses With  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Glacier-Waterton Park Glacier-Waterton Park Powers Buses With Propane to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glacier-Waterton Park Powers Buses With Propane on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glacier-Waterton Park Powers Buses With Propane on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glacier-Waterton Park Powers Buses With Propane on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glacier-Waterton Park Powers Buses With Propane on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glacier-Waterton Park Powers Buses With Propane on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Glacier-Waterton Park Powers Buses With Propane on AddThis.com... Dec. 31, 2004 Glacier-Waterton Park Powers Buses With Propane F ind out how Glacier-Waterton International Peace Park uses propane buses.

64

Long Beach Transit: Two-Year Evaluation of Gasoline-Electric Hybrid Transit Buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report focuses on a gasoline-electric hybrid transit bus propulsion system. The propulsion system is an alternative to standard diesel buses and allows for reductions in emissions (usually focused on reductions of particulate matter and oxides of nitrogen) and petroleum use. Gasoline propulsion is an alternative to diesel fuel and hybrid propulsion allows for increased fuel economy, which ultimately results in reduced petroleum use.

Lammert, M.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Final Evaluation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CA Peterbilt378, Class 8 truck Cummins Westport ISXG high-pressure direct injection LNG and diesel Completed in 2004 Note: CNG compressed natural gas; LNG liquefied...

66

RePower Bainbridge "Final Boarding Call" Event Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This story is just one example of how RePower's "Final Boarding Call" helped homeowners and our partners. By the end of this one-day event, Kitsap Credit Union and Puget...

67

Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities Boise Buses Running Strong with Clean Cities May 28, 2013 - 12:05pm Addthis Working with Republic Services, the city of Boise and Valley Regional Transit, Treasure Valley Clean Cities built four compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling stations that allowed all three organizations to transition to CNG vehicles. | Photo courtesy of Valley Regional Transit. Working with Republic Services, the city of Boise and Valley Regional Transit, Treasure Valley Clean Cities built four compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling stations that allowed all three organizations to transition to CNG vehicles. | Photo courtesy of Valley Regional Transit. Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program What are the key facts?

68

Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting ControlApplications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subcontract Statement of Work consists of two major tasks. This report is the Final Report in fulfillment of the contract deliverable for Task 1. The purpose of Task 1 was to evaluate existing and emerging protocols and standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The detailed task description follows: Task 1. Evaluate alternative sensor/field buses. The objective of this task is to evaluate existing and emerging standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The protocols to be evaluated will include at least: (1) 1-Wire Net, (2) DALI, (3) MODBUS (or appropriate substitute such as EIB) and (4) ZigBee. The evaluation will include a comparative matrix for comparing the technical performance features of the different alternative systems. The performance features to be considered include: (1) directionality and network speed, (2) error control, (3) latency times, (4) allowable cable voltage drop, (5) topology, and (6) polarization. Specifically, Subcontractor will: (1) Analyze the proposed network architecture and identify potential problems that may require further research and specification. (2) Help identify and specify additional software and hardware components that may be required for the communications network to operate properly. (3) Identify areas of the architecture that can benefit from existing standards and technology and enumerate those standards and technologies. (4) Identify existing companies that may have relevant technology that can be applied to this research. (5) Help determine if new standards or technologies need to be developed.

Koch, Ed; Rubinstein, Francis

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

69

Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Third Evaluation Report and Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes operations at Alameda-Contra Costa Transit district for three protoype fuel cell buses and six diesel buses operating from the same location.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Pennsylvania School Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas on AddThis.com... Feb. 16, 2013 Pennsylvania School Buses Run on Natural Gas F ind out how schools in Pennsylvania transport students in compressed

71

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas School Buses Help Kansas City  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas School Natural Gas School Buses Help Kansas City Save Money to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas School Buses Help Kansas City Save Money on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas School Buses Help Kansas City Save Money on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas School Buses Help Kansas City Save Money on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas School Buses Help Kansas City Save Money on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas School Buses Help Kansas City Save Money on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas School Buses Help Kansas City Save Money on AddThis.com... Nov. 12, 2011 Natural Gas School Buses Help Kansas City Save Money

72

Emission Testing of Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) Natural Gas and Diesel Transit Buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An evaluation of emissions of natural gas and diesel buses operated by the Washington Metro Area Transit Authority.

Melendez, M.; Taylor, J.; Wayne, W. S.; Smith, D.; Zuboy, J.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Lower Merion a Key Player in Alternative Fuel Buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This 2-page Clean Cities fact sheet describes the use of natural gas power in buses by the Lower Merion School District, located in the western suburbs of Philadelphia, PA. It includes information on the history of the program, along with contact information for the local Clean Cities Coordinator and Lower Merion School District.

Not Available

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Propane Fuel Buses for Dallas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel and Propane Biodiesel and Propane Fuel Buses for Dallas County Schools to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Propane Fuel Buses for Dallas County Schools on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Propane Fuel Buses for Dallas County Schools on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Propane Fuel Buses for Dallas County Schools on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Propane Fuel Buses for Dallas County Schools on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Propane Fuel Buses for Dallas County Schools on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Propane Fuel Buses for Dallas County Schools on AddThis.com... Oct. 2, 2009

75

New Buses Transport Students and Savings in Texas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buses Transport Students and Savings in Texas Buses Transport Students and Savings in Texas New Buses Transport Students and Savings in Texas July 29, 2010 - 6:27pm Addthis Students look underneath one of Fort Worth Independent School District's new hybrid diesel buses. | Photo courtesy of FWISD Students look underneath one of Fort Worth Independent School District's new hybrid diesel buses. | Photo courtesy of FWISD Lindsay Gsell This fall, when students in Texas' Fort Worth Independent School District (FWISD) board school buses, some of them will be riding on the district's new hybrid electric diesel vehicles. Thanks to Recovery Act funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program, the district was able to purchase 25 buses-enough to transport 1,800 students to school while saving the district 12,000 gallons

76

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #555: January 26, 2009 Transit Buses are  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: January 26, 5: January 26, 2009 Transit Buses are Relying Less on Diesel Fuel to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #555: January 26, 2009 Transit Buses are Relying Less on Diesel Fuel on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #555: January 26, 2009 Transit Buses are Relying Less on Diesel Fuel on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #555: January 26, 2009 Transit Buses are Relying Less on Diesel Fuel on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #555: January 26, 2009 Transit Buses are Relying Less on Diesel Fuel on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #555: January 26, 2009 Transit Buses are Relying Less on Diesel Fuel on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #555: January 26, 2009 Transit Buses are Relying Less on Diesel Fuel on

77

Yosemite Waters Vehicle Evaluation Report: Final Results (Brochure)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Results Results Prepared for South Coast Air Quality Management District by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory CRD-01-098 Fischer-Tropsch Synthetic Fuel Demonstration in a Southern California Vehicle Fleet Yosemite Waters Vehicle Evaluation Report Yosemite Waters Vehicle Evaluation Report i Alternative Fuel Trucks YOSEMITE WATERS VEHICLE EVALUATION REPORT Authors Leslie Eudy, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

78

Final Results from U.S. FCEV Learning Demonstration (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the objectives of the U.S. DOE Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration Project, describes NREL's technology validation approach, and summarizes key technical results from the project.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Economic Analysis of Alternative Fuel School Buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Clean Cities final report provides a general idea of the potential economic impacts of choosing alternative fuels for school bus fleets. It provides information on different school bus types, as well as analysis of the three main types of alternative fuel used in school bus fleets today (natural gas, propane, and biodiesel).

Laughlin, M.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Microsoft Word - PR_SWG Trial Results_FINAL.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE MEDIA CONTACT FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE MEDIA CONTACT Gary Koppenjan 805-376-6546 mediaoffice@ceres.net Ceres Yield Results: Energy Crop Benefits are Greatly Underestimated THOUSAND OAKS, Calif. - May 20, 2009 - Energy crop company Ceres, Inc. announced today that switchgrass can produce substantially more biomass than previously reported and that average yields often used by academics and policymakers to forecast bioenergy economics and environmental benefits may, in fact, be far too conservative. The company reported that yield results from its nation-wide network of field trials showed that average biomass yields among switchgrass seed varieties tested last season were as much as 50% more than the government's projected yields for 2022. Proprietary varieties sold under the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buses final results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting Control Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Field Buses Alternative Field Buses for Lighting Control Applications Prepared By: Ed Koch, Akua Controls Francis Rubinstein, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Prepared For: Broadata Communications Torrence, CA May 15, 2005 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name,

82

Final Binary Stars Results From The VLT Lunar Occultations Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on 13 sub-arcsecond binaries, detected by means of lunar occultations in the near-infrared at the ESO Very Large Telescope. They are all first-time detections, except for the visual binary HD~158122 which we resolved for the first time in the near infrared. The primaries have magnitudes in the range $K$=4.5 to 10.0, and the companions in the range $K$=6.8 to 11.1. The magnitude differences have a median value of 2.4, with the largest being 4.6. The projected separations are in the range 4 to 168 milliarcseconds with a median of 13 milliarcseconds. We discuss and compare our results with the available literature. With this paper, we conclude the mining for binary star detections in the volume of 1226 occultations recorded at the VLT with the ISAAC instrument. We expect that the majority of these binaries may be unresolvable by adaptive optics on current telescopes, and they might be challenging for long-baseline interferometry. However they constitute an interesting sample for future larger telescope...

Richichi, Andrea; Cusano, Felice; Ivanov, Valentin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Final Test and Evaluation Results from the Solar Two Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar Two was a collaborative, cost-shared project between 11 U. S. industry and utility partners and the U. S. Department of Energy to validate molten-salt power tower technology. The Solar Two plant, located east of Barstow, CA, comprised 1926 heliostats, a receiver, a thermal storage system, a steam generation system, and steam-turbine power block. Molten nitrate salt was used as the heat transfer fluid and storage media. The steam generator powered a 10-MWe (megawatt electric), conventional Rankine cycle turbine. Solar Two operated from June 1996 to April 1999. The major objective of the test and evaluation phase of the project was to validate the technical characteristics of a molten salt power tower. This report describes the significant results from the test and evaluation activities, the operating experience of each major system, and overall plant performance. Tests were conducted to measure the power output (MW) of the each major system, the efficiencies of the heliostat, receiver, thermal storage, and electric power generation systems and the daily energy collected, daily thermal-to-electric conversion, and daily parasitic energy consumption. Also included are detailed test and evaluation reports.

BRADSHAW, ROBERT W.; DAWSON, DANIEL B.; DE LA ROSA, WILFREDO; GILBERT, ROCKWELL; GOODS, STEVEN H.; HALE, MARY JANE; JACOBS, PETER; JONES, SCOTT A.; KOLB, GREGORY J.; PACHECO, JAMES E.; PRAIRIE, MICHAEL R.; REILLY, HUGH E.; SHOWALTER, STEVEN K.; VANT-HULL, LORIN L.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Un-Regulated Emissions from CRT-Equipped Transit Buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Demonstrate applicability of the CRT TM to both new 4-stroke and older 2-stroke diesel engines Document the emissions reductions available using CRT TM retrofits in conjunction with reduced sulfur diesel fuel Evaluate the durability of CRTs in rigorous New York City bus service Apply new measurement and monitoring technologies for PM and toxic emissions Compare diesel-CRTTM with CNG and diesel-electric hybrid buses

Gibbs, Richard

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

85

TANK 40 FINAL SB7B CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

A sample of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) was taken from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB7b WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals and fissile constituents, and these results are reported here. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) as SB7b. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) the 3-L Tank 40 SB7b sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle over the weekend. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 558 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent analytical samples. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon{reg_sign} vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass - 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB7b supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH{sup -}/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses, and Cs-137 gamma scan. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH{sup -}/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method developed by SRNL AD and previously described. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results reported here: (1) The ratios of the major elements for the SB7b WAPS sample are different from those measured for the SB7a WAPS sample. There is less Al and Mn relative to Fe than the previous sludge batch. (2) The elemental composition of this sample and the analyses conducted here are reasonable and consistent with DWPF batch data measurements in light of DWPF pre-sample concentration and SRAT product heel contributions to the DWPF SRAT receipt analyses. The element ratios for Al/Fe, Ca/Fe, Mn/Fe, and U/Fe agree within 10% between this work and the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt analyses. (3) Sulfur in the SB7b WAPS sample is 82% soluble, slightly less than results reported for SB3, SB4, and SB6 samples but unlike the 50% insoluble sulfur observed in the SB5 WAPS sample. In addition, 23% of the soluble sulfur is not present as sulfate in SB7b. (4) The average activities of the fissile isotopes of interest in the SB7b WAPS sample are (in {mu}Ci/g of total dried solids): 4.22E-02 U-233, 6.12E-04 U-235, 1.08E+01 Pu-239, and 5.09E+01 Pu-241. The full radionuclide composition will be reported in a future document. (5) The fission product noble metal and Ag concentrations appear to have largely peaked in previous DWPF sludge batches, with the exception of Ru, which still shows a slight increase in SB7b.

Bannochie, C.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

TANK 40 FINAL SLUDGE BATCH 8 CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

A sample of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) was pulled from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB8 WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition, including noble metals, and fissile constituents, and these results are reported here. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) as SB8. At SRNL, the 3-L Tank 40 SB8 sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 553 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent slurry sample preparations. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon? vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass ? 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma ? atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma ? mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB8 supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH-/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH-/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method developed by SRNL AD and previously described.

Bannochie, C.

2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

87

100,000-Mile Evaluation of Transit Buses Operated on Biodiesel Blends (B20)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Evaluates the emissions, fuel economy, and maintenance of five 40-foot transit buses operated on B20 compared to four on petroleum diesel.

Proc, K.; Barnitt, R.; Hayes, R. R.; Ratcliff, M.; McCormick, R. L.; Ha, L.; Fang, H. L.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Bay Area Transit Agencies Propel Fuel Cell Buses Toward Commercialization (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) demonstration of the next generation of fuel cells buses. Several transit agencies in the San Francisco Bay Area are participating in demonstrating the largest single fleet of fuel cell buses in the United States.

Not Available

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Natural Gas Buses: Separating Myth from Fact; Autobuses Urbanos de Gas Natural: Separemos el Mito de la Realidad  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using a myth vs. fact format, this fact sheet addresses common public misconceptions about compressed natural gas buses.

LaRocque, T.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Kansas City Buses Provide a Clean Ride for Kids | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kansas City Buses Provide a Clean Ride for Kids Kansas City Buses Provide a Clean Ride for Kids Kansas City Buses Provide a Clean Ride for Kids March 18, 2011 - 2:25pm Addthis Kansas City Buses Provide a Clean Ride for Kids Dennis A. Smith Director, National Clean Cities What does this project do? Creates infrastructure such as fueling stations to support compressed natural gas vehicles. Saves the Kansas City, Kansas School District money Reduces pollution Educates students about natural gas technologies. On Wednesday March 16, the Kansas City, Kansas School District welcomed some newcomers to their community - 47 natural gas school buses deployed as part of the Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Vehicle Pilot Program, supported by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Kansas City's mayor, the school's director of transportation, and the Kansas City Clean

91

Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - La Spezia | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - La Spezia Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - La Spezia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Experiences from Ethanol Buses and Fuel Station Report - La Spezia Agency/Company /Organization: BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.best-europe.org/upload/BEST_documents/info_documents/Best%20report This report summarizes the introduction and utilization of E95 buses and E95 pumps in the region of La Spezia (Italy) within the framework of the BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport (BEST) project. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Avoid - Cut the need for travel Shift - Change to low-carbon modes Improve - Enhance infrastructure & policies

92

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Ethanol-Diesel Blends in Buses and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ethanol-Diesel Blends in Buses and Tractors Ethanol-Diesel Blends in Buses and Tractors Project Summary Full Title: Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emission Impacts of Ethanol-Diesel Blends in Urban Buses and Farming Tractors Project ID: 86 Principal Investigator: Michael Wang Brief Description: This project studied the full fuel-cycle energy and emissions effects of ethanol-diesel blends relative to those of petroleum diesel when used in urban transit buses and farming tractors. Keywords: Ethanol; diesel; emissions; well-to-wheels (WTW) Purpose Numerous studies have been conducted to evaluate the fuel-cycle energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission effects of ethanol-gasoline blends relative to those of gasoline for applications in spark- ignition engine vehicles. Those studies did not address the energy and emission effects of

93

Lightweight Buses With Electric Drive Improve Fuel Economy and Passenger Experience  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lightweight Buses With Electric Drive Improve Lightweight Buses With Electric Drive Improve Fuel Economy and Passenger Experience Background The standard, 40-foot diesel- powered transit bus is noisy, consumes a gallon of fuel for every three miles it travels, weighs 28,000 pounds, and contributes significantly to ur- ban air pollution. While hybrid electric buses do exist, they are very expensive, and typi- cally get just four miles to the gallon. Autokinetics and the Department of Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program saw sig- nificant room for improvement in hybrid electric buses-in terms of weight and noise reduction, better fuel economy, lower cost, and rider percep- tion-using lightweight body

94

Fuel Cell Vehicle World Survey 2003-Fuel Cells in Transit Buses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

range of heavy-duty diesel, compressed natural gas (CNG), and liquefied natural gas (LNG) transit buses. NABI, Inc., is a wholly owned subsidiary of NABI Rt., which was...

95

Alternative Fuel School Buses Earn High Marks: Reprint from Alternative Fuel News, Vol. 5, No. 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two-page article on school buses that run on alternative fuels including biodiesel and compressed natural gas. Reprinted from Alternative Fuel News, published by the Clean Cities Program of DOE.

Not Available

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

SunLine Transit Agency Hydrogen-Powered Transit Buses: Third Evaluation Report (Report and Appendices)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for a protoype fuel cell bus, a prototype hydrogen hybrid interal combustion engine bus, and five new compressed natural gas buses.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents progress in meeting the technological challenges of fuel cell propulsion for transportation based on current fuel cell transit bus demonstrations and plans for more fuel cell transit buses and hydrogen infrastructure.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.; Gikakis, C.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Emissions from Buses with DDC 6V92 Engines Using Synthetic Diesel Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Synthetic diesel fuel can be made from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent autoignition characteristics. Moreover, synthetic diesel fuels may also economically competitive with California diesel fuel if .roduced in large volumes. Previous engine laboratory and field tests using a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer indicate that synthetic diesel fuel made using the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process is a promising alternative fuel, because it can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and can reduce exhaust emissions substantially. The objective of this study was a preliminary assessment of the emissions from older model transit operated on Mossgas synthetic diesel fuel. The study compared emissions from transit buses operating on Federal no. 2 Diesel fuel, Mossgas synthetic diesel (MGSD), and a 50/50 blend of the two fuels. The buses were equipped with unmodified Detroit Diesel 6V92 2-stroke diesel engines. Six 40-foot buses were tested. Three of the buses had recently rebuilt engines and were equipped with an oxidation catalytic converter. Vehicle emissions measurements were performed using West Virginia University's unique transportable chassis dynamometer. The emissions were measured over the Central Business District (CBD) driving cycle. The buses performed well on both neat and blended MGSD fuel. Three buses without catalytic converters were tested. Compared to their emissions when operating on Federal no. 2 diesel fuel, these buses emitted an average of 5% lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and 20% lower particulate matter (PM) when operating on neat MGSD fuel. Catalyst equipped buses emitted an average of 8% lower NOx and 31% lower PM when operating on MGSD than when operating on Federal no. 2 diesel fuel.

Paul Norton; Keith Vertin; Nigel N. Clark; Donald W. Lyons; Mridul Gautam; Stephen Goguen; James Eberhardt

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

99

Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation. Advanced Technology Vehicles in Service: Diesel Hybrid Electric Buses (Fact Sheet).  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Web site and in print publications. Web site and in print publications. TESTING ADVANCED VEHICLES INDIANAPOLIS PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ◆ DIESEL HYBRID ELECTRIC BUSES Indianapolis Public Transportation DIESEL HYBRID ELECTRIC BUSES NREL/PIX 13504, 13505, 13583 THE INDIANAPOLIS PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION CORPORATION (INDYGO) provides transit service in the Indianapolis Metropolitan area, using 226 vehicles to serve 28 fixed and demand response routes. IndyGo vehicles

100

Inspection of compressed natural gas cylinders on school buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring compressed natural gas (CNF)-powered school bus demonstrations in various locations around the country. Early in 1994, two non-DOE-sponsored CNG pickup trucks equipped with composite-reinforced-aluminum fuel cylinders experienced cylinder ruptures during refueling. As reported by the Gas Research Institute (GRI): ...analysis of the cylinder ruptures on the pickup trucks revealed that they were due to acid-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the overwrap. The overwrap that GRI refers to is a resin-impregnated fiber that is wrapped around the outside of the gas cylinder for added strength. Because ensuring the safety of the CNG vehicles it sponsors is of paramount concern to DOE, the Department, through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), conducted inspections of DOE-sponsored vehicles nationwide. The work had three objectives: inspection, documentation, and education. First, inspectors visited sites where CNG-powered school buses sponsored by DOE are based, and inspected the CNG cylinders for damage. Second, information learned during the inspections was collected for DOE. Third, the inspections found that the education and awareness of site personnel, in terms of cylinder damage detection, needed to be increased.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buses final results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

FINAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR EXIDE TECHNOLOGIES ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLE BATTERY AND COMPONENT MANUFACTURING INITIATIVE APPLICATION, BRISTOL, TN, AND COLUMBUS, GA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2010 DOE/EA-1712 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR EXIDE TECHNOLOGIES ELECTRIC DRIVE VEHICLE BATTERY AND COMPONENT MANUFACTURING INITIATIVE APPLICATION, BRISTOL, TN, AND COLUMBUS, GA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory March 2010 DOE/EA-1712 iii COVER SHEET Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Title: Environmental Assessment for Exide Technologies Electric Drive Vehicle Battery and Component Manufacturing Initiative Application, Bristol, TN, and Columbus, GA

102

Microsoft Word - NUCLEUS - INL Busing-DAT 10-14-2010.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INL busing now becoming the DOE role model INL busing now becoming the DOE role model For energy savings and pollution reduction The following message to Integrated Transportation Services from R&D Support Services Director Debby Tate was sent to all her transportation employees last month. There has been a surprising and welcome change in attitude for why we have INL busing. I'd like to share it with you because of the role each of you has played in moving Bus Operations forward in exciting new directions for the future. INL was one of only eight institutions in the nation to win a 2010 GreenGov Presidential Award. The Laboratory received the Lean, Clean & Green Award for extraordinary improvements to fleet sustainability. Robert Gallegos (DOE-ID), Deborah Tate, Scott Wold (Integrated

103

Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2012 Leslie Eudy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Kevin Chandler Battelle Christina Gikakis Federal Transit Administration Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-56406 November 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2012 Leslie Eudy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Kevin Chandler Battelle Christina Gikakis Federal Transit Administration

104

Guidelines for Conversion of Diesel Buses to Compressed Natural Gas | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guidelines for Conversion of Diesel Buses to Compressed Natural Gas Guidelines for Conversion of Diesel Buses to Compressed Natural Gas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Guidelines for Conversion of Diesel Buses to Compressed Natural Gas Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Transportation Topics: Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.unescap.org/ttdw/Publications/TIS_pubs/pub_1361/pub_1361_fulltext. UN Region: Central Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, "Pacific" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

105

Microsoft Word - DTRS56-05-T-0003-Benchmark Results Report- Final...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pipeline & Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Pipeline Inspection Technologies Demonstration Report Pipeline Safety Research & Development Program Final 2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...

106

Vehicle Technologies Heavy Vehicle Program: FY 2007 Benefits Analysis, Methodology and Results - Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Benefits Analysis, 7 Benefits Analysis, Methodology and Results - Final Report ANL-08/06 Energy Systems Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 phone (865) 576-8401 fax (865) 576-5728 reports@adonis.osti.gov Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States

107

Vehicle Technologies Heavy Vehicle Program: FY 2008 Benefit Analysis, Methodology and Results - Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Benefits Analysis, 8 Benefits Analysis, Methodology and Results- Final Report ANL-08/07 Energy Systems Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available on paper to the U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, for a processing fee, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 phone (865) 576-8401 fax (865) 576-5728 reports@adonis.osti.gov Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States

108

Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, , Final for Vegetation Control at VHF Stations, Microwave Stations, Electrical Substations, and Pole Yards . Environmental Assessment Prepared for Southwestern Power Administration U.S. Department of Energy - _ . . . " Prepared by Black & Veatch October 13,1995 ' Table of Contents 1 . 0 Purpose and Need for Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 Description of the Alternatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1 Alternative 1 . No Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 Alternative 2 . Mechanical and Manual Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3 Alternative 3 . Proposed Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.1 Foliar Spray Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3.2 Soil-Spot Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

109

7X performance results - final report : ASCI Red vs Red Storm.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the 7X performance testing was to assure Sandia National Laboratories, Cray Inc., and the Department of Energy that Red Storm would achieve its performance requirements which were defined as a comparison between ASCI Red and Red Storm. Our approach was to identify one or more problems for each application in the 7X suite, run those problems at multiple processor sizes in the capability computing range, and compare the results between ASCI Red and Red Storm. The first part of this report describes the two computer systems, the applications in the 7X suite, the test problems, and the results of the performance tests on ASCI Red and Red Storm. During the course of the testing on Red Storm, we had the opportunity to run the test problems in both single-core mode and dual-core mode and the second part of this report describes those results. Finally, we reflect on lessons learned in undertaking a major head-to-head benchmark comparison.

Dinge, Dennis C. (Cray Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Davis, Michael E. (Cray Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Haskell, Karen H.; Ballance, Robert A.; Gardiner, Thomas Anthony; Stevenson, Joel O.; Noe, John P.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Sulfur, Chlorine, and Argon Abundances in Planetary Nebulae. III: Observations and Results for a Final Sample  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is the fourth in a series whose purpose is to study the interstellar abundances of sulfur, chlorine, and argon in the Galaxy using a sample of 86 planetary nebulae. Here we present new high-quality spectrophotometric observations of 20 Galactic planetary nebulae with spectral coverage from 3700-9600 Angstroms. A major feature of our observations throughout the entire study has been the inclusion of the near-infrared lines of [S III] 9069,9532, which allows us to calculate accurate S+2 abundances and to either improve upon or convincingly confirm results of earlier sulfur abundance studies. For each of the 20 objects here we calculate ratios of S/O, Cl/O, and Ar/O and find average values of S/O=1.1E-2+/-1.1E-2, Cl/O=4.2E-4+/-5.3E-4, and Ar/O=5.7E-3+/-4.3E-3. For six objects we are able to compare abundances of S+3 calculated directly from available [S IV] 10.5 micron measurements with those inferred indirectly from the values of the ionization correction factors for sulfur. In the final paper of the series, we will compile results from all 86 objects, search for and evaluate trends, and use chemical evolution models to interpret our results.

K. B. Kwitter; R. B. C. Henry; J. B. Milingo

2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

111

Vehicle technologies heavy vehicle program : FY 2008 benefits analysis, methodology and results --- final report.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the approach to estimating the benefits and analysis results for the Heavy Vehicle Technologies activities of the Vehicle Technologies (VT) Program of EERE. The scope of the effort includes: (1) Characterizing baseline and advanced technology vehicles for Class 3-6 and Class 7 and 8 trucks, (2) Identifying technology goals associated with the DOE EERE programs, (3) Estimating the market potential of technologies that improve fuel efficiency and/or use alternative fuels, and (4) Determining the petroleum and greenhouse gas emissions reductions associated with the advanced technologies. In FY 08 the Heavy Vehicles program continued its involvement with various sources of energy loss as compared to focusing more narrowly on engine efficiency and alternative fuels. These changes are the result of a planning effort that first occurred during FY 04 and was updated in the past year. (Ref. 1) This narrative describes characteristics of the heavy truck market as they relate to the analysis, a description of the analysis methodology (including a discussion of the models used to estimate market potential and benefits), and a presentation of the benefits estimated as a result of the adoption of the advanced technologies. The market penetrations are used as part of the EERE-wide integrated analysis to provide final benefit estimates reported in the FY08 Budget Request. The energy savings models are utilized by the VT program for internal project management purposes.

Singh, M.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

112

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Reports Increase in Durability and Reliability for Current Generation Fuel Cell Buses (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in evaluating the durability and reliability of fuel cell buses being demonstrated in transit service. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technology Validation team in the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Emission Testing of Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) Natural Gas and Diesel Transit Buses  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emission Testing of Washington Emission Testing of Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) Natural Gas and Diesel Transit Buses M. Melendez, J. Taylor, and J. Zuboy National Renewable Energy Laboratory W.S. Wayne West Virginia University D. Smith U.S. Department of Energy Technical Report NREL/TP-540-36355 December 2005 Emission Testing of Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) Natural Gas and Diesel Transit Buses M. Melendez, J. Taylor, and J. Zuboy National Renewable Energy Laboratory W.S. Wayne West Virginia University D. Smith U.S. Department of Energy Prepared under Task No. FC05-9000 Technical Report NREL/TP-540-36355 December 2005 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov

114

Double-contained receiver tank 244-TX, grab samples, 244TX-97-3 analytical results for the final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the final report for the double-contained receiver tank (DCRT) 244-TX grab samples. Three grabs samples were collected from riser 8 on May 29, 1997. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO). The analytical results are presented in a table.

Esch, R.A.

1997-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

115

Final Report - Independent Confirmatory Survey Summary and Results for the Hematite Decommissioning Project  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the confirmatory surveys were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the NRC in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the licensees procedures and survey results.

E.N. Bailey

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

116

Microsoft Word - RFLMA CR 2010-06 Monitoring Results at SW027 Final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Report of Steps Taken Regarding Monitoring Results at Surface Water Report of Steps Taken Regarding Monitoring Results at Surface Water Point of Evaluation (POE) SW027 and Contact Record 2010-06 This page intentionally left blank 1 of 16 Report of Steps Taken Regarding Monitoring Results at Surface Water Point of Evaluation (POE) SW027 August 31, 2010 Introduction Surface water location SW027 is the Rocky Flats Legacy Management Agreement (RFLMA) POE at the eastern (downstream) end of the South Interceptor Ditch (SID), upstream of Pond C-2. The plutonium-239/240 (Pu) concentration measured at SW027 in samples collected through April 27, 2010, indicated that the 12-month rolling average of data from this monitoring point for the full month of April 2010 would likely exceed the RFLMA surface water standard when the

117

Oscillating flow loss test results in Stirling engine heat exchangers. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The results are presented for a test program designed to generate a database of oscillating flow loss information that is applicable to Stirling engine heat exchangers. The tests were performed on heater/cooler tubes of various lengths and entrance/exit configurations, on stacked and sintered screen regenerators of various wire diameters and on Brunswick and Metex random fiber regenerators. The test results were performed over a range of oscillating flow parameters consistent with Stirling engine heat exchanger experience. The tests were performed on the Sunpower oscillating flow loss rig which is based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. In general, the results are presented by comparing the measured oscillating flow losses to the calculated flow losses. The calculated losses are based on the cycle integration of steady flow friction factors and entrance/exit loss coefficients.

Koester, G.; Howell, S.; Wood, G.; Miller, E.; Gedeon, D.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Monitoring to detect groundwater problems resulting from enhanced oil recovery. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report develops a four-stage monitoring program to detect groundwater contamination events that may potentially result from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects. The monitoring system design is based on a statistical analysis evolving from a series of equations that model subsurface transport of EOR spills. Results of the design include both spatial and frequency monitoring intervals that depend on properties of the local geology and dispersion characteristics of the potential contaminants. Sample results are provided for typical reservoir characteristics. The number of independent variables in the analysis dictate that EOR monitoring systems be designed on a site-specific basis. Sampling designs can be easily formulated to conform to the peculiarities of chosen EOR sites based on data already available from federal and state geological surveys and from oil company statistics.

Beck, R.; Aboba, B.; Miller, D.; Kaklins, I.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Conceptual design and systems analysis of photovoltaic systems. Volume II. Study results. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This investigation of terrestrial PV systems considered the technical and economic feasibility for systems in three size categories: a small system of about 12 kW peak output for on-site residential use; a large 1500 MW central power plant contributing to the bulk energy of a utility system power grid; and an intermediate size system of about 250 kW for use on public or commercial buildings. In each category, conceptual designs were developed, performance was analyzed for a range of climatic regions, economic analyses were performed, and assessments were made of pertinent institutional issues. The report consists of three volumes. Volume I contains a Study Summary of the major study results. This volume contains the detailed results pertaining to on-site residential photovoltaic systems, central power plant photovoltaic systems, and intermediate size systems applied to commercial and public buildings. Volume III contains supporting appendix material. (WHK)

Kirpich, A.

1977-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

120

Final results of double-shell tank 241-AY-102 ultrasonic inspection  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results and documentation of the nondestructive ultrasonic examination of tank 241-AY-102. A tank inspection supplier was retained to provide and use an ultrasonic examination system (equipment, procedures, and inspectors) to scan a limited area of double-shell tank 241-AY-102 primary tank wall and welds. The inspection found some indication of insignificant general and local wall thinning with no cracks detected.

JENSEN, C.E.

1999-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buses final results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Final results of double-shell tank 241-AZ-101 ultrasonic inspection  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results and documentation of the nondestructive ultrasonic examination of tank 241-AZ-101. A tank inspection supplier was retained to provide and use an ultrasonic examination system (equipment, procedures, and inspectors) to scan a limited area of double-shell tank 241-AZ-101 primary tank wall and welds. The inspection found one reportable indication of thinning and no reportable pitting, corrosion, or cracking.

JENSEN, C.E.

1999-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

122

Final results of double-shell tank 241-AN-106 ultrasonic inspection  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results and documentation of the nondestructive ultrasonic examination of tank 241-AN-106. A tank inspection supplier was retained to provide and use an ultrasonic examination system (equipment, procedures, and inspectors) to scan a limited area of double-shell tank 241-AN-106 primary tank wall and welds. The inspection found no reportable indications of thinning, pitting, corrosion, or cracking.

JENSEN, C.E.

1999-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

123

Procedures for evaluating health impacts resulting from development of energy resources. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This manual is a compilation of formats, protocols, and procedures that may be used by communities and state agencies to evaluate health impacts resulting from the development of energy resources. The manual also considers ways of using these evaluations to develop plans for coping with health impacts. It is an outgrowth of a study of health problems experienced by impacted communities in Colorado, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

FINAL REPORT FOR INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATORY SURVEY SUMMARY AND RESULTS FOR THE HEMATITE DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT, FESTUS, MISSOURI  

SciTech Connect

ORAU conducted confirmatory surveys of the Hematite site during the period of June 12 through June 13, 2012. The survey activities included in-process inspections, document review, walkover surveys, sampling activities, and laboratory analysis of split samples. WEC was forthcoming with information relating to practices, procedures, and surface scan results. Scans performed by the WEC technician were extremely thorough and methodical. The WEC and ORAU technicians identified the same areas of elevated activity with comparable detector responses. WEC sampling of re-use soils, waste soils, sediments, and groundwater were conducted under ORAU observation. The sampling efforts observed by ORAU were performed in accordance with site-specific procedures and in a manner sufficient to provide quality supporting data. Three observations were made during groundwater sampling activities. First, the water level indicator was re-used without submitting rinse blank. Second, bubbles created during tubing extraction could indicate the presence of volatilized organic compounds. Third, samplers did not use a photo ionization detector prior to sample collection to indicate the presence of volatile organic vapors. Results of split samples indicated a high level of comparability between the WEC and ORAU/ORISE radiological laboratories. Analytical practices and procedures appear to be sufficient in providing quality radiochemical data. All concentrations from the Soil Re-Use Area and sediment samples are below Uniform radionuclide-specific derived concentration guideline level (DCGL{sub W}) limits; thus, comparisons to the less conservative stratified geometry were not required. Results were compared to individual DCGLs and using the sum of fractions approach. Both composite soil samples collected from the Waste Handling Area (Bins 1 and 4) were well below the prescribed USEI waste acceptance criteria.

Bailey, Erika N.; Lee, Jason D.

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

125

Tank 241-S-102, Core 232 analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-S-102 push mode core segments collected between March 5, 1998 and April 2, 1998. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-S-102 Retained Gas Sampler System Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (McCain, 1998), Letter of Instruction for Compatibility Analysis of Samples from Tank 241-S-102 (LOI) (Thompson, 1998) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Mulkey and Miller, 1998). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1).

STEEN, F.H.

1998-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

126

B Plant canyon sample TK-21-1 analytical results for the final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the analytical laboratory report for the TK-21-1 sample collected from the B Plant Canyon on February 18, 1998. The sample was analyzed in accordance with the Sampling and Analysis Plan for B Plant Solutions (SAP) (Simmons, 1997) in support of the B Plant decommissioning project. Samples were analyzed to provide data both to describe the material which would remain in the tanks after the B Plant transition is complete and to determine Tank Farm compatibility. The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1).

Steen, F.H.

1998-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

127

Panel results of the solar thermal program research requirement assessment review. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the assessment were to identify: research needs by topic and activity, relative priority of research needs, options for performing needed research, potential performers, costs and duration of R and D activities, gaps and duplications within the R and D program, and activities underway that appear to be of low priority. To achieve these objectives, research programs of the Division of Solar Thermal Technologies within the Office of Renewable Energy and Conservation and the Materials and Advanced Energy Programs of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences were reviewed. Several recent assessments of solar thermal research needs made within the past two years by various groups were also reviewed, and the key research issues and needs were extracted. The primary results from the assessment are a set of prioritized activities to meet the most important research needs for solar thermal technologies. These activities belong to four disciplines: materials science, thermal science, thermochemistry, and engineering. Further, priorities associated with the needs for research result from the various activities allow the recommended activities to be grouped into two categories; a core group which should be at the heart of any future program developed by the department, and a set of important needs that should, at least, find their way into a program at some time during its existence. The recommended research program is outlined, and the complete set of ranked research needs is listed.

None

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Tank 241-TX-118, core 236 analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-TX-118 push mode core segments collected between April 1, 1998 and April 13, 1998. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-TX-118 Push Mode Core sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Benar, 1997), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995), the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO) (Turner, et al, 1995) and the Historical Model Evaluation Data Requirements (Historical DQO) (Sipson, et al., 1995). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Benar, 1997). One sample exceeded the Total Alpha Activity (AT) analysis notification limit of 38.4{micro}Ci/g (based on a bulk density of 1.6), core 236 segment 1 lower half solids (S98T001524). Appropriate notifications were made. Plutonium 239/240 analysis was requested as a secondary analysis. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and are not considered in this report.

ESCH, R.A.

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

129

Control of hydrogen sulfide emission from geothermal power plants. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program of laboratory and pilot plant tests, detailed process and project engineering work, and process engineering and economic evaluation studies has been carried out in support of the design of a test facility for demonstration of the copper sulfate process for the removal of hydrogen sulfide from geothermal steam at turbine upstream conditions. A demonstration plant has been designed which is capable of removing 99% of the H/sub 2/S, 90% of the NH/sub 3/, and significant amounts of H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ and particulates from 100,000 lb/hr of geothermal steam of The Geysers composition. Criteria for the mechanical and process design of the scrubber have been confirmed in field tests of fifty hours duration on an eight-inch diameter scrubber at PG and E's Unit No. 7, The Geysers. The background of the problem and the technical approach to its solution, the scope and results of the first-phase laboratory testing, the scope and results of the experimental and analytical studies carried out in the second phase, and a description of the configuration of the demonstration plant and the test plan for its operation are summarized. (MHR)

Brown, F.C.; Harvey, W.W.; Warren, R.B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Tank 241-T-203, core 190 analytical results for the final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-T-203 push mode core segments collected on April 17, 1997 and April 18, 1997. The segments were subsainpled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-T-203 Push Mode Core Sampling andanalysis Plan (TSAP) (Schreiber, 1997a), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO)(Dukelow, et al., 1995) and Leffer oflnstructionfor Core Sample Analysis of Tanks 241-T-201, 241-T-202, 241-T-203, and 241-T-204 (LOI)(Hall, 1997). The analytical results are included in the data summary report (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Total Alpha Activity (AT) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Schreiber, 1997a). The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997b) and not considered in this report.

Steen, F.H.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

131

Treaty verification sample analysis program analytical results: UNSCOM 65 samples. Final report, December 1993-January 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nineteen samples from the United Nations Special Commission 65 on Iraq (UNSCOM 65) were analyzed for chemical warfare (CW) related compounds using a variety of highly sophisticated spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques. The samples consisted of six water, six soil, two vegetation, one cloth, one wood, and two mortar shell crosscut sections. No sulfur or nitrogen mustards, Lewsite, or any of their degradation products were detected. No nerve agents were observed, and no tin was detected precluding the presence of stannic chloride, a component of NC, a World War I choking agent. Diethyl phosphoric acid was unambiguously identified in three water samples, and ethyl phosphoric acid was tentatively identified, at very low levels, in one water sample. These phosphoric acids are degradation products of Amiton, many commercially available pesticides, as well as Tabun, and impurities in munitions-grade Tabun. No definitive conclusions concerning the source of these two chemicals could be drawn from the analytical results.

Szafraniec, L.L.; Beaudry, W.T.; Bossle, P.C.; Durst, H.D.; Ellzy, M.W.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

RE-1000 free-piston Stirling engine sensitivity test results. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NASA Lewis Research Center has been testing a 1 kW (1.33 hp) free-piston Stirling engine at the NASA Lewis test facilities. The tests performed over the past several years have been on a single cylinder machine known as the RE-1000. The data recorded were to aid in the investigation of the dynamics and thermodynamics of the free-piston Stirling engine. The data are intended to be used primarily for computer code validation. NASA reports TM-82999, TM-83407, and TM-87126 give initial results of the engine tests. The tests were designed to investigate the sensitivity of the engine performance to variations on the mean pressure of the working space, the working fluid used, heater and cooler temperatures, regenerator porosity, power piston mass and displacer dynamics. These tests have now been completed at NASA Lewis. This report presents some of the detailed data collected in the sensitivity tests. In all, 781 data points were recorded. A complete description of the engine and test facility is given. Many of the data can be found in tabular form, while a microfiche containing all of the data points can be requested from NASA Lewis.

Schreiber, J.G.; Geng, S.M.; Lorenz, G.V.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Devon Station repowering study: Volume 1, Summary and results: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report presents the results of a site specific conceptual design and economic evaluation of a combined cycle repowering scheme for four nonreheat steam turbines. The first and major objective of the study from EPRI's perspective was to document the methodology of the study so that other utilities that may be planning similar studies in the future may benefit from knowledge developed in this study. The second objective was to select a repowering scheme and develop a site specific conceptual engineering design and associated budget capital and operating estimates. The third objective was to evaluate the feasibility of repowering the plant in stages. The fourth objective was to evaluate the economics of the repowering scheme as an alternative to other generating options. To meet the first objective, the study's team set up a screening approach to identify and evaluate all possible alternatives for repowering the four steam turbines and select the scheme for detailed engineering. To meet the second and third objectives, the project team prepared conceptual level capital cost estimates for both a complete dismantlement and reconstruction project. To meet the fourth objective, NUSCO evaluated the repowered plant against other generating options using a levelized bus bar analysis. In addition, NUSCO compared the repowered plant with a pulverized coal steam plant on a year-by-year basis over the forty year life of the plant. 24 tabs.

Rorstrom, E.G.; Pishko, D.A.; Athas, J.G.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Automatic lighting controls demonstration: Long-term results. Final report, July 1991  

SciTech Connect

An advanced electronically ballasted lighting control system was installed in a portion of an office building to measure the energy and demand savings. The lighting control system used an integrated lighting control scenario that included daylight following, lumen depreciation correction, and scheduling. The system reduced lighting energy on weekdays by 62% and 51% in the north and south daylit zones, respectively, compared to a reference zone that did not have controls. During the summer, over 75% energy savings were achieved on weekdays in the north daylit zone. Even in the south interior zone, which benefitted lime from daylight, correction strategies and adjustment of the aisleway lights to a low level resulted in energy use of only half that of the reference zone. Although, in general, the savings varied over the year due to changing daylight conditions, the energy reduction achieved with controls could be fit using a simple analytical model. Significant savings also occurred during core operating hours when it is more expensive to supply and use energy. Compared to the usage in the reference zone, energy reductions of 49%, 44%, and 62% were measured in the south daylight, south interior, and north daylight zones, respectively, during core operating hours throughout the year. Lighting energy usage on weekends decreased dramatically in the zones with controls, with the usage in the north daylit zone only 10% that of the reference zone. A simple survey developed to assess occupant response to the lighting control system showed that the occupants were satisfied with the light levels provided.

Rubinstein, F. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

135

Hypofractionated Versus Conventionally Fractionated Radiotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: Final Results of Phase III Randomized Trial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the long-term efficacy and toxicity of a hypofractionated (55 Gy in 20 fractions within 4 weeks) vs. a conventionally fractionated (64 Gy in 32 fractions within 6.5 weeks) dose schedule for radiotherapy (RT) for localized carcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: A total of 217 patients were randomized to either the hypofractionated (n = 108) or the conventional (n = 109) dose schedule. Most patients (n = 156) underwent RT planning and RT using a two-dimensional computed tomography method. Efficacy using the clinical, radiologic, and prostate-specific antigen data in each patient was evaluated before RT and at predetermined intervals after RT until death. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity using the modified Late Effect in Normal Tissue - Subjective Objective Management Analytic (LENT-SOMA) scales was also evaluated before and at intervals after RT to 60 months. Results: The whole group has now been followed for a median of 90 months (range, 3-138). Of the 217 patients, 85 developed biochemical relapse (nadir prostate-specific antigen level + 2 {mu}g/L), 36 in the hypofractionated and 49 in the conventional group. The biochemical relapse-free, but not overall, survival at 90 months was significantly better with the hypofractionated (53%) than with the conventional (34%) schedule. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity persisted 60 months after RT and did not differ between the two dose schedules. Multivariate analyses revealed that the conventional schedule was of independent prognostic significance, not only for biochemical failure, but also for an increased risk of worse genitourinary symptoms at 4 years. Conclusions: A therapeutic advantage of the hypofractionated compared with the conventional dose schedule for RT of prostate cancer was evident at 90 months in the present study.

Yeoh, Eric E., E-mail: eric.yeoh@health.sa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Botten, Rochelle J.; Butters, Julie; Di Matteo, Addolorata C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Holloway, Richard H. [Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide (Australia); Fowler, Jack [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Medical School, Madison, WI (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Final results of Borexino Phase-I on low energy solar neutrino spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Borexino has been running since May 2007 at the LNGS with the primary goal of detecting solar neutrinos. The detector, a large, unsegmented liquid scintillator calorimeter characterized by unprecedented low levels of intrinsic radioactivity, is optimized for the study of the lower energy part of the spectrum. During the Phase-I (2007-2010) Borexino first detected and then precisely measured the flux of the 7Be solar neutrinos, ruled out any significant day-night asymmetry of their interaction rate, made the first direct observation of the pep neutrinos, and set the tightest upper limit on the flux of CNO neutrinos. In this paper we discuss the signal signature and provide a comprehensive description of the backgrounds, quantify their event rates, describe the methods for their identification, selection or subtraction, and describe data analysis. Key features are an extensive in situ calibration program using radioactive sources, the detailed modeling of the detector response, the ability to define an innermost fiducial volume with extremely low background via software cuts, and the excellent pulse-shape discrimination capability of the scintillator that allows particle identification. We report a measurement of the annual modulation of the 7 Be neutrino interaction rate. The period, the amplitude, and the phase of the observed modulation are consistent with the solar origin of these events, and the absence of their annual modulation is rejected with higher than 99% C.L. The physics implications of phase-I results in the context of the neutrino oscillation physics and solar models are presented.

Borexino Collaboration; G. Bellini; J. Benziger; D. Bick; G. Bonfini; D. Bravo; M. B. Avanzini; B. Caccianiga; L. Cadonati; F. Calaprice; P. Cavalcante; A. Chavarria; A. Chepurnov; D. D'Angelo; S. Davini; A. Derbin; A. Empl; A. Etenko; K. Fomenko; D. Franco; C. Galbiati; S. Gazzana; C. Ghiano; M. Giammarchi; M. Goeger-Neff; A. Goretti; L. Grandi; C. Hagner; E. Hungerford; Aldo Ianni; Andrea Ianni; V. Kobychev; D. Korablev; G. Korga; D. Kryn; M. Laubenstein; T. Lewke; E. Litvinovich; B. Loer; F. Lombardi; P. Lombardi; L. Ludhova; G. Lukyanchenko; I. Machulin; S. Manecki; W. Maneschg; G. Manuzio; Q. Meindl; E. Meroni; L. Miramonti; M. Misiaszek; P. Mosteiro; V. Muratova; L. Oberauer; M. Obolensky; F. Ortica; K. Otis; M. Pallavicini; L. Papp; C. Pena-Garay; L. Perasso; S. Perasso; A. Pocar; G. Ranucci; A. Razeto; A. Re; A. Romani; N. Rossi; R. Saldanha; C. Salvo; S. Schoenert; H. Simgen; M. Skorokhvatov; O. Smirnov; A. Sotnikov; S. Sukhotin; Y. Suvorov; R. Tartaglia; G. Testera; D. Vignaud; R. B. Vogelaar; F. von Feilitzsch; J. Winter; M. Wojcik; A. Wright; M. Wurm; J. Xu; O. Zaimidoroga; S. Zavatarelli; G. Zuzel

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

137

Final test results for the Schott HCE on a LS-2 collector.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has completed thermal performance testing on the Schott parabolic trough receiver using the LS-2 collector on the Sandia rotating platform at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, NM. This testing was funded as part of the US DOE Sun-Lab USA-Trough program. The receiver tested was a new Schott receiver, known as Heat Collector Elements (HCEs). Schott is a new manufacturer of trough HCEs. The Schott HCEs are 4m long; therefore, two were joined and mounted on the LS-2 collector module for the test. The Schott HCE design consists of a 70mm diameter high solar absorptance coated stainless steel (SS) tube encapsulated within a 125mm diameter Pyrex{reg_sign} glass tube with vacuum in the annulus formed between the SS and glass tube to minimize convection heat losses. The Schott HCE design is unique in two regards. First, the bellows used to compensate for the difference in thermal expansion between the metal and glass tube are inside the glass envelope rather than outside. Second, the composition of materials at the glass-to-metal seal has very similar thermal expansion coefficients making the joint less prone to breakage from thermal shock. Sandia National Laboratories provided both the azimuth and elevation collector module tracking systems used during the tests. The test results showed the efficiency of the Schott HCE to be very similar to current HCEs being manufactured by Solel. This testing provided performance verification for the use of Schott tubes with Solargenix trough collector assemblies at currently planned trough power plant projects in Arizona and Nevada.

Moss, Timothy A.; Brosseau, Douglas A.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Final report : results of the 2007 targeted investigation at Hilton, Kansas.  

SciTech Connect

The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility in Hilton, Kansas, in 1954-1965. In 1992, carbon tetrachloride was first identified, at a concentration of 910 {micro}g/L, in groundwater from well GW01 at Hilton. This discovery occurred in association with the sale of the private grain storage facility on which well GW01 is located to the current owner, the Mid-Kansas Cooperative Association. The Kansas Department of Health and Environment conducted investigations at Hilton in 1992-1994. In 1996-1997, Argonne National Laboratory conducted Phase I and Phase II investigations on behalf of the CCC/USDA to characterize the distribution of the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in well GW01, the stratigraphic units potentially hosting contaminant migration, and local hydrogeology in the Hilton area. The 2007 targeted investigation reported here focused specifically on the former CCC/USDA property at Hilton, west of the railroad tracks. (Until a property record search in 2005, the location of the CCC/USDA's former facility at Hilton was not known with certainty.) The objectives of the investigation, as implemented, were to (1) investigate for carbon tetrachloride contamination in the shallower soil and shallow aquifer units below the former CCC/USDA property and (2) investigate groundwater flow patterns. The key results of the 2007 targeted investigation are as follows: (1) No carbon tetrachloride or chloroform contamination was found in soil or groundwater below the former CCC/USDA facility. (2) The 2007 groundwater level data support a southwesterly direction for groundwater flow in the main Hilton aquifer (Equus Beds), consistent with findings of previous investigations. Contaminated well GW01 was confirmed to be upgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility. (3) The contaminants carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, and 1,2-dibromoethane (ethylene dibromide) were found in groundwater only at well GW01. No evidence of contamination was found in other monitoring wells and piezometers. This pattern is consistent with findings of previous investigations. The findings of the 2007 targeted investigation clearly demonstrate that the former CCC/USDA facility at Hilton was not the source of the carbon tetrachloride contamination persistently detected in well GW01. Well GW01 is approximately 300 ft upgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility. This well is the only sampling location at Hilton where carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater has ever been identified. The CCC/USDA never operated grain storage facilities on the property on which well GW01 is located.

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

139

In-Use Performance Comparison of Hybrid Electric, CNG, and Diesel Buses at New York City Transit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) evaluated the performance of diesel, compressed natural gas (CNG), and hybrid electric (equipped with BAE Systems? HybriDrive propulsion system) transit buses at New York City Transit (NYCT). CNG, Gen I and Gen II hybrid electric propulsion systems were compared on fuel economy, maintenance and operating costs per mile, and reliability.

Barnitt, R. A.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Further Results on Forecasting and Model Selection Under Asymmetric Loss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: We make three related contributions. First, we propose a new technique for solving prediction problems under asymmetric loss using piecewise-linear approximations to the loss function, and we establish existence and uniqueness of the optimal predictor. Second, we provide a detailed application to optimal prediction of a conditionally heteroskedastic process under asymmetric loss, the insights gained from which are broadly applicable. Finally, we incorporate our results into a general framework for recursive prediction-based model selection under the relevant loss function. Acknowledgements: Helpful discussion was provided by Adolf Buse, Hashem Pesaran, Dale Poirrier, Enrique Sentana, Jim Stock, Ken Wallis, participants at meetings of the Econometric Society World Congress, the NBER/NSF Forecasting Seminar, the UCSD Conference on Multivariate Financial Econometrics, and numerous university seminars. All remaining inadequacies are ours alone. We thank the National Science Foundation, t...

Peter F. Christoffersen; Francis X. Diebold

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buses final results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Natural gas buses: Separating myth from fact (Clean Cities alternative fuel information series fact sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increasing numbers of transit agencies across North America are making the choice to convert their bus fleets to compressed natural gas (CNG), and even more are seriously considering it. Natural gas buses now account for at least 20{percent} of all new bus orders. However, it becomes difficult for fleet operators to fairly evaluate the potential benefits of an alternative fuel program if they are confronted with misinformation or poor comparisons based on false assumptions. This fact sheet addresses some of the most common misconceptions that seem to work their way into anecdotal stories, media reports, and even some poorly researched white papers and feasibility studies. It is an expanded version of information that was presented on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy at the South Coast Air Basin Alternative Fuel and Electric Transit Bus Workshop in Diamond Bar, California, on March 15, 2000.

Parish, R.

2000-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

142

FreedomCAR and vehicle technologies heavy vehicle program FY 2006. Benefits analysis : methodology and results - final report.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the approach to estimating benefits and the analysis results for the Heavy Vehicle Technologies activities of the Freedom Car and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) Program of EERE. The scope of the effort includes: (1) Characterizing baseline and advanced technology vehicles for Class 3-6 and Class 7 and 8 trucks, (2) Identification of technology goals associated with the DOE EERE programs, (3) Estimating the market potential of technologies that improve fuel efficiency and/or use alternative fuels, (4) Determining the petroleum and greenhouse gas emissions reductions associated with the advanced technologies. In FY 05 the Heavy Vehicles program activity expanded its technical involvement to more broadly address various sources of energy loss as compared to focusing more narrowly on engine efficiency and alternative fuels. This broadening of focus has continued in the activities planned for FY 06. These changes are the result of a planning effort that occurred during FY 04 and 05. (Ref. 1) This narrative describes characteristics of the heavy truck market as they relate to the analysis, a description of the analysis methodology (including a discussion of the models used to estimate market potential and benefits), and a presentation of the benefits estimated as a result of the adoption of the advanced technologies. These benefits estimates, along with market penetrations and other results, are then modeled as part of the EERE-wide integrated analysis to provide final benefit estimates reported in the FY06 Budget Request.

Singh, M.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering, Inc.

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Freedom car and vehicle technologies heavy vehicle program : FY 2007 benefits analysis, methodology and results -- final report.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the approach to estimating the benefits and analysis results for the Heavy Vehicle Technologies activities of the FreedomCar and Vehicle Technologies (FCVT) Program of EERE. The scope of the effort includes: (1) Characterizing baseline and advanced technology vehicles for Class 3-6 and Class 7 and 8 trucks, (2) Identifying technology goals associated with the DOE EERE programs, (3) Estimating the market potential of technologies that improve fuel efficiency and/or use alternative fuels, (4) Determining the petroleum and greenhouse gas emissions reductions associated with the advanced technologies. In FY 05 the Heavy Vehicles program activity expanded its technical involvement to more broadly address various sources of energy loss as compared to focusing more narrowly on engine efficiency and alternative fuels. This broadening of focus has continued in subsequent activities. These changes are the result of a planning effort that occurred during FY 04 and 05. (Ref. 1) This narrative describes characteristics of the heavy truck market as they relate to the analysis, a description of the analysis methodology (including a discussion of the models used to estimate market potential and benefits), and a presentation of the benefits estimated as a result of the adoption of the advanced technologies. The market penetrations are used as part of the EERE-wide integrated analysis to provide final benefit estimates reported in the FY07 Budget Request. The energy savings models are utilized by the FCVT program for internal project management purposes.

SIngh, M.; Energy Systems; TA Engineering

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

144

Environmental Life-cycle Assessment of Passenger Transportation: A Detailed Methodology for Energy, Greenhouse Gas and Criteria Pollutant Inventories of Automobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005. [FTA 2006] U.S. Non-Rail Vehicle Market ViabilityWelding BARTs Aluminum Rail Transit Cars, Welding JournalAutomobiles, Buses, Light Rail, Heavy Rail and Air Mikhail

Chester, Mikhail; Horvath, Arpad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen and Compressed Natural Gas (H/CNG) Blend Transit Buses: October 15, 2002--September 30, 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report covers literature and laboratory analyses to identify modification requirements of a Cummins Westport B Gas Plus engine for transit buses using a hydrogen/compressed natural fuel blend.

Del Toro, A.; Frailey, M.; Lynch, F.; Munshi, S.; Wayne, S.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Environmental, health, and safety issues of fuel cells in transportation. Volume 1: Phosphoric acid fuel-cell buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Phosphoric Acid Fuel-Cell (PAFC) Bus Program to demonstrate the feasibility of fuel cells in heavy-duty transportation systems. As part of this program, PAFC- powered buses are being built to meet transit industry design and performance standards. Test-bed bus-1 (TBB-1) was designed in 1993 and integrated in March 1994. TBB-2 and TBB-3 are under construction and should be integrated in early 1995. In 1987 Phase I of the program began with the development and testing of two conceptual system designs- liquid- and air-cooled systems. The liquid-cooled PAFC system was chosen to continue, through a competitive award, into Phase H, beginning in 1991. Three hybrid buses, which combine fuel-cell and battery technologies, were designed during Phase III. After completing Phase II, DOE plans a comprehensive performance testing program (Phase HI) to verify that the buses meet stringent transit industry requirements. The Phase III study will evaluate the PAFC bus and compare it to a conventional diesel bus. This NREL study assesses the environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues that may affect the commercialization of the PAFC bus. Because safety is a critical factor for consumer acceptance of new transportation-based technologies the study focuses on these issues. The study examines health and safety together because they are integrally related. In addition, this report briefly discusses two environmental issues that are of concern to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first issue involves a surge battery used by the PAFC bus that contains hazardous constituents. The second issue concerns the regulated air emissions produced during operation of the PAFC bus.

Ring, S.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

FORMAL APPEAL AGAINST ASSESSMENT You may appeal the mark awarded for an assessment task or final result for a unit if you have evidence that  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or final result for a unit if you have evidence that the mark or grade you received is unfair or incorrect. Assessment method differs from the description in the unit outline A copy of the unit outline A copy in the published unit outline b. Assessment criteria used to evaluate the work differs from the agreed assessment

148

Technical evaluation report on the 120 Vac vital instrument buses and inverter Technical Specifications Issue B71  

SciTech Connect

The operation of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) with one of its 120 Vac vital buses energized in an off-normal mode was analyzed. A Probabilistic Risk Assessment was made to determine the increment of risk by energizing a vital bus from an off-site source directly vs energizing it from its normal, uninterruptible source (i.e., a battery/inverter arrangement). The calculations were made based on uninterruptible source energized vital buses as the normal mode. The analysis indicated that a reduction in the incremental risk increase (caused by plant operation with a vital bus being energized in an off-normal mode) can be accomplished by limiting the time permitted in that condition. Currently, the time that a vital bus can be energized in the off-normal mode is not universally time-limited by plant Technical Specifications. Several alternatives for the reduction in incremental risk were examined and their value/impacts were derived. These data indicate that a recommendation be made for a Technical Specification time limitation of 72 hours per year for off-normal energizing a vital bus during operation of a PWR.

St. Leger-Barter, G.; White, R.L.

1982-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

149

The results of the PEP`93 intercomparison of reference cell calibrations and newer technology performance measurements: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an international intercomparison of photovoltaic (PV) performance measurements and calibrations that took place from 1993 to 1997. The intercomparison, which was organized and operated by a group of representatives from national PV measurements laboratories, was accomplished by circulating two sample sets. One set, consisting of 20 silicon reference cells, was intended to form the basis of an international PV reference scale. A qualification procedure applied to the calibration results gave average calibration numbers with an overall standard deviation of less than 2% for the entire set. The second sample set was assembled from a wide range of newer technologies that present unique problems for PV measurements. As might be expected, these results showed much greater differences among the laboratories. Methods were then identified that should be used to measure such devices, along with problems to avoid. The report concludes with recommendations for future intercomparisons.

Osterwald, C.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Anevsky, S. [All-Union Research Inst. for Optophysical Measurements, Moscow (Russian Federation); Barua, A.K. [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Calcutta (India)] [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

OECD/NEA Agesta Decontamination Project. Phase 1, final report. Volume 1. Project description and overview of results  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Agesta Decontamination Project, which has been organized by the Nuclear Energy Agency, Paris, is to utilize the four primary loops of the Agesta reactor to demonstrate decontamination methods for PWR primary systems. The first phase of the project consisted of laboratory scale tests. The test programme consisted of decontamination tests on steam generator tubing and other active material from Agesta and number of operating reactors as well as material compatibility tests on standardized samples of a representative selection of modern PWR primary system materials. The results show that all six processes in general met the acceptance criteria both regarding decontamination and corrosion. The decontamination results with the hard chemistries were rather uneven. 4 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Determination of Fishery Losses in the Flathead System Resulting from the Construction of Hungry Horse Dam, 1986 Final Completion Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study is part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's residential fish and wildlife plan, which is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife resources caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River basin. The major goal of this study was to provide estimates of fishery losses to the Flathead system as a result of the completion of Hungry Horse Dam and to propose mitigation alternatives for enhancing the fishery. Construction of Hungry Horse Dam had the greatest adverse impacts on cutthroat and full trout from Flathead Lake and mitigative measures should be taken to offset these losses, if biologically and economically feasible. Also, other losses to fish and wildlife have been documented in the Flathead basin due to hydroelectric facilities and their operation. Some of these research projects will not be completed until 1989, when mitigation will be recommended using a basin-wide approach. Since HHR is at the headwaters of the Columbia system, mitigative measures may also affect downstream projects. Therefore, we presented an array of possible mitigation alternatives for consideration by decision-makers, with suggestions on the ones we feel are the most cost effective. Possible mitigation measures are included.

Zubik, Raymond J.; Fraley, John

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Final Results from the High-Current, High-Action Closing Switch Test Program at Sandia National Laboratories  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We tested a variety of high-current closing switches for lifetime and reliability on a dedicated 2 MJ, 500 kA capacitor bank facility at Sandia National Laboratories. Our interest was a switch capable of one shot every few minutes, switching a critically damped, DC-charged 6.2 mF bank at 24 kV, with a peak current of 500 kA. The desired lifetime is 24 thousand shots. Typical of high-energy systems, particularly multi-module systems, the primary parameters of interest related to the switch are: (1) reliability, meaning absence of both pre-fires and no-fires, (2) total switch lifetime or number of shots between maintenance, and (3) cost. Cost was given lower priority at this evaluation stage because there are great uncertainties in estimating higher-quantity prices of these devices, most of which have been supplied before in only small quantities. The categories of switches tested are vacuum discharge, high-pressure discharge, and solid-state. Each group varies in terms of triggering ease, ease of maintenance, and tolerance to faults such as excess current and current reversal. We tested at least two variations of each technology group. The total number of shots on the switch test facility is about 50 thousand. We will present the results from the switch testing. The observed lifetime of different switches varied greatly: the shortest life was one shot; one device was still operating after six thousand shots. On several switches we measured the voltage drop during conduction and calculated energy dissipated in the switch; we will show these data also.

Savage, M.E.

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

153

Tank 241-AP-106, Grab samples, 6AP-98-1, 6AP-98-2 and 6AP-98-3 Analytical results for the final report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report for tank 241-AP-106 grab samples. Three grab samples 6AP-98-1, 6AP-98-2 and 6AP-98-3 were taken from riser 1 of tank 241-AP-106 on May 28, 1998 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on May 28, 1998. Analyses were performed in accordance with the ''Compatability Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan'' (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1998) and the ''Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatability Program (DQO). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report. No notification limits were exceeded. The request for sample analysis received for AP-106 indicated that the samples were polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) suspects. The results of this analysis indicated that no PCBs were present at the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) regulated limit of 50 ppm. The results and raw data for the PCB analysis are included in this document.

FULLER, R.K.

1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

154

biogas to indian buses come home, dad biosensor lab in singapore sexy statistics world university No reason to rush homeLiU alumna Klara Tiitso enjoys her life in London | page 30  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biogas to indian buses come home, dad biosensor lab in singapore sexy statistics world university an Indian Master's student whose studies at Linköping inspired him to use biogas as fuel for busses. He

Zhao, Yuxiao

155

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Reports Increase in Durability and Reliability for Current Generation Fuel Cell Buses (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

869 * November 2010 869 * November 2010 National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Reports Increase in Durability and Reliability for Current Generation Fuel Cell Buses NREL Team: Hydrogen Technology Validation, Leslie Eudy Accomplishment: NREL recently reported an increase in durability and reliability for fuel cell systems demonstrated in transit service (first reported in July 2010). Context: The transit industry provides an excellent test-bed for developing and optimizing advanced transportation technologies, such as fuel cells. In coordination with the Federal Transit Administration, the Department of Energy (DOE) funds the evaluation of fuel cell buses (FCBs) in real-world service. Under this funding, NREL has collected and analyzed data on nine early generation FCBs operated by four transit agencies in the United States.

156

Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen and Compressed Natural Gas (H/CNG) Blend Transit Buses: October 15, 2002-September 30, 2004  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Development and Demonstration Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen and Compressed Natural Gas (H/CNG) Blend Transit Buses October 15, 2002 - September 30, 2004 A. Del Toro SunLine Services Group Thousand Palms, California M. Frailey National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado F. Lynch Hydrogen Components Inc. Littleton, Colorado S. Munshi Westport Innovations Inc. Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada S. Wayne West Virginia University Morgantown, West Virginia Technical Report NREL/TP-540-38707 November 2005 Development and Demonstration of Hydrogen and Compressed Natural Gas (H/CNG) Blend Transit Buses October 15, 2002 - September 30, 2004 A. Del Toro SunLine Services Group Thousand Palms, California M. Frailey National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado

157

Mixed strategies for energy conservation and alternative energy utilization (solar) in buildings. Final report. Volume II. Detailed results. [New York, Atlanta, Omaha, and Albuquerque  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The mixed-strategy analysis was a tradeoff analysis between energy-conservation methods and an alternative energy source (solar) considering technical and economic benefits. The objective of the analysis was to develop guidelines for: reducing energy requirements; reducing conventional fuel use; and identifying economic alternatives for building owners. The analysis was done with a solar system in place. This makes the study unique in that it is determining the interaction of energy conservation with a solar system. The study, therefore, established guidelines as to how to minimize capital investment while reducing the conventional fuel consumption through either a larger solar system or an energy-conserving technique. To focus the scope of energy-conservation techniques and alternative energy sources considered, five building types (house, apartment buildings, commercial buildings, schools, and office buildings) were selected. Finally, the lists of energy-conservation techniques and alternative energy sources were reduced to lists of manageable size by using technical attributes to select the best candidates for further study. The resultant energy-conservation techniques were described in detail and installed costs determined. The alternative energy source reduced to solar. Building construction characteristics were defined for each building for each of four geographic regions of the country. A mixed strategy consisting of an energy-conservation technique and solar heating/hot water/cooling system was analyzed, using computer simulation to determine the interaction between energy conservation and the solar system. Finally, using FEA fuel-price scenarios and installed costs for the solar system and energy conservation techniques, an economic analysis was performed to determine the cost effectiveness of the combination. (MCW)

None

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Behavioral Response to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Refueling: Results of California Drive Clinics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the public willing to pay for hydrogen buses? A comparativeon the attitude towards hydrogen fuel cell buses in the CUTEInternational Journal of Hydrogen Energy 2007; 32: 4295- 4.

Martin, Elliot W; Shaheen, Susan A; Lipman, T E; Lidicker, Jeffrey

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides results from fuel cell bus evaluations at Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District, SunLine Transit Agency, and Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.; Gikakis, C.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Fuel Cell Buses in U.S. Transit Fleets: Current Status 2012  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the sixth in an annual series of reports that summarize the progress of fuel cell electric bus (FCEB) development in the United States and discuss the achievements and challenges of introducing fuel cell propulsion in transit. The report also provides a snapshot of current FCEB performance results over the last year. There are 25 active FCEBs in demonstrations this year at eight locations.

Eudy, L.; Chander, K.; Gikakis, C.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buses final results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Diesel and CNG Transit Bus Emissions Characterization By Two Chassis Dynamometer Laboratories: Results and Issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emissions of six 32 passenger transit buses were characterized using one of the West Virginia University (WVU) Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratories, and the fixed base chassis dynamometer at the Colorado Institute for Fuels and High Altitude Engine Research (CIFHAER). Three of the buses were powered with 1997 ISB 5.9 liter Cummins diesel engines, and three were powered with the 1997 5.9 liter Cummins natural gas (NG) counterpart. The NG engines were LEV certified. Objectives were to contrast the emissions performance of the diesel and NG units, and to compare results from the two laboratories. Both laboratories found that oxides of nitrogen and particulate matter (PM) emissions were substantially lower for the natural gas buses than for the diesel buses. It was observed that by varying the rapidity of pedal movement during accelerations in the Central Business District cycle (CBD), CO and PM emissions from the diesel buses could be varied by a factor of three or more. The driving styles may be characterized as aggressive and non-aggressive, but both styles followed the CBD speed command acceptably. PM emissions were far higher for the aggressive driving style. For the NG fueled vehicles driving style had a similar, although smaller, effect on NO{sub x}. It is evident that driver habits may cause substantial deviation in emissions for the CBD cycle. When the CO emissions are used as a surrogate for driver aggression, a regression analysis shows that NO{sub x} and PM emissions from the two laboratories agree closely for equivalent driving style. Implications of driver habit for emissions inventories and regulations are briefly considered.

Nigel N. Clark, Mridul Gautam; Byron L. Rapp; Donald W. Lyons; Michael S. Graboski; Robert L. McCormick; Teresa L. Alleman; Paul Norton

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

162

Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration: Second Results Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of a demonstration of 12 new fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. The 12 FCEBs operate as a part of the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, which also includes two new hydrogen fueling stations. This effort is the largest FCEB demonstration in the United States and involves five participating transit agencies. The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service. The first results report was published in August 2011, describing operation of these new FCEBs from September 2010 through May 2011. New results in this report provide an update through April 2012.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Empirical impact evaluation of the energy savings resulting from BPA's Stage II irrigation system retrofit program: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of an evaluation of the impacts on irrigation system energy consumption of conservation measures installed under the Bonneville Power Administration's Stage II retrofit program. Historical billing data and other farm records provided the basis for this evaluation. A number of different statistical techniques were used to estimate the actual energy savings resulting from the Stage II conservation measures. Results of the study reveal that the methodology used in predicting energy savings resulting from the Stage II program is accurate. The basis for energy savings predictions in the Stage II program are changes in brake horsepower, and, in this study, a 1% change in brake horsepower was found to result in slightly more than a 1% change in energy consumption. Overall, Stage II program conservation measures were found to reduce irrigation system energy use by an average of 34%. The average costs of obtaining these savings were 6 mills (.6 cents) per kWh saved.

Harrer, B.J.; Tawil, J.W.; Lyke, A.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Edin, E.S.; Bailey, B.M.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Final Report-Confirmatory Survey Results for the ABB Combustion Engineering Site, Windsor, Connecticut; Revision 1 (DCN 5158-SR-02-1) (Docket No. 030-03754; RFTA No. 12-003)  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the confirmatory activities were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the NRC in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the contractor?s procedures and FSS results. ORAU reviewed ABB CE?s decommissioning plan, final status survey plan, and the applicable soil DCGLs, which were developed based on an NRC-approved radiation dose assessment. The surveys included gamma surface scans, gamma direct measurements, and soil sampling.

ADAMS, WADE C

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

165

Fuel-Cycle energy and emission impacts of ethanol-diesel blends in urban buses and farming tractors.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

About 2.1 billion gallons of fuel ethanol was used in the United States in 2002, mainly in the form of gasoline blends containing up to 10% ethanol (E10). Ethanol use has the potential to increase in the U.S. blended gasoline market because methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), formerly the most popular oxygenate blendstock, may be phased out owing to concerns about MTBE contamination of the water supply. Ethanol would remain the only viable near-term option as an oxygenate in reformulated gasoline production and to meet a potential federal renewable fuels standard (RFS) for transportation fuels. Ethanol may also be blended with additives (co-solvents) into diesel fuels for applications in which oxygenation may improve diesel engine emission performance. Numerous studies have been conducted to evaluate the fuel-cycle energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission effects of ethanol-gasoline blends relative to those of gasoline for applications in spark-ignition engine vehicles (see Wang et al. 1997; Wang et al. 1999; Levelton Engineering et al. 1999; Shapouri et al. 2002; Graboski 2002). Those studies did not address the energy and emission effects of ethanol-diesel (E-diesel or ED) blends relative to those of petroleum diesel fuel in diesel engine vehicles. The energy and emission effects of E-diesel could be very different from those of ethanol-gasoline blends because (1) the energy use and emissions generated during diesel production (so-called ''upstream'' effects) are different from those generated during gasoline production; and (2) the energy and emission performance of E-diesel and petroleum diesel fuel in diesel compression-ignition engines differs from that of ethanol-gasoline blends in spark-ignition (Otto-cycle-type) engine vehicles. The Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs (DCCA) commissioned Argonne National Laboratory to conduct a full fuel-cycle analysis of the energy and emission effects of E-diesel blends relative to those of petroleum diesel when used in the types of diesel engines that will likely be targeted first in the marketplace. This report documents the results of our study. The draft report was delivered to DCCA in January 2003. This final report incorporates revisions by the sponsor and by Argonne.

Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Lee, H.

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

166

Comparative ranking of 0. 1 to 10 MW(e) solar thermal electric power systems. Volume I. Summary of results. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is part of a two-volume set summarizing the results of a comparative ranking of generic solar thermal concepts designed specifically for electric power generation. The original objective of the study was to project the mid-1990 cost and performance of selected generic solar thermal electric power systems for utility applications and to rank these systems by criteria that reflect their future commercial acceptance. This study considered plants with rated capacities of 1 to 10 MW(e), operating over a range of capacity factors from the no-storage case to 0.7 and above. Later, the study was extended to include systems with capacities from 0.1 to 1 MW(e), a range that is attractive to industrial and other non-utility applications. This volume summarizes the results for the full range of capacities from 0.1 to 10 MW(e). Volume II presents data on performance and cost and ranking methodology.

Thornton, J.P.; Brown, K.C.; Finegold, J.G.; Gresham, J.B.; Herlevich, F.A.; Kowalik, J.S.; Kriz, T.A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

60-day waste compatibility safety issue and final results for 244-TX DCRT, grab samples TX-95-1, TX-95-2, and TX-95-3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three grab samples (TX-95-1, TX-95-2, and TX-95-3) were taken from tank 241- TX-244 riser 8 on November 7, 1995 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on that same day. Samples TX-95-1 and TX-95-2 were designated as supernate liquids, and sample TX-95-3 was designated as a supernate/sludge. These samples were analyzed to support the waste compatibility safety program. Accuracy and precision criteria were met for all analyses. No notifications were required based on sample results. This document provides the analysis to support the waste compatibility safety program.

Esch, R.A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Final report on the Background Soil Characterization Project at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Results of Field Sampling Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents, evaluates, and documents data and results obtained in the Background Soil Characterization Project (BSCP). It is intended to be a stand-alone document for application and use in structuring and conducting remedial investigation and remedial action projects in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. The objectives of the BSCP consist of the following: determine background concentrations of organics, metals, and radionuclides in natural soils that are key to environmental restoration projects; provide remediation projects with 100% validated data on background concentrations, which are technically and legally defensible; and quantify baseline risks from background constituents for comparison of risks associated with contaminated sites.

Watkins, D.R.; Ammons, J.T.; Branson, J.L. [and others

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

High-solids black liquor firing in pulp and paper industry kraft recovery boilers: Phase 1 -- Final report. Volume 2: Project technical results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is a multiple-phase effort to develop technologies to improve high-solids black liquor firing in pulp mill recovery boilers. The principal means to this end is to construct and operate a pilot-scale recovery furnace simulator (RFS) in which these technologies can be tested. The Phase 1 objectives are to prepare a preliminary design for the RFS, delineate a project concept for evaluating candidate technologies, establish industrial partners, and report the results. Phase 1 addressed the objectives with seven tasks: Develop a preliminary design of the RFS; estimate the detailed design and construction costs of the RFS and the balance of the project; identify interested parties in the paper industry and key suppliers; plan the Phase 2 and Phase 3 tests to characterize the RFS; evaluate the economic justification for high-solids firing deployment in the industry; evaluate high-solids black liquor property data to support the RFS design; manage the project and reporting results, which included planning the future program direction.

Southards, W.T.; Clement, J.L.; McIlroy, R.A.; Tharp, M.R.; Verrill, C.L.; Wessell, R.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A study of toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant utilizing an ESP/Wet FGD system. Volume 1, Sampling, results, and special topics: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This was one of a group of assessments of toxic emissions from coal-fired power plants, conducted for DOE-PETC in 1993 as mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act. It is organized into 2 volumes; Volume 1 describes the sampling effort, presents the concentration data on toxic chemicals in several power plant streams, and reports the results of evaluations and calculations. The study involved solid, liquid, and gaseous samples from input, output, and process streams at Coal Creek Station Unit No. 1, Underwood, North Dakota (1100 MW mine-mouth plant burning lignite from the Falkirk mine located adjacent to the plant). This plant had an electrostatic precipitator and a wet scrubber flue gas desulfurization unit. Measurements were conducted on June 21--24, 26, and 27, 1993; chemicals measured were 6 major and 16 trace elements (including Hg, Cr, Cd, Pb, Se, As, Be, Ni), acids and corresponding anions (HCl, HF, chloride, fluoride, phosphate, sulfate), ammonia and cyanide, elemental C, radionuclides, VOCs, semivolatiles (incl. PAH, polychlorinated dioxins, furans), and aldehydes. Volume 2: Appendices includes process data log sheets, field sampling data sheets, uncertainty calculations, and quality assurance results.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Fast Feedback Results 2011 Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Washington and Residential Solar Water Heating to 83% for New Buildings. Most programs or measures showed 90% -- -- Industrial Sector Production Efficiency 184 91% 14% 20% Commercial Solar Commercial Solar Electric and Water 232 88% 42% Water Heaters 243 91% 47% Windows 128 85% 42% Home Performance 109 90% 27% Home Ener

172

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2009 Final Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Team Germany Solar Decathlon 2009 house. First Place: Team Germany (Technische Universitt Darmstadt) Photo the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Solar Decathlon 2009...

173

Raley's LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Raley's, a large retail grocery company based in Northern California, began operating heavy-duty trucks powered by liquefied natural gas (LNG) in 1997, in cooperation with the Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District (SMAQMD). The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) sponsored a research project to collect and analyze data on the performance and operation costs of eight of Raley's LNG trucks in the field. Their performance was compared with that of three diesel trucks operating in comparable commercial service. The objective of the DOE research project, which was managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was to provide transportation professionals with quantitative, unbiased information on the cost, maintenance, operational, and emissions characteristics of LNG as one alternative to conventional diesel fuel for heavy-duty trucking applications.

Chandler, K. (Battelle); Norton, P. (NREL); Clark, N. (West Virginia University)

2000-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

174

Waste Management's LNG Truck Fleet: Final Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste Management, Inc., began operating a fleet of heavy-duty LNG refuse trucks at its Washington, Pennsylvania, facility. The objective of the project was to provide transportation professionals with quantitative, unbiased information on the cost, maintenance, operational, and emissions characteristics of LNG as one alternative to conventional diesel for heavy-duty trucking applications.

Chandler, K. [Battelle (US); Norton, P. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (US); Clark, N. [West Virginia University (US)

2001-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

175

Yosemite Waters Vehicle Evaluation Report: Final Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Document details the evaluation of Fischer-Tropsch diesel, a gas-to-liquid fuel, in medium-duty delivery vehicles at Yosemite Waters. The study was conducted by NREL at the company's Fullerton, California, bottling headquarters.

Eudy, L.; Barnitt, R.; Alleman, T. L.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Final Reminder:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Reminder: Final Reminder: Final Reminder: Please save your $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2 imporant files by 4/30/12 April 27, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) Franklin batch system is drained, and all batch queues are stopped as of 4/26 23:59pm. This is the final reminder that please make sure to save important files on your Franklin $SCRATCH and $SCRATCH2. ALL FILES THERE WILL BE DELETED, and there will be no mechanisms to recover any of the files after May 1. Mon Apr 30: Last day to retrieve files from Franklin scratch file systems Mon Apr 30, 23:59: User logins are disabled If you need help or have any concerns, please contact "consult at nersc dot gov". Post your comment You cannot post comments until you have logged in. Login Here. Comments No one has commented on this page yet.

177

Tank 241S109 Grab Samples 9S-99-1 and 9S-99-2 and 9S-99-3 Analytical Results for the Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report for tank 2414-109 grab samples. Three grab samples were collected from riser 13 on July 28, 1999 and received by the 222-S laboratory on July 28, 1999. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan for Fiscal Year 1999 (TSAP) (Sasaki, 1999) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) (Fowler 1995, Mulkey and Miller 1998). The analytical results are presented in the data summary report (Table 1). None of the subsamples submitted for differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), total organic carbon (TOC) and plutonium 239 (Pu239) analyses exceeded the notification limits as stated in TSAP (Sasaki, 1999).

STEEN, F.H.

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

178

Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Final Report to Improved Reservoir Access Through Refracture Treatments in Tight Gas Sands and Gas Shales 07122-41.FINAL June 2013 PI Mukul M. Sharma The University of Texas at Austin 200 E. Dean Keeton St. Stop C0300 Austin, Texas 78712 (512) 471---3257 msharma@mail.utexas.edu LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by The University of Texas at Austin as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of any of the entities: a. MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR USEFULNESS OF THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DOCUMENT, OR THAT THE

179

Early Results from DOE/NREL Transit Bus Evaluations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation at 2005 American Public Transportation Association Conference provides status of NREL/DOE evaluations of New York City Transit and King County Metro hybrid electric buses.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the results of a DOE funded joint effort of Membrane Technology and Research Inc. (MTR), SRI International (SRI), and ABB Lummus (ABB) to develop facilitated transport membranes for olefin/paraffin separations. Currently, olefin/paraffin separation is done by distillationan extremely energy-intensive process because of the low relative volatilities of olefins and paraffins. If facilitated transport membranes could be successfully commercialized, the potential energy savings achievable with this membrane technology are estimated to be 48 trillion Btu per year by the year 2020. We discovered in this work that silver salt-based facilitated transport membranes are not stable even in the presence of ideal olefin/paraffin mixtures. This decline in membrane performance appears to be caused by a previously unrecognized phenomenon that we have named olefin conditioning. As the name implies, this mechanism of performance degradation becomes operative once a membrane starts permeating olefins. This project is the first study to identify olefin conditioning as a significant factor impacting the performance of facilitated olefin transport membranes. To date, we have not identified an effective strategy to mitigate the impact of olefin conditioning. other than running at low temperatures or with low olefin feed pressures. In our opinion, this issue must be addressed before further development of facilitated olefin transport membranes can proceed. In addition to olefin conditioning, traditional carrier poisoning challenges must also be overcome. Light, hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, and acetylene exposure adversely affect membrane performance through unwanted reaction with silver ions. Harsh poisoning tests with these species showed useful membrane lifetimes of only one week. These tests demonstrate a need to improve the stability of the olefin complexing agent to develop membranes with lifetimes satisfactory for commercial application. A successful effort to improve membrane coating solution stability resulted in the finding that membrane performance loss could be reversed for all poisoning cases except hydrogen sulfide exposure. This discovery offers the potential to extend membrane lifetime through cyclic regeneration. We also found that certain mixed carriers exhibited greater stability in reducing environments than exhibited by silver salt alone. These results offer promise that solutions to deal with carrier poisoning are possible. The main achievement of this program was the progress made in gaining a more complete understanding of the membrane stability challenges faced in the use of facilitated olefin transport membranes. Our systematic study of facilitated olefin transport uncovered the full extent of the stability challenge, including the first known identification of olefin conditioning and its impact on membrane development. We believe that significant additional fundamental research is required before facilitated olefin transport membranes are ready for industrial implementation. The best-case scenario for further development of this technology would be identification of a novel carrier that is intrinsically more stable than silver ions. If the stability problems could be largely circumvented by development of a new carrier, it would provide a clear breakthrough toward finally recognizing the potential of facilitated olefin transport. However, even if such a carrier is identified, additional development will be required to insure that the membrane matrix is a benign host for the olefin-carrier complexation reaction and shows good long-term stability.

Merkel, T.C.; Blanc, R.; Zeid, J.; Suwarlim, A.; Firat, B.; Wijmans, H.; Asaro, M. (SRI); Greene, M. (Lummus)

2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buses final results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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181

FINAL REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FINAL REPORT AEC-ERDA Research Contract AT (11-1) 2174 Columbia University's Nevis Laboratories "Research in Neutron Velocity Spectroscopy" James RainwatGr DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or

182

U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This Oil Bypass Filter Technology Evaluation final report documents the feasibility of using oil bypass filters on 17 vehicles in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) fleet during a 3-year test period. Almost 1.3 million test miles were accumulated, with eleven 4-cycle diesel engine buses accumulating 982,548 test miles and six gasoline-engine Chevrolet Tahoes accumulating 303,172 test miles. Two hundred and forty oil samples, taken at each 12,000-mile bus servicing event and at 3,000 miles for the Tahoes, documented the condition of the engine oils for continued service. Twenty-eight variables were normally tested, including the presence of desired additives and undesired wear metals such as iron and chrome, as well as soot, water, glycol, and fuel. Depending on the assumptions employed, the INL found that oil bypass filter systems for diesel engine buses have a positive payback between 72,000 and 144,000 miles. For the Tahoes, the positive payback was between 66,000 and 69,000 miles.

L. R. Zirker; J. E. Francfort; J. J. Fielding

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Documents: Final PEIS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final PEIS Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Final Programmatic EIS DOEEIS-0269 Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for...

184

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: First Results Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This report provides the early data results and implementation experience of the AT fuel cell bus since it was placed in service.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Revised FINALREPORT NO. 2: INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATORY SURVEY SUMMARY AND RESULTS FOR THE ENRICO FERMI ATOMIC POWER PLANT, UNIT 1, NEWPORT, MICHIGAN (DOCKET NO. 50 16; RFTA 10-004) 2018-SR-02-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant, Unit 1 (Fermi 1) was a fast breeder reactor design that was cooled by sodium and operated at essentially atmospheric pressure. On May 10, 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) granted an operating license, DPR-9, to the Power Reactor Development Company (PRDC), a consortium specifically formed to own and operate a nuclear reactor at the Fermi 1 site. The reactor was designed for a maximum capability of 430 megawatts (MW); however, the maximum reactor power with the first core loading (Core A) was 200 MW. The primary system was filled with sodium in December 1960 and criticality was achieved in August 1963. The reactor was tested at low power during the first couple years of operation. Power ascension testing above 1 MW commenced in December 1965 immediately following the receipt of a high-power operating license. In October 1966 during power ascension, zirconium plates at the bottom of the reactor vessel became loose and blocked sodium coolant flow to some fuel subassemblies. Two subassemblies started to melt and the reactor was manually shut down. No abnormal releases to the environment occurred. Forty-two months later after the cause had been determined, cleanup completed, and the fuel replaced, Fermi 1 was restarted. However, in November 1972, PRDC made the decision to decommission Fermi 1 as the core was approaching its burn-up limit. The fuel and blanket subassemblies were shipped off-site in 1973. Following that, the secondary sodium system was drained and sent off-site. The radioactive primary sodium was stored on-site in storage tanks and 55 gallon (gal) drums until it was shipped off-site in 1984. The initial decommissioning of Fermi 1 was completed in 1975. Effective January 23, 1976, DPR-9 was transferred to the Detroit Edison Company (DTE) as a 'possession only' license (DTE 2010a). This report details the confirmatory activities performed during the second Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) site visit to Fermi 1 in November 2010. The survey was strategically planned during a Unit 2 (Fermi 2) outage to take advantage of decreased radiation levels that were observed and attributed to Fermi 2 from the operating unit during the first site visit. However, during the second visit there were elevated radiation levels observed and attributed to the partially dismantled Fermi 1 reactor vessel and a waste storage box located on the 3rd floor of the Fermi 1 Turbine Building. Confirmatory surveys (unshielded) performed directly in the line of sight of these areas were affected. The objective of the confirmatory survey was to verify that the final radiological conditions were accurately and adequately described in Final Status Survey (FSS) documentation, relative to the established release criteria. This objective was achieved by performing document reviews, as well as independent measurements and sampling. Specifically, documentation of the planning, implementation, and results of the FSS were evaluated; side-by-side FSS measurement and source comparisons were performed; site areas were evaluated relative to appropriate FSS classification; and areas were assessed for residual, undocumented contamination.

Erika Bailey

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

186

Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This grant resulted in three distinct scientific advances, the most important being the discovery of a inhomogeneous superconducting state first predicted over 40 years ago. Two graduate students received PhDs as a result of this grant, and a major US high magnetic field facility was rebuilt.

Agosta, Charles C. [Clark University] [Clark University

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

187

Final Report  

SciTech Connect

OAK B135 The formation of metastable crystalline phases in lithium disilicate glass has been a subject of controversy for decades. Here, one aspect of this problem relating to the stability of these non-equilibrium phases when glasses are heated for extended time periods in the nucleation regime is addressed. The results of a systematic experimental investigation on the persistence of metastable phases and the factors that may influence the appearance of such phases, e.g., water content, impurities, glass composition, and glass preparation procedure are presented. Growth rates of lithium disilicate crystals in lithium disilicate glass are measured as a function water concentration in the glass and of temperature in the deeply undercooled regime. The growth rate data obtained in this work are combined with data reported in the literature and used to assess the applicability of standard models of crystal growth for the description of experimental results over a very broad temperature range. The reduced growth rate versus undercooling graph is found to consist of three regimes. For undercoolings less than 140C, the reduced growth rate curve is suggestive of either 2-D surface nucleation or screw dislocation growth. For undercoolings greater than 400C, the reduced growth rate plot suggests the operative crystal growth mechanism is 2-D surface nucleation, but detailed calculations cast doubt upon this conclusion. In the intermediate undercooling range, there appears to be some sort of transitional behavior for which none of the standard models appear to be applicable. Further, it is observed that small differences in the viscosity data employed can produce enormous differences in the predicted growth rates at larger undercoolings. Results of the kinetic analyses conducted herein seem to indicate that the nature of the kinetic rate coefficient used in the standard growth models may be incorrect. Nucleation rates of sodium metasilicate crystals in a sodium silicate glass of composition 43Na2O-57SiO2 (mol%) are investigated using the development technique. The results of this study are compared with the nucleation rate results recently obtained for this composition using a novel DTA method. The two techniques are found to agree within experimental error.

Michael C. Weinberg; Lori L. Burgner; Joseph H. Simmons

2003-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

188

Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Our research program was aimed at elucidating the nature of proton transport in ionomer membranes by means of a combination of analytical theory and molecular modeling. There were two broad thrusts. The first of these was directed towards understanding the equilibrium structure of Nafion and related polymers at various levels of hydration. The second thrust was concerned with the transport of protons through a membrane of this type. The research on structure proceeded by building on existing work, but with the introduction of some novel techniques, among which is a hybrid Molecular Dynamics--Monte Carlo approach. This method permits rapid computations by temporarily decoupling the motion of the polar side chains from that of the perfluorinated backbone, while still retaining the essential aspects of the constraint that phase separation can only continue to a very limited degree. Competition between an elastic energy due to this constraint and the tendency to phase separation lead to the equilibrium structure, which turns out to be qualitatively different at different levels of hydration. The use of a carefully formulated dielectric function was necessary to achieve accurate results. The work on transport of protons in Nafion-like membranes also involved a combination of theory and simulation. Atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations were employed to determine some of the characteristic parameters for the diffusion of hydronium in hydrated membranes. These results were used in a theoretical model of non-linear diffusion to predict transport coefficients. Among our results was the discovery that treatment with strong electric fields may enhance the properties of the polymer membranes. Our computer simulations showed that the vigorous application of a stretching force or an electric field can modify the structure of the ionomer that lies at the heart of a polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cell. If these predictions are verified experimentally, then it should be possible to produce fuel cells capable of delivering much higher currents than those currently available.

Taylor, Philip L.

2012-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

189

FINAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen storage systems based on the readily reversible adsorption of H{sub 2} in porous materials have a number of very attractive properties with the potential to provide superior performance among candidate materials currently being investigated were it not for the fact that the interaction of H{sub 2} with the host material is too weak to permit viable operation at room temperature. Our study has delineated in quantitative detail the structural elements which we believe to be the essential ingredients for the future synthesis of porous materials, where guest-host interactions are intermediate between those found in the carbons and the metal hydrides, i.e. between physisorption and chemisorption, which will result in H{sub 2} binding energies required for room temperature operation. The ability to produce porous materials with much improved hydrogen binding energies depends critically on detailed molecular level analysis of hydrogen binding in such materials. However, characterization of H{sub 2} sorption is almost exclusively carried by thermodynamic measurements, which give average properties for all the sites occupied by H{sub 2} molecules at a particular loading. We have therefore extensively utilized the most powerful of the few molecular level experimental probes available to probe the interactions of hydrogen with porous materials, namely inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy of the hindered rotations of the hydrogen molecules adsorbed at various sites, which in turn can be interpreted in a very direct way in by computational studies. This technique can relate spectral signatures of various H{sub 2} molecules adsorbed at binding sites with different degrees of interaction. In the course of this project we have synthesized a rather large number of entirely new hybrid materials, which include structural modifications for improved interactions with adsorbed hydrogen. The results of our systematic studies on many porous materials provide detailed information on the effects on hydrogen binding from framework modifications, including charged frameworks and extraframework cations, from reduction in pore sizes, functionalization of the organic linking group, and most importantly, that of the various types of metal sites. We provided a clear demonstration that metal sites are most effective if the metal is highly undercoordinated, open and completely accessible to the H{sub 2} molecule, a condition which is not currently met in MOFs with intra-framework metals. The results obtained from this project therefore will give detailed direction to efforts in the synthesis of new materials that can reach the goal of a practical sorption based hydrogen storage material.

Juergen Eckert; Anthony K. Cheetham (Principal Investigator)

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

190

Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This grant was a continuation of research conducted at the University of Florida under Grant No. DE-FG05-91ER45462 in which we investigated the energy bandgap shifts produced in semiconductor quantum dots of sizes between 1.5 and 40 nm. The investigated semiconductors consisted of a series of Column 2-6 compounds (CdS, CdSe, CdTe) and pure Column IV elements (Si and Ge). It is well-known of course that the 2-6 semiconductors possess a direct-gap electronic structure, while the Column IV elements possess an indirect-gap structure. The investigation showed a major difference in quantum confinement behavior between the two sets of semiconductors. This difference is essentially associated with the change in bandgap energy resulting from size confinement. In the direct-gap semiconductors, the change in energy (blue shift) saturates when the crystals approach 2-3 nm in diameter. This limits the observed shift in energy to less than 1 eV above the bulk value. In the indirect-gap semiconductors, the energy shift does not show any sign of saturation and in fact, we produced Si and Ge nanocrystals with absorption edges in the UV. The reason for this difference has not been determined and will require additional experimental and theoretical studies. In our work, we suggest, but do not prove that mixing of conduction band side valleys with the central valley under conditions of size confinement may be responsible for the saturation in the blue-shift of direct-gap semiconductors. The discovery of large bandgap energy shifts with crystal size prompted us to suggest that these materials may be used to form photovoltaic cells with multi-gap layers for high efficiency in a U.S. Patent issued in 1998. However, this possibility depends strongly on the ability to collect photoexcited carriers from energy-confined crystals. The research conducted at the University of Arizona under the subject grant had a major goal of testing an indirect gap semiconductor in size-confined structures to determine if photocarriers could be collected. Thus, we tested a variety of semiconductor-glass nano-composite structures for photoconductivity. Tests were conducted in collaboration with the Laser Physics Division at Sandia National Laboratories. Nano-composite samples were formed consisting of Ge nanocrystals embedded in an indium-tin-oxide matrix. Photoconductivity measurements were conducted with exposure of the films to sub-bandgap and super-bandgap light. The results showed a clear photoconductivity effect arising from exposure to super-bandgap light only. These results suggest that the high-efficiency photovoltaic cell structure proposed in DOE sponsored U.S. Patent 5,720,827 is viable. The results of fabrication studies, structural characterization studies and photovoltaic measurements are presented in the report. This report is taken from a PhD dissertation of Tracie J. Bukowski submitted to the University of Florida in May 2002. ''The optical and photoconductive response in germanium quantum dots and indium tin oxide composite thin film structures,'' Dr. Bukowski conducted her PhD study under this grant at the University of Arizona and under Grant No DE-FG05-91ER45462 at the University of Florida, as well as during a two-year fellowship at Sandia National Laboratories.

Joseph H. Simmons; Tracie J. Bukowski

2002-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

191

Final report  

SciTech Connect

Calabazas Creek Research Inc. (CCR) has investigated the feasibility of a 30 GHz gyroklystron amplifier for driving advanced accelerators. Gyroklystrons have been shown to be efficient sources of high power radiation at frequencies above X-Band and are, therefore, well suited for driving high frequency accelerators. CCR's gyroklystron design includes a novel inverted magnetron injection gun (MIG) that allows support and cooling of the coaxial inner conductor of the circuit. This novel gun provides a very high quality electron beam, making it possible to achieve a cavity design with an efficiency of 54%. During Phase I, it was determined that the original frequency of 17 GHz was no longer well matched to the potential market. A survey of accelerator needs identified the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) as requiring 30 GHz sources for testing of accelerator structures. Developers at CLIC are seeking approximately 25 MW per tube. This will result in the same power density as in the original 80 MW, 17 GHz device and will thus have essentially the same risk. CLIC will require initially 3-4 tubes and eventually 12-16 tubes. This quantity represents $5M-$10M in sales. In addition, gyroklystrons are of interest for radar systems and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) instruments. Following discussions with the Department of Energy, it was determined that changing the program goal to the CLIC requirement was in the best interest of CCR and the funding agency. The Phase I program resulted in a successful gyroklystron design with a calculated efficiency of 54% with an output power of 33 MW. Design calculations for all critical components are complete, and no significant technical issues remain.

Michael Read, Wesley Lawson, George Miram, David Marsden, Philipp Borchard,pborchard@gmx.net

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forest products provide essential resources for human civilization, including energy and materials. In processing forest products, however, unwanted byproducts, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) are generated. The goal of this study was to develop a cost effective and reliable air pollution control system to reduce VOC and HAP emissions from pulp, paper and paperboard mills and solid wood product facilities. Specifically, this work focused on the removal of VOCs and HAPs from high volume low concentration (HVLC) gases, particularly methanol since it is the largest HAP constituent in these gases. Three technologies were developed and tested at the bench-scale: (1) A novel composite material of activated carbon coated with a photocatalyst titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) (referred to as TiO{sub 2}-coated activated carbon or TiO{sub 2}/AC), (2) a novel silica gel impregnated with nanosized TiO{sub 2} (referred to as silica-titania composites or STC), and (3) biofiltration. A pilot-scale reactor was also fabricated and tested for methanol removal using the TiO{sub 2}/AC and STC. The technical feasibility of removing methanol with TiO{sub 2}/AC was studied using a composite synthesized via a spay desiccation method. The removal of methanol consists of two consecutive operation steps: removal of methanol using fixed-bed activated carbon adsorption and regeneration of spent activated carbon using in-situ photocatalytic oxidation. Regeneration using photocatalytic oxidation employed irradiation of the TiO{sub 2} catalyst with low-energy ultraviolet (UV) light. Results of this technical feasibility study showed that photocatalytic oxidation can be used to regenerate a spent TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent. A TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent was then developed using a dry impregnation method, which performed better than the TiO{sub 2}/AC synthesized using the spray desiccation method. The enhanced performance was likely a result of the better distribution of TiO2 particles on the activated carbon surface. A method for pore volume impregnation using microwave irradiation was also developed. A commercial microwave oven (800 W) was used as the microwave source. Under 2450 MHz microwave irradiation, TTIP was quickly hydrolyzed and anatase TiO2 was formed in a short time (pellets, and

David W. Mazyck; Angela Lindner; CY Wu, Rick Sheahan, Ashok Jain

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

FINAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this program the teams at Penn State University (PSU), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), DCH Technology (DCHT), and Air Products and Chemicals Inc. (APCI), have aggressively pursued engineering solutions to eliminate barriers to solid-state chemiresistor hydrogen sensor technology. The metallurgical effects of alloying palladium with nickel have been shown to prevent phase transitions in the thin films at high H2 overpressures, making the devices more suitable for IOF process conditions. We investigated the use of thin, semi-permeable membranes that protect the catalytic surface from poisoning or other undesirable surface reactions that would otherwise reduce sensitivity or operability in harsh IOF process environments. The results of this project have provided new insight into the effects of metallurgy and protective coatings on device behavior, and open new avenues for research in this field. Commercialization of this sensor technology could be easily achieved, although not yet realized. The benefits to society, once this technology is commercialized, is a dramatic cost and energy savings to the industry, which employs these sensors. In addition, the fundamental understandings gained in this program could have an impact on both cost and safety in the future hydrogen economy utilizing hydrogen fuel cells and hydrogen storage.

Horn, Mark W; McDaniel, Anthony; Schweighardt, Frank K

2003-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

194

Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to quantify organic aerosol precursor concentrations in an urban environment and to measure suitable organic photoproduct species that can act as tracers of photochemical processing to identify the occurrence and rate of secondary organic aerosol formation. Field measurements were made as part of the ASR field program Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) in June 2010. What is new in our approach is the measurement for the total concentration of long chain alkanes (>C10) and heavier alkyl substituted aromatics associated with diesel exhaust gas phase organic compound emissions. A method to measure these so called intermediate volatility organic compounds (IVOCs) was developed by modifying a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer instrument to perform both volatile organic compound (VOC) and IVOC analysis by thermal desorption from a Tenax adsorbent trap (TD-PTR-MS). Lab and field results show that the TD-PTR-MS technique can measure long chain alkanes associated with diesel engine emissions and thus provide a novel means to measure these compounds to better understand the impact of vehicle emissions on secondary organic aerosol formation.

None

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

195

Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Forest products provide essential resources for human civilization, including energy and materials. In processing forest products, however, unwanted byproducts, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) are generated. The goal of this study was to develop a cost effective and reliable air pollution control system to reduce VOC and HAP emissions from pulp, paper and paperboard mills and solid wood product facilities. Specifically, this work focused on the removal of VOCs and HAPs from high volume low concentration (HVLC) gases, particularly methanol since it is the largest HAP constituent in these gases. Three technologies were developed and tested at the bench-scale: (1) A novel composite material of activated carbon coated with a photocatalyst titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) (referred to as TiO{sub 2}-coated activated carbon or TiO{sub 2}/AC), (2) a novel silica gel impregnated with nanosized TiO{sub 2} (referred to as silica-titania composites or STC), and (3) biofiltration. A pilot-scale reactor was also fabricated and tested for methanol removal using the TiO{sub 2}/AC and STC. The technical feasibility of removing methanol with TiO{sub 2}/AC was studied using a composite synthesized via a spay desiccation method. The removal of methanol consists of two consecutive operation steps: removal of methanol using fixed-bed activated carbon adsorption and regeneration of spent activated carbon using in-situ photocatalytic oxidation. Regeneration using photocatalytic oxidation employed irradiation of the TiO{sub 2} catalyst with low-energy ultraviolet (UV) light. Results of this technical feasibility study showed that photocatalytic oxidation can be used to regenerate a spent TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent. A TiO{sub 2}/AC adsorbent was then developed using a dry impregnation method, which performed better than the TiO{sub 2}/AC synthesized using the spray desiccation method. The enhanced performance was likely a result of the better distribution of TiO2 particles on the activated carbon surface. A method for pore volume impregnation using microwave irradiation was also developed. A commercial microwave oven (800 W) was used as the microwave source. Under 2450 MHz microwave irradiation, TTIP was quickly hydrolyzed and anatase TiO2 was formed in a short time (< 20 minutes). Due to the volumetric heating and selective heating of microwave, the solvent and by-products were quickly removed which reduced energy consumption and processing time. Activated carbon and TiO{sub 2}/AC were also tested for the removal of hydrogen sulfide, which was chosen as the representative total reduced sulfur (TRS) species. The BioNuchar AC support itself was a good H{sub 2}S remover. After coating TiO{sub 2} by dry impregnation, H{sub 2}S removal efficiency of TiO{sub 2}/AC decreased compared with the virgin AC due to the change of surface pH. Under UV light irradiation, H{sub 2}S removal efficiency of TiO{sub 2}/AC composite doubled, and its sulfate conversion efficiency was higher than that of AC. The formation of sulfate is preferred since the sulfate can be removed from the composite by rising with water. A pilot-scale fluidized bed reactor was designed to test the efficiency of methanol oxidation with TiO{sub 2}/AC in the presence of UV light. TiO{sub 2}/AC was prepared using the spray desiccation method. The TiO{sub 2}/AC was pre-loaded with (1) methanol (equivalent to about 2%wt) and (2) methanol and water. When the TiO{sub 2}/AC loaded with methanol only was exposed to UV light for one hour in the reactor, most of the methanol remained in the carbon pores and, thus, was not oxidized. The TiO{sub 2}/AC loaded with methanol and water desorbed about 2/3 of the methanol from its pores during fluidization, however, only a small portion of this desorbed methanol was oxidized. A biofilter system employing biological activated carbon was developed for methanol removal. The biofilter contained a mixed packing with Westvaco BioNuchar granular activated carbon, perlite, Osmocote slow release ammonium nitrate pellets, and

David W. Mazyck; Angela Lindner; CY Wu, Rick Sheahan, Ashok Jain

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The STI product is the Final Technical Report from ReliOn, Inc. for contract award DE-EE0000487: Recovery Act PEM Fuel Cell Systems Providing Emergency Reserve and Backup Power. The program covered the turnkey deployment of 431 ReliOn fuel cell systems at 189 individual sites for AT&T and PG&E with ReliOn functioning as the primary equipment supplier and the project manager. The Final Technical Report provides an executive level summary, a comparison of the actual accomplishments vs. the goals and objectives of the project, as well as a summary of the project activity from the contract award date of August 1, 2009 through the contract expiration date of December 31, 2011. Two photos are included in the body of the report which show hydrogen storage and bulk hydrogen refueling technologies developed as a result of this program.

Maxwell, Mike, J., P.E.

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

197

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.5 Household Demographics of U.S....

198

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.8 Household Demographics of Homes...

199

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.1 Household Demographics of U.S....

200

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.7 Household Demographics of U.S....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buses final results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.6 Household Demographics of U.S....

202

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.3 Household Demographics of U.S....

203

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.4 Household Demographics of U.S....

204

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.11 Household Demographics of Homes...

205

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.10 Household Demographics of Homes...

206

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.9 Household Demographics of Homes...

207

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC9.2 Household Demographics of U.S....

208

Ventura/Lompoc Smart Card Demonstration Evaluation: Final Report Volume 1 Technical Performance, User Response, and Institutional Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of APCs in Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) buses, which haveinstrument nine new compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicless use of a large compressed natural gas (CNG) compressor

Giuliano, Genevieve; Moore, II, James E.; Golob, Jacqueline

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Diffraction Results from CDF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present final results by the CDF II collaboration on diffractive W and Z production, report on the status of ongoing analyses on diffractive dijet production and on rapidity gaps between jets, and briefly summarize results obtained on exclusive production pointing to their relevance to calibrating theoretical models used to predict exclusive Higgs-boson production at the LHC.

Goulianos, Konstantin

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Accumulations Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Accumulations Final Report Date: July 15, 2013 Period: October 1, 2008 - June 30, 2013 NETL Manager: Skip Pratt Principal Investigators: Matthew Reagan (LBNL), Philip W. Jones (LLNL) 1. Goal of this report This report will summarize previously reported or published results concerning the behavior of hydrates subjected to warming, highlighting contributing and mitigating factors relating to the possibility of rapid climate feedbacks. We will thus assess various scenarios and possibilities for the relationship between climate and hydrates: i.e., the likelihood of a "clathrate

211

Final Design RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Final Design (FD) Review Module (RM) is a tool that assists Department of Energy (DOE) federal project review teams in evaluating the technical sufficiency of the final design prior to CD-3...

212

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.10 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in...

213

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.11 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in...

214

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.3 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...

215

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.4 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...

216

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.1 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...

217

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.7 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...

218

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.8 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in...

219

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.2 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...

220

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.9 Space Heating in U.S. Homes in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buses final results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC6.6 Space Heating in U.S. Homes, by...

222

NGP Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... suppression in aircraft. The enclosed CD compiles the collected publications from the program. Final Report (NIST SP 1069). ...

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

223

" Million Housing Units, Final"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Consumption Survey." " U.S. Energy Information Administration 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary...

224

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Consumption Survey." " U.S. Energy Information Administration 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary...

225

FINAL/ SCIENTIFIC TECHNICAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Chattanooga fuel cell demonstrations project was to develop and demonstrate a prototype 5-kW grid-parallel, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system that co-produces hydrogen, based on Ion Americas technology. The commercial viability of the 5kW SOFC system was tested by transporting, installing and commissioning the SOFC system at the Alternative Energy Laboratory at the University of Tennessee Chattanooga. The system also demonstrated the efficiency and the reliability of the system running on natural gas. This project successfully contributed to the achievement of DOE technology validation milestones from the Technology Validation section of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan. Results of the project can be found in the final technical report.

McDonald, Henry; Singh, Suminderpal

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

226

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Fourth Results Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SunLine Transit Agency, which provides public transit services to the Coachella Valley area of California, has demonstrated hydrogen and fuel cell bus technologies for more than 10 years. In May 2010, SunLine began demonstrating the advanced technology (AT) fuel cell bus with a hybrid electric propulsion system, fuel cell power system, and lithium-based hybrid batteries. This report describes operations at SunLine for the AT fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas buses. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is working with SunLine to evaluate the bus in real-world service to document the results and help determine the progress toward technology readiness. NREL has previously published three reports documenting the operation of the fuel cell bus in service. This report provides a summary of the results with a focus on the bus operation from February 2012 through November 2012.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Module Utilization Committee. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaic collector modules were declared surplus to the needs of the US Department of Energy. The Module Utilization Committee was formed to make appropriate disposition of the surplus modules. The final report of that committee accounts for that disposition. The membership and activities of the committee are set forth and the results of its activities are reported.

None

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant progress was made in testing methods to harvest corn stover in a single pass harvest mode (collect corn grain and stover at the same time). This is technically feasible on small scale, but additional equipment refinements will be needed to facilitate cost effective harvest on a larger scale. Transportation models were developed, which indicate that at a corn stover yield of 2.8 tons/acre and purchase price of $35/ton stover, it would be unprofitable to transport stover more than about 25 miles; thus suggesting the development of many regional collection centers. Therefore, collection centers should be located within about 30 miles of the farm, to keep transportation costs to an acceptable level. These collection centers could then potentially do some preprocessing (to fractionate or increase bulk density) and/or ship the biomass by rail or barge to the final customers. Wet storage of stover via ensilage was tested, but no clear economic advantages were evident. Wet storage eliminates fire risk, but increases the complexity of component separation and may result in a small loss of carbohydrate content (fermentation potential). A study of possible supplier-producer relationships, concluded that a quasi-vertical integration model would be best suited for new bioproducts industries based on stover. In this model, the relationship would involve a multiyear supply contract (processor with purchase guarantees, producer group with supply guarantees). Price will likely be fixed or calculated based on some formula (possibly a cost plus). Initial quality requirements will be specified (but subject to refinement).Producers would invest in harvest/storage/transportation equipment and the processor would build and operate the plant. Pilot fermentation studies demonstrated dramatic improvements in yields and rates with optimization of batch fermentor parameters. Demonstrated yields and rates are approaching those necessary for profitable commercial operation for production of ethanol or lactic acid. The ability of the biocatalyst to adapt to biomass hydrolysate (both biomass sugars and toxins in the hydrolysate) was demonstrated and points towards ultimate successful commercialization of the technology. However, some of this work will need to be repeated and possibly extended to adapt the final selected biocatalyst for the specific commercial hydrolysate composition. The path from corn stover in the farm field to final products, involves a number of steps. Each of these steps has options, problems, and uncertainties; thus creating a very complex multidimensional obstacle to successful commercial development. Through the tasks of this project, the technical and commercial uncertainties of many of these steps have been addressed; thus providing for a clearer understanding of paths forward and commercial viability of a corn stover-based biorefinery.

Aristos Aristidou Natureworks); Robert Kean (NatureWorks); Tom Schechinger (IronHorse Farms, Mat); Stuart Birrell (Iowa State); Jill Euken (Wallace Foundation & Iowa State)

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Ralphs Grocery EC-Diesel Truck Fleet: Final Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies sponsored a research project with Ralphs Grocery Company to collect and analyze data on the performance and operation of 15 diesel trucks fueled with EC-Diesel in commercial service. These trucks were compared to 5 diesel trucks fueled with CARB diesel and operating on similar routes. This document reports this evaluation.

Not Available

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Final Results from U.S. FCEV Learning Demonstration: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 'Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project,' also known as the National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Learning Demonstration, is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project started in 2004 and concluded in late 2011. The purpose of this project was to conduct an integrated field validation that simultaneously examined the performance of fuel cell vehicles and the supporting hydrogen fueling infrastructure. The DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) received and analyzed all of the raw technical data collected by the industry partners through their participation in the project over its seven-year duration. This paper reviews highlights from the project and draws conclusions about the demonstrated status of the fuel cell vehicle and hydrogen fueling infrastructure technology.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Tank 40 Final SB7b Chemical Characterization Results  

SciTech Connect

A sample of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) was taken from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB7b WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition including noble metals and fissile constituents. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) the 3-L Tank 40 SB7b sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle over the weekend. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 558 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent analytical samples. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon? vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass ? 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma ? atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma ? mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB7b supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH{sup -}/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses, and Cs-137 gamma scan. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH-/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method.

Bannochie, C. J.

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

232

Final_Report.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

United States Department of Energy, Offi ce of Fossil Energy. Ormat: Low-Temperature Geothermal Power Generation Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Teapot Dome Field, Wyoming Final...

233

Final Report.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selection and Treatment of Stripper Gas Wells for Production Enhancement, Mocane-Laverne Field, Oklahoma Final Report October, 2000 - September 30, 2003 Scott Reeves Advanced...

234

NETL Final Report Outline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Active and Passive Gas Imagers for Transmission Pipeline Remote Leak Detection Final Report December 2002 Submitted by Thomas A. Reichardt, Sanjay Devdas, and Thomas...

235

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 Appliances in Homes in South Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"South Census Region" ,,,"South Atlantic Census Division",,,,,,"East South...

236

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Home Appliances in Homes in Northeast Region, Divisions, and States, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Northeast Census Region" ,,,"New England Census Division",,,"Middle...

237

Jets and the hadronic final state at HERA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent results on jets and the hadronic final state from the HERA collaborations H1 and ZEUS are reviewed.

T. Schoerner-Sadenius

2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

238

Search Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Search Results. CAS Number, Formula, Name, State, JANAF Table, Links. 7439-97-6, Hg, Mercury, ref, view, ... 7439-97-6, Hg, Mercury, cr,l, view, ...

239

GLODAP Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Results Evaluation of Inorganic Carbon Quality Carbon Thermodynamics Anthropogenic CO2 Radio Carbon Gridded Carbon Fields Click the map to enlarge. Indian Ocean Pacific Ocean...

240

Search Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Search Results. CAS Number, Formula, Name, State, JANAF Table, Links. 7440-33-7, W, Tungsten, cr,l, view, ... 7440-33-7, W, Tungsten, cr, view, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buses final results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

St. Louis Metro Biodiesel (B20) Transit Bus Evaluation: 12-Month Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The St. Louis Metro Bodiesel Transit Bus Evaluation project is being conducted under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between NREL and the National Biodiesel Board to evaluate the extended in-use performance of buses operating on B20 fuel. The objective of this research project is to compare B20 and ultra-low sulfur diesel buses in terms of fuel economy, veicles maintenance, engine performance, component wear, and lube oil performance.

Barnitt, R.; McCormick, R. L.; Lammert, M.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Third Results Reports  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. NREL has previously published two reports documenting the operation of the fuel cell bus in service. This report provides a summary of the results with a focus on the bus operation from July 2011 through January 2012.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

SunLine Transit Agency Advanced Technology Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Second Results Report and Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes operations at SunLine Transit Agency for their newest prototype fuel cell bus and five compressed natural gas (CNG) buses. In May 2010, SunLine began operating its sixth-generation hydrogen fueled bus, an Advanced Technology (AT) fuel cell bus that incorporates the latest design improvements to reduce weight and increase reliability and performance. The agency is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This is the second results report for the AT fuel cell bus since it was placed in service, and it focuses on the newest data analysis and lessons learned since the previous report. The appendices, referenced in the main report, provide the full background for the evaluation. They will be updated as new information is collected but will contain the original background material from the first report.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Final Report to DOE  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes the accomplished goals and provide a list of the publications and presentations made during the project. The goals of the project were accomplished through the various publications submitted to Journals and presentations done at the DOE and international meetings and conferences. The 8 journal articles related to the goals of this project were accepted or submitted. The 23 presentations related to goals of the project were presented at the meetings. There were some minor changes regarding to project goals because of issues encountered during the analysis of the data. For example, a total water probe sensor mounted on the Convair-580 that can be used for defining mixed phase conditions and parameterization, had some problems to estimate magnitude of total water mass, and this resulted in issues providing an accurate parameterization for cloud fraction. Variability related aerosol number concentrations and their composition for direct and indirect effects were studied and published. Results were given to explain aerosol and ice microphysical effects on climate change studies. It is suggested that developed parameterizations should consider the variability in aerosol and ice parameters over the Arctic regions.

Ismail Gultepe

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

SEARCH RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home | search results Please enter one or more search words. ADVANCED SEARCH with all the words with the exact phrase with at least one of the words without the words File Format...

246

Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This DOE project DE-FC36-04GO14052 ''Plasma Pilot Plant Test for Treating VOC Emissions from Wood Products Plants'' was conducted by Drexel University in cooperation with Georgia-Pacific (G-P) and Kurchatov Institute (KI). The objective of this project was to test the Plasma Pilot Plant capabilities in wood industry. The final goal of the project was to replace the current state-of-the-art, regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO) technology by Low-Temperature Plasma Technology (LTPT) in paper and wood industry for Volatile Organic Components (VOC) destruction in High Volume Low Concentration (HVLC) vent emissions. MetPro Corporation joined the team as an industrial partner from the environmental control business and a potential leader for commercialization. Concurrent Technology Corporation (CTC) has a separate contract with DOE for this technology evaluation. They prepared questionnaires for comparison of this technology and RTO, and made this comparison. These data are presented in this report along with the description of the technology itself. Experiments with the pilot plant were performed with average plasma power up to 3.6 kW. Different design of the laboratory and pilot plant pulsed coronas, as well as different analytical methods revealed many new peculiarities of the VOC abatement process. The work reported herein describes the experimental results for the VOCs removal efficiency with respect to energy consumption, residence time, water effect and initial concentration.

Alexander Fridman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two main objectives of this project were: 1) to develop and test technologies to harvest, transport, store, and separate corn stover to supply a clean raw material to the bioproducts industry, and 2) engineer fermentation systems to meet performance targets for lactic acid and ethanol manufacturers. Significant progress was made in testing methods to harvest corn stover in a single pass harvest mode (collect corn grain and stover at the same time). This is technically feasible on small scale, but additional equipment refinements will be needed to facilitate cost effective harvest on a larger scale. Transportation models were developed, which indicate that at a corn stover yield of 2.8 tons/acre and purchase price of $35/ton stover, it would be unprofitable to transport stover more than about 25 miles; thus suggesting the development of many regional collection centers. Therefore, collection centers should be located within about 30 miles of the farm, to keep transportation costs to an acceptable level. These collection centers could then potentially do some preprocessing (to fractionate or increase bulk density) and/or ship the biomass by rail or barge to the final customers. Wet storage of stover via ensilage was tested, but no clear economic advantages were evident. Wet storage eliminates fire risk, but increases the complexity of component separation and may result in a small loss of carbohydrate content (fermentation potential). A study of possible supplier-producer relationships, concluded that a quasi-vertical integration model would be best suited for new bioproducts industries based on stover. In this model, the relationship would involve a multiyear supply contract (processor with purchase guarantees, producer group with supply guarantees). Price will likely be fixed or calculated based on some formula (possibly a cost plus). Initial quality requirements will be specified (but subject to refinement).Producers would invest in harvest/storage/transportation equipment and the processor would build and operate the plant. Pilot fermentation studies demonstrated dramatic improvements in yields and rates with optimization of batch fermentor parameters. Demonstrated yields and rates are approaching those necessary for profitable commercial operation for production of ethanol or lactic acid. The ability of the biocatalyst to adapt to biomass hydrolysate (both biomass sugars and toxins in the hydrolysate) was demonstrated and points towards ultimate successful commercialization of the technology. However, some of this work will need to be repeated and possibly extended to adapt the final selected biocatalyst for the specific commercial hydrolysate composition. The path from corn stover in the farm field to final products, involves a number of steps. Each of these steps has options, problems, and uncertainties; thus creating a very complex multidimensional obstacle to successful commercial development. Through the tasks of this project, the technical and commercial uncertainties of many of these steps have been addressed; thus providing for a clearer understanding of paths forward and commercial viability of a corn stover-based biorefinery.

Aristos Aristidou Natureworks); Robert Kean (NatureWorks); Tom Schechinger (IronHorse Farms, Mat); Stuart Birrell (Iowa State); Jill Euken (Wallace Foundation & Iowa State)

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 2013 January 2013 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for the GREEN ENERGY SCHOOL WIND PROJECT SAIPAN, COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office JANUARY 2013 DOE/EA-1923 iv January 2013 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for the GREEN ENERGY SCHOOL WIND PROJECT SAIPAN, COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Golden Field Office January 2013 DOE/EA-1923 v January 2013 COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy TITLE: Final Environmental Assessment for the Green Energy School Wind Project (DOE/EA-1923) CONTACT: For additional copies or more information on this final Environmental Assessment (EA),

249

CFC Charity Fair Finale  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Finish out the 2012 CFC with the Charity Fair Finale! Buy cookies, participate in a putt-putt golf game, eat some popcorn, and meet and talk with CFC charity representatives.

250

Microsoft Word - Final Rule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 CFR, part 835 Docket No. HS-RM-09-835 RIN 1992-AA-45 Occupational Radiation Protection AGENCY: Office of Health, Safety and Security Department of Energy ACTION: Final Rule...

251

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Household Income, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Household Income" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)",,,"Below Poverty Line2" ,,"Less than...

252

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Year of Construction, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Year of Construction" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Before 1940","1940 to 1949","1950...

253

" Million Housing Units, Final...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Appliances in U.S. Homes, by Climate Region, 2009" " Million Housing Units, Final" ,,"Climate Region2" ,"Total U.S.1 (millions)" ,,"Very Cold","Mixed- Humid","Mixed-Dry"...

254

Final Beamline Design Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Beamline Design Report Final Beamline Design Report Guidelines and Review Criteria (SCD 1.20.95) 6.0 Final Beamline Design Report (FDR) Overview The Final Beamline Design Report is part of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamline review process and should be planned for when approximately 90% of the total beamline design has been completed. Fifteen copies of the FDR are to be submitted to the APS Users Office. Approval of the Collaborative Access Team's (CAT) designs described in the report is required prior to installation of beamline components in the APS Experiment Hall. Components that have a long lead time for design or procurement can be reviewed separately from the remainder of the beamline, but enough information must be provided so that the reviewer can understand the

255

Fuel Cell School Buses: Report to Congress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and power equipment manufacturers, energy and chemical companies, electric and natural gas utilities, building designers, standards development organizations, other Federal...

256

High Energy Batteries for Hybrid Buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

EnerDel batteries have already been employed successfully for electric vehicle (EV) applications. Compared to EV applications, hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) bus applications may be less stressful, but are still quite demanding, especially compared to battery applications for consumer products. This program evaluated EnerDel cell and pack system technologies with three different chemistries using real world HEV-Bus drive cycles recorded in three markets covering cold, hot, and mild climates. Cells were designed, developed, and fabricated using each of the following three chemistries: (1) Lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide (NMC) - hard carbon (HC); (2) Lithium manganese oxide (LMO) - HC; and (3) LMO - lithium titanium oxide (LTO) cells. For each cell chemistry, battery pack systems integrated with an EnerDel battery management system (BMS) were successfully constructed with the following features: real time current monitoring, cell and pack voltage monitoring, cell and pack temperature monitoring, pack state of charge (SOC) reporting, cell balancing, and over voltage protection. These features are all necessary functions for real-world HEV-Bus applications. Drive cycle test data was collected for each of the three cell chemistries using real world drive profiles under hot, mild, and cold climate conditions representing cities like Houston, Seattle, and Minneapolis, respectively. We successfully tested the battery packs using real-world HEV-Bus drive profiles under these various climate conditions. The NMC-HC and LMO-HC based packs successfully completed the drive cycles, while the LMO-LTO based pack did not finish the preliminary testing for the drive cycles. It was concluded that the LMO-HC chemistry is optimal for the hot or mild climates, while the NMC-HC chemistry is optimal for the cold climate. In summary, the objectives were successfully accomplished at the conclusion of the project. This program provided technical data to DOE and the public for assessing EnerDel technology, and helps DOE to evaluate the merits of underlying technology. The successful completion of this program demonstrated the capability of EnerDel battery packs to satisfactorily supply all power and energy requirements of a real-world HEV-Bus drive profile. This program supports green solutions to metropolitan public transportation problems by demonstrating the effectiveness of EnerDel lithium ion batteries for HEV-Bus applications.

Bruce Lu

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

Liquefied Natural Gas for Trucks and Buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is being developed as a heavy vehicle fuel. The reason for developing LNG is to reduce our dependency on imported oil by eliminating technical and costs barriers associated with its usage. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a program, currently in its third year, to develop and advance cost-effective technologies for operating and refueling natural gas-fueled heavy vehicles (Class 7-8 trucks). The objectives of the DOE Natural Gas Vehicle Systems Program are to achieve market penetration by reducing vehicle conversion and fuel costs, to increase consumer acceptance by improving the reliability and efficiency, and to improve air quality by reducing tailpipe emissions. One way to reduce fuel costs is to develop new supplies of cheap natural gas. Significant progress is being made towards developing more energy-efficient, low-cost, small-scale natural gas liquefiers for exploiting alternative sources of natural gas such as from landfill and remote gas sites. In particular, the DOE program provides funds for research and development in the areas of; natural gas clean up, LNG production, advanced vehicle onboard storage tanks, improved fuel delivery systems and LNG market strategies. In general, the program seeks to integrate the individual components being developed into complete systems, and then demonstrate the technology to establish technical and economic feasibility. The paper also reviews the importance of cryogenics in designing LNG fuel delivery systems.

James Wegrzyn; Michael Gurevich

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

258

DOE_FINAL_REPORT_newest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Scientific/Technical Report Final Scientific/Technical Report October 1 2008 to June 30 2011 Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01 Submitted by: College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Science Oregon State University Corvallis, OR 97331-5503 Principal Investigator: Anne Trehu Graduate Research Assistant: Peter Kannberg Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory November 15, 2012 Oil & Natural Gas Technology 2 Disclaimer: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or

259

final_report.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Scientific/Technical Report Final Scientific/Technical Report October 1, 2008 - December 31, 2011 Integrating Natural Gas Hydrates in the Global Carbon Cycle Submitted by: The University of Chicago 5801 S. Ellis Avenue Chicago, IL 60637 Principal Author: David Archer Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 10, 2012 Office of Fossil Energy 1 Integrating Natural Gas Hydrates in the Global Carbon Cycle Final Scientific/Technical Report submitted by David Archer 1 and Bruce Buffett 2 Submitted 4-10-2012 1 Department of the Geophysical Sciences University of Chicago Chicago IL 60637 2 University of California, Berkeley Earth & Planetary Science 383 McCone Hall Berkeley, CA 94720-5800 Agency Award Number: DE-NT0006558 Award Dates 1/1/08 to 12/31/11

260

SWERA_Final_Report  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethiopian Rural Energy Development Ethiopian Rural Energy Development and Promotion Center Final Report Country background information Solar and Wind Energy Utilization and Project Development Scenarios October 2007 Ethio Resource Group with Partners i Table of Contents Executive Summary..................................................................................... ii 1 Introduction.........................................................................................................1-1 1.1 Overview.....................................................................................................1-1 1.2 Objective of the study .................................................................................1-1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buses final results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project, ?Capital Investment to Fund Equipment Purchases and Facility Modifications to Create a Sustainable Future for EnergyXchange? served to replace landfill gas energy with alternative energy resources, primarily solar and wood waste. This is the final project closeout report.

Gilbert, Chris [Altamont Environmental, Inc.] [Altamont Environmental, Inc.

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

262

Sage Final EA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINAL FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Environmental Assessment for DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE FOR SAGE ELECTROCHROMICS SAGEGLASS® HIGH VOLUME MANUFACTURING (HVM) FACILITY IN FARIBAULT, MN U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, DC 20585 July 2009 DOE/EA-1645 Environmental Assessment for Department of Energy Loan Guarantee for Sage Electrochromics SageGlass® High Volume Manufacturing Facility in Faribault, MN DOE/EA-1645 TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF ACRONYMS iii Executive Summary 1 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION 2 2.0 PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 2 2.1 Description of Proposed Action 2 2.2 Alternatives Considered but Eliminated 7 2.3 No Action Alternative 8 3.0 AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS 9

263

Final - Gasbuggy S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasbuggy S Gasbuggy S i t e Environmental Management End State Vision - January 2005 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Gasbuggy Site ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT END STATE VISION Final Final - Gasbuggy Site Environmental Management End State Vhion - fanuaty 2005 Executive Summary The Environmental Management End State Vision is to be used as the primary tool for communicating the individual site end state to the involved parties (e.g., U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], regulators, public stakeholders, Tribal Nations). The end state document is not a decisional document. If the DOE decides to seek changes to the current compliance agreements, decisions, or statutoqdregulatory requirements, those changes will be made in accordance with applicable requirements (DOEIEM, 2003).

264

RPSEA Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RPSEA RPSEA Final Report 08122-36.Final Produced Water Pretreatment for Water Recovery and Salt Production 08122-36 January 26, 2012 Principal Investigator: James M. Silva Senior Chemical Engineer General Electric Global Research Center 1 Research Circle Niskayuna, NY 12309 ii Legal Notice This report was prepared by General Electric Global Research as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA, members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of any of the entities: a. MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR USEFULNESS OF THE INFORMATION

265

Final Notice of Violation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8,2011 8,2011 CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED Mr. Jolm J. Grossenbacher Director, Idaho National Laboratory and President, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC P. O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415-3695 SEA-2011-01 Dear Mr. Grossenbacher: Pursuant to section 234B of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, (the Act), and the Department of Energy's (DOE) regulations at 10 C.F.R . §§ 824.4(a)(3) and 824.7(b), DOE is issuing this Final Notice of Violation (FNOV) to Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) for multiple violations of classified information security requirements. The FNOV is based upon the Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement May 11, 2010, Investigation Report and an evaluation of the evidence presented to DOE by BEA, including BEA's final

266

Final Design RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Design Review Module Final Design Review Module March 2010 CD-0 [This Rev Design Re O 0 view Module w eview of the OR OFFICE OF C CD-1 was used to dev R U 233 Dispo F ENVIRO Standard R Fin Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M velop the Revie osition Project ONMENTAL Review Plan al Design view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 ew Plan for 90% in 2009. Lesso Module.] L MANAGE n (SRP) n e pplicability D-3 % Design Revi ons learned hav EMENT CD-4 iew of SWPF i ve been incorpo Post Ope in 2008 and for orated in the R eration r 60% Review Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively.

267

Final Report for the H2Fuel Bus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The H2Fuel Bus is the world's first hydrogen-fueled electric hybrid transit bus. It was a project developed through a public/private partnership involving several leading technological and industrial organizations, with primary funding by the Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goals of the project are to gain valuable information on the technical readiness and economic viability of hydrogen fueled buses and to enhance the public awareness and acceptance of emerging hydrogen technologies.

Jacobs, W.D.

1998-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

268

EIS-0240: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0240: Final Environmental Impact Statement Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium This document assesses the environmental impacts that may result from...

269

Modeling Protein Structures with Conditional Random Fields: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report for DE-FG02-05ER25696. It describes the results of the performed research.

Christopher Langmead

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

270

EA-1463: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1463: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1463: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1463: Final Environmental Assessment 10 CFR 433: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings and 10 CFR 435: Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings This document is functionally identical to the Environmental Assessment released in support of the Interim Final Rules published on December 4, 2006 (71 FR 70275). No findings or results have been changed. The EA examines the potential environmental impacts of the Final Rule on building habitability and the outdoor environment. To identify the potential environmental impacts that may result from implementing the Final Rule for new Federal commercial and residential buildings, DOE compared the Final

271

Final Environmental Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

95 95 :&,, ' - , i . -- Final Environmental Assessment for Device Assembly - Facility Operations f 3: >fi - , - , ' , 7 - . ' ' , , . I 8 ' , :-<:- L , a . ' ' ' -L. -1 , , ~ e m - . - I ! - , - # 8 , r I I , , , - , . .-- - ' - I S - . ! - , - , Y 2 L - . . 8 : L.-- , r Nevada ' f e s t ~ h e , Nye county, Nevada U. S. Department Of Energy - , 8 - - . 8 - I,, ' - 8 - - , , 8 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT for DEVICE ASSEMBLY FACIUTY OPERATIONS MAY 1995 TABLE OF CONTENTS LISTOFFIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv USTOFTABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv A. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 8. PURPOSE AND NEED FOR ACTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B.1 Purpose and Need for Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

272

SIM Metrology School FINAL PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ph Photometry (M. Nadal, 22/B317) P Pressure (Doug Olson, 220/B39) SIM Metrology School FINAL PROGRAM TIMETABLE ...

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

273

Matrix of Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Report Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for "Big Box" stores in California: predicted indoor air quality and energy consumption...

274

Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6E/EIS-0096-F . Ji^ ' 6E/EIS-0096-F . Ji^ ' w V' - > DOE/EIS--00 96-F-Vol.1 //C^ DE84 0 0 1 4 4 6 Final Environmental Impact Statement Remedial Actions at the Former Vitro Rare Metals Plant Site, Canonsburg, Washington County, Pennsylvania United States Department of Energy July 1983 Volume I r NOTICE } IPORTIONS OF THIS REPORT ARE ILLEGIBLE.' / It has been reproduced from the besi ' available copy to permit the broadest possible availability. This document is PUBLICLY RELEASABLl Authorizmg OfFtciai Date: Z P l ^ o " ? isTWBUTim ef T H I S m\jM] IS mm\m DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal

275

NETL Final Report Outline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensor Evaluation for a Robotic In Line Inspection Vehicle for Sensor Evaluation for a Robotic In Line Inspection Vehicle for Detection of Natural Gas Pipeline Defects and Leaks Final Report February 2003 Submitted by Michael Hassard and Gerald Stoker Advanced Diagnostics and Production Testing Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS 0555 And Mark Vaughn and Bob Bickerstaff Mobile Robotics Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS1125 Albuquerque, NM 87185 This work was sponsored by The Strategic Center for Natural Gas Natural Gas Infrastructure Reliability Program, Natural Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), DOE Office of Fossil Energy ABSTRACT When examining the condition of a pipeline, In-Line Inspection (ILI) utilizing various Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) methods is an essential tool and a significant factor in establishing a quality management

276

FINAL CEf VED  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOElEA 1147 DOElEA 1147 FINAL CEf VED 6 I 3 I996 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSME ~ ~ O S T I for the LOW ENERGY DEMONSTRATION ACCELERATOR TECHNICAL AREA 53 LUS ALAMUS NATFUNAL LABORATORY LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO . . - . - . I Date Prepared: April 1, 1996 ~ Prepared for: Office of Defense Programs US Department of Energy Los Alamos Area Q S c e DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or use- fulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any

277

NETL Final Report Outline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Active and Passive Gas Imagers for Evaluation of Active and Passive Gas Imagers for Transmission Pipeline Remote Leak Detection Final Report December 2002 Submitted by Thomas A. Reichardt, Sanjay Devdas, and Thomas J. Kulp Diagnostics and Remote Sensing Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 969, MS 9056 Livermore, CA 94551 and Wayne Einfeld Environmental Monitoring and Characterization Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS 0755 Albuquerque, NM 87185 This work was sponsored by The Strategic Center for Natural Gas Natural Gas Infrastructure Reliability Program, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), DOE Office of Fossil Energy 2 Abstract The pipeline industry would benefit considerably from the development of systems that could provide early warning capabilities for major pipeline integrity and safety issues caused by leaks.

278

Final Report.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selection and Treatment of Stripper Gas Wells for Selection and Treatment of Stripper Gas Wells for Production Enhancement, Mocane-Laverne Field, Oklahoma Final Report October, 2000 - September 30, 2003 Scott Reeves Advanced Resources International 9801 Westhemier, Suite 805 Houston, Texas 77042 and Buckley Walsh Oneok Resources 100 West Fifth Street Tulsa, OK 74103-0871 September, 2002 U.S. Department of Energy DE-FG26-00NT40789 i Disclaimers U.S. Department of Energy This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United Sates Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

279

Final_Report.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy, Offi ce of Fossil Energy Technology International Inc.: Seismic While Drilling Project Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Teapot Dome Field, Wyoming Final Report for the period of June 11-14, 2008 Completed February 2009 This document may contain protected Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) information and is not to be further disclosed for a period of 5 years from the date it was produced except as expressly provided for in the CRADA. DISCLAIMER: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors or their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied,

280

Final Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

In this project we have established guidelines for the design on organic chromophores suitable for producing high triplet yields via singlet fission. We have proven their utility by identifying a chromophore of a structural class that had never been examined for singlet fission before, 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran, and demonstrating in two independent ways that a thin layer of this material produces a triplet yield of 200% within experimental error. We have also designed a second chromophore of a very different type, again of a structural class that had not been examined for singlet fission before, and found that in a thin layer it produces a 70% triplet yield. Finally, we have enhanced the theoretical understanding of the quantum mechanical nature of the singlet fission process.

Josef Michl

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buses final results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

AIPM Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The final AIPM project report consists of six sections. Each section includes information on the original AIPM project and extension work on the high temperature design. The first section (1) provides an overview of the program and highlights the significant targets to meet at the end of the program. The next section (2) summarizes the significant technical accomplishments by the SEMIKRON AIPM team during the course of the project. Greater technical details are provided in a collection of all the quarterly reports which can be found in the appendix. Section three (3) presents some the more significant technical data collected from technology demonstrators. Section four (4) analyzes the manufacturing cost or economic aspects of producing 100,000 units/yr. Section five (5) describes the commercialization efforts of the AIPM technology into the automotive market. The last section (6) recommends follow on work that will build on the efforts and achievements of the AIPM program.

John Mookken

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

NETL Final Report Outline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrument for Airborne Remote Sensing of Transmission Instrument for Airborne Remote Sensing of Transmission Pipeline Leaks Final Report August 2004 Submitted by Thomas A. Reichardt, Sanjay Devdas, and Thomas J. Kulp Diagnostics and Remote Sensing Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 969, MS 9056 Livermore, CA 94551 and Wayne Einfeld Environmental Monitoring and Characterization Department Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 5800, MS 0755 Albuquerque, NM 87185 This work was sponsored by The Strategic Center for Natural Gas, Natural Gas Infrastructure Reliability Program, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), DOE Office of Fossil Energy Abstract The pipeline industry would benefit considerably from the development of systems that could provide early warning capabilities for major pipeline integrity and safety issues indicated by

283

Clean Fleet Final Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

3 3 V e h i c l e M a i n t e n a n c e a n d D u r a b i l i t y FINAL REPORT December 1995 December 1995 December 1995 This information was prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Operations, through sponsor- ship by various companies and associations, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District), and the California Energy Commission (Commission). Battelle has endeavored to produce a high quality study consistent with its contract commitments. However, because of the research and/or experimental nature of this work, the District or Commission, Battelle, the sponsoring companies and associations, along with the employees, contractors, and subcontractors of each of them, make no warranties, expressed or implied, and they assume no legal liability for the information in this report. The District or

284

Blackout Final Implementation Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Report on the Implementation of the Task Force Recommendations U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force Natural Resources Canada U.S. Department of Energy September 2006 Final Report on the Implementation of the Task Force Recommendations U.S.-Canada Power System Outage Task Force September 2006 Natural Resources Canada U.S. Department of Energy Acknowledgments This document was prepared by staff of Natural Resources Canada and the U.S. Department of Energy. The principal contributors are listed in Annex 1. The staff wish to acknowledge the contributions of the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the Ontario Ministry of Energy. The staff also wish to acknowl- edge the support and cooperation of the North American Electric Reliability Council and, in particular, of Mr. David Nevius, Senior Vice President and Direc- tor of Reliability Assessment & Performance

285

Clean Fleet Final Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

2 2 P r o j e c t D e s i g n a n d I m p l e m e n t a t i o n FINAL REPORT December 1995 December 1995 This information was prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus Operations, through sponsorship by various companies and associations, the South Coast Air Quality Management District (District), and the California Energy Commission (Commission). Battelle has endeavored to produce a high quality study consistent with its contract commitments. However, because of the research and/or experimental nature of this work, the District or Commission, Battelle, the sponsoring companies and associations, along with the employees, contractors, and subcontractors of each of them, make no warranties, expressed or implied, and they assume no legal liability for the information in this report.

286

Combustion turbine repowering: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The study discusses the findings of a conceptual site-specific investigation into the feasibility of repowering an existing reheat fossil unit utilizing combustion turbines. It identifies a potentially attractive repowering project, through the evaluation and selective elimination of a large number of alternatives. A conceptual design is performed on the selected alternative. Capital costs are developed for this alternative including new equipment and modifications to existing equipment. The results of an economic evaluation and sensitivity analysis are presented, to serve as a basis for a decision on whether or not to proceed with final design, procurement, and construction of the system. The steps presented in the report are intended to provide for the utility industry a detailed methodology for investigating repowering at a specific utility site. 4 refs., 21 figs., 15 tabs.

Oliker, I.; Silaghy, F.J.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Dairy methane generator. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Details of the work completed under this contract are presented. During the winter of 1979-80 three students enrolled, in the Mechanical Design Engineering Technology program at the Pennsylvania State University's Capitol Campus (Middletown, PA), undertook a feasibility study for the utilization of the manure generated by the dairy cows located on Mr. Thomas B. Williams farm for the generation and use of methane gas. The results of their effort was the design of an Anaerobic Digester/Electric Generation System. This preliminary designed system was later changed and improved by another group of P.S.U. MDET students in the spring of 1980. The final design included working drawings and an economic analysis of the estimated investment necessary to complete the Methane Generator/Electric Power Generation System.

Williams, T.B.

1981-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

Blackout 2003: Blackout Final Implementation Report | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Blackout Final Implementation Report Blackout 2003: Blackout Final Implementation Report Final Report on the August 14, 2003 Blackout in the United States and Canada: Causes and...

289

Final ECR 2008 Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final ECR 2008 Report Final ECR 2008 Report Final ECR 2008 Report Environmental Conflict Resolution Third Annual Report January 2009 More Documents & Publications ECR Annual Report...

290

Fermilab Today | Results for the Frontiers | 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 CMS: Higgs and top quarks together March 21, 2013 CDF: CDF finalizes combined Higgs boson results March 15, 2013 MINOS: Does matter matter for neutrino flavor? March 14,...

291

Latest results from OBELIX on hadron spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the last year OBELIX has produced final results on some selected annihilation channels and has studied new experimental approaches for the selection of the initial state quantum number of the (N?N) annihilation

The OBELIX Collaboration

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report for the Research Grant DE-FG02-08ER54989 'Edge Plasma Simulations in NSTX and CTF: Synergy of Lithium Coating, Non-Diffusive Anomalous Transport and Drifts'. The UCSD group including: A.Yu. Pigarov (PI), S.I. Krasheninnikov and R.D. Smirnov, was working on modeling of the impact of lithium coatings on edge plasma parameters in NSTX with the multi-species multi-fluid code UEDGE. The work was conducted in the following main areas: (i) improvements of UEDGE model for plasma-lithium interactions, (ii) understanding the physics of low-recycling divertor regime in NSTX caused by lithium pumping, (iii) study of synergistic effects with lithium coatings and non-diffusive ballooning-like cross-field transport, (iv) simulation of experimental multi-diagnostic data on edge plasma with lithium pumping in NSTX via self-consistent modeling of D-Li-C plasma with UEDGE, and (v) working-gas balance analysis. The accomplishments in these areas are given in the corresponding subsections in Section 2. Publications and presentations made under the Grant are listed in Section 3.

Alexander Pigarov

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

293

Final Report to the U  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Markup Language Final Report Gas Hydrate Markup Language Final Report Development of a Gas Hydrate Markup Language Final Report Prepared By: E. Dendy Sloan, Director and Weaver Chair Center for Hydrate Research Colorado School of Mines Golden, Colorado 80401 esloan@mines.edu For: U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Under Contract DE-AF26-067Nt00440 Development of a Gas Hydrate Markup Language Final Report Table of Contents Preface............................................................................................................................................. 2 1.0 Introduction......................................................................................................................... 3 1.1 OBJECTIVES OF THE DATABASE AND GHML DEVELOPMENT EFFORT

294

MTX final report  

SciTech Connect

The MTX experiment was proposed in 1986 to apply high frequency microwaves generated by a free-electron laser (FEL) to electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in a high field, high density tokamak. As the absorption of microwaves at the electron cyclotron resonance requires high frequencies, the opportunity of applying a free-electron laser has appeal as the device is not limited to frequencies in the microwave or long millimeter wavelength regions, in contrast to many other sources. In addition, the FEL is inherently a high power source of microwaves, which would permit single units of 10 MW or more, optimum for reactors. Finally, it was recognized early in the study of the application of the FEL based on the induction linear accelerator, that the nonlinear effects associated with the intense pulses of microwaves naturally generated would offer several unique opportunities to apply ECRH to current drive, MHD control, and other plasma effects. It was consequently decided to adapt the induction accelerator based FEL to heating and controlling the tokamak, and to conduct experiments on the associated physics. To this end, the Alcator C tokamak was moved from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where it was installed in Building 431 and operated from March, 1989, until the conclusion of the experiment in October, 1992. The FEL, based on the ETA-11 accelerator and IMP wiggler was brought into operation by the LLNL Electron Beam Group and power injected into the tokamak during an experimental run in the Fall, 1989. Following an upgrade by the MTX group, a second experimental run was made lasting from the Winter, 1992 through the end of the experiment. Significant contributions to the ECRH experiments were made by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI).

Hooper, E.B. [ed.; Allen, S.L.; Brown, M.D.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Foote, J.H.; Hoshino, K. [and others

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

EA-0386: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-0386: Final Environmental Assessment EA-0386: Final Environmental Assessment EA-0386: Final Environmental Assessment Energy Conservation Standards for Consumer Products: Dishwashers, Clothes Washers, and Clothes Dryers This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the environmental impacts resulting from new or amended energy-efficiency, standards for dishwashers, clothes washers and clothes dryers as mandated by the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987. Technical Support Document: Energy Conservation Standards for Consumer Products: Dishwashers, Clothes Washers, and Clothes Dryers including Environmental Assessment Regulatory Impact Analysis, DOE/EA-0386, July 1989 More Documents & Publications EA-0372: Final Environmental Assessment EA-0386: Finding of No Significant Impact

296

EA-1418: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Final Environmental Assessment 8: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1418: Final Environmental Assessment Otter Tail Power Company Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector, Big Stone City, Grant County, South Dakota DOE's objective in participating in the cooperative agreement is to support demonstration of technoloy potentially capable of substantially reducing particulate emissions, particularly emissions of fine particulate, from coal-fired power plants. The environmental analysis identified that the most notable changes to result from the proposed action would occur in the following areas: air emissions, construction impacts, and solid waste disposal. Final Environmental Assessment Otter Tail Power Company Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector, Big Stone City, Grant County, South Dakota

297

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Executive Summary The document contains Final Technical Report on the Industrial Assessment Center Program at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, covering the contract period of 9/1/2002 to 11/30/2006, under the contract DE-FC36-02GO 12073. The Report describes six required program tasks, as follows: TASK 1 is a summary of the assessments performed over the life of the award: 77 assessments were performed, 595 AR were recommended, covering a very broad range of manufacturing plants. TASK 2 is a description of the efforts to promote and increase the adoption of assessment recommendations and employ innovative methods to assist in accomplishing these goals. The LMU IAC has been very successful in accomplishing the program goals, including implemented savings of $5,141,895 in energy, $10,045,411 in productivity and $30,719 in waste, for a total of $15,218,025. This represents 44% of the recommended savings of $34,896,392. TASK 3 is a description of the efforts promoting the IAC Program and enhancing recruitment efforts for new clients and expanded geographic coverage. LMU IAC has been very successful recruiting new clients covering Southern California. Every year, the intended number of clients was recruited. TASK 4 describes the educational opportunities, training, and other related activities for IAC students. A total of 38 students graduated from the program, including 2-3 graduate students every semester, and the remainder undergraduate students, mostly from the Mechanical Engineering Department. The students received formal weekly training in energy (75%) and productivity (25). All students underwent extensive safety training. All students praised the IAC experience very highly. TASK 5 describes the coordination and integration of the Center activities with other Center and IAC Program activities, and DOE programs. LMU IAC worked closely with MIT, and SDSU IAC and SFSU IAC, and enthusiastically supported the SEN activities. TASK 6 describes other tasks and accomplishments. During the award period, Assistant Director Rudy Marloth became a DOE Qualified Specialist in PHAST, a DOE Qualified Specialist in Compressed Air, and a Certified Energy Manager, and earned a MS degree in Environmental Science.

Bohdan W. Oppenheim; Rudolf Marloth

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

298

Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion can exploit natural temperature gradients in the oceans to generate usable forms of energy (for example, cost-competitive baseload electricity in tropical regions such as Hawaii) free from fossil fuel consumption and global warming emissions.The No.1 acknowledged challenge of constructing an OTEC plant is the Cold Water Pipe (CWP), which draws cold water from 1000m depths up to the surface, to serve as the coolant for the OTEC Rankine cycle. For a commercial-scale plant, the CWP is on the order of 10m in diameter.This report describes work done by LMSSC developing the CWP for LM MS2 New Ventures emerging OTEC business. The work started in early 2008 deciding on the minimum-cost CWP architecture, materials, and fabrication process. In order to eliminate what in previous OTEC work had been a very large assembly/deployment risk, we took the innovative approach of building an integral CWP directly from theOTEC platform and down into the water. During the latter half of 2008, we proceeded to a successful small-scale Proof-of-Principles validation of the new fabrication process, at the Engineering Development Lab in Sunnyvale. During 2009-10, under the Cooperative Agreement with the US Dept. of Energy, we have now successfully validated key elements of the process and apparatus at a 4m diameter scale suitable for a future OTEC Pilot Plant. The validations include: (1) Assembly of sandwich core rings from pre-pultruded hollow 'planks,' holding final dimensions accurately; (2) Machine-based dispensing of overlapping strips of thick fiberglass fabric to form the lengthwise-continuous face sheets, holding accurate overlap dimensions; (3) Initial testing of the fabric architecture, showing that the overlap splices develop adequate mechanical strength (work done under a parallel US Naval Facilities Command program); and (4) Successful resin infusion/cure of 4m diameter workpieces, obtaining full wet-out and a non-discernable knitline between successive stepwise infusions.

Dr. Alan Miller; Matthew Ascari

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

299

Energy efficient residence: research results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report on the design, construction, and monitoring of an energy efficient residence and a conventional comparison home by the National Association of Home Builders Research Foundation, Inc. The report describes the two homes in considerable detail, summarizes the results of the energy and other measurements, and evaluates many of the energy conservation techniques used. Finally, these results are synthesized with the foundation's other energy conservation experience into two lists of energy saving design tips for homes in both colder and warmer climates. Most of the design tips are accompanied by brief comments intended to aid in their interpretation and use.

Johnson, R.J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Bireachability and final multialgebras  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multialgebras generalise algebraic semantics to handle nondeterminism. They model relational structures, representing relations as multivalued functions by selecting one argument as the result. This leads to strong algebraic properties ...

Micha? Walicki

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Final Technical Report for U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-09ER55005 Nonlinear FLR Effects in Reduced Fluid Models Alain J. Brizard, Saint Michael??s College The above-mentioned DoE grant was used to support research activities by the PI during a sabbatical leave from Saint Michael??s College in 2009. The major focus of the work was the role played by guiding-center and gyrocenter (linear and nonlinear) polarization and magnetization effects in understanding transport processes in turbulent magnetized plasmas. The theoretical tools used for this work include Lie-transform perturbation methods and Lagrangian (variational) methods developed by the PI in previous work. The present final technical report lists (I) the peer-reviewed publications that were written based on work funded by the Grant; (II) invited and contributed conference presentations during the period funded by the Grant; and (III) seminars presented during the period funded by the Grant. I. Peer-reviewed Publications A.J. Brizard and N. Tronko, 2011, Exact momentum conservation for the gyrokinetic Vlasov- Poisson equations, Physics of Plasmas 18 , 082307:1-14 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3625554 ]. J. Decker, Y. Peysson, A.J. Brizard, and F.-X. Duthoit, 2010, Orbit-averaged guiding-center Fokker-Planck operator for numerical applications, Physics of Plasmas 17, 112513:1-12 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3519514]. A.J. Brizard, 2010, Noether derivation of exact conservation laws for dissipationless reduced fluid models, Physics of Plasmas 17, 112503:1-8 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3515303]. F.-X. Duthoit, A.J. Brizard, Y. Peysson, and J. Decker, 2010, Perturbation analysis of trapped particle dynamics in axisymmetric dipole geometry, Physics of Plasmas 17, 102903:1-9 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3486554]. A.J. Brizard, 2010, Exact energy conservation laws for full and truncated nonlinear gyrokinetic equations, Physics of Plasmas 17, 042303:1-11 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3374428]. A.J. Brizard, J. Decker, Y. Peysson, and F.-X. Duthoit, 2009, Orbit-averaged guiding-center Fokker-Planck operator, Physics of Plasmas 16, 102304:1-9[http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3249627]. A.J. Brizard, 2009, Variational Principles for Reduced Plasma Physics, Journal of Physics: Conference Series 169, 012003 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1742-6596/169/1/012003]. II. Invited and Contributed Conference Presentations A.J. Brizard and N. Tronko, Momentum conservation law for the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Poisson equations, 53rd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Salt Lake City (Utah), November 14-18, 2011. A.J. Brizard, P.J. Morrison, C. Chandre, and E. Tassi, On the road to the Hamiltonian formulation of gyrokinetic theory, 52nd Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Chicago (Illinois), November 8-12, 2010. F.-X. Duthoit, A.J. Brizard, Y. Peysson, and J. Decker, Lie-transform perturbation analysis of trapped-particle dynamics in axisymmetric dipole geometry, 2010 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference, Seattle (Washington), April 19-21, 2010. N. Tronko and A.J. Brizard, Gyrokinetic momentum conservation law, 2010 International Sherwood Fusion Theory Conference, Seattle (Washington), April 19-21, 2010. C. Chandre and A.J. Brizard, Hamiltonian formulation of reduced Vlasov-Maxwell equations, 50th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, Dallas (Texas), November 17-21, 2008. A.J. Brizard, Nonlinear FLR effects in reduced fluid models, Invited Presentation at 11th Easter Plasma Meeting, Torino (Italy), April 15-17, 2009. III. Seminars Reduced Fokker-Planck operators for advanced plasma simulations, seminar given at CEA Cadarache (France), May 25, 2009. Ray phase-space methods in linear mode conversion, seminar given at CPT Luminy (France), April 1, 2009. Old and new methods in gyrokinetic theory, seminar given at CEA Cadarache (France), March 20, 2009. Hamiltonian theory of adiabatic motion of relativistic charged particles, seminar given at CPT Luminy (France), March 11, 2009. Noether method for fluids a

Alain J. Brizard

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

Development of a Turnkey Hydrogen Fueling Station Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transition to hydrogen as a fuel source presents several challenges. One of the major hurdles is the cost-effective production of hydrogen in small quantities (less than 1MMscf/month). In the early demonstration phase, hydrogen can be provided by bulk distribution of liquid or compressed gas from central production plants; however, the next phase to fostering the hydrogen economy will likely include onsite generation and extensive pipeline networks to help effect a pervasive infrastructure. Providing inexpensive hydrogen at a fleet operators garage or local fueling station is a key enabling technology for direct hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs). The objective of this project was to develop a comprehensive, turnkey, stand-alone, commercial hydrogen fueling station for FCVs with state-of-the-art technology that is cost-competitive with current hydrocarbon fuels. Such a station would promote the advent of the hydrogen fuel economy for buses, fleet vehicles, and ultimately personal vehicles. Air Products, partnering with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), The Pennsylvania State University, Harvest Energy Technology, and QuestAir, developed a turnkey hydrogen fueling station on the Penn State campus. Air Products aimed at designing a station that would have 65% overall station efficiency, 82% PSA (pressure swing adsorption) efficiency, and the capability of producing hydrogen at $3.00/kg (gge) H2 at mass production rates. Air Products designed a fueling station at Penn State from the ground up. This project was implemented in three phases. The first phase evaluated the various technologies available in hydrogen generation, compression, storage, and gas dispensing. In the second phase, Air Products designed the components chosen from the technologies examined. Finally, phase three entailed a several-month period of data collection, full-scale operation, maintenance of the station, and optimization of system reliability and performance. Based on field data analysis, it was determined by a proprietary hydrogen-analysis model that hydrogen produced from the station at a rate of 1500 kg/day and when produced at 1000 stations per year would be able to deliver hydrogen at a price of $3.03/kg (gge) H2. The stations efficiency was measured to be 65.1%, and the PSA was tested and ran at an efficiency of 82.1%, thus meeting the project targets. From the study, it was determined that more research was needed in the area of hydrogen fueling. The overall cost of the hydrogen energy station, when combined with the required plot size for scaled-up hydrogen demands, demonstrated that a station using steam methane reforming technology as a means to produce onsite hydrogen would have limited utility in the marketplace. Alternative hydrogen supplies, such as liquid or pipeline delivery to a refueling station, need to be included in the exploration of alternative energy site layouts. These avenues need to be explored before a definitive refueling station configuration and commercialization pathway can be determined.

David E. Guro; Edward Kiczek; Kendral Gill; Othniel Brown

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

303

Microsoft Word - Phase I - Final Report _final_.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low NOx Emissions in a Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine FINAL REPORT Reporting Period Start Date: October 1, 2003 Reporting Period End Date: May 31, 2004 Principal Author(s): Raymond...

304

LANL Volume 2_Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Emergency Management Programs at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Office of the Secretary of Energy April 2002 Volume II INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INSPECTION OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AT THE LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY Volume II April 2002 Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ................................................................................................................................1 2.0 Results .......................................................................................................................................2 3.0 Conclusions .................................................................................................................................4

305

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Our team of investigators from MIT (Michael Laub) and Stanford (Harley McAdams and Lucy Shapiro) conducted a multi-faceted, systematic experimental analysis of the 106 Caulobacter two-component signal transduction system proteins (62 histidine kinases and 44 response regulators) to understand how they coordinate cell cycle progression, metabolism, and response to environmental changes. These two-component signaling proteins were characterized at the genetic, biochemical, and genomic levels. The results generated by our laboratories have provided numerous insights into how Caulobacter cells sense and respond to a myriad of signals. As nearly all bacteria use two-component signaling for cell regulation, the results from this project help to deepen our general understanding of bacterial signal transduction. The tools and approaches developed can be applied to other bacteria. In particular, work from the Laub laboratory now enables the systematic, rational rewiring of two-component signaling proteins, a major advance that stands to impact synthetic biology and the development of biosensors and other designer molecular circuits. Results are summarized from our work. Each section lists publications and publicly-available resources which result from the work described.

Michael Laub

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

306

LCC-0089 final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 UCRL-ID-148939 July 2002 Structural Modeling of Tesla TDR Positron Target Werner Stein Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, CA John C. Sheppard Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford University Menlo Park, California Abstract: The Tesla positron target is a 0.4 radiation length thick titanium target that is rotating with a speed of 50 m/s at its periphery. Energy deposition from one pulse occurs over 1 millisecond and results in heating of the target over a 5 cm arc of material. The 22.2 MeV photon beam has a spot size of 0.75 mm and results in a maximum temperature jump of 440 °C. Stresses are induced in the material from thermal expansion of the hotter material. Peak effective stresses reach 38 Ksi (2.7x10

307

UPS CNG Truck Fleet Final Report  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

® ® ® ® ® ® ® ® Clean Air Natural Gas Vehicle This is a Clean Air Natural Gas Vehicle This is a UPS CNG Truck Fleet UPS CNG Truck Fleet UPS CNG Truck Fleet Final results Final Results Produced for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), a DOE national laboratory Alternative Fuel Trucks DOE/NREL Truck Evaluation Project By Kevin Chandler, Battelle Kevin Walkowicz, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Nigel Clark, West Virginia University Acknowledgments This evaluation would not have been possible without the cooperation, support, and responsiveness of the staff at UPS in Hartford and Atlanta. Thanks are due to the following UPS personnel: On-Site Headquarters Tom Robinson Ken Henrie Bill Jacob Rick Rufolo

308

Phase I Final Technical Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Report to Final Report to Phase I Final Technical Report 10121.4302.01.Final1 Ultra-High Conductivity Umbilicals: Polymer Nanotube Umbilicals (PNUs) 10121-4302-01 June 24, 2013 Christopher A. Dyke Principal Investigator NanoRidge Materials, Inc. 15850 Vickery Drive Houston, Texas 77032 LEGAL NOTICE THIS REPORT WAS PREPARED BY NANORIDGE MATERIALS, INC. AS AN ACCOUNT OF WORK SPONSORED BY THE RESEARCH PARTNERSHIP TO SECURE ENERGY FOR AMERICA, RPSEA. NEITHER RPSEA MEMBERS OF RPSEA, THE NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY, THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NOR ANY PERSON ACTING ON BEHALF OF ANY OF THE ENTITIES: a. MAKES ANY WARRANTY OR REPRESENTATION, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WITH RESPECT TO ACCURACY, COMPLETENESS, OR USEFULNESS OF THE INFORMATION

309

Danish Energy Authority Final report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Danish Energy Authority Final report Kaliningrad Regional District Heating Network 2004 - 2006 2006 #12;Kaliningrad District Heating Network Project 2004 - 2006 2 Table of content The report........................................................................................................... 7 1.4.1 District heating in the Region

310

Heat transfer in oscillatory flow: Final report  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report on a 4-year research effort funded by DOE. The bulk of the material has been included in numerous publications which are listed in a later section. Most of these have appeared already in archival journals. The most recent work is included in two Ph.D. dissertations. Since most of the material is already documented in detail in the publications mentioned above, we confine the discussion here to highlights of the results.

Telionis, D.P.; Diller, T.E.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration: First Results Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the early implementation experience for the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, the largest fleet of fuel cell buses in the United States. The ZEBA Demonstration group includes five participating transit agencies: AC Transit (lead transit agency), Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA), Golden Gate Transit (GGT), San Mateo County Transit District (SamTrans), and San Francisco Municipal Railway (Muni). The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project was centered on developing new ceramic materials to improve efficiency of solar energy capture for photovoltaic cells and for catalysts to split water to make hydrogen. The work has led to one possible breakthrough material, a nanoscale photocatalyst that can be used to assemble nanocomposite catalysts. Another important result of the work is the development of synthesis methods to create nanostructured and mesoporous oxides for use in solar energy harvesting. Specifically, we have developed two new methods potentially useful for preparing high performance electrodes for PV cells.

S.T. Misture

2011-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

313

EMERGE. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EMERGE had two basic goals: (1) To ensure that the DOE-funded labs at UW-Madison, U of Chicago, and UIUC were connected to the DOE National Labs at the highest available speeds. EMERGE grantees were to work with DOE network engineers to achieve this goal. (2) Establish a testbed for DiffServ networking, develop monitoring, measuring and, visualization tools, develop a grid services package, cooperate with Internet2's Quality DiffServ efforts, and deploy results. For the most part these goals have been achieved, although there were some gaps. By the same token there were also some achievements that came about beyond expectations. The EMERGE testbed was established and extended to Internet2 and, via STAR TAP, to CERN. Additionally, software was developed. Differentiated Services (DiffServ) is a mechanism for supporting network Quality of Service (or QoS) whereby packets that are transmitted by a client program are marked with a priority setting that can be interpreted by the router to effect special treatment of the packet. In particular the marked packets are promoted to a higher priority queue in the router and, as a result, spend a minimum amount of time in the router. Packets that are not marked are attached to a lower priority queue, and in some cases may be dropped when congestion arises.

Vonderhoe, Robert H.

2002-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

314

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

This program applied reservoir cathode technology to increase the lifetime of cesiated tungsten photocathodes. Cesiated tungsten photocathodes provide a quantum efficiency of approximately 0.08% when cesium is initially applied to the surface. During operation, however, the cesium evaporates from the surface, resulting in a gradual decrease in quantum efficiency. After 4-6 hours of operation, the efficiency drop to below useful levels, requiring recoating on the emission surface. This program developed a cathode geometry where cesium could be continuously diffused to the surface at a rate matching the evaporation rate. This results in constant current emission until the cesium in the reservoir is depleted. Measurements of the evaporation rate indicated that the reservoir should provide cesium for more than 30,000 hours of continuous operation. This is orders of magnitude longer operation then previously available. Experiments also demonstrated that the photocathode could be rejuvenated following contamination from a vacuum leak. Recoating of the emission surface demonstrated that the initial quantum efficiency could be recovered.

Lawrence Ives; Eric Montgomery; Zhigang Pan; Blake Riddick; Donald Feldman; Lou Falce

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

315

Summary-Final.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUMMARY SUMMARY June 2000 1 SUMMARY This document constitutes the first edition of a long-term research and development (R&D) plan for nuclear technology in the United States. Introduction In 1998, DOE established the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) to provide advice to the Secretary and to the Director, Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology (NE), on the broad range of non-defense DOE nuclear technology programs. The NERAC recommended development of a long-range R&D program. This R&D plan is a result of that recommendation and is the first of what is expected to be an iterated series of long-range plans for nuclear energy in the Department of Energy. To develop this plan, 145 nuclear and non-nuclear scientists, engineers, and academics

316

Final_Report.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Microwave Radar for Remote Detection of Gas Pipeline Leaks Use of Microwave Radar for Remote Detection of Gas Pipeline Leaks By N. Gopalsami, A. Dron, T. Elmer, and A. C. Raptis Energy Technology Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL and V. D. Asanov, S. V. Kokhatski, and S. A. Mishin AOZT Finn-Trade St. Petersburg, Russia Abstract: This report describes the development of a microwave (MW) radar sensing and imaging system to remotely detect and locate gas leaks in natural gas pipelines. It contains theoretical and experimental results to show feasibility of the radar technique. The gas dynamics of the leak jet are modeled first to determine the plume geometry and the variation of gas concentration in air with distance from the leak source. From the turbulence-induced static and dynamic changes of index of refraction, the radar

317

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1986 the Oregon State University Industrial Assessment Center (OSU IAC) has worked to increase the energy efficiency, productivity, sustainability, and competitiveness of US manufacturers; provide engineering students an education not available in the classroom; keep engineering faculty in contact with technology and challenges in Northwest industry; and reduce dependence on nonrenewable energy resources, both imported and domestic. Project Objective: Over the duration of this project (2002-2006), the OSU IAC worked to directly support and influence industrial decisions primarily regarding energy but also regarding sustainability and profitability through: Assessments & Follow-up: The OSU IAC performed 111 Industrial Assessments in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Nevada to help industry identify and implement opportunities to increase energy efficiency, productivity, sustainability, and competitiveness Workshops Seminars Forums Etc: OSU IAC staff worked with regional peers to offer appropriate workshops and trainings as opportunities availed themselves. Graduating Excellent Energy Aware Professional Alumni: As technically capable, skilled written and verbal communicators, our alumni contributed to OSU IAC influence from their positions within industry, consulting organizations, utilities, and governmental and non governmental agencies. Tool Development: Analysis tools and guides originated at the OSU IAC extended our reach. The center continually worked to develop computer based analysis tools, evaluation checklists, analysis guide sheets for internal use and general sharing with industry, energy, and other professionals to assist them in efforts to improve US Industry. Impact: Over 20 years of activity the OSU IAC has typically performed 25 Industrial Assessments a year. On average, each year of 25 assessments has resulted in implemented projects that saved industry a total of: 25.3 TBTU in annual energy and $4.5 Million annually, with an average investment payback of one year. Over the duration of this project, while a number of recommendations are still under consideration for implementation, those already implemented have resulted in over $11 million in annual savings.

Joseph Junker; Greg Wheeler

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

318

Microsoft Word - 10 Nov 10 - FINAL APMS Report Follow Up  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

interests with which EM deals. As USACE has learned in its New Orleans recovery work, the final result is worth enduring the front end pressure. Initial anxiety from stakeholders...

319

FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST has played a key role in many of the one-on-one, domestic, and international interlaboratory comparisons of measurements on superconductors. The history of interlaboratory comparisons of measurements on superconductors tells us that careful measurement methods are needed to obtain consistent results. Inconsistent results can lead to many problems including: a mistrust of the results of others, unfair advantages in commerce, and erroneous feedback in the optimization of conductor performance. NIST has experience in many interlaboratory comparisons; a long-term commitment to measurement accuracy; and independent, third-party laboratory status. The principal investigator's direct involvement in the measurements and daily supervision of sample mounting is the unique situation that has allowed important discoveries and evolution of our capabilities over the last 30 years. The principal investigator's research and metrology has helped to improve the accuracy of critical-current (I{sub c}) measurements in laboratories throughout the world. As conductors continue to improve and design limits are tested, the continuation of the long-term commitment to measurement accuracy could be vitally important to the success of new conductor development programs. It is extremely important to the U.S. wire manufacturers to get accurate (high certainty) I{sub c} measurements in order to optimize conductor performance. The optimization requires the adjustment of several fabrication parameters (such as reaction time, reaction temperature, conductor design, doping, diffusion barrier, Cu to non-Cu ratio, and twist pitch) based on the I{sub c} measurement of the conductor. If the I{sub c} measurements are made with high variability, it may be unclear whether or not the parameters are being adjusted in the optimal direction or whether or not the conductor meets the target specification. Our metrology is vital to the U.S. wire manufacturers in the highly competitive international arena and to meet the aggressive performance goals. The latest high-performance Nb{sub 3}Sn wires are being designed with higher current densities, larger effective filament diameter, less Cu stabilizer, and, in some cases, larger wire diameters than ever before. In addition, some of the conductor designs and heat treatments cause the residual resistivity ratio (RRR, ratio of room temperature resistivity to the resistivity at 20 K) of the stabilizer to be less than 20. These parameters are pushing the conductors towards less intrinsic stability, into a region we call marginally stable. These parameters also create a whole series of challenges for routine I{sub c} testing on short-samples, even when tested with the sample immersed in liquid helium. High-current, variable-temperature I{sub c} measurements are even more difficult than those made in liquid helium because the sample is only cooled by flowing helium gas. Providing accurate I{sub c} results under these conditions requires a complex system that provide adequate cooling as well as uniform sample temperature. We have been make variable-temperature measurements for about 15 years, but we started to design the first high-current (at least 500 A), variable-temperature, variable-strain apparatus in late 2006. Our first critical-current measurements as a function of strain, temperature, and magnetic field, I{sub c}(B,T,{var_epsilon}), in a new single, unified apparatus (full matrix characterization) were made in the summer of 2008. This is the only such facility in the U.S. and it has some unique components that are not duplicated anywhere in the world. The compounding of all three variables (H, T, {var_epsilon}) makes an already labor and time intensive characterization very formidable; however, the results cannot be generated any other way and are needed to answer key questions about strain and temperature safety margins and about the reliability of using scaling laws based on small data sets to predict performance. In the future, this new apparatus will allow NIST to create a database on strands that would benefit

Loren F. Goodrich

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK-B135 This study took place at the Nevada Desert FACE (Free Air CO2 Enrichment) Facility at the Nevada Test Site, where effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 on a desert ecosystem are being studied. One hundred sixty-eight minirhizotrons (clear plastic tubes) were installed to a depth of 1m in the soil in the control and elevated CO2 plots. Tubes were installed from a suspended platform to avoid soil compaction and disturbance. Tubes were placed under individuals of two dominant shrub species, Larrea tridentata and Ambrosia dumosa, and along systematic transects across the plots. Specialized video cameras were inserted down the tubes at 4 week intervals to provide images of plant root systems on the upper side of the tube. A ratcheting mechanism assured consistent imaging of the same precise locations during each sampling period. Images were collected every 4 weeks from December 1997 to January 2001, after which the images were too degraded from repeated camera abrasion on the tubes for adequate analysis. Over 100,000 video images were analyzed and the appearance, growth, and disappearance of 23,634 individual fine roots (<2 mm diameter) were tracked over time, totaling 125,679 root observations and measurements. Elevated CO2 did not have an effect on the timing of seasonal patterns of fine root growth or turnover (mortality). There were no consistent effects of elevated CO2 on fine root length standing crop, production, or turnover except standing crop was consistently lower under the elevated CO2 treatment across the community transects. The specific root length (m/g of root dry weight) found to be higher for Larrea and Ambrosia under elevated CO2 treatments. Procedures were developed to translate the length measurements taken from minirhizotron images to biomass estimates per unit soil volume, utilizing these specific root length measurements. While few differences in fine root length were apparent as a result of elevated CO2 treatment, conversion to biomass units indicated that elevated CO2 led to decreases in fine root biomass, production, and turnover. This was an unexpected result since many elevated CO2 studies have shown increases in below ground biomass allocation. No differences were found in fine root carbon or nitrogen concentrations, but lower biomass turnover under elevated CO2 implies lower rates of C and N cycling through fine root turnover. Funds from this interagency agreement also allowed the development of improved software for image analysis, which will benefit other researchers using minirhizotrons to study below ground responses to elevated CO2 or other treatments.

Donald L. Phillips; Mark G. Johnson, David T. Tingey

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buses final results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was very successful in terms of providing a unique source of information for rural communities and landowners. We are very pleased with the overall results and believe that this is a vital program for the sustainable development of wind energy. The outreach materials created by Windustry are filling a serious void in information about how local communities and rural landowners can participate in wind development projects. In our program implementation we learned how great the demand is for this type of information both through our hotline calls and website usage. We also realized that the materials require constant updating and maintenance. There is a balance that needs to be found in printing the materials to have handouts ready at meetings for our primary target audience and more research and revisions for the website materials. All of this work is of an ongoing nature. Since this funding was awarded for one year, Windustry will be seeking other funding sources to continue the work in future years. Below is a summary of the Windustry accomplishments as well a sampling of website usage reports. Windustry is appreciative of the US DOE for its support of this wind energy industry work and the Wind Powering America initiative.

Lisa M. Daniels

2002-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

322

Final Scientific Report (FSR)  

SciTech Connect

The Flambeau River Papers â??Manufacturing Conversion for Energy Efficiencyâ? Project has identified the following goals and objectives: 1. A low pressure accumulator tank will be installed to capture low pressure gases for reuse. The estimated cost is $2.1 million with an energy savings of $500,000 annually or enough natural gas savings to heat 590 average Wisconsin homes. 2. Replace the steam turbine and upgrade Paper Machine #3, the largest of Flambeau River Papers machines, at a cost of $6.265 million. The result will save enough natural gas to heat 141 average homes, or about $1.2-million each year. 3. Install a new cyclonic and cell fracturing technology dryer to reduce moisture in both sludge and biomass wastes. The estimated cost of this task is $1.5-million with an annual energy savings of $700,000. It will also eliminate all coal burning at Flambeau River Papers (7,200 tons of coal annually).

Bill Granzin

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

323

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

In the fiscal years 2003 through 2006, the LMU-IAC conducted 76 industrial assessments with 595 assessment recommendations, with 382 recommendations implemented, with practically all plant types and sizes, extending in geographical location from about 250 miles north of LMU-IAC to 50 miles south and 90 miles east. Plant sizes varied from one building of 30,000 sq ft to 17 buildings of 1.5 million sq ft. The amount of energy savings identified was worth about $34,303,699. Because of the national level Lean Productivity programs at the university, LMU-IAC is unique in its expertise of the impact of Lean productivity on energy savings, which is huge, far exceeding the energy savings from the equipment improvements. Besides energy savings, LMU-IAC promoted the good name of the program and DOE in the local industry, utilities, trade organizations, the vast aerospace industry, educational institutions, and the public. The IAC work resulted in numerous public lectures, a chapter in the Encyclopedia of Industrial Energy, and several journal articles. 37 students, including 8 graduate students have been trained and issued DOE IAC Certificates. Several of them found work as energy experts.

Bohdan W. Oppenheim

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

324

Final Technical Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Michigan Technological University has demonstrated major inroads in establishing the viability of utilizing aluminum smelting by-product waste materials in lightweight concrete product applications. The research identified key elements of producing various forms of lightweight concrete products through utilizing various procedures and mixture components with the by-product materials. A process was developed through pilot plant testing that results in additional aluminum recovery at finer sizes, a clean returnable salt product through spray drying technology, and a low-salt-content oxide product with enough aluminum metal content that it can be used to form lightweight cementitious mixtures. Having three distinct products aids in generating favorable process economics. Revenue projections from aluminum recovery and salt recovery are enough to cover processing costs and create a cost-free oxide product to market for lightweight concrete applications. This supply side commercialization strategy offers aluminum by-product recyclers a potentially no cost product, which has been demonstrated through this project to create desirable and marketable lightweight concrete products of various forms. Environmental benefits to the public are tremendous. At best, all dross and salt cake materials have the potential to be completely recycled and utilized. At worst, disposal sites would see a reduced amount of material: a post processed oxide product with little salt and no hydrogen sulfide or ammonia gas generating capability, which, if isolated from high alkali conditions, would pose no reactivity concerns. The US aluminum industry has historically, along with the steel industry, been a leader in recycling metal. The findings from this project, increased metal recovery, improved salt recycling, and demonstrated end uses for oxide residues, will go a long way in helping the aluminum industry obtain 100% material utilization and zero discharge.

J.Y. Hwang; R.C. Greenlund

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

EIS-0394: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0394: Final Environmental Impact Statement FutureGen Project The Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the potential environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) proposal to provide federal funding to the FutureGen Alliance, Inc. (Alliance) for the FutureGen Project. In a March 2004 Report to Congress, DOE estimated the cost of the project at $950 million in constant 2004 dollars shared at a 74/26 ratio by DOE and the Alliance. Accounting for escalation, based on representative industry indices, the project is currently estimated to cost $1.757 billion in as-spent dollars. The cost estimate will be updated as work progresses. The Final EIS provides an evaluation of the environmental consequences that may result from the

326

EIS-0394: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

94: Final Environmental Impact Statement 94: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0394: Final Environmental Impact Statement FutureGen Project The Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the potential environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) proposal to provide federal funding to the FutureGen Alliance, Inc. (Alliance) for the FutureGen Project. In a March 2004 Report to Congress, DOE estimated the cost of the project at $950 million in constant 2004 dollars shared at a 74/26 ratio by DOE and the Alliance. Accounting for escalation, based on representative industry indices, the project is currently estimated to cost $1.757 billion in as-spent dollars. The cost estimate will be updated as work progresses. The Final EIS provides an evaluation of the environmental consequences that may result from the

327

FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States has abundant wind resources, such that only about 3% of the resource would need to be developed to achieve the goal of producing 20% of electricity in the United States by 2030. Inappropriately sited wind development may result in conflicts with wildlife that can delay or derail development projects, increase projects costs, and may degrade important conservation values. The most cost-effective approach to reducing such conflicts is through landscape-scale siting early in project development. To support landscape scale siting that avoids sensitive areas for wildlife, we compiled a database on species distributions, wind resource, disturbed areas, and land ownership. This database can be viewed and obtained via http://wind.tnc.org/awwi. Wind project developers can use this web tool to identify potentially sensitive areas and areas that are already disturbed and are therefore likely to be less sensitive to additional impacts from wind development. The United States goal of producing 20% of its electricity from wind energy by the year 2030 would require 241 GW of terrestrial nameplate capacity. We analyzed whether this goal could be met by using lands that are already disturbed, which would minimize impacts to wildlife. Our research shows that over 14 times the DOE goal could be produced on lands that are already disturbed (primarily cropland and oil and gas fields), after taking into account wind resource availability and areas that would be precluded from wind development because of existing urban development or because of development restrictions. This work was published in the peer reviewed science journal PLoS ONE (a free online journal) and can be viewed here: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0017566. Even projects that are sited appropriately may have some impacts on wildlife habitat that can be offset with offsite compensatory mitigation. We demonstrate one approach to mapping and quantifying mitigation costs, using the state of Kansas as a case study. Our approach considers a range of conservation targets (species and habitat) and calculates mitigation costs based on actual costs of the conservation actions (protection and restoration) that would be needed to fully offset impacts. This work was published in the peer reviewed science journal PLoS ONE (a free online journal) and can be viewed here: http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0026698.

Fargione, Joseph

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

328

HARE: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of work done over a 6 year period under the FAST-OS programs. The first effort was called Right-Weight Kernels, (RWK) and was concerned with improving measurements of OS noise so it could be treated quantitatively; and evaluating the use of two operating systems, Linux and Plan 9, on HPC systems and determining how these operating systems needed to be extended or changed for HPC, while still retaining their general-purpose nature. The second program, HARE, explored the creation of alternative runtime models, building on RWK. All of the HARE work was done on Plan 9. The HARE researchers were mindful of the very good Linux and LWK work being done at other labs and saw no need to recreate it. Even given this limited funding, the two efforts had outsized impact: _ Helped Cray decide to use Linux, instead of a custom kernel, and provided the tools needed to make Linux perform well _ Created a successor operating system to Plan 9, NIX, which has been taken in by Bell Labs for further development _ Created a standard system measurement tool, Fixed Time Quantum or FTQ, which is widely used for measuring operating systems impact on applications _ Spurred the use of the 9p protocol in several organizations, including IBM _ Built software in use at many companies, including IBM, Cray, and Google _ Spurred the creation of alternative runtimes for use on HPC systems _ Demonstrated that, with proper modifications, a general purpose operating systems can provide communications up to 3 times as effective as user-level libraries Open source was a key part of this work. The code developed for this project is in wide use and available at many places. The core Blue Gene code is available at https://bitbucket.org/ericvh/hare. We describe details of these impacts in the following sections. The rest of this report is organized as follows: First, we describe commercial impact; next, we describe the FTQ benchmark and its impact in more detail; operating systems and runtime research follows; we discuss infrastructure software; and close with a description of the new NIX operating system, future work, and conclusions.

Mckie, Jim

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

329

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The Georgia Institute of Technologys Industrial Assessment Center (GT IAC) has a long history working on the IAC program with over 30 years of experience in meeting the IAC programs goals in a very effective manner since beginning participation in the IAC programs predecessor, the EADC, in 1977. During the last four year contract period, October 1, 2002 through September 31, 2006, the GT IAC continued this work with the assessments of eighty nine (89) industrial facilities. These assessments resulted in the reported implemented savings of forty eight thousand (48,000,000) kWh of electricity and seven hundred and fifty thousand (750,000) MMBtu of natural gas. The total calculated cost savings from the recommendations implemented was five and a half million dollars ($5,500,000). These savings reoccur annually. However, this cost savings is the total of various recommendations that were calculated during 2002 to 2006. During this time period, energy prices were almost always lower than current energy prices. If you adjust the cost savings number to account for current energy prices, the cost savings would exceed nine million dollars ($9,000,000) reoccurring annually. Beyond the reduction of industrial energy consumption and the cost savings benefit, education has also been an important element of this Centers work. Primarily this entailed both formal and on the job training of this Centers student employees. Over the four year time frame, this Center has had fifteen different student employees work for this Center. This Center has also instructed a graduate level senior mechanical engineering class that allowed senior engineering students to conduct IAC assessments under the supervision of IAC staff. This class exposed over one hundred students to industrial energy consumption and energy efficiency. In addition to educating students, the education of plant personnel has also been an important element for this Center. It is believed that this Center has made effective use of IAC program resources by reducing industrial plant energy consumption and cost by helping them become more energy efficient. In turn, this has helped make domestic industry more competitive. This Center has also helped by introducing the next generation of engineers to energy efficiency in the industrial sector.

Meffert, Bill; Soderlund, Matthew, R

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

330

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The industrial Assessment Center at the University of Massachusetts completed 83 assessments in this project period, covering all states in New England and the eastern part of New York. The combined energy consumption for these facilities was more than 750,000,000 kWh costing approximately $77,000,000 for electricity and close to 5,600,000 MMBtu for all fossil fuels combined, totaling almost $37,000,000. The average annual energy costs per plant were $1,372,600. We had almost eight recommendations per assessment, and the implemented recommendations alone are saving these facilities on an average $66,500 or almost 5% of their total energy bill. We have organized and participated in sixteen seminars and presentations promoting energy efficiency practices and other DOE tools and programs. Our center developed the Chilled Water System Assessment tool that is part of DOEs BestPractices Suite of Tools. During this period we had nineteen students in the program. Fifteen were graduate students, and four were undergraduate students. Eleven of them graduated with the Masters of Science degree in mechanical engineering and are working in the energy field, and three are currently in the program. Two undergraduate students were hired by engineering firms that perform energy efficiency services, and one continued his education and is pursuing an advanced engineering degree. We cooperate with the Manufacturing Extension Partnerships and state Energy Offices to provide energy efficiency services to their constituents. As a result of our activities, all our clients requested assessments or were referred to us by one of the state energy offices, the MEPs or DOE. Our current and former staff members hold 16 Qualified Specialist certificates. Seven of those were awarded to our students while participating in the IAC program. Currently we have three staff members with nine QS certificates and two students with four. Three people from our staff were involved in the DOEs Save Energy Now program during the first year of program as steam and process heating qualified specialists. We completed eleven ESAs during 2006.

Kosanovic, Dragoljub (Beka)

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

331

EIS-0269: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

69: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0269: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement The Department of Energy (DOE) limits electronic access to certain...

332

EIS-0161: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0161: Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement The Department of Energy (DOE) limits electronic access to certain...

333

Decommissioning Benchmarking Study Final Report | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benchmarking Study Final Report Decommissioning Benchmarking Study Final Report DOE's former Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) conducted a benchmarking study of its...

334

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The state of New York through the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) has developed a suite of digester projects throughout the state to assess the potential for anaerobic digestion systems to improve manure management and concurrently produce energy through the production of heat and electrical power using the biogas produced from the digesters. Dairies comprise a significant part of the agribusiness and economy of the state of New York. Improving the energy efficiency and environmental footprint of dairies is a goal of NYSERDA. SUNY Morrisville State College (MSC) is part of a collection of state universities, dairy farms, cooperatives, and municipalities examining anaerobic digestion systems to achieve the goals of NYSERDA, the improvement of manure management, and reducing emissions to local dairy animal sites. The process for siting a digester system at the MSCs free-stall Dairy Complex was initiated in 2002. The project involved the construction of an anaerobic digester that can accommodate the organic waste generated at Dairy complex located about a mile southeast of the main campus. Support for the project was provided through funding from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. The DOE contribution to the project provided additional resources to construct an expanded facility to handle waste generated from the existing free-stall dairy and the newly-constructed barns. Construction on the project was completed in 2006 and the production of biogas started soon after the tanks were filled with the effluent generated at the Dairy Complex. The system has been in operation since December 17, 2006. The generated biogas was consistently flared starting from December 20, 2006, and until the operation of the internal combustion engine/generator set were first tested on the 9th of January, 2007. Flaring the biogas continued until the interconnect with the power grid was approved by NYSEG (the electrical power provider) and the combined heat and power generation (CHP) system was authorized to start on February 27, 2007. The system has been in operation since February 28, 2007, and is generating 45 to 50 kW of electrical power on continuous basis. The completed project will ultimately allow for investigating the facility of utilizing organic waste from a dairy operation in a hard-top plug-flow methane digester with the ultimate goal of reducing environmental risk, increasing economic benefits, and demonstrating the viability of an anaerobic methane digestion system. Many benefits are expected as a result of the completed project including our better understanding of the anaerobic digestion process and its management as well as the facility to utilize the methane digester as a demonstration site for dairy producers, farmers, and organic waste producers in New York State and the Northeast. Additional benefits include helping current and future students in dairy science and technology, agricultural business, environmental sciences, agricultural engineering, and other disciplines develop better understanding of underutilized biomass alternative energy technologies, environmental conservation, environmental stewardship, and sustainable agriculture.

Shayya, Walid

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

335

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The following report contributes to our knowledge of how to economically produce wildlife-friendly grass mixtures for future fuel feedstocks in the northern plains. It investigates northern-adapted cultivars; management and harvest regimes that are good for yields, soils and wildlife; comparative analysis of monocultures and simple mixtures of native grasses; economic implications of growing grasses for fuel feedstocks in specific locations in the northern plains; and conversion options for turning the grasses into useful chemicals and fuels. The core results of this study suggest the following: ? Native grasses, even simple grass mixtures, can be produced profitably in the northern plains as far west as the 100th meridian with yields ranging from 2 to 6 tons per acre. ? Northern adapted cultivars may yield less in good years, but have much greater long-term sustainable yield potential than higher-yielding southern varieties. ? Grasses require very little inputs and stop economically responding to N applications above 56kg/hectare. ? Harvesting after a killing frost may reduce the yield available in that given year but will increase overall yields averaged throughout multiple years. ? Harvesting after a killing frost or even in early spring reduces the level of ash and undesirable molecules like K which cause adverse reactions in pyrolysis processing. Grasses can be managed for biomass harvest and maintain or improve overall soil-health and carbon sequestration benefits of idled grassland ? The carbon sequestration activity of the grasses seems to follow the above ground health of the biomass. In other words plots where the above ground biomass is regularly removed can continue to sequester carbon at the rate of 2 tons/acre/year if the stand health is strong and yielding significant amounts of biomass. ? Managing grasses for feedstock quality in a biomass system requires some of the same management strategies as managing for wildlife benefit. We believe that biomass development can be done in such a way that also maximizes or improves upon conservation and other environmental goals (in some cases even when compared to idled land). ? Switchgrass and big bluestem work well together in simple mixture plots where big bluestem fills in around the switchgrass which alone grows in bunches and leaves patches of bare soil open and susceptible to erosion. ? Longer-term studies in the northern plains may also find that every other year harvest schemes produce as much biomass averaged over the years as annual harvests ? Grasses can be grown for between $23 and $54/ton in the northern plains at production rates between 3 and 5 tons/acre. ? Land costs, yields, and harvest frequency are the largest determining factors in the farm scale economics. Without any land rent offset or incentive for production, and with annual harvesting, grass production is likely to be around $35/ton in the northern plains (farm gate). ? Average transportation costs range from $3 to $10/ton delivered to the plant gate. Average distance from the plant is the biggest factor - $3/ton at 10 miles, $10/ton at 50 miles. ? There is a substantial penalty paid on a per unit of energy produced basis when one converts grasses to bio-oil, but the bio-oil can then compete in higher priced fuel markets whereas grasses alone compete directly with relatively cheap coal. ? Bio oil or modified bio-oil (without the HA or other chemical fraction) is a suitable fuel for boiler and combustion turbines that would otherwise use residual fuel oil or number 2 diesel. ? Ensyn has already commercialized the use of HA in smokey flavorants for the food industry but that market is rather small. HA, however, is also found to be a suitable replacement for the much larger US market for ethanolamines and ethalyne oxides that are used as dispersants. ? Unless crude oil prices rise, the highest and best use of grass based bio-oil is primarily as a direct fuel. As prices rise, HA, phenol and other chemical fractions may become more attractive ? Although we were

Sara Bergan, Executive Director; Brendan Jordan, Program Manager; Subcontractors as listed on the report.

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

336

Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following report contributes to our knowledge of how to economically produce wildlife-friendly grass mixtures for future fuel feedstocks in the northern plains. It investigates northern-adapted cultivars; management and harvest regimes that are good for yields, soils and wildlife; comparative analysis of monocultures and simple mixtures of native grasses; economic implications of growing grasses for fuel feedstocks in specific locations in the northern plains; and conversion options for turning the grasses into useful chemicals and fuels. The core results of this study suggest the following: ? Native grasses, even simple grass mixtures, can be produced profitably in the northern plains as far west as the 100th meridian with yields ranging from 2 to 6 tons per acre. ? Northern adapted cultivars may yield less in good years, but have much greater long-term sustainable yield potential than higher-yielding southern varieties. ? Grasses require very little inputs and stop economically responding to N applications above 56kg/hectare. ? Harvesting after a killing frost may reduce the yield available in that given year but will increase overall yields averaged throughout multiple years. ? Harvesting after a killing frost or even in early spring reduces the level of ash and undesirable molecules like K which cause adverse reactions in pyrolysis processing. Grasses can be managed for biomass harvest and maintain or improve overall soil-health and carbon sequestration benefits of idled grassland ? The carbon sequestration activity of the grasses seems to follow the above ground health of the biomass. In other words plots where the above ground biomass is regularly removed can continue to sequester carbon at the rate of 2 tons/acre/year if the stand health is strong and yielding significant amounts of biomass. ? Managing grasses for feedstock quality in a biomass system requires some of the same management strategies as managing for wildlife benefit. We believe that biomass development can be done in such a way that also maximizes or improves upon conservation and other environmental goals (in some cases even when compared to idled land). ? Switchgrass and big bluestem work well together in simple mixture plots where big bluestem fills in around the switchgrass which alone grows in bunches and leaves patches of bare soil open and susceptible to erosion. ? Longer-term studies in the northern plains may also find that every other year harvest schemes produce as much biomass averaged over the years as annual harvests ? Grasses can be grown for between $23 and $54/ton in the northern plains at production rates between 3 and 5 tons/acre. ? Land costs, yields, and harvest frequency are the largest determining factors in the farm scale economics. Without any land rent offset or incentive for production, and with annual harvesting, grass production is likely to be around $35/ton in the northern plains (farm gate). ? Average transportation costs range from $3 to $10/ton delivered to the plant gate. Average distance from the plant is the biggest factor - $3/ton at 10 miles, $10/ton at 50 miles. ? There is a substantial penalty paid on a per unit of energy produced basis when one converts grasses to bio-oil, but the bio-oil can then compete in higher priced fuel markets whereas grasses alone compete directly with relatively cheap coal. ? Bio oil or modified bio-oil (without the HA or other chemical fraction) is a suitable fuel for boiler and combustion turbines that would otherwise use residual fuel oil or number 2 diesel. ? Ensyn has already commercialized the use of HA in smokey flavorants for the food industry but that market is rather small. HA, however, is also found to be a suitable replacement for the much larger US market for ethanolamines and ethalyne oxides that are used as dispersants. ? Unless crude oil prices rise, the highest and best use of grass based bio-oil is primarily as a direct fuel. As prices rise, HA, phenol and other chemical fractions may become more attractive ? Although we were

Sara Bergan, Executive Director; Brendan Jordan, Program Manager; Subcontractors as listed on the report.

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

337

Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

During the past decades, considerable theoretical efforts have been devoted to studying the electronic and geometric structures and related properties of surfaces. Such efforts are particularly important for systems like the actinides for which experimental work is relatively difficult to perform due to material problems and toxicity. The actinides are characterized by a gradual filling of the 5f-electron shell with the degree of localization increasing with the atomic number Z along the last series of the periodic table. The open shell of the 5f electrons determines the atomic, molecular, and solid state properties of the actinide elements and their compounds and understanding the quantum mechanics of the 5f electrons is the defining issue in the chemistry and physics of actinide elements. These elements are also characterized by the increasing prominence of relativistic effects and their studies can, in fact, help us understand the role of relativity throughout the periodic table. However, the electronic and geometric structures of the actinides, specifically the trans-uranium actinides and the roles of the 5f electrons in chemical bonding are still not well understood. This is crucial not only for our understanding of the actinides but also for the fact that the actinides constitute 'the missing link' between the d transition elements and the lanthanides. The 5f orbitals have properties intermediate between those of localized 4f and delocalized 3d orbitals. Thus, a proper understanding of the actinides will help us understand the behavior of the lanthanides and transition metals as well. In fact, there is an urgent need for continued extensive and detailed theoretical research in this area to provide significant and deep understandings of the electronic and geometric structures of the actinides. In this work, we have performed electronic structure studies for plutonium (Pu), americium (Am), and curium (Cm) surfaces, and molecular adsorptions on Pu and Am surfaces. In particular, the region at the boundary of Pu and Am, is widely believed to be the crossover region between d-like itinerant and f-like localized behavior The eventual goal is a complete understanding of the surface chemistry and physics processes of all actinide surfaces, defining the chemistry and physics of such heavy elements. Among the actinides, plutonium, with five 5f electrons in the solid state, is arguably the most complex, fascinating, and enigmatic element known to mankind and has attracted extraordinary scientific and technological interests because of its unique properties, generating a significant body of research in diverse areas, including superconductivity. Pu has, at least, six stable allotropes between room temperature and melting at atmospheric pressure, indicating that the valence electrons can hybridize into a number of complex bonding arrangements. Central and critical questions relate to the electronic structure, localization of the 5f electrons and the magnetism of Pu. For the light-actinides, from Th to Pu, the 5f electrons are believed to be delocalized, hybridizing with the 6d and 7s electrons. For the heavier actinides, Am and beyond, the 5f electrons are localized with the 5f orbitals progressively lower in energy relative to the 6d configuration. Hence, Pu is in a position where the 5f electronic behavior changes from itinerant to localized. As far as magnetism is concerned, a majority of the theoretical calculations continues to claim the existence of magnetism while almost all the experimental results do not find any support for such claims. The second element of interest to us, namely americium, occupies a central position in the actinide series with respect to the involvement of 5f electrons in metallic bonding. It is widely believed that the 5f electrons in Am are localized and that Am undergoes a series of crystallographic phase changes with pressure. Fully-relativistic all electron surface studies of the different phases of Am, initially for the dhcp and the fcc surfaces, can and have provided us with valuable informa

Dr. Asok K. Ray

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

338

EPA Final Ground Water Rule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Nuclear Safety and Environment Information Brief HS-20-IB-2007-02 (March 2007) EPA Final Ground Water Rule Safe Drinking Water Act: National Primary Drinking Water Regulations Ground Water Rule - 40 CFR Parts 9, 141 and 142 Final Rule: 71 FR 65574 Effective Date: January 8, 2007 1 RULE SYNOPSIS On November 8, 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a final Ground Water Rule (GWR) to promote increased protection against microbial pathogens that may be present in public water systems (PWSs) that use ground water sources for their supply (these systems are known as ground water systems). This Rule establishes a risk-targeted approach

339

MACCS2 Final Gap Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MACCS2-Gap Analysis MACCS2-Gap Analysis Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2002-1 Software Quality Assurance Improvement Plan Commitment 4.2.1.3: Software Quality Assurance Improvement Plan: MACCS2 Gap Analysis Final Report U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environment, Safety and Health 1000 Independence Ave., S.W. Washington, DC 20585-2040 May 2004 MACCS2 Gap Analysis May 2004 Final Report INTENTIONALLY BLANK ii MACCS2 Gap Analysis May 2004 Final Report FOREWORD This report documents the outcome of an evaluation of the Software Quality Assurance (SQA) attributes of the radiological dispersion computer code, MACCS2, relative to established software requirements. This evaluation, a "gap analysis", is performed to meet commitment 4.2.1.3 of the

340

MPO B593110 - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) shall provide one (1) Mechanical Engineer to support the Linear Collider Subsystem Development Program at Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS). The NSTec Mechanical Engineer's efforts will include engineering, design, and drawing support for the Vacuum Seal Test. NSTec will also provide a final report of the setup and input to LLNL's project management on project status. The NSTec Mechanical Engineer's efforts will also include engineering, design, and drawing support to the conceptual design for manufacturing of the Flux Concentrator Magnet. NSTec will also contribute to LLNS's final report on the Flux Concentrator Magnet. The deliverables are drawings, sketches, engineering documents, and final reports delivered to the LLNS Technical Representative.

Brooksby, C

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

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341

FinalProgramReportfinal.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 8, 2004 November 8, 2004 Paul Wambach EH-53/270 Corporate Square Building U. S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Germantown, MD 20585-0270 CONTRACT NO. DE-AC05-00OR22750: FY04 FINAL REPORT FOR THE FORMER RADIATION WORKER MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM AT ROCKY FLATS The enclosed subject final report prepared by Joe M. Aldrich is submitted as stated in the Fiscal Year 2004 Field Work Proposal for the Former Radiation Worker Medical Surveillance Program at Rocky Flats. This is the final report for this program. If you have any questions, please contact me at (303) 423-9585, ext. 238 or Joe M. Aldrich at (303) 423- 9585, ext. 227. Sincerely, Duane E. Hilmas, D.V.M., Ph.D. Technical Director Enclosure cc: Donna Cragle Robert Bistline

342

Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of their proposed installation, construction, and operation of a single low-speed wind turbine and its associated facilities. The project is needed to generate electricity for...

343

Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISTRIBUTION: Primary distribution of this Research Report has been made by ARI. Please address correspondence concerning distribution of reports to: U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and

Carl W. Lickteig; William R. Sanders; Scott B. Shadrick; James W. Lussier; Brian J. Holt; Shawn J. Rainey; Kenneth Copeland; Brooke B. Schaab; Paula Durlach; Zita M. Simutis

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Final  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thank you for your submittal of the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) documents that address biological impairments in Allen, Indian, Sunderland, and Munroe Brooks. These waterbodies are included on Vermonts 2006 303(d) list and were prioritized for TMDL development. The purpose of these TMDLs is to address aquatic life use impairments caused by stormwater runoff. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hereby approves Vermonts June, 2008 versions of the four TMDLs (for Allen, Indian, Sunderland, and Munroe Brooks) submitted with a cover letter dated June 19, 2008. EPA has determined that these TMDLs meet the requirements of 303(d) of the Clean Water Act (CWA), and of EPAs implementing regulations (40 CFR Part 130). A copy of our approval documentation is enclosed. Thank you again for your submittal. My staff and I look forward to continued cooperation with the VT DEC in exercising our shared responsibility of implementing the requirements under Section 303(d) of the CWA. Sincerely, /s/

Laura Pelosi Commissioner; Munroe Brook Tmdls; Stephen S. Perkins

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Lossless compression of instrumentation data. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is our final report on Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory- Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project 3517.070. Its purpose has been to investigate lossless compression of digital waveform and image data, particularly the types of instrumentation data generated and processed at Sandia Labs. The three-year project period ran from October 1992 through September 1995. This report begins with a descriptive overview of data compression, with and without loss, followed by a summary of the activities on the Sandia project, including research at several universities and the development of waveform compression software. Persons who participated in the project are also listed. The next part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles of lossless compression. Two basic compression stages, decorrelation and entropy coding, are described and discussed. An example of seismic data compression is included. Finally, there is a bibliography of published research. Taken together, the published papers contain the details of most of the work and accomplishments on the project. This final report is primarily an overview, without the technical details and results found in the publications listed in the bibliography.

Stearns, S.D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Microsoft Word - Abengoa Final EA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83 83 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LOAN GUARANTEE TO ABENGOA SOLAR INC. FOR THE SOLANA THERMAL ELECTRIC POWER PROJECT NEAR GILA BEND, ARIZONA U.S. Department of Energy Loan Guarantee Program Office Washington, DC 20585 May 2010 DOE/EA-1683 i CONTENTS Acronynms and Abbreviations ................................................................................................. viii SUMMARY ....................................................................................................................................x 1 Purpose and Need for Agency Action .......................................................................... 1-1

347

MINIMARS conceptual design: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains the following sections: (1) fueling systems; (2) blanket; (3) alternative blanket concepts; (4) halo scraper/direct converter system study and final conceptual design; (5) heat-transport and power-conversion systems; (6) tritium systems; (7) minimars air detritiation system; (8) appropriate radiological safety design criteria; and (9) cost estimate. (MOW)

Lee, J.D. (ed.)

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

FINAL Announcement International Brainstorming Work-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, though in an energy in-efficient way. Organic MSW is identified as one of the potential sources of biomass energy. Biomass is a renewable resource that has a steady and abundant supply, especially thoseFINAL Announcement 1st International Brainstorming Work- shop on Waste to Energy in India Organized

Hone, James

349

EA-1478: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

78: Final Environmental Assessment 78: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1478: Final Environmental Assessment Hoover Dam Bypass Project Phase II The proposed project includes replacing existing transmission line tower structures, installing new structures, and adding new electrical conductors and fiber optic cables. As a consequence of these activities, ground disturbance may result from grading areas for structure placement, constructing new roads, improving existing roads for vehicle and equipment access, and from installing structures, conductors, and fiber optic cables. Environmental Assessment Western's Hoover Dam Bypass Project Phase II, DOE/EA-1478 (October 2003) More Documents & Publications EA-1478: Finding of No Significant Impact EIS-0352: Record of Decision EIS-0490: DOE Record of Decision

350

EA-1662: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

62: Final Environmental Assessment 62: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1662: Final Environmental Assessment 10 CFR Part 430 Energy Conservation Program: EnergyConservation Standards for Certain Consumer Products (Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, Microwave Ovens, and Electric and Gas Kitchen Ranges and Ovens) This chapter describes potential environmental effects that may result from amended energy conservation standards for residential cooking products and commercial clothes washers. Environmental Assessment for 10 CFR Part 430 Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Certain Consumer Products (Dishwashers, Dehumidifiers, Microwave Ovens, and Electric and Gas Kitchen Ranges and Ovens) and for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment (Commercial Clothes Washers), DOE/EA-1662 (April 2009)

351

EA-0372: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

72: Final Environmental Assessment 72: Final Environmental Assessment EA-0372: Final Environmental Assessment Energy Conservation Standards for Consumer Products: Refrigerators, Furnaces and Television Sets including Environmental Assessment Regulatory Impact Analysis This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the environmental impacts resulting from new or amended energy-efficiency standards for refrigerators, refrigerator-freezers, freezers, small gas furnaces, and television sets as mandated by the National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987 (NAECA, 1987). Technical Support Document: Energy Conservation Standards for Consumer Products: Refrigerators, Furnaces and Television Sets including Environmental Assessment Regulatory Impact Analysis, November 1988, DOE/EA-0372 More Documents & Publications

352

EA-1352: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Final Environmental Assessment 2: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1352: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps The Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended, specifies that the Department mustconsider, for new or amended conservation standards, those standards that "achieve the maximum improvement in energy efficiency which the Secretary determines is technologically feasible and economically justified" and which will "result in significant conservation of energy." Accordingly, DOE's proposed rule would amend the energy conservation standard for residential central air conditioners and heat pumps. Consistent with this requirement, DOE's purpose in the proposed action is to reduce the consumption of energy used by central air

353

EA-1673: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Final Environmental Assessment 3: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1673: Final Environmental Assessment 10 CFR 431 Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Commercial Heating, Air-Conditioning, and Water-Heating Equipment This chapter describes potential environmental effects that may result from amended energy conservation standards for certain equipment covered by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE)/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Standard 90.1. Environmental Assessment for 10 CFR 431 Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Commercial Heating, Air-Conditioning, and Water-Heating

354

Final Information Quality Bulletin for Peer Review | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Information Quality Bulletin for Peer Review Final Information Quality Bulletin for Peer Review Final Information Quality Bulletin for Peer Review Final Information Quality...

355

Final report on SNAC 11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details how the $5,000 DOE grant to support the workshop titled Sterile Neutrinos at the Crossroads (or SNAC11) was allocated and spent. The SNAC11 workshop covered three days during which there were 28 talks, multiple discussion sessions, a poster session with 9 posters delivered, and an impromptu public lecture on the OPERA superluminal neutrino result by the former project manager of OPERA (this was the first official OPERA talk on the subject in North America). The workshop scientific agenda can be viewed at http://www.cpe.vt.edu/snac/program.html. Emerging out of the workshop discussions, was the idea to write a comprehensive white paper describing the current state of the light sterile neutrino. This effort soon became an international collaboration. The final document, titled Light Sterile Neutrinos: A White Paper has nearly 200 authors, is 267 pages long, and cites 730 unique references. It has been posted the preprint archive as arXiv:1204.5379 [hep-ph]. Workshop local organizing committee co-chairs, Patrick Huber and Jonathan Link, are the white papers head editors. The white papers sections and section editors are as follows: 1. Theory and Motivation (Gabriela Barenboim, Valencia and Werner Rodejohann, MPI Heidelberg) 2. Astrophysical Evidence (Kev Abazajian, UC Irvine and Yvonne Wong, Aachen) 3. Evidence from Oscillation Experiments (Joachim Kopp, FNAL and Bill Louis, LANL) 4. Global Picture (Thierry Lasserre, CEA Saclay and Thomas Schwetz, MPI Heidelberg) 5. Requirements for Future Measurements (Bonnie Fleming, Yale and Joe Formaggio, MIT) 6. Appendix: Possible Future Experiments (Patrick Huber, Virginia Tech and Jon Link, Virginia Tech) In all 56 people participated in the workshop, of these 11 were young scientists. The workshop was covered in a feature article in Science (Science, 334, (2011), 304-306.). The DOE award was spent, as budgeted, as contractual services to VT CPE, which is the unit within the University which organizes conferences. Specifically, the travel cost of the speakers P. Langacker, K. Schreckenbach and P. Vogel was covered as well as bus transportation to KURF and to/from the airport.

Huber, Patrick [Virginia Tech

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

356

Final Report Package_Winnebago  

SciTech Connect

The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska energy options study results will be used to advance the Tribes near term energy management objectives. The array of energy options identified allows the Tribe to select those activities that best fit its energy strategies, goals and objectives. During the course of the study, Red Mountain analyzed both energy options and energy organizational alternatives suitable for the Tribe, presented findings to the Tribal Council, and made recommendations regarding each. Work products delivered to the Tribe, and provided in the Final Report included: A matrix of energy management options applicable to the Tribe, which provided descriptions of particular conservation, efficiency, weatherization, and demand management alternatives. The matrix also provided insight about relative costs of the alternatives, cost/benefit efficacy, ease of implementation, resources for implementing, and observations about each. A matrix of utility service options applicable to the Tribe, describing each of the four alternatives described above. The matrix also provided insight about key benefits of each option, required resources, costs and timeframe for implementation, funding sources and analysis, and key issues for consideration. Discussion guides prepared for each meeting between the Energy Committee and Council, and the Tribes contractor, Red Mountain Energy Partners, which included preliminary analysis and findings. A Position Description for the Energy Manager position, which was reviewed by the Tribal HR Department, and used by the Tribe to develop a position posting. A Utility Code designed for Winnebago to use in establishing its Utility Board, and, ultimately, to provide guidance for the Boards further development. A project summary book developed to include all key information, deliverables and utility provider data for the project. Winnebagos growth trends and expansion plans require the Tribe to play a more active role in assuring that safe, reliable, affordable, and clean energy is available to meet the Reservations present and future needs. In considering alternatives to meet these needs, the Tribe intends to maintain alignment between its growth goals, and cultural values of sustainable, environmental stewardship.

Carolyn Stewart, Director, Red Mountain Energy Partners

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

Microsoft Word - Phase I - Final Report _final_.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FINAL REPORT FINAL REPORT Reporting Period Start Date: October 1, 2003 Reporting Period End Date: May 31, 2004 Principal Author(s): Raymond Drnevich (Praxair) James Meagher (Praxair) Vasilis Papavassiliou (Praxair) Troy Raybold (Praxair) Peter Stuttaford (Power Systems Mfg.) Leonard Switzer (Praxair) Lee Rosen (Program Manager, Praxair) Issued August 2004 DOE Award No: DE-FC26-03NT41892 Submitted by: Praxair, Inc. 175 East Park Dr. Tonawanda, NY 14150 Subcontractor: Power Systems Mfg 1440 W. Indiantown Rd., Suite 200 Jupiter, FL 33458 ii DISCLAIMER "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Gov- ernment. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employ- ees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the

358

Si concentrator solar cell development. [Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of a program to develop a commercial, high-efficiency, low-cost concentrator solar cell compatible with Spectrolab`s existing manufacturing infrastructure for space solar cells. The period covered is between 1991 and 1993. The program was funded through Sandia National Laboratories through the DOE concentrator initiative and, was also cost shared by Spectrolab. As a result of this program, Spectrolab implemented solar cells achieving an efficiency of over 19% at 200 to 300X concentration. The cells are compatible with DOE guidelines for a cell price necessary to achieve a cost of electricity of 12 cents a kilowatthour.

Krut, D.D. [Spectrolab, Inc., Sylmar, CA (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada Summary U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management DOE/EIS-0250F-S1 June 2008 Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada Summary U.S. Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management DOE/EIS-0250F-S1 June 2008 Foreword COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

360

EA-1774: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

74: Final Environmental Assessment 74: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1774: Final Environmental Assessment 10 CFR Part 431 Energy Conservation Standards: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Water Heaters, Direct Heating Equipment, and Pool Heaters This document is Chapter 16 (Environmental Impacts Analysis) of the TSD supporting the Residential Heating Products Final Rule. This chapter describes potential environmental effects that may result from amended energy conservation standards for residential heating products. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s energy conservation standards are not site-specific, and would apply to all 50 States and U.S. territories. Therefore, none of the standards would impact land uses, cause any direct disturbance to the land, or directly affect biological resources in any one

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buses final results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

EA-1812: Final Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Supplement Analysis Final Supplement Analysis EA-1812: Final Supplement Analysis This Supplement Analysis (SA) has been prepared to address changes in the design and operating parameters of the NECO (formerly Haxtun) Wind Farm Project ("original proposed project") in Logan and Phillips Counties, Colorado. In January 2012, the DOE published the Final Environmental Assessment ("DOE/EA-1812") for the original proposed project and published a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) on January 4, 2012. DOE/EA-1812 was conducted to analyze and disclose potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts that would result from the construction and operation of the original proposed project, which received federal funding through a Community Renewable Energy Deployment (CRED) Program grant to

362

EIS-0345: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

345: Final Environmental Impact Statement 345: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0345: Final Environmental Impact Statement Plymouth Generating Facility Plymouth, Washington Plymouth Energy, L.L.C. proposes to construct and operate a 307-megawatt (MW), natural gas-fired, combined cycle power generation facility that would be interconnected with BPA's regional transmission system.This environmental impact statement (EIS) evaluates the environmental effects of the proposed project and determines if any environmental impacts would result. The environmental evaluation of the proposed project includes the proposed power generation facility, which includes the plant, gas pipeline, and water supply/wastewater pipeline; high voltage transmission interconnection; and access road. Final Environmental Impact Statement Plymouth Generating Facility Plymouth,

363

EIS-0023: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

023: Final Environmental Impact Statement 023: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0023: Final Environmental Impact Statement Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive Wastes (Research and Development Program for Immobilization) Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina This EIS analyzes the potential environmental implications of the proposed continuation of a large Federal research and development (R&D) program directed toward the immobilization of the high-level radioactive wastes resulting from chemical separations operations for defense radionuclides production at the DOE Savannah River Plant (SRP) near Aiken, South Carolina. EIS-0023-FEIS-1979.pdf EIS-0023-FEIS-Figures-1979.pdf EIS-0023-FEIS-Tables-1979.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0062: Final Environmental Impact Statement

364

EIS-0345: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0345: Final Environmental Impact Statement Plymouth Generating Facility Plymouth, Washington Plymouth Energy, L.L.C. proposes to construct and operate a 307-megawatt (MW), natural gas-fired, combined cycle power generation facility that would be interconnected with BPA's regional transmission system.This environmental impact statement (EIS) evaluates the environmental effects of the proposed project and determines if any environmental impacts would result. The environmental evaluation of the proposed project includes the proposed power generation facility, which includes the plant, gas pipeline, and water supply/wastewater pipeline; high voltage transmission interconnection; and access road. Final Environmental Impact Statement Plymouth Generating Facility Plymouth,

365

EIS-0409: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0409: Final Environmental Impact Statement Kemper County Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) Project This Final EIS assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed DOE action to provide cost-shared funding and possibly a loan guarantee for construction and operation of advanced power generation plant in Kemper County, Mississippi. The project was selected under DOE's Clean Coal Power Initiative to demonstrate IGCC technology. DOE also invited Mississippi Power Company to submit an application for the Kemper County IGCC Project to the Loan Guarantee Program during 2008. Assessment of a prospective loan guarantee is currently in progress. The power genera- tion components (i.e., coal gasifiers, synthesis gas [syngas]

366

EIS-0318: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0318: Final Environmental Impact Statement Kentucky Pioneer Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration Project The Kentucky Pioneer IGCC Demonstration Project Final EIS assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed DOE action to provide cost-shared financial support for construction and operation of an electrical power station demonstrating use of a Clean Coal Technology in Clark County, Kentucky. Under the Proposed Action, DOE would provide financial assistance, through a Cooperative Agreement with Kentucky Pioneer Energy, LLC, for design, construction, and operation of a 540 megawatt demonstration power station comprised of two synthesis gas-fired combined cycle units in Clark County, Kentucky. The station would also be

367

EA-1388: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1388: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1388: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1388: Final Environmental Assessment Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing three ground water compliance strategies for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. These proposed strategies were derived through consultation with representatives of the Navajo UMTRA Program, the Navajo Environmental Protection Agency, and other agencies. The strategies are designed to minimize risk to human health and the environment that result from mill-related constituents in ground water and surface water. Final Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Shiprock Uranium Mill Tailings Site DOE/EA-1388 (September 2001)

368

EA-1527: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

527: Final Environmental Assessment 527: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1527: Final Environmental Assessment Corrective Measures Study Report for Remediating Contamination at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act The Corrective Measures Study (CMS) Plan established the requirements and procedures to be used for completing the CMS.This report describes the results of the CMS, which was conducted in accordance with that approved plan. Environmental Assessment and Corrective Measures Study Report for Remediating Contamination at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, DOE/EA-1527 (September 2005) More Documents & Publications EA-1579: Final Environmental Assessment Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites

369

EA-0971: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0971: Final Environmental Assessment 0971: Final Environmental Assessment EA-0971: Final Environmental Assessment Device Assembly Facility Operations This environmental assessment (EA) evaluates the proposed action to open and operate the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). Since the DAF has already been constructed, this EA focuses on potential impacts resulting from operation of the facility. The alternative of no action, i.e., continuing current operations at the Area 27 facilities, is also considered. The proposed action and the no-action alternative are compared with respect to their potential environmental impacts, their effect on the safety of operations, and their security concerns. Final Environmental Assessment for Device Assembly Facility Operations, DOE/EA-0971, May 1995 More Documents & Publications

370

Help - Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Results The search results are displayed ten documents at a time. The Next >> and << Back links at the top and bottom of the list allow you to navigate through the results...

371

Reference Undulator Measurement Results  

SciTech Connect

The LCLS reference undulator has been measured 22 times during the course of undulator tuning. These measurements provide estimates of various statistical errors. This note gives a summary of the reference undulator measurements and it provides estimates of the undulator tuning errors. We measured the reference undulator many times during the tuning of the LCLS undulators. These data sets give estimates of the random errors in the tuned undulators. The measured trajectories in the reference undulator are stable and straight to within {+-}2 {micro}m. Changes in the phase errors are less than {+-}2 deg between data sets. The phase advance in the cell varies by less than {+-}2 deg between data sets. The rms variation between data sets of the first integral of B{sub x} is 9.98 {micro}Tm, and the rms variation of the second integral of B{sub x} is 17.4 {micro}Tm{sup 2}. The rms variation of the first integral of B{sub y} is 6.65 {micro}Tm, and the rms variation of the second integral of B{sub y} is 12.3 {micro}Tm{sup 2}. The rms variation of the x-position of the fiducialized beam axis is 35 {micro}m in the final production run This corresponds to an rms uncertainty in the K value of {Delta}K/K = 2.7 x 10{sup -5}. The rms variation of the y-position of the fiducialized beam axis is 4 {micro}m in the final production run.

Wolf, Z

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

372

ANI Testbed: Published Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testbed Results R&D Overview 100G Testbed Testbed Description Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and Conditions Virtual Circuits (OSCARS) Performance...

373

Analytical and demonstration experience with changing load profile. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography of load management and supply management projects, sponsored by EPRI, was developed. Summaries of project scope and results were made for a selection of these projects already completed. Finally, summaries of six utility load management demonstration projects were made, including project descriptions and presentation of selected results.

Isaksen, L.; Khan, S.; Ma, F.S.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Engineering development of advanced froth flotation. Volume 2, Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is an account of findings related to the Engineering and Development of Advanced Froth Flotation project. The results from benchscale and proof-of-concept (POC) level testing are presented and the important results from this testing are used to refine a conceptual design and cost estimate for a 20 TPH Semi-Works Facility incorporating the final proposed technology.

Ferris, D.D.; Bencho, J.R.; Torak, E.R. [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Decays of J/psi (3100) to baryon final states  

SciTech Connect

We present results for the decays of psi(3100) into baryon and hyperon final states. The sample studied here consists of 1.3 million produced psi decays. The decays into nonstrange baryons agree well with currently established results, but with better statistics. In addition, significant resonance formation in multibody final states is observed. The decay psi ..-->.. anti pp..gamma.., the first direct photon decay of the psi involving baryons in the final state, is presented and the theoretical implications of the decays are briefly explored. Several new decays of the psi involving strange baryons are explored, including the first observations of three body final states involving hyperons. The I-spin symmetry of the strong decay psi ..-->.. baryons has clearly been observed. The reduced matrix elements for psi ..-->.. B anti B are presented for final states of different SU(3) content. The B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 8/ results are in excellent agreement with the psi being an SU(3) singlet as are the results for psi ..-->.. B/sub 10/ anti B/sub 10/. We present the first evidence for the SU(3) violating decays of the type psi ..-->.. B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 10/ + c.c.. Angular distributions for psi ..-->.. B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 8/ are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. Statistics are limited, but the data tends to prefer other than a 1 + Cos/sup 2/theta distribution.

Eaton, M.W.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Congressional Final House Final Senate Current Request Mark  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY 2010 FY 2010 FY 2010 FY 2010 ($ in thousands) Congressional Final House Final Senate Current Request Mark Mark Appropriation FOSSIL ENERGY R&D Coal 368,865 394,315 428,200 393,485 Natural Gas Technologies 25,000 25,000 25,000 17,364 Unconventional Fossil Energy Technologies 0 0 25,000 19,474 Program Direction 158,000 158,000 158,000 158,000 Plant & Capital Equipment 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 Environmental Restoration 10,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 Cooperative Res. & Development 0 0 5,000 4,868 Congressional Directed Projects 0 9,550 27,300 35,879 Special Recruitment Program 700 700 700 700 Subtotal 582,565 617,565 699,200 659,770 Transfer from Biomass (non-add) TOTAL FOSSIL ENERGY R&D 582,565 617,565 699,200 659,770 STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE Facilities Expansion

377

Heavy Flavour results from Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

The CDF and D0 experiments finalize the analysis of their full statistics collected in the p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper presents several new results on the properties of hadrons containing heavy b- and c-quarks obtained by both collaborations. These results include the search for the rare decays B{sup 0}, B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} (CDF), the study of CP asymmetry in B{sub s} {yields} J{psi}{phi} decay (CDF, D0), the measurement of the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry (D0), the measurement of CP asymmetry in D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays (CDF), and the new measurement of the B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} branching fraction (CDF). Both experiments still expect to produce more results on the properties of heavy flavours.

Borissov, G.; /Lancaster U.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

2009 ECR FINAL REPORT 2010 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2009 ECR FINAL REPORT 2010 2009 ECR FINAL REPORT 2010 2009 ECR FINAL REPORT 2010 2009 ECR FINAL REPORT 2010 2009 ECR Report More Documents & Publications Final ECR 2008 Report...

379

Grid result checking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Result checking is the theory and practice of proving that the result of an execution of a program on an input is correct. Result checking has most often been envisioned in the framework of program testing or property testing, where the issue is the ... Keywords: grids, result checking, simulation

Ccile Germain-Renaud; Dephine Monnier-Ragaigne

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

CONTAM Overview - Simulation Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Currently there are two types: boundary layer diffusion (BLS) deposition/ resuspension (DVR). Table CONTAM Results Files. ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buses final results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Field practice internship final report  

SciTech Connect

This field practice internship final report gives an overview of the field practice, which was completed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Management Department, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field practice focused on the completion of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Section 312, Tier II Report. The field practice internship was conducted on a full-time basis between December 13, 1993 through February 18, 1994. Sheila Poligone, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Coordinator served as the field practice preceptor.

Foster, T.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

CMS: First Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary of the LHC and CMS detector performance is given and the first CMS results are presented. In particular

Paolo Checchia; The CMS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Review of Test Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GAC004 Revision 1 Effective June 2008 Review of Test Results Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: Date: Garrett...

384

Microsoft PowerPoint - Energy CS Prius Accel Testing Results...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2008 and the final results can be found in the table to the right. The Energy CS Prius averaged 66.1 mpg over the 5,596 miles of testing (5,440-mile goal). Based on an...

385

Microsoft PowerPoint - Hymotion Prius Accel Testing Results Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in May 2008 and the final results can be found in the table to the right. The Hymotion Prius averaged 79.5 mpg over the 5,591 miles of testing (5,440-mile goal). Based on an...

386

King County Metro Transit Hybrid Articulated Buses: Interim Evaluation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CA Peterbilt378, Class 8 truck Cummins Westport ISXG high-pressure direct injection LNG and diesel Completed in 2004 Note: CNG compressed natural gas; LNG liquefied...

387

Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting Control Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

meter reading), home automation, alarm and security systems,home appliances, wireless headsets for mobile phones, domestic and industrial environmental monitoring as in wireless security

Koch, Ed; Rubinstein, Francis

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting Control Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rincon Research Corporation (RRC) is a Tucson based employeeand computer professionals. RRC provides consulting services

Koch, Ed; Rubinstein, Francis

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Case Study: Ebus Hybrid Electric Buses and Trolleys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

successful in terms of cost per mile and fuel economy. vii KAT * KAT observed an average fuel economy of 3.22 mpg (diesel equivalent gallons for LPG use). * KAT observed a...

390

Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting Control Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of standards. WILAs ergonomic lighting forms the basis forachievement with motivating and health enhancing lighting.We create professional lighting for professionals. DALI

Koch, Ed; Rubinstein, Francis

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Fuel Cell Buses: Current Status and Path Forward  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hr, or 5 yr warranty Includes: air humidification system hydrogen re-circulation condenser for water management CAN and power supply connections control system 150 or 75 kW...

392

Vehicle Modeling and Verification of CNG-Powered Transit Buses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Compressed Natural Gas. . . . . . . . .. . 2 Internalbuses powered by compressed natural gas (CNG) engines. ThisBus Powered by Compressed Natural Gas The remainder of the

Hedrick, J. K.; Ni, A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting Control Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metering; meter data collection; energy information management; demand response; load forecasting, analysis and consulting services;

Koch, Ed; Rubinstein, Francis

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting Control Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and wireless applications. With design and sales operationsoperations costs and comfort by providing robust, secure, self-forming and self-healing wirelessand wireless markets worldwide. Based in Austin, Texas, Freescale Semiconductor has design, manufacturing or sales operations

Koch, Ed; Rubinstein, Francis

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

PROJECT MANGEMENT PLAN EXAMPLES Project Closeout - Final Report Example  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report Example Final Report Example Example 79 4.6.2.2.4.2 Closeout Reports Completion documentation will be compiled for each of the identified worksets. A final Closeout Report will be prepared for the 771/774 Closure Project when work is completed and the analytical data has been received. The report will consist of a brief description of the work that was completed, including any modifications or variations from the original decision document. The report will also include analytical results, including the results of any confirmatory sampling taken to verify completion of the action to the specific performance standards. A discussion of the quantity and characteristics of the actual wastes produced and how the wastes were stored or disposed will also be provided.

396

Beam based alignment of the SLC final focus sextupoles  

SciTech Connect

The strong demagnification inherent in final focus systems requires local cancellation of the resulting chromaticty. Strong sextupole pair separated by a -I transform are positioned {pi}/2 in the betatron phase away from the Interaction Point (IP) in order to cancel chromatic aberrations primarily due to the final quadrupoles. Sextupole alignment is critical in order to provide orthogonal tuning of the chromaticty and, in the case of the SLC, to limit the third and higher order optical aberrations generated from misaligned and `nested` horizontal and vertical sextupole pairs. Reported here is a novel technique for aligning the beam centroid to the sextupole centers, which uses measurements of the criticality dependent parameter - the beam size at the IP. Results for the SLC final focus sextupoles are presented, where a resolution of <50 {mu}m is achieved.

Emma, P.; Irwin, J.; Phinney, N.; Raimondi, P.; Toge, N.; Walker, N.J.; Ziemann, V.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop: Preliminary Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop: Preliminary Results Marc Melaina, PhD Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center, NREL Distributed electronically to workshop attendees for review March 24, 2011 Goal of this presentation * This presentation is being disseminated to workshop attendees to convey the aggregate and "raw" feedback collected during the workshop * This feedback will be compiled in a final report * We would like to accomplish two things with these slides: 1. Share the preliminary results with participants 2. Get your feedback now on any corrections or omissions * We are still open to receiving additional feedback on the workshop topic, but will report it as having been received outside of the workshop if it is included in the final report

398

An Overview of Recent Results from CLAS  

SciTech Connect

The unique capabilities of the CLAS detector to measure exclusive meson electroproduction off protons, with almost complete coverage of the final hadron phase space, has extended our knowledge of excited baryon structure. Consistent results from Np and Npp final states provide convincing evidence for reliable extraction of N* electrocouplings. Theoretical analyses of these results, using self-consistent dynamical calculations using an internal quark core and an external meson-baryon cloud suggest that meson-baryon dressing amplitudes need to be included. The meson-baryon dressing was already shown to be necessary to get agreement between calculations and data on the D resonance transition magnetic moment at low Q{sup 2}. Similarly, a new measurement of the transition magnetic moment for strange baryons also disagrees with quark models, suggesting the need for meson-baryon dressings. In the near future, the CLAS detector will be replaced with CLAS12, providing new high-precision data.

Kenneth Hicks

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

SPECIAL REREVIEW FINAL DETERMINATION UNCLASSIFIED  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SPECIAL REREVIEW SPECIAL REREVIEW FINAL DETERMINATION UNCLASSIFIED , ?4~0180N SctuAnr P. 0. 00x *a STATION F New YORK, N. Y. IN RLPLY RCFSRTO EID?f A- 43 MS ~-7405 eng-8 ". Subject: Contract No.H-7405 eng-8 with Metal Hydrides Incorporated. MEMORAhDUM to the Files. 1. Reference is made to basi.c communication dated 27 September 1945, Symbol No. EIDM 1%-30-b, requesting certain information with respect to the subject contract. 2. Reference pars,?-raph a. The Government committed to restore Contractor's plant 70 its original conditfon because of the fact that In furtherance of the Government work great expansion of facility ?.natallation in the Con- tractor's plant was required and the Contractor was un- W illing, in the event of termination or early cessation of

400

Microsoft Word - NT06555-Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Award No.: DE-NT0006555 Final Scientific/Technical Report October 1, 2008 to September 30, 2011 USE OF POLYMERS TO RECOVER VISCOUS OIL FROM UNCONVENTIONAL RESERVOIRS Submitted by: New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center New Mexico Tech, 801 Leroy, Socorro, NM 87801 Authored By: Randall Scott Seright (Principal Investigator) Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory October 12, 2011 Office of Fossil Energy ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buses final results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Final_Testimony(20).pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 1 Chairman Bingaman, Ranking Member Murkowski, Members of the Committee, thank you for the opportunity to discuss the Implementation of National Consensus Appliance Agreements Act of 2011 (S.398) and the Better Use of Light Bulbs Act (S.395). In June 2009, President Obama said, "One of the fastest, easiest, and cheapest ways to make our economy stronger and cleaner is to make our economy more energy efficient." 1 Energy-conserving appliance standards are one of the significant steps the Administration has taken to save energy in homes and businesses nationwide, and pave the way toward a clean energy future for our country. 2 Since January 2009, the Department of Energy has finalized new efficiency standards for more than twenty household and commercial

402

Attributes Paper-Final.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October, 2000 Annex: Attributes of Proliferation Resistance for Civilian Nuclear Power Systems Annex: Attributes of Proliferation Resistance for Civilian Nuclear Power Systems Attributes Paper-Final (9/19/00) 1 Attributes of Proliferation Resistance for Civilian Nuclear Power Systems Preface The NERAC 1 Task Force on Technology Opportunities for Increasing the Proliferation Resistance of Global Civilian Nuclear Power Systems (TOPS) determined at its first meeting in November 1999 that a set of metrics was needed to judge proliferation resistance and to identify areas in which technical contributions could be useful. However, because of the time constraints imposed on the Task Force and the difficulty of developing quantifiable metrics, it was decided that a set of qualitative attributes could

403

NZERTF, Recent Research Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A. Hunter Fanney, Chief Building Environment Division (301) 975-5864 hunter.fanney@nist.gov. *. Bookmark and Share. Recent Research Results. ...

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

404

Search Results Quadrats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lassoquadratss-searchresults-quadrat2006.lasso (1 of 2)61507 10:18 AM Search Results Quadrats 3183 Lederman Science Center Docent .P 3184 Lederman Science Center...

405

TSA waste stream and final waste form composition  

SciTech Connect

A final vitrified waste form composition, based upon the chemical compositions of the input waste streams, is recommended for the transuranic-contaminated waste stored at the Transuranic Storage Area of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The quantities of waste are large with a considerable uncertainty in the distribution of various waste materials. It is therefore impractical to mix the input waste streams into an ``average`` transuranic-contaminated waste. As a result, waste stream input to a melter could vary widely in composition, with the potential of affecting the composition and properties of the final waste form. This work examines the extent of the variation in the input waste streams, as well as the final waste form under conditions of adding different amounts of soil. Five prominent Rocky Flats Plant 740 waste streams are considered, as well as nonspecial metals and the ``average`` transuranic-contaminated waste streams. The metals waste stream is the most extreme variation and results indicate that if an average of approximately 60 wt% of the mixture is soil, the final waste form will be predominantly silica, alumina, alkaline earth oxides, and iron oxide. This composition will have consistent properties in the final waste form, including high leach resistance, irrespective of the variation in waste stream. For other waste streams, much less or no soil could be required to yield a leach resistant waste form but with varying properties.

Grandy, J.D.; Eddy, T.L.; Anderson, G.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Durability and reliability of solar domestic hot water heaters: Survey results. Final report, Part 1  

SciTech Connect

An unresolved barrier for consumer acceptance of SDWH systems is the perception that they are unreliable and that their service life is significantly less than that claimed by the manufacturers/dealers. A comprehensive survey was developed to identify and define the relevant durability and reliability issues that affect the long term performance of SDWH systems. The survey was directed towards installers and service contractors with significant field experience.

Ramirez-Vargas, R.; Whitfield, K. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Hicks, B.; Wood, B.D. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Final Report for Organic Partitioning Resulting from Operation of an INTEC Double-needle Sampler  

SciTech Connect

The double needle sampler testing is a continuation of previous test series that investigated the fate of organic species in the Process Equipment Waste Evaporator (PEWE) system at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). This test series was designed to investigate the effects of operation of the double needle sampling systems on volatile organic constituents in an acidic feed matrix.

Michael B. Heiser

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Ohio's First Ethanol-Fueled Light-Duty Fleet: Final Study Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1996, the State of Ohio established a project to demonstrate the use of an ethanol blend transportation fuel in flexible-fuel vehicles. This report presents the data collection and analysis from this project, with particular focus on vehicle performance, cost of operation and limited emissions testing.

Whalen, P.; Poole, L.; Howard, R.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

Ohio's First Ethanol-Fueled Light-Duty Fleet: Final Study Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1996, the State of Ohio established a project to demonstrate the use of an ethanol blend (E85, which is 85% transportation-grade ethanol and 15% gasoline) as a transportation fuel in flexible-fuel vehicles (FFVs). The study included ten FFVs and three gasoline vehicles (used as control vehicles) operated by five state agencies. The project included 24 months of data collection on vehicle operations. This report presents the data collection and analysis from the study, with a focus on the last year.

Battelle

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

UPS CNG Truck Fleet Final Results: Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides transportation professionals with quantitative, unbiased information on the cost, maintenance, operational and emissions characteristics of CNG as one alternative to conventional diesel fuel for heavy-duty trucking applications.

Not Available

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Final report : results of the 2005 investigation of contaminant sources at Agra, Kansas.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2005 investigation of contaminant sources at Agra, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE; Gotto 2004). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The investigation was designed to (1) update the conceptual site model and (2) investigate sources of previously identified carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater. Six technical objectives were proposed in the ''Work Plan'' (Argonne 2005). The ''Work Plan'' was approved by the KDHE on March 28, 2005 (KDHE 2005). The six objectives were as follows: (1) Determine the current configuration of the carbon tetrachloride plume in the investigation area. (2) Delineate contamination detected in 1998-1999 at the former CCC/USDA facility. (3) Investigate the Pro-Ag Co-op property for evidence of releases of carbon tetrachloride. (4) Investigate the area adjacent to the site of the former retail store for evidence of releases of carbon tetrachloride to the subsurface. (5) Collect data to support the analysis of potential remedial alternatives. (6) Update the inventory of private wells to identify potential downgradient receptors. This report details and interprets the data collected during the 2005 investigation at Agra. The investigation met the objectives defined in the ''Work Plan''.

LaFreniere, L. M.

2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

412

Ohio's First Ethanol-Fueled Light-Duty Fleet: Final Study Results  

SciTech Connect

In 1996, the State of Ohio established a project to demonstrate the use of an ethanol blend transportation fuel in flexible-fuel vehicles. This report presents the data collection and analysis from this project, with particular focus on vehicle performance, cost of operation and limited emissions testing.

Whalen, P.; Poole, L.; Howard, R.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Ohio's First Ethanol-Fueled Light-Duty Fleet: Final Study Results  

SciTech Connect

In 1996, the State of Ohio established a project to demonstrate the use of an ethanol blend (E85, which is 85% transportation-grade ethanol and 15% gasoline) as a transportation fuel in flexible-fuel vehicles (FFVs). The study included ten FFVs and three gasoline vehicles (used as control vehicles) operated by five state agencies. The project included 24 months of data collection on vehicle operations. This report presents the data collection and analysis from the study, with a focus on the last year.

Battelle

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

New drug development strategies: The differences between the initial plans and the final results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??According to the literature, R&D investments in the pharmaceutical industry do not corresponds equally to the number of developed new drugs. The literature indicates that (more)

Zoest, T.W. van

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Advanced Nuclear Technology: Final Test Results on 80% Service Test and Implementation Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current practice within the nuclear power industry is to use performance discharge tests for condition monitoring to determine when a battery has reached 80% of its rated capacity, which is considered the end of its service life. A service test is now used every refueling outage to verify that a battery can satisfy its design basis function as defined by the battery duty cycle. A modified performance test is used at ...

2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

416

Economic evaluation of the Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES). Volume II. Detailed results. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy effectiveness and the economic viability of the ACES concept are examined. ACES is studied in a variety of different applications and compared to a number of conventional systems. The different applications are studied in two groups: the class of building into which the ACES is incorporated and the climatic region in which the ACES is located. Buildings investigated include single-family and multi-family residences and a commercial office building. The application of ACES to each of these building types is studied in Minneapolis, Atlanta, and Philadelphia. The economic evaluation of the ACES is based on a comparison of the present worth of the ACES to the present worth of conventional systems; namely, electric resistance heating, electric air conditioning, and electric domestic water heating; air-to-air heat pump and electric domestic water heating; oil-fired furnace, electric air conditioning, and electric domestic water heating; and gas-fired furnace, electric air conditioning, and gas domestic water heating.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Final Report on the PREMIO Experimental Results: EDF Smart Grid Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PREMIO is a French acronym for Production Rpartie, Enr et MDE, Intgres et Optimises or in English, Integration and Optimization of DG, DSM & Renewable Energies. The term PREMIO is used in this document in reference to the project and the working consortium, as well as the Virtual Power Plant. Electricit de France (EDF) supports the PREMIO demonstration project in the south of France. PREMIO combines the control of installed ...

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

418

Final Technical Progress Report NANOSTRUCTURED MAGNETIC MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

This report describes progress made during the final phase of our DOE-funded program on Nanostructured Magnetic Materials. This period was quite productive, resulting in the submission of three papers and presentation of three talks at international conferences and three seminars at research institutions. Our DOE-funded research efforts were directed toward studies of magnetism at surfaces and interfaces in high-quality, well-characterized materials prepared by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and sputtering. We have an exceptionally well-equipped laboratory for these studies, with: Thin film preparation equipment; Characterization equipment; Equipment to study magnetic properties of surfaces and ultra-thin magnetic films and interfaces in multi-layers and superlattices.

Charles M. Falco

2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

419

Fuel consolidation demonstration program: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI, Northeast Utilities, Baltimore Gas and Electric, the US Department of Energy and Combustion Engineering are engaged in a program to develop a system for consolidating spent fuel and a method of storing the consolidated fuel in the spent fuel storage pool which is licensable by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Fuel consolidation offers a means of substantially increasing the capacity of spent fuel storage pools. This is a final report of the Fuel Consolidation Demonstration Program. It provides a review of the overall program, a summary of the results obtained, the lessons learned, and an assessment of the present status of the consolidation system developed in the program. 7 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

AISI Direct Steelmaking Program. Final technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report deals with the results of a 5-yr project for developing a more energy-efficient, environmentally friendly, less costly process for producing hot metal than current coke ovens and blast furnaces. In the process, iron ore pellets are smelted in a foamy slag created by reaction of coal char with molten slag to produce CO. The CO further reacts with oxygen, which also reacts with coal volatile matter, to produce the heat necessary to sustain the endothermic reduction reaction. The uncombusted CO and H{sub 2} from the coal are used to preheat and prereduce hematite pellets for the most efficient use of the energy in the coal. Laboratory programs confirmed that the process steps worked. Pilot plant studies were successful. Economic analysis for a 1 million tpy plant is promising.

Aukrust, E.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buses final results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Environment 100808 FINAL.doc | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environment 100808 FINAL.doc Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Environment 100808 FINAL.doc Microsoft Word - Fact Sheet Environment 100808 FINAL.doc More Documents & Publications...

422

Microsoft Word - CERFDOE Final Report - 071204.doc | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CERFDOE Final Report - 071204.doc Microsoft Word - CERFDOE Final Report - 071204.doc Microsoft Word - CERFDOE Final Report - 071204.doc More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word...

423

Microsoft Word - 1 Million Electric Vehicle Report Final | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Million Electric Vehicle Report Final Microsoft Word - 1 Million Electric Vehicle Report Final Microsoft Word - 1 Million Electric Vehicle Report Final More Documents &...

424

Microsoft Word - 564M_Biomass_Project Descriptions FINAL 120409...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

564MBiomassProject Descriptions FINAL 120409 Microsoft Word - 564MBiomassProject Descriptions FINAL 120409 Microsoft Word - 564MBiomassProject Descriptions FINAL 120409 More...

425

2002 DOE Final Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 DOE Final Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activities Inventory 2002 DOE Final Inherently Governmental and Commercial Activities Inventory 2002 DOE Final Inherently...

426

Microsoft PowerPoint - Tsinghua Slideshow final for distribution...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PowerPoint - Tsinghua Slideshow final for distribution (2) Microsoft PowerPoint - Tsinghua Slideshow final for distribution (2) Microsoft PowerPoint - Tsinghua Slideshow final for...

427

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT NOVEMBER 2010 CEC5002013048 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: California Biomass Collaborative BIOFUELS as the result of work sponsored by the California Energy Commission. It does not necessarily represent the views

428

Exclusive hadronic B decays to charm and charmonium final states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have fully reconstructed decays of both B0 and B- Mesons into final states containing either D, D*, D**, Psi, Psi', or Chi_{c1} mesons. This allows us to obtain new results on many physics topics including branching ratios, tests of the factorization hypothesis, color suppression, resonant substructure, and the B- - B0 mass difference.

Alam, M S; Nemati, B; O'Neill, J J; Severini, H; Sun, C R; Zoeller, M M; Crawford, G; Daubenmier, C M; Fulton, R; Fujino, D; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Lee, J; Malchow, R L; Morrow, F H; Skovpen, Y; Sung, M; White, C; Butler, F; Fu, X; Kalbfleisch, G R; Ross, W R; Skubic, P L; Snow, J; Wang, P L; Wood, M; Brown, D N; Fast, J; McIlwain, R L; Miao, T; Miller, D H; Modesitt, M; Payne, D; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Wang Pei Ning; Battle, M; Ernst, J; Kwon, Y; Roberts, S; Thorndike, E H; Wang, C H; Dominick, J; Lambrecht, M; Sanghera, S; Shelkov, V; Skwarnicki, T; Stroynowski, R; Volobuev, I P; Wei, G; Zadorozhny, P; Artuso, M; Goldberg, M; He, D; Horwitz, N; Kennett, R; Mountain, R; Moneti, G C; Muheim, F; Mukhin, Y; Playfer, S; Rozen, Y; Stone, S; Thulasidas, M; Vasseur, G; Zhu, G; Bartelt, J; Csorna, S E; Egyed, Z; Jain, V; Kinoshita, K; Edwards, K W; Ogg, M; Britton, D I; Hyatt, E R F; MacFarlane, D B; Patel, P M; Akerib, D S; Barish, B C; Chadha, M; Chan, S; Cowen, D F; Eigen, G; Miller, J S; O'Grady, C; Urheim, J; Weinstein, A J; Acosta, D; Athanas, M; Masek, G E; Paar, H P; Gronberg, J B; Kutschke, R; Menary, S R; Morrison, R J; Nakanishi, S; Nelson, H N; Nelson, T K; Qiao, C; Richman, J D; Ryd, A; Tajima, H; Schmidt, D; Sperka, D; Witherell, M S; Procario, M; Balest, R; Cho, K; Daoudi, M; Ford, W T; Johnson, D R; Lingel, K; Lohner, M; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Alexander, J P; Bebek, C; Berkelman, K; Bloom, K; Browder, T E; Cassel, David G; Cho, H A; Coffman, D M; Drell, P S; Ehrlich, R; Garca-Sciveres, M; Geiser, B; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Jones, C D; Jones, S L; Kandaswamy, J; Katayama, N; Kim, P C; Kreinick, D L; Ludwig, G S; Masui, J; Mevissen, J; Mistry, N B; Ng, C R; Nordberg, E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Salman, S; Sapper, M; Wrthwein, F; Avery, P; Freyberger, A P; Rodrguez, J; Stephens, R; Yang, S; Yelton, J; Cinabro, D; Henderson, S; Liu, T; Saulnier, M; Wilson, R; Yamamoto, H; Bergfeld, T; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G; Ong, B; Palmer, M; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Sadoff, A J; Ammar, R; Ball, S; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Besson, D; Coppage, D; Copty, N K; Davis, R; Hancock, N; Kelly, M; Kwak, N; Lam, H; Kubota, Y; Lattery, M; Nelson, J K; Patton, S; Perticone, D; Poling, R A; Savinov, V; Schrenk, S; Wang, R; CLEO collaboration

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Core Measure Results  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Core Measure Core Measure Results FY 07 Results FY 08 Results FY 09 Results FY 10 Target FY 10 Customer Perspective: Customer Satisfaction: -Timeliness NM 81 NM NM NM -Quality NM 90 NM NM NM Effective Service Partnership: -Extent of Customer Satisfaction with the responsiveness, etc. NM 87 NM NM NM Internal Business Perspective: Acquisition Excellence: -Extent to which internal quality control systems are effective 86 87 84 87 88 Most Effective Use of Contracting Approaches to Maximize Efficiency and Cost Effectiveness: Use of Electronic Commerce: - % of delivery & purchase orders issued electronically as a % of total simplified actions 70 72 89 99 100 - % of new competitive transactions > $100K conducted through EC 70 72 91 100 95 Performance Based Service Contracts: - PBSCs awarded as a % of eligible new

430

Recent results from SPEAR  

SciTech Connect

Recent results from SPEAR include measurements of Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes of the tau (Mark II), and a limit on the decay J/psi ..-->.. ..gamma.. + axion (Crystal Ball).

Porter, F.C.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Search Results Quadrats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lassoquadratss-searchresults-quadrat2007.lasso (1 of 2)2808 10:29 PM Search Results Quadrats 3584 Lederman Science Center Public16B 3586 Lederman Science Center...

432

Search Results Quadrats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2arr.lasso121112 5:07:23 PM Search Results Quadrats Public Quadrats Data collected by the public with the guidance of docents. Click the Quadrat Id to view more details about...

433

IRIS Final Technical Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK-B135 This NERI project, originally started as the Secure Transportable Autonomous Light Water Reactor (STAR-LW) and currently known as the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) project, had the objective of investigating a novel type of water-cooled reactor to satisfy the Generation IV goals: fuel cycle sustainability, enhanced reliability and safety, and improved economics. The research objectives over the three-year (1999-2002) program were as follows: First year: Assess various design alternatives and establish main characteristics of a point design; Second year: Perform feasibility and engineering assessment of the selected design solutions; Third year: Complete reactor design and performance evaluation, including cost assessment These objectives were fully attained and actually they served to launch IRIS as a full fledged project for eventual commercial deployment. The program did not terminate in 2002 at the end of the NERI program, and has just entered in its fifth year. This has been made possible by the IRIS project participants which have grown from the original four member, two-countries team to the current twenty members, nine countries consortium. All the consortium members work under their own funding and it is estimated that the value of their in-kind contributions over the life of the project has been of the order of $30M. Currently, approximately 100 people worldwide are involved in the project. A very important constituency of the IRIS project is the academia: 7 universities from four countries are members of the consortium and five more US universities are associated via parallel NERI programs. To date, 97 students have worked or are working on IRIS; 59 IRIS-related graduate theses have been prepared or are in preparation, and 41 of these students have already graduated with M.S. (33) or Ph.D. (8) degrees. This ''final'' report (final only as far as the NERI program is concerned) summarizes the work performed in the first four years of IRIS, from October 1999 to October 2003. It provides a panoramic of the project status and design effort, with emphasis on the current status, since two previous reports have very extensively documented the work performed, from inception to early 2002.

M. D. Carelli

2003-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

434

FINAL SCIENTIFIC/TECHNICAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dynalene Inc has developed and patented a fuel cell coolant with the help of DOE SBIR Phase I and Phase II funding (Project DE-FG02-04ER83884). However, this coolant could only be produced in lab scale (500 ml to 2 L) due to problems in the optimization and scale-up of a nanoparticle ingredient. This project optimized the nanoparticle production process in 10 L and 100 L reactors (which translates to about 5000 gallons of coolant), optimized the filtration process for the nanoparticles, and develop a high throughput production as well as quality control method for the final coolant formulation. Scale-up of nanoparticle synthesis (using emulsion polymerization) is an extremely challenging task. Dynalene researchers, in collaboration with a university partner, identified all the parameters affecting the size, charge density and coagulation characteristics of the nanoparticles and then optimized these parameters to achieve the goals and the objectives of this project. Nanoparticle synthesis was demonstrated to be reproducible in the 10 L and 100 L scales.

Satish Mohapatra

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

435

Demand Side Bidding. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This document sets forth the final report for a financial assistance award for the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) to enhance coordination between the building operators and power system operators in terms of demand-side responses to Location Based Marginal Pricing (LBMP). Potential benefits of this project include improved power system reliability, enhanced environmental quality, mitigation of high locational prices within congested areas, and the reduction of market barriers for demand-side market participants. NARUC, led by its Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE), actively works to promote the development and use of energy efficiency and clean distributive energy policies within the framework of a dynamic regulatory environment. Electric industry restructuring, energy shortages in California, and energy market transformation intensifies the need for reliable information and strategies regarding electric reliability policy and practice. NARUC promotes clean distributive generation and increased energy efficiency in the context of the energy sector restructuring process. NARUC, through ERE's Subcommittee on Energy Efficiency, strives to improve energy efficiency by creating working markets. Market transformation seeks opportunities where small amounts of investment can create sustainable markets for more efficient products, services, and design practices.

Spahn, Andrew

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS DEMONSTRATION BUS 7. Author{s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A demonstration compressed natural gas (CNG) bus has been operating on The University of Texas at Austin shuttle system since 1992. This CNG vehicle, provided by the Blue Bird Company, was an opportunity for the University to evaluate the effectiveness of a CNG bus for shuttle operations. Three basic operating comparisons were made: 1) fuel consumption, 2) tire wear, and 3) vehicle performance. The bus was equipped with a data logger, Which was downloaded regularly, for trip reports. Tire wear was monitored regularly, and performance tests were conducted at the Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Center. Overall, the data suggest that fuel costs for the CNG bus are comparable to those for University diesel buses. This is a result of the lower fuel price for natural gas. Actual natural gas fuel consumption was higher for the CNG buses than for the diesel buses. Due to weight differences, tire wear was much less on the CNG buses. Finally, after installation of a closed-loop system, the CNG bus out-performed the diesel bus on acceleration, grade climbing ability, and speed.

Cheng-ming Wu; Ron Matthews; Mark Euritt

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Analysis of the University of Texas at Austin compressed natural gas demonstration bus. Interim research report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A demonstration compressed natural gas (CNG) bus has been operating on The University of Texas at Austin shuttle system since 1992. This CNG vehicle, provided by the Blue Bird Company, was an opportunity for the University to evaluate the effectiveness of a CNG bus for shuttle operations. Three basic operating comparisons were made: (1) fuel consumption, (2) tire wear, and (3) vehicle performance. The bus was equipped with a data logger, which was downloaded regularly, for trip reports. Tire wear was monitored regularly, and performance tests were conducted at the Natural Gas Vehicle Technology Center. Overall, the data suggest that fuel costs for the CNG bus are comparable to those for University diesel buses. This is a result of the lower fuel price for natural gas. Actual natural gas fuel consumption was higher for the CNG buses than for the diesel buses. Due to weight differences, tire wear was much less on the CNG buses. Finally, after installation of a closed-loop system, the CNG bus out-performed the diesel bus on acceleration, grade climbing ability, and speed.

Wu, C.M.; Matthews, R.; Euritt, M.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix F: Assessment Methodologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX F: ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGIES Assessment Methodologies F-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS Assessment Methodologies F-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX F: ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGIES In general, the activities assessed in this environmental impact statement (EIS) could affect workers, members of the general public, and the environment during construction of new facilities, during routine operation of facilities, during transportation, and during facility or transportation accidents. Activities could have adverse effects (e.g., human health impairment) or positive effects (e.g., regional socioeconomic benefits, such as the creation of jobs). Some impacts would result primarily from the unique characteristics of the uranium and other chemical

439

EA-1565: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

565: Final Environmental Assessment 565: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1565: Final Environmental Assessment Adopted Energy Conservation Standards for Distribution Transformers, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Energy-efficiency standards for distribution transformers are expected to result in savings inelectricalenergy. Themetric used to measure the efficiency of distribution transformers is percent efficiency, which is calculated by taking into account no-load losses (which are constant) and load losses (which vary by the square of the load) at a specified design load. An increase in the percent efficiency as measured above indicates that the distribution transformer is more energy-efficient. Details on the technical analysis of increased efficiency levels are provided in the TSD

440

EA-1565: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1565: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1565: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1565: Final Environmental Assessment Adopted Energy Conservation Standards for Distribution Transformers, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Energy-efficiency standards for distribution transformers are expected to result in savings inelectricalenergy. Themetric used to measure the efficiency of distribution transformers is percent efficiency, which is calculated by taking into account no-load losses (which are constant) and load losses (which vary by the square of the load) at a specified design load. An increase in the percent efficiency as measured above indicates that the distribution transformer is more energy-efficient. Details on the technical analysis of increased efficiency levels are provided in the TSD

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "buses final results" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Incorporates the results of flow tests for geothermal production and injection wells in the Raft River geothermal field in southern Idaho. Interference testing was also accomplished across the wellfield. Author(s): Glaspey, Douglas J. Published: DOE Information Bridge, 1/30/2008 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: 10.2172/922630 Source: View Original Report Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2008) Raft River Geothermal Area Retrieved from

442

EA-1408: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

08: Final Environmental Assessment 08: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1408: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Future Disposition of Certain Cerro Grande Fire Flood and Sediment Retention Structures at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared to analyze the environmental consequences resulting from the future disposition of certain flood retention structures built in the wake of the Cerro Grande Fire within the boundaries of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In May 2000, a prescription burn, started on Federally-administered land to the northwest of LANL, blew out of control and was designated as a wildfire. This wildfire, which became known as the Cerro Grande Fire, burned approximately 7,650 acres (3,061 hectares) within the boundaries of

443

EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project, Gilberton, Pennsylvania This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action to provide cost-shared funding for construction and operation of facilities near Gilberton, Pennsylvania, which have been proposed by WMPI PTY, LLC, for producing electricity, steam, and liquid fuels from anthracite coal waste (culm). The project has been selected by DOE under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) to demonstrate the integration of coal waste gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis of liquid hydrocarbon fuels at commercial scale.

444

EA-1295: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

295: Final Environmental Assessment 295: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1295: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Decontamination and Decommissioning of Building 301 Hot Cell Facility at Argonne National Laboratory The proposed action is the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of Building 301. This includes activities such as equipment and systems disassembly, size reduction by mechanical saws or torches, removal of contaminated paint from building surfaces by grit blasting or scabbling coupled with a High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA)-filtered recovery system, and all packaging and disposal of resultant waste. This work would be performed indoors in Building 301. The D&D would leave Building 301 in a safe lay-up condition. There are no current plans to reuse this structure

445

EA-1534: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Assessment Final Environmental Assessment EA-1534: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Upgrade and Operation of the CEBAF and FEL Accelerators and Construction and Use of Buildings Associated with the 2005 Ten-Year Site Plan The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), in this Environmental Assessment (EA), reports the results of an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from the proposed upgrade and operation of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) and Free-Electron Laser (FEL) accelerators and the construction and use of buildings associated with the 2005 Ten-Year Site Plan at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF or Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia. Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Upgrade and Operation of the

446

EA-1935: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Final Environmental Assessment 5: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1935: Final Environmental Assessment Hajilee Solar Project This EA was prepared as a result of the request for BIA approval of a master lease agreement for CBN lands, which are held in trust by the U.S. government. The master lease agreement between CBN and TEDI would provide the legal instrument under which TEDI could enter into a sublease agreement with a solar operator to build a 30-MW solar power plant within Chapter trust boundaries. The purpose of the EA is 1) for the BIA to evaluate and disclose potential impacts of the proposed project and alternatives and 2) to determine whether to approve the master lease and sublease agreements. EA-1935-FEA-2012.pdf More Documents & Publications Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, December 2012

447

DOE Issues Final Appliance Test Procedure Rule | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appliance Test Procedure Rule Appliance Test Procedure Rule DOE Issues Final Appliance Test Procedure Rule December 8, 2006 - 9:46am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced a final rule establishing new test procedures and related definitions to determine the energy efficiency of certain residential appliances and commercial equipment. The rulemaking clarifies and codifies the test procedures mandated by the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005. "These new test procedures are the foundation for standards that will help bring more energy efficient options to the marketplace and result in energy savings for all Americans," said DOE Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Andy Karsner. The final rulemaking, which appears in today's Federal Register, will

448

EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

57: Final Environmental Impact Statement 57: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project, Gilberton, Pennsylvania This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action to provide cost-shared funding for construction and operation of facilities near Gilberton, Pennsylvania, which have been proposed by WMPI PTY, LLC, for producing electricity, steam, and liquid fuels from anthracite coal waste (culm). The project has been selected by DOE under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) to demonstrate the integration of coal waste gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis of liquid hydrocarbon fuels at commercial scale.

449

EIS-0379 - Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Final Environmental Impact Statement - Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0379 - Final Environmental Impact Statement This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action on the proposed rebuilding, operation, and maintenance of a 17-mile-long portion of BPA's Libby to Bonners Ferry 115-kilovolt (kV) Transmission Line in Lincoln County, Montana. The portion to be rebuilt would start at Flathead Electric Cooperative's (FEC) Libby Substation, in the town of Libby, Montana, and proceed west along an existing right-of-way for about 17 miles, terminating at BPA's Troy Substation just east of the town of Troy, Montana. EIS-0379-FEIS-2008 More Documents & Publications EIS-0379: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

450

EA-1748: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1748: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1748: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1748: Final Environmental Assessment Energy Conservation Standards for Small Electric Motors This document is Chapter 15 of the TSD supporting the Energy Conservation Standards for Small Electric Motors Rulemaking. This chapter describes potential environmental effects that may result from energy conservation standards for small electric motors. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s proposed energy conservation standards are not site-specific and would apply to all 50 states and U.S. territories. Therefore, none of the proposed standards would impact land uses, cause any direct disturbance to the land, or directly affect biological resources in any one area. Environmental Assessment for Proposed Energy Conservation Standards for

451

EIS-0379 - Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0379 - Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0379 - Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0379 - Final Environmental Impact Statement This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action on the proposed rebuilding, operation, and maintenance of a 17-mile-long portion of BPA's Libby to Bonners Ferry 115-kilovolt (kV) Transmission Line in Lincoln County, Montana. The portion to be rebuilt would start at Flathead Electric Cooperative's (FEC) Libby Substation, in the town of Libby, Montana, and proceed west along an existing right-of-way for about 17 miles, terminating at BPA's Troy Substation just east of the town of Troy, Montana. EIS-0379-FEIS-2008 More Documents & Publications EIS-0379: Draft Environmental Impact Statement

452

EA-1384: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1384: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1384: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1384: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Improvements at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility Newport News, Virginia In this EA, the DOE reports the results of an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from proposed improvements to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF or Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia. The proposed action evaluated in this EA involves improvements to support the operation of Jefferson Lab. DOE has prepared this EA to determine the potential for adverse impacts from radiation produced with the operation of the Helios, disturbance of land from construction, effects on the offsite population, and other sources of potential impact. Environmental Assessment Proposed Improvements at the Thomas Jefferson

453

EIS-0385: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0385: Final Environmental Impact Statement Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve As required by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (P.L. 109-58), DOE would expand the SPR to its full authorized 1 billion-barrel capacity by selecting additional storage sites. DOE would develop one new site or a combination of two new sites, and would expand capacity at two or three existing sites. Storage capacity would be developed by solution mining of salt domes and disposing of the resulting salt brine by ocean discharge or underground injection. New pipelines, marine terminal facilities, and other infrastructure could also be required. DOE has prepared this draft EIS to address the environmental impacts of the proposed expansion of the capacity

454

EA-1464: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

464: Final Environmental Assessment 464: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1464: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Corrective Measures at Material Disposal Area H within Technical Area 54 at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, National Nuclear Security Administration, Los Alamos Site Office DOE, NNSA has the Congressionally assigned responsibility for the administration of LANL, including the management of radioactive and hazardous wastes generated by LANL mission support activities. As a result of historical LANL waste disposal practices, wastes disposed of within shafts at MDA H have been identified by NMED as potentially having a future adverse effect on human health and the environment. A CMS Report prepared for MDA H evaluated various corrective measure options for MDA H. DOE now

455

EA-1356: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

56: Final Environmental Assessment 56: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1356: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Biosolids Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to raise the biosolids land application radionuclide loading limits from the current, self-imposed 4 mrem/yr lifetime loading to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC)-approved level of 10 mrem/yr. The planning level increase is necessary for industrial development within the Oak Ridge community. In addition, DOE proposes to allow the discharge of treated wastewaters from the West End Treatment Facility (WETF) to the Y-12 Plant and City of Oak Ridge sanitary sewer systems, resulting in an operational cost savings of approximately $133,000 per year.

456

SPR Acquisition Procedures - Final Rulemaking | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Director of Operatons and Readiness, Strategic Petroleum Reserve, (202) 586-4691 SPR Crude Oil Acquisition Procedures - Final Rulemaking More Documents & Publications Price...

457

Final Information Quality Bulletin for Peer Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

04 OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET Final Information Quality Bulletin for Peer Review INTRODUCTION This Bulletin establishes that important scientific information shall be peer...

458

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Final Technical Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Final Technical Report Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On...

459

Calpine Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Final Environmental...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calpine Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Final Environmental Assessment June 2010 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401 Prepared by: RMT...

460

Microsoft Word - Final Report5 9.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wettability and Oil Recovery by Imbibition and Viscous Displacement from Fractured and Heterogeneous Carbonates Final Report 07182002 - 01172006 Norman R. Morrow, Co-Principle...

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461

Final Nightclub Fire Report Urges Code Compliance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... on our investigation findings and the comments received on our draft report, we are making 10 recommendations in our final report for increased ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

462

Final Technical Report on Radioxenon Event Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This is a final deliverable report for the Advanced Spectral Analysis for Radioxenon project with a focus on radioxenon event categorization.

Ely, James H.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Hayes, James C.; Heimbigner, Tom R.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Schrom, Brian T.

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

TESTING OF TMR SAND MANTIS FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Screening tests of Sand Mantis candidate materials selected for erosion resistance have been completed. The results of this testing identified that over a relatively short period of operation (<1 hour), measurable erosion will occur in each of the candidate zoom tube materials given equal operating exposure. Additionally, this testing has shown that erosion of the rubber discharge hose directly downstream of the vehicle could be expected to limit the service life of the discharge hose. On the basis of these test results, SRNL recommends the following; {lg_bullet} redesign of critical system components (e.g., zoom tube, discharge hose) should be conducted to improve system characteristics relative to erosion and capitalize on the results of this testing, {lg_bullet} continued efforts to deploy the Sand Mantis should include testing to better define and optimize operating parameters, and gain an understanding of system dynamics, {lg_bullet} discontinue wear testing with the selected materials pending redesign of critical system components (1st recommendation) and inclusion of other candidate materials. The final selection of additional candidate materials should be made following design changes, but might include a Stellite alloy or zirconia.

Krementz, D; William Daugherty, W

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z